Science.gov

Sample records for lensing shear maps

  1. Direct shear mapping - a new weak lensing tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Burgh-Day, C. O.; Taylor, E. N.; Webster, R. L.; Hopkins, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a new technique called direct shear mapping (DSM) to measure gravitational lensing shear directly from observations of a single background source. The technique assumes the velocity map of an unlensed, stably rotating galaxy will be rotationally symmetric. Lensing distorts the velocity map making it asymmetric. The degree of lensing can be inferred by determining the transformation required to restore axisymmetry. This technique is in contrast to traditional weak lensing methods, which require averaging an ensemble of background galaxy ellipticity measurements, to obtain a single shear measurement. We have tested the efficacy of our fitting algorithm with a suite of systematic tests on simulated data. We demonstrate that we are in principle able to measure shears as small as 0.01. In practice, we have fitted for the shear in very low redshift (and hence unlensed) velocity maps, and have obtained null result with an error of ±0.01. This high-sensitivity results from analysing spatially resolved spectroscopic images (i.e. 3D data cubes), including not just shape information (as in traditional weak lensing measurements) but velocity information as well. Spirals and rotating ellipticals are ideal targets for this new technique. Data from any large Integral Field Unit (IFU) or radio telescope is suitable, or indeed any instrument with spatially resolved spectroscopy such as the Sydney-Australian-Astronomical Observatory Multi-Object Integral Field Spectrograph (SAMI), the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA).

  2. High resolution weak lensing mass mapping combining shear and flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Starck, J.-L.; Leonard, A.; Pires, S.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We propose a new mass mapping algorithm, specifically designed to recover small-scale information from a combination of gravitational shear and flexion. Including flexion allows us to supplement the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map without relying on strong lensing constraints. Methods: To preserve all available small scale information, we avoid any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treat the mass mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, which is regularised using a robust multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators. Results: We tested our reconstruction method on a set of realistic weak lensing simulations corresponding to typical HST/ACS cluster observations and demonstrate our ability to recover substructures with the inclusion of flexion, which are otherwise lost if only shear information is used. In particular, we can detect substructures on the 15'' scale well outside of the critical region of the clusters. In addition, flexion also helps to constrain the shape of the central regions of the main dark matter halos. Our mass mapping software, called Glimpse2D, is made freely available at http://www.cosmostat.org/software/glimpse

  3. WEAK LENSING MASS RECONSTRUCTION: FLEXION VERSUS SHEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Pires, S.

    2010-11-10

    Weak gravitational lensing has proven to be a powerful tool to map directly the distribution of dark matter in the universe. The technique, currently used, relies on the accurate measurement of the gravitational shear that corresponds to the first-order distortion of the background galaxy images. More recently, a new technique has been introduced that relies on the accurate measurement of the gravitational flexion that corresponds to the second-order distortion of the background galaxy images. This technique should probe structures on smaller scales than that of shear analysis. The goal of this paper is to compare the ability of shear and flexion to reconstruct the dark matter distribution by taking into account the dispersion in shear and flexion measurements. Our results show that the flexion is less sensitive than shear for constructing the convergence maps on scales that are physically feasible for mapping, meaning that flexion alone should not be used to do convergence map reconstruction, even on small scales.

  4. Weak shear study of galaxy clusters by simulated gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coss, David

    Gravitational lensing has been simulated for numerical galaxy clusters in order to characterize the effects of substructure and shape variations of dark matter halos on the weak lensing properties of clusters. In order to analyze realistic galaxy clusters, 6 high-resolution Adaptive Refinement Tree N-body simulations of clusters with hydrodynamics are used, in addition to a simulation of one group undergoing a merger. For each cluster, the three-dimensional particle distribution is projected perpendicular to three orthogonal lines of sight, providing 21 projected mass density maps. The clusters have representative concentration and mass values for clusters in the concordance cosmology. Two gravitational lensing simulation methods are presented. In the first method, direct integration is used to calculate deflection angles. To overcome computational constraints inherent in this method, a distributed computing project was created for parallel computation. In addition to its use in gravitational lensing simulation, a description of the setup and function of this distributed computing project is presented as an alternative to in-house computing clusters, which has the added benefit of public enrollment in science and low cost. In the second method, shear maps are created using a fast Fourier transform method. From these shear maps, the effects of substructure and shape variation are related to observational gravitational lensing studies. Average shear in regions less than and greater than half of the virial radius demonstrates distinct dispersion, varying by 24% from the mean among the 21 maps. We estimate the numerical error in shear calculations to be of the order of 5%. Therefore, this shear dispersion is a reliable consequence of shape dispersion, correlating most strongly with the ratio of smallest-to-largest principal axis lengths of a cluster isodensity shell. On the other hand, image ellipticities, which are of great importance in mass reconstruction, are shown

  5. N-body lensed CMB maps: lensing extraction and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Antolini, Claudia; Martinelli, Matteo; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Fantaye, Yabebal; Carbone, Carmelita E-mail: y.t.fantaye@astro.uio.no E-mail: carmelita.carbone@brera.inaf.it

    2014-02-01

    We reconstruct shear maps and angular power spectra from simulated weakly lensed total intensity (TT) and polarised (EB) maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, obtained using Born approximated ray-tracing through the N-body simulated Cold Dark Matter (CDM) structures in the Millennium Simulations (MS). We compare the recovered signal with the ΛCDM prediction, on the whole interval of angular scales which is allowed by the finite box size, extending from the degree scale to the arcminute, by applying a quadratic estimator in the flat sky limit; we consider PRISM-like instrumental specification for future generation CMB satellites, corresponding to arcminute angular resolution of 3.2' and sensitivity of 2.43 μK-arcmin. The noise contribution in the simulations closely follows the estimator prediction, becoming dominated by limits in the angular resolution for the EB signal, at ℓ ≅ 1500. The recovered signal shows no visible departure from predictions of the weak lensing power within uncertainties, when considering TT and EB data singularly. In particular, the reconstruction precision reaches the level of a few percent in bins with Δℓ ≅ 100 in the angular multiple interval 1000∼<ℓ∼<2000 for T, and about 10% for EB. Within the adopted specifications, polarisation data do represent a significant contribution to the lensing shear, which appear to faithfully trace the underlying N-body structure down to the smallest angular scales achievable with the present setup, validating at the same time the latter with respect to semi-analytical predictions from ΛCDM cosmology at the level of CMB lensing statistics. This work demonstrates the feasibility of CMB lensing studies based on large scale simulations of cosmological structure formation in the context of the current and future high resolution and sensitivity CMB experiment.

  6. Spurious Shear in Weak Lensing with LSST

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Kahn, S.M.; Jernigan, J.G.; Peterson, J.R.; AlSayyad, Y.; Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Bard, D.; Connolly, A.; Gibson, R.R.; Gilmore, K.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Hodge, M.A.; Jee, M.J.; Jones, L.; Krughoff, S.; Lorenz, S.; Marshall, P.J.; Marshall, S.; Meert, A.

    2012-09-19

    The complete 10-year survey from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will image {approx} 20,000 square degrees of sky in six filter bands every few nights, bringing the final survey depth to r {approx} 27.5, with over 4 billion well measured galaxies. To take full advantage of this unprecedented statistical power, the systematic errors associated with weak lensing measurements need to be controlled to a level similar to the statistical errors. This work is the first attempt to quantitatively estimate the absolute level and statistical properties of the systematic errors on weak lensing shear measurements due to the most important physical effects in the LSST system via high fidelity ray-tracing simulations. We identify and isolate the different sources of algorithm-independent, additive systematic errors on shear measurements for LSST and predict their impact on the final cosmic shear measurements using conventional weak lensing analysis techniques. We find that the main source of the errors comes from an inability to adequately characterise the atmospheric point spread function (PSF) due to its high frequency spatial variation on angular scales smaller than {approx} 10{prime} in the single short exposures, which propagates into a spurious shear correlation function at the 10{sup -4}-10{sup -3} level on these scales. With the large multi-epoch dataset that will be acquired by LSST, the stochastic errors average out, bringing the final spurious shear correlation function to a level very close to the statistical errors. Our results imply that the cosmological constraints from LSST will not be severely limited by these algorithm-independent, additive systematic effects.

  7. Extreme value statistics of weak lensing shear peak counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischke, R.; Maturi, M.; Bartelmann, M.

    2016-02-01

    The statistics of peaks in weak gravitational lensing maps is a promising technique to constrain cosmological parameters in present and future surveys. Here we investigate its power when using general extreme value statistics which is very sensitive to the exponential tail of the halo mass function. To this end, we use an analytic method to quantify the number of weak lensing peaks caused by galaxy clusters, large-scale structures and observational noise. Doing so, we further improve the method in the regime of high signal-to-noise ratios dominated by non-linear structures by accounting for the embedding of those counts into the surrounding shear caused by large-scale structures. We derive the extreme value and order statistics for both overdensities (positive peaks) and underdensities (negative peaks) and provide an optimized criterion to split a wide field survey into subfields in order to sample the distribution of extreme values such that the expected objects causing the largest signals are mostly due to galaxy clusters. We find good agreement of our model predictions with a ray-tracing N-body simulation. For a Euclid-like survey, we find tight constraints on σ8 and Ωm with relative uncertainties of ˜10-3. In contrast, the equation of state parameter w0 can be constrained only with a 10 per cent level, and wa is out of reach even if we include redshift information.

  8. The DES Science Verification weak lensing shear catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, M.; Sheldon, E.; Zuntz, J.; Kacprzak, T.; Bridle, S. L.; Amara, A.; Armstrong, R.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bonnett, C.; Chang, C.; Das, R.; Dietrich, J. P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Gangkofner, C.; Gruen, D.; Hirsch, M.; Huff, E. M.; Jain, B.; Kent, S.; Kirk, D.; MacCrann, N.; Melchior, P.; Plazas, A. A.; Refregier, A.; Rowe, B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Suchyta, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Clampitt, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.

    2016-08-01

    We present weak lensing shear catalogues for 139 square degrees of data taken during the Science Verification (SV) time for the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam) being used for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe our object selection, point spread function estimation and shear measurement procedures using two independent shear pipelines, IM3SHAPE and NGMIX, which produce catalogues of 2.12 million and 3.44 million galaxies respectively. We detail a set of null tests for the shear measurements and find that they pass the requirements for systematic errors at the level necessary for weak lensing science applications using the SV data. We also discuss some of the planned algorithmic improvements that will be necessary to produce sufficiently accurate shear catalogues for the full 5-year DES, which is expected to cover 5000 square degrees.

  9. The DES Science Verification Weak Lensing Shear Catalogs

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, M.

    2015-07-20

    We present weak lensing shear catalogs for 139 square degrees of data taken during the Science Verification (SV) time for the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam) being used for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe our object selection, point spread function estimation and shear measurement procedures using two independent shear pipelines, IM3SHAPE and NGMIX, which produce catalogs of 2.12 million and 3.44 million galaxies respectively. We also detail a set of null tests for the shear measurements and find that they pass the requirements for systematic errors at the level necessary for weak lensing science applications using the SV data. Furthermore, we discuss some of the planned algorithmic improvements that will be necessary to produce sufficiently accurate shear catalogs for the full 5-year DES, which is expected to cover 5000 square degrees.

  10. The DES Science Verification weak lensing shear catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, M.; Sheldon, E.; Zuntz, J.; Kacprzak, T.; Bridle, S. L.; Amara, A.; Armstrong, R.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bonnett, C.; Chang, C.; Das, R.; Dietrich, J. P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Gangkofner, C.; Gruen, D.; Hirsch, M.; Huff, E. M.; Jain, B.; Kent, S.; Kirk, D.; MacCrann, N.; Melchior, P.; Plazas, A. A.; Refregier, A.; Rowe, B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Suchyta, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Clampitt, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.

    2016-08-01

    We present weak lensing shear catalogues for 139 square degrees of data taken during the Science Verification (SV) time for the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam) being used for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe our object selection, point spread function estimation and shear measurement procedures using two independent shear pipelines, IM3SHAPE and NGMIX, which produce catalogues of 2.12 million and 3.44 million galaxies, respectively. We detail a set of null tests for the shear measurements and find that they pass the requirements for systematic errors at the level necessary for weak lensing science applications using the SV data. We also discuss some of the planned algorithmic improvements that will be necessary to produce sufficiently accurate shear catalogues for the full 5-yr DES, which is expected to cover 5000 square degrees.

  11. The DES Science Verification Weak Lensing Shear Catalogs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jarvis, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present weak lensing shear catalogs for 139 square degrees of data taken during the Science Verification (SV) time for the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam) being used for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe our object selection, point spread function estimation and shear measurement procedures using two independent shear pipelines, IM3SHAPE and NGMIX, which produce catalogs of 2.12 million and 3.44 million galaxies respectively. We also detail a set of null tests for the shear measurements and find that they pass the requirements for systematic errors at the level necessary for weak lensing science applications using the SVmore » data. Furthermore, we discuss some of the planned algorithmic improvements that will be necessary to produce sufficiently accurate shear catalogs for the full 5-year DES, which is expected to cover 5000 square degrees.« less

  12. The DES Science Verification Weak Lensing Shear Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, M.; Sheldon, E.; Zuntz, J.; Kacprzak, T.; Bridle, S. L.; Amara, A.; Armstrong, R.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bonnett, C.; Chang, C.; Das, R.; Dietrich, J. P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Gangkofner, C.; Gruen, D.; Hirsch, M.; Huff, E. M.; Jain, B.; Kent, S.; Kirk, D.; MacCrann, N.; Melchior, P.; Plazas, A. A.; Refregier, A.; Rowe, B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Suchyta, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Clampitt, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.

    2016-05-01

    We present weak lensing shear catalogues for 139 square degrees of data taken during the Science Verification (SV) time for the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam) being used for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe our object selection, point spread function estimation and shear measurement procedures using two independent shear pipelines, IM3SHAPE and NGMIX, which produce catalogues of 2.12 million and 3.44 million galaxies respectively. We detail a set of null tests for the shear measurements and find that they pass the requirements for systematic errors at the level necessary for weak lensing science applications using the SV data. We also discuss some of the planned algorithmic improvements that will be necessary to produce sufficiently accurate shear catalogues for the full 5-year DES, which is expected to cover 5000 square degrees.

  13. An implementation of Bayesian lensing shear measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Erin S.

    2014-10-01

    The Bayesian gravitational shear estimation algorithm developed by Bernstein & Armstrong can potentially be used to overcome multiplicative noise bias and recover shear using very low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) galaxy images. In that work, the authors confirmed that the method is nearly unbiased in a simplified demonstration, but no test was performed on images with realistic pixel noise. Here, I present a full implementation for fitting models to galaxy images, including the effects of a point spread function (PSF) and pixelization. I tested the implementation using simulated galaxy images modelled as Sérsic profiles with n = 1 (exponential) and n = 4 (De Vaucouleurs'), convolved with a PSF and a flat pixel response function. I used a round Gaussian model for the PSF to avoid potential PSF-fitting errors. I simulated galaxies with mean observed, post-PSF full width at half-maximum equal to approximately 1.2 times that of the PSF, with lognormal scatter. I also drew fluxes from a lognormal distribution. I produced independent simulations, each with pixel noise tuned to produce different mean S/N ranging from 10-1000. I applied a constant shear to all images. I fitted the simulated images to a model with the true Sérsic index to avoid modelling biases. I recovered the input shear with fractional error Δg/g < 2 × 10-3 in all cases. In these controlled conditions, and in the absence of other multiplicative errors, this implementation is sufficiently unbiased for current surveys and approaches the requirements for planned surveys.

  14. FAst STatistics for weak Lensing (FASTLens): fast method for weak lensing statistics and map making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, S.; Starck, J.-L.; Amara, A.; Teyssier, R.; Réfrégier, A.; Fadili, J.

    2009-05-01

    With increasingly large data sets, weak lensing measurements are able to measure cosmological parameters with ever-greater precision. However, this increased accuracy also places greater demands on the statistical tools used to extract the available information. To date, the majority of lensing analyses use the two-point statistics of the cosmic shear field. These can be either studied directly using the two-point correlation function or in Fourier space, using the power spectrum. But analysing weak lensing data inevitably involves the masking out of regions, for example to remove bright stars from the field. Masking out the stars is common practice but the gaps in the data need proper handling. In this paper, we show how an inpainting technique allows us to properly fill in these gaps with only NlogN operations, leading to a new image from which we can compute straightforwardly and with a very good accuracy both the power spectrum and the bispectrum. We then propose a new method to compute the bispectrum with a polar FFT algorithm, which has the main advantage of avoiding any interpolation in the Fourier domain. Finally, we propose a new method for dark matter mass map reconstruction from shear observations, which integrates this new inpainting concept. A range of examples based on 3D N-body simulations illustrates the results.

  15. Cross-correlation of Planck CMB lensing and CFHTLenS galaxy weak lensing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Hill, J. Colin

    2015-09-01

    We cross-correlate cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing and galaxy weak lensing maps using the Planck 2013 and 2015 data and the 154 deg2 Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). This measurement probes large-scale structure at intermediate redshifts ≈0.9 , between the high- and low-redshift peaks of the CMB and CFHTLenS lensing kernels, respectively. Using the noise properties of these data sets and standard Planck 2015 Λ CDM cosmological parameters, we forecast a signal-to-noise ratio ≈4.6 for the cross-correlation. We find that the noise level of our actual measurement agrees well with this estimate, but the amplitude of the signal lies well below the theoretical prediction. The best-fit amplitudes of our measured cross-correlations are A2013=0.48 ±0.26 and A2015=0.44 ±0.22 , using the 2013 and 2015 Planck CMB lensing maps, respectively, where A =1 corresponds to the fiducial Planck 2015 Λ CDM prediction. Due to the low measured amplitude, the detection significance is moderate (≈2 σ ) and the data are in tension with the theoretical prediction (≈2 - 2.5 σ ) . The tension is reduced somewhat when compared to predictions using WMAP9 parameters, for which we find A2013=0.56 ±0.30 and A2015=0.52 ±0.26 . We consider various systematic effects, finding that photometric redshift uncertainties, contamination by intrinsic alignments, and effects due to the masking of galaxy clusters in the Planck 2015 CMB lensing reconstruction are able to help resolve the tension at a significant level (≈10 % each). An overall multiplicative bias in the CFHTLenS shear data could also play a role, which can be tested with existing data. We close with forecasts for measurements of the CMB lensing—galaxy lensing cross-correlation using ongoing and future weak lensing surveys, which will definitively test the significance of the tension in our results with respect to Λ CDM .

  16. FASTLens (FAst STatistics for weak Lensing): Fast Method for Weak Lensing Statistics and Map Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, S.; Starck, J.-L.; Amara, A.; Teyssier, R.; Refregier, A.; Fadili, J.

    2010-10-01

    The analysis of weak lensing data requires to account for missing data such as masking out of bright stars. To date, the majority of lensing analyses uses the two point-statistics of the cosmic shear field. These can either be studied directly using the two-point correlation function, or in Fourier space, using the power spectrum. The two-point correlation function is unbiased by missing data but its direct calculation will soon become a burden with the exponential growth of astronomical data sets. The power spectrum is fast to estimate but a mask correction should be estimated. Other statistics can be used but these are strongly sensitive to missing data. The solution that is proposed by FASTLens is to properly fill-in the gaps with only NlogN operations, leading to a complete weak lensing mass map from which one can compute straight forwardly and with a very good accuracy any kind of statistics like power spectrum or bispectrum.

  17. The MICE Grand Challenge light-cone simulation - III. Galaxy lensing mocks from all-sky lensing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosalba, P.; Gaztañaga, E.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.

    2015-02-01

    In Paper I of this series, we presented a new N-body light-cone simulation from the MICE Collaboration, the MICE Grand Challenge (MICE-GC), containing about 70 billion dark-matter particles in a (3 h-1 Gpc)3 comoving volume, from which we built halo and galaxy catalogues using a Halo Occupation Distribution and Halo Abundance Matching technique, as presented in the companion Paper II. Given its large volume and fine mass resolution, the MICE-GC simulation also allows an accurate modelling of the lensing observables from upcoming wide and deep galaxy surveys. In the last paper of this series (Paper III), we describe the construction of all-sky lensing maps, following the `Onion Universe' approach, and discuss their properties in the light-cone up to z = 1.4 with sub-arcminute spatial resolution. By comparing the convergence power spectrum in the MICE-GC to lower mass-resolution (i.e. particle mass ˜1011 h-1 M⊙) simulations, we find that resolution effects are at the 5 per cent level for multipoles ℓ ˜ 103 and 20 per cent for ℓ ˜ 104. Resolution effects have a much lower impact on our simulation, as shown by comparing the MICE-GC to recent numerical fits by Takahashi. We use the all-sky lensing maps to model galaxy lensing properties, such as the convergence, shear, and lensed magnitudes and positions, and validate them thoroughly using galaxy shear auto and cross-correlations in harmonic and configuration space. Our results show that the galaxy lensing mocks here presented can be used to accurately model lensing observables down to arcminute scales. Accompanying this series of papers, we make a first public data release of the MICE-GC galaxy mock, the MICECAT v1.0, through a dedicated web-portal for the MICE simulations, http://cosmohub.pic.es, to help developing and exploiting the new generation of astronomical surveys.

  18. Constraining multiplicative bias in CFHTLenS weak lensing shear data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Ortiz-Vazquez, Alvaro; Hill, J. Colin

    2016-05-01

    Several recent cosmological analyses have found tension between constraints derived from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) data and those derived from other data sets, such as the Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies. Similarly, a direct cross-correlation of the CFHTLenS data with Planck CMB lensing data yielded an anomalously low amplitude compared to expectations based on Planck or WMAP-derived cosmological parameters Liu and Hill [Phys. Rev. D 92, 063517 (2015)]. One potential explanation for these results is a multiplicative bias afflicting the CFHTLenS galaxy shape measurements, from which shears are inferred. Simulations are used in the CFHTLenS pipeline to calibrate such biases, but no data-driven constraints have been presented to date. In this paper, we cross-correlate CFHTLenS galaxy density maps with CFHTLenS shear maps and Planck CMB lensing maps to calibrate an additional multiplicative shear bias (m ) in CFHTLenS (beyond the multiplicative correction that has already been applied to the CFHTLenS galaxy shears), following methods suggested by Vallinotto [Astrophys. J. 759, 32 (2012)], and Das et al. [arXiv:1311.2338]. We analyze three magnitude-limited galaxy samples, finding 2 - 4 σ evidence for m <1 using the deepest sample (i <24 ), while the others are consistent with m =1 (no bias). This matches the expectation that the shapes of faint galaxies are the most prone to measurement biases. Our results for m are essentially independent of the assumed cosmology, and only weakly sensitive to assumptions about the galaxy bias. We consider three galaxy bias models, finding in all cases that the best-fit multiplicative shear bias is less than unity (neglecting photometric redshift errors and intrinsic alignment contamination). A value of m ≈0.9 would suffice to reconcile the amplitude of density fluctuations inferred from the CFHTLenS shear two-point statistics with that inferred from Planck CMB

  19. PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS OF COSMOLOGICAL LENSING: CONVERGENCE, SHEAR, AND MAGNIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryuichi; Oguri, Masamune; Sato, Masanori; Hamana, Takashi

    2011-11-20

    We perform high-resolution ray-tracing simulations to investigate probability distribution functions (PDFs) of lensing convergence, shear, and magnification on distant sources up to the redshift of z{sub s} = 20. We pay particular attention to the shot noise effect in N-body simulations by explicitly showing how it affects the variance of the convergence. We show that the convergence and magnification PDFs are closely related to each other via the approximate relation {mu} = (1 - {kappa}){sup -2}, which can reproduce the behavior of PDFs surprisingly well up to the high magnification tail. The mean convergence measured in the source plane is found to be systematically negative, rather than zero as often assumed, and is correlated with the convergence variance. We provide simple analytical formulae for the PDFs, which reproduce simulated PDFs reasonably well for a wide range of redshifts and smoothing sizes. As explicit applications of our ray-tracing simulations, we examine the strong-lensing probability and the magnification effects on the luminosity functions of distant galaxies and quasars.

  20. Impact of spurious shear on cosmological parameter estimates from weak lensing observables

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Haiman, Zoltán; Kratochvil, Jan M.

    2014-12-30

    We research, residual errors in shear measurements, after corrections for instrument systematics and atmospheric effects, can impact cosmological parameters derived from weak lensing observations. Here we combine convergence maps from our suite of ray-tracing simulations with random realizations of spurious shear. This allows us to quantify the errors and biases of the triplet (Ωm,w,σ8) derived from the power spectrum (PS), as well as from three different sets of non-Gaussian statistics of the lensing convergence field: Minkowski functionals (MFs), low-order moments (LMs), and peak counts (PKs). Our main results are as follows: (i) We find an order of magnitude smaller biasesmore » from the PS than in previous work. (ii) The PS and LM yield biases much smaller than the morphological statistics (MF, PK). (iii) For strictly Gaussian spurious shear with integrated amplitude as low as its current estimate of σsys2 ≈ 10-7, biases from the PS and LM would be unimportant even for a survey with the statistical power of Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. However, we find that for surveys larger than ≈ 100 deg2, non-Gaussianity in the noise (not included in our analysis) will likely be important and must be quantified to assess the biases. (iv) The morphological statistics (MF, PK) introduce important biases even for Gaussian noise, which must be corrected in large surveys. The biases are in different directions in (Ωm,w,σ8) parameter space, allowing self-calibration by combining multiple statistics. Our results warrant follow-up studies with more extensive lensing simulations and more accurate spurious shear estimates.« less

  1. Impact of spurious shear on cosmological parameter estimates from weak lensing observables

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Haiman, Zoltán; Kratochvil, Jan M.

    2014-12-30

    We research, residual errors in shear measurements, after corrections for instrument systematics and atmospheric effects, can impact cosmological parameters derived from weak lensing observations. Here we combine convergence maps from our suite of ray-tracing simulations with random realizations of spurious shear. This allows us to quantify the errors and biases of the triplet (Ωm,w,σ8) derived from the power spectrum (PS), as well as from three different sets of non-Gaussian statistics of the lensing convergence field: Minkowski functionals (MFs), low-order moments (LMs), and peak counts (PKs). Our main results are as follows: (i) We find an order of magnitude smaller biases from the PS than in previous work. (ii) The PS and LM yield biases much smaller than the morphological statistics (MF, PK). (iii) For strictly Gaussian spurious shear with integrated amplitude as low as its current estimate of σsys2 ≈ 10-7, biases from the PS and LM would be unimportant even for a survey with the statistical power of Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. However, we find that for surveys larger than ≈ 100 deg2, non-Gaussianity in the noise (not included in our analysis) will likely be important and must be quantified to assess the biases. (iv) The morphological statistics (MF, PK) introduce important biases even for Gaussian noise, which must be corrected in large surveys. The biases are in different directions in (Ωm,w,σ8) parameter space, allowing self-calibration by combining multiple statistics. Our results warrant follow-up studies with more extensive lensing simulations and more accurate spurious shear estimates.

  2. Dynamic Spectral Mapping of Interstellar Plasma Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuntsov, Artem V.; Walker, Mark A.; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Bannister, Keith W.; Stevens, Jamie; Johnston, Simon; Reynolds, Cormac; Bignall, Hayley E.

    2016-02-01

    Compact radio sources sometimes exhibit intervals of large, rapid changes in their flux density, due to lensing by interstellar plasma crossing the line of sight. A novel survey program has made it possible to discover these “Extreme Scattering Events” (ESEs) in real time, resulting in a high-quality dynamic spectrum of an ESE observed in PKS 1939-315. Here we present a method for determining the column-density profile of a plasma lens, given only the dynamic radio spectrum of the lensed source, under the assumption that the lens is either axisymmetric or totally anisotropic. Our technique relies on the known, strong frequency dependence of the plasma refractive index in order to determine how points in the dynamic spectrum map to positions on the lens. We apply our method to high-frequency (4.2-10.8 GHz) data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the PKS 1939-315 ESE. The derived electron column-density profiles are very similar for the two geometries we consider, and both yield a good visual match to the data. However, the fit residuals are substantially above the noise level, and deficiencies are evident when we compare the predictions of our model to lower-frequency (1.6-3.1 GHz) data on the same ESE, thus motivating future development of more sophisticated inversion techniques.

  3. SHELS: TESTING WEAK-LENSING MAPS WITH REDSHIFT SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Ramella, Massimo E-mail: mkurtz@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: ian@het.brown.ed

    2010-02-01

    Weak-lensing surveys are emerging as an important tool for the construction of 'mass-selected' clusters of galaxies. We evaluate both the efficiency and completeness of a weak-lensing selection by combining a dense, complete redshift survey, the Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS), with a weak-lensing map from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS). SHELS includes 11,692 redshifts for galaxies with R <= 20.6 in the 4 deg{sup 2} DLS field; the survey is a solid basis for identifying massive clusters of galaxies with redshift z approx< 0.55. The range of sensitivity of the redshift survey is similar to the range for the DLS convergence map. Only four of the 12 convergence peaks with signal to noise >=3.5 correspond to clusters of galaxies with M approx> 1.7 x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun}. Four of the eight massive clusters in SHELS are detected in the weak-lensing map yielding a completeness of approx50%. We examine the seven known extended cluster X-ray sources in the DLS field: three can be detected in the weak-lensing map, three should not be detected without boosting from superposed large-scale structure, and one is mysteriously undetected even though its optical properties suggest that it should produce a detectable lensing signal. Taken together, these results underscore the need for more extensive comparisons among different methods of massive cluster identification.

  4. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Vikram, V.; Jain, B.; Bacon, D.; Amara, A.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S.; Brout, D.; Busha, M.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Hartley, W.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Kovács, A.; Lahav, O.; Lin, H.; Melchior, P.; Peiris, H.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sánchez, C.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Wechsler, R.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2015-07-01

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139 deg2 from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for superclusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 6.8 σ level with 20 arc min smoothing. These measurements are consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on N -body simulations from a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant. This suggests low systematics uncertainties in the map. We summarize our key findings in this Letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper.

  5. Galaxy bias from the DES Science Verification data: combining galaxy density maps and weak lensing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Pujol, A.; Gaztañaga, E.; Amara, A.; Réfrégier, A.; Bacon, D.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Giannantonio, T.; Hartley, W.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Ross, A. J.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a ˜116 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. (2012) and later re-examined in a companion paper (Pujol et al. 2016) with rigorous simulation tests and analytical treatment of tomographic measurements. In this work we apply this method to the DES SV data and measure the galaxy bias for a i < 22.5 galaxy sample. We find the galaxy bias and 1σ error bars in 4 photometric redshift bins to be 1.12 ± 0.19 (z = 0.2 - 0.4), 0.97 ± 0.15 (z = 0.4 - 0.6), 1.38 ± 0.39 (z = 0.6 - 0.8), and 1.45 ± 0.56 (z = 0.8 - 1.0). These measurements are consistent at the 2σ level with measurements on the same dataset using galaxy clustering and cross-correlation of galaxies with CMB lensing, with most of the redshift bins consistent within the 1σ error bars. In addition, our method provides the only σ8-independent constraint among the three. We forward-model the main observational effects using mock galaxy catalogs by including shape noise, photo-z errors and masking effects. We show that our bias measurement from the data is consistent with that expected from simulations. With the forthcoming full DES data set, we expect this method to provide additional constraints on the galaxy bias measurement from more traditional methods. Furthermore, in the process of our measurement, we build up a 3D mass map that allows further exploration of the dark matter distribution and its relation to galaxy evolution.

  6. A new weak lensing shear analysis method using ellipticity defined by 0th order moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okura, Yuki; Futamase, Toshifumi

    2015-04-01

    We developed a new method that uses ellipticity defined by 0th order moments (0th-ellipticity) for weak gravitational lensing shear analysis. Although there is a strong correlation between the ellipticity calculated using this approach and the usual ellipticity defined by the 2nd order moment, the ellipticity calculated here has a higher signal-to-noise ratio because it is weighted to the central region of the image. These results were confirmed using data for Abell 1689 from the Subaru telescope. For shear analysis, we adopted the ellipticity of re-smeared artificial image method for point spread function correction, and we tested the precision of this 0th-ellipticity with simple simulation, then we obtained the same level of precision with the results of ellipticity defined by quadrupole moments. Thus, we can expect that weak lensing analysis using 0 shear will be improved in proportion to the statistical error.

  7. Mapping matter jointly with CMB lensing and Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffenberger, Kevin; Rotti, Aditya; Maldonado, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    In the near future, Stage III and Stage IV Cosmic Microwave Background experiments will measure to high precision the lensing distortions that trace matter fluctuations in the universe. On a similar timescale DES, HSC, WFIRST, EUCLID, DESI, LSST, and other surveys will provide galaxy redshift information, imaging, and cosmic shear data over large regions of the sky. Taking a holistic, Bayesian approach to combine datasets, we seek to understand the statistical properties of joint estimates of the matter distribution and its correlations, including their non-Gaussian likelihoods.

  8. Mapping matter jointly with CMB lensing and Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffenberger, Kevin; Maldonado, Felipe; Rotti, Aditya

    2015-04-01

    In the near future, Stage III and Stage IV Cosmic Microwave Background experiments will measure to high precision the lensing distortions that trace matter fluctuations in the universe. On a similar timescale, WFIRST, EUCLID, DESI, LSST, and other surveys will provide galaxy redshift information, imaging, and cosmic shear data over large regions of the sky. Taking a holistic, Bayesian approach to combine datasets, we seek to understand keenly the statistical properties of joint estimates of the matter distribution and its correlations, including their non-Gaussian likelihoods.

  9. Using Cosmic Microwave Background Lensing to Constrain the Multiplicative Bias of Cosmic Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallinotto, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is one of the key probes of cosmology. Cosmic shear surveys aimed at measuring the distribution of matter in the universe are currently being carried out (Pan-STARRS) or planned for the coming decade (DES, LSST, EUCLID, WFIRST). Crucial to the success of these surveys is the control of systematics. In this work, a new method to constrain one such family of systematics, known as multiplicative bias, is proposed. This method exploits the cross-correlation between weak-lensing measurements from galaxy surveys and the ones obtained from high-resolution cosmic microwave background experiments. This cross-correlation is shown to have the power to break the degeneracy between the normalization of the matter power spectrum and the multiplicative bias of cosmic shear and to be able to constrain the latter to a few percent.

  10. USING COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND LENSING TO CONSTRAIN THE MULTIPLICATIVE BIAS OF COSMIC SHEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Vallinotto, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is one of the key probes of cosmology. Cosmic shear surveys aimed at measuring the distribution of matter in the universe are currently being carried out (Pan-STARRS) or planned for the coming decade (DES, LSST, EUCLID, WFIRST). Crucial to the success of these surveys is the control of systematics. In this work, a new method to constrain one such family of systematics, known as multiplicative bias, is proposed. This method exploits the cross-correlation between weak-lensing measurements from galaxy surveys and the ones obtained from high-resolution cosmic microwave background experiments. This cross-correlation is shown to have the power to break the degeneracy between the normalization of the matter power spectrum and the multiplicative bias of cosmic shear and to be able to constrain the latter to a few percent.

  11. Wide-field lensing mass maps from Dark Energy Survey science verification data: Methodology and detailed analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikram, V.; Chang, C.; Jain, B.; Bacon, D.; Amara, A.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S.; Brout, D.; Busha, M.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Hartley, W.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Kovács, A.; Lahav, O.; Leistedt, B.; Lin, H.; Melchior, P.; Peiris, H.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sánchez, C.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Wechsler, R.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J.; Martini, P.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.

    2015-07-01

    Weak gravitational lensing allows one to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the projected mass density across the sky. These "mass maps" provide a powerful tool for studying cosmology as they probe both luminous and dark matter. In this paper, we present a weak lensing mass map reconstructed from shear measurements in a 139 deg2 area from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data. We compare the distribution of mass with that of the foreground distribution of galaxies and clusters. The overdensities in the reconstructed map correlate well with the distribution of optically detected clusters. We demonstrate that candidate superclusters and voids along the line of sight can be identified, exploiting the tight scatter of the cluster photometric redshifts. We cross-correlate the mass map with a foreground magnitude-limited galaxy sample from the same data. Our measurement gives results consistent with mock catalogs from N -body simulations that include the primary sources of statistical uncertainties in the galaxy, lensing, and photo-z catalogs. The statistical significance of the cross-correlation is at the 6.8 σ level with 20 arcminute smoothing. We find that the contribution of systematics to the lensing mass maps is generally within measurement uncertainties. In this work, we analyze less than 3% of the final area that will be mapped by the DES; the tools and analysis techniques developed in this paper can be applied to forthcoming larger data sets from the survey.

  12. Lenses and effective spatial resolution in macroscopic optical mapping.

    PubMed

    Bien, Harold; Parikh, Puja; Entcheva, Emilia

    2007-02-21

    Optical mapping of excitation dynamically tracks electrical waves travelling through cardiac or brain tissue by the use of fluorescent dyes. There are several characteristics that set optical mapping apart from other imaging modalities: dynamically changing signals requiring short exposure times, dim fluorescence demanding sensitive sensors and wide fields of view (low magnification) resulting in poor optical performance. These conditions necessitate the use of optics with good light gathering ability, i.e. lenses having high numerical aperture. Previous optical mapping studies often used sensor resolution to estimate the minimum spatial feature resolvable, assuming perfect optics and infinite contrast. We examine here the influence of finite contrast and real optics on the effective spatial resolution in optical mapping under broad-field illumination for both lateral (in-plane) resolution and axial (depth) resolution of collected fluorescence signals. PMID:17264363

  13. Wide-field lensing mass maps from Dark Energy Survey science verification data: Methodology and detailed analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, V.

    2015-07-29

    Weak gravitational lensing allows one to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the projected mass density across the sky. These “mass maps” provide a powerful tool for studying cosmology as they probe both luminous and dark matter. In this paper, we present a weak lensing mass map reconstructed from shear measurements in a 139 deg2 area from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data. We compare the distribution of mass with that of the foreground distribution of galaxies and clusters. The overdensities in the reconstructed map correlate well with the distribution of optically detected clusters. We demonstrate that candidate superclusters and voids along the line of sight can be identified, exploiting the tight scatter of the cluster photometric redshifts. We cross-correlate the mass map with a foreground magnitude-limited galaxy sample from the same data. Our measurement gives results consistent with mock catalogs from N-body simulations that include the primary sources of statistical uncertainties in the galaxy, lensing, and photo-z catalogs. The statistical significance of the cross-correlation is at the 6.8σ level with 20 arcminute smoothing. We find that the contribution of systematics to the lensing mass maps is generally within measurement uncertainties. In this study, we analyze less than 3% of the final area that will be mapped by the DES; the tools and analysis techniques developed in this paper can be applied to forthcoming larger data sets from the survey.

  14. Wide-field lensing mass maps from Dark Energy Survey science verification data: Methodology and detailed analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vikram, V.

    2015-07-29

    Weak gravitational lensing allows one to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the projected mass density across the sky. These “mass maps” provide a powerful tool for studying cosmology as they probe both luminous and dark matter. In this paper, we present a weak lensing mass map reconstructed from shear measurements in a 139 deg2 area from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data. We compare the distribution of mass with that of the foreground distribution of galaxies and clusters. The overdensities in the reconstructed map correlate well with the distribution of optically detected clusters. We demonstrate that candidate superclustersmore » and voids along the line of sight can be identified, exploiting the tight scatter of the cluster photometric redshifts. We cross-correlate the mass map with a foreground magnitude-limited galaxy sample from the same data. Our measurement gives results consistent with mock catalogs from N-body simulations that include the primary sources of statistical uncertainties in the galaxy, lensing, and photo-z catalogs. The statistical significance of the cross-correlation is at the 6.8σ level with 20 arcminute smoothing. We find that the contribution of systematics to the lensing mass maps is generally within measurement uncertainties. In this study, we analyze less than 3% of the final area that will be mapped by the DES; the tools and analysis techniques developed in this paper can be applied to forthcoming larger data sets from the survey.« less

  15. CLASH: Joint Analysis of Strong-lensing, Weak-lensing Shear, and Magnification Data for 20 Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetsu, Keiichi; Zitrin, Adi; Gruen, Daniel; Merten, Julian; Donahue, Megan; Postman, Marc

    2016-04-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of strong-lensing, weak-lensing shear and magnification data for a sample of 16 X-ray-regular and 4 high-magnification galaxy clusters at 0.19≲ z≲ 0.69 selected from Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Our analysis combines constraints from 16-band Hubble Space Telescope observations and wide-field multi-color imaging taken primarily with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope, spanning a wide range of cluster radii (10″–16‧). We reconstruct surface mass density profiles of individual clusters from a joint analysis of the full lensing constraints, and determine masses and concentrations for all of the clusters. We find the internal consistency of the ensemble mass calibration to be ≤5% ± 6% in the one-halo regime (200–2000 kpc h‑1) compared to the CLASH weak-lensing-only measurements of Umetsu et al. For the X-ray-selected subsample of 16 clusters, we examine the concentration–mass (c–M) relation and its intrinsic scatter using a Bayesian regression approach. Our model yields a mean concentration of c{| }z=0.34=3.95+/- 0.35 at M200c ≃ 14 × 1014 M⊙ and an intrinsic scatter of σ ({ln}{c}200{{c}})=0.13+/- 0.06, which is in excellent agreement with Λ cold dark matter predictions when the CLASH selection function based on X-ray morphological regularity and the projection effects are taken into account. We also derive an ensemble-averaged surface mass density profile for the X-ray-selected subsample by stacking their individual profiles. The stacked lensing signal is detected at 33σ significance over the entire radial range ≤4000 kpc h‑1, accounting for the effects of intrinsic profile variations and uncorrelated large-scale structure along the line of sight. The stacked mass profile is well described by a family of density profiles predicted for cuspy dark-matter-dominated halos in gravitational equilibrium, namely, the Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW), Einasto, and DARKexp models

  16. Radio Weak Lensing Shear Measurement in the Visibility Domain - I. Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivi, M.; Miller, L.; Makhathini, S.; Abdalla, F. B.

    2016-08-01

    The high sensitivity of the new generation of radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will allow cosmological weak lensing measurements at radio wavelengths that are competitive with optical surveys. We present an adaptation to radio data of lensfit, a method for galaxy shape measurement originally developed and used for optical weak lensing surveys. This likelihood method uses an analytical galaxy model and makes a Bayesian marginalisation of the likelihood over uninteresting parameters. It has the feature of working directly in the visibility domain, which is the natural approach to adopt with radio interferometer data, avoiding systematics introduced by the imaging process. As a proof of concept, we provide results for visibility simulations of individual galaxies with flux density S ≥ 10μJy at the phase centre of the proposed SKA1-MID baseline configuration, adopting 12 frequency channels in the band 950 - 1190 MHz. Weak lensing shear measurements from a population of galaxies with realistic flux and scalelength distributions are obtained after natural gridding of the raw visibilities. Shear measurements are expected to be affected by `noise bias': we estimate the bias in the method as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We obtain additive and multiplicative bias values that are comparable to SKA1 requirements for SNR > 18 and SNR > 30, respectively. The multiplicative bias for SNR >10 is comparable to that found in ground-based optical surveys such as CFHTLenS, and we anticipate that similar shear measurement calibration strategies to those used for optical surveys may be used to good effect in the analysis of SKA radio interferometer data.

  17. CLASH: Weak-lensing shear-and-magnification analysis of 20 galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Umetsu, Keiichi; Czakon, Nicole; Medezinski, Elinor; Lemze, Doron; Ford, Holland; Nonino, Mario; Balestra, Italo; Biviano, Andrea; Merten, Julian; Postman, Marc; Koekemoer, Anton; Meneghetti, Massimo; Donahue, Megan; Molino, Alberto; Benítez, Narciso; Seitz, Stella; Gruen, Daniel; Broadhurst, Tom; Grillo, Claudio; Melchior, Peter; and others

    2014-11-10

    We present a joint shear-and-magnification weak-lensing analysis of a sample of 16 X-ray-regular and 4 high-magnification galaxy clusters at 0.19 ≲ z ≲ 0.69 selected from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Our analysis uses wide-field multi-color imaging, taken primarily with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. From a stacked-shear-only analysis of the X-ray-selected subsample, we detect the ensemble-averaged lensing signal with a total signal-to-noise ratio of ≅ 25 in the radial range of 200-3500 kpc h {sup –1}, providing integrated constraints on the halo profile shape and concentration-mass relation. The stacked tangential-shear signal is well described by a family of standard density profiles predicted for dark-matter-dominated halos in gravitational equilibrium, namely, the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW), truncated variants of NFW, and Einasto models. For the NFW model, we measure a mean concentration of c{sub 200c}=4.01{sub −0.32}{sup +0.35} at an effective halo mass of M{sub 200c}=1.34{sub −0.09}{sup +0.10}×10{sup 15} M{sub ⊙}. We show that this is in excellent agreement with Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) predictions when the CLASH X-ray selection function and projection effects are taken into account. The best-fit Einasto shape parameter is α{sub E}=0.191{sub −0.068}{sup +0.071}, which is consistent with the NFW-equivalent Einasto parameter of ∼0.18. We reconstruct projected mass density profiles of all CLASH clusters from a joint likelihood analysis of shear-and-magnification data and measure cluster masses at several characteristic radii assuming an NFW density profile. We also derive an ensemble-averaged total projected mass profile of the X-ray-selected subsample by stacking their individual mass profiles. The stacked total mass profile, constrained by the shear+magnification data, is shown to be consistent with our shear-based halo-model predictions, including the effects of surrounding large-scale structure as

  18. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data.

    PubMed

    Chang, C; Vikram, V; Jain, B; Bacon, D; Amara, A; Becker, M R; Bernstein, G; Bonnett, C; Bridle, S; Brout, D; Busha, M; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Hartley, W; Jarvis, M; Kacprzak, T; Kovács, A; Lahav, O; Lin, H; Melchior, P; Peiris, H; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E; Sánchez, C; Sheldon, E; Troxel, M A; Wechsler, R; Zuntz, J; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Annis, J; Bauer, A H; Benoit-Lévy, A; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Carnero Rosell, A; Carrasco Kind, M; Castander, F J; Crocce, M; D'Andrea, C B; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Fausti Neto, A; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kent, S; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Maia, M A G; March, M; Martini, P; Merritt, K W; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Tucker, D; Walker, A R

    2015-07-31

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139  deg2 from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for superclusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 6.8σ level with 20 arc min smoothing. These measurements are consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on N-body simulations from a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant. This suggests low systematics uncertainties in the map. We summarize our key findings in this Letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper. PMID:26274409

  19. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.

    2015-07-29

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139 deg2 from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We also find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for superclusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 6.8σ level with 20 arc min smoothing. These measurements are consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on N-body simulations from a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant. This suggests low systematics uncertainties in the map. Finally, we summarize our key findings in this Letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper.

  20. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chang, C.

    2015-07-29

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139 deg2 from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We also find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for superclusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 6.8σ level with 20 arc min smoothing. Thesemore » measurements are consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on N-body simulations from a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant. This suggests low systematics uncertainties in the map. Finally, we summarize our key findings in this Letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper.« less

  1. Electromagnetic methods for mapping freshwater lenses on Micronesian atoll islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    The overall shape of freshwater lenses can be determined by applying electromagnetic methods and inverse layered-earth modeling to the mapping of atoll island freshwater lenses. Conductivity profiles were run across the width of the inhabited islands at Mwoakilloa, Pingelap, and Sapwuahfik atolls of the Pohnpei State, Federated States of Micronesia using a dual-loop, frequency-domain, electromagnetic profiling system. Six values of apparent conductivity were recorded at each sounding station and were used to interpret layer conductivities and/or thicknesses. A three-layer model that includes the unsaturated, freshwater, and saltwater zones was used to simulate apparent-conductivity data measured in the field. Interpreted results were compared with chloride-concentration data from monitoring wells and indicate that the interface between freshwater and saltwater layers, defined from electromagnetic data, is located in the upper part of the transition zone, where the chloride-concentration profile shows a rapid increase with depth. The electromagnetic method can be used to interpret the thickness of the freshwater between monitoring wells, but can not be used to interpret the thickness of freshwater from monitoring wells to the margin of an island. ?? 1992.

  2. A demonstration of position angle-only weak lensing shear estimators on the GREAT3 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Lee; Brown, Michael L.; Battye, Richard A.

    2015-12-01

    We develop and apply the position angle-only shear estimator of Whittaker, Brown & Battye to realistic galaxy images. This is done by demonstrating the method on the simulations of the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, which include contributions from anisotropic point spread functions (PSFs). We measure the position angles of the galaxies using three distinct methods - the integrated light method, quadrupole moments of surface brightness, and using model-based ellipticity measurements provided by IM3SHAPE. A weighting scheme is adopted to address biases in the position angle measurements which arise in the presence of an anisotropic PSF. Biases on the shear estimates, due to measurement errors on the position angles and correlations between the measurement errors and the true position angles, are corrected for using simulated galaxy images and an iterative procedure. The properties of the simulations are estimated using the deep field images provided as part of the challenge. A method is developed to match the distributions of galaxy fluxes and half-light radii from the deep fields to the corresponding distributions in the field of interest. We recover angle-only shear estimates with a performance close to current well-established model and moments-based methods for all three angle measurement techniques. The Q-values for all three methods are found to be Q ˜ 400. The code is freely available online at http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/mbrown/angle_only_shear/.

  3. Constraining primordial non-Gaussianity with cosmological weak lensing: shear and flexion

    SciTech Connect

    Fedeli, C.; Bartelmann, M.; Moscardini, L. E-mail: bartelmann@uni-heidelberg.de

    2012-10-01

    We examine the cosmological constraining power of future large-scale weak lensing surveys on the model of the ESA planned mission Euclid, with particular reference to primordial non-Gaussianity. Our analysis considers several different estimators of the projected matter power spectrum, based on both shear and flexion. We review the covariance and Fisher matrix for cosmic shear and evaluate those for cosmic flexion and for the cross-correlation between the two. The bounds provided by cosmic shear alone are looser than previously estimated, mainly due to the reduced sky coverage and background number density of sources for the latest Euclid specifications. New constraints for the local bispectrum shape, marginalized over σ{sub 8}, are at the level of Δf{sub NL} ∼ 100, with the precise value depending on the exact multipole range that is considered in the analysis. We consider three additional bispectrum shapes, for which the cosmic shear constraints range from Δf{sub NL} ∼ 340 (equilateral shape) up to Δf{sub NL} ∼ 500 (orthogonal shape). Also, constraints on the level of non-Gaussianity and on the amplitude of the matter power spectrum σ{sub 8} are almost perfectly anti-correlated, except for the orthogonal bispectrum shape for which they are correlated. The competitiveness of cosmic flexion constraints against cosmic shear ones depends by and large on the galaxy intrinsic flexion noise, that is still virtually unconstrained. Adopting the very high value that has been occasionally used in the literature results in the flexion contribution being basically negligible with respect to the shear one, and for realistic configurations the former does not improve significantly the constraining power of the latter. Since the shear shot noise is white, while the flexion one decreases with decreasing scale, by considering high enough multipoles the two contributions have to become comparable. Extending the analysis up to l{sub max} = 20,000 cosmic flexion, while

  4. Redshift Distributions of Galaxies in the DES Science Verification Shear Catalogue and Implications for Weak Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnett, C.

    2015-07-21

    We present photometric redshift estimates for galaxies used in the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES SV) data. Four model- or machine learning-based photometric redshift methods { annz2, bpz calibrated against BCC-U fig simulations, skynet, and tpz { are analysed. For training, calibration, and testing of these methods, we also construct a catalogue of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies matched against DES SV data. The performance of the methods is evalu-ated against the matched spectroscopic catalogue, focusing on metrics relevant for weak lensing analyses, with additional validation against COSMOS photo-zs. From the galaxies in the DES SV shear catalogue, which have mean redshift 0.72 ±0.01 over the range 0:3 < z < 1:3, we construct three tomographic bins with means of z = {0.45; 0.67,1.00g}. These bins each have systematic uncertainties δz ≲ 0.05 in the mean of the fiducial skynet photo-z n(z). We propagate the errors in the redshift distributions through to their impact on cosmological parameters estimated with cosmic shear, and find that they cause shifts in the value of σ8 of approx. 3%. This shift is within the one sigma statistical errors on σ8 for the DES SV shear catalog. We also found that further study of the potential impact of systematic differences on the critical surface density, Σcrit, contained levels of bias safely less than the statistical power of DES SV data. We recommend a final Gaussian prior for the photo-z bias in the mean of n(z) of width 0:05 for each of the three tomographic bins, and show that this is a sufficient bias model for the corresponding cosmology analysis.

  5. Galaxy bias from the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data: combining galaxy density maps and weak lensing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Pujol, A.; Gaztañaga, E.; Amara, A.; Réfrégier, A.; Bacon, D.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Giannantonio, T.; Hartley, W.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Ross, A. J.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-07-01

    We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a ˜116 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. and later re-examined in a companion paper with rigorous simulation tests and analytical treatment of tomographic measurements. In this work we apply this method to the DES SV data and measure the galaxy bias for a i < 22.5 galaxy sample. We find the galaxy bias and 1σ error bars in four photometric redshift bins to be 1.12 ± 0.19 (z = 0.2-0.4), 0.97 ± 0.15 (z = 0.4-0.6), 1.38 ± 0.39 (z = 0.6-0.8), and 1.45 ± 0.56 (z = 0.8-1.0). These measurements are consistent at the 2σ level with measurements on the same data set using galaxy clustering and cross-correlation of galaxies with cosmic microwave background lensing, with most of the redshift bins consistent within the 1σ error bars. In addition, our method provides the only σ8 independent constraint among the three. We forward model the main observational effects using mock galaxy catalogues by including shape noise, photo-z errors, and masking effects. We show that our bias measurement from the data is consistent with that expected from simulations. With the forthcoming full DES data set, we expect this method to provide additional constraints on the galaxy bias measurement from more traditional methods. Furthermore, in the process of our measurement, we build up a 3D mass map that allows further exploration of the dark matter distribution and its relation to galaxy evolution.

  6. Cosmological constraint on the light gravitino mass from CMB lensing and cosmic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osato, Ken; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Shirasaki, Masato; Kamada, Ayuki; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    Light gravitinos of mass lesssim O (10) eV are of particular interest in cosmology, offering various baryogenesis scenarios without suffering from the cosmological gravitino problem. The gravitino may contribute considerably to the total matter content of the Universe and affect structure formation from early to present epochs. After the gravitinos decouple from other particles in the early Universe, they free-stream and consequently suppress density fluctuations of (sub-)galactic length scales. Observations of structure at the relevant length-scales can be used to infer or constrain the mass and the abundance of light gravitinos. We derive constraints on the light gravitino mass using the data of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing from Planck and of cosmic shear from the Canada France Hawaii Lensing Survey survey, combined with analyses of the primary CMB anisotropies and the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations in galaxy distributions. The obtained constraint on the gravitino mass is m3/2 < 4.7 eV (95 % C.L.), which is substantially tighter than the previous constraint from clustering analysis of Ly-α forests.

  7. SELF-CALIBRATION OF GRAVITATIONAL SHEAR-GALAXY INTRINSIC ELLIPTICITY CORRELATION IN WEAK LENSING SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Pengjie

    2010-09-10

    The galaxy intrinsic alignment is a severe challenge to precision cosmic shear measurement. We propose self-calibrating the induced gravitational shear-galaxy intrinsic ellipticity correlation (the GI correlation) in weak lensing surveys with photometric redshift measurements. (1) We propose a method to extract the intrinsic ellipticity-galaxy density cross-correlation (I-g) from the galaxy ellipticity-density measurement in the same redshift bin. (2) We also find a generic scaling relation to convert the extracted I-g correlation to the necessary GI correlation. We perform a concept study under simplified conditions and demonstrate its capability to significantly reduce GI contamination. We discuss the impact of various complexities on the two key ingredients of the self-calibration technique, namely the method for extracting the I-g correlation and the scaling relation between the I-g and the GI correlation. We expect that none of them will likely be able to completely invalidate the proposed self-calibration technique.

  8. CALCLENS: weak lensing simulations for large-area sky surveys and second-order effects in cosmic shear power spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Matthew R.

    2013-10-01

    I present a new algorithm, Curved-sky grAvitational Lensing for Cosmological Light conE simulatioNS (CALCLENS), for efficiently computing weak gravitational lensing shear signals from large N-body light cone simulations over a curved sky. This new algorithm properly accounts for the sky curvature and boundary conditions, is able to produce redshift-dependent shear signals including corrections to the Born approximation by using multiple-plane ray tracing and properly computes the lensed images of source galaxies in the light cone. The key feature of this algorithm is a new, computationally efficient Poisson solver for the sphere that combines spherical harmonic transform and multigrid methods. As a result, large areas of sky (˜10 000 square degrees) can be ray traced efficiently at high resolution using only a few hundred cores. Using this new algorithm and curved-sky calculations that only use a slower but more accurate spherical harmonic transform Poisson solver, I study the convergence, shear E-mode, shear B-mode and rotation mode power spectra. Employing full-sky E/B-mode decompositions, I confirm that the numerically computed shear B-mode and rotation mode power spectra are equal at high accuracy (≲1 per cent) as expected from perturbation theory up to second order. Coupled with realistic galaxy populations placed in large N-body light cone simulations, this new algorithm is ideally suited for the construction of synthetic weak lensing shear catalogues to be used to test for systematic effects in data analysis procedures for upcoming large-area sky surveys. The implementation presented in this work, written in C and employing widely available software libraries to maintain portability, is publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/calclens.

  9. COMPARING DENSE GALAXY CLUSTER REDSHIFT SURVEYS WITH WEAK-LENSING MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Zahid, H. Jabran; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Rines, Kenneth J. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it

    2014-12-20

    We use dense redshift surveys of nine galaxy clusters at z ∼ 0.2 to compare the galaxy distribution in each system with the projected matter distribution from weak lensing. By combining 2087 new MMT/Hectospec redshifts and the data in the literature, we construct spectroscopic samples within the region of weak-lensing maps of high (70%-89%) and uniform completeness. With these dense redshift surveys, we construct galaxy number density maps using several galaxy subsamples. The shape of the main cluster concentration in the weak-lensing maps is similar to the global morphology of the number density maps based on cluster members alone, mainly dominated by red members. We cross-correlate the galaxy number density maps with the weak-lensing maps. The cross-correlation signal when we include foreground and background galaxies at 0.5z {sub cl} < z < 2z {sub cl} is 10%-23% larger than for cluster members alone at the cluster virial radius. The excess can be as high as 30% depending on the cluster. Cross-correlating the galaxy number density and weak-lensing maps suggests that superimposed structures close to the cluster in redshift space contribute more significantly to the excess cross-correlation signal than unrelated large-scale structure along the line of sight. Interestingly, the weak-lensing mass profiles are not well constrained for the clusters with the largest cross-correlation signal excesses (>20% for A383, A689, and A750). The fractional excess in the cross-correlation signal including foreground and background structures could be a useful proxy for assessing the reliability of weak-lensing cluster mass estimates.

  10. CALCLENS: Weak lensing simulations for large-area sky surveys and second-order effects in cosmic shear power spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Matthew Rand

    I present a new algorithm, CALCLENS, for efficiently computing weak gravitational lensing shear signals from large N-body light cone simulations over a curved sky. This new algorithm properly accounts for the sky curvature and boundary conditions, is able to produce redshift- dependent shear signals including corrections to the Born approximation by using multiple- plane ray tracing, and properly computes the lensed images of source galaxies in the light cone. The key feature of this algorithm is a new, computationally efficient Poisson solver for the sphere that combines spherical harmonic transform and multigrid methods. As a result, large areas of sky (~10,000 square degrees) can be ray traced efficiently at high-resolution using only a few hundred cores. Using this new algorithm and curved-sky calculations that only use a slower but more accurate spherical harmonic transform Poisson solver, I study the convergence, shear E-mode, shear B-mode and rotation mode power spectra. Employing full-sky E/B-mode decompositions, I confirm that the numerically computed shear B-mode and rotation mode power spectra are equal at high accuracy ( ≲ 1%) as expected from perturbation theory up to second order. Coupled with realistic galaxy populations placed in large N-body light cone simulations, this new algorithm is ideally suited for the construction of synthetic weak lensing shear catalogs to be used to test for systematic effects in data analysis procedures for upcoming large-area sky surveys. The implementation presented in this work, written in C and employing widely available software libraries to maintain portability, is publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/calclens.

  11. NEW DEVELOPMENTS ON INVERSE POLYGON MAPPING TO CALCULATE GRAVITATIONAL LENSING MAGNIFICATION MAPS: OPTIMIZED COMPUTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mediavilla, E.; Lopez, P.; Gonzalez-Morcillo, C.; Jimenez-Vicente, J.

    2011-11-01

    We derive an exact solution (in the form of a series expansion) to compute gravitational lensing magnification maps. It is based on the backward gravitational lens mapping of a partition of the image plane in polygonal cells (inverse polygon mapping, IPM), not including critical points (except perhaps at the cell boundaries). The zeroth-order term of the series expansion leads to the method described by Mediavilla et al. The first-order term is used to study the error induced by the truncation of the series at zeroth order, explaining the high accuracy of the IPM even at this low order of approximation. Interpreting the Inverse Ray Shooting (IRS) method in terms of IPM, we explain the previously reported N {sup -3/4} dependence of the IRS error with the number of collected rays per pixel. Cells intersected by critical curves (critical cells) transform to non-simply connected regions with topological pathologies like auto-overlapping or non-preservation of the boundary under the transformation. To define a non-critical partition, we use a linear approximation of the critical curve to divide each critical cell into two non-critical subcells. The optimal choice of the cell size depends basically on the curvature of the critical curves. For typical applications in which the pixel of the magnification map is a small fraction of the Einstein radius, a one-to-one relationship between the cell and pixel sizes in the absence of lensing guarantees both the consistence of the method and a very high accuracy. This prescription is simple but very conservative. We show that substantially larger cells can be used to obtain magnification maps with huge savings in computation time.

  12. Prospects for clustering and lensing measurements with forthcoming intensity mapping and optical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtsidou, A.; Bacon, D.; Crittenden, R.; Metcalf, R. B.

    2016-06-01

    We explore the potential of using intensity mapping surveys (MeerKAT, SKA) and optical galaxy surveys (DES, LSST) to detect H I clustering and weak gravitational lensing of 21 cm emission in auto- and cross-correlation. Our forecasts show that high-precision measurements of the clustering and lensing signals can be made in the near future using the intensity mapping technique. Such studies can be used to test the intensity mapping method, and constrain parameters such as the H I density Ω _{H I}, the H I bias b_{H I} and the galaxy-H I correlation coefficient r_{H I-g}.

  13. TESTING WEAK-LENSING MAPS WITH REDSHIFT SURVEYS: A SUBARU FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Michael J.; Geller, Margaret J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Utsumi, Yousuke; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Dell'Antonio, Ian P. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: yousuke.utsumi@nao.ac.jp E-mail: ian@het.brown.edu

    2012-05-10

    We use a dense redshift survey in the foreground of the Subaru GTO2deg{sup 2} weak-lensing field (centered at {alpha}{sub 2000} = 16{sup h}04{sup m}44{sup s}; {delta}{sub 2000} = 43 Degree-Sign 11'24'') to assess the completeness and comment on the purity of massive halo identification in the weak-lensing map. The redshift survey (published here) includes 4541 galaxies; 4405 are new redshifts measured with the Hectospec on the MMT. Among the weak-lensing peaks with a signal-to-noise greater than 4.25, 2/3 correspond to individual massive systems; this result is essentially identical to the Geller et al. test of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS) field F2. The Subaru map, based on images in substantially better seeing than the DLS, enables detection of less massive halos at fixed redshift as expected. We demonstrate that the procedure adopted by Miyazaki et al. for removing some contaminated peaks from the weak-lensing map improves agreement between the lensing map and the redshift survey in the identification of candidate massive systems.

  14. Shear wave mapping of skeletal muscle using shear wave wavefront reconstruction based on ultrasound color flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Iijima, Tomohiro; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2015-07-01

    We have proposed a quantitative shear wave imaging technique for continuous shear wave excitation. Shear wave wavefront is observed directly by color flow imaging using a general-purpose ultrasonic imaging system. In this study, the proposed method is applied to experiments in vivo, and shear wave maps, namely, the shear wave phase map, which shows the shear wave propagation inside the medium, and the shear wave velocity map, are observed for the skeletal muscle in the shoulder. To excite the shear wave inside the skeletal muscle of the shoulder, a hybrid ultrasonic wave transducer, which combines a small vibrator with an ultrasonic wave probe, is adopted. The shear wave velocity of supraspinatus muscle, which is measured by the proposed method, is 4.11 ± 0.06 m/s (N = 4). This value is consistent with those obtained by the acoustic radiation force impulse method.

  15. Maps of CMB lensing deflection from N-body simulations in Coupled Dark Energy Cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Baldi, Marco; Baccigalupi, Carlo E-mail: marco.baldi5@unibo.it E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2013-09-01

    We produce lensing potential and deflection-angle maps in order to simulate the weak gravitational lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) via ray-tracing through the COupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations (CoDECS), the largest suite of N-body simulations to date for interacting Dark Energy cosmologies. The constructed maps faithfully reflect the N-body cosmic structures on a range of scales going from the arcminute to the degree scale, limited only by the resolution and extension of the simulations. We investigate the variation of the lensing pattern due to the underlying Dark Energy (DE) dynamics, characterised by different background and perturbation behaviours as a consequence of the interaction between the DE field and Cold Dark Matter (CDM). In particular, we study in detail the results from three cosmological models differing in the background and perturbations evolution at the epoch in which the lensing cross section is most effective, corresponding to a redshift of ∼ 1, with the purpose to isolate their imprints in the lensing observables, regardless of the compatibility of these models with present constraints. The scenarios investigated here include a reference ΛCDM cosmology, a standard coupled DE (cDE) scenario, and a ''bouncing'' cDE scenario. For the standard cDE scenario, we find that typical differences in the lensing potential result from two effects: the enhanced growth of linear CDM density fluctuations with respect to the ΛCDM case, and the modified nonlinear dynamics of collapsed structures induced by the DE-CDM interaction. As a consequence, CMB lensing highlights the DE impact in the cosmological expansion, even in the degenerate case where the amplitude of the linear matter density perturbations, parametrised through σ{sub 8}, is the same in both the standard cDE and ΛCDM cosmologies. For the ''bouncing'' scenario, we find that the two opposite behaviours of the lens density contrast and of the matter abundance lead to

  16. CMB Lensing Cross Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleem, Lindsey

    2014-03-01

    A new generation of experiments designed to conduct high-resolution, low-noise observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB)--including ACTpol, Planck, POLARBEAR and SPTpol--are producing exquisite measurements of the gravitational lensing of the CMB. Such measurements, covering large fractions of the sky, provide detailed maps of the projected mass distribution extending to the surface of the CMB's last scattering. Concurrently, a large number of deep, wide-area imaging and spectroscopic surveys (e.g., the Dark Energy Survey (DES),WISE all-sky survey, Subaru HyperSuprimeCam Survey, LSST, MS-DESI, BigBoss, etc.) are, or will soon be, providing maps of the distribution of galaxies in the Universe. Correlations of such tracer populations with lensing data allows new probes of where and how galaxies form in the dark matter skeleton of the Universe. Recent correlations of maps of galaxy and quasar densities with lensing convergence maps have produced significant measurements of galaxy bias. The near-term prospect for improvements in such measurements is notable as more precise lensing data from CMB polarization experiments will help to break cosmological and astrophysical parameter degeneracies. Work by the Planck, SPT, and POLARBEAR collaborations has also focused on the correlation of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) with CMB lensing convergence maps. This correlation is particularly strong as the redshifts of the CIB and CMB lensing kernel are well matched. Such correlations probe high-redshift structure, constraining models of star-formation and the characteristic mass scale for halos hosting CIB galaxies and have also been used to demonstrate the first detection of CMB B-mode polarization--an important milestone in CMB observations. Finally, combining galaxy number density, cosmic shear and CMB lensing maps has the potential to provide valuable systematic tests for upcoming cosmological results from large optical surveys such as LSST.

  17. Improving three-dimensional mass mapping with weak gravitational lensing using galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    Context. The weak gravitational lensing distortion of distant galaxy images (defined as sources) probes the projected large-scale matter distribution in the Universe. The availability of redshift information in galaxy surveys also allows us to recover the radial matter distribution to a certain degree. Aims: To improve quality in the mass mapping, we combine the lensing information with the spatial clustering of a population of galaxies (defined as tracers) that trace the matter density with a known galaxy bias. Methods: We construct a minimum-variance estimator for the 3D matter density that incorporates the angular distribution of galaxy tracers, which are coarsely binned in redshift. Merely the second-order bias of the tracers has to be known, which can in principle be self-consistently constrained in the data by lensing techniques. This synergy introduces a new noise component because of the stochasticity in the matter-tracer density relation. We give a description of the stochasticity noise in the Gaussian regime, and we investigate the estimator characteristics analytically. We apply the estimator to a mock survey based on the Millennium Simulation. Results: The estimator linearly mixes the individual lensing mass and tracer number density maps into a combined smoothed mass map. The weighting in the mix depends on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the individual maps and the correlation, R, between the matter and galaxy density. The weight of the tracers can be reduced by hand. For moderate mixing, the S/N in the mass map improves by a factor ~2-3 for R ≳ 0.4. Importantly, the systematic offset between a true and apparent mass peak distance (defined as z-shift bias) in a lensing-only map is eliminated, even for weak correlations of R ~ 0.4. Conclusions: If the second-order bias of tracer galaxies can be determined, the synergy technique potentially provides an option to improve redshift accuracy and completeness of the lensing 3D mass map. Herein, the aim

  18. The Systematic Error Test for PSF Correction in Weak Gravitational Lensing Shear Measurement By the ERA Method By Idealizing PSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okura, Yuki; Futamase, Toshifumi

    2016-08-01

    We improve the ellipticity of re-smeared artificial image (ERA) method of point-spread function (PSF) correction in a weak lensing shear analysis in order to treat the realistic shape of galaxies and the PSF. This is done by re-smearing the PSF and the observed galaxy image using a re-smearing function (RSF) and allows us to use a new PSF with a simple shape and to correct the PSF effect without any approximations or assumptions. We perform a numerical test to show that the method applied for galaxies and PSF with some complicated shapes can correct the PSF effect with a systematic error of less than 0.1%. We also apply the ERA method for real data of the Abell 1689 cluster to confirm that it is able to detect the systematic weak lensing shear pattern. The ERA method requires less than 0.1 or 1 s to correct the PSF for each object in a numerical test and a real data analysis, respectively.

  19. CMB lensing power spectrum biases from galaxies and clusters using high-angular resolution temperature maps

    SciTech Connect

    Van Engelen, A.; Sehgal, N.; Bhattacharya, S.; Holder, G. P.; Zahn, O.; Nagai, D.

    2014-05-01

    The lensing power spectrum from cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps will be measured with unprecedented precision with upcoming experiments, including upgrades to the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and the South Pole Telescope. Achieving significant improvements in cosmological parameter constraints, such as percent level errors on σ{sub 8} and an uncertainty on the total neutrino mass of ∼50 meV, requires percent level measurements of the CMB lensing power. This necessitates tight control of systematic biases. We study several types of biases to the temperature-based lensing reconstruction signal from foreground sources such as radio and infrared galaxies and the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect from galaxy clusters. These foregrounds bias the CMB lensing signal due to their non-Gaussian nature. Using simulations as well as some analytical models we find that these sources can substantially impact the measured signal if left untreated. However, these biases can be brought to the percent level if one masks galaxies with fluxes at 150 GHz above 1 mJy and galaxy clusters with masses above M {sub vir} = 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉}. To achieve such percent level bias, we find that only modes up to a maximum multipole of l {sub max} ∼ 2500 should be included in the lensing reconstruction. We also discuss ways to minimize additional bias induced by such aggressive foreground masking by, for example, exploring a two-step masking and in-painting algorithm.

  20. A COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND LENSING MASS MAP AND ITS CORRELATION WITH THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, G. P.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J.; Viero, M. P.; Bock, J.; Zahn, O.; Aird, K. A.; Benson, B. A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H-M.; Conley, A.; George, E. M.; Halverson, N. W.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We use a temperature map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) obtained using the South Pole Telescope at 150 GHz to construct a map of the gravitational convergence to z {approx} 1100, revealing the fluctuations in the projected mass density. This map shows individual features that are significant at the {approx}4{sigma} level, providing the first image of CMB lensing convergence. We cross-correlate this map with Herschel/SPIRE maps covering 90 deg{sup 2} at wavelengths of 500, 350, and 250 {mu}m. We show that these submillimeter (submm) wavelength maps are strongly correlated with the lensing convergence map, with detection significances in each of the three submm bands ranging from 6.7{sigma} to 8.8{sigma}. We fit the measurement of the cross power spectrum assuming a simple constant bias model and infer bias factors of b = 1.3-1.8, with a statistical uncertainty of 15%, depending on the assumed model for the redshift distribution of the dusty galaxies that are contributing to the Herschel/SPIRE maps.

  1. Early Weak Lensing Results From The Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccrann, Niall; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    I present the early weak lensing results, including cosmological constraints, from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Although only 3% of the final survey, DES Science Verification data already constituted a competitive weak lensing dataset, and the thoroughly tested shear catalogs allowed a number of interesting science analyses including cosmology from cosmic shear, mass mapping, combining lensing with galaxy clustering and combining with CMB lensing. I will summarize the main results of these analyses, discuss common systematic effects which need to be addressed to take advantage of the greater statistical power of main survey data, and outline some of improvements at various stages of the analysis pipeline that aim to do this.

  2. ELLIPTICAL-WEIGHTED HOLICs FOR WEAK LENSING SHEAR MEASUREMENT. II. POINT-SPREAD FUNCTION CORRECTION AND APPLICATION TO A370

    SciTech Connect

    Okura, Yuki; Futamase, Toshifumi E-mail: tof@astr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2012-04-01

    We developed a new method (E-HOLICs) of estimating gravitational shear by adopting an elliptical weight function to measure background galaxy images in our previous paper. Following the previous paper, in which an isotropic point-spread function (PSF) correction is calculated, in this paper we consider an anisotropic PSF correction in order to apply E-HOLICs to real data. As an example, E-HOLICs is applied to Subaru data of the massive and compact galaxy cluster A370 and is able to detect double peaks in the central region of the cluster consistent with the analysis of strong lensing. We also study the systematic error in E-HOLICs using STEP2 simulation. In particular, we consider the dependences of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of background galaxies in the shear estimation. Although E-HOLICs does improve the systematic error due to the ellipticity dependence as shown in Paper I, a systematic error due to the S/N dependence remains, namely, E-HOLICs underestimates shear when background galaxies with low S/N objects are used. We discuss a possible improvement of the S/N dependence.

  3. FTIR spectroscopic imaging and mapping with correcting lenses for studies of biological cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Kimber, James A; Foreman, Liberty; Turner, Benjamin; Rich, Peter; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2016-06-23

    Histopathology of tissue samples is used to determine the progression of cancer usually by staining and visual analysis. It is recognised that disease progression from healthy tissue to cancerous is accompanied by spectral signature changes in the mid-infrared range. In this work, FTIR spectroscopic imaging in transmission mode using a focal plane array (96 × 96 pixels) has been applied to the characterisation of Barrett's oesophageal adenocarcinoma. To correct optical aberrations, infrared transparent lenses were used of the same material (CaF2) as the slide on which biopsies were fixed. The lenses acted as an immersion objective, reducing scattering and improving spatial resolution. A novel mapping approach using a sliding lens is presented where spectral images obtained with added lenses are stitched together such that the dataset contained a representative section of the oesophageal tissue. Images were also acquired in transmission mode using high-magnification optics for enhanced spatial resolution, as well as with a germanium micro-ATR objective. The reduction of scattering was assessed using k-means clustering. The same tissue section map, which contained a region of high grade dysplasia, was analysed using hierarchical clustering analysis. A reduction of the trough at 1077 cm(-1) in the second derivative spectra was identified as an indicator of high grade dysplasia. In addition, the spatial resolution obtained with the lens using high-magnification optics was assessed by measurements of a sharp interface of polymer laminate, which was also compared with that achieved with micro ATR-FTIR imaging. In transmission mode using the lens, it was determined to be 8.5 μm and using micro-ATR imaging, the resolution was 3 μm for the band at a wavelength of ca. 3 μm. The spatial resolution was also assessed with and without the added lens, in normal and high-magnification modes using a USAF target. Spectroscopic images of cells in transmission mode using two

  4. Mapping an aquitard breach using shear-wave seismic reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, B. A.; Harris, J. B.; Larsen, D.; Pell, A.

    2009-05-01

    In multi-layered hydrostratigraphic systems, aquitard breaches caused by faulting or paleo-erosion can allow substantial quantities of water of differing quality to be exchanged between aquifers. Seismic reflection technology was used to map the extent and orientation of an aquitard breach connecting a shallow alluvial aquifer to the deeper semi-confined Memphis aquifer in southwestern Tennessee, USA. Geophysical well logs indicate the presence of the aquitard at borehole locations that define the beginning and end points on two seismic survey lines, which intersect at a borehole where the aquitard is absent. A SE-NW-oriented paleochannel, 350 m wide and approximately 35-40 m deep, is interpreted from the seismic reflection surveys. The paleochannel cuts through the aquitard and into the upper part of the Memphis aquifer, thus creating a hydraulic connection between the shallow unconfined and deeper, semi-confined aquifers. The results indicate the potential of the shear-wave seismic reflection methods to resolve shallow breaches through fine-grained aquitards given availability of sufficient well control.

  5. Mapping tissue shear modulus on Thiel soft-embalmed mouse skin with shear wave optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Joy, Joyce; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    A quantitative measurement of the mechanical properties of biological tissue is a useful assessment of its physiologic conditions, which may aid medical diagnosis and treatment of, e.g., scleroderma and skin cancer. Traditional elastography techniques such as magnetic resonance elastography and ultrasound elastography have limited scope of application on skin due to insufficient spatial resolution. Recently, dynamic / transient elastography are attracting more applications with the advantage of non-destructive measurements, and revealing the absolute moduli values of tissue mechanical properties. Shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) is a novel transient elastography method, which lays emphasis on the propagation of dynamic mechanical waves. In this study, high speed shear wave imaging technique was applied to a range of soft-embalmed mouse skin, where 3 kHz shear waves were launched with a piezoelectric actuator as an external excitation. The shear wave velocity was estimated from the shear wave images, and used to recover a shear modulus map in the same OCT imaging range. Results revealed significant difference in shear modulus and structure in compliance with gender, and images on fresh mouse skin are also compared. Thiel embalming technique is also proven to present the ability to furthest preserve the mechanical property of biological tissue. The experiment results suggest that SW-OCE is an effective technique for quantitative estimation of skin tissue biomechanical status.

  6. Testing the lognormality of the galaxy and weak lensing convergence distributions from Dark Energy Survey maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerkin, L.; Kirk, D.; Manera, M.; Lahav, O.; Abdalla, F.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Chang, C.; Gaztañaga, E.; Hawken, A.; Jain, B.; Joachimi, B.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carrasco Kind, M.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Melchior, P.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the probability distribution function (PDF) of galaxy density contrast is approximately lognormal; whether the PDF of mass fluctuations derived from weak lensing convergence (κWL) is lognormal is less well established. We derive PDFs of the galaxy and projected matter density distributions via the Counts in Cells (CiC) method. We use maps of galaxies and weak lensing convergence produced from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data over 139 deg2. We test whether the underlying density contrast is well described by a lognormal distribution for the galaxies, the convergence and their joint PDF. We confirm that the galaxy density contrast distribution is well modeled by a lognormal PDF convolved with Poisson noise at angular scales from 10'- 40'(corresponding to physical scales of 3-10 Mpc). We note that as κWL is a weighted sum of the mass fluctuations along the line of sight, its PDF is expected to be only approximately lognormal. We find that the κWL distribution is well modeled by a lognormal PDF convolved with Gaussian shape noise at scales between 10'and 20', with a best-fit χ2/DOF of 1.11 compared to 1.84 for a Gaussian model, corresponding to p-values 0.35 and 0.07 respectively, at a scale of 10'. Above 20'a simple Gaussian model is sufficient. The joint PDF is also reasonably fitted by a bivariate lognormal. As a consistency check we compare the variances derived from the lognormal modelling with those directly measured via CiC. Our methods are validated against maps from the MICE Grand Challenge N-body simulation.

  7. A new method for point-spread function correction using the ellipticity of re-smeared artificial images in weak gravitational lensing shear analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Okura, Yuki; Futamase, Toshifumi E-mail: tof@astr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2014-09-10

    Highly accurate weak lensing analysis is urgently required for planned cosmic shear observations. For this purpose we have eliminated various systematic noises in the measurement. The point-spread function (PSF) effect is one of them. A perturbative approach for correcting the PSF effect on the observed image ellipticities has been previously employed. Here we propose a new non-perturbative approach for PSF correction that avoids the systematic error associated with the perturbative approach. The new method uses an artificial image for measuring shear which has the same ellipticity as the lensed image. This is done by re-smearing the observed galaxy images and observed star images (PSF) with an additional smearing function to obtain the original lensed galaxy images. We tested the new method with simple simulated objects that have Gaussian or Sérsic profiles smeared by a Gaussian PSF with sufficiently large size to neglect pixelization. Under the condition of no pixel noise, it is confirmed that the new method has no systematic error even if the PSF is large and has a high ellipticity.

  8. Cross-correlating Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and weak lensing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, Dipak; Joudaki, Shahab; Coles, Peter; Smidt, Joseph; Kay, Scott T.

    2014-07-01

    We present novel statistical tools to cross-correlate frequency cleaned thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) maps and tomographic weak lensing (wl) convergence maps. Moving beyond the lowest order cross-correlation, we introduce a hierarchy of mixed higher order statistics, the cumulants and cumulant correlators, to analyse non-Gaussianity in real space, as well as corresponding polyspectra in the harmonic domain. Using these moments, we derive analytical expressions for the joint two-point probability distribution function for smoothed tSZ (y) and convergence (κ) maps. The presence of tomographic information allows us to study the evolution of higher order mixed tSZ-wl statistics with redshift. We express the joint PDFs pκy(κ, y) in terms of individual one-point PDFs [pκ(κ), py(y)] and the relevant bias functions [bκ(κ), by(y)]. Analytical results for two different regimes are presented that correspond to the small and large angular smoothing scales. Results are also obtained for corresponding hotspots in the tSZ and convergence maps. In addition to results based on hierarchical techniques and perturbative methods, we present results of calculations based on the lognormal approximation. The analytical expressions derived here are generic and applicable to cross-correlation studies of arbitrary tracers of large-scale structure including, e.g., that of tSZ and soft X-ray background. We provide detailed comparison of our analytical results against state of the art Millennium Gas Simulations with and without non-gravitational effects such as pre-heating and cooling. Comparison of these results with gravity only simulations, shows reasonable agreement and can be used to isolate effect of non-gravitational physics from observational data.

  9. Simulation and analysis of Magnetically-Applied Pressure-Shear (MAPS) experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Haill, Thomas A.; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James Russell

    2011-06-01

    A new experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures has been developed for use on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms. The technique is referred to as Magnetically-Applied Pressure-Shear (MAPS). By applying an external static magnetic field to the sample region, the MHD drive directly induces a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. Strength is probed by passing this shear wave through a sample material where the transmissible shear stress is limited to the sample strength. The magnitude of the transmitted shear wave is measured via a transverse velocity interferometry system (VISAR) from which the sample strength is determined. The strength of materials is defined as the ability of a material to sustain deviatoric (shear) stresses. Strength is an important aspect of the response of materials subjected to compression to high pressure. Beyond the elastic response, material strength will govern at what pressure and to what extent a material will plastically deform. The MAPS technique cleverly exploits the property that, for a von Mises yield criterion at a given longitudinal stress, the maximum amplitude shear wave that can be transmitted is limited by the strength at that stress level. Successful fielding of MAPS experiments to measure shear stresses relies upon correct numerical simulation of the experiment. Complex wave interactions among forward and reflected longitudinal and shear waves, as well as the advancing magnetic diffusion front of the MHD drive, can make the design of the experiment complicated. Careful consideration must be given to driver, sample, and anvil materials; to the thicknesses of the driver, sample and anvil layers; as well as to the timing of the interacting waves. This paper will present and analyze the 2D MHD simulations used to design the MAPS experiments. The MAPS experiments are modeled using Sandia's ALEGRA-MHD simulation code. ALEGRA-MHD is an operator

  10. Regular and chaotic states in a local map description of sheared nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Kamil, S M; Sinha, Sudeshna; Menon, Gautam I

    2008-07-01

    We propose and study a local map capable of describing the full variety of dynamical states, ranging from regular to chaotic, obtained when a nematic liquid crystal is subjected to a steady shear flow. The map is formulated in terms of a quaternion parametrization of rotations of the local frame described by the axes of the nematic director, subdirector, and the joint normal to these, with two additional scalars describing the strength of ordering. Our model yields kayaking, wagging, tumbling, aligned, and coexistence states, accommodated in a phase diagram which closely resembles phase diagrams obtained using representations of the dynamics which are based on ordinary differential equations. We also study the behavior of the map under periodic perturbations of the shear rate. Such a map can serve as a building block for the construction of lattice models of the complex spatiotemporal states predicted for sheared nematics. PMID:18763972

  11. Supersonic shear imaging: a new technique for soft tissue elasticity mapping.

    PubMed

    Bercoff, Jérémy; Tanter, Mickaël; Fink, Mathias

    2004-04-01

    Supersonic shear imaging (SSI) is a new ultrasound-based technique for real-time visualization of soft tissue viscoelastic properties. Using ultrasonic focused beams, it is possible to remotely generate mechanical vibration sources radiating low-frequency, shear waves inside tissues. Relying on this concept, SSI proposes to create such a source and make it move at a supersonic speed. In analogy with the "sonic boom" created by a supersonic aircraft, the resulting shear waves will interfere constructively along a Mach cone, creating two intense plane shear waves. These waves propagate through the medium and are progressively distorted by tissue heterogeneities. An ultrafast scanner prototype is able to both generate this supersonic source and image (5000 frames/s) the propagation of the resulting shear waves. Using inversion algorithms, the shear elasticity of medium can be mapped quantitatively from this propagation movie. The SSI enables tissue elasticity mapping in less than 20 ms, even in strongly viscous medium like breast. Modalities such as shear compounding are implementable by tilting shear waves in different directions and improving the elasticity estimation. Results validating SSI in heterogeneous phantoms are presented. The first in vivo investigations made on healthy volunteers emphasize the potential clinical applicability of SSI for breast cancer detection. PMID:15139541

  12. Construction of the one-point PDF of the local aperture mass in weak lensing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardeau, F.; Valageas, P.

    2000-12-01

    We present a general method for the reconstruction of the one-point Probability Distribution Function of the local aperture mass in weak lensing maps. Exact results, that neglect the lens-lens coupling and departure from the Born approximation, are derived for both the quasilinear regime at leading order and the strongly nonlinear regime assuming the tree hierarchical model is valid. We describe in details the projection effects on the properties of the PDF and the associated generating functions. In particular, we show how the generic features which are common to both the quasilinear and nonlinear regimes lead to two exponential tails for P(M_ap). We briefly investigate the dependence of the PDF with cosmology and with the shape of the angular filter. Our predictions are seen to agree reasonably well with the results of numerical simulations and should be able to serve as foundations for alternative methods to measure the cosmological parameters that take advantage of the full shape of the PDF.

  13. 4D shear stress maps of the developing heart using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lindsy M.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Gu, Shi; Barwick, Lee; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate imaging and measurement of hemodynamic forces is vital for investigating how physical forces acting on the embryonic heart are transduced and influence developmental pathways. Of particular importance is blood flow-induced shear stress, which influences gene expression by endothelial cells and potentially leads to congenital heart defects through abnormal heart looping, septation, and valvulogenesis. However no imaging tool has been available to measure shear stress on the endocardium volumetrically and dynamically. Using 4D structural and Doppler OCT imaging, we are able to accurately measure the blood flow in the heart tube in vivo and to map endocardial shear stress throughout the heart cycle under physiological conditions for the first time. These measurements of the shear stress patterns will enable precise titration of experimental perturbations and accurate correlation of shear with the expression of molecules critical to heart development. PMID:23162737

  14. Intermediate Strength Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, John

    2005-03-17

    Weak lensing is found in the correlations of shear in {approx}10{sup 4} galaxy images, strong lensing is detected by the obvious distortion of a single galaxy image, whereas intermediate lensing requires detection of less obvious curvature in several neighboring galaxies. Small impact-parameter lensing causes a sextupole distortion whose orientation is correlated with the quadrupole distortion (shear). By looking within a field for the spatial correlation of this sextupole-quadrupole correlation, an intermediate lensing regime is observed. This technique requires correction for the sextupole as well as the quadrupole content of the PSF. We remove the HST PSF and uncover intermediate lensing in the Hubble deep fields. Correlations of the type expected are found.

  15. Lensing-induced morphology changes in CMB temperature maps in modified gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, D.; Hu, B.; Matsubara, T.; Coles, P.; Heavens, A.

    2016-04-01

    Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) changes the morphology of pattern of temperature fluctuations, so topological descriptors such as Minkowski Functionals can probe the gravity model responsible for the lensing. We show how the recently introduced two-to-two and three-to-one kurt-spectra (and their associated correlation functions), which depend on the power spectrum of the lensing potential, can be used to probe modified gravity theories such as f(R) theories of gravity and quintessence models. We also investigate models based on effective field theory, which include the constant-Ω model, and low-energy Hořava theories. Estimates of the cumulative signal-to-noise for detection of lensing-induced morphology changes, reaches Script O(103) for the future planned CMB polarization mission COrE+. Assuming foreground removal is possible to lmax=3000, we show that many modified gravity theories can be rejected with a high level of significance, making this technique comparable in power to galaxy weak lensing or redshift surveys. These topological estimators are also useful in distinguishing lensing from other scattering secondaries at the level of the four-point function or trispectrum. Examples include the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect which shares, with lensing, a lack of spectral distortion. We also discuss the complication of foreground contamination from unsubtracted point sources.

  16. High-resolution spatial mapping of shear properties in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Mark R; Bergou, Attila J; Fouchard, Jonathan; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Cohen, Itai

    2010-03-01

    Structural properties of articular cartilage such as proteoglycan content, collagen content and collagen alignment are known to vary over length scales as small as a few microns (Bullough and Goodfellow, 1968; Bi et al., 2006). Characterizing the resulting variation in mechanical properties is critical for understanding how the inhomogeneous architecture of this tissue gives rise to its function. Previous studies have measured the depth-dependent shear modulus of articular cartilage using methods such as particle image velocimetry (PIV) that rely on cells and cell nuclei as fiducial markers to track tissue deformation (Buckley et al., 2008; Wong et al., 2008a). However, such techniques are limited by the density of trackable markers, which may be too low to take full advantage of optical microscopy. This limitation leads to noise in the acquired data, which is often exacerbated when the data is manipulated. In this study, we report on two techniques for increasing the accuracy of tissue deformation measurements. In the first technique, deformations were tracked in a grid that was photobleached on each tissue sample (Bruehlmann et al., 2004). In the second, a numerical technique was implemented that allowed for accurate differentiation of optical displacement measurements by minimizing the propagated experimental error while ensuring that truncation error associated with local averaging of the data remained small. To test their efficacy, we employed these techniques to compare the depth-dependent shear moduli of neonatal bovine and adult human articular cartilage. Using a photobleached grid and numerical optimization to gather and analyze data led to results consistent with those reported previously (Buckley et al., 2008; Wong et al., 2008a), but with increased spatial resolution and characteristic coefficients of variation that were reduced up to a factor of 3. This increased resolution allowed us to determine that the shear modulus of neonatal bovine and adult

  17. Generation of Shear Adhesion Map Using SynVivo Synthetic Microvascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ashley M.; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Pant, Kapil

    2014-01-01

    Cell/particle adhesion assays are critical to understanding the biochemical interactions involved in disease pathophysiology and have important applications in the quest for the development of novel therapeutics. Assays using static conditions fail to capture the dependence of adhesion on shear, limiting their correlation with in vivo environment. Parallel plate flow chambers that quantify adhesion under physiological fluid flow need multiple experiments for the generation of a shear adhesion map. In addition, they do not represent the in vivo scale and morphology and require large volumes (~ml) of reagents for experiments. In this study, we demonstrate the generation of shear adhesion map from a single experiment using a microvascular network based microfluidic device, SynVivo-SMN. This device recreates the complex in vivo vasculature including geometric scale, morphological elements, flow features and cellular interactions in an in vitro format, thereby providing a biologically realistic environment for basic and applied research in cellular behavior, drug delivery, and drug discovery. The assay was demonstrated by studying the interaction of the 2 µm biotin-coated particles with avidin-coated surfaces of the microchip. The entire range of shear observed in the microvasculature is obtained in a single assay enabling adhesion vs. shear map for the particles under physiological conditions. PMID:24893648

  18. A MEASUREMENT OF THE CORRELATION OF GALAXY SURVEYS WITH CMB LENSING CONVERGENCE MAPS FROM THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bleem, L. E.; Becker, M. R.; Benson, B. A.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Van Engelen, A.; Holder, G. P.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Aird, K. A.; Armstrong, R.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Biesiadzinski, T.; Brodwin, M.; Busha, M. T.; Cho, H. M.; Desai, S.; Dore, O.; and others

    2012-07-01

    We compare cosmic microwave background lensing convergence maps derived from South Pole Telescope (SPT) data with galaxy survey data from the Blanco Cosmology Survey, WISE, and a new large Spitzer/IRAC field designed to overlap with the SPT survey. Using optical and infrared catalogs covering between 17 and 68 deg{sup 2} of sky, we detect a correlation between the SPT convergence maps and each of the galaxy density maps at >4{sigma}, with zero correlation robustly ruled out in all cases. The amplitude and shape of the cross-power spectra are in good agreement with theoretical expectations and the measured galaxy bias is consistent with previous work. The detections reported here utilize a small fraction of the full 2500 deg{sup 2} SPT survey data and serve as both a proof of principle of the technique and an illustration of the potential of this emerging cosmological probe.

  19. Eulerian Mapping Closure Approach for Probability Density Function of Concentration in Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Guowei; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Eulerian mapping closure approach is developed for uncertainty propagation in computational fluid mechanics. The approach is used to study the Probability Density Function (PDF) for the concentration of species advected by a random shear flow. An analytical argument shows that fluctuation of the concentration field at one point in space is non-Gaussian and exhibits stretched exponential form. An Eulerian mapping approach provides an appropriate approximation to both convection and diffusion terms and leads to a closed mapping equation. The results obtained describe the evolution of the initial Gaussian field, which is in agreement with direct numerical simulations.

  20. Mapping the functional properties of soft biological tissues under shear loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Mark Raymond

    The structure and composition of articular cartilage and other load-bearing biological tissues are highly complex and heterogeneous. As a result, their functional mechanical properties exhibit clear spatial variations. Unlocking the structure-function relationship in these materials is critical for devising strategies to restore tissue impaired by injury or disease and can provide a template for successful implant design. Here, we describe a tissue deformation imaging stage (TDIS) allowing for simultaneous force measurement and visualization of microscale deformation in soft biological tissues under controlled shear strain. In combination with a fast confocal microscope, the TDIS is used to test the microscale response of articular cartilage to shear loading. To obtain the location-specific shear modulus of this tissue, we employ a high-resolution technique that involves tracking the deformation of a line photobleached into a fluorescently stained sample loaded in the TDIS. We find that the quasi-static and dynamic shear moduli are lowest roughly 100 mum below the articular surface. Here, articular cartilage is highly nonlinear, stiffening under increased shear strain and becoming more compliant under increased compressive strain. Using a simple thought model, we relate these results to structural features of the collagen network in articular cartilage. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the region of maximum compliance is also the primary site of shear energy dissipation in articular cartilage. Our findings suggest that damage to or surgical removal of the surface of this tissue will increase the joint's susceptibility to shear-induced damage. Finally, similar experiments are performed on intervertebral disc and growth plate, demonstrating the versatility of our in-situ strain mapping techniques.

  1. A coupled map lattice model for rheological chaos in sheared nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Kamil, S M; Menon, Gautam I; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2010-12-01

    A variety of complex fluids under shear exhibit complex spatiotemporal behavior, including what is now termed rheological chaos, at moderate values of the shear rate. Such chaos associated with rheological response occurs in regimes where the Reynolds number is very small. It must thus arise as a consequence of the coupling of the flow to internal structural variables describing the local state of the fluid. We propose a coupled map lattice model for such complex spatiotemporal behavior in a passively sheared nematic liquid crystal using local maps constructed so as to accurately describe the spatially homogeneous case. Such local maps are coupled diffusively to nearest and next-nearest neighbors to mimic the effects of spatial gradients in the underlying equations of motion. We investigate the dynamical steady states obtained as parameters in the map and the strength of the spatial coupling are varied, studying local temporal properties at a single site as well as spatiotemporal features of the extended system. Our methods reproduce the full range of spatiotemporal behavior seen in earlier one-dimensional studies based on partial differential equations. We report results for both the one- and two-dimensional cases, showing that spatial coupling favors uniform or periodically time-varying states, as intuitively expected. We demonstrate and characterize regimes of spatiotemporal intermittency out of which chaos develops. Our work indicates that similar simplified lattice models of the dynamics of complex fluids under shear should provide useful ways to access and quantify spatiotemporal complexity in such problems, in addition to representing a fast and numerically tractable alternative to continuum representations. PMID:21198093

  2. Weak lensing corrections to tSZ-lensing cross correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröster, Tilman; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic

    2014-11-01

    The cross correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect and gravitational lensing in wide field has recently been measured. It can be used to probe the distribution of the diffuse gas in large scale structure, as well as inform us about the missing baryons. As for any lensing-based quantity, higher order lensing effects can potentially affect the signal. Here, we extend previous higher order lensing calculations to the case of tSZ-lensing cross correlations. We derive terms analogous to corrections due to the Born approximation, lens-lens coupling, and reduced shear up to order l gtrsim 3000.

  3. Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-06-24

    In a long line of intellectual triumphs, Einstein’s theory of general relativity was his greatest and most imaginative. It tells us that what we experience as gravity can be most accurately described as the bending of space itself. This idea leads to consequences, including gravitational lensing, which is caused by light traveling in this curved space. This is works in a way analogous to a lens (and hence the name). In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains a little general relativity, a little gravitational lensing, and tells us how this phenomenon allows us to map out the matter of the entire universe, including the otherwise-invisible dark matter.

  4. Structural mapping and analysis of a Madagascar Precambrian shear zone using enhanced Landsat Thematic Mapper Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kilmer, D.S.; Duncan, I.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Recently, the west coast of Madagascar has become a frontier region for petroleum exploration. Major structures in the Precambrian shield of Madagascar may have a strong control on the development of sedimentary basins, as has been documented in the Morondava basin. The 2.5-3.0+ Ga shield of Madagascar is an amphibolite- to granulite-grade metamorphic gneiss terrain, intruded by anorthosites and 550-Ma granites and pegmatites. Landsat Thematic Mapper data provides a cost-effective method for regional-scale structural mapping of this poorly known terrain. A five-component linear mixing model has been used to enhance the lithologic information in this six-band data. Lithologic component images thus produced utilize the full geologic spectral range of the data. A preliminary structural geologic map compiled from the component images has greater detail than existing maps at 1:100,000 scale, to which it has been compared. The Ankafotra-Saririaky shear zone has been identified as a north-northeast-trending, 15- to 20-km-wide region of appressed folds, attenuated layering, and subparallel faults on the western side of the shield. Two anorthosite massifs that occur within this shear zone have the structural characteristics of boudins in a ductile matrix. The shear deformed a preexisting terrain of poly-phase folding, characterized by tight folds and complex fold interference structures displayed by basins and domes on a scale of 10 km. Enhanced remote sensing data can be used to characterize the nature and mechanism of shear deformation in such zones.

  5. Mapping stellar content to dark matter haloes using galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing in the SDSS DR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Ying; Mandelbaum, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    The mapping between the distributions of the observed galaxy stellar mass and the underlying dark matter haloes provides the crucial link from theories of large-scale structure formation to interpreting the complex phenomena of galaxy formation and evolution. We develop a novel statistical method, based on the halo occupation distribution (HOD) model, to solve for this mapping by jointly fitting the galaxy clustering and the galaxy-galaxy lensing from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The method, called the iHOD model, extracts maximum information from the survey by including ˜80 per cent more galaxies than the traditional HOD methods, accounting for the incompleteness of the stellar mass samples self-consistently. The derived stellar-to-halo mass relation (SHMR) explains the clustering and lensing of SDSS galaxies over four decades in stellar mass, while successfully predicting the observed stellar mass functions (SMFs). By modelling significantly more galaxies, the iHOD breaks the degeneracy between the logarithmic scatter in the stellar mass at fixed halo mass and the slope of the mean SHMR at high masses, without assuming a strong prior on the scatter and/or using the SMF as an input. We detect a decline of the scatter with halo mass, from 0.22_{-0.01}^{+0.02} dex below 1012 h-1 M⊙ to 0.18 ± 0.01 dex at 1014 h-1 M⊙. The model predicts a departure of satellite SMFs from the Schechter form in massive haloes and a linear scaling of satellite number with halo mass. The iHOD model can be easily applied to other spectroscopic data sets, greatly improving statistical constraints on the SHMR compared to traditional HOD methods within the same survey.

  6. Full-sky lensing reconstruction of gradient and curl modes from CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Taruya, Atsushi E-mail: yamauchi@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-01-01

    We present a method of lensing reconstruction on the full sky, by extending the optimal quadratic estimator proposed by Okamoto and Hu (2003) to the case including the curl mode of deflection angle. The curl mode is induced by the vector and tensor metric perturbations, and the reconstruction of the curl mode would be a powerful tool to not only check systematics in the estimated gradient mode but also probe any vector and tensor sources. We find that the gradient and curl modes can be reconstructed separately, thanks to the distinctive feature in the parity symmetry between the gradient and curl modes. We compare our estimator with the flat-sky estimator proposed by Cooray et al (2005). Based on the new formalism, the expected signal-to-noise ratio of the curl mode produced by the primordial gravitational-waves and a specific model of cosmic strings are estimated, and prospects for future observations are discussed.

  7. Novel ultrasound based time averaged flow mapping method for die entry visualization in flow of highly concentrated shear-thinning and shear-thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouriev (Ur'ev), Boris; Windhab, Erich

    2003-01-01

    In this work a methodology for high-resolution time averaged two-dimensional flow mapping of converging flows was explored. Flow of non-transparent, highly concentrated shear-thinning and shear-thickening suspensions was circulating through the entrance flow adapter with adjustable position of the die entry. The entrance region was scanned with the distance resolution of 2.7 mm × 1 mm, radial to axial displacement respectively. The time averaged flow map was composed from one-dimensional flow profiles measured along the ultrasonic sensor beam using the ultrasonic pulsed echo Doppler technique. Priory to die entry visualization an investigation of flow properties was performed using a novel in-line non-invasive measuring technique. The method is based on combination of the ultrasound velocity profiler velocity monitoring and pressure difference method. The rheological flow properties were derived from simultaneous recording and on-line analysis of the velocity profiles across the tube channel and related radial shear stress profiles calculated from the pressure loss along the flow channel. For the first time the entrance flow of shear-thickening suspension could be visualized. A comparison between the flow of the investigated model suspensions was qualitatively analysed. This method gives an opportunity for time averaged flow mapping of viscoelastic and viscous, non-transparent, multiphase and highly concentrated fluids.

  8. Karhunen-Loeve Analysis for Weak Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderplas, Jacob T.

    In the past decade, weak gravitational lensing has become an important tool in the study of the universe at the largest scale, giving insights into the distribution of dark matter, the expansion of the universe, and the nature of dark energy. This thesis research explores several applications of Karhunen-Loève (KL) analysis to speed and improve the comparison of weak lensing shear catalogs to theory in order to constrain cosmological parameters in current and future lensing surveys. This work addresses three related aspects of weak lensing analysis: Three-dimensional Tomographic Mapping: (Based on work published in Vanderplas et al 2011) We explore a new fast approach to three-dimensional mass mapping in weak lensing surveys. The KL approach uses a KL-based filtering of the shear signal to reconstruct mass structures on the line-of-sight, and provides a unified framework to evaluate the efficacy of linear reconstruction techniques. We find that the KL-based filtering leads to near-optimal angular resolution, and computation times which are faster than previous approaches. We also use the KL formalism to show that linear non-parametric reconstruction methods are fundamentally limited in their ability to resolve lens redshifts. Shear Peak Statistics with Incomplete Data: (Based on work published in Vanderplas et al 2012) We explore the use of KL eigenmodes for interpolation across masked regions in observed shear maps. Mass mapping is an inherently non-local calculation, meaning gaps in the data can have a significant effect on the properties of the derived mass map. Our KL mapping procedure leads to improvements in the recovery of detailed statistics of peaks in the mass map, which holds promise of improved cosmological constraints based on such studies. Two-point parameter estimation with KL modes: The power spectrum of the observed shear can yield powerful cosmological constraints. Incomplete survey sky coverage, however, can lead to mixing of power between

  9. Structural characterization of wind-sheared turbulent flow using self-organized mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Nicholas V.; Handler, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    A nonlinear cluster analysis algorithm is used to characterize the spatial structure of a wind-sheared turbulent flow obtained from the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the three-dimensional temperature and momentum fields. The application of self-organizing mapping to DNS data for data reduction is utilized because of the dimensional similitude in structure between DNS data and remotely sensed hyperspectral and multispectral data where the technique has been used extensively. For the three Reynolds numbers of 150, 180, and 220 used in the DNS, self-organized mapping is successful in the extraction of boundary layer streaky structures from the turbulent temperature and momentum fields. In addition, it preserves the cross-wind scale structure of the streaks exhibited in both fields which loosely scale with the inverse of the Reynolds number. Self-organizing mapping of the along wind component of the helicity density shows a layer of the turbulence field which is spotty suggesting significant direct coupling between the large and small-scale turbulent structures. The spatial correlation of the temperature and momentum fields allows for the possibility of the remote extrapolation of the momentum structure from thermal structure.

  10. RCSLenS: The Red Cluster Sequence Lensing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, H.; Choi, A.; Heymans, C.; Blake, C.; Erben, T.; Miller, L.; Nakajima, R.; van Waerbeke, L.; Viola, M.; Buddendiek, A.; Harnois-Déraps, J.; Hojjati, A.; Joachimi, B.; Joudaki, S.; Kitching, T. D.; Wolf, C.; Gwyn, S.; Johnson, N.; Kuijken, K.; Sheikhbahaee, Z.; Tudorica, A.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), an application of the methods developed for the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) to the ˜785 deg2, multi-band imaging data of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey 2 (RCS2). This project represents the largest public, sub-arcsecond seeing, multi-band survey to date that is suited for weak gravitational lensing measurements. With a careful assessment of systematic errors in shape measurements and photometric redshifts we extend the use of this data set to allow cross-correlation analyses between weak lensing observables and other data sets. We describe the imaging data, the data reduction, masking, multi-colour photometry, photometric redshifts, shape measurements, tests for systematic errors, and a blinding scheme to allow for more objective measurements. In total we analyse 761 pointings with r-band coverage, which constitutes our lensing sample. Residual large-scale B-mode systematics prevent the use of this shear catalogue for cosmic shear science. The effective number density of lensing sources over an unmasked area of 571.7 deg2 and down to a magnitude limit of r ˜ 24.5 is 8.1 galaxies per arcmin2 (weighted: 5.5 arcmin-2) distributed over 14 patches on the sky. Photometric redshifts based on 4-band griz data are available for 513 pointings covering an unmasked area of 383.5 deg2. We present weak lensing mass reconstructions of some example clusters as well as the full survey representing the largest areas that have been mapped in this way. All our data products are publicly available through CADC at http://www.cadc-ccda.hia-iha.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/en/community/rcslens/query.html in a format very similar to the CFHTLenS data release.

  11. cluster-lensing: Tools for calculating properties and weak lensing profiles of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Jes

    2016-05-01

    The cluster-lensing package calculates properties and weak lensing profiles of galaxy clusters. Implemented in Python, it includes cluster mass-richness and mass-concentration scaling relations, and NFW halo profiles for weak lensing shear, the differential surface mass density ΔΣ(r), and for magnification, Σ(r). Optionally the calculation will include the effects of cluster miscentering offsets.

  12. Discret aperture mapping with a micro-lenses array for interferometric direct imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Antichi, Jacopo; Rabou, Patrick; Giro, Enrico; Mawet, Dimitri; Milli, Julien; Girard, Julien; Carbillet, Marcel; Mourard, Denis

    2013-12-01

    A challenging study for high resolution and high-contrast imaging is the detection and the characterization of planets in the habitable zone. The problem of detection in imaging is due to both the contrast ratio and the tiny separation between the hosting star and the exoplanet. Certainly, many techniques in high-contrast imaging will have to be optimized simultaneously to enhance the detection treshold and to probe the candidates for life. In this context, the objective is to demonstrate the technical faisability and to get scientific returns with a new concept called Discret Aperture Mapping or DAM (Patru et al. 2011). DAM is a new interferometric technique allowing high contrast imaging over a narrow field of view imaged by the present class of mono-pupil telescopes equipped with adaptive optics (AO). DAM consists in mapping the telescope pupil to provide a correct sampling of the spatial frequency content of the telescope. DAM can be realized by an afocal double lenslet array array (BIGRE-DAM, Antichi et al. 2011), or by a single-mode fiber combiner (Fibered-DAM, Patru et al. 2008). The spatial filtering used in interferometry allows to subdivide the entrance pupil of a large telescope into many coherent sub-pupils, so that the intra-sub-pupil residual phase is averaged out. On the other side, frequencies higher than the deformable mirror sampling one are not corected by AO impling aliasing effect and a strong impact of Fresnel propagation on the compensated wavefront up to the final focus (Antichi et al. 2010). DAM is then a high frequency optical filter able to remove part of the AO residuals and to remove most of the halo in the image. It may improve the contrast limit to explore the inner region of new stellar systems (disk, exoplanet). We show here first simulation results on the DAM concept.

  13. Statistical wall shear stress maps of ruptured and unruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Goubergrits, L.; Schaller, J.; Kertzscher, U.; van den Bruck, N.; Poethkow, K.; Petz, Ch.; Hege, H.-Ch.; Spuler, A.

    2012-01-01

    Haemodynamics and morphology play an important role in the genesis, growth and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. The goal of this study was to generate and analyse statistical wall shear stress (WSS) distributions and shapes in middle cerebral artery (MCA) saccular aneurysms. Unsteady flow was simulated in seven ruptured and 15 unruptured MCA aneurysms. In order to compare these results, all geometries must be brought in a uniform coordinate system. For this, aneurysms with corresponding WSS data were transformed into a uniform spherical shape; then, all geometries were uniformly aligned in three-dimensional space. Subsequently, we compared statistical WSS maps and surfaces of ruptured and unruptured aneurysms. No significant (p > 0.05) differences exist between ruptured and unruptured aneurysms regarding radius and mean WSS. In unruptured aneurysms, statistical WSS map relates regions with high (greater than 3 Pa) WSS to the neck region. In ruptured aneurysms, additional areas with high WSS contiguous to regions of low (less than 1 Pa) WSS are found in the dome region. In ruptured aneurysms, we found significantly lower WSS. The averaged aneurysm surface of unruptured aneurysms is round shaped, whereas the averaged surface of ruptured cases is multi-lobular. Our results confirm the hypothesis of low WSS and irregular shape as the essential rupture risk parameters. PMID:21957117

  14. Discretized aperture mapping with a micro-lenses array for interferometric direct imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Antichi, Jacopo; Mawet, Dimitri; Jolissaint, Laurent; Carbillet, Marcel; Milli, Julien; Girard, Julien; Rabou, Patrick; Giro, Enrico; Mourard, Denis

    2014-08-01

    Discretized Aperture Mapping (DAM) appears as an original filtering technique easy to play with existing adaptive optics (AO) systems. In its essential DAM operates as an optical passive filter removing part of the phase residuals in the wavefront without introducing any difficult-to-align component in the Fourier conjugate of the entrance pupil plane. DAM reveals as a new interferometric technique combined with spatial filtering allowing direct imaging over a narrow field of view (FOV). In fact, the entrance pupil of a single telescope is divided into many sub-pupils so that the residual phase in each sub-pupil is filtered up to the DAM cut-off frequency. DAM enables to smooth the small scale wavefront defects which correspond to high spatial frequencies in the pupil plane and to low angular frequencies in the image plane. Close to the AO Nyquist frequency, such pupil plane spatial frequencies are not well measured by the wavefront sensor (WFS) due to aliasing. Once bigger than the AO Nyquist frequency, they are no more measured by the WFS due to the fitting limit responsible for the narrow AO FOV. The corresponding image plane angular frequencies are not transmitted by DAM and are useless to image small FOVs, as stated by interferometry. That is why AO and DAM are complementary assuming that the DAM cut-off frequency is equal to the AO Nyquist frequency. Here we describe the imaging capabilities when DAM is placed downstream an AO system, over a convenient pupil which precedes the scientific detector. We show firstly that the imaging properties are preserved on a narrow FOV allowing direct imaging throughout interferometry. Then we show how the residual pupil plane spatial frequencies bigger than the AO Nyquist one are filtered out, as well as the residual halo in the image is dimmed.

  15. Mapping all the mass in the universe (with weak gravitational lensing) - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Spencer

    2015-08-13

    Recent discoveries have shown that most of the universe is made of an exotic dark matter that behaves much differently than the normal matter that we experience in everyday life. As we cannot detect dark matter directly, we must infer its location in the universe by indirect effects, such as the distortion of light from distant galaxies as it travels through large clouds of dark matter. While the degree of distortion should be proportional to the amount of dark matter present, we don't know the original shape of the galaxy so the distortion is difficult to quantify. If we had a model of how dark matter is linked to galaxies, and thus be able predict the amount of distortion that should occur, we could apply the model to galaxy surveys to map out the dark matter in our universe. In this research, I attach a spherical 'halo' of dark matter to each galaxy in a simulated universe to approximate its known complex dark matter structure. I then predict how the halos distort the light from distant galaxies generated behind the halos. As the data is simulated, the true distortion of the light is known which is compared to the halo-predicted distortion. I find that, on average, the model under-predicts the degree of distortion on all scales and fails to capture distortions from large-scale dark matter structure. These issues are likely due to missing features in the model, as the halo model is a greatly simplified version of the actual distribution of dark matter. Potential improvements to the model for future work are discussed.

  16. The general theory of secondary weak gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is normally assumed to have only two principle effects: a magnification of a source and a distortion of the sources shape in the form of a shear. However, further distortions are actually present owing to changes in the gravitational field across the scale of the ray bundle of light propagating to us, resulting in the familiar arcs in lensed images. This is normally called the flexion, and is approximated by Taylor expanding the shear and magnification across the image plane. However, the physical origin of this effect arises from higher-order corrections in the geodesic deviation equation governing the gravitational force between neighbouring geodesics— so involves derivatives of the Riemann tensor. We show that integrating the second-order geodesic deviation equation results in a `Hessian map' for gravitational lensing, which is a higher-order addition to the Jacobi map. We derive the general form of the Hessian map in an arbitrary spacetime paying particular attention to the separate effects of local Ricci versus non-local Weyl curvature. We then specialise to the case of a perturbed FLRW model, and give the general form of the Hessian for the first time. This has a host of new contributions which could in principle be used as tests for modified gravity.

  17. Shear wave velocity mapping of Hat Yai district, southern Thailand: implication for seismic site classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordkayhun, Sawasdee; Sujitapan, Chedtaporn; Chalermyanont, Tanit

    2015-02-01

    Soil characteristics play an important role in the degree of ground shaking due to local site amplification during an earthquake. The objectives of this work are to study shear wave velocity (Vs) distribution in the near surface, and to develop a seismic site classification map for soil effect characterization and seismic hazard assessment in Hat Yai district, southern Thailand. The Vs determination based on the multichannel analysis of surface waves technique, has been carried out and analyzed at 70 measuring sites throughout the district. On the basis of the weighted-average Vs in the upper 30 m depth (Vs30), a seismic site classification map, based on the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) standard has been developed. It is found that the NEHRP site class in Hat Yai can be classified into four groups in accordance with the value of Vs30 within the range of about 150 to 1160 m s-1. Most parts of the study area are typically classified as site class C and D. Site class C is mostly found within the colluvial and terrace deposits in the western and eastern part of the area, whereas site class D is concentrated in the alluvial sediment of the middle and northern flood plain areas. A small portion of site class B is observed in the western mountain ranges, where there is a thin overburden on the firm rock. There is a remarkably low Vs30 value at only one site, located near the main stream in the northern part of the study area. The results imply that the soil characteristics in the central and northern Hat Yai district pose a medium to high amplification rate with respect to the other regions. Although Vs data alone are insufficient to verify the potential of the amplification of ground shaking, this study provides an initial attempt to understand seismic hazards in the study area.

  18. Roulettes: a weak lensing formalism for strong lensing: I. Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, Chris

    2016-08-01

    We present a new perspective on gravitational lensing. We describe a new extension of the weak lensing formalism capable of describing strongly lensed images. By integrating the nonlinear geodesic deviation equation, the amplification matrix of weak lensing is generalised to a sum over independent amplification tensors of increasing rank. We show how an image distorted by a generic lens may be constructed as a sum over ‘roulettes’, which are the natural curves associated with the independent spin modes of the amplification tensors. Highly distorted images can be constructed even for large sources observed near or within the Einstein radius of a lens where the shear and convergence are large. The amplitude of each roulette is formed from a sum over appropriate derivatives of the lensing potential. Consequently, measuring these individual roulettes for images around a lens gives a new way to reconstruct a strong lens mass distribution without requiring a lens model. This formalism generalises the convergence, shear and flexion of weak lensing to arbitrary order, and provides a unified bridge between the strong and weak lensing regimes. This overview paper is accompanied by a much more detailed paper II, arXiv:1603.04652.

  19. The relationship between substructure in 2D X-ray surface brightness images and weak-lensing mass maps of galaxy clusters: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Leila C.; Kay, Scott T.; Babul, Arif

    2009-12-01

    Recent X-ray and weak-lensing observations of galaxy clusters have revealed that the hot gas does not always directly trace the dark matter within these systems. Such configurations are extremely interesting. They offer a new vista on to the complex interplay between gravity and baryonic physics, and may even be used as indicators of the clusters' dynamical state. In this paper, we undertake a study to determine what insight can be reliably gleaned from the comparison of the X-ray and the weak-lensing mass maps of galaxy clusters. We do this by investigating the two-dimensional (2D) substructure within three high-resolution cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters. Our main results focus on non-radiative gas dynamics, but we also consider the effects of radiative cooling at high redshift. For our analysis, we use a novel approach, based on unsharp-masking, to identify substructures in 2D surface mass density and X-ray surface brightness maps. At full resolution (~15h-1 kpc), this technique is capable of identifying almost all self-bound dark matter subhaloes with M > 1012h-1Msolar. We also report a correlation between the mass of a subhalo and the area of its corresponding 2D detection; such a correlation, once calibrated, could provide a useful estimator for substructure mass. Comparing our 2D mass and X-ray substructures, we find a surprising number of cases where the matching fails: around one-third of galaxy-sized substructures have no X-ray counterpart. Some interesting cases are also found at larger masses, in particular the cores of merging clusters where the situation can be complex. Finally, we degrade our mass maps to what is currently achievable with weak-lensing observations (~100h-1kpc at z = 0.2). While the completeness mass limit increases by around an order of magnitude, a mass-area correlation remains. Our paper clearly demonstrates that the next generation of lensing surveys should start to reveal a wealth of information on cluster substructure.

  20. Types of Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Devices Consumer Products Contact Lenses Types of Contact Lenses Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Orthokeratology (Ortho-K) Decorative (Plano) Contact Lenses Soft Contact Lenses Soft contact lenses are made of soft, ...

  1. Subaru Weak Lensing Measurements of Four Strong Lensing Clusters: Are Lensing Clusters Over-Concentrated?

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Gladders, Michael D.; Dahle, Haakon; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Dalal, Neal; Koester, Benjamin P.; Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew

    2009-01-29

    We derive radial mass profiles of four strong lensing selected clusters which show prominent giant arcs (Abell 1703, SDSS J1446+3032, SDSS J1531+3414, and SDSS J2111-0115), by combining detailed strong lens modeling with weak lensing shear measured from deep Subaru Suprime-cam images. Weak lensing signals are detected at high significance for all four clusters, whose redshifts range from z = 0.28 to 0.64. We demonstrate that adding strong lensing information with known arc redshifts significantly improves constraints on the mass density profile, compared to those obtained from weak lensing alone. While the mass profiles are well fitted by the universal form predicted in N-body simulations of the {Lambda}-dominated cold dark matter model, all four clusters appear to be slightly more centrally concentrated (the concentration parameters c{sub vir} {approx} 8) than theoretical predictions, even after accounting for the bias toward higher concentrations inherent in lensing selected samples. Our results are consistent with previous studies which similarly detected a concentration excess, and increases the total number of clusters studied with the combined strong and weak lensing technique to ten. Combining our sample with previous work, we find that clusters with larger Einstein radii are more anomalously concentrated. We also present a detailed model of the lensing cluster Abell 1703 with constraints from multiple image families, and find the dark matter inner density profile to be cuspy with the slope consistent with -1, in agreement with expectations.

  2. EDITORIAL: Focus on Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2007-11-01

    Gravitational lensing emerged as an observational field following the 1979 discovery of a doubly imaged quasar lensed by a foreground galaxy. In the 1980s and '90s dozens of other multiply imaged systems were observed, as well as time delay measurements, weak and strong lensing by galaxies and galaxy clusters, and the discovery of microlensing in our galaxy. The rapid pace of advances has continued into the new century. Lensing is currently one of best techniques for finding and mapping dark matter over a wide range of scales, and also addresses broader cosmological questions such as understanding the nature of dark energy. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics presents a snapshot of current research in some of the exciting areas of lensing. It provides an occasion to look back at the advances of the last decade and ahead to the potential of the coming years. Just about a decade ago, microlensing was discovered through the magnification of stars in our galaxy by invisible objects with masses between that of Jupiter and a tenth the mass of the Sun. Thus a new component of the mass of our galaxy, dubbed MACHOs, was established (though a diffuse, cold dark matter-like component is still needed to make up most of the galaxy mass). More recently, microlensing led to another exciting discovery—of extra-solar planets with masses ranging from about five times that of Earth to that of Neptune. We can expect many more planets to be discovered through ongoing surveys. Microlensing is the best technique for finding Earth mass planets, though it is not as productive overall as other methods and does not allow for follow up observations. Beyond planet hunting, microlensing has enabled us to observe previously inaccessible systems, ranging from the surfaces of other stars to the accretion disks around the black holes powering distant quasars. Galaxies and galaxy clusters at cosmological distances can produce dramatic lensing effects: multiple images of background galaxies

  3. Mapping between atomistic simulations and Eshelby inclusions in the shear deformation of an amorphous silicon model.

    PubMed

    Albaret, T; Tanguy, A; Boioli, F; Rodney, D

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we perform quasistatic shear simulations of model amorphous silicon bulk samples with Stillinger-Weber-type potentials. Local plastic rearrangements identified based on local energy variations are fitted through their displacement fields on collections of Eshelby spherical inclusions, allowing determination of their transformation strain tensors. The latter are then used to quantitatively reproduce atomistic stress-strain curves, in terms of both shear and pressure components. We demonstrate that our methodology is able to capture the plastic behavior predicted by different Stillinger-Weber potentials, in particular, their different shear tension coupling. These calculations justify the decomposition of plasticity into shear transformations used so far in mesoscale models and provide atomic-scale parameters that can be used to limit the empiricism needed in such models up to now. PMID:27300968

  4. Mapping between atomistic simulations and Eshelby inclusions in the shear deformation of an amorphous silicon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albaret, T.; Tanguy, A.; Boioli, F.; Rodney, D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we perform quasistatic shear simulations of model amorphous silicon bulk samples with Stillinger-Weber-type potentials. Local plastic rearrangements identified based on local energy variations are fitted through their displacement fields on collections of Eshelby spherical inclusions, allowing determination of their transformation strain tensors. The latter are then used to quantitatively reproduce atomistic stress-strain curves, in terms of both shear and pressure components. We demonstrate that our methodology is able to capture the plastic behavior predicted by different Stillinger-Weber potentials, in particular, their different shear tension coupling. These calculations justify the decomposition of plasticity into shear transformations used so far in mesoscale models and provide atomic-scale parameters that can be used to limit the empiricism needed in such models up to now.

  5. Measurement of dynamic strength at high pressures using magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) on the Sandia Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C.; Haill, T.; Dalton, D.; Rovang, D.; Lamppa, D.

    2013-06-01

    The recently developed magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) technique used to measure dynamic material strength at high pressures on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms has been implemented on the Sandia Z accelerator. MAPS relies on an external magnetic field normal to the plane of the MHD drive current to directly induce a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. This shear wave is used to directly probe the strength of a sample. By implementing this technique on Z, far greater pressures can be attained than were previously available using other MHD facilities. In addition, the use of isentropic compression will limit sample heating allowing the measurement to be made at a much lower temperature than under shock compression. Details of the experimental approach, including design considerations and analysis of the results, will be presented along with the results of Z experiments measuring the strength of tantalum at pressures up to 50 GPa, a five-fold increase in pressure over previous results using this technique. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Weak Lensing with LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittman, David M.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Knox, L.; Margoniner, V.; Takada, M.; Tyson, J.; Zhan, H.; LSST Weak Lensing Science Collaboration

    2006-12-01

    Constraining dark energy parameters with weak lensing is one of the primary science goals of the LSST. The LSST Weak Lensing Science Collaboration has been formed with the goal of optimizing the weak lensing science by optimizing the survey cadence; working with Data Management to insure high-quality pipeline processing which will meet our needs; developing the necessary analysis tools well before the onset of data-taking; participating in high-fidelity simulations to test the system end-to-end; and analyzing the real dataset as it becomes available. We review the major weak lensing probes, the twoand three-point shear correlations, and how they constrain dark energy parameters. We also review the possibility of going beyond dark energy models and testing gravity with the LSST data. To realize the promise of the awesome LSST statistical precision, we must ensure that systematic errors are kept under control. We review the major sources of systematics and our plans for mitigation. We present data that demonstrate that these sources of systematics can be kept to a level smaller than the statistical error.

  7. Optimizing weak lensing mass estimates for cluster profile uncertainty

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gruen, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Lam, T. Y.; Seitz, S.

    2011-09-11

    Weak lensing measurements of cluster masses are necessary for calibrating mass-observable relations (MORs) to investigate the growth of structure and the properties of dark energy. However, the measured cluster shear signal varies at fixed mass M200m due to inherent ellipticity of background galaxies, intervening structures along the line of sight, and variations in the cluster structure due to scatter in concentrations, asphericity and substructure. We use N-body simulated halos to derive and evaluate a weak lensing circular aperture mass measurement Map that minimizes the mass estimate variance <(Map - M200m)2> in the presence of all these forms of variability. Dependingmore » on halo mass and observational conditions, the resulting mass estimator improves on Map filters optimized for circular NFW-profile clusters in the presence of uncorrelated large scale structure (LSS) about as much as the latter improve on an estimator that only minimizes the influence of shape noise. Optimizing for uncorrelated LSS while ignoring the variation of internal cluster structure puts too much weight on the profile near the cores of halos, and under some circumstances can even be worse than not accounting for LSS at all. As a result, we discuss the impact of variability in cluster structure and correlated structures on the design and performance of weak lensing surveys intended to calibrate cluster MORs.« less

  8. Weak Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Sandrine; Starck, Jean-Luc; Leonard, Adrienne; Réfrégier, Alexandre

    2012-03-01

    This chapter reviews the data mining methods recently developed to solve standard data problems in weak gravitational lensing. We detail the different steps of the weak lensing data analysis along with the different techniques dedicated to these applications. An overview of the different techniques currently used will be given along with future prospects. Until about 30 years ago, astronomers thought that the Universe was composed almost entirely of ordinary matter: protons, neutrons, electrons, and atoms. The field of weak lensing has been motivated by the observations made in the last decades showing that visible matter represents only about 4-5% of the Universe (see Figure 14.1). Currently, the majority of the Universe is thought to be dark, that is, does not emit electromagnetic radiation. The Universe is thought to be mostly composed of an invisible, pressure less matter - potentially relic from higher energy theories - called "dark matter" (20-21%) and by an even more mysterious term, described in Einstein equations as a vacuum energy density, called "dark energy" (70%). This "dark" Universe is not well described or even understood; its presence is inferred indirectly from its gravitational effects, both on the motions of astronomical objects and on light propagation. So this point could be the next breakthrough in cosmology. Today's cosmology is based on a cosmological model that contains various parameters that need to be determined precisely, such as the matter density parameter Omega_m or the dark energy density parameter Omega_lambda. Weak gravitational lensing is believed to be the most promising tool to understand the nature of dark matter and to constrain the cosmological parameters used to describe the Universe because it provides a method to directly map the distribution of dark matter (see [1,6,60,63,70]). From this dark matter distribution, the nature of dark matter can be better understood and better constraints can be placed on dark energy

  9. Full-sky formulae for weak lensing power spectra from total angular momentum method

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Taruya, Atsushi; Namikawa, Toshiya E-mail: namikawa@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-08-01

    We systematically derive full-sky formulae for the weak lensing power spectra generated by scalar, vector and tensor perturbations from the total angular momentum (TAM) method. Based on both the geodesic and geodesic deviation equations, we first give the gauge-invariant expressions for the deflection angle and Jacobi map as observables of the CMB lensing and cosmic shear experiments. We then apply the TAM method, originally developed in the theoretical studies of CMB, to a systematic derivation of the angular power spectra. The TAM representation, which characterizes the total angular dependence of the spatial modes projected along a line-of-sight, can carry all the information of the lensing modes generated by scalar, vector, and tensor metric perturbations. This greatly simplifies the calculation, and we present a complete set of the full-sky formulae for angular power spectra in both the E-/B-mode cosmic shear and gradient-/curl-mode lensing potential of deflection angle. Based on the formulae, we give illustrative examples of non-vanishing B-mode cosmic shear and curl-mode of deflection angle in the presence of the vector and tensor perturbations, and explicitly compute the power spectra.

  10. Constraining the mass-concentration relation through weak lensing peak function

    SciTech Connect

    Mainini, R.; Romano, A. E-mail: anna.romano@oar.inaf.it

    2014-08-01

    Halo masses and concentrations have been studied extensively, by means of N-body simulations as well as observationally, during the last decade. Nevertheless, the exact form of the mass-concentration relation is still widely debated. One of the most promising method to estimate masses and concentrations relies on gravitational lensing from massive halos. Here we investigate the impact of the mass-concentration relation on halo peak abundance in weak lensing shear maps relying on the aperture mass method for peak detections. After providing a prescription to take into account the concentration dispersion (always neglected in previous works) in peak number counts predictions, we assess their power to constrain the mass-concentration relation by means of Fisher matrix technique. We find that, when combined with different cosmological probes, peak statistics information from near-future weak lensing surveys provides an interesting and complementary alternative method to lessen the long standing controversy about the mass-concentration relation.

  11. A generalized method for measuring weak lensing magnification with weighted number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Bryan R.; Taylor, Andy N.

    2016-03-01

    We present a derivation of a generalized optimally weighted estimator for the weak lensing magnification signal, including a calculation of errors. With this estimator, we present a local method for optimally estimating the local effects of magnification from weak gravitational lensing, using a comparison of number counts in an arbitrary region of space to the expected unmagnified number counts. We show that when equivalent lens and source samples are used, this estimator is simply related to the optimally weighted correlation function estimator used in past work and vice-versa, but this method has the benefits that it can calculate errors with significantly less computational time, that it can handle overlapping lens and source samples, and that it can easily be extended to mass-mapping. We present a proof-of-principle test of this method on data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey, showing that its calculated magnification signals agree with predictions from model fits to shear data. Finally, we investigate how magnification data can be used to supplement shear data in determining the best-fitting model mass profiles for galaxy dark matter haloes. We find that at redshifts greater than z ˜ 0.6, the inclusion of magnification can often significantly improve the constraints on the components of the mass profile which relate to galaxies' local environments relative to shear alone, and in high-redshift low- and medium-mass bins, it can have a higher signal-to-noise than the shear signal.

  12. Lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, R.J.; Benett, W.J.

    1994-04-26

    A lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of front surface lensing and reflective waveguiding is described. The duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side being lens-shaped and coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The four side surfaces are uncoated, preventing light from escaping by total internal reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials, and can be fabricated from inexpensive glass and plastic. 3 figures.

  13. Lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J. , Benett

    1994-01-01

    A lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of front surface lensing and reflective waveguiding. The duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side being lens-shaped and coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The four side surfaces are uncoated, preventing light from escaping by total internal reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials, and can be fabricated from inexpensive glass and plastic.

  14. CONSTRAINING SOURCE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS WITH GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Wittman, D.; Dawson, W. A.

    2012-09-10

    We introduce a new method for constraining the redshift distribution of a set of galaxies, using weak gravitational lensing shear. Instead of using observed shears and redshifts to constrain cosmological parameters, we ask how well the shears around clusters can constrain the redshifts, assuming fixed cosmological parameters. This provides a check on photometric redshifts, independent of source spectral energy distribution properties and therefore free of confounding factors such as misidentification of spectral breaks. We find that {approx}40 massive ({sigma}{sub v} = 1200 km s{sup -1}) cluster lenses are sufficient to determine the fraction of sources in each of six coarse redshift bins to {approx}11%, given weak (20%) priors on the masses of the highest-redshift lenses, tight (5%) priors on the masses of the lowest-redshift lenses, and only modest (20%-50%) priors on calibration and evolution effects. Additional massive lenses drive down uncertainties as N{sub lens}{sup -1/2}, but the improvement slows as one is forced to use lenses further down the mass function. Future large surveys contain enough clusters to reach 1% precision in the bin fractions if the tight lens-mass priors can be maintained for large samples of lenses. In practice this will be difficult to achieve, but the method may be valuable as a complement to other more precise methods because it is based on different physics and therefore has different systematic errors.

  15. Atomic Inference from Weak Gravitational Lensing Data

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Phil; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-14

    We present a novel approach to reconstructing the projected mass distribution from the sparse and noisy weak gravitational lensing shear data. The reconstructions are regularized via the knowledge gained from numerical simulations of clusters, with trial mass distributions constructed from n NFW profile ellipsoidal components. The parameters of these ''atoms'' are distributed a priori as in the simulated clusters. Sampling the mass distributions from the atom parameter probability density function allows estimates of the properties of the mass distribution to be generated, with error bars. The appropriate number of atoms is inferred from the data itself via the Bayesian evidence, and is typically found to be small, reecting the quality of the data. Ensemble average mass maps are found to be robust to the details of the noise realization, and succeed in recovering the demonstration input mass distribution (from a realistic simulated cluster) over a wide range of scales. As an application of such a reliable mapping algorithm, we comment on the residuals of the reconstruction and the implications for predicting convergence and shear at specific points on the sky.

  16. Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Gravity bends light rays in a way analogous to, but quantitatively different from, the way it bends trajectories of passing particles. If light from some bright object passes close enough to some foreground mass, that object's image will be altered. The effect is more like a piece of bathroom glass in the sky than a precision-ground and well-focused lens, but the terms `gravitational lensing' or ...

  17. Weak lensing in the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troxel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    I will present the current status of weak lensing results from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). DES will survey 5000 square degrees in five photometric bands (grizY), and has already provided a competitive weak lensing catalog from Science Verification data covering just 3% of the final survey footprint. I will summarize the status of shear catalog production using observations from the first year of the survey and discuss recent weak lensing science results from DES. Finally, I will report on the outlook for future cosmological analyses in DES including the two-point cosmic shear correlation function and discuss challenges that DES and future surveys will face in achieving a control of systematics that allows us to take full advantage of the available statistical power of our shear catalogs.

  18. Cosmology with weak lensing surveys.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Dipak; Valageas, Patrick

    2005-12-15

    Weak gravitational lensing is responsible for the shearing and magnification of the images of high-redshift sources due to the presence of intervening mass. Since the lensing effects arise from deflections of the light rays due to fluctuations of the gravitational potential, they can be directly related to the underlying density field of the large-scale structures. Weak gravitational surveys are complementary to both galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background observations as they probe unbiased nonlinear matter power spectra at medium redshift. Ongoing CMBR experiments such as WMAP and a future Planck satellite mission will measure the standard cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. The focus of attention will then shift to understanding the nature of dark matter and vacuum energy: several recent studies suggest that lensing is the best method for constraining the dark energy equation of state. During the next 5 year period, ongoing and future weak lensing surveys such as the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM; e.g. SNAP) or the Large-aperture Synoptic Survey Telescope will play a major role in advancing our understanding of the universe in this direction. In this review article, we describe various aspects of probing the matter power spectrum and the bi-spectrum and other related statistics with weak lensing surveys. This can be used to probe the background dynamics of the universe as well as the nature of dark matter and dark energy. PMID:16286284

  19. Magnified Weak Lensing Cross Correlation Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, Melville P., Clowe, Douglas I.

    2010-11-30

    nights on 4-m class telescopes, which gives concrete evidence of strong community support for this project. The WLT technique is based on the dependence of the gravitational shear signal on the angular diameter distances between the observer, the lens, and the lensed galaxy to measure cosmological parameters. By taking the ratio of measured shears of galaxies with different redshifts around the same lens, one obtains a measurement of the ratios of the angular diameter distances involved. Making these observations over a large range of lenses and background galaxy redshifts will measure the history of the expansion rate of the universe. Because this is a purely geometric measurement, it is insensitive to any form of evolution of objects or the necessity to understand the physics in the early universe. Thus, WLT was identified by the Dark Energy Task Force as perhaps the best method to measure the evolution of DE. To date, however, the conjecture of the DETF has not been experimentally verified, but will be by the proposed project. The primary reason for the lack of tomography measurements is that one must have an exceptional data-set to attempt the measurement. One needs both extremely good seeing (or space observations) in order to minimize the point spread function smearing corrections on weak lensing shear measurements and deep, multi-color data, from B to z, to measure reliable photometric redshifts of the background galaxies being lensed (which are typically too faint to obtain spectroscopic redshifts). Because the entire process from multi-drizzling the HST images, and then creating shear maps, to gathering the necessary ground based observations, to generating photo-zs and then carrying out the tomography is a complicated task, until the creation of our team, nobody has taken the time to connect all the levels of expertise necessary to carry out this project based on HST archival data. Our data are being used in 2 Ph.D. theses. Kellen Murphy, at Ohio University, is

  20. Astrophysical Uses Of Cmb Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sudeep

    2009-01-01

    The future of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) research lies in exploiting the arcminute scale secondary anisotropies which encode information about the late time interaction of the CMB photons with the structure in the Universe. A specific form of such interaction is the gravitational lensing of the CMB - the main topic of this thesis. Upcoming experiments like ACT, SPT and PLANCK will measure these anisotropies with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity. In this thesis, we present new techniques to model and analyse such high resolution data and explore the implications of such measurements on Cosmology. First, we describe a novel method for simulating high resolution large sky lensed CMB maps. Maps simulated through this method will be instrumental in developing the detection and analysis techniques for CMB lensing. Second, we describe a new and efficient method for measuring the power spectrum of arcminute resolution CMB maps. At these resolutions, aliasing of power due to hard edges and point source masks become a serious problem. Our method efficiently remedies these problems and the reduces uncertainties in the final power spectrum estimate by several factors over those obtainable by the now standard methods. This technique will be also useful for estimating higher order statistics from the maps, like the ones related to the detection of CMB lensing and its cross-correlation with large scale structure. Next, we exemplify how such cross-correlations can be turned into Cosmological probes. We propose an estimator for cosmological distance ratios based on CMB and galaxy lensing and show that it can be measured to sufficient accuracy in future experiments to be Cosmologically useful. Finally, we show that CMB lensing can be used to constrain the void and the texture hypotheses that have been put forward for explaining the intriguing Cold Spot anomaly in the WMAP data.

  1. [C II] and {sup 12}CO(1-0) emission maps in HLSJ091828.6+514223: A strongly lensed interacting system at z = 5.24

    SciTech Connect

    Rawle, T. D.; Altieri, B.; Egami, E.; Rex, M.; Clement, B.; Bussmann, R. S.; Gurwell, M.; Fazio, G. G.; Ivison, R. J.; Boone, F.; Combes, F.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Smail, I.; Swinbank, A. M.; Edge, A. C.; Richard, J.; Blain, A. W.; Dessauges-Zavadsky, M.; Jones, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; and others

    2014-03-01

    We present Submillimeter Array [C II] 158 μm and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array {sup 12}CO(1-0) line emission maps for the bright, lensed, submillimeter source at z = 5.2430 behind A 773: HLSJ091828.6+514223 (HLS0918). We combine these measurements with previously reported line profiles, including multiple {sup 12}CO rotational transitions, [C I], water, and [N II], providing some of the best constraints on the properties of the interstellar medium in a galaxy at z > 5. HLS0918 has a total far-infrared (FIR) luminosity L {sub FIR(8–1000} {sub μm)} = (1.6 ± 0.1) × 10{sup 14} L {sub ☉} μ{sup –1}, where the total magnification μ{sub total} = 8.9 ± 1.9, via a new lens model from the [C II] and continuum maps. Despite a HyLIRG luminosity, the FIR continuum shape resembles that of a local LIRG. We simultaneously fit all of the observed spectral line profiles, finding four components that correspond cleanly to discrete spatial structures identified in the maps. The two most redshifted spectral components occupy the nucleus of a massive galaxy, with a source-plane separation <1 kpc. The reddest dominates the continuum map (demagnified L {sub FIR,} {sub component} = (1.1 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}) and excites strong water emission in both nuclear components via a powerful FIR radiation field from the intense star formation. A third star-forming component is most likely a region of a merging companion (ΔV ∼ 500 km s{sup –1}) exhibiting generally similar gas properties. The bluest component originates from a spatially distinct region and photodissociation region analysis suggests that it is lower density, cooler, and forming stars less vigorously than the other components. Strikingly, it has very strong [N II] emission, which may suggest an ionized, molecular outflow. This comprehensive view of gas properties and morphology in HLS0918 previews the science possible for a large sample of high-redshift galaxies once ALMA attains full sensitivity.

  2. Phakic Intraocular Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Implants and Prosthetics Phakic Intraocular Lenses Phakic Intraocular Lenses Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Phakic intraocular lenses are new devices used to correct nearsightedness. These ...

  3. Bayesian Inference of CMB Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderes, Ethan; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Lavaux, Guilhem

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite, along with several ground-based telescopes, has mapped the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at sufficient resolution and signal-to-noise so as to allow a detection of the subtle distortions due to the gravitational influence of the intervening matter distribution. A natural modeling approach is to write a Bayesian hierarchical model for the lensed CMB in terms of the unlensed CMB and the lensing potential. So far there has been no feasible algorithm for inferring the posterior distribution of the lensing potential from the lensed CMB map. We propose a solution that allows efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling from the joint posterior of the lensing potential and the unlensed CMB map using the Hamiltonian Monte Carlo technique. The main conceptual step in the solution is a re-parameterization of CMB lensing in terms of the lensed CMB and the “inverse lensing” potential. We demonstrate a fast implementation on simulated data, including noise and a sky cut, that uses a further acceleration based on a very mild approximation of the inverse lensing potential. We find that the resulting Markov Chain has short correlation lengths and excellent convergence properties, making it promising for applications to high-resolution CMB data sets in the future.

  4. Analysis of the nonlinear behavior of shear-Alfvén modes in tokamaks based on Hamiltonian mapping techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Briguglio, S. Vlad, G.; Fogaccia, G.; Di Troia, C.; Fusco, V.; Wang, X.; Zonca, F.

    2014-11-15

    We present a series of numerical simulation experiments set up to illustrate the fundamental physics processes underlying the nonlinear dynamics of Alfvénic modes resonantly excited by energetic particles in tokamak plasmas and of the ensuing energetic particle transports. These phenomena are investigated by following the evolution of a test particle population in the electromagnetic fields computed in self-consistent MHD-particle simulation performed by the HMGC code. Hamiltonian mapping techniques are used to extract and illustrate several features of wave-particle dynamics. The universal structure of resonant particle phase space near an isolated resonance is recovered and analyzed, showing that bounded orbits and untrapped trajectories, divided by the instantaneous separatrix, form phase space zonal structures, whose characteristic non-adiabatic evolution time is the same as the nonlinear time of the underlying fluctuations. Bounded orbits correspond to a net outward resonant particle flux, which produces a flattening and/or gradient inversion of the fast ion density profile around the peak of the linear wave-particle resonance. The connection of this phenomenon to the mode saturation is analyzed with reference to two different cases: a Toroidal Alfvén eigenmode in a low shear magnetic equilibrium and a weakly unstable energetic particle mode for stronger magnetic shear. It is shown that, in the former case, saturation is reached because of radial decoupling (resonant particle redistribution matching the mode radial width) and is characterized by a weak dependence of the mode amplitude on the growth rate. In the latter case, saturation is due to resonance detuning (resonant particle redistribution matching the resonance width) with a stronger dependence of the mode amplitude on the growth rate.

  5. Weak lensing galaxy cluster field reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jullo, E.; Pires, S.; Jauzac, M.; Kneib, J.-P.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we compare three methods to reconstruct galaxy cluster density fields with weak lensing data. The first method called FLens integrates an inpainting concept to invert the shear field with possible gaps, and a multi-scale entropy denoising procedure to remove the noise contained in the final reconstruction, that arises mostly from the random intrinsic shape of the galaxies. The second and third methods are based on a model of the density field made of a multi-scale grid of radial basis functions. In one case, the model parameters are computed with a linear inversion involving a singular value decomposition (SVD). In the other case, the model parameters are estimated using a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain optimization implemented in the lensing software LENSTOOL. Methods are compared on simulated data with varying galaxy density fields. We pay particular attention to the errors estimated with resampling. We find the multi-scale grid model optimized with Monte Carlo Markov Chain to provide the best results, but at high computational cost, especially when considering resampling. The SVD method is much faster but yields noisy maps, although this can be mitigated with resampling. The FLens method is a good compromise with fast computation, high signal-to-noise ratio reconstruction, but lower resolution maps. All three methods are applied to the MACS J0717+3745 galaxy cluster field, and reveal the filamentary structure discovered in Jauzac et al. We conclude that sensitive priors can help to get high signal-to-noise ratio, and unbiased reconstructions.

  6. Quaternary layer anomalies around the Carlsberg Fault zone mapped with high-resolution shear-wave seismics south of Copenhagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Nielsen, Lars; Boldreel, Lars Ole

    2015-04-01

    The Carlsberg Fault zone is located in the N-S striking Höllviken Graben and traverses the city of Copenhagen. The fault zone is a NNW-SSE striking structure in direct vicinity to the transition zone of the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. Recent small earthquakes indicate activity in the area, although none of the mapped earthquakes appear to have occurred on the Carlsberg Fault. We examined the fault evolution by a combination of very high resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The chalk stratigraphy and the localization of the fault zone at depth was inferred from previous studies by other authors. We extrapolated the Jurassic and Triassic stratigraphy from the Pomeranian Bay to the area of investigation. The fault zone shows a flower structure in the Triassic as well as in Cretaceous sediments. The faulting geometry indicates strong influence of Triassic processes when subsidence and rifting prevailed in the Central European Basin System. Growth strata within the surrounding Höllviken Graben reveal syntectonic sedimentation in the lower Triassic, indicating the opening to be a result of Triassic rifting. In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. This finding contrasts the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighbouring structures, as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image structures in Quaternary layers in the Carlsberg Fault zone. The portable compact vibrator source ElViS III S8 was used to acquire a 1150 m long seismic section on the island Amager, south of Copenhagen. The shallow subsurface in the investigation area is dominated by Quaternary glacial till deposits in the upper 5-11 m and Danian limestone below. In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the 30 m of the upward continuation of the Carlsberg Fault zone. In our area of investigation, the fault zone appears to comprise

  7. Tomography and weak lensing statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Munshi, Dipak; Coles, Peter; Kilbinger, Martin E-mail: peter.coles@astro.cf.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We provide generic predictions for the lower order cumulants of weak lensing maps, and their correlators for tomographic bins as well as in three dimensions (3D). Using small-angle approximation, we derive the corresponding one- and two-point probability distribution function for the tomographic maps from different bins and for 3D convergence maps. The modelling of weak lensing statistics is obtained by adopting a detailed prescription for the underlying density contrast that involves hierarchal ansatz and lognormal distribution. We study the dependence of our results on cosmological parameters and source distributions corresponding to the realistic surveys such as LSST and DES. We briefly outline how photometric redshift information can be incorporated in our results. We also show how topological properties of convergence maps can be quantified using our results.

  8. Sample variance in weak lensing: How many simulations are required?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, Andrea; Haiman, Zoltán; May, Morgan

    2016-03-01

    Constraining cosmology using weak gravitational lensing consists of comparing a measured feature vector of dimension Nb with its simulated counterpart. An accurate estimate of the Nb×Nb feature covariance matrix C is essential to obtain accurate parameter confidence intervals. When C is measured from a set of simulations, an important question is how large this set should be. To answer this question, we construct different ensembles of Nr realizations of the shear field, using a common randomization procedure that recycles the outputs from a smaller number Ns≤Nr of independent ray-tracing N -body simulations. We study parameter confidence intervals as a function of (Ns , Nr ) in the range 1 ≤Ns≤200 and 1 ≤Nr≲105. Previous work [S. Dodelson and M. D. Schneider, Phys. Rev. D 88, 063537 (2013)] has shown that Gaussian noise in the feature vectors (from which the covariance is estimated) lead, at quadratic order, to an O (1 /Nr) degradation of the parameter confidence intervals. Using a variety of lensing features measured in our simulations, including shear-shear power spectra and peak counts, we show that cubic and quartic covariance fluctuations lead to additional O (1 /Nr2) error degradation that is not negligible when Nr is only a factor of few larger than Nb. We study the large Nr limit, and find that a single, 240 Mpc /h sized 5123-particle N -body simulation (Ns=1 ) can be repeatedly recycled to produce as many as Nr=few×104 shear maps whose power spectra and high-significance peak counts can be treated as statistically independent. As a result, a small number of simulations (Ns=1 or 2) is sufficient to forecast parameter confidence intervals at percent accuracy.

  9. Sample variance in weak lensing: How many simulations are required?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Haiman, Zoltan

    2016-03-24

    Constraining cosmology using weak gravitational lensing consists of comparing a measured feature vector of dimension Nb with its simulated counterpart. An accurate estimate of the Nb × Nb feature covariance matrix C is essential to obtain accurate parameter confidence intervals. When C is measured from a set of simulations, an important question is how large this set should be. To answer this question, we construct different ensembles of Nr realizations of the shear field, using a common randomization procedure that recycles the outputs from a smaller number Ns ≤ Nr of independent ray-tracing N-body simulations. We study parameter confidence intervalsmore » as a function of (Ns, Nr) in the range 1 ≤ Ns ≤ 200 and 1 ≤ Nr ≲ 105. Previous work [S. Dodelson and M. D. Schneider, Phys. Rev. D 88, 063537 (2013)] has shown that Gaussian noise in the feature vectors (from which the covariance is estimated) lead, at quadratic order, to an O(1/Nr) degradation of the parameter confidence intervals. Using a variety of lensing features measured in our simulations, including shear-shear power spectra and peak counts, we show that cubic and quartic covariance fluctuations lead to additional O(1/N2r) error degradation that is not negligible when Nr is only a factor of few larger than Nb. We study the large Nr limit, and find that a single, 240 Mpc/h sized 5123-particle N-body simulation (Ns = 1) can be repeatedly recycled to produce as many as Nr = few × 104 shear maps whose power spectra and high-significance peak counts can be treated as statistically independent. Lastly, a small number of simulations (Ns = 1 or 2) is sufficient to forecast parameter confidence intervals at percent accuracy.« less

  10. Gravitational lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, E.L.

    1988-07-01

    For several years astronomers have devoted considerable effort to finding and studying a class of celestial phenomena whose very existence depends on rare cosmic accidents. These are gravitational-lens events, which occur when two or more objects at different distances from the earth happen to lie along the same line of sight and so coincide in the sky. The radiation from the more distant object, typically a quasar, is bent by the gravitational field of the foreground object. The bending creates a cosmic mirage: distorted or multiple images of the background object. Such phenomena may reveal many otherwise undetectable features of the image source, of the foreground object and of the space lying between them. Such observations could help to resolve several fundamental questions in cosmology. In the past decade theoretical and observational research on gravitational lenses has grown rapidly and steadily. At this writing at least 17 candidate lens systems have been discussed in the literature. Of the 17 lens candidates reported so far in professional literature, only five are considered to have been reliably established by subsequent observations. Another three are generally regarded as weak or speculative cases with less than 50 percent chance of actually being lens systems. In the remaining nine cases the evidence is mixed or is sparse enough so that the final judgment could swing either way. As might be concluded, little of the scientific promise of gravitational lenses has yet been realized. The work has not yielded a clear value for the proportionality constant or any of the other fundamental cosmological parameter. 7 figs.

  11. Glasses and Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Glasses and Contact Lenses KidsHealth > For Kids > Glasses and Contact Lenses Print A A A Text Size What's ... together the way they should. But eyeglasses or contact lenses, also called corrective lenses, can help most ...

  12. SUNGLASS: A Weak-lensing Simulation Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiessling, Alina; Taylor, A.; Heavens, A.; Rhodes, J.; Bartlett, J.

    2013-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing analysis is a powerful tool to investigate the dark Universe. Next generation weak-lensing telescope surveys (e.g. Euclid and WFIRST) promise to determine the equation of state of dark energy to 1% as well as probing the possibilities of extra dimensional gravity models and alternative cosmologies. To realize the potential of these new telescope surveys and to test new weak-lensing analysis techniques, challenges must be met. To achieve the small statistical errors required, experiments require full end-to-end simulations of huge volumes, which also probe the non-linear regime to assist in understanding the limitations of the analysis techniques. We have developed a new cosmic shear analysis pipeline SUNGLASS (Simulated UNiverses for Gravitational Lensing Analysis and Shear Surveys) that rapidly generates cosmic shear and convergence catalogues using N-body simulations. In this poster, I introduce the SUNGLASS pipeline and show how the SUNGLASS mock shear catalogues can be used in preparation for upcoming telescope missions and for analysis of existing observational data sets.

  13. Optimizing SNAP for Weak Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High, F. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Massey, R. J.; Rhodes, J. D.; Lamoureux, J. I.; SNAP Collaboration

    2004-12-01

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) satellite proposes to measure weak gravitational lensing in addition to type Ia supernovae. Its pixel scale has been set to 0.10 arcsec per pixel as established by the needs of supernova observations. To find the optimal pixel scale for accurate weak lensing measurements we conduct a tradeoff study in which, via simulations, we fix the suvey size in total pixels and vary the pixel scale. Our preliminary results show that with a smaller scale of about 0.08 arcsec per pixel we can minimize the contribution of intrinsic shear variance to the error on the power spectrum of mass density distortion. Currently we are testing the robustness of this figure as well as determining whether dithering yields analogous results.

  14. Astrophysical uses of CMB lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sudeep

    The future of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) research lies in exploiting the arcminute scale secondary anisotropies which encode information about the late time interaction of the CMB photons with the structure in the Universe. A specific form of such interaction is the gravitational lensing of the CMB photons by intervening matter--the main topic of this thesis. Upcoming experiments like the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and PLANCK will measure these anisotropies with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity. In four separate papers, laid out as four chapters in this thesis, we present new techniques to model and analyze such high resolution data and explore the implications of such measurements on Cosmology, mainly in the context of CMB lensing. The first chapter describes a novel and accurate method for simulating high resolution lensed CMB maps by ray-tracing through a large scale structure simulation. This method does not adopt the flat sky approximation and retains information from large angular scales in the dark matter distribution. Maps simulated through this method will be instrumental in developing the detection and analysis techniques for CMB lensing in high resolution CMB experiments like ACT. In the second chapter, we describe a new and efficient method for measuring the power spectrum of arcminute resolution CMB maps. At these resolutions, the CMB power spectrum is extremely red and is prone to aliasing of power due to hard edges and point source masks. By combining two new techniques, namely, prewhitening and the adaptive multitaper method, we show that these problems can be efficiently remedied and the uncertainties in the final power spectrum estimate can be reduced by several factors over those obtainable by the now standard methods. These techniques will be also useful for estimating higher order statistics from the maps, like the ones related to the detection of CMB lensing and its cross-correlation with large scale structure tracers. In

  15. First measurement of the cross-correlation of CMB lensing and galaxy lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, Nick; Leauthaud, Alexie; Das, Sudeep; Sherwin, Blake D.; Addison, Graeme E.; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Charbonnier, Aldée; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Erben, Thomas; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hincks, Adam D.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kosowsky, Arthur; Makler, Martin; Miller, Lance; Moodley, Kavilan; Moraes, Bruno; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Sehgal, Neelima; Shan, Huanyuan; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Switzer, Eric R.; Taylor, James E.; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Welker, Charlotte; Wollack, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    We measure the cross-correlation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence maps derived from Atacama Cosmology Telescope data with galaxy lensing convergence maps as measured by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey. The CMB-galaxy lensing cross power spectrum is measured for the first time with a significance of 4.2 σ , which corresponds to a 12% constraint on the amplitude of density fluctuations at redshifts ˜0.9 . With upcoming improved lensing data, this novel type of measurement will become a powerful cosmological probe, providing a precise measurement of the mass distribution at intermediate redshifts and serving as a calibrator for systematic biases in weak lensing measurements.

  16. Matter in the Beam: Weak Lensing, Substructures, and the Temperature of Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi, Hareth S.; Elahi, Pascal J.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Power, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Warm dark matter (WDM) models offer an attractive alternative to the current cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model. We present a novel method to differentiate between WDM and CDM cosmologies, namely, using weak lensing; this provides a unique probe as it is sensitive to all of the “matter in the beam,” not just dark matter haloes and the galaxies that reside in them, but also the diffuse material between haloes. We compare the weak lensing maps of CDM clusters to those in a WDM model corresponding to a thermally produced 0.5 keV dark matter particle. Our analysis clearly shows that the weak lensing magnification, convergence, and shear distributions can be used to distinguish between CDM and WDM models. WDM models increase the probability of weak magnifications, with the differences being significant to ≳5σ, while leaving no significant imprint on the shear distribution. WDM clusters analyzed in this work are more homogeneous than CDM ones, and the fractional decrease in the amount of material in haloes is proportional to the average increase in the magnification. This difference arises from matter that would be bound in compact haloes in CDM being smoothly distributed over much larger volumes at lower densities in WDM. Moreover, the signature does not solely lie in the probability distribution function but in the full spatial distribution of the convergence field.

  17. Infrared lateral shearing interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, O.

    1980-04-01

    Recently IR interferometry has received much attention for its special capabilities of testing IR materials, diamond-turned metal mirrors, deep aspherics, unpolished rough surface optics, and other unconventional optics. A CW CO2 laser is used as a coherent light source at 10.6 microns, and germanium and zinc selenide optics are used for lenses and beam splitters. A pyroelectric vidicon (PEV) detects the modulated interference pattern through a TV monitor and video recorder-player. This paper presents three methods of IR lateral shear interferometry using (1) a germanium plane-parallel plate, (2) a Ronchi ruling, and (3) a double-grating lateral shear interferometer.

  18. Weak lensing mass reconstruction of the galaxy cluster Abell 209

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulin-Henriksson, S.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Haines, C. P.; Radovich, M.; Mercurio, A.; Becciani, U.

    2007-05-01

    Context: Weak lensing applied to deep optical images of clusters of galaxies provides a powerful tool to reconstruct the distribution of the gravitating mass associated to these structures. Aims: We use the shear signal extracted by an analysis of deep exposures of a region centered around the galaxy cluster ABCG 209, at redshift z˜ 0.2, to derive both a map of the projected mass distribution and an estimate of the total mass within a characteristic radius. Methods: We use a series of deep archival R-band images from CFHT-12k, covering an area of 0.3 deg^2. We determine the shear of background galaxy images using a new implementation of the modified Kaiser-Squires-Broadhurst KSB+ pipeline for shear determination, which we has been tested against the "Shear TEsting Program 1 and 2'' simulations. We use mass aperture statistics to produce maps of the 2 dimensional density distribution, and parametric fits using both Navarro-Frenk-White and singular-isothermal-sphere profiles to constrain the total mass. Results: The projected mass distribution shows a pronounced asymmetry, with an elongated structure extending from the SE to the NW. This is in general agreement with the optical distribution previously found by other authors. A similar elongation was previously detected in the X-ray emission map, and in the distribution of galaxy colours. The circular NFW mass profile fit gives a total mass of M200 = 7.7+4.3-2.7× 1014 {M}_⊙ inside the virial radius r200 = 1.8± 0.3 Mpc. Conclusions: The weak lensing profile reinforces the evidence for an elongated structure of ABCG 209, as previously suggested by studies of the galaxy distribution and velocities. This project has been partly supported by a Marie Curie Transfer of Knowledge Fellowship of the European Community's Sixth Framework Programme, under contract: MTKD-CT-002995 COSMOCT. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada

  19. Measuring neutrino masses with weak lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2006-11-17

    Weak gravitational lensing of distant galaxies by large scale structure (LSS) provides an unbiased way to map the matter distribution in the low redshift universe. This technique, based on the measurement of small distortions in the images of the source galaxies induced by the intervening LSS, is expected to become a key cosmological probe in the future. We discuss how future lensing surveys can probe the sum of the neutrino masses at the 0 05 eV level.

  20. Solid immersion lenses for enhancing the optical resolution of thermal and electroluminescence mapping of GaN-on-SiC transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, J. W.; Kuball, M.

    2015-10-01

    Solid immersion lenses (SILs) are shown to greatly enhance optical spatial resolution when measuring AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs), taking advantage of the high refractive index of the SiC substrates commonly used for these devices. Solid immersion lenses can be applied to techniques such as electroluminescence emission microscopy and Raman thermography, aiding the development device physics models. Focused ion beam milling is used to fabricate solid immersion lenses in SiC substrates with a numerical aperture of 1.3. A lateral spatial resolution of 300 nm is demonstrated at an emission wavelength of 700 nm, and an axial spatial resolution of 1.7 ± 0.3 μm at a laser wavelength of 532 nm is demonstrated; this is an improvement of 2.5× and 5×, respectively, when compared with a conventional 0.5 numerical aperture objective lens without a SIL. These results highlight the benefit of applying the solid immersion lenses technique to the optical characterization of GaN HEMTs. Further improvements may be gained through aberration compensation and increasing the SIL numerical aperture.

  1. Solid immersion lenses for enhancing the optical resolution of thermal and electroluminescence mapping of GaN-on-SiC transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, J. W. Kuball, M.

    2015-10-14

    Solid immersion lenses (SILs) are shown to greatly enhance optical spatial resolution when measuring AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs), taking advantage of the high refractive index of the SiC substrates commonly used for these devices. Solid immersion lenses can be applied to techniques such as electroluminescence emission microscopy and Raman thermography, aiding the development device physics models. Focused ion beam milling is used to fabricate solid immersion lenses in SiC substrates with a numerical aperture of 1.3. A lateral spatial resolution of 300 nm is demonstrated at an emission wavelength of 700 nm, and an axial spatial resolution of 1.7 ± 0.3 μm at a laser wavelength of 532 nm is demonstrated; this is an improvement of 2.5× and 5×, respectively, when compared with a conventional 0.5 numerical aperture objective lens without a SIL. These results highlight the benefit of applying the solid immersion lenses technique to the optical characterization of GaN HEMTs. Further improvements may be gained through aberration compensation and increasing the SIL numerical aperture.

  2. The integrated analyses of digital field mapping techniques and traditional field methods: implications from the Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone, SW Turkey as a case-study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitez, İrem; Yaltırak, Cenk; Zabcı, Cengiz; Şahin, Murat

    2015-04-01

    The precise geological mapping is one of the most important issues in geological studies. Documenting the spatial distribution of geological bodies and their contacts play a crucial role on interpreting the tectonic evolution of any region. Although the traditional field techniques are still accepted to be the most fundamental tools in construction of geological maps, we suggest that the integration of digital technologies to the classical methods significantly increases the resolution and the quality of such products. We simply follow the following steps in integration of the digital data with the traditional field observations. First, we create the digital elevation model (DEM) of the region of interest by interpolating the digital contours of 1:25000 scale topographic maps to 10 m of ground pixel resolution. The non-commercial Google Earth satellite imagery and geological maps of previous studies are draped over the interpolated DEMs in the second stage. The integration of all spatial data is done by using the market leading GIS software, ESRI ArcGIS. We make the preliminary interpretation of major structures as tectonic lineaments and stratigraphic contacts. These preliminary maps are controlled and precisely coordinated during the field studies by using mobile tablets and/or phablets with GPS receivers. The same devices are also used in measuring and recording the geologic structures of the study region. Finally, all digitally collected measurements and observations are added to the GIS database and we finalise our geological map with all available information. We applied this integrated method to map the Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone (BFSZ) in the southwest Turkey. The BFSZ is an active sinistral 60-to-90 km-wide shear zone, which prolongs about 300 km-long between Suhut-Cay in the northeast and Köyceğiz Lake-Kalkan in the southwest on land. The numerous studies suggest contradictory models not only about the evolution but also about the fault geometry of this

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW Gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelmann, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    Gravitational lensing has developed into one of the most powerful tools for the analysis of the dark universe. This review summarizes the theory of gravitational lensing, its main current applications and representative results achieved so far. It has two parts. In the first, starting from the equation of geodesic deviation, the equations of thin and extended gravitational lensing are derived. In the second, gravitational lensing by stars and planets, galaxies, galaxy clusters and large-scale structures is discussed and summarized.

  4. Weak gravitational lensing with the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Bacon, D.; Camera, S.; Harrison, I.; Joachimi, B.; Metcalf, R. B.; Pourtsidou, A.; Takahashi, K.; Zuntz, J.; Abdalla, F. B.; Bridle, S.; Jarvis, M.; Kitching, T.; Miller, L.; Patel, P.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the capabilities of various stages of the SKA to perform world-leading weak gravitational lensing surveys. We outline a way forward to develop the tools needed for pursuing weak lensing in the radio band. We identify the key analysis challenges and the key pathfinder experiments that will allow us to address them in the run up to the SKA. We identify and summarize the unique and potentially very powerful aspects of radio weak lensing surveys, facilitated by the SKA, that can solve major challenges in the field of weak lensing. These include the use of polarization and rotational velocity information to control intrinsic alignments, and the new area of weak lensing using intensity mapping experiments. We show how the SKA lensing surveys will both complement and enhance corresponding efforts in the optical wavebands through cross-correlation techniques and by way of extending the reach of weak lensing to high redshift.

  5. Gradient Refractive Index Lenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the nature of gradient refractive index (GRIN) lenses, focusing on refraction in these materials, focal length of a thin Wood lens, and on manufacturing of such lenses. Indicates that GRIN lenses of small cross section are in limited production with applications suggested for optical communication and photocopying fields. (JN)

  6. A Lagrangian-Eulerian Mapping Solver for Direct Numerical Simulation of Bubble-Laden Turbulent Shear Flows Using the Two-Fluid Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O. A.; Elghobashi, S. E.

    1999-09-01

    In a recent study we showed that the two-fluid (TF) formulation can be used in the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of bubble- (or particle-) laden decaying isotropic turbulence with considerable saving in CPU-time and memory as compared to the trajectory approach employed by many researchers. In the present paper, we develop a Lagrangian-Eulerian mapping (LEM) solver for DNS of bubble-laden turbulent shear flows using TF. The purpose of LEM is to resolve the large gradients of bubble velocity and concentration which result from the absence of the diffusion terms in the equations of bubble-phase motion and the preferential accumulation of bubbles. A standard finite-difference scheme (FDS) fails to resolve these gradients. We examine the performance of the new method in DNS of a bubble-laden Taylor-Green vortex, spatially developing plane mixing layer, and homogeneous shear turbulent flow.

  7. Broadband waveplate lenses.

    PubMed

    Tabiryan, Nelson V; Serak, Svetlana V; Nersisyan, Sarik R; Roberts, David E; Zeldovich, Boris Ya; Steeves, Diane M; Kimball, Brian R

    2016-04-01

    We report on lenses that operate over the visible wavelength band from 450 nm to beyond 700 nm, and other lenses that operate over a wide region in the near-infrared from 650 nm to beyond 1000 nm. Lenses were recorded in liquid crystal polymer layers only a few micrometers thick, using laser-based photoalignment and UV photopolymerization. Waveplate lenses allowed focusing and defocusing laser beams depending on the sign of the circularity of laser beam polarization. Diffraction efficiency of recorded waveplate lenses was up to 90% and contrast ratio was up to 500:1. PMID:27137003

  8. Pulsar lensing geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siqi; Pen, Ue-Li; Macquart, J.-P.; Brisken, Walter; Deller, Adam

    2016-05-01

    We test the inclined sheet pulsar scintillation model (Pen & Levin) against archival very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data on PSR 0834+06 and show that its scintillation properties can be precisely reproduced by a model in which refraction occurs on two distinct lens planes. These data strongly favour a model in which grazing-incidence refraction instead of diffraction off turbulent structures is the primary source of pulsar scattering. This model can reproduce the parameters of the observed diffractive scintillation with an accuracy at the percent level. Comparison with new VLBI proper motion results in a direct measure of the ionized interstellar medium (ISM) screen transverse velocity. The results are consistent with ISM velocities local to the PSR 0834+06 sight-line (through the Galaxy). The simple 1-D structure of the lenses opens up the possibility of using interstellar lenses as precision probes for pulsar lens mapping, precision transverse motions in the ISM, and new opportunities for removing scattering to improve pulsar timing. We describe the parameters and observables of this double screen system. While relative screen distances can in principle be accurately determined, a global conformal distance degeneracy exists that allows a rescaling of the absolute distance scale. For PSR B0834+06, we present VLBI astrometry results that provide (for the first time) a direct measurement of the distance of the pulsar. For most of the recycled millisecond pulsars that are the targets of precision timing observations, the targets where independent distance measurements are not available. The degeneracy presented in the lens modelling could be broken if the pulsar resides in a binary system.

  9. CLASH: COMPLETE LENSING ANALYSIS OF THE LARGEST COSMIC LENS MACS J0717.5+3745 AND SURROUNDING STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Medezinski, Elinor; Lemze, Doron; Ford, Holland; Umetsu, Keiichi; Nonino, Mario; Zitrin, Adi; Broadhurst, Tom; Sayers, Jack; Czakon, Nicole; Waizmann, Jean-Claude; Meneghetti, Massimo; Koekemoer, Anton; Coe, Dan; Postman, Marc; Molino, Alberto; Melchior, Peter; Grillo, Claudio; and others

    2013-11-01

    The galaxy cluster MACS J0717.5+3745 (z = 0.55) is the largest known cosmic lens, with complex internal structures seen in deep X-ray, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and dynamical observations. We perform a combined weak- and strong-lensing analysis with wide-field BVR{sub c} i'z' Subaru/Suprime-Cam observations and 16-band Hubble Space Telescope observations taken as part of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble. We find consistent weak distortion and magnification measurements of background galaxies and combine these signals to construct an optimally estimated radial mass profile of the cluster and its surrounding large-scale structure out to 5 Mpc h {sup –1}. We find consistency between strong-lensing and weak-lensing in the region where these independent data overlap, <500 kpc h {sup –1}. The two-dimensional weak-lensing map reveals a clear filamentary structure traced by distinct mass halos. We model the lensing shear field with nine halos, including the main cluster, corresponding to mass peaks detected above 2.5σ{sub κ}. The total mass of the cluster as determined by the different methods is M{sub vir} ≈ (2.8 ± 0.4) × 10{sup 15} M{sub ☉}. Although this is the most massive cluster known at z > 0.5, in terms of extreme value statistics, we conclude that the mass of MACS J0717.5+3745 by itself is not in serious tension with ΛCDM, representing only a ∼2σ departure above the maximum simulated halo mass at this redshift.

  10. Finding Galaxy Groups in the Fields of Lensed Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Catherine E.; Bautz, M. W.

    2006-09-01

    Gravitationally lensed quasars can be used as an invaluable cosmological tool, however, the asymmetry observed in many lensed systems requires models of the lens to include a strong external shear component in addition to the lensing galaxy. The lensing galaxy may be a member of a group or cluster which could provide sufficient shear to account for the lensed image configuration. We are searching for X-ray emission from groups and clusters of galaxies in the fields of multiply-imaged quasars using Chandra's resolving power to separate the faint diffuse emission from the much brighter quasar images. We have analyzed all observations of gravitationally lensed quasars available in the Chandra archive from launch through the end of 2005 to search for this diffuse emission. We present a catalog of cluster and group properties for those fields with significant diffuse emission, and upper limits on group properties in fields where no diffuse emission is detected. These measurements are compared with optical data, where available, and with quasar lensing models. This research was supported by NASA contracts NAS-8-38252 and NAS-8-37716.

  11. Weak gravitational lensing systematic errors in the dark energy survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plazas, Andres Alejandro

    Dark energy is one of the most important unsolved problems in modern Physics, and weak gravitational lensing (WL) by mass structures along the line of sight ("cosmic shear") is a promising technique to learn more about its nature. However, WL is subject to numerous systematic errors which induce biases in measured cosmological parameters and prevent the development of its full potential. In this thesis, we advance the understanding of WL systematics in the context of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We develop a testing suite to assess the performance of the shapelet-based DES WL measurement pipeline. We determine that the measurement bias of the parameters of our Point Spread Function (PSF) model scales as (S/N )-2, implying that a PSF S/N > 75 is needed to satisfy DES requirements. PSF anisotropy suppression also satisfies the requirements for source galaxies with S/N ≳ 45. For low-noise, marginally-resolved exponential galaxies, the shear calibration errors are up to about 0.06% (for shear values ≲ 0.075). Galaxies with S/N ≳ 75 present about 1% errors, sufficient for first-year DES data. However, more work is needed to satisfy full-area DES requirements, especially in the high-noise regime. We then implement tests to validate the high accuracy of the map between pixel coordinates and sky coordinates (astrometric solution), which is crucial to detect the required number of galaxies for WL in stacked images. We also study the effect of atmospheric dispersion on cosmic shear experiments such as DES and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) in the four griz bands. For DES (LSST), we find systematics in the g and r (g, r, and i) bands that are larger than required. We find that a simple linear correction in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r ( i) band for DES (LSST). More complex corrections will likely reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band

  12. Cosmic shear from scalar-induced gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Devdeep; Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Baumann, Daniel

    2008-05-15

    Weak gravitational lensing by foreground density perturbations generates a gradient mode in the shear of background images. In contrast, cosmological tensor perturbations induce a nonzero curl mode associated with image rotations. In this note, we study the lensing signatures of both primordial gravitational waves from inflation and second-order gravitational waves generated from the observed spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. We derive the curl mode for galaxy lensing surveys at redshifts of 1-3 and for lensing of the cosmic microwave background at a redshift of 1100. We find that the curl mode angular power spectrum associated with secondary tensor modes for galaxy lensing surveys dominates over the corresponding signal generated by primary gravitational waves from inflation. However, both tensor contributions to the shear curl mode spectrum are below the projected noise levels of upcoming galaxy and cosmic microwave background lensing surveys and therefore are unlikely to be detectable.

  13. Diagnosing Multiplicative Error with Lensing Magnification of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-06-01

    Weak lensing causes spatially coherent fluctuations in the flux of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). This lensing magnification allows for weak lensing measurement independent of cosmic shear. It is free of the shape measurement errors associated with cosmic shear and can therefore be used to diagnose and calibrate multiplicative error. Although this lensing magnification is difficult to accurately measure in auto correlation, its cross correlation with cosmic shear and galaxy distribution in an overlapping area can be measured to a significantly higher accuracy. Therefore, these cross correlations can put useful constraints on multiplicative error, and the obtained constraint is free of cosmic variance in the weak lensing field. We present two methods implementing this idea and estimate their performances. We find that, with ˜1 million SNe Ia that can be achieved with the proposed D2k survey with the LSST telescope, a multiplicative error of ˜0.5% for source galaxies at {{z}s}˜ 1 can be detected and a larger multiplicative error can be corrected to the level of 0.5%. It is therefore a promising approach to control the multiplicative error to the sub-percent level required for stage IV projects. The combination of the two methods even has the potential to diagnose and calibrate galaxy intrinsic alignment, which is another major systematic error in cosmic shear cosmology.

  14. SARCS strong-lensing galaxy groups. II. Mass-concentration relation and strong-lensing bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foëx, G.; Motta, V.; Jullo, E.; Limousin, M.; Verdugo, T.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: Various studies have shown a lensing bias in the mass-concentration relation of cluster-scale structures that is the result of an alignment of the major axis and the line of sight. In this paper, we aim to study this lensing bias through the mass-concentration relation of galaxy groups, thus extending observational constraints to dark matter haloes of mass ~1013-1014 M⊙. Methods: Our work is based on the stacked weak-lensing analysis of a sample of 80 strong-lensing galaxy groups. By combining several lenses, we significantly increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the lensing signal, thus providing constraints on the mass profile that cannot be obtained for individual objects. The resulting shear profiles were fitted with various mass models, among them the Navarro-Frank-White (NFW) profile, which provides an estimate of the total mass and of the concentration of the composite galaxy groups. Results: The main results of our analysis are the following: (i) the lensing signal does not allow us to firmly distinguish between a simple singular isothermal sphere mass distribution and the expected NFW mass profile; (ii) we obtain an average concentration c200 = 8.6-1.3+2.1 that is much higher than the value expected from numerical simulations for the corresponding average mass M200 = 0.73-0.10+0.11 × 1014 M⊙; (iii) the combination of our results with those at larger mass scales gives a mass-concentration relation c(M) of more than two decades in mass, whose slope disagrees with predictions from numerical simulations using unbiased populations of dark matter haloes; (iv) our combined c(M) relation matches results from simulations that only used haloes with a large strong-lensing cross-section, that is, elongated with a major axis close to the line of sight; (v) for the simplest case of prolate haloes, we estimate a lower limit on the minor-to-major axis ratio a/c = 0.5 for the average SARCS galaxy group with a toy model. Conclusions: Our analysis based on galaxy

  15. Contact Lenses for Vision Correction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Lenses Colored Contact Lenses Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Brenda ... on the surface of the eye. They correct vision like eyeglasses do and are safe when used ...

  16. Cosmology with cosmic shear observations: a review.

    PubMed

    Kilbinger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic shear is the distortion of images of distant galaxies due to weak gravitational lensing by the large-scale structure in the Universe. Such images are coherently deformed by the tidal field of matter inhomogeneities along the line of sight. By measuring galaxy shape correlations, we can study the properties and evolution of structure on large scales as well as the geometry of the Universe. Thus, cosmic shear has become a powerful probe into the nature of dark matter and the origin of the current accelerated expansion of the Universe. Over the last years, cosmic shear has evolved into a reliable and robust cosmological probe, providing measurements of the expansion history of the Universe and the growth of its structure. We review here the principles of weak gravitational lensing and show how cosmic shear is interpreted in a cosmological context. Then we give an overview of weak-lensing measurements, and present the main observational cosmic-shear results since it was discovered 15 years ago, as well as the implications for cosmology. We then conclude with an outlook on the various future surveys and missions, for which cosmic shear is one of the main science drivers, and discuss promising new weak cosmological lensing techniques for future observations. PMID:26181770

  17. Analecta of structures formed during the 28 June 1992 Landers-Big Bear, California earthquake sequence (including maps of shear zones, belts of shear zones, tectonic ridge, duplex en echelon fault, fault elements, and thrusts in restraining steps)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.M.; Johnson, N.A.; Johnson, K.M.; Wei, W.; Fleming, R.W.; Cruikshank, K.M.; Martosudarmo, S.Y.

    1997-12-31

    The June 28, 1992, M{sub s} 7.5 earthquake at Landers, California, which occurred about 10 km north of the community of Yucca Valley, California, produced spectacular ground rupturing more than 80 km in length (Hough and others, 1993). The ground rupturing, which was dominated by right-lateral shearing, extended along at least four distinct faults arranged broadly en echelon. The faults were connected through wide transfer zones by stepovers, consisting of right-lateral fault zones and tension cracks. The Landers earthquakes occurred in the desert of southeastern California, where details of ruptures were well preserved, and patterns of rupturing were generally unaffected by urbanization. The structures were varied and well-displayed and, because the differential displacements were so large, spectacular. The scarcity of vegetation, the aridity of the area, the compactness of the alluvium and bedrock, and the relative isotropy and brittleness of surficial materials collaborated to provide a marvelous visual record of the character of the deformation zones. The authors present a series of analecta -- that is, verbal clips or snippets -- dealing with a variety of structures, including belts of shear zones, segmentation of ruptures, rotating fault block, en echelon fault zones, releasing duplex structures, spines, and ramps. All of these structures are documented with detailed maps in text figures or in plates (in pocket). The purpose is to describe the structures and to present an understanding of the mechanics of their formation. Hence, most descriptions focus on structures where the authors have information on differential displacements as well as spatial data on the position and orientation of fractures.

  18. One Episode, Two Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drijvers, Paul; Godino, Juan D.; Font, Vicenc; Trouche, Luc

    2013-01-01

    A deep understanding of students' learning processes is one of the core challenges of research in mathematics education. To achieve this, different theoretical lenses are available. The question is how these different lenses compare and contrast, and how they can be coordinated and combined to provide a more comprehensive view on the topic of…

  19. Learning through Different Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeweler, Sue; Barnes-Robinson, Linda

    2015-01-01

    When parents and teachers help gifted kids use the metaphor "learning through different lenses," amazing things happen: Horizons open up. Ideas are focused. Thoughts are magnified and clarified. They see the big picture. Metaphoric thinking offers new and exciting ways to see the world. Viewing the world through different lenses provides…

  20. The Orphan Lenses Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Brownstein, J.; Fadely, R.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Gavazzi, R.; Goodsall, T.; Griffith, R. L.; Keeton, C. R.; Kneib, J. P.; Koekemoer, A.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Marshall, P. J.; Merten, J.; Metcalf, R. B.; Oguri, M.; Papovich, C.; Rein, H.; Ryan, R.; Stewart, K. R.; Treu, T.

    2012-01-01

    Strong gravitational lenses are uniquely suited for the study of dark matter structure and substructure within massive halos of many scales, act as gravitational telescopes for distant faint objects, and can give powerful and competitive cosmological constraints. Some 300 lenses have been identified in the literature in one form or another; many others have been found, but perhaps have not warranted dedicated publications. The Orphan Lenses project aims to be a master compilation of all strong gravitational lenses that are known, and a community repository for candidate lenses. A clear and uniform database of basic properties and gravitational lens models is being developed, which will be available online and through a smartphone interactive application. I will present the project, and scientific highlights with this dataset.

  1. Shear representations of beam transfer matrices.

    PubMed

    Başkal, S; Kim, Y S

    2001-05-01

    The beam transfer matrix, often called the ABCD matrix, is one of the essential mathematical instruments in optics. It is a unimodular matrix whose determinant is 1. If all the elements are real with three independent parameters, this matrix is a 2 x 2 representation of the group Sp(2). It is shown that a real ABCD matrix can be generated by two shear transformations. It is then noted that, in para-axial lens optics, the lens and translation matrices constitute two shear transformations. It is shown that a system with an arbitrary number of lenses can be reduced to a system consisting of three lenses. PMID:11415030

  2. XMM-Newton Observations of the DLS Shear-Selected Cluster Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellAntonio, Ian

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project continues to be to test the selection effects in cluster surveys by investigating the X-ray properties of the first shear-selected sample of galaxy clusters, the Deep Lens Survey (DLS). Because lensing signal is only sensitive to mass (albeit with projection effects), lensing signal can be used to select a sample that is independent of its X-ray properties. If a lensing-selected sample has very different X-ray properties from an X-ray selected sample, it would have important consequences for evolutionary studies based on existing cluster samples was aimed at refining the lensing-selected sample as part of this continuing study The grant supported a KPNO run to obtain data on another region of the sky to extend the cluster sample, and also the purchase of a disk array for archiving the optical mosaic data (Two terabytes worth) from which the lensing maps are derived As a result of the grant, we have extended the lensing cluster sample to another 4-square degree patch of the sky, adding another three clusters to our sample to be observed While the sample of X-ray observed clusters is too small to derive a firm conclusion yet, our preliminary finding is that the X-ray properties of the observed sample do not differ from those of X-ray selected surveys A paper discussing the first results has been published, and a second paper on the mass differences is still in preparation (with J Hughes as first author)

  3. MC2: Mapping the Dark Matter Distribution of the "Toothbrush" Cluster RX J0603.3+4214 with Hubble Space Telescope and Subaru Weak Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, M. James; Dawson, William A.; Stroe, Andra; Wittman, David; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brüggen, Marcus; Bradač, Maruša; Röttgering, Huub

    2016-02-01

    The galaxy cluster RX J0603.3+4214 at z = 0.225 is one of the rarest clusters boasting an extremely large (˜2 Mpc) radio relic. Because of the remarkable morphology of the relic, the cluster is nicknamed the “Toothbrush Cluster.” Although the cluster's underlying mass distribution is one of the critical pieces of information needed to reconstruct the merger scenario responsible for the puzzling radio relic morphology, its proximity to the Galactic plane b ˜ 10° has imposed significant observational challenges. We present a high-resolution weak-lensing study of the cluster with Subaru/Suprime Cam and Hubble Space Telescope imaging data. Our mass reconstruction reveals that the cluster is composed of complicated dark matter substructures closely tracing the galaxy distribution, in contrast, however, with the relatively simple binary X-ray morphology. Nevertheless, we find that the cluster mass is still dominated by the two most massive clumps aligned north-south with a ˜3:1 mass ratio ({M}200={6.29}-1.62+2.24× {10}14 {M}⊙ and {1.98}-0.74+1.24× {10}14 {M}⊙ for the northern and southern clumps, respectively). The southern mass peak is ˜2‧ offset toward the south with respect to the corresponding X-ray peak, which has a “bullet”-like morphology pointing south. Comparison of the current weak-lensing result with the X-ray, galaxy, and radio relic suggests that perhaps the dominant mechanism responsible for the observed relic may be a high-speed collision of the two most massive subclusters, although the peculiarity of the morphology necessitates involvement of additional subclusters. Careful numerical simulations should follow in order to obtain more complete understanding of the merger scenario utilizing all existing observations. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc.

  4. Measuring the reduced shear

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    Neglecting the second order corrections in weak lensing measurements can lead to a few percent uncertainties on cosmic shears, and becomes more important for cluster lensing mass reconstructions. Existing methods which claim to measure the reduced shears are not necessarily accurate to the second order when a point spread function (PSF) is present. We show that the method of Zhang (2008) exactly measures the reduced shears at the second order level in the presence of PSF. A simple theorem is provided for further confirming our calculation, and for judging the accuracy of any shear measurement method at the second order based on its properties at the first order. The method of Zhang (2008) is well defined mathematically. It does not require assumptions on the morphologies of galaxies and the PSF. To reach a sub-percent level accuracy, the CCD pixel size is required to be not larger than 1/3 of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the PSF, regardless of whether the PSF has a power-law or exponential profile at large distances. Using a large ensemble (∼>10{sup 7}) of mock galaxies of unrestricted morphologies, we study the shear recovery accuracy under different noise conditions. We find that contaminations to the shear signals from the noise of background photons can be removed in a well defined way because they are not correlated with the source shapes. The residual shear measurement errors due to background noise are consistent with zero at the sub-percent level even when the amplitude of such noise reaches about 1/10 of the source flux within the half-light radius of the source. This limit can in principle be extended further with a larger galaxy ensemble in our simulations. On the other hand, the source Poisson noise remains to be a cause of systematic errors. For a sub-percent level accuracy, our method requires the amplitude of the source Poisson noise to be less than 1/80 ∼ 1/100 of the source flux within the half-light radius of the source

  5. Shear-wave velocity characterization of the USGS Hawaiian strong-motion network on the Island of Hawaii and development of an NEHRP site-class map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, I.G.; Stokoe, K.H., II; Cox, B.R.; Yuan, J.; Knudsen, K.-L.; Terra, F.; Okubo, P.; Lin, Y.-C.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the level and nature of ground shaking in Hawaii for the purposes of earthquake hazard mitigation and seismic design, empirical groundmotion prediction models are desired. To develop such empirical relationships, knowledge of the subsurface site conditions beneath strong-motion stations is critical. Thus, as a first step to develop ground-motion prediction models for Hawaii, spectralanalysis-of-surface-waves (SASW) profiling was performed at the 22 free-field U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) strong-motion sites on the Big Island to obtain shear-wave velocity (VS) data. Nineteen of these stations recorded the 2006 Kiholo Bay moment magnitude (M) 6.7 earthquake, and 17 stations recorded the triggered M 6.0 Mahukona earthquake. VS profiling was performed to reach depths of more than 100 ft. Most of the USGS stations are situated on sites underlain by basalt, based on surficial geologic maps. However, the sites have varying degrees of weathering and soil development. The remaining strong-motion stations are located on alluvium or volcanic ash. VS30 (average VS in the top 30 m) values for the stations on basalt ranged from 906 to 1908 ft/s [National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site classes C and D], because most sites were covered with soil of variable thickness. Based on these data, an NEHRP site-class map was developed for the Big Island. These new VS data will be a significant input into an update of the USGS statewide hazard maps and to the operation of ShakeMap on the island of Hawaii.

  6. Cosmological constraints from weak lensing non-Gaussian statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Haiman, Zoltan; Petri, Andrea; Hill, James; Hui, Lam; Kratochvil, Jan Michael; May, Morgan

    2016-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is one of the most promising techniques to probe dark energy. Our work to date suggests that the information in the nonlinear regime exceeds that in the two-point functions. Using the publicly available data from the 154 deg^2 CFHTLenS survey and a large suite of ray-tracing N-body simulations on a grid of 91 cosmological models, we find that constraints from peak counts are comparable to those from the power spectrum, and somewhat tighter when different smoothing scales are combined.I will also introduce the utility of cross-correlating weak galaxy lensing maps with CMB lensing maps, a technique that will be useful to probe structures at an intermediate redshift of 0.9, as larger weak lensing surveys such as HSC, DES, KiDS, Euclid, and LSST come online. We cross-correlate the CFHTLenS galaxy lensing convergence maps with Planck CMB lensing maps. Our results show two sigma tension with the constraints obtained from the Planck temperature measurements. I will discuss possible sources of the tension, including intrinsic alignments, photo-z uncertainties, masking of tSZ in the CMB maps, and the multiplicative bias.

  7. Stress-Detection Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    An Ames Research Center scientist invented an infrared lens used in sunglasses to filter out ultraviolet rays. This product finds its origins in research for military enemy detection. Through a Space Act Agreement, Optical Sales Corporation introduced the Hawkeye Lenses not only as sunglasses but as plant stress detection lenses. The lenses enhance the stressed part of the leaf, which has less chlorophyll than healthy leaves, through dyes that filter out certain wavelengths of light. Plant stress is visible earlier, at a stage when something can be done to save the plants.

  8. WEAK GRAVITATIONAL LENSING AS A PROBE OF PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SUBSTRUCTURES IN DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Shirasaki, Masato

    2015-02-01

    We propose a novel method to select satellite galaxies in outer regions of galaxy groups or clusters using weak gravitational lensing. The method is based on the theoretical expectation that the tangential shear pattern around satellite galaxies would appear with negative values at an offset distance from the center of the main halo. We can thus locate the satellite galaxies statistically with an offset distance of several lensing smoothing scales by using the standard reconstruction of surface mass density maps from weak lensing observation. We test the idea using high-resolution cosmological simulations. We show that subhalos separated from the center of the host halo are successfully located even without assuming the position of the center. For a number of such subhalos, the characteristic mass and offset length can be also estimated on a statistical basis. We perform a Fisher analysis to show how well upcoming weak lensing surveys can constrain the mass density profile of satellite galaxies. In the case of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope with a sky coverage of 20,000 deg{sup 2}, the mass of the member galaxies in the outer region of galaxy clusters can be constrained with an accuracy of ∼0.1 dex for galaxy clusters with mass 10{sup 14} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉} at z = 0.15. Finally we explore the detectability of tidal stripping features for subhalos having a wide range of masses of 10{sup 11}-10{sup 13} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}.

  9. Detection of stacked filament lensing between SDSS luminous red galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, Joseph; Miyatake, Hironao; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Takada, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    We search for the lensing signal of massive filaments between 135 000 pairs of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We develop a new estimator that cleanly removes the much larger shear signal of the neighbouring LRG haloes, relying only on the assumption of spherical symmetry. We consider two models: a `thick'-filament model constructed from ray-tracing simulations for Λ cold dark matter model, and a `thin'-filament model which models the filament by a string of haloes along the line connecting the two LRGs. We show that the filament lensing signal is in nice agreement with the thick simulation filament, while strongly disfavouring the thin model. The magnitude of the lensing shear due to the filament is below 10-4. Employing the likelihood ratio test, we find a 4.5σ significance for the detection of the filament lensing signal, corresponding to a null hypothesis fluctuation probability of 3 × 10-6. We also carried out several null tests to verify that the residual shear signal from neighbouring LRGs and other shear systematics are minimized.

  10. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  11. [Phakic intraocular lenses].

    PubMed

    Kohnen, T; Shajari, M

    2016-06-01

    Refractive surgical procedures are generally divided into additive procedures with, e. g. implantation of an artificial lens and subtractive procedures with ablation of corneal tissue. In this article the current status of phakic intraocular lens (IOL) implantation for correction of refractive errors is reviewed. Phakic IOLs are constructed as angle-supported or iris-fixated anterior chamber lenses and sulcus-fixated posterior chamber lenses. The implantation of phakic IOLs has been demonstrated to be an effective, safe, predictable and stable procedure to correct higher refractive errors. Complications are rare and depend to a large extent on the location. For anterior chamber lenses the main concern is critical endothelial cell loss and for posterior chamber lenses early cataract formation. PMID:27277751

  12. Probing Dark Energy with Weak Lensing with LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Wittman, D.; Jain, B.; Bosch, J.; Clowe, D.; Jarvis, M.; Jee, M.; Tyson, J.; Zhan, H.; LSST Weak Lensing Science Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    LSST will measure the shape, magnitude, and colors of more than 3x109 galaxies over 20,000 square degrees. These data will be used in several complementary ways to measure the properties of dark energy. Reconstruction of the shear power spectrum on linear and non-linear scales l /< 2000, and of the cross-correlation of shear measured in different photometric redshift bins, provides a constraint on the evolution of dark energy that is complementary to the purely geometric measures provided by Supernovae and BAO. Combining weak lensing and BAO measurements breaks degeneracies and results in tighter constraints on dark energy than each method can provide individually. Cross-correlation of the shear and galaxy number density signal within redshift shells minimizes the sensitivity to photo-z errors. Measurements of the shear bispectrum constrain dark energy and allow an independent test of theories of gravity. In addition to the galaxy shape correlations, LSST will detect 50,000 shear peaks with significance greater than 4σ, and 10,000 securely detected clusters of galaxies with line-of-sight velocity dispersions greater than 700 km/s. These allow independent constraints on the dark energy signature in the growth of structure. Tomographic study of the shear of background galaxies as a function of redshift allows the a geometric test of dark energy to be extracted from the weak lensing data. Finally, lensing signatures beyond the shear (magnification and flexion) will be accessible with LSST with unprecedented statistical power. The ability of LSST to extract the dark energy signal will depend on the accuracy with which the stellar PSF can be determined, and on the unbiased reconstruction of object shapes from long sequences of exposures in which the objects are detected at low significance. We discuss the prospects for cosmological constraints from weak lensing studies with LSST.

  13. Comparison of galaxy clusters selected by weak-lensing, optical spectroscopy, and X-rays in the deep lens survey F2 field

    SciTech Connect

    Starikova, Svetlana; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Murray, Stephen S.; Geller, Margaret J.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.

    2014-05-10

    We compare galaxy clusters selected in Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the 4 deg{sup 2} Deep Lens Survey (DLS) F2 field to the cluster samples previously selected in the same field from a sensitive weak-lensing shear map derived from the DLS and from a detailed galaxy redshift survey—the Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS). Our Chandra and XMM-Newton observations cover 1.6 deg{sup 2} of the DLS F2 field, including all 12 weak-lensing peaks above a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.5, along with 16 of the 20 SHELS clusters with published velocity dispersions >500 km s{sup –1}. We detect 26 extended X-ray sources in this area and confirm 23 of them as galaxy clusters using the optical imaging. Approximately 75% of clusters detected in either X-ray or spectroscopic surveys are found in both; these follow the previously established scaling relations between velocity dispersion, L {sub X}, and T {sub X}. A lower percentage, 60%, of clusters are in common between X-ray and DLS samples. With the exception of a high false-positive rate in the DLS weak-lensing search (5 out of 12 DLS candidates appear to be false), differences between the three cluster detection methods can be attributed primarily to observational uncertainties and intrinsic scatter between different observables and cluster mass.

  14. Atmospheric Dispersion Effects in Weak Lensing Measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Plazas, Andrés Alejandro; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and PSF characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions (dr) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF (dv) for galaxies.We estimate the level of dv that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed themore » statistical errors of the DES and the LSST cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the dr signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions after stacking of exposures taken at different airmasses and hour angles. We also calculate the errors in the griz bands, and find that dispersion systematics, uncorrected, are up to 6 and 2 times larger in g and r bands,respectively, than the requirements for the DES error budget, but can be safely ignored in i and z bands. For the LSST requirements, the factors are about 30, 10, and 3 in g, r, and i bands,respectively. We find that a simple correction linear in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r band for DES and i band for LSST,but still as much as 5 times than the requirements for LSST r-band observations. More complex corrections will likely be able to reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band. But g-band effects remain large enough that it seems likely that induced systematics will dominate the statistical errors of both surveys, and cosmic-shear measurements should rely on the redder bands.« less

  15. Atmospheric Dispersion Effects in Weak Lensing Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Plazas, Andrés Alejandro; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and PSF characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions (dr) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF (dv) for galaxies.We estimate the level of dv that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed the statistical errors of the DES and the LSST cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the dr signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions after stacking of exposures taken at different airmasses and hour angles. We also calculate the errors in the griz bands, and find that dispersion systematics, uncorrected, are up to 6 and 2 times larger in g and r bands,respectively, than the requirements for the DES error budget, but can be safely ignored in i and z bands. For the LSST requirements, the factors are about 30, 10, and 3 in g, r, and i bands,respectively. We find that a simple correction linear in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r band for DES and i band for LSST,but still as much as 5 times than the requirements for LSST r-band observations. More complex corrections will likely be able to reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band. But g-band effects remain large enough that it seems likely that induced systematics will dominate the statistical errors of both surveys, and cosmic-shear measurements should rely on the redder bands.

  16. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Apoutou N'Djin, W.; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion’s extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n=11 ) and mapped (n= 7 ). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n= 2 ) and ventricular (left n=1 , right n=1 ) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8   ±   13

  17. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Colas, Elodie Constanciel; N'Djin, W Apoutou; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-21

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion's extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n = 11) and mapped (n = 7). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n = 2) and ventricular (left n = 1, right n = 1) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8

  18. Cross-correlation of gravitational lensing from DES Science Verification data with SPT and Planck lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, D.; Omori, Y.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Larsen, P.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Crawford, T. M.; Dodelson, S.; Fosalba, P.; Giannantonio, T.; Holder, G.; Jain, B.; Kacprzak, T.; Lahav, O.; MacCrann, N.; Nicola, A.; Refregier, A.; Sheldon, E.; Story, K. T.; Troxel, M. A.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Becker, M. R.; Benson, B. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reichardt, C. L.; Roodman, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Simard, G.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.

    2016-06-01

    We measure the cross-correlation between weak lensing of galaxy images and of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The effects of gravitational lensing on different sources will be correlated if the lensing is caused by the same mass fluctuations. We use galaxy shape measurements from 139 deg2 of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data and overlapping CMB lensing from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck. The DES source galaxies have a median redshift of zmed ˜ 0.7, while the CMB lensing kernel is broad and peaks at z ˜ 2. The resulting cross-correlation is maximally sensitive to mass fluctuations at z ˜ 0.44. Assuming the Planck 2015 best-fitting cosmology, the amplitude of the DES×SPT cross-power is found to be ASPT = 0.88 ± 0.30 and that from DES×Planck to be APlanck = 0.86 ± 0.39, where A = 1 corresponds to the theoretical prediction. These are consistent with the expected signal and correspond to significances of 2.9σ and 2.2σ, respectively. We demonstrate that our results are robust to a number of important systematic effects including the shear measurement method, estimator choice, photo-z uncertainty and CMB lensing systematics. We calculate a value of A = 1.08 ± 0.36 for DES×SPT when we correct the observations with a simple intrinsic alignment model. With three measurements of this cross-correlation now existing in the literature, there is not yet reliable evidence for any deviation from the expected LCDM level of cross-correlation. We provide forecasts for the expected signal-to-noise ratio of the combination of the five-year DES survey and SPT-3G.

  19. Weak-lensing statistics from the Coyote Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eifler, Tim

    2011-11-01

    Analysing future weak-lensing data sets from KIDS, Dark Energy Survey (DES), LSST, Euclid and WFIRST requires precise predictions for the weak-lensing measures. In this paper, we present a weak-lensing prediction code based on the Coyote Universe emulator. The Coyote Universe emulator predicts the (non-linear) power spectrum of density fluctuations (Pδ) to high accuracy for k∈[0.002; 3.4] h Mpc-1 within the redshift interval z∈[0; 1]; outside this regime, we extend Pδ using a modified HALOFIT code. This pipeline is used to calculate various second-order cosmic shear statistics, e.g., shear power spectrum, shear-shear correlation function, ring statistics and Complete Orthogonal Set of EB-mode Integrals (COSEBIs), and we examine how the upper limit in k (and z), to which Pδ is known, impacts on these statistics. For example, we find that kmax˜ 8 h Mpc-1 causes a bias in the shear power spectrum at ℓ˜ 4000 that is comparable to the statistical errors (intrinsic shape noise and cosmic variance) of a DES-like survey, whereas for LSST-like errors kmax˜ 15 h Mpc-1 is needed to limit the bias at ℓ˜ 4000. For the most recently developed second-order shear statistics, the COSEBIs, we find that nine modes can be calculated accurately knowing Pδ to kmax= 10 h Mpc-1. The COSEBIs allow for an EB-mode decomposition using a shear-shear correlation function measured over a finite range, thereby avoiding any EB-mode mixing due to finite survey size. We perform a detailed study in a five-dimensional parameter space in order to examine whether all cosmological information is captured by these nine modes with the result that already 7-8 modes are sufficient.

  20. Weak lensing by galaxy troughs in DES Science Verification data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gruen, D.; Friedrich, O.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Bonnett, C.; Hartley, W.; Jain, B.; M. Jarvis; Kavprzak, T.; Krause, E.; et al

    2015-11-29

    In this study, we measure the weak lensing shear around galaxy troughs, i.e. the radial alignment of background galaxies relative to underdensities in projections of the foreground galaxy field over a wide range of redshift in Science Verification data from the Dark Energy Survey. Our detection of the shear signal is highly significant (10σ–15σ for the smallest angular scales) for troughs with the redshift range z ϵ [0.2, 0.5] of the projected galaxy field and angular diameters of 10 arcmin…1°. These measurements probe the connection between the galaxy, matter density, and convergence fields. By assuming galaxies are biased tracers ofmore » the matter density with Poissonian noise, we find agreement of our measurements with predictions in a fiducial Λ cold dark matter model. The prediction for the lensing signal on large trough scales is virtually independent of the details of the underlying model for the connection of galaxies and matter. Our comparison of the shear around troughs with that around cylinders with large galaxy counts is consistent with a symmetry between galaxy and matter over- and underdensities. In addition, we measure the two-point angular correlation of troughs with galaxies which, in contrast to the lensing signal, is sensitive to galaxy bias on all scales. The lensing signal of troughs and their clustering with galaxies is therefore a promising probe of the statistical properties of matter underdensities and their connection to the galaxy field.« less

  1. Weak Lensing by Galaxy Troughs in DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.

    2015-09-29

    We measure the weak lensing shear around galaxy troughs, i.e. the radial alignment of background galaxies relative to underdensities in projections of the foreground galaxy field over a wide range of redshift in Science Verification data from the Dark Energy Survey. Our detection of the shear signal is highly significant (10σ–15σ for the smallest angular scales) for troughs with the redshift range z ϵ [0.2, 0.5] of the projected galaxy field and angular diameters of 10 arcmin…1°. These measurements probe the connection between the galaxy, matter density, and convergence fields. By assuming galaxies are biased tracers of the matter density with Poissonian noise, we find agreement of our measurements with predictions in a fiducial Λ cold dark matter model. Furthermore, the prediction for the lensing signal on large trough scales is virtually independent of the details of the underlying model for the connection of galaxies and matter. Our comparison of the shear around troughs with that around cylinders with large galaxy counts is consistent with a symmetry between galaxy and matter over- and underdensities. In addition, we measure the two-point angular correlation of troughs with galaxies which, in contrast to the lensing signal, is sensitive to galaxy bias on all scales. Finally, the lensing signal of troughs and their clustering with galaxies is therefore a promising probe of the statistical properties of matter underdensities and their connection to the galaxy field.

  2. Weak lensing by galaxy troughs in DES Science Verification data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, D.; Friedrich, O.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Bonnett, C.; Hartley, W.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Krause, E.; Mana, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Seitz, S.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Becker, M. R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Neto, A. Fausti; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.

    2016-01-01

    We measure the weak lensing shear around galaxy troughs, i.e. the radial alignment of background galaxies relative to underdensities in projections of the foreground galaxy field over a wide range of redshift in Science Verification data from the Dark Energy Survey. Our detection of the shear signal is highly significant (10σ-15σ for the smallest angular scales) for troughs with the redshift range z ∈ [0.2, 0.5] of the projected galaxy field and angular diameters of 10 arcmin…1°. These measurements probe the connection between the galaxy, matter density, and convergence fields. By assuming galaxies are biased tracers of the matter density with Poissonian noise, we find agreement of our measurements with predictions in a fiducial Λ cold dark matter model. The prediction for the lensing signal on large trough scales is virtually independent of the details of the underlying model for the connection of galaxies and matter. Our comparison of the shear around troughs with that around cylinders with large galaxy counts is consistent with a symmetry between galaxy and matter over- and underdensities. In addition, we measure the two-point angular correlation of troughs with galaxies which, in contrast to the lensing signal, is sensitive to galaxy bias on all scales. The lensing signal of troughs and their clustering with galaxies is therefore a promising probe of the statistical properties of matter underdensities and their connection to the galaxy field.

  3. Weak lensing by galaxy troughs in DES Science Verification data

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.; Friedrich, O.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Bonnett, C.; Hartley, W.; Jain, B.; M. Jarvis; Kavprzak, T.; Krause, E.; Mana, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Seitz, S.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Becker, M. R.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Neto, A. Fausti; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miguel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nord, B.; Orgando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.

    2015-11-29

    In this study, we measure the weak lensing shear around galaxy troughs, i.e. the radial alignment of background galaxies relative to underdensities in projections of the foreground galaxy field over a wide range of redshift in Science Verification data from the Dark Energy Survey. Our detection of the shear signal is highly significant (10σ–15σ for the smallest angular scales) for troughs with the redshift range z ϵ [0.2, 0.5] of the projected galaxy field and angular diameters of 10 arcmin…1°. These measurements probe the connection between the galaxy, matter density, and convergence fields. By assuming galaxies are biased tracers of the matter density with Poissonian noise, we find agreement of our measurements with predictions in a fiducial Λ cold dark matter model. The prediction for the lensing signal on large trough scales is virtually independent of the details of the underlying model for the connection of galaxies and matter. Our comparison of the shear around troughs with that around cylinders with large galaxy counts is consistent with a symmetry between galaxy and matter over- and underdensities. In addition, we measure the two-point angular correlation of troughs with galaxies which, in contrast to the lensing signal, is sensitive to galaxy bias on all scales. The lensing signal of troughs and their clustering with galaxies is therefore a promising probe of the statistical properties of matter underdensities and their connection to the galaxy field.

  4. Aerosol lenses propagation model.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Grégoire; Roy, Gilles

    2011-09-01

    We propose a model based on the properties of cascading lenses modulation transfer function (MTF) to reproduce the irradiance of a screen illuminated through a dense aerosol cloud. In this model, the aerosol cloud is broken into multiple thin layers considered as individual lenses. The screen irradiance generated by these individual layers is equivalent to the point-spread function (PSF) of each aerosol lens. Taking the Fourier transform of the PSF as a MTF, we cascade the lenses MTF to find the cloud MTF. The screen irradiance is found with the Fourier transform of this MTF. We show the derivation of the model and we compare the results with the Undique Monte Carlo simulator for four aerosols at three optical depths. The model is in agreement with the Monte Carlo for all the cases tested. PMID:21886230

  5. Shear Brillouin light scattering microscope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonseok; Besner, Sebastien; Ramier, Antoine; Kwok, Sheldon J J; An, Jeesoo; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-11

    Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to characterize shear acoustic phonons in materials. However, conventional instruments had slow acquisition times over 10 min per 1 mW of input optical power, and they required two objective lenses to form a 90° scattering geometry necessary for polarization coupling by shear phonons. Here, we demonstrate a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of detecting both shear and longitudinal phonons with improved speeds and with a single objective lens. Brillouin scattering spectra were measured from polycarbonate, fused quartz, and borosilicate in 1-10 s at an optical power level of 10 mW. The elastic constants, phonon mean free path and the ratio of the Pockels coefficients were determined at microscopic resolution. PMID:26832263

  6. Radiation Blocking Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Biomedical Optical Company of America's (BOCA) suntiger lenses, similar in principle to natural filters in the eyes of hawks and eagles, bar 99 percent of potentially harmful wavelengths, while allowing visually useful colors of light (red, orange, green) to pass through. They also improve visual acuity, night vision and haze or fog visibility. The lenses evolved from work done by James B. Stephens and Dr. Charles G. Miller of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. They developed a formula and produced a commercial welding curtain that absorbs, filters, and scatters light. This research led to protective glasses now used by dentists, workers in hazardous environments, CRT operators and skiers.

  7. Lensing effects in inhomogeneous cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Ghassemi, Sima; Khoeini-Moghaddam, Salomeh; Mansouri, Reza

    2009-05-15

    Concepts developed in the gravitational lensing techniques such as shear, convergence, tangential, and radial arcs maybe used to see how tenable inhomogeneous models proposed to explain the acceleration of the universe models are. We study the widely discussed Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) cosmological models. It turns out that for the observer sitting at origin of a global LTB solution the shear vanishes as in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models, while the value of convergence is different, which may lead to observable cosmological effects. We also consider Swiss-cheese models proposed recently based on LTB with an observer sitting in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker part. It turns out that they have different behavior as far as the formation of radial and tangential arcs are concerned.

  8. Weak Lensing : Ground vs. Space in the Cosmos Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Massey, R. J.; Ellis, R. S.; Rhodes, J.

    2006-12-01

    Weak lensing statistics are best for large numbers wide surveys with greater number of galaxies and deep surveys with a higher number density of galaxies. Although space-based surveys are unparalleled in their depth, ground-based surveys are the more cost-effective way to survey wide regions of the sky. We assess the relative merits of the two observing platforms, by using premier, multi-band, ground-based Subaru SuprimeCam data and space-based Hubble ACS data, in the 2 sq. degree COSMOS field in three ways. First, we compare shear measurements of individual galaxies and identify the relative calibration of the two datasets in terms of the largest subset in magnitude and size that is consistent. Second, we compare spaceand ground-based mass maps to quantify the relative completeness and contamination of the resulting cluster catalogs. We find that more clusters with XMM catalog counterparts are detected from space than ground and some ground-based clusters are possibly spurious detections. Third, we perform a detailed comparison of the precision with which it is possible to reconstruct the mass and size of four clusters at various redshifts identified from both ground and space. We find that the noise is much lower from space in all three investigations, but find no evidence for systematic overestimation or underestimation of the individual cluster properties by either survey.

  9. Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1979-01-01

    The area of geological mapping in the United States in 1978 increased greatly over that reported in 1977; state geological maps were added for California, Idaho, Nevada, and Alaska last year. (Author/BB)

  10. Pixelation Effects in Weak Lensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    High, F. William; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Ellis, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing can be used to investigate both dark matter and dark energy but requires accurate measurements of the shapes of faint, distant galaxies. Such measurements are hindered by the finite resolution and pixel scale of digital cameras. We investigate the optimum choice of pixel scale for a space-based mission, using the engineering model and survey strategy of the proposed Supernova Acceleration Probe as a baseline. We do this by simulating realistic astronomical images containing a known input shear signal and then attempting to recover the signal using the Rhodes, Refregier, and Groth algorithm. We find that the quality of shear measurement is always improved by smaller pixels. However, in practice, telescopes are usually limited to a finite number of pixels and operational life span, so the total area of a survey increases with pixel size. We therefore fix the survey lifetime and the number of pixels in the focal plane while varying the pixel scale, thereby effectively varying the survey size. In a pure trade-off for image resolution versus survey area, we find that measurements of the matter power spectrum would have minimum statistical error with a pixel scale of 0.09' for a 0.14' FWHM point-spread function (PSF). The pixel scale could be increased to 0.16' if images dithered by exactly half-pixel offsets were always available. Some of our results do depend on our adopted shape measurement method and should be regarded as an upper limit: future pipelines may require smaller pixels to overcome systematic floors not yet accessible, and, in certain circumstances, measuring the shape of the PSF might be more difficult than those of galaxies. However, the relative trends in our analysis are robust, especially those of the surface density of resolved galaxies. Our approach thus provides a snapshot of potential in available technology, and a practical counterpart to analytic studies of pixelation, which necessarily assume an idealized shape

  11. Pixelation Effects in Weak Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High, F. William; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Ellis, Richard

    2007-11-01

    Weak gravitational lensing can be used to investigate both dark matter and dark energy but requires accurate measurements of the shapes of faint, distant galaxies. Such measurements are hindered by the finite resolution and pixel scale of digital cameras. We investigate the optimum choice of pixel scale for a space-based mission, using the engineering model and survey strategy of the proposed Supernova Acceleration Probe as a baseline. We do this by simulating realistic astronomical images containing a known input shear signal and then attempting to recover the signal using the Rhodes, Refregier, & Groth algorithm. We find that the quality of shear measurement is always improved by smaller pixels. However, in practice, telescopes are usually limited to a finite number of pixels and operational life span, so the total area of a survey increases with pixel size. We therefore fix the survey lifetime and the number of pixels in the focal plane while varying the pixel scale, thereby effectively varying the survey size. In a pure trade-off for image resolution versus survey area, we find that measurements of the matter power spectrum would have minimum statistical error with a pixel scale of 0.09" for a 0.14" FWHM point-spread function (PSF). The pixel scale could be increased to ~0.16" if images dithered by exactly half-pixel offsets were always available. Some of our results do depend on our adopted shape measurement method and should be regarded as an upper limit: future pipelines may require smaller pixels to overcome systematic floors not yet accessible, and, in certain circumstances, measuring the shape of the PSF might be more difficult than those of galaxies. However, the relative trends in our analysis are robust, especially those of the surface density of resolved galaxies. Our approach thus provides a snapshot of potential in available technology, and a practical counterpart to analytic studies of pixelation, which necessarily assume an idealized shape

  12. Fresnel's Lighthouse Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    One of the rewards of walking up the scores of steps winding around the inside of the shaft of a lighthouse is turning inward and examining the glass optical system. This arrangement of prisms, lenses, and reflectors is used to project the light from a relatively small source in a beam that can be seen far at sea.

  13. Rainwater lenses in wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, S. C.; Schot, P. P.; Bootsma, M. C.

    2003-04-01

    In the Netherlands, drainage and groundwater abstraction in wetlands has lead to deterioration of fen vegetation through lowering of the phreatic level. This enables recharge of local, acid precipitation and the development of rainwater lenses which float on alkaline groundwater. These lenses prevent upward seeping of the groundwater reaching the fen root zone. In the nature reserve Ilperveld (The Netherlands), a ditch/trench system was dug for the purpose of creating run-off for acid rainwater in wet periods, and to enable neutral surface water in dry periods. Sods were removed to decrease the evapotranspiration. Knowledge of the form and behaviour of rainwater lenses in the root zone of wetlands is a prerequisite in fen restoration projects in order to design effective and cost-efficient measures. With a saturated-unsaturated solute transport model (HYDRUS-2D), numerical simulations were performed. Model results are compared with temporal and spatial measurements of electrical conductivity measured in the Ilperveld. Furthermore, results of temporal dynamics of rainwater lenses are shown as function of (i) the phreatic level, (ii) the number of drainage canals and (iii) the groundwater inflow fluxes.

  14. Baryons, neutrinos, feedback and weak gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Viola, Massimo; Heymans, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    The effect of baryonic feedback on the dark matter mass distribution is generally considered to be a nuisance to weak gravitational lensing. Measurements of cosmological parameters are affected as feedback alters the cosmic shear signal on angular scales smaller than a few arcminutes. Recent progress on the numerical modelling of baryon physics has shown that this effect could be so large that, rather than being a nuisance, the effect can be constrained with current weak lensing surveys, hence providing an alternative astrophysical insight on one of the most challenging questions of galaxy formation. In order to perform our analysis, we construct an analytic fitting formula that describes the effect of the baryons on the mass power spectrum. This fitting formula is based on three scenarios of the OverWhelmingly Large hydrodynamical simulations. It is specifically calibrated for z < 1.5, where it models the simulations to an accuracy that is better than 2 per cent for scales k < 10 h Mpc-1 and better than 5 per cent for 10 < k < 100 h Mpc-1. Equipped with this precise tool, this paper presents the first constraint on baryonic feedback models using gravitational lensing data, from the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). In this analysis, we show that the effect of neutrino mass on the mass power spectrum is degenerate with the baryonic feedback at small angular scales and cannot be ignored. Assuming a cosmology precision fixed by WMAP9, we find that a universe with massless neutrinos is rejected by the CFHTLenS lensing data with 85-98 per cent confidence, depending on the baryon feedback model. Some combinations of feedback and non-zero neutrino masses are also disfavoured by the data, although it is not yet possible to isolate a unique neutrino mass and feedback model. Our study shows that ongoing weak gravitational lensing surveys (KiDS, HSC and DES) will offer a unique opportunity to probe the physics of baryons at galactic scales, in

  15. Fitting gravitational lenses: truth or delusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. Wyn; Witt, Hans J.

    2003-11-01

    The observables in a strong gravitational lens are usually just the image positions and sometimes the flux ratios. We develop a new and simple algorithm which allows a set of models to be fitted exactly to the observations. Taking our cue from the strong body of evidence that early-type galaxies are close to isothermal, we assume that the lens is scale-free with a flat rotation curve. External shear can be easily included. Our algorithm allows full flexibility regarding the angular structure of the lensing potential. Importantly, all the free parameters enter linearly into the model and so the lens and flux ratio equations can always be solved by straightforward matrix inversion. The models are only restricted by the fact that the surface mass density must be positive. We use this new algorithm to examine some of the claims made for anomalous flux ratios. It has been argued that such anomalies betray the presence of substantial amounts of substructure in the lensing galaxy. We demonstrate by explicit construction that some of the lens systems for which substructure has been claimed can be well fitted by smooth lens models. This is especially the case when the systematic errors in the flux ratios (caused by microlensing or differential extinction) are taken into account. However, there is certainly one system (B1422+231) for which the existing smooth models are definitely inadequate and for which substructure may be implicated. Within a few tens of kpc of the lensing galaxy centre, dynamical friction and tidal disruption are known to be very efficient at dissolving any substructure. Very little substructure is projected within the Einstein radius. The numbers of strong lenses for which substructure is currently being claimed may be so large that this contradicts rather than supports cold dark matter theories.

  16. Generalized shear-ratio tests: A new relation between cosmological distances, and a diagnostic for a redshift-dependent multiplicative bias in shear measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We derive a new relation between cosmological distances that is valid in any (statistically) isotropic space-time and independent of cosmological parameters or even the validity of the field equation of General Relativity. In particular, this relation yields an equation between those distance ratios that are the geometrical factors determining the strength of the gravitational lensing effect of mass concentrations. Considering a combination of weak-lensing shear ratios, based on lenses at two different redshifts and sources at three different redshifts, we derive a relation between shear-ratio tests that must be identically satisfied. A redshift-dependent multiplicative bias in shear estimates will violate this relation, and thus can be probed by this generalized shear-ratio test. Combining the lensing effect for lenses at three different redshifts and three different source redshifts, a relation between shear ratios is derived that must be valid independent of a multiplicative bias. We propose these generalized shear-ratio tests as a diagnostic for the presence of systematics in upcoming weak-lensing surveys.

  17. Learning unit: Thin lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, L.-S.

    2012-04-01

    Learning unit: Thin lenses "Why objects seen through lenses are sometimes upright and sometimes reversed" Nita Laura Simona National College of Arts and Crafts "Constantin Brancusi", Craiova, Romania 1. GEOMETRIC OPTICS. 13 hours Introduction (models, axioms, principles, conventions) 1. Thin lenses (Types of lenses. Defining elements. Path of light rays through lenses. Image formation. Required physical quantities. Lens formulas). 2. Lens systems (Non-collated lenses. Focalless systems). 3. Human eye (Functioning as an optical system. Sight defects and their corrections). 4. Optical instruments (Characteristics exemplified by a magnifying glass. Paths of light rays through a simplified photo camera. Path of light rays through a classical microscope) (Physics curriculum for the IXth grade/ 2011). This scenario exposes a learning unit based on experimental sequences (defining specific competencies), as a succession of lessons started by noticing a problem whose solution assumes the setup of an experiment under laboratory conditions. Progressive learning of theme objectives are realised with sequential experimental steps. The central cognitive process is the induction or the generalization (development of new knowledge based on observation of examples or counterexamples of the concept to be learnt). Pupil interest in theme objectives is triggered by problem-situations, for example: "In order to better see small objects I need a magnifying glass. But when using a magnifier, small object images are sometimes seen upright and sometimes seen reversed!" Along the way, pupils' reasoning will converge to the idea: "The image of an object through a lens depends on the relative distances among object, lens, and observer". Associated learning model: EXPERIMENT Specific competencies: derived from the experiment model, in agreement with the following learning unit steps I. Evoking - Anticipation: Size of the problem, formulation of hypotheses and planning of experiment. II

  18. Gravitational lensing in observational cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottale, L.

    This paper reviews some previous theoretical and observational results concerning the various effects of gravitational lensing, and also presents still unpublished results in this field. The theoretical section deals with the Optical Scalar Equation (OSE) approach. We recall the form of these equations, which relate the deformations of the cross sectional area of a light beam to the material and energetic distribution it encounters, via the two basic contributions to lensing, the matter or Ricci term and the shear term. The introduction of a new distance, the optical distance, allows to write the OSE in a simplified way from which new solutions are easily derived. We demonstrate here that a general form may be obtained for the amplification formula in the exact relativistic treatment, provided the Universe is assumed to be Friedmannian in the mean. New results are also presented concerning the probability distribution of amplifications, the relation from matter term to shear terms (the first ones give the mean of the second ones) and the problem of energy conservation. We recall how our method let to an analytical formula yielding the amplification by any number of lenses placed anywhere along the line of sight and present new general solutions for lensing by large scale density inhomogeneities. The gravitational redshift effects are also considered, either due to the crossing by photons of inhomogeneities, or intrinsic to them ; generalized solutions to the last problem are given. Some observational evidence concerning various lensing effects, either statistical or applying to individual sources, are considered. We first recall how the dependence of the amplification formula on the various physical parameters points towards the optimisation of lensing by very rich clusters of galaxies lying at redshifts around 0.7, which may give rise to very large amplifications for reasonable values of the density parameter. Recent results concerning a statistical effect of

  19. Interferometric Plasmonic Lensing with Nanohole Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-18

    Nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) of nanohole arrays in gold films maps propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) launched from lithographically patterned structures. Strong near field photoemission patterns are observed in the PEEM images, recorded following low angle of incidence irradiation of nanohole arrays with sub-15 fs laser pulses centered at 780 nm. The recorded photoemission patterns are attributed to constructive and destructive interferences between PSPs launched from the individual nanoholes which comprise the array. By exploiting the wave nature of PSPs, we demonstrate how varying the array geometry (hole diameter, pitch, and number of rows/columns) ultimately yields intense localized photoemission. Through a combination of PEEM and finite-difference time-domain simulations, we identify the optimal array geometry for efficient light coupling and interferometric plasmonic lensing. We show a preliminary application of inteferometric plasmonic lensing by enhancing the photoemission from the vertex of a gold triangle using nanohole array.

  20. The geometry of gravitational lensing magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aazami, Amir Babak; Werner, Marcus C.

    2016-02-01

    We present a definition of unsigned magnification in gravitational lensing valid on arbitrary convex normal neighborhoods of time oriented Lorentzian manifolds. This definition is a function defined at any two points along a null geodesic that lie in a convex normal neighborhood, and foregoes the usual notions of lens and source planes in gravitational lensing. Rather, it makes essential use of the van Vleck determinant, which we present via the exponential map, and Etherington's definition of luminosity distance for arbitrary spacetimes. We then specialize our definition to spacetimes, like Schwarzschild's, in which the lens is compact and isolated, and show that our magnification function is monotonically increasing along any geodesic contained within a convex normal neighborhood.

  1. Shear piezoelectricity in bone at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2010-10-01

    Recent demonstration of shear piezoelectricity in an isolated collagen fibril, which is the origin of piezoelectricity in bone, necessitates investigation of shear piezoelectric behavior in bone at the nanoscale. Using high resolution lateral piezoresponse force microcopy (PFM), shear piezoelectricity in a cortical bone sample was studied at the nanoscale. Subfibrillar structure of individual collagen fibrils with a periodicity of 60-70 nm were revealed in PFM map, indicating the direct contribution of collagen fibrils to the shear piezoelectricity of bone.

  2. Harmonic diffractive lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, D.W.; Sommargren, G.E.

    1995-05-10

    The harmonic diffractive lens is a diffractive imaging lens for which the optical path-length transition between adjacent facets is an integer multiple {ital m} of the design wavelength {lambda}{sub 0}. The total lens thickness in air is {ital m}{lambda}{sub 0}/({ital n} {minus} 1), which is {ital m} times thicker than the so-called modulo 2{pi} diffractive lens. Lenses constructed in this way have hybrid properties of both refractive and diffractive lenses. Such a lens will have a diffraction-limited, common focus for a number of discrete wavelengths across the visible spectrum. A 34.75-diopter, 6-mm-diameter lens is diamond turned in aluminum and replicated in optical materials. The sag of the lens is 23 {mu}m. Modulation transfer function measurements in both monochromatic and white light verify the performance of the lens. The lens approaches the diffraction limit for 10 discrete wavelengths across the visible spectrum.

  3. Tolerances in panoramic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Simon; Dallaire, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    Almost every aspect concerning the optical design of panoramic lenses brings new challenges to optical designers. Examples of these include ray tracing programs having problems finding the entrance pupil which is moving through the field-of-view, optimization, production particularities due to the shape of the lenses, and ways of tolerancing these systems having strong distortion. This last topic will be discussed in this paper. We will start from a historical perspective on the understanding of panoramic imagery. This will lead us to the modern panoramic imager called the Panomorph lens. We will discuss the particular case of the tolerance of the front surface (most of the time a freeform surface) and the impact on the image quality, both image footprint and field curvature. We will explain the behavior using first and second order approaches.

  4. Tolerancing panoramic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, Jocelyn; Thibault, Simon

    2009-08-01

    Tolerancing a lens is a basic procedure in lens design. It consists in first defining an appropriate set of tolerances for the lens, then in adding compensators with their allowable ranges and finally in selecting an appropriate quality criterion (MTF, RMS spot size, wavefront error, boresight error...) for the given application. The procedure is straightforward for standard optical systems. However, it becomes more complex when tolerancing very wide angle lenses (larger than 150 degrees). With a large field of view, issues such as severe off-axis pupil shift, considerable distortion and low relative illumination must be addressed. The pupil shift affects the raytrace as some rays can no longer be traced properly. For high resolution imagers, particularly for robotic and security applications, the image footprint is most critical in order to limit or avoid complex calibration procedures. We studied various wide angle lenses and concluded that most of the distortion comes from the front surface of the lens. Consequently, any variation of the front surface will greatly affect the image footprint. In this paper, we study the effects on the image footprint of slightly modifying the front surface of four different lenses: a simple double-gauss for comparison, a fisheye lens, a catadioptric system (omnidirectional lens) and a Panomorph lens. We also present a method to analyze variations of the image footprint. Our analysis shows that for wide angle lenses, on which the entrance pupil is much smaller than the front surface, irregularities (amplitude, slope and location) are critical on both aspherical and spherical front surfaces to predict the image footprint variation for high resolution cameras. Finally, we present how the entrance pupil varies (location, size) with the field of view for these optical systems.

  5. MAGNIFICENT MAGNIFICATION: EXPLOITING THE OTHER HALF OF THE LENSING SIGNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, Eric M.; Graves, Genevieve J.

    2014-01-10

    We describe a new method for measuring galaxy magnification due to weak gravitational lensing. Our method makes use of a tight scaling relation between galaxy properties that are modified by gravitational lensing, such as apparent size, and other properties that are not, such as surface brightness. In particular, we use a version of the well-known fundamental plane relation for early-type galaxies. This modified ''photometric fundamental plane'' uses only photometric galaxy properties, eliminating the need for spectroscopic data. We present the first detection of magnification using this method by applying it to photometric catalogs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This analysis shows that the derived magnification signal is within a factor of three of that available from conventional methods using gravitational shear. We suppress the dominant sources of systematic error and discuss modest improvements that may further enhance the lensing signal-to-noise available with this method. Moreover, some of the dominant sources of systematic error are substantially different from those of shear-based techniques. With this new technique, magnification becomes a useful measurement tool for the coming era of large ground-based surveys intending to measure gravitational lensing.

  6. Weak lensing study of 16 DAFT/FADA clusters: Substructures and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinet, Nicolas; Clowe, Douglas; Durret, Florence; Adami, Christophe; Acebrón, Ana; Hernandez-García, Lorena; Márquez, Isabel; Guennou, Loic; Sarron, Florian; Ulmer, Mel

    2016-05-01

    While our current cosmological model places galaxy clusters at the nodes of a filament network (the cosmic web), we still struggle to detect these filaments at high redshifts. We perform a weak lensing study for a sample of 16 massive, medium-high redshift (0.4 shear profile measured in a KSB-like method, adding our contribution to the calibration of the observable-mass relation required for cluster abundance cosmological studies. We compute convergence maps and select structures within these maps, securing their detection with noise resampling techniques. Taking advantage of the large field of view of our data, we study cluster environment, adding information from galaxy density maps at the cluster redshift and from X-ray images when available. We find that clusters show a large variety of weak lensing maps at large scales and that they may all be embedded in filamentary structures at megaparsec scale. We classify these clusters in three categories according to the smoothness of their weak lensing contours and to the amount of substructures: relaxed (~7%), past mergers (~21.5%), and recent or present mergers (~71.5%). The fraction of clusters undergoing merging events observationally supports the hierarchical scenario of cluster growth, and implies that massive clusters are strongly evolving at the studied redshifts. Finally, we report the detection of unusually elongated structures in CLJ0152, MACSJ0454, MACSJ0717, A851, BMW1226, MACSJ1621, and MS1621. This study is based on observations obtained with MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/IRFU, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of

  7. IDCS J1426.5+3508: Weak Lensing Analysis of a Massive Galaxy Cluster at z = 1.75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Wenli; Gonzalez, Anthony; Jee, M. James; Massey, Richard; Rhodes, Jason; Brodwin, Mark; Eisenhardt, Peter; Marrone, Daniel P.; Stanford, S. A.; Zeimann, Gregory R.

    2016-02-01

    We present a weak lensing study of the galaxy cluster IDCS J1426.5+3508 at z = 1.75, which is the highest-redshift strong lensing cluster known and the most distant cluster for which a weak lensing analysis has been undertaken. Using F160W, F814W, and F606W observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, we detect tangential shear at 2σ significance. Fitting a Navarro–Frenk–White mass profile to the shear with a theoretical median mass-concentration relation, we derive a mass {M}200,{crit}={2.3}-1.4+2.1× {10}14 M⊙. This mass is consistent with previous mass estimates from the Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (SZ) effect, X-ray, and strong lensing. The cluster lies on the local SZ–weak lensing mass scaling relation observed at low redshift, indicative of minimal evolution in this relation.

  8. Weak Lensing Analysis of Massive Galaxy Cluster IDCS J1426.5+3508 at z=1.75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Wenli; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jee, Myungkook J.; Massey, Richard; Rhodes, Jason; Brodwin, Mark; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Marrone, Daniel P.; Stanford, S. Adam; Zeimann, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    We present a weak lensing study of the galaxy cluster IDCS J1426.5+3508 at z=1.75, which is the highest redshift strong lensing cluster known and the most distant cluster for which a weak lensing analysis has been undertaken. Using F160W, F814W, and F606W observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, we detect tangential shear at 2σ significance. Fitting a Navarro-Frenk-White mass profile to the shear with a theoretical median mass-concentration relation, we derive a mass consistent with previous mass estimates from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, X-ray, and strong lensing. The cluster lies on the local SZ-weak lensing mass scaling relation observed at low redshift, indicative of minimal evolution in this relation.

  9. Probing gravity at large scales through CMB lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Alam, Shadab; Ho, Shirley

    2015-06-01

    We describe a methodology to probe gravity with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence κ, specifically by measuring EG, the ratio of the Laplacian of the gravitational scalar potential difference to the velocity divergence. Using CMB lensing instead of galaxy-galaxy lensing avoids intrinsic alignments while also lacking a hard limit on the lens redshift and significant uncertainties in the source plane. We model EG for general relativity and modified gravity, finding that EG for f(R) gravity should be scale dependent due to the scale dependence of the growth rate f. Next, we construct an estimator for EG in terms of the galaxy-CMB lensing and galaxy clustering angular power spectra, along with the redshift-space distortion parameter β. We also forecast statistical errors for EG from the current Planck CMB lensing map and the spectroscopic galaxy and quasar samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 11, being 9 per cent with galaxies and 8 per cent when quasars are included. We also find that upcoming spectroscopic and photometric surveys, combined with the final Planck lensing map, can measure precisely the redshift- and scale dependence of EG out to redshifts z = 2 and higher, with photometric surveys having an advantage due to their high number densities. Advanced ACTPol's lensing map will increase the EG sensitivity even further. Finally, we find that Advanced ACTPol cross-correlated with spectroscopic (photometric) surveys can differentiate between general relativity and f(R) gravity at the level of 3σ (13σ). Performing a <1 per cent measurement of EG requires a 10 per cent precision in β from Euclid or Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, currently achievable with a spectroscopic survey but difficult with only a photometric survey.

  10. Evidence of lensing of the cosmic microwave background by dark matter halos.

    PubMed

    Madhavacheril, Mathew; Sehgal, Neelima; Allison, Rupert; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Caligiuri, Jerod; Coughlin, Kevin; Crichton, Devin; Datta, Rahul; Devlin, Mark J; Dunkley, Joanna; Dünner, Rolando; Fogarty, Kevin; Grace, Emily; Hajian, Amir; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hill, J Colin; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D; Hlozek, Renée; Hughes, John P; Kosowsky, Arthur; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; McMahon, Jeff; Moodley, Kavilan; Munson, Charles; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D; Page, Lyman A; Partridge, Bruce; Schmitt, Benjamin; Sherwin, Blake D; Sievers, Jon; Spergel, David N; Staggs, Suzanne T; Thornton, Robert; Van Engelen, Alexander; Ward, Jonathan T; Wollack, Edward J

    2015-04-17

    We present evidence of the gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background by 10(13) solar mass dark matter halos. Lensing convergence maps from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) are stacked at the positions of around 12 000 optically selected CMASS galaxies from the SDSS-III/BOSS survey. The mean lensing signal is consistent with simulated dark matter halo profiles and is favored over a null signal at 3.2σ significance. This result demonstrates the potential of microwave background lensing to probe the dark matter distribution in galaxy group and galaxy cluster halos. PMID:25933304

  11. A DETECTION OF WEAK-LENSING MAGNIFICATION USING GALAXY SIZES AND MAGNITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Fabian; Rhodes, Jason; Leauthaud, Alexie; Tanaka, Masayuki; Massey, Richard; George, Matthew R.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Finoguenov, Alexis

    2012-01-10

    Weak lensing is commonly measured using shear through galaxy ellipticities or using the effect of magnification bias on galaxy number densities. Here, we report on the first detection of weak-lensing magnification with a new, independent technique using the distribution of galaxy sizes and magnitudes. These data come for free in galaxy surveys designed for measuring shear. We present the magnification estimator and apply it to an X-ray-selected sample of galaxy groups in the COSMOS Hubble Space Telescope survey. The measurement of the projected surface density {Sigma}(r) is consistent with the shear measurements within the uncertainties and has roughly 40% of the signal to noise of the latter. We discuss systematic issues and challenges to realizing the potential of this new probe of weak lensing.

  12. Atmospheric PSF Interpolation for Weak Lensing in Short Exposure Imaging Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Marshall, P.J.; Jernigan, J.G.; Peterson, J.R.; Kahn, S.M.; Gull, S.F.; AlSayyad, Y.; Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Bard, D.; Connolly, A.; Gibson, R.R.; Gilmore, K.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Hodge, M.A.; Jones, L.; Krughoff, S.; Lorenz, S.; Marshall, S.; Meert, A.

    2012-09-19

    A main science goal for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is to measure the cosmic shear signal from weak lensing to extreme accuracy. One difficulty, however, is that with the short exposure time ({approx_equal}15 seconds) proposed, the spatial variation of the Point Spread Function (PSF) shapes may be dominated by the atmosphere, in addition to optics errors. While optics errors mainly cause the PSF to vary on angular scales similar or larger than a single CCD sensor, the atmosphere generates stochastic structures on a wide range of angular scales. It thus becomes a challenge to infer the multi-scale, complex atmospheric PSF patterns by interpolating the sparsely sampled stars in the field. In this paper we present a new method, psfent, for interpolating the PSF shape parameters, based on reconstructing underlying shape parameter maps with a multi-scale maximum entropy algorithm. We demonstrate, using images from the LSST Photon Simulator, the performance of our approach relative to a 5th-order polynomial fit (representing the current standard) and a simple boxcar smoothing technique. Quantitatively, psfent predicts more accurate PSF models in all scenarios and the residual PSF errors are spatially less correlated. This improvement in PSF interpolation leads to a factor of 3.5 lower systematic errors in the shear power spectrum on scales smaller than {approx} 13, compared to polynomial fitting. We estimate that with psfent and for stellar densities greater than {approx_equal}1/arcmin{sup 2}, the spurious shear correlation from PSF interpolation, after combining a complete 10-year dataset from LSST, is lower than the corresponding statistical uncertainties on the cosmic shear power spectrum, even under a conservative scenario.

  13. The impact of camera optical alignments on weak lensing measures for the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Antonik, M. L.; Bacon, D. J.; Bridle, S.; Doel, P.; Brooks, D.; Worswick, S.; Bernstein, G.; Bernstein, R.; DePoy, D.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gladders, M.; Gutierrez, G.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Kent, S. M.; Lahav, O.; Parker, S. -. J.; Roodman, A.; Walker, A. R.

    2013-04-10

    Telescope point spread function (PSF) quality is critical for realizing the potential of cosmic weak lensing observations to constrain dark energy and test general relativity. In this paper, we use quantitative weak gravitational lensing measures to inform the precision of lens optical alignment, with specific reference to the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We compute optics spot diagrams and calculate the shear and flexion of the PSF as a function of position on the focal plane. For perfect optical alignment, we verify the high quality of the DES optical design, finding a maximum PSF contribution to the weak lensing shear of 0.04 near the edge of the focal plane. However, this can be increased by a factor of approximately 3 if the lenses are only just aligned within their maximum specified tolerances. We calculate the E- and B-mode shear and flexion variance as a function of the decentre or tilt of each lens in turn. We find tilt accuracy to be a few times more important than decentre, depending on the lens considered. Finally, we consider the compound effect of decentre and tilt of multiple lenses simultaneously, by sampling from a plausible range of values of each parameter. We find that the compound effect can be around twice as detrimental as when considering any one lens alone. Furthermore, this combined effect changes the conclusions about which lens is most important to align accurately. For DES, the tilt of the first two lenses is the most important.

  14. Thermal lensing in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang

    2016-08-22

    Average powers from fiber lasers have reached the point that a quantitative understanding of thermal lensing and its impact on transverse mode instability is becoming critical. Although thermal lensing is well known qualitatively, there is a general lack of a simple method for quantitative analysis. In this work, we first conduct a study of thermal lensing in optical fibers based on a perturbation technique. The perturbation technique becomes increasingly inaccurate as thermal lensing gets stronger. It, however, provides a basis for determining a normalization factor to use in a more accurate numerical study. A simple thermal lensing threshold condition is developed. The impact of thermal lensing on transverse mode instability is also studied. PMID:27557260

  15. Lens models and magnification maps of the six Hubble Frontier Fields clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Traci L.; Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Gladders, Michael D.; Coe, Dan; Ebeling, Harald

    2014-12-10

    We present strong-lensing models as well as mass and magnification maps for the cores of the six Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Frontier Fields galaxy clusters. Our parametric lens models are constrained by the locations and redshifts of multiple image systems of lensed background galaxies. We use a combination of photometric redshifts and spectroscopic redshifts of the lensed background sources obtained by us (for A2744 and AS1063), collected from the literature, or kindly provided by the lensing community. Using our results, we (1) compare the derived mass distribution of each cluster to its light distribution, (2) quantify the cumulative magnification power of the HST Frontier Fields clusters, (3) describe how our models can be used to estimate the magnification and image multiplicity of lensed background sources at all redshifts and at any position within the cluster cores, and (4) discuss systematic effects and caveats resulting from our modeling methods. We specifically investigate the effect of the use of spectroscopic and photometric redshift constraints on the uncertainties of the resulting models. We find that the photometric redshift estimates of lensed galaxies are generally in excellent agreement with spectroscopic redshifts, where available. However, the flexibility associated with relaxed redshift priors may cause the complexity of large-scale structure that is needed to account for the lensing signal to be underestimated. Our findings thus underline the importance of spectroscopic arc redshifts, or tight photometric redshift constraints, for high precision lens models. All products from our best-fit lens models (magnification, convergence, shear, deflection field) and model simulations for estimating errors are made available via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes.

  16. Weak lensing generated by vector perturbations and detectability of cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Namikawa, Toshiya; Taruya, Atsushi E-mail: namikawa@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-10-01

    We study the observational signature of vector metric perturbations through the effect of weak gravitational lensing. In the presence of vector perturbations, the non-vanishing signals for B-mode cosmic shear and curl-mode deflection angle, which have never appeared in the case of scalar metric perturbations, naturally arise. Solving the geodesic and geodesic deviation equations, we drive the full-sky formulas for angular power spectra of weak lensing signals, and give the explicit expressions for E-/B-mode cosmic shear and gradient-/curl-mode deflection angle. As a possible source for seeding vector perturbations, we then consider a cosmic string network, and discuss its detectability from upcoming weak lensing and CMB measurements. Based on the formulas and a simple model for cosmic string network, we calculate the angular power spectra and expected signal-to-noise ratios for the B-mode cosmic shear and curl-mode deflection angle. We find that the weak lensing signals are enhanced for a smaller intercommuting probability of the string network, P, and they are potentially detectable from the upcoming cosmic shear and CMB lensing observations. For P ∼ 10{sup −1}, the minimum detectable tension of the cosmic string will be down to Gμ ∼ 5 × 10{sup −8}. With a theoretically inferred smallest value P ∼ 10{sup −3}, we could even detect the string with Gμ ∼ 5 × 10{sup −10}.

  17. EFFECT OF MASKED REGIONS ON WEAK-LENSING STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki; Hamana, Takashi

    2013-09-10

    Sky masking is unavoidable in wide-field weak-lensing observations. We study how masks affect the measurement of statistics of matter distribution probed by weak gravitational lensing. We first use 1000 cosmological ray-tracing simulations to examine in detail the impact of masked regions on the weak-lensing Minkowski Functionals (MFs). We consider actual sky masks used for a Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging survey. The masks increase the variance of the convergence field and the expected values of the MFs are biased. The bias then compromises the non-Gaussian signals induced by the gravitational growth of structure. We then explore how masks affect cosmological parameter estimation. We calculate the cumulative signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for masked maps to study the information content of lensing MFs. We show that the degradation of S/N for masked maps is mainly determined by the effective survey area. We also perform simple {chi}{sup 2} analysis to show the impact of lensing MF bias due to masked regions. Finally, we compare ray-tracing simulations with data from a Subaru 2 deg{sup 2} survey in order to address if the observed lensing MFs are consistent with those of the standard cosmology. The resulting {chi}{sup 2}/n{sub dof} = 29.6/30 for three combined MFs, obtained with the mask effects taken into account, suggests that the observational data are indeed consistent with the standard {Lambda}CDM model. We conclude that the lensing MFs are a powerful probe of cosmology only if mask effects are correctly taken into account.

  18. Effect of Masked Regions on Weak-lensing Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki; Hamana, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    Sky masking is unavoidable in wide-field weak-lensing observations. We study how masks affect the measurement of statistics of matter distribution probed by weak gravitational lensing. We first use 1000 cosmological ray-tracing simulations to examine in detail the impact of masked regions on the weak-lensing Minkowski Functionals (MFs). We consider actual sky masks used for a Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging survey. The masks increase the variance of the convergence field and the expected values of the MFs are biased. The bias then compromises the non-Gaussian signals induced by the gravitational growth of structure. We then explore how masks affect cosmological parameter estimation. We calculate the cumulative signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for masked maps to study the information content of lensing MFs. We show that the degradation of S/N for masked maps is mainly determined by the effective survey area. We also perform simple χ2 analysis to show the impact of lensing MF bias due to masked regions. Finally, we compare ray-tracing simulations with data from a Subaru 2 deg2 survey in order to address if the observed lensing MFs are consistent with those of the standard cosmology. The resulting χ2/n dof = 29.6/30 for three combined MFs, obtained with the mask effects taken into account, suggests that the observational data are indeed consistent with the standard ΛCDM model. We conclude that the lensing MFs are a powerful probe of cosmology only if mask effects are correctly taken into account.

  19. RHIC electron lenses upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Bruno, D.; Binello, S.; Costanzo, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D. M.; Hock, J.; Hock, K.; Harvey, M.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Mi, C.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T. A.; Pikin, A. I.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Samms, T.; Shrey, T. C.; Schoefer, V.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; White, S. M.

    2015-05-03

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 100 GeV polarized proton run in 2015, two electron lenses were used to partially compensate for the head-on beam-beam effect for the first time. Here, we describe the design of the current electron lens, detailing the hardware modifications made after the 2014 commissioning run with heavy ions. A new electron gun with 15-mm diameter cathode is characterized. The electron beam transverse profile was measured using a YAG screen and fitted with a Gaussian distribution. During operation, the overlap of the electron and proton beams was achieved using the electron backscattering detector in conjunction with an automated orbit control program.

  20. LensTools: Weak Lensing computing tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, A.

    2016-02-01

    LensTools implements a wide range of routines frequently used in Weak Gravitational Lensing, including tools for image analysis, statistical processing and numerical theory predictions. The package offers many useful features, including complete flexibility and easy customization of input/output formats; efficient measurements of power spectrum, PDF, Minkowski functionals and peak counts of convergence maps; survey masks; artificial noise generation engines; easy to compute parameter statistical inferences; ray tracing simulations; and many others. It requires standard numpy and scipy, and depending on tools used, may require Astropy (ascl:1304.002), emcee (ascl:1303.002), matplotlib, and mpi4py.

  1. Cross-correlation of gravitational lensing from DES Science Verification data with SPT and Planck lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, D.; et al.

    2015-12-14

    We measure the cross-correlation between weak lensing of galaxy images and of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The effects of gravitational lensing on different sources will be correlated if the lensing is caused by the same mass fluctuations. We use galaxy shape measurements from 139 deg$^{2}$ of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data and overlapping CMB lensing from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck. The DES source galaxies have a median redshift of $z_{\\rm med} {\\sim} 0.7$, while the CMB lensing kernel is broad and peaks at $z{\\sim}2$. The resulting cross-correlation is maximally sensitive to mass fluctuations at $z{\\sim}0.44$. Assuming the Planck 2015 best-fit cosmology, the amplitude of the DES$\\times$SPT cross-power is found to be $A = 0.88 \\pm 0.30$ and that from DES$\\times$Planck to be $A = 0.86 \\pm 0.39$, where $A=1$ corresponds to the theoretical prediction. These are consistent with the expected signal and correspond to significances of $2.9 \\sigma$ and $2.2 \\sigma$ respectively. We demonstrate that our results are robust to a number of important systematic effects including the shear measurement method, estimator choice, photometric redshift uncertainty and CMB lensing systematics. Significant intrinsic alignment of galaxy shapes would increase the cross-correlation signal inferred from the data; we calculate a value of $A = 1.08 \\pm 0.36$ for DES$\\times$SPT when we correct the observations with a simple IA model. With three measurements of this cross-correlation now existing in the literature, there is not yet reliable evidence for any deviation from the expected LCDM level of cross-correlation, given the size of the statistical uncertainties and the significant impact of systematic errors, particularly IAs. We provide forecasts for the expected signal-to-noise of the combination of the five-year DES survey and SPT-3G.

  2. Predicting weak lensing statistics from halo mass reconstructions - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Spencer

    2015-08-20

    As dark matter does not absorb or emit light, its distribution in the universe must be inferred through indirect effects such as the gravitational lensing of distant galaxies. While most sources are only weakly lensed, the systematic alignment of background galaxies around a foreground lens can constrain the mass of the lens which is largely in the form of dark matter. In this paper, I have implemented a framework to reconstruct all of the mass along lines of sight using a best-case dark matter halo model in which the halo mass is known. This framework is then used to make predictions of the weak lensing of 3,240 generated source galaxies through a 324 arcmin² field of the Millennium Simulation. The lensed source ellipticities are characterized by the ellipticity-ellipticity and galaxy-mass correlation functions and compared to the same statistic for the intrinsic and ray-traced ellipticities. In the ellipticity-ellipticity correlation function, I and that the framework systematically under predicts the shear power by an average factor of 2.2 and fails to capture correlation from dark matter structure at scales larger than 1 arcminute. The model predicted galaxy-mass correlation function is in agreement with the ray-traced statistic from scales 0.2 to 0.7 arcminutes, but systematically underpredicts shear power at scales larger than 0.7 arcminutes by an average factor of 1.2. Optimization of the framework code has reduced the mean CPU time per lensing prediction by 70% to 24 ± 5 ms. Physical and computational shortcomings of the framework are discussed, as well as potential improvements for upcoming work.

  3. Optics of progressive addition lenses.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, J E; Buri, M; Bailey, I L; Azus, J; Borish, I M

    1987-02-01

    The optical characteristics of the major progressive addition lenses were measured using an automated lensometer with a specially designed lens holder to simulate eye rotation. Measurements were made every 3 degrees (about 1.5 mm) and graphs of isospherical equivalent lines and isocylinder lines were developed. Generally the near zone of these lenses is narrower and lower than in bifocal or trifocal lenses. Distinct differences exist between the various progressive lenses. The width of the near zone, rate of power progression, amount of unwanted cylinder (level with the distance center), and clarity of the distance zone are compared for the various lenses. The optical measurements demonstrate an apparent trade-off between the size of the cylinder-free area of the lens and the amount of the cylinder. PMID:3826294

  4. Weak lensing cosmology beyond ΛCDM

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sudeep; Linder, Eric V.; Nakajima, Reiko; Putter, Roland de E-mail: rdeputter@icc.ub.edu E-mail: reiko@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2012-11-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is one of the key probes of the cosmological model, dark energy, and dark matter, providing insight into both the cosmic expansion history and large scale structure growth history. Taking into account a broad spectrum of physics affecting growth — dynamical dark energy, extended gravity, neutrino masses, and spatial curvature — we analyze the cosmological constraints. Similarly we consider the effects of a range of systematic uncertainties, in shear measurement, photometric redshifts, intrinsic alignments, and the nonlinear power spectrum, on cosmological parameter extraction. We also investigate, and provide fitting formulas for, the influence of survey parameters such as redshift depth, galaxy number densities, and sky area on the cosmological constraints in the beyond-ΛCDM parameter space. Finally, we examine the robustness of results for different fiducial cosmologies.

  5. WEAK-LENSING PEAK FINDING: ESTIMATORS, FILTERS, AND BIASES

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Fabian

    2011-07-10

    Large catalogs of shear-selected peaks have recently become a reality. In order to properly interpret the abundance and properties of these peaks, it is necessary to take into account the effects of the clustering of source galaxies, among themselves and with the lens. In addition, the preferred selection of magnified galaxies in a flux- and size-limited sample leads to fluctuations in the apparent source density that correlate with the lensing field. In this paper, we investigate these issues for two different choices of shear estimators that are commonly in use today: globally normalized and locally normalized estimators. While in principle equivalent, in practice these estimators respond differently to systematic effects such as magnification and cluster member dilution. Furthermore, we find that the answer to the question of which estimator is statistically superior depends on the specific shape of the filter employed for peak finding; suboptimal choices of the estimator+filter combination can result in a suppression of the number of high peaks by orders of magnitude. Magnification and size bias generally act to increase the signal-to-noise {nu} of shear peaks; for high peaks the boost can be as large as {Delta}{nu} {approx} 1-2. Due to the steepness of the peak abundance function, these boosts can result in a significant increase in the observed abundance of shear peaks. A companion paper investigates these same issues within the context of stacked weak-lensing mass estimates.

  6. LENSED: a code for the forward reconstruction of lenses and sources from strong lensing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessore, Nicolas; Bellagamba, Fabio; Metcalf, R. Benton

    2016-09-01

    Robust modelling of strong lensing systems is fundamental to exploit the information they contain about the distribution of matter in galaxies and clusters. In this work, we present LENSED, a new code which performs forward parametric modelling of strong lenses. LENSED takes advantage of a massively parallel ray-tracing kernel to perform the necessary calculations on a modern graphics processing unit (GPU). This makes the precise rendering of the background lensed sources much faster, and allows the simultaneous optimisation of tens of parameters for the selected model. With a single run, the code is able to obtain the full posterior probability distribution for the lens light, the mass distribution and the background source at the same time. LENSED is first tested on mock images which reproduce realistic space-based observations of lensing systems. In this way, we show that it is able to recover unbiased estimates of the lens parameters, even when the sources do not follow exactly the assumed model. Then, we apply it to a subsample of the SLACS lenses, in order to demonstrate its use on real data. The results generally agree with the literature, and highlight the flexibility and robustness of the algorithm.

  7. Simple Hartmann test data interpretation for ophthalmic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas-Peimbert, Didia Patricia; Trujillo-Schiaffino, Gerardo; González-Silva, Jorge Alberto; Almazán-Cuellar, Saúl; Malacara-Doblado, Daniel

    2006-04-01

    This article describes a simple Hartmann test data interpretation that can be used to evaluate the performance of ophthalmic lenses. Considering each spot of the Hartmann pattern such as a single test ray, using simple ray tracing analysis, it is possible to calculate the power values from the lens under test at the point corresponding with each spot. The values obtained by this procedure are used to plot the power distribution map of the entire lens. We present the results obtained applying this method with single vision, bifocal, and progressive lenses.

  8. Gravitational lensing analysis of the Kilo-Degree Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijken, Konrad; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Nakajima, Reiko; Erben, Thomas; de Jong, Jelte T. A.; Viola, Massimo; Choi, Ami; Hoekstra, Henk; Miller, Lance; van Uitert, Edo; Amon, Alexandra; Blake, Chris; Brouwer, Margot; Buddendiek, Axel; Conti, Ian Fenech; Eriksen, Martin; Grado, Aniello; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Helmich, Ewout; Herbonnet, Ricardo; Irisarri, Nancy; Kitching, Thomas; Klaes, Dominik; La Barbera, Francesco; Napolitano, Nicola; Radovich, Mario; Schneider, Peter; Sifón, Cristóbal; Sikkema, Gert; Simon, Patrick; Tudorica, Alexandru; Valentijn, Edwin; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; van Waerbeke, Ludovic

    2015-12-01

    The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is a multi-band imaging survey designed for cosmological studies from weak lensing and photometric redshifts. It uses the European Southern Observatory VLT Survey Telescope with its wide-field camera OmegaCAM. KiDS images are taken in four filters similar to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugri bands. The best seeing time is reserved for deep r-band observations. The median 5σ limiting AB magnitude is 24.9 and the median seeing is below 0.7 arcsec. Initial KiDS observations have concentrated on the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) regions near the celestial equator, where extensive, highly complete redshift catalogues are available. A total of 109 survey tiles, 1 square degree each, form the basis of the first set of lensing analyses of halo properties of GAMA galaxies. Nine galaxies per square arcminute enter the lensing analysis, for an effective inverse shear variance of 69 arcmin-2. Accounting for the shape measurement weight, the median redshift of the sources is 0.53. KiDS data processing follows two parallel tracks, one optimized for weak lensing measurement and one for accurate matched-aperture photometry (for photometric redshifts). This technical paper describes the lensing and photometric redshift measurements (including a detailed description of the Gaussian aperture and photometry pipeline), summarizes the data quality and presents extensive tests for systematic errors that might affect the lensing analyses. We also provide first demonstrations of the suitability of the data for cosmological measurements, and describe our blinding procedure for preventing confirmation bias in the scientific analyses. The KiDS catalogues presented in this paper are released to the community through http://kids.strw.leidenuniv.nl.

  9. Model-free analysis of quadruply imaged gravitationally lensed systems and substructured galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woldesenbet, Addishiwot G.; Williams, Liliya L. R.

    2015-11-01

    Multiple image gravitational lens systems, and especially quads, are invaluable in determining the amount and distribution of mass in galaxies. This is usually done by mass modelling using parametric or free-form methods. An alternative way of extracting information about lens mass distribution is to use lensing degeneracies and invariants. Where applicable, they allow one to make conclusions about whole classes of lenses without model fitting. Here, we use approximate, but observationally useful invariants formed by the three relative polar angles of quad images around the lens centre to show that many smooth elliptical+shear lenses can reproduce the same set of quad image angles within observational error. This result allows us to show in a model-free way what the general class of smooth elliptical+shear lenses looks like in the three-dimensional (3D) space of image relative angles, and that this distribution does not match that of the observed quads. We conclude that, even though smooth elliptical+shear lenses can reproduce individual quads, they cannot reproduce the quad population. What is likely needed is substructure, with clump masses larger than those responsible for flux ratio anomalies in quads, or luminous or dark nearby perturber galaxies.

  10. Lenses for JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, Harald; Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Repp, Andrew; Atek, Hakim; Egami, Eiichi; Windhorst, Rogier; Edge, Alastair

    2016-08-01

    JWST will dramatically advance our knowledge and understanding of the first generations of galaxies at z>10, their role in the re-ionization of the Universe, and the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the complexity and diversity of galaxies at the current epoch. As demonstrated by HST legacy projects like CLASH and the Hubble Frontier Fields, gravitational amplification by massive galaxy clusters can significantly extend the depth of the required observations. However, for JWST, reducing any diffuse background light will be just as crucial. We here propose Spitzer/IRAC observations of six massive cluster lenses, specifically selected as candidates for observation with JWST. By (a) quantifying the amount of intra-cluster light and (b) enabling us to improve our current lens models, the data resulting from the requested observations will be instrumental for the final selection of cluster targets that maximize the scientific returns of deep JWST observations.

  11. Gravitational lensing by gravastars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Tomohiro; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    As a possible method to detect gravastars (gravitational-vacuum-star), which was originally proposed by Mazur and Mottola, we study their gravitational lensing effects. Specifically, we adopt a spherical thin-shell model of a gravastar developed by Visser and Wiltshire, which connects interior de Sitter geometry and exterior Schwarzschild geometry, and assume that its surface is optically transparent. We calculate the image of a companion which rotates around the gravastar; we find that some characteristic images appear, depending on whether the gravastar possess unstable circular orbits of photons (Model 1) or not (Model 2). For Model 2, we calculate the total luminosity change, which is called microlensing effects; the maximal luminosity could be considerably larger than the black hole with the same mass.

  12. Combining Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing and Galaxy Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Youngsoo; Krause, Elisabeth; Dodelson, Scott; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Amara, Adam; Becker, Matt; Bridle, Sarah; Clampitt, Joseph; Crocce, Martin; Honscheid, Klaus; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Sanchez, Carles; Wechsler, Risa

    2015-01-01

    Combining galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering is a promising method for inferring the growth rate of large scale structure, a quantity that will shed light on the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a prime candidate for such an analysis, with its measurements of both the distribution of galaxies on the sky and the tangential shears of background galaxies induced by these foreground lenses. By constructing an end-to-end analysis that combines large-scale galaxy clustering and small-scale galaxy-galaxy lensing, we also forecast the potential of a combined probes analysis on DES datasets. In particular, we develop a practical approach to a DES combined probes analysis by jointly modeling the assumptions and systematics affecting the different components of the data vector, employing a shared halo model, HOD parametrization, photometric redshift errors, and shear measurement errors. Furthermore, we study the effect of external priors on different subsets of these parameters. We conclude that DES data will provide powerful constraints on the evolution of structure growth in the universe, conservatively/ optimistically constraining the growth function to 8%/4.9% with its first-year data covering 1000 square degrees, and to 4%/2.3% with its full five-year data covering 5000 square degrees.

  13. Galaxy cluster lensing masses in modified lensing potentials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barreira, Alexandre; Li, Baojiu; Jennings, Elise; Merten, Julian; King, Lindsay; Baugh, Carlton M.; Pascoli, Silvia

    2015-10-28

    In this study, we determine the concentration–mass relation of 19 X-ray selected galaxy clusters from the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble survey in theories of gravity that directly modify the lensing potential. We model the clusters as Navarro–Frenk–White haloes and fit their lensing signal, in the Cubic Galileon and Nonlocal gravity models, to the lensing convergence profiles of the clusters. We discuss a number of important issues that need to be taken into account, associated with the use of non-parametric and parametric lensing methods, as well as assumptions about the background cosmology. Our results show that the concentrationmore » and mass estimates in the modified gravity models are, within the error bars, the same as in Λ cold dark matter. This result demonstrates that, for the Nonlocal model, the modifications to gravity are too weak at the cluster redshifts, and for the Galileon model, the screening mechanism is very efficient inside the cluster radius. However, at distances ~ [2–20] Mpc/h from the cluster centre, we find that the surrounding force profiles are enhanced by ~ 20–40% in the Cubic Galileon model. This has an impact on dynamical mass estimates, which means that tests of gravity based on comparisons between lensing and dynamical masses can also be applied to the Cubic Galileon model.« less

  14. Galaxy cluster lensing masses in modified lensing potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Barreira, Alexandre; Li, Baojiu; Jennings, Elise; Merten, Julian; King, Lindsay; Baugh, Carlton M.; Pascoli, Silvia

    2015-10-28

    In this study, we determine the concentration–mass relation of 19 X-ray selected galaxy clusters from the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble survey in theories of gravity that directly modify the lensing potential. We model the clusters as Navarro–Frenk–White haloes and fit their lensing signal, in the Cubic Galileon and Nonlocal gravity models, to the lensing convergence profiles of the clusters. We discuss a number of important issues that need to be taken into account, associated with the use of non-parametric and parametric lensing methods, as well as assumptions about the background cosmology. Our results show that the concentration and mass estimates in the modified gravity models are, within the error bars, the same as in Λ cold dark matter. This result demonstrates that, for the Nonlocal model, the modifications to gravity are too weak at the cluster redshifts, and for the Galileon model, the screening mechanism is very efficient inside the cluster radius. However, at distances ~ [2–20] Mpc/h from the cluster centre, we find that the surrounding force profiles are enhanced by ~ 20–40% in the Cubic Galileon model. This has an impact on dynamical mass estimates, which means that tests of gravity based on comparisons between lensing and dynamical masses can also be applied to the Cubic Galileon model.

  15. Galaxy cluster lensing masses in modified lensing potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreira, Alexandre; Li, Baojiu; Jennings, Elise; Merten, Julian; King, Lindsay; Baugh, Carlton M.; Pascoli, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    We determine the concentration-mass relation of 19 X-ray selected galaxy clusters from the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble survey in theories of gravity that directly modify the lensing potential. We model the clusters as Navarro-Frenk-White haloes and fit their lensing signal, in the Cubic Galileon and Nonlocal gravity models, to the lensing convergence profiles of the clusters. We discuss a number of important issues that need to be taken into account, associated with the use of non-parametric and parametric lensing methods, as well as assumptions about the background cosmology. Our results show that the concentration and mass estimates in the modified gravity models are, within the error bars, the same as in Λ cold dark matter. This result demonstrates that, for the Nonlocal model, the modifications to gravity are too weak at the cluster redshifts, and for the Galileon model, the screening mechanism is very efficient inside the cluster radius. However, at distances ˜(2-20) Mpc h-1 from the cluster centre, we find that the surrounding force profiles are enhanced by ˜20-40 per cent in the Cubic Galileon model. This has an impact on dynamical mass estimates, which means that tests of gravity based on comparisons between lensing and dynamical masses can also be applied to the Cubic Galileon model.

  16. THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Anne H.

    2012-04-10

    Accurate measurement of galaxy cluster masses is an essential component not only in studies of cluster physics but also for probes of cosmology. However, different mass measurement techniques frequently yield discrepant results. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey MaxBCG catalog's mass-richness relation has previously been constrained using weak lensing shear, Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ), and X-ray measurements. The mass normalization of the clusters as measured by weak lensing shear is {approx}>25% higher than that measured using SZ and X-ray methods, a difference much larger than the stated measurement errors in the analyses. We constrain the mass-richness relation of the MaxBCG galaxy cluster catalog by measuring the gravitational lensing magnification of type I quasars in the background of the clusters. The magnification is determined using the quasars' variability and the correlation between quasars' variability amplitude and intrinsic luminosity. The mass-richness relation determined through magnification is in agreement with that measured using shear, confirming that the lensing strength of the clusters implies a high mass normalization and that the discrepancy with other methods is not due to a shear-related systematic measurement error. We study the dependence of the measured mass normalization on the cluster halo orientation. As expected, line-of-sight clusters yield a higher normalization; however, this minority of haloes does not significantly bias the average mass-richness relation of the catalog.

  17. Statistical and systematic errors in the measurement of weak-lensing Minkowski functionals: Application to the Canada-France-Hawaii Lensing Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki

    2014-05-01

    The measurement of cosmic shear using weak gravitational lensing is a challenging task that involves a number of complicated procedures. We study in detail the systematic errors in the measurement of weak-lensing Minkowski Functionals (MFs). Specifically, we focus on systematics associated with galaxy shape measurements, photometric redshift errors, and shear calibration correction. We first generate mock weak-lensing catalogs that directly incorporate the actual observational characteristics of the Canada-France-Hawaii Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). We then perform a Fisher analysis using the large set of mock catalogs for various cosmological models. We find that the statistical error associated with the observational effects degrades the cosmological parameter constraints by a factor of a few. The Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey with a sky coverage of ∼1400 deg{sup 2} will constrain the dark energy equation of the state parameter with an error of Δw {sub 0} ∼ 0.25 by the lensing MFs alone, but biases induced by the systematics can be comparable to the 1σ error. We conclude that the lensing MFs are powerful statistics beyond the two-point statistics only if well-calibrated measurement of both the redshifts and the shapes of source galaxies is performed. Finally, we analyze the CFHTLenS data to explore the ability of the MFs to break degeneracies between a few cosmological parameters. Using a combined analysis of the MFs and the shear correlation function, we derive the matter density Ω{sub m0}=0.256±{sub 0.046}{sup 0.054}.

  18. CMB lensing and giant rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathaus, Ben; Itzhaki, Nissan

    2012-05-01

    We study the CMB lensing signature of a pre-inationary particle (PIP), assuming it is responsible for the giant rings anomaly that was found recently in the WMAP data. Simulating Planck-like data we find that generically the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio associated with such a PIP is quite small and it would be difficult to cross correlate the temperature giant rings with the CMB lensing signal. However, if the pre-inationary particle is also responsible for the bulk flow measured from the local large scale structure, which happens to point roughly at the same direction as the giant rings, then the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio is fairly significant.

  19. KINOFORM LENSES - TOWARD NANOMETER RESOLUTION.

    SciTech Connect

    STEIN, A.; EVANS-LUTTERODT, K.; TAYLOR, A.

    2004-10-23

    While hard x-rays have wavelengths in the nanometer and sub-nanometer range, the ability to focus them is limited by the quality of sources and optics, and not by the wavelength. A few options, including reflective (mirrors), diffractive (zone plates) and refractive (CRL's) are available, each with their own limitations. Here we present our work with kinoform lenses which are refractive lenses with all material causing redundant 2{pi} phase shifts removed to reduce the absorption problems inherently limiting the resolution of refractive lenses. By stacking kinoform lenses together, the effective numerical aperture, and thus the focusing resolution, can be increased. The present status of kinoform lens fabrication and testing at Brookhaven is presented as well as future plans toward achieving nanometer resolution.

  20. Ophthalmic halo reduced lenses design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limon, Ofer; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-05-01

    The halo effect is a very problematic visual artifact occurring in extended depth of focus or multi-focal ophthalmic lenses such as e.g. intra-ocular (after cataract surgery) or contact lenses when used in dark illumination conditions. This artifact is generated due to surface structures added on top of those lenses in order to increase their depth of focus or to realize multiple focal lengths. In this paper we present novel solution that can resolve this major problem of ophthalmic lenses. The proposed solution involves modification to the surface structure that realizes the extended depth of focus. Our solution is fabricated and numerically and experimentally validated also in preliminary in-vivo trials.

  1. HUBBLE'S TOP TEN GRAVITATIONAL LENSES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Hubble Space Telescope serendipitous survey of the sky has uncovered exotic patterns, rings, arcs and crosses that are all optical mirages produced by a gravitational lens, nature's equivalent of having giant magnifying glass in space. Shown are the top 10 lens candidates uncovered in the deepest 100 Hubble fields. Hubble's sensitivity and high resolution allow it to see faint and distant lenses that cannot be detected with ground-based telescopes whose images are blurred by Earth's atmosphere. [Top Left] - HST 01248+0351 is a lensed pair on either side of the edge-on disk lensing galaxy. [Top Center] - HST 01247+0352 is another pair of bluer lensed source images around the red spherical elliptical lensing galaxy. Two much fainter images can be seen near the detection limit which might make this a quadruple system. [Top Right] - HST 15433+5352 is a very good lens candidate with a bluer lensed source in the form of an extended arc about the redder elliptical lensing galaxy. [Middle Far Left] - HST 16302+8230 could be an 'Einstein ring' and the most intriguing lens candidate. It has been nicknamed the 'the London Underground' since it resembles that logo. [Middle Near Left] - HST 14176+5226 is the first, and brightest lens system discovered in 1995 with the Hubble telescope. This lens candidate has now been confirmed spectroscopically using large ground-based telescopes. The elliptical lensing galaxy is located 7 billion light-years away, and the lensed quasar is about 11 billion light-years distant. [Middle Near Right] - HST 12531-2914 is the second quadruple lens candidate discovered with Hubble. It is similar to the first, but appears smaller and fainter. [Middle Far Right] - HST 14164+5215 is a pair of bluish lensed images symmetrically placed around a brighter, redder galaxy. [Bottom Left] - HST 16309+8230 is an edge-on disk-like galaxy (blue arc) which has been significantly distorted by the redder lensing elliptical galaxy. [Bottom Center] - HST 12368

  2. Gravitational lensing in quasar samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeskens, Jean-François; Surdej, Jean

    The first cosmic mirage was discovered approximately 20 years ago as the double optical counterpart of a radio source. This phenomenon had been predicted some 70 years earlier as a consequence of General Relativity. We present here a summary of what we have learnt since. The applications are so numerous that we had to concentrate on a few selected aspects of this new field of research. This review is focused on strong gravitational lensing, i.e. the formation of multiple images, in QSO samples. It is intended to give the reader an up-to-date status of the observations and to present an overview of its most interesting potential applications in cosmology and astrophysics, as well as numerous important results achieved so far. The first section follows an intuitive approach to the basics of gravitational lensing and is developed in view of our interest in multiply imaged quasars. The astrophysical and cosmological applications of gravitational lensing are outlined in Sect. 2 and the most important results are presented in Sect. 5. Sections 3 and 4 are devoted to the observations. Finally, conclusions are summarized in the last section. We have tried to avoid duplication with existing (and excellent) introductions to the field of gravitational lensing. For this reason, we did not concentrate on the individual properties of specific lens models, as these are already well presented in Narayan and Bartelmann (1996) and on a more intuitive ground in Refsdal and Surdej (1994). Wambsganss (1998) proposes a broad view on gravitational lensing in astronomy; the reviews by Fort and Mellier (1994) and Hattori et al. (1999) deal with lensing by galaxy clusters; microlensing in the Galaxy and the local group is reviewed by Paczynski (1996) and a general panorama on weak lensing is given by Bartelmann and Schneider (1999) and Mellier (1999). The monograph on the theory of gravitational lensing by Schneider, Ehlers and Falco (1992) also remains a reference in the field.

  3. The Thirring-Lense Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embacher, Franz

    The Thirring-Lense effect is the phenomenon that an observer near a rotating mass, being in a state which is non-rotating with respect to the rest of the universe, experiences extra inertial forces, i.e. becomes dizzy. The first anticipation of the effect goes back to Ernst Mach; its first quantitative prediction on the basis of general relativity was given by Hans Thirring and Joseph Lense. Almost ninety years later, the effect seems to be experimentally verified.

  4. Uncertainties in pixel-based source reconstruction for gravitationally lensed objects and applications to lensed galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagore, Amitpal Singh

    Gravitational lens modeling of spatially resolved sources is a challenging inverse problem that can involve many observational constraints and model parameters. I present a new software package, pixsrc, that works in conjunction with the lensmodel software and builds on established pixel-based source reconstruction (PBSR) algorithms for de-lensing a source and constraining lens model parameters. Using test data, I explore statistical and systematic uncertainties associated with gridding, source regularization, interpolation errors, noise, and telescope pointing. I compare two gridding schemes in the source plane: a fully adaptive grid and an adaptive Cartesian grid. I also consider regularization schemes that minimize derivatives of the source and introduce a scheme that minimizes deviations from an analytic source profile. Careful choice of gridding and regularization can reduce "discreteness noise" in the chi2 surface that is inherent in the pixel-based methodology. With a gridded source, errors due to interpolation need to be taken into account (especially for high S/N data). Different realizations of noise and telescope pointing lead to slightly different values for lens model parameters, and the scatter between different "observations" can be comparable to or larger than the model uncertainties themselves. The same effects create scatter in the lensing magnification at the level of a few percent for a peak S/N of 10. I then apply pixsrc to observations of lensed, high-redshift galaxies. SDSS J0901+1814, is an ultraluminous infrared galaxy at z=2.26 that is also UV-bright, and it is lensed by a foreground group of galaxies at z=0.35. I constrain the lens model using maps of CO(3-2) rotational line emission and optical imaging and apply the lens model to observations of CO(1-0), H-alpha, and [NII] line emission as well. Using the de-lensed images, I calculate properties of the source, such as the gas mass fraction and dynamical mass. Finally, I examine a

  5. Micro-optofluidic Lenses: A review

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2010-01-01

    This review presents a systematic perspective on the development of micro-optofluidic lenses. The progress on the development of micro-optofluidic lenses are illustrated by example from recent literature. The advantage of micro-optofluidic lenses over solid lens systems is their tunability without the use of large actuators such as servo motors. Depending on the relative orientation of light path and the substrate surface, micro-optofluidic lenses can be categorized as in-plane or out-of-plane lenses. However, this review will focus on the tunability of the lenses and categorizes them according to the concept of tunability. Micro-optofluidic lenses can be either tuned by the liquid in use or by the shape of the lens. Micro-optofluidic lenses with tunable shape are categorized according to the actuation schemes. Typical parameters of micro-optofluidic lenses reported recently are compared and discussed. Finally, perspectives are given for future works in this field. PMID:20714369

  6. Tracking quintessence by cosmic shear. Constraints from VIRMOS-Descart and CFHTLS and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimd, C.; Tereno, I.; Uzan, J.-P.; Mellier, Y.; van Waerbeke, L.; Semboloni, E.; Hoekstra, H.; Fu, L.; Riazuelo, A.

    2007-02-01

    Aims:Dark energy can be investigated in two complementary ways, by considering either general parameterizations or physically well-defined models. Following the second route, we explore the observational constraints on quintessence models where the acceleration of our universe is driven by a slow-rolling scalar field. Using weak lensing data to investigate high-energy motivated models of dark energy for the first time, the analysis focuses on cosmic shear, examining how weak lensing surveys can constrain dark energy, discussing the limitations due to the lack of knowledge of the non-linear regime, and combining with type Ia supernovae data and cosmic microwave background observations to lift some degeneracies. Methods: Using a Boltzmann code that includes quintessence models along with a weak lensing add-on code, we determine the shear power spectrum and several two-point statistics, describing the non-linear regime by two different mappings. The likelihood analysis completing the pipeline, based on a grid method, uses the "gold set" of supernovae Ia, VIRMOS-Descart and CFHTLS-deep and -wide data for weak lensing; we also explore larger angular scales, using a synthetic realization of the complete CFHTLS-wide survey, as well as of space-based mission surveys. WMAP-first year data are used for the normalization and to broadly define the location of the first acoustic peak constraining the quintessence parameter space. Results: Two classes of cosmological parameters are discussed: i) those accounting for quintessence affect mainly geometrical factors; ii) cosmological parameters specifying the primordial universe strongly depend on the description of the non-linear regime. This dependence is confirmed using wide surveys, by discarding the smaller angular scales to reduce the dependence on the non-linear regime. For a flat universe and a quintessence inverse-power-law potential with slope α, the joint analysis gives α<1 and ΩQ0=0.75+0.03-0.04 at a 95% confidence

  7. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  8. Cosmic Shear Measurements with the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Matthew; Troxel, Michael; Eifler, Tim; Maccrann, Niall; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    We present the first cosmic shear measurements with the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data, approximately 160 square degrees of four band, multiepoch imaging. We use two independent shear measurement pipelines developed for this data to perform a large suite null tests of the comsic shear signal, test for the presence of B-modes and search for instrumental contamination in the shear measurements. Combined with a suite of 126 ray traced weak lensing simulations, we are able to calibrate the covariance matrix of the cosmic shear measurements for the final likelihood analysis.

  9. GLAMER - II. Multiple-plane gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Margarita; Metcalf, R. Benton; Giocoli, Carlo

    2014-12-01

    We present an extension to multiple planes of the gravitational lensing code GLAMER. The method entails projecting the mass in the observed light-cone on to a discrete number of lens planes and inverse ray-shooting from the image to the source plane. The mass on each plane can be represented as haloes, simulation particles, a projected mass map extracted form a numerical simulation or any combination of these. The image finding is done in a source-oriented fashion, where only regions of interest are iteratively refined on an initially coarse image plane grid. The calculations are performed in parallel on shared memory machines. The code is able to handle different types of analytic haloes (NFW, NSIE, power law, etc.), haloes extracted from numerical simulations and clusters constructed from semi-analytic models (MOKA). Likewise, there are several different options for modelling the source(s) which can be distributed throughout the light-cone. The distribution of matter in the light-cone can be either taken from a pre-existing N-body numerical simulations, from halo catalogues, or are generated from an analytic mass function. We present several tests of the code and demonstrate some of its applications such as generating mock images of galaxy and galaxy cluster lenses.

  10. Thermal lensing in ocular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincelette, Rebecca Lee

    2009-12-01

    This research was a collaborative effort between the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and the University of Texas to examine the laser-tissue interaction of thermal lensing induced by continuous-wave, CW, near-infrared, NIR, laser radiation in the eye and its influence on the formation of a retinal lesion from said radiation. CW NIR laser radiation can lead to a thermal lesion induced on the retina given sufficient power and exposure duration as related to three basic parameters; the percent of transmitted energy to, the optical absorption of, and the size of the laser-beam created at the retina. Thermal lensing is a well-known phenomenon arising from the optical absorption, and subsequent temperature rise, along the path of the propagating beam through a medium. Thermal lensing causes the laser-beam profile delivered to the retina to be time dependent. Analysis of a dual-beam, multidimensional, high-frame rate, confocal imaging system in an artificial eye determined the rate of thermal lensing in aqueous media exposed to 1110, 1130, 1150 and 1318-nm wavelengths was related to the power density created along the optical axis and linear absorption coefficient of the medium. An adaptive optics imaging system was used to record the aberrations induced by the thermal lens at the retina in an artificial eye during steady-state. Though the laser-beam profiles changed over the exposure time, the CW NIR retinal damage thresholds between 1110--1319-nm were determined to follow conventional fitting algorithms which neglected thermal lensing. A first-order mathematical model of thermal lensing was developed by conjoining an ABCD beam propagation method, Beer's law of attenuation, and a solution to the heat-equation with respect to radial diffusion. The model predicted that thermal lensing would be strongest for small (< 4-mm) 1/e2 laser-beam diameters input at the corneal plane and weakly transmitted wavelengths where less than 5% of the energy is delivered to the retina

  11. Weak lensing and cosmological investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Viviana

    2005-03-01

    In the last few years the scientific community has been dealing with the challenging issue of identifying the dark energy component. We regard weak gravitational lensing as a brand new, and extremely important, tool for cosmological investigation in this field. In fact, the features imprinted on the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation by the lensing from the intervening distribution of matter represent a pretty unbiased estimator, and can thus be used for putting constraints on different dark energy models. This is true in particular for the magnetic-type B-modes of CMB polarization, whose unlensed spectrum at large multipoles (l ~= 1000) is very small even in presence of an amount of gravitational waves as large as currently allowed by the experiments: therefore, on these scales the lensing phenomenon is the only responsible for the observed power, and this signal turns out to be a faithful tracer of the dark energy dynamics. We first recall the formal apparatus of the weak lensing in extended theories of gravity, introducing the physical observables suitable to cast the bridge between lensing and cosmology, and then evaluate the amplitude of the expected effect in the particular case of a Non-Minimally-Coupled model, featuring a quadratic coupling between quintessence and Ricci scalar.

  12. Surface gravity-wave lensing.

    PubMed

    Elandt, Ryan B; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-02-01

    Here we show that a nonlinear resonance between oceanic surface waves caused by small seabed features (the so-called Bragg resonance) can be utilized to create the equivalent of lenses and curved mirrors for surface gravity waves. Such gravity wave lenses, which are merely small changes to the seafloor topography and therefore are surface noninvasive, can focus or defocus the energy of incident waves toward or away from any desired focal point. We further show that for a broadband incident wave spectrum (i.e., a wave group composed of a multitude of different-frequency waves), a polychromatic topography (occupying no more than the area required for a monochromatic lens) can achieve a broadband lensing effect. Gravity wave lenses can be utilized to create localized high-energy wave zones (e.g., for wave energy harvesting or creating artificial surf zones) as well as to disperse waves in order to create protected areas (e.g., harbors or areas near important offshore facilities). In reverse, lensing of oceanic waves may be caused by natural seabed features and may explain the frequent appearance of very high amplitude waves in certain bodies of water. PMID:25353576

  13. Stacked Weak Lensing Mass Calibration: Estimators, Systematics, and Impact on Cosmological Parameter Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Wu, Hao-Yi; Schmidt, Fabian; /Caltech

    2011-11-04

    When extracting the weak lensing shear signal, one may employ either locally normalized or globally normalized shear estimators. The former is the standard approach when estimating cluster masses, while the latter is the more common method among peak finding efforts. While both approaches have identical signal-to-noise in the weak lensing limit, it is possible that higher order corrections or systematic considerations make one estimator preferable over the other. In this paper, we consider the efficacy of both estimators within the context of stacked weak lensing mass estimation in the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We find that the two estimators have nearly identical statistical precision, even after including higher order corrections, but that these corrections must be incorporated into the analysis to avoid observationally relevant biases in the recovered masses. We also demonstrate that finite bin-width effects may be significant if not properly accounted for, and that the two estimators exhibit different systematics, particularly with respect to contamination of the source catalog by foreground galaxies. Thus, the two estimators may be employed as a systematic cross-check of each other. Stacked weak lensing in the DES should allow for the mean mass of galaxy clusters to be calibrated to {approx}2% precision (statistical only), which can improve the figure of merit of the DES cluster abundance experiment by a factor of {approx}3 relative to the self-calibration expectation. A companion paper investigates how the two types of estimators considered here impact weak lensing peak finding efforts.

  14. The M31 pixel lensing plan campaign: MACHO lensing and self-lensing signals

    SciTech Connect

    Calchi Novati, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Bozza, V.; Bruni, I.; Gualandi, R.; Dall'Ora, M.; De Paolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.; Nucita, A.; Strafella, F.; Dominik, M.; Jetzer, Ph.; Mancini, L.; Safonova, M.; Subramaniam, A.; Sereno, M.; Gould, A.; Collaboration: PLAN Collaboration

    2014-03-10

    We present the final analysis of the observational campaign carried out by the PLAN (Pixel Lensing Andromeda) collaboration to detect a dark matter signal in form of MACHOs through the microlensing effect. The campaign consists of about 1 month/year observations carried out over 4 years (2007-2010) at the 1.5 m Cassini telescope in Loiano (Astronomical Observatory of BOLOGNA, OAB) plus 10 days of data taken in 2010 at the 2 m Himalayan Chandra Telescope monitoring the central part of M31 (two fields of about 13' × 12.'6). We establish a fully automated pipeline for the search and the characterization of microlensing flux variations. As a result, we detect three microlensing candidates. We evaluate the expected signal through a full Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment completed by an analysis of the detection efficiency of our pipeline. We consider both 'self lensing' and 'MACHO lensing' lens populations, given by M31 stars and dark matter halo MACHOs, in M31 and the Milky Way, respectively. The total number of events is consistent with the expected self-lensing rate. Specifically, we evaluate an expected signal of about two self-lensing events. As for MACHO lensing, for full 0.5(10{sup –2}) M {sub ☉} MACHO halos, our prediction is for about four (seven) events. The comparatively small number of expected MACHO versus self-lensing events, together with the small number statistics at our disposal, do not enable us to put strong constraints on that population. Rather, the hypothesis, suggested by a previous analysis, on the MACHO nature of OAB-07-N2, one of the microlensing candidates, translates into a sizeable lower limit for the halo mass fraction in form of the would-be MACHO population, f, of about 15% for 0.5 M {sub ☉} MACHOs.

  15. An accurate and practical method for inference of weak gravitational lensing from galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Armstrong, Robert; Krawiec, Christina; March, Marisa C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate highly accurate recovery of weak gravitational lensing shear using an implementation of the Bayesian Fourier Domain (BFD) method proposed by Bernstein & Armstrong, extended to correct for selection biases. The BFD formalism is rigorously correct for Nyquist-sampled, background-limited, uncrowded images of background galaxies. BFD does not assign shapes to galaxies, instead compressing the pixel data D into a vector of moments M, such that we have an analytic expression for the probability P(M|g) of obtaining the observations with gravitational lensing distortion g along the line of sight. We implement an algorithm for conducting BFD's integrations over the population of unlensed source galaxies which measures ≈10 galaxies s-1 core-1 with good scaling properties. Initial tests of this code on ≈109 simulated lensed galaxy images recover the simulated shear to a fractional accuracy of m = (2.1 ± 0.4) × 10-3, substantially more accurate than has been demonstrated previously for any generally applicable method. Deep sky exposures generate a sufficiently accurate approximation to the noiseless, unlensed galaxy population distribution assumed as input to BFD. Potential extensions of the method include simultaneous measurement of magnification and shear; multiple-exposure, multiband observations; and joint inference of photometric redshifts and lensing tomography.

  16. An accurate and practical method for inference of weak gravitational lensing from galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Armstrong, Robert; Krawiec, Christina; March, Marisa C.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate highly accurate recovery of weak gravitational lensing shear using an implementation of the Bayesian Fourier Domain (BFD) method proposed by Bernstein & Armstrong (2014, BA14), extended to correct for selection biases. The BFD formalism is rigorously correct for Nyquist-sampled, background-limited, uncrowded image of background galaxies. BFD does not assign shapes to galaxies, instead compressing the pixel data D into a vector of moments M, such that we have an analytic expression for the probability P(M|g) of obtaining the observations with gravitational lensing distortion g along the line of sight. We implement an algorithm for conducting BFD's integrations over the population of unlensed source galaxies which measures ≈10 galaxies/second/core with good scaling properties. Initial tests of this code on ≈109 simulated lensed galaxy images recover the simulated shear to a fractional accuracy of m = (2.1 ± 0.4) × 10-3, substantially more accurate than has been demonstrated previously for any generally applicable method. Deep sky exposures generate a sufficiently accurate approximation to the noiseless, unlensed galaxy population distribution assumed as input to BFD. Potential extensions of the method include simultaneous measurement of magnification and shear; multiple-exposure, multi-band observations; and joint inference of photometric redshifts and lensing tomography.

  17. Reducing systematic error in weak lensing cluster surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Yousuke; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Hamana, Takashi; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Oguri, Masamune

    2014-05-10

    Weak lensing provides an important route toward collecting samples of clusters of galaxies selected by mass. Subtle systematic errors in image reduction can compromise the power of this technique. We use the B-mode signal to quantify this systematic error and to test methods for reducing this error. We show that two procedures are efficient in suppressing systematic error in the B-mode: (1) refinement of the mosaic CCD warping procedure to conform to absolute celestial coordinates and (2) truncation of the smoothing procedure on a scale of 10'. Application of these procedures reduces the systematic error to 20% of its original amplitude. We provide an analytic expression for the distribution of the highest peaks in noise maps that can be used to estimate the fraction of false peaks in the weak-lensing κ-signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) maps as a function of the detection threshold. Based on this analysis, we select a threshold S/N = 4.56 for identifying an uncontaminated set of weak-lensing peaks in two test fields covering a total area of ∼3 deg{sup 2}. Taken together these fields contain seven peaks above the threshold. Among these, six are probable systems of galaxies and one is a superposition. We confirm the reliability of these peaks with dense redshift surveys, X-ray, and imaging observations. The systematic error reduction procedures we apply are general and can be applied to future large-area weak-lensing surveys. Our high-peak analysis suggests that with an S/N threshold of 4.5, there should be only 2.7 spurious weak-lensing peaks even in an area of 1000 deg{sup 2}, where we expect ∼2000 peaks based on our Subaru fields.

  18. Lensed Type Ia supernovae as probes of cluster mass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, J.; Rubin, D.; Richard, J.; Rykoff, E.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Atek, H.; Barbary, K.; Deustua, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Goobar, A.; Hook, I.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Huang, X.; Kneib, J.-P.; Lidman, C.; Meyers, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Saunders, C.; Spadafora, A. L.; Suzuki, N.; Supernova Cosmology Project

    2014-05-01

    Using three magnified Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) detected behind CLASH (Cluster Lensing and Supernovae with Hubble) clusters, we perform a first pilot study to see whether standardizable candles can be used to calibrate cluster mass maps created from strong lensing observations. Such calibrations will be crucial when next-generation Hubble Space Telescope cluster surveys (e.g. Frontier) provide magnification maps that will, in turn, form the basis for the exploration of the high-redshift Universe. We classify SNe using combined photometric and spectroscopic observations, finding two of the three to be clearly of Type Ia and the third probable. The SNe exhibit significant amplification, up to a factor of 1.7 at ˜5σ significance (SN-L2). We conducted this as a blind study to avoid fine-tuning of parameters, finding a mean amplification difference between SNe and the cluster lensing models of 0.09 ± 0.09stat ± 0.05sys mag. This impressive agreement suggests no tension between cluster mass models and high-redshift-standardized SNe Ia. However, the measured statistical dispersion of σμ = 0.21 mag appeared large compared to the dispersion expected based on statistical uncertainties (0.14). Further work with the SN and cluster lensing models, post-unblinding, reduced the measured dispersion to σμ = 0.12. An explicit choice should thus be made as to whether SNe are used unblinded to improve the model, or blinded to test the model. As the lensed SN samples grow larger, this technique will allow improved constraints on assumptions regarding e.g. the structure of the dark matter halo.

  19. Transmission of the normal and cataractous lenses.

    PubMed

    Bielski, A; Robaczewski, T; Wolnikowski, J; Bieganowski, L

    1991-01-01

    Results of measurements of the transmission (total and in line) of cataractous lenses are presented. A magnitude is introduced which can be used as a measure of the in vitro opacity of lenses. PMID:1911631

  20. Visual Reliability : The Conception Of Varilux Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenne, William

    1986-05-01

    There is currently very rapid development of progressive lenses ; indeed, these lenses have been the subject of numerous studies, which show their remarkable aptitude for the correction of presbyopia.

  1. Probing cosmology with weak lensing selected clusters. II. Dark energy and f(R) gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirasaki, Masato; Hamana, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-02-01

    Ongoing and future wide-field galaxy surveys can be used to locate a number of clusters of galaxies with cosmic shear measurement alone. We study constraints on cosmological models using statistics of weak lensing selected galaxy clusters. We extend our previous theoretical framework to model the statistical properties of clusters in variants of cosmological models as well as in the standard ΛCDM model. Weak lensing selection of clusters does not rely on conventional assumptions such as the relation between luminosity and mass and/or hydrostatic equilibrium, but a number of observational effects compromise robust identification. We use a large set of realistic mock weak lensing catalogs as well as analytic models to perform a Fisher analysis and make a forecast for constraining two competing cosmological models, the wCDM model and f(R) model proposed by Hu and Sawicki (2007, Phys. Rev. D, 76, 064004), with our lensing statistics. We show that weak lensing selected clusters are excellent probes of cosmology when combined with cosmic shear power spectrum even in the presence of galaxy shape noise and masked regions. With the information from weak lensing selected clusters, the precision of cosmological parameter estimates can be improved by a factor of ˜1.6 and ˜8 for the wCDM model and f(R) model, respectively. The Hyper Suprime-Cam survey with sky coverage of 1250 degrees squared can constrain the equation of state of dark energy w0 with a level of Δw0 ˜ 0.1. It can also constrain the additional scalar degree of freedom in the f(R) model with a level of |fR0| ˜ 5 × 10-6, when constraints from cosmic microwave background measurements are incorporated. Future weak lensing surveys with sky coverage of 20000 degrees squared will place tighter constraints on w0 and |fR0| even without cosmic microwave background measurements.

  2. Aspheric lenses for terahertz imaging.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yat Hei; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2008-09-29

    We present novel designs for aspheric lenses used in terahertz (THz) imaging. As different surfaces result in different beam shaping properties and in different losses from reflection and absorption, the resultant imaging resolution (i.e. the focal spot size) depends critically on the design approach. We evaluate the different lens designs using Kirchhoff's scalar diffraction theory, and test the predictions experimentally. We also show that our lenses can achieve sub-wavelength resolution. While our lens designs are tested with THz radiation, the design considerations are applicable also to other regions of the electro-magnetic spectrum. PMID:18825237

  3. Terahertz super thin planar lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Ye, Jiasheng; Hu, Dan; Wang, Xinke; Feng, Shengfei; Sun, Wenfeng

    2012-12-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is an under developing range in the electromagnetic spectrum. It has attracted a lot of attentions due to its various potential applications. However, THz systems are difficult to be integrated into a smart size due to the limitation of its long wavelength. In this presentation, we propose a new approach to design planar lenses with a thickness of several hundred nanometers in the THz range. The fabricated lenses are characterized with a focal plane imaging system and it is found that they can focus the THz light and image an object well. It is expected that this new approach can pave a way for smart THz systems integration.

  4. Spatially multiplexed X-Y lateral shear interferometer with varying shears using holographic lens and spatial Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Joenathan, Charles; Bernal, Ashley; Sirohi, Rajpal S

    2013-08-01

    Current methods in shear interferometry provide shear only along one direction at a time. We propose a method in which interferograms with shear along the x, y, and xy directions can be obtained simultaneously from a single exposure recording via the concept of spatial multiplexing. The method utilizes holographic lenses, which have been recorded on a single plate with their optical centers translated along the x and y directions. The phase information is extracted through the Fourier transform method. In addition, this technique also provides a method to obtain interferograms with shear in multiples of the original shear along the x and y axis in one single frame capture due to the nonlinearity inherent in the phase holographic lens. PMID:23913080

  5. Analytic solutions for Navarro-Frenk-White lens models in the strong lensing regime for low characteristic convergences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dúmet-Montoya, H. S.; Caminha, G. B.; Makler, M.

    2013-12-01

    Context. The Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profile is often used to model gravitational lenses. For κs ≲ 0.1 (where κs is a parameter that defines the normalization of the NFW lens potential) - corresponding to galaxy and galaxy group mass scales - high numerical precision is required to accurately compute several quantities in the strong lensing regime. Aims: We obtain analytic solutions for several lensing quantities for circular NFW models and their elliptical (ENFW) and pseudo-elliptical (PNFW) extensions, on the typical scales where gravitational arcs are expected to be formed, in the κs ≲ 0.1 limit, by establishing their domain of validity. Methods: We approximate the deflection angle of the circular NFW model and derive analytic expressions for the convergence and shear for the PNFW and ENFW models. We obtain the constant distortion curves (including the tangential critical curve), which are used to define the domain of validity of the approximations, by employing a figure-of-merit to compare with the exact numerical solutions. We compute the deformation cross section as a further check of the validity of the approximations. Results: We derive analytic solutions for iso-convergence contours and constant distortion curves for the models considered here. We also obtain the deformation cross section, which is given in closed form for the circular NFW model and in terms of a one-dimensional integral for the elliptical ones. In addition, we provide a simple expression for the ellipticity of the iso-convergence contours of the pseudo-elliptical models and the connection of characteristic convergences among the PNFW and ENFW models. Conclusions: We conclude that the set of solutions derived here is generally accurate for κs ≲ 0.1. For low ellipticities, values up to κs ≃ 0.18 are allowed. On the other hand, the mapping among PNFW and the ENFW models is valid up to κs ≃ 0.4. The solutions derived in this work can be used to speed up numerical

  6. Searching for massive clusters in weak lensing surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamana, Takashi; Takada, Masahiro; Yoshida, Naoki

    2004-05-01

    We explore the ability of weak lensing surveys to locate massive clusters. We use both analytic models of dark matter haloes and mock weak lensing surveys generated from a large cosmological N-body simulation. The analytic models describe the average properties of weak lensing haloes and predict the number counts, enabling us to compute an effective survey selection function. We argue that the detectability of massive haloes depends not only on the halo mass but also strongly on the redshift where the halo is located. We test the model prediction for the peak number counts in weak lensing mass maps against mock numerical data, and find that the noise resulting from intrinsic galaxy ellipticities causes a systematic effect which increases the peak counts. We develop a correction scheme for the systematic effect in an empirical manner, and show that, after correction, the model prediction agrees well with the mock data. The mock data is also used to examine the completeness and efficiency of the weak lensing halo search by fully taking into account the noise and the projection effect by large-scale structures. We show that the detection threshold of S/N = 4 ~ 5 gives an optimal balance between completeness and efficiency. Our results suggest that, for a weak lensing survey with a galaxy number density of ng= 30 arcmin-2 with a mean redshift of z= 1, the mean number of haloes which are expected to cause lensing signals above S/N = 4 is Nhalo(S/N > 4) = 37 per 10 deg2, whereas 23 of the haloes are actually detected with S/N > 4, giving the effective completeness as good as 63 per cent. Alternatively, the mean number of peaks in the same area is Npeak= 62 for a detection threshold of S/N = 4. Among the 62 peaks, 23 are caused by haloes with the expected peak height S/N > 4, 13 result from haloes with 3 < S/N < 4 and the remaining 26 peaks are either the false peaks caused by the noise or haloes with a lower expected peak height. Therefore the contamination rate is 44

  7. Disentangling dark sector models using weak lensing statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giocoli, Carlo; Metcalf, R. Benton; Baldi, Marco; Meneghetti, Massimo; Moscardini, Lauro; Petkova, Margarita

    2015-09-01

    We perform multiplane ray tracing using the GLAMER gravitational lensing code within high-resolution light-cones extracted from the CoDECS simulations: a suite of cosmological runs featuring a coupling between dark energy and cold dark matter (CDM). We show that the presence of the coupling is evident not only in the redshift evolution of the normalization of the convergence power spectrum, but also in differences in non-linear structure formation with respect to ΛCDM. Using a tomographic approach under the assumption of a ΛCDM cosmology, we demonstrate that weak lensing measurements would result in a σ8 value that changes with the source redshift if the true underlying cosmology is a coupled dark energy (cDE) one. This provides a generic null test for these types of models. We also find that different models of cDE can show either an enhanced or a suppressed correlation between convergence maps with differing source redshifts as compared to ΛCDM. This would provide a direct way to discriminate between different possible realizations of the cDE scenario. Finally, we discuss the impact of the coupling on several lensing observables for different source redshifts and angular scales with realistic source redshift distributions for current ground-based and future space-based lensing surveys.

  8. Extreme value statistics of cosmic microwave background lensing deflection angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Philipp M.; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2015-10-01

    The smaller the angular scales on which the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are probed the more important their distortion due to gravitational lensing becomes. Here we investigate the maxima and minima of the CMB lensing deflection field using general extreme value statistics. Since general extreme value statistics applies to uncorrelated data in first place, we consider appropriately low-pass-filtered deflection maps. Besides the suppression of correlations filtering is required for another reason: the lensing field itself is not directly observable but needs to be (statistically) reconstructed from the lensed CMB by means of a quadratic estimator. This reconstruction, though, is noise dominated and therefore requires smoothing too. In idealized Gaussian realizations as well as in realistically reconstructed data, we find that both maxima and minima of the deflection angle components follow consistently a general extreme value distribution of Weibull type. However, its shape, location and scale parameters vary significantly between different realizations. The statistics' potential power to constrain cosmological models appears, therefore, rather limited.

  9. From weak lensing to non-Gaussianity via Minkowski functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, Dipak; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Smidt, Joseph; Coles, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present a new harmonic-domain-based approach for extracting morphological information, in the form of Minkowski functionals (MFs), from weak-lensing convergence maps. Using a perturbative expansion of the MFs, which is expected to be valid for the range of angular scales probed by most current weak-lensing surveys, we show that the study of three generalized skewness parameters is equivalent to the study of the three MFs defined in 2D. We then extend these skewness parameters to three associated skew spectra which carry more information about the convergence bispectrum than their one-point counterparts. We discuss various issues such as noise and incomplete sky coverage in the context of estimation of these skew spectra from realistic data. Our technique provides an alternative to the pixel-space approaches typically used in the estimation of MFs, and it can be particularly useful in the presence of masks with non-trivial topology. Analytical modelling of weak-lensing statistics relies on an accurate modelling of the statistics of the underlying density distribution. We apply three different formalisms to model the underlying dark matter bispectrum: the hierarchical ansatz, halo model and a fitting function based on numerical simulations; MFs resulting from each of these formalisms are computed and compared. We investigate the extent to which late-time gravity-induced non-Gaussianity (to which weak lensing is primarily sensitive) can be separated from primordial non-Gaussianity and how this separation depends on source redshift and angular scale.

  10. Optical Beam-Shear Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan; Szwaykowski, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    A technique for measuring optical beam shear is based on collecting light from the four quadrants of the beam and comparing the optical power collected from each quadrant with that from the other three quadrants. As used here, "shear" signifies lateral displacement of a beam of light from a nominal optical axis. A sensor for implementing this technique consists of a modified focusing lens and a quad-cell photodetector, both centered on the nominal optical axis. The modification of the lens consists in cutting the lens into four sectors (corresponding to the four quadrants) by sawing along two orthogonal diameters, then reassembling the lens following either of two approaches described next. In one approach, the lens is reassembled by gluing the sectors back together. In the simplest variant of this approach, the kerf of the saw matches the spacing of the photodetector cells, so that the focus of each sector crosses the axis of symmetry to fall on the opposite photodetector cell (see figure). In another variant of this approach, the lens sectors are spaced apart to make their individual foci to fall on separate photodetector cells, without crossing the optical axis. In the case of a sufficiently wide beam, the modified lens could be replaced with four independent lenses placed in a square array, each focusing onto an independent photodetector

  11. Optimizing weak lensing mass estimates for cluster profile uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Lam, T. Y.; Seitz, S.

    2011-09-11

    Weak lensing measurements of cluster masses are necessary for calibrating mass-observable relations (MORs) to investigate the growth of structure and the properties of dark energy. However, the measured cluster shear signal varies at fixed mass M200m due to inherent ellipticity of background galaxies, intervening structures along the line of sight, and variations in the cluster structure due to scatter in concentrations, asphericity and substructure. We use N-body simulated halos to derive and evaluate a weak lensing circular aperture mass measurement Map that minimizes the mass estimate variance <(Map - M200m)2> in the presence of all these forms of variability. Depending on halo mass and observational conditions, the resulting mass estimator improves on Map filters optimized for circular NFW-profile clusters in the presence of uncorrelated large scale structure (LSS) about as much as the latter improve on an estimator that only minimizes the influence of shape noise. Optimizing for uncorrelated LSS while ignoring the variation of internal cluster structure puts too much weight on the profile near the cores of halos, and under some circumstances can even be worse than not accounting for LSS at all. As a result, we discuss the impact of variability in cluster structure and correlated structures on the design and performance of weak lensing surveys intended to calibrate cluster MORs.

  12. SKA Weak Lensing II: Simulated Performance and Survey Design Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaldi, Anna; Harrison, Ian; Camera, Stefano; Brown, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We construct a pipeline for simulating weak lensing cosmology surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), taking as inputs telescope sensitivity curves; correlated source flux, size and redshift distributions; a simple ionospheric model; source redshift and ellipticity measurement errors. We then use this simulation pipeline to optimise a 2-year weak lensing survey performed with the first deployment of the SKA (SKA1). Our assessments are based on the total signal-to-noise of the recovered shear power spectra, a metric that we find to correlate very well with a standard dark energy figure of merit. We first consider the choice of frequency band, trading off increases in number counts at lower frequencies against poorer resolution; our analysis strongly prefers the higher frequency Band 2 (950-1760 MHz) channel of the SKA-MID telescope to the lower frequency Band 1 (350-1050 MHz). Best results would be obtained by allowing the centre of Band 2 to shift towards lower frequency, around 1.1 GHz. We then move on to consider survey size, finding that an area of 5,000 square degrees is optimal for most SKA1 instrumental configurations. Finally, we forecast the performance of a weak lensing survey with the second deployment of the SKA. The increased survey size (3π steradian) and sensitivity improves both the signal-to-noise and the dark energy metrics by two orders of magnitude.

  13. Colors Of Liquid Crystals Used To Measure Surface Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, D. C.; Muratore, J. J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Developmental method of mapping shear stresses on aerodynamic surfaces involves observation, at multiple viewing angles, of colors of liquid-crystal surface coats illuminated by white light. Report describing method referenced in "Liquid Crystals Indicate Directions Of Surface Shear Stresses" (ARC-13379). Resulting maps of surface shear stresses contain valuable data on magnitudes and directions of skin friction forces associated with surface flows; data used to refine mathematical models of aerodynamics for research and design purposes.

  14. Weak lensing survey of galaxy clusters in the CFHTLS Deep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, R.; Soucail, G.

    2007-02-01

    Aims: We present a weak lensing search of galaxy clusters in the 4 deg2 of the CFHT Legacy Survey Deep. This work aims at building a mass-selected sample of clusters with well controlled selection effects. This present survey is a preliminary step toward a full implementation in the forthcoming 170 deg2 of the CFHTLS Wide survey. Methods: We use the deep i' band images observed under subarcsecond seeing conditions to perform weak lensing mass reconstructions and to identify high convergence peaks. Thanks to the availability of deep u^*g'r'i'z' exposures, sources are selected from their photometric redshifts in the weak lensing analysis. We also use lensing tomography to derive an estimate of the lens redshift. After considering the raw statistics of peaks we check whether they can be associated to a clear optical counterpart or to published X-ray selected clusters. Results: Among the 14 peaks found above a signal-to-noise detection threshold ν=3.5, nine are secure detections with estimated redshift 0.1⪉ z_l⪉0.7 and a velocity dispersion 450⪉σ_v⪉ 700 {km s}-1. This low mass range is accessible thanks to the high density of background sources. Considering the intersection between the shear-selected clusters and XMM-LSS X-ray clusters in the D1 field, we observe that the ICM gas in these low-mass clusters (T_X˜1{-}2 keV) is not hotter than the temperature inferred from shear, this trend being different for published massive clusters. A more extended weak lensing survey, with higher statistics of mass structures will be a promising way to bypass several of the problems related to standard detection methods based on the complex physics of baryons. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of

  15. Gravitational Lenses in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2008-01-01

    It is not common to introduce current astronomy in school lessons. This article presents a set of experiments about gravitational lenses. It is normal to simulate them by means of computers, but it is very simple to simulate similar effects using a drinking glass full of liquid or using only the glass base. These are, of course, cheap and easy…

  16. Optics Demonstrations Using Cylindrical Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the main properties of cylindrical lenses and propose several demonstrational experiments that can be performed with them. Specifically we use simple glasses full of water to demonstrate some basic geometrical optics principles and phenomena. We also present some less standard experiments that can be performed with such…

  17. [Special intra-ocular lenses].

    PubMed

    Jacobi, K W; Nowak, M R; Strobel, J

    1990-01-01

    Intraocular lens (IOL) implantation is the method established worldwide for visual rehabilitation following cataract surgery. IOL's with particular characteristics and/or for special purposes are available for clinical or experimental use. Bifocal and multifocal IOLs have two or more foci for simultaneous far and near vision. The first clinical results are promising. The theoretically expected disadvantages, i.e., reduced contrast sensitivity or reduced visual acuity under reduced contrast conditions, have not yet been found in clinical studies. In cases of age-related macular degeneration, IOLs with a high negative diopter power in the center can be implanted as part of a Galilei telescope. By using high-plus power spectacles, a 2.5x to 4x magnification and a wide field of view can be achieved. Clinical investigation has started recently. Intraocular lenses for the correction of high-grade myopia are being tested by some surgeons. These lenses are made to be implanted in phakic eyes with a clear crystalline lens. Angle-supported and iris-fixated types are under investigation. Longterm results will show the clinical efficacy and safety. Other special intraocular lenses are iris-color lenses and a polymethymethacrylate (PMMA) iris diaphragm. PMID:2083909

  18. Gravitational Lensing of Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Olga; Mocioiu, Irina; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The black hole at the center of the galaxy is a powerful lens for supernova neutrinos. In the very special circumstance of a supernova near the extended line of sight from Earth to the galactic center, lensing could dramatically enhance the neutrino flux at Earth and stretch the neutrino pulse.

  19. Irlen Lenses and Reading Difficulties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Creig S.

    1990-01-01

    The article reviews three studies (EC 600 064-066) evaluating the effectiveness of using Irlen tinted lenses with reading-disabled persons. The studies are individually critiqued, and recommendations are offered concerning the methodology of further research. Stressed is the need to determine whether a specific syndrome of scotopic sensitivity…

  20. Strong Gravitational Lensing Insights into Dark Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Keeton, C. R.; Sigurdson, K. R.; Cyr-Racine, F.; Fadely, R.; Dobler, G.; Marshall, P. J.; OMEGA Explorer Science Team

    2013-01-01

    The thermal or interaction properties of dark matter are expected to lead to different levels of sub-galactic structure within Milky-Way scale galaxies. Through observations of galaxies acting as strong gravitational lenses, it is possible to statistically map the details of these structures. In recent theoretical and simulation work examined through Importance Sampling approaches, we demonstrate how efficiently dark matter substructures can be statistically constrained through select ground- and space-based measurements, and map out forecasts for how well possible Hubble Space Telescope and possible future space based experiments may perform.

  1. Probing cosmology with weak lensing Minkowski functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratochvil, Jan M.; Lim, Eugene A.; Wang, Sheng; Haiman, Zoltán; May, Morgan; Huffenberger, Kevin

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we show that Minkowski functionals (MFs) of weak gravitational lensing (WL) convergence maps contain significant non-Gaussian, cosmology-dependent information. To do this, we run a large suite of cosmological ray-tracing N-body simulations to create mock WL convergence maps, and study the cosmological information content of MFs derived from these maps. Our suite consists of 80 independent 5123 N-body runs, covering seven different cosmologies, varying three cosmological parameters Ωm, w, and σ8 one at a time, around a fiducial lambda cold dark matter model. In each cosmology, we use ray tracing to create a thousand pseudoindependent 12deg2 convergence maps, and use these in a Monte Carlo procedure to estimate the joint confidence contours on the above three parameters. We include redshift tomography at three different source redshifts zs=1, 1.5, 2, explore five different smoothing scales θG=1,2,3,5,10arcmin, and explicitly compare and combine the MFs with the WL power spectrum. We find that the MFs capture a substantial amount of information from non-Gaussian features of convergence maps, i.e. beyond the power spectrum. The MFs are particularly well suited to break degeneracies and to constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter w (by a factor of ≈three better than from the power spectrum alone). The non-Gaussian information derives partly from the one-point function of the convergence (through V0, the “area” MF), and partly through nonlinear spatial information (through combining different smoothing scales for V0, and through V1 and V2, the boundary length and genus MFs, respectively). In contrast to the power spectrum, the best constraints from the MFs are obtained only when multiple smoothing scales are combined.

  2. 3D printed diffractive terahertz lenses.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Walter D; Ferrando, Vicente; Monsoriu, Juan A; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Czerwińska, Elżbieta; Szustakowski, Mieczysław

    2016-04-15

    A 3D printer was used to realize custom-made diffractive THz lenses. After testing several materials, phase binary lenses with periodic and aperiodic radial profiles were designed and constructed in polyamide material to work at 0.625 THz. The nonconventional focusing properties of such lenses were assessed by computing and measuring their axial point spread function (PSF). Our results demonstrate that inexpensive 3D printed THz diffractive lenses can be reliably used in focusing and imaging THz systems. Diffractive THz lenses with unprecedented features, such as extended depth of focus or bifocalization, have been demonstrated. PMID:27082335

  3. Constraining gravity at the largest scales through CMB lensing and galaxy velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Alam, Shadab; He, Siyu; Ho, Shirley

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a new method to constrain gravity on the largest cosmological scales by combining measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing and the galaxy velocity field. EG is a statistic, constructed from a gravitational lensing tracer and a measure of velocities such as redshift-space distortions (RSD), that can discriminate between gravity models while being independent of clustering bias and σ8. While traditionally, the lensing field for EG has been probed through galaxy lensing, CMB lensing has been proposed as a more robust tracer of the lensing field for EG at higher redshifts while avoiding intrinsic alignments. We perform the largest-scale measurement of EG ever, up to 150 Mpc h-1, by cross-correlating the Planck CMB lensing map with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) CMASS galaxy sample and combining this with our measurement of the CMASS auto-power spectrum and the RSD parameter β. We report EG(z = 0.57) = 0.243 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.013 (sys), a measurement in tension with the general relativity (GR) prediction at a level of 2.6σ. Note that our EG measurement deviates from GR only at scales greater than 80 Mpc h-1, scales which have not been probed by previous EG tests. Upcoming surveys, which will provide an order-of-magnitude reduction in statistical errors, can significantly constrain alternative gravity models when combined with better control of systematics.

  4. Thermal lensing of laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Mark J.; Hayden, Joseph S.

    2014-10-01

    This paper focuses on the three main effects that can induce wave-front distortion due to thermal lensing in laser gain media: 1) thermo-optic (dn/dT); 2) stress-optic; and 3) surface deformation (e.g., "end-bulging" of a laser rod). Considering the simple case of a side-pumped cylindrical rod which is air- or water-cooled along its length, the internal temperature distribution has long been known to assume a simple parabolic profile. Resulting from this are two induced refractive index variations due to thermo-optic and stress-optic effects that also assume a parabolic profile, but generally not of the same magnitude, nor even of the same sign. Finally, a small deformation on the rod ends can induce a small additional lensing contribution. We had two goals in this study: a) use finite-element simulations to verify the existing analytical expressions due to Koechner1 and Foster and Osterink; and b) apply them to glasses from the SCHOTT laser glass portfolio. The first goal was a reaction to more recent work by Chenais et al. who claimed Koechner made an error in his analysis with regard to thermal stress, throwing into doubt conclusions within studies since 1970 which made use of his equations. However, our re-analysis of their derivations, coupled with our FE modeling, confirmed that the Koechner and Foster and Osterink treatments are correct, and that Chenais et al. made mistakes in their derivation of the thermally-induced strain. Finally, for a nominal laser rod geometry, we compared the thermally-induced optical distortions in LG-680, LG-750, LG-760, LG-770, APG-1, and APG-2. While LG-750, -760, and -770 undergo considerable thermo-optic lensing, their stress-optic lensing is nearly of the same magnitude but of opposite sign, leading to a small total thermal lensing signature.

  5. Weak Lensing Analysis of IDCS J1426.5+3508: A Massive Galaxy Cluster at z=1.75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Wenli

    2015-08-01

    We present a weak lensing study of the galaxy cluster IDCS J1426.5+3508 which, at z=1.75, is the highest redshift strong lensing cluster known and the most distant cluster for which a weak lensing analysis has been undertaken. Using F160W, F814W, and F606W observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, we detect a tangential shear signal out to a radius of ~1 Mpc. Fitting the shear to a Navarro-Frenk-White mass profile, we derive a mass that agrees with previous masses calculated from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, X-ray, and strong lensing observations. The combination of weak lensing and SZ measurements are consistent with the scaling relation observed at low redshift, indicative of minimal evolution in this relation. The cluster concentration is not well-constrained by the weak lensing data alone, but we derive a concentration using the SZ mass measurements as a prior. It has previously been noted that an exceptionally high concentration might afford a means to explain the unexpected existence of a giant arc in this cluster. Our data argue that the concentration is not unusually large, indicating that an alternate solution is required.

  6. Cosmic shears should not be measured in conventional ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2011-06-01

    A long-standing problem in weak lensing is about how to construct cosmic shear estimators from galaxy images. Conventional methods average over a single quantity per galaxy to estimate each shear component. We show that any such shear estimators must reduce to a highly non-linear form when the galaxy image is described by three parameters (pure ellipse), even in the absence of the point spread function (PSF). In the presence of the PSF, we argue that this class of shear estimators are not likely to exist. Alternatively, we propose a new way of measuring the cosmic shear: instead of averaging over a single value from each galaxy, we average over two numbers, and then take the ratio to estimate the shear component. In particular, the two numbers correspond to the numerator and denominator that generate the quadrupole moments of the galaxy image in Fourier space, as proposed by Zhang. This yields a statistically unbiased estimate of the shear component. Consequently, measurements of the n-point spatial correlations of the shear fields should also be modified: one needs to derive the ratio of the two correlation functions to get the desired unbiased shear correlation.

  7. Probing Cosmology with Weak Lensing Peak Counts and Minkowski Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratochvil, Jan Michael; Wang, S.; Lim, E. A.; Haiman, Z.; May, M.

    2010-05-01

    The new method of counting peaks in weak lensing (WL) maps, as a function of their height, to probe models of dark energy and to constrain cosmological parameters offers advantages over similar, more traditional statistics like cluster counts: Because peaks can be identified in two-dimensional WL maps directly, they can provide constraints which are free from potential selection effects and biases involved in identifying and determining the masses of galaxy clusters. Our pilot study (Kratochvil, Haiman, May 2009), where we investigated three cosmological models with different constant values of the dark energy equation of state parameter w=-0.8, w=-1, w=-1.2 and with a fixed normalization of the primordial power spectrum, revealed a parameter sensitivity of w which warrants a numerically very costly in-depth study when marginalization over other uncertain cosmological parameters is included. Towards that goal, we present recent results from a new, extensive simulation suite of ninety 5123-particle N-body simulations, run on New York Blue at BNL, allowing us to vary several cosmological parameters individually and yielding vastly improved statistics. Studies have shown that weak lensing maps likely contain as much information in the nonlinear regime as in the linear one. While being a powerful probe of the nonlinear regime, weak lensing peak counts capture by definition only a subset of the total available information in the convergence maps. In particular, we found that relatively low-amplitude peaks account for most of the parameter sensitivity detected, hinting to a more complicated structure. Therefore, we extend our work by probing the morphology of the maps with Minkowski functionals, in our quest to extract the most possible information from the nonlinear aspects of large-scale structure formation.

  8. A new parallel plate shear cell for in situ real-space measurements of complex fluids under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu Ling; Brand, Joost H. J.; van Gemert, Josephus L. A.; Verkerk, Jaap; Wisman, Hans; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Imhof, Arnout

    2007-10-01

    We developed and tested a parallel plate shear cell that can be mounted on top of an inverted microscope to perform confocal real-space measurements on complex fluids under shear. To follow structural changes in time, a plane of zero velocity is created by letting the plates move in opposite directions. The location of this plane is varied by changing the relative velocities of the plates. The gap width is variable between 20 and 200μm with parallelism better than 1μm. Such a small gap width enables us to examine the total sample thickness using high numerical aperture objective lenses. The achieved shear rates cover the range of 0.02-103s-1. This shear cell can apply an oscillatory shear with adjustable amplitude and frequency. The maximum travel of each plate equals 1cm, so that strains up to 500 can be applied. For most complex fluids, an oscillatory shear with such a large amplitude can be regarded as a continuous shear. We measured the flow profile of a suspension of silica colloids in this shear cell. It was linear except for a small deviation caused by sedimentation. To demonstrate the excellent performance and capabilities of this new setup we examined shear induced crystallization and melting of concentrated suspensions of 1μm diameter silica colloids.

  9. A new parallel plate shear cell for in situ real-space measurements of complex fluids under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu Ling; Brand, Joost H J; van Gemert, Josephus L A; Verkerk, Jaap; Wisman, Hans; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Imhof, Arnout

    2007-10-01

    We developed and tested a parallel plate shear cell that can be mounted on top of an inverted microscope to perform confocal real-space measurements on complex fluids under shear. To follow structural changes in time, a plane of zero velocity is created by letting the plates move in opposite directions. The location of this plane is varied by changing the relative velocities of the plates. The gap width is variable between 20 and 200 microm with parallelism better than 1 microm. Such a small gap width enables us to examine the total sample thickness using high numerical aperture objective lenses. The achieved shear rates cover the range of 0.02-10(3) s(-1). This shear cell can apply an oscillatory shear with adjustable amplitude and frequency. The maximum travel of each plate equals 1 cm, so that strains up to 500 can be applied. For most complex fluids, an oscillatory shear with such a large amplitude can be regarded as a continuous shear. We measured the flow profile of a suspension of silica colloids in this shear cell. It was linear except for a small deviation caused by sedimentation. To demonstrate the excellent performance and capabilities of this new setup we examined shear induced crystallization and melting of concentrated suspensions of 1 microm diameter silica colloids. PMID:17979430

  10. Class B0631+519: Last of the Class Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    York, Tom; Jackson, N.; Browne, I.W.A.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; McKean, J.P.; Norbury, M.A.; Biggs, A.D.; Blandford, R.D.; de Bruyn, A.G.; Fassnacht, C.D.; Myers, S.T.; Pearson, T.J.; Phillips, P.M.; Readhead, A.C.S.; Rusin, D.; Wilkinson, P.N.; /Jodrell Bank /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen /UC, Davis /JIVE, Dwingeloo /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NFRA, Dwingeloo /NRAO, Socorro /Caltech /Pennsylvania U.

    2005-05-31

    We report the discovery of the new gravitational lens system CLASS B0631+519. Imaging with the VLA, MERLIN and the VLBA reveals a doubly-imaged flat-spectrum radio core, a doubly-imaged steep-spectrum radio lobe and possible quadruply-imaged emission from a second lobe. The maximum separation between the lensed images is 1.16 arcsec. High resolution mapping with the VLBA at 5 GHz resolves the most magnified image of the radio core into a number of sub-components spread across approximately 20 mas. No emission from the lensing galaxy or an odd image is detected down to 0.31 mJy (5{sigma}) at 8.4 GHz. Optical and near-infrared imaging with the ACS and NICMOS cameras on the HST show that there are two galaxies along the line of sight to the lensed source, as previously discovered by optical spectroscopy. We find that the foreground galaxy at z=0.0896 is a small irregular, and that the other, at z=0.6196 is a massive elliptical which appears to contribute the majority of the lensing effect. The host galaxy of the lensed source is detected in the HST near-infrared imaging as a set of arcs, which form a nearly complete Einstein ring. Mass modeling using non-parametric techniques can reproduce the near-infrared observations and indicates that the small irregular galaxy has a (localized) effect on the flux density distribution in the Einstein ring at the 5-10% level.

  11. Unfolding the matter distribution using three-dimensional weak gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, P.; Taylor, A. N.; Hartlap, J.

    2009-10-01

    Combining redshift and galaxy shape information offers new exciting ways of exploiting the gravitational lensing effect for studying the large scales of the cosmos. One application is the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the matter density distribution which is explored in this paper. We give a generalization of an already known minimum-variance estimator of the 3D matter density distribution that facilitates the combination of thin redshift slices of sources with samples of broad redshift distributions for an optimal reconstruction; sources can be given individual statistical weights. We show how, in principle, intrinsic alignments of source ellipticities or shear/intrinsic alignment correlations can be accommodated, albeit these effects are not the focus of this paper. We describe an efficient and fast way to implement the estimator on a contemporary desktop computer. Analytic estimates for the noise and biases in the reconstruction are given. Some regularization (Wiener filtering) of the estimator, adjustable by a tuning parameter, is necessary to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) to a sensible level and to suppress oscillations in radial direction. This, however, introduces as side effect a systematic shift and stretch of structures in radial direction. This bias can be expressed in terms of a radial point-spread function (PSF) comprising the limitations of the reconstruction due to given source shot noise and a lack of knowledge of the exact source redshifts. We conclude that a 3D mass-density reconstruction on galaxy cluster scales (~1Mpc) is feasible but, for foreseeable surveys, a map with a S/N >~ 3 threshold is limited to structures with M200 >~ 1 × 1014 or 7 × 1014Msolarh-1, at low to moderate redshifts (z = 0.1 or 0.6). However, we find that a heavily smoothed full-sky map of the very large-scale density field may also be possible as the S/N of reconstructed modes increases towards larger scales. Future improvements of the method may be

  12. Neutrino halos in clusters of galaxies and their weak lensing signature

    SciTech Connect

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Peña-Garay, Carlos; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Quilis, Vicent E-mail: miralda@icc.ub.es E-mail: vicent.quilis@uv.es

    2011-06-01

    We study whether non-linear gravitational effects of relic neutrinos on the development of clustering and large-scale structure may be observable by weak gravitational lensing. We compute the density profile of relic massive neutrinos in a spherical model of a cluster of galaxies, for several neutrino mass schemes and cluster masses. Relic neutrinos add a small perturbation to the mass profile, making it more extended in the outer parts. In principle, this non-linear neutrino perturbation is detectable in an all-sky weak lensing survey such as EUCLID by averaging the shear profile of a large fraction of the visible massive clusters in the universe, or from its signature in the general weak lensing power spectrum or its cross-spectrum with galaxies. However, correctly modeling the distribution of mass in baryons and cold dark matter and suppressing any systematic errors to the accuracy required for detecting this neutrino perturbation is severely challenging.

  13. Mass Models and Environment of the New Quadruply Lensed Quasar SDSS J1330+1810

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Shin, Min-Su; Kayo, Issha; Strauss, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald G.

    2008-09-09

    We present the discovery of a new quadruply lensed quasar. The lens system, SDSS J1330+1810 at z{sub s} = 1.393, was identified as a lens candidate from the spectroscopic sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Optical and near-infrared images clearly show four quasar images with a maximum image separation of 1.76 inch, as well as a bright lensing galaxy. We measure a redshift of the lensing galaxy of z{sub 1} = 0.373 from absorption features in the spectrum. We find a foreground group of galaxies at z = 0.31 centred {approx} 120 inch southwest of the lens system. Simple mass models fit the data quite well, including the flux ratios between images, although the lens galaxy appears to be {approx} 1 mag brighter than expected by the Faber-Jackson relation. Our mass modeling suggests that shear from nearby structure is affecting the lens potential.

  14. Testing modified gravity with cosmic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnois-Déraps, J.; Munshi, D.; Valageas, P.; van Waerbeke, L.; Brax, P.; Coles, P.; Rizzo, L.

    2015-12-01

    We use the cosmic shear data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey to place constraints on f(R) and Generalized Dilaton models of modified gravity. This is highly complementary to other probes since the constraints mainly come from the non-linear scales: maximal deviations with respects to the General Relativity (GR) + Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) scenario occurs at k ˜ 1 h Mpc-1. At these scales, it becomes necessary to account for known degeneracies with baryon feedback and massive neutrinos, hence we place constraints jointly on these three physical effects. To achieve this, we formulate these modified gravity theories within a common tomographic parametrization, we compute their impact on the clustering properties relative to a GR universe, and propagate the observed modifications into the weak lensing ξ± quantity. Confronted against the cosmic shear data, we reject the f(R) \\lbrace |f_{R_0}| = 10^{-4}, n = 1\\rbrace model with more than 99.9 per cent confidence interval (CI) when assuming a ΛCDM dark matter only model. In the presence of baryonic feedback processes and massive neutrinos with total mass up to 0.2 eV, the model is disfavoured with at least 94 per cent CI in all different combinations studied. Constraints on the \\lbrace |f_{R_0}| = 10^{-4}, n = 2\\rbrace model are weaker, but nevertheless disfavoured with at least 89 per cent CI. We identify several specific combinations of neutrino mass, baryon feedback and f(R) or Dilaton gravity models that are excluded by the current cosmic shear data. Notably, universes with three massless neutrinos and no baryon feedback are strongly disfavoured in all modified gravity scenarios studied. These results indicate that competitive constraints may be achieved with future cosmic shear data.

  15. Fermat Potentials of Embedded Lensing, the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe Effect, and Weak-Lensing of CMB by Cosmic Voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, R.; Dai, X.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an accurate gravitational lens theory for an inhomogeneity embedded in an otherwise homogeneous universe, which to the lowest order is applicable to any mass distribution. We derive the Fermat potential for a spherically symmetric lens embedded in a FLRW cosmology and use it to investigate the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect (ISW) caused by individual large scale inhomogeneities, in particular, cosmic voids. We present a simple analytical expression for the CMB temperature fluctuation across such a lens as the derivative of the lens Fermat potential. Our formalism is applicable to both linear and nonlinear density evolution scenarios, to arbitrarily large density contrasts, and to all open and closed background cosmologies. Our results are particularly useful for modeling ISW effects extracted through stacking large numbers of cosmic voids and clusters (that is, the aperture photometry method). For structures co-expanding with the background cosmology, i.e., for time-independent density contrasts, we find that the gravitational lensing time delay alone can produce fluctuations of the order of seen in recent observations by WMAP and Planck. We revisit the possibility of explaining the non-Gaussian cold spot on the south hemisphere via the Rees-Sciama effect of a large cosmic void using constraints obtained from the most recent void catalogs and our new void-lensing formalism, and compare it with other explanations such as a collapsing cosmic texture. We also study the remapping of primordial CMB anisotropies, the weak-lensing shear, and magnification caused by void lensing.

  16. Planck 2013 results. XVII. Gravitational lensing by large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Déchelette, T.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Ho, S.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Pullen, A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Smith, K.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    On the arcminute angular scales probed by Planck, the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are gently perturbed by gravitational lensing. Here we present a detailed study of this effect, detecting lensing independently in the 100, 143, and 217 GHz frequency bands with an overall significance of greater than 25σ. We use thetemperature-gradient correlations induced by lensing to reconstruct a (noisy) map of the CMB lensing potential, which provides an integrated measure of the mass distribution back to the CMB last-scattering surface. Our lensing potential map is significantly correlated with other tracers of mass, a fact which we demonstrate using several representative tracers of large-scale structure. We estimate the power spectrum of the lensing potential, finding generally good agreement with expectations from the best-fitting ΛCDM model for the Planck temperature power spectrum, showing that this measurement at z = 1100 correctly predicts the properties of the lower-redshift, later-time structures which source the lensing potential. When combined with the temperature power spectrum, our measurement provides degeneracy-breaking power for parameter constraints; it improves CMB-alone constraints on curvature by a factor of two and also partly breaks the degeneracy between the amplitude of the primordial perturbation power spectrum and the optical depth to reionization, allowing a measurement of the optical depth to reionization which is independent of large-scale polarization data. Discarding scale information, our measurement corresponds to a 4% constraint on the amplitude of the lensing potential power spectrum, or a 2% constraint on the root-mean-squared amplitude of matter fluctuations at z ~ 2.

  17. The Grism Lens-amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). IV. Mass Reconstruction of the Lensing Cluster Abell 2744 from Frontier Field Imaging and GLASS Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Hoag, A.; Huang, K.-H.; Treu, T.; Bradač, M.; Schmidt, K. B.; Brammer, G. B.; Vulcani, B.; Jones, T. A.; Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Merlin, E.; Trenti, M.

    2015-09-01

    We present a strong and weak lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744, the first cluster for which deep Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) images and spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) are available. By performing a targeted search for emission lines in multiply imaged sources using the GLASS spectra, we obtain five high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts and two tentative ones. We confirm one strongly lensed system by detecting the same emission lines in all three multiple images. We also search for additional line emitters blindly and use the full GLASS spectroscopic catalog to test reliability of photometric redshifts for faint line emitters. We see a reasonable agreement between our photometric and spectroscopic redshift measurements, when including nebular emission in photometric redshift estimations. We introduce a stringent procedure to identify only secure multiple image sets based on colors, morphology, and spectroscopy. By combining 7 multiple image systems with secure spectroscopic redshifts (at 5 distinct redshift planes) with 18 multiple image systems with secure photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive grid, using a total of 72 images. The resulting mass map is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. We find that the stellar to total mass ratio varies substantially across the cluster field, suggesting that stars do not trace exactly the total mass in this interacting system. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available in the standard HFF format.

  18. Optical method for the surface topographic characterization of Fresnel lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Antón, Juan Carlos; Gómez Pedrero, José Antonio; Alonso Fernández, José; Quiroga, Juan Antonio

    2011-10-01

    Fresnel lenses and other faceted or micro-optic devices are increasingly used in multiple applications like solar light concentrators and illumination devices. As applications are more exigent this characterization is of increasing importance. We present a technique to characterize the surface topography of optical surfaces. It is especially well adapted to Fresnel lenses where abrupt surface slopes are usually difficult to handle in conventional techniques. The method is based on a new photometric strategy able to codify the height information in terms of optical absorption in a liquid. A detailed topographic map is simple to acquire by capturing images of the surface. Some experimental results are presented. A single pixel height resolution of ~0.1 μm is achieved for a height range of ~50 μm. A surface slope analysis is also made achieving a resolution of ~+/-0.15°.

  19. Weak Lensing from Space I: Instrumentation and Survey Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, Jason; Refregier, Alexandre; Massey, Richard; Albert, Justin; Bacon, David; Bernstein, Gary; Ellis, Richard; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Kim, Alex; Lampton, Mike; McKay, Tim; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bercovitz, J.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.; Harvey, P.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Kreiger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.; Devin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch, A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, D.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-04-23

    A wide field space-based imaging telescope is necessary to fully exploit the technique of observing dark matter via weak gravitational lensing. This first paper in a three part series outlines the survey strategies and relevant instrumental parameters for such a mission. As a concrete example of hardware design, we consider the proposed Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Using SNAP engineering models, we quantify the major contributions to this telescope's Point Spread Function (PSF). These PSF contributions are relevant to any similar wide field space telescope. We further show that the PSF of SNAP or a similar telescope will be smaller than current ground-based PSFs, and more isotropic and stable over time than the PSF of the Hubble Space Telescope. We outline survey strategies for two different regimes - a ''wide'' 300 square degree survey and a ''deep'' 15 square degree survey that will accomplish various weak lensing goals including statistical studies and dark matter mapping.

  20. Optimal Weak-Lensing Skewness Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tong-Jie; Pen, Ue-Li; Zhang, Pengjie; Dubinski, John

    2003-12-01

    Weak-lensing measurements are starting to provide statistical maps of the distribution of matter in the universe that are increasingly precise and complementary to cosmic microwave background maps. The most common measurement is the correlation in alignments of background galaxies, which can be used to infer the variance of the projected surface density of matter. This measurement of the fluctuations is insensitive to the total mass content and is analogous to using waves on the ocean to measure its depths. However, when the depth is shallow, as happens near a beach, waves become skewed. Similarly, a measurement of skewness in the projected matter distribution directly measures the total matter content of the universe. While skewness has already been convincingly detected, its constraint on cosmology is still weak. We address optimal analyses for the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey in the presence of noise. We show that a compensated Gaussian filter with a width of 2.5‧ optimizes the cosmological constraint, yielding ΔΩm/Ωm~10%. This is significantly better than other filters that have been considered in the literature. This can be further improved with tomography and other sophisticated analyses.

  1. Evidence for gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background polarization from cross-correlation with the cosmic infrared background.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Borys, C; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Linder, E; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2014-04-01

    We reconstruct the gravitational lensing convergence signal from cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data taken by the Polarbear experiment and cross-correlate it with cosmic infrared background maps from the Herschel satellite. From the cross spectra, we obtain evidence for gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization at a statistical significance of 4.0σ and indication of the presence of a lensing B-mode signal at a significance of 2.3σ. We demonstrate that our results are not biased by instrumental and astrophysical systematic errors by performing null tests, checks with simulated and real data, and analytical calculations. This measurement of polarization lensing, made via the robust cross-correlation channel, not only reinforces POLARBEAR auto-correlation measurements, but also represents one of the early steps towards establishing CMB polarization lensing as a powerful new probe of cosmology and astrophysics. PMID:24745402

  2. Evidence for Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization from Cross-Correlation with the Cosmic Infrared Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Anthony, A. E.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Borys, C.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Flanigan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Linder, E.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Meng, X.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Quealy, E.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Rotermund, K.; Schanning, I.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shimizu, A.; Shimmin, C.; Shimon, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Takakura, S.; Tikhomirov, A.; Tomaru, T.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.; Polarbear Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    We reconstruct the gravitational lensing convergence signal from cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data taken by the Polarbear experiment and cross-correlate it with cosmic infrared background maps from the Herschel satellite. From the cross spectra, we obtain evidence for gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization at a statistical significance of 4.0σ and indication of the presence of a lensing B-mode signal at a significance of 2.3σ. We demonstrate that our results are not biased by instrumental and astrophysical systematic errors by performing null tests, checks with simulated and real data, and analytical calculations. This measurement of polarization lensing, made via the robust cross-correlation channel, not only reinforces POLARBEAR auto-correlation measurements, but also represents one of the early steps towards establishing CMB polarization lensing as a powerful new probe of cosmology and astrophysics.

  3. Extinction Curves of Lensing Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elíasdóttir, Árdís

    2006-09-01

    Dust extinction causes light from distant sources to be dimmed on itsway to the observer. In cosmological studies, such as SN Ia studies,it is of great importance that the effects of dust extinction becorrectly accounted for. However, although dust properties, andhence extinction, are expected to vary with redshift, not very muchis known about the extinction properties of high redshift galaxies.This is because the methods traditionally used to study extinctioncurves are only applicable for the most nearby galaxies. Studyinggravitationally lensed quasars is an emerging method of studying thedust extinction of high redshift galaxies. I will present an ESO VLTstudy of 10 such lensing galaxies, with redshifts up to 1. The 10systems display varying amount and type of extinction, with thedoubly imaged quasar B1152+199 showing the greatest extinction with A(V)=2.4 and R_V=2.1 for a Galactic type extinction law.

  4. Three Gravitationally Lensed Supernovae Behind Clash Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Brandon; McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurbh W.; Rodney, Steven A.; Jones, David O.; Graur, Or; Merten, Julian; Zitrin, Adi; Riess, Adam G.; Matheson, Thomas; Sako, Masao; Holoien, Thomas W. -S.; Postman, Marc; Coe, Dan; Bartelmann, Matthias; Balestra, Italo; Benitez, Narciso; Bouwens, Rychard; Bradley, Larry; Broadhurst, Tom; Cenko, Stephen Bradley; Donahue, Megan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ford, Holland; Garnavich, Peter; Grillo, Claudio; Infante, Leopoldo; Jouvel, Stephanie; Kelson, Daniel; Koekemoer, Anton; Lahav, Ofer; Lemze, Doron; Maoz, Dan; Medezinski, Elinor; Melchior, Peter; Meneghetti, Massimo; Molino, Alberto; Moustakas, John; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Nonino, Mario; Rosati, Piero; Seitz, Stella; Strolger, Louis G.; Umetsu, Keiichi; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We report observations of three gravitationally lensed supernovae (SNe) in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. These objects, SN CLO12Car (z = 1.28), SN CLN12Did (z = 0.85), and SN CLA11Tib (z = 1.14), are located behind three different clusters, MACSJ1720.2+3536 (z = 0.391), RXJ1532.9+3021 (z = 0.345), and A383 (z = 0.187), respectively. Each SN was detected in Hubble Space Telescope optical and infrared images. Based on photometric classification, we find that SNe CLO12Car and CLN12Did are likely to be Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), while the classification of SN CLA11Tib is inconclusive. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was approx. 1.0 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is approx. 0.2 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. We derive independent estimates of the predicted magnification from CLASH strong+weak-lensing maps of the clusters (in magnitude units, 2.5 log10 µ): 0.83 +/- 0.16 mag for SN CLO12Car, 0.28 +/- 0.08 mag for SN CLN12Did, and 0.43 +/- 0.11 mag for SN CLA11Tib. The two SNe Ia provide a new test of the cluster lens model predictions: we find that the magnifications based on the SN Ia brightness and those predicted by the lens maps are consistent. Our results herald the promise of future observations of samples of cluster-lensed SNe Ia (from the ground or space) to help illuminate the dark-matter distribution in clusters of galaxies, through the direct determination of absolute magnifications.

  5. Three-point galaxy-galaxy lensing as a probe of dark matter halo shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, Susmita; Chue, Chun Yin Ricky; Dalal, Neal E-mail: chue2@illinois.edu

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to measure the ellipticities of dark matter halos using the lens-shear-shear 3-point correlation function. This method is immune to effects of galaxy-halo misalignments that can potentially limit 2-point galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements of halo anisotropy. Using a simple model for the projected mass distributions of dark matter halos, we construct an ellipticity estimator that sums over all possible triangular configurations of the 3-point function. By applying our estimator to halos from N-body simulations, we find that systematic errors in the recovered ellipticity will be at the ∼< 5% fractional level. We estimate that future imaging surveys like LSST will have sufficient statistics to detect halo ellipticities using 3-point lensing.

  6. Hierarchical cosmic shear power spectrum inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsing, Justin; Heavens, Alan; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Kiessling, Alina; Wandelt, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Till

    2016-02-01

    We develop a Bayesian hierarchical modelling approach for cosmic shear power spectrum inference, jointly sampling from the posterior distribution of the cosmic shear field and its (tomographic) power spectra. Inference of the shear power spectrum is a powerful intermediate product for a cosmic shear analysis, since it requires very few model assumptions and can be used to perform inference on a wide range of cosmological models a posteriori without loss of information. We show that joint posterior for the shear map and power spectrum can be sampled effectively by Gibbs sampling, iteratively drawing samples from the map and power spectrum, each conditional on the other. This approach neatly circumvents difficulties associated with complicated survey geometry and masks that plague frequentist power spectrum estimators, since the power spectrum inference provides prior information about the field in masked regions at every sampling step. We demonstrate this approach for inference of tomographic shear E-mode, B-mode and EB-cross power spectra from a simulated galaxy shear catalogue with a number of important features; galaxies distributed on the sky and in redshift with photometric redshift uncertainties, realistic random ellipticity noise for every galaxy and a complicated survey mask. The obtained posterior distributions for the tomographic power spectrum coefficients recover the underlying simulated power spectra for both E- and B-modes.

  7. Combining weak lensing tomography with halo clustering to probe dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Charles; Dodelson, Scott

    2007-10-01

    Two methods of constraining the properties of dark energy are weak lensing tomography and cluster counting. Uncertainties in mass calibration of clusters can be reduced by using the properties of halo clustering (the clustering of clusters). However, within a single survey, weak lensing and halo clustering probe the same density fluctuations. We explore the question of whether this information can be used twice—once in weak lensing and then again in halo clustering to calibrate cluster masses—or whether the combined dark energy constraints are weaker than the sum of the individual constraints. For a survey like the Dark Energy Survey (DES), we find that the cosmic shearing of source galaxies at high redshifts is indeed highly correlated with halo clustering at lower redshifts. Surprisingly, this correlation does not degrade cosmological constraints for a DES-like survey, and in fact, constraints are marginally improved since the correlations themselves act as additional observables. This considerably simplifies the analysis for a DES-like survey: when weak lensing and halo clustering are treated as independent experiments, the combined dark energy constraints (cluster counts included) are accurate if not slightly conservative. Our findings mirror those of Takada and Bridle, who investigated correlations between the cosmic shear and cluster counts.

  8. Multimodal characterization of contact lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Michael A.; Compertore, David; Gibson, Donald S.; Herbrand, Matthew E.; Ignatovich, Filipp V.

    2015-10-01

    A table top instrument has been designed, constructed and tested to characterize all of the primary optical and physical properties of contact lenses. Measured optical properties include base power, cylinder power, cylindrical axis, prism, refractive index and wavefront aberrations. Measured physical properties include center thickness, lens diameter and lens sagittal depth. The instrument combines a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS), a machine vision sensor, and a low coherence light interferometer (LCI) all coaxially aligned into a single tabletop unit. The unit includes a cuvette, mounted in a translatable sample chamber for holding the contact lens under test, and it can be configured to measure wet or dry contact lenses. During operation, the vision sensor measures the diameter of the lens, and locates the center of the lens. The lens is then aligned for other measurements. The vision sensor can also measure various alignment marks on the lens, as well as identify any alpha numerical features, which can be used to associate the lens orientation with the measured aberrations. The LCI measures the center thickness, sagittal depth and index of refraction of the contact lens. The base radius of curvature is then calculated using these measured parameters. The SHWS measures the lenses prescription power, including spherical, cylinder, prism, and higher order wavefront aberrations. NIST traceable calibration artifacts are used to calibrate the SHWS, machine vision and LCI modalities. Repeatability measurements on a contact lens in a saline solution are presented.

  9. Gravitational lensing in plasmic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Tsupko, O. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    The influence of plasma on different effects of gravitational lensing is reviewed. Using the Hamiltonian approach for geometrical optics in a medium in the presence of gravity, an exact formula for the photon deflection angle by a black hole (or another body with a Schwarzschild metric) embedded in plasma with a spherically symmetric density distribution is derived. The deflection angle in this case is determined by the mutual combination of different factors: gravity, dispersion, and refraction. While the effects of deflection by the gravity in vacuum and the refractive deflection in a nonhomogeneous medium are well known, the new effect is that, in the case of a homogeneous plasma, in the absence of refractive deflection, the gravitational deflection differs from the vacuum deflection and depends on the photon frequency. In the presence of a plasma nonhomogeneity, the chromatic refractive deflection also occurs, so the presence of plasma always makes gravitational lensing chromatic. In particular, the presence of plasma leads to different angular positions of the same image if it is observed at different wavelengths. It is discussed in detail how to apply the presented formulas for the calculation of the deflection angle in different situations. Gravitational lensing in plasma beyond the weak deflection approximation is also considered.

  10. Gravitational lensing in plasmic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S. Tsupko, O. Yu.

    2015-07-15

    The influence of plasma on different effects of gravitational lensing is reviewed. Using the Hamiltonian approach for geometrical optics in a medium in the presence of gravity, an exact formula for the photon deflection angle by a black hole (or another body with a Schwarzschild metric) embedded in plasma with a spherically symmetric density distribution is derived. The deflection angle in this case is determined by the mutual combination of different factors: gravity, dispersion, and refraction. While the effects of deflection by the gravity in vacuum and the refractive deflection in a nonhomogeneous medium are well known, the new effect is that, in the case of a homogeneous plasma, in the absence of refractive deflection, the gravitational deflection differs from the vacuum deflection and depends on the photon frequency. In the presence of a plasma nonhomogeneity, the chromatic refractive deflection also occurs, so the presence of plasma always makes gravitational lensing chromatic. In particular, the presence of plasma leads to different angular positions of the same image if it is observed at different wavelengths. It is discussed in detail how to apply the presented formulas for the calculation of the deflection angle in different situations. Gravitational lensing in plasma beyond the weak deflection approximation is also considered.

  11. Gravitational Lensing: Einstein's unfinished symphony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treu, Tommaso; Ellis, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational lensing - the deflection of light rays by gravitating matter - has become a major tool in the armoury of the modern cosmologist. Proposed nearly a hundred years ago as a key feature of Einstein's theory of general relativity, we trace the historical development since its verification at a solar eclipse in 1919. Einstein was apparently cautious about its practical utility and the subject lay dormant observationally for nearly 60 years. Nonetheless there has been rapid progress over the past twenty years. The technique allows astronomers to chart the distribution of dark matter on large and small scales thereby testing predictions of the standard cosmological model which assumes dark matter comprises a massive weakly-interacting particle. By measuring the distances and tracing the growth of dark matter structure over cosmic time, gravitational lensing also holds great promise in determining whether the dark energy, postulated to explain the accelerated cosmic expansion, is a vacuum energy density or a failure of general relativity on large scales. We illustrate the wide range of applications which harness the power of gravitational lensing, from searches for the earliest galaxies magnified by massive clusters to those for extrasolar planets which temporarily brighten a background star. We summarise the future prospects with dedicated ground and space-based facilities designed to exploit this remarkable physical phenomenon.

  12. 30 CFR 18.30 - Windows and lenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Windows and lenses. 18.30 Section 18.30 Mineral... § 18.30 Windows and lenses. (a) MSHA may waive testing of materials for windows or lenses except headlight lenses. When tested, material for windows or lenses shall meet the test requirements prescribed...

  13. 30 CFR 18.30 - Windows and lenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Windows and lenses. 18.30 Section 18.30 Mineral... § 18.30 Windows and lenses. (a) MSHA may waive testing of materials for windows or lenses except headlight lenses. When tested, material for windows or lenses shall meet the test requirements prescribed...

  14. 30 CFR 18.30 - Windows and lenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Windows and lenses. 18.30 Section 18.30 Mineral... § 18.30 Windows and lenses. (a) MSHA may waive testing of materials for windows or lenses except headlight lenses. When tested, material for windows or lenses shall meet the test requirements prescribed...

  15. 30 CFR 18.30 - Windows and lenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Windows and lenses. 18.30 Section 18.30 Mineral... § 18.30 Windows and lenses. (a) MSHA may waive testing of materials for windows or lenses except headlight lenses. When tested, material for windows or lenses shall meet the test requirements prescribed...

  16. 30 CFR 18.30 - Windows and lenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Windows and lenses. 18.30 Section 18.30 Mineral... § 18.30 Windows and lenses. (a) MSHA may waive testing of materials for windows or lenses except headlight lenses. When tested, material for windows or lenses shall meet the test requirements prescribed...

  17. Origins of weak lensing systematics, and requirements on future instrumentation (or knowledge of instrumentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Hoekstra, Henk; Kitching, Thomas; Rhodes, Jason; Cropper, Mark; Amiaux, Jérôme; Harvey, David; Mellier, Yannick; Meneghetti, Massimo; Miller, Lance; Paulin-Henriksson, Stéphane; Pires, Sandrine; Scaramella, Roberto; Schrabback, Tim

    2013-02-01

    The first half of this paper explores the origin of systematic biases in the measurement of weak gravitational lensing. Compared to previous work, we expand the investigation of point spread function instability and fold in for the first time the effects of non-idealities in electronic imaging detectors and imperfect galaxy shape measurement algorithms. Together, these now explain the additive {A}(ℓ) and multiplicative {M}(ℓ) systematics typically reported in current lensing measurements. We find that overall performance is driven by a product of a telescope/camera's absolute performance, and our knowledge about its performance. The second half of this paper propagates any residual shear measurement biases through to their effect on cosmological parameter constraints. Fully exploiting the statistical power of Stage IV weak lensing surveys will require additive biases overline{{A}}≲ 1.8× 10^{-12} and multiplicative biases overline{{M}}≲ 4.0× 10^{-3}. These can be allocated between individual budgets in hardware, calibration data and software, using results from the first half of the paper. If instrumentation is stable and well calibrated, we find extant shear measurement software from Gravitational Lensing Accuracy Testing 2010 (GREAT10) already meet requirements on galaxies detected at signal-to-noise ratio = 40. Averaging over a population of galaxies with a realistic distribution of sizes, it also meets requirements for a 2D cosmic shear analysis from space. If used on fainter galaxies or for 3D cosmic shear tomography, existing algorithms would need calibration on simulations to avoid introducing bias at a level similar to the statistical error. Requirements on hardware and calibration data are discussed in more detail in a companion paper. Our analysis is intentionally general, but is specifically being used to drive the hardware and ground segment performance budget for the design of the European Space Agency's recently selected Euclid mission.

  18. Gravitational lenses and dark matter - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, J. Richard, III

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical models are presented for guiding the application of gravitational lenses to probe the characteristics of dark matter in the universe. Analytical techniques are defined for quantifying the mass associated with lensing galaxies (in terms of the image separation), determining the quantity of dark mass of the lensing bodies, and estimating the mass density of the lenses. The possibility that heavy halos are made of low mass stars is considered, along with the swallowing of central images of black holes or cusps in galactic nuclei and the effects produced on a lensed quasar image by nonbaryonic halos. The observable effects of dense groups and clusters and the characteristics of dark matter strings are discussed, and various types of images which are possible due to lensing phenomena and position are described.

  19. CMB lensing and primordial non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Duncan; Smith, Kendrick M.; Challinor, Anthony; Liguori, Michele

    2009-10-15

    We study the effects of gravitational lensing on the estimation of non-Gaussianity from the bispectrum of the CMB temperature anisotropies. We find that the effect of lensing on the bispectrum may qualitatively be described as a smoothing of the acoustic features analogous to the temperature power spectrum. In contrast to previous results, for a Planck-like experiment which is cosmic-variance limited to l{sub max}=2000, we find that lensing causes no significant degradation of our ability to constrain the non-Gaussianity amplitude f{sub NL} for both local and equilateral configurations, provided that the biases due to the cross correlation between the lensing potential and the integrated-Sachs-Wolfe contribution to the CMB temperature are adequately understood. With numerical simulations, we also verify that low-order Taylor approximations to the lensed bispectrum and integrated-Sachs-Wolfe-lensing biases are accurate.

  20. Measuring Lensing Magnification of Quasars by Large Scale Structure Using the Variability-Luminosity Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Anne H.; Seitz, Stella; Jerke, Jonathan; Scalzo, Richard; Rabinowitz, David; Ellman, Nancy; Baltay, Charles

    2011-05-01

    We introduce a technique to measure gravitational lensing magnification using the variability of type I quasars. Quasars' variability amplitudes and luminosities are tightly correlated, on average. Magnification due to gravitational lensing increases the quasars' apparent luminosity, while leaving the variability amplitude unchanged. Therefore, the mean magnification of an ensemble of quasars can be measured through the mean shift in the variability-luminosity relation. As a proof of principle, we use this technique to measure the magnification of quasars spectroscopically identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), due to gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters in the SDSS MaxBCG catalog. The Palomar-QUEST Variability Survey, reduced using the DeepSky pipeline, provides variability data for the sources. We measure the average quasar magnification as a function of scaled distance (r/R 200) from the nearest cluster; our measurements are consistent with expectations assuming Navarro-Frenk-White cluster profiles, particularly after accounting for the known uncertainty in the clusters' centers. Variability-based lensing measurements are a valuable complement to shape-based techniques because their systematic errors are very different, and also because the variability measurements are amenable to photometric errors of a few percent and to depths seen in current wide-field surveys. Given the volume data of the expected from current and upcoming surveys, this new technique has the potential to be competitive with weak lensing shear measurements of large-scale structure.

  1. Joint measurement of lensing-galaxy correlations using SPT and DES SV data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baxter, E. J.

    2016-07-04

    We measure the correlation of galaxy lensing and cosmic microwave background lensing with a set of galaxies expected to trace the matter density field. The measurements are performed using pre-survey Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification optical imaging data and millimeter-wave data from the 2500 square degree South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey. The two lensing-galaxy correlations are jointly fit to extract constraints on cosmological parameters, constraints on the redshift distribution of the lens galaxies, and constraints on the absolute shear calibration of DES galaxy lensing measurements. We show that an attractive feature of these fits is that they are fairly insensitive to the clustering bias of the galaxies used as matter tracers. The measurement presented in this work confirms that DES and SPT data are consistent with each other and with the currently favoredmore » $$\\Lambda$$CDM cosmological model. In conclusion, it also demonstrates that joint lensing-galaxy correlation measurement considered here contains a wealth of information that can be extracted using current and future surveys.« less

  2. MEASURING LENSING MAGNIFICATION OF QUASARS BY LARGE SCALE STRUCTURE USING THE VARIABILITY-LUMINOSITY RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Anne H.; Jerke, Jonathan; Scalzo, Richard; Rabinowitz, David; Ellman, Nancy; Baltay, Charles

    2011-05-10

    We introduce a technique to measure gravitational lensing magnification using the variability of type I quasars. Quasars' variability amplitudes and luminosities are tightly correlated, on average. Magnification due to gravitational lensing increases the quasars' apparent luminosity, while leaving the variability amplitude unchanged. Therefore, the mean magnification of an ensemble of quasars can be measured through the mean shift in the variability-luminosity relation. As a proof of principle, we use this technique to measure the magnification of quasars spectroscopically identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), due to gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters in the SDSS MaxBCG catalog. The Palomar-QUEST Variability Survey, reduced using the DeepSky pipeline, provides variability data for the sources. We measure the average quasar magnification as a function of scaled distance (r/R{sub 200}) from the nearest cluster; our measurements are consistent with expectations assuming Navarro-Frenk-White cluster profiles, particularly after accounting for the known uncertainty in the clusters' centers. Variability-based lensing measurements are a valuable complement to shape-based techniques because their systematic errors are very different, and also because the variability measurements are amenable to photometric errors of a few percent and to depths seen in current wide-field surveys. Given the volume data of the expected from current and upcoming surveys, this new technique has the potential to be competitive with weak lensing shear measurements of large-scale structure.

  3. GERLUMPH DATA RELEASE 1: HIGH-RESOLUTION COSMOLOGICAL MICROLENSING MAGNIFICATION MAPS AND eResearch TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.; Croton, D.; Bate, N. F.

    2014-03-01

    As synoptic all-sky surveys begin to discover new multiply lensed quasars, the flow of data will enable statistical cosmological microlensing studies of sufficient size to constrain quasar accretion disk and supermassive black hole properties. In preparation for this new era, we are undertaking the GPU-Enabled, High Resolution cosmological MicroLensing parameter survey (GERLUMPH). We present here the GERLUMPH Data Release 1, which consists of 12,342 high resolution cosmological microlensing magnification maps and provides the first uniform coverage of the convergence, shear, and smooth matter fraction parameter space. We use these maps to perform a comprehensive numerical investigation of the mass-sheet degeneracy, finding excellent agreement with its predictions. We study the effect of smooth matter on microlensing induced magnification fluctuations. In particular, in the minima and saddle-point regions, fluctuations are enhanced only along the critical line, while in the maxima region they are always enhanced for high smooth matter fractions (≈0.9). We describe our approach to data management, including the use of an SQL database with a Web interface for data access and online analysis, obviating the need for individuals to download large volumes of data. In combination with existing observational databases and online applications, the GERLUMPH archive represents a fundamental component of a new microlensing eResearch cloud. Our maps and tools are publicly available at http://gerlumph.swin.edu.au/.

  4. Lens Models and Magnification Maps of the Six Hubble Frontier Fields Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Traci L.; Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Gladders, Michael D.; Coe, Dan; Ebeling, Harald

    2014-12-01

    We present strong-lensing models as well as mass and magnification maps for the cores of the six Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Frontier Fields galaxy clusters. Our parametric lens models are constrained by the locations and redshifts of multiple image systems of lensed background galaxies. We use a combination of photometric redshifts and spectroscopic redshifts of the lensed background sources obtained by us (for A2744 and AS1063), collected from the literature, or kindly provided by the lensing community. Using our results, we (1) compare the derived mass distribution of each cluster to its light distribution, (2) quantify the cumulative magnification power of the HST Frontier Fields clusters, (3) describe how our models can be used to estimate the magnification and image multiplicity of lensed background sources at all redshifts and at any position within the cluster cores, and (4) discuss systematic effects and caveats resulting from our modeling methods. We specifically investigate the effect of the use of spectroscopic and photometric redshift constraints on the uncertainties of the resulting models. We find that the photometric redshift estimates of lensed galaxies are generally in excellent agreement with spectroscopic redshifts, where available. However, the flexibility associated with relaxed redshift priors may cause the complexity of large-scale structure that is needed to account for the lensing signal to be underestimated. Our findings thus underline the importance of spectroscopic arc redshifts, or tight photometric redshift constraints, for high precision lens models. All products from our best-fit lens models (magnification, convergence, shear, deflection field) and model simulations for estimating errors are made available via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes. Based on observations made with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile and the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained through the Mikulski

  5. Weak lensing of the primary CMB bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Cooray, Asantha; Sarkar, Devdeep; Serra, Paolo

    2008-06-15

    The bispectrum of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies is a well-known probe of the non-Gaussianity of primordial perturbations. Just as the intervening large-scale structure modifies the CMB angular power spectrum through weak gravitational lensing, the CMB primary bispectrum generated at the last scattering surface is also modified by lensing. We discuss the lensing modification to the CMB bispectrum and show that lensing leads to an overall decrease in the amplitude of the primary bispectrum at multipoles of interest between 100 and 2000 through additional smoothing introduced by lensing. Since weak lensing is not accounted for in current estimators of the primordial non-Gaussianity parameter, the existing measurements of f{sub NL} of the local model with WMAP out to l{sub max}{approx}750 is biased low by about 6%. For a high resolution experiment such as Planck, the lensing modification to the bispectrum must be properly included when attempting to estimate the primordial non-Gaussianity or the bias will be at the level of 30%. For Planck, weak lensing increases the minimum detectable value for the non-Gaussianity parameter of the local type f{sub NL} to 7 from the previous estimate of about 5 without lensing. The minimum detectable value of f{sub NL} for a cosmic variance limited experiment is also increased from less than 3 to {approx}5.

  6. The Alvarez and Lohmann refractive lenses revisited.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Sergio

    2009-05-25

    Alvarez and Lohmann lenses are variable focus optical devices based on lateral shifts of two lenses with cubic-type surfaces. I analyzed the optical performance of these types of lenses computing the first order optical properties (applying wavefront refraction and propagation) without the restriction of the thin lens approximation, and the spot diagram using a ray tracing algorithm. I proposed an analytic and numerical method to select the most optimum coefficients and the specific configuration of these lenses. The results show that Lohmann composite lens is slightly superior to Alvarez one because the overall thickness and optical aberrations are smaller. PMID:19466190

  7. Reduced shear power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Shapiro, Charles; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Berkeley

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  8. Combining weak-lensing tomography and spectroscopic redshift surveys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-05-11

    Redshift space distortion (RSD) is a powerful way of measuring the growth of structure and testing General Relativity, but it is limited by cosmic variance and the degeneracy between galaxy bias b and the growth rate factor f. The cross-correlation of lensing shear with the galaxy density field can in principle measure b in a manner free from cosmic variance limits, breaking the f-b degeneracy and allowing inference of the matter power spectrum from the galaxy survey. We analyze the growth constraints from a realistic tomographic weak lensing photo-z survey combined with a spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey over the samemore » sky area. For sky coverage fsky = 0.5, analysis of the transverse modes measures b to 2-3% accuracy per Δz = 0.1 bin at z < 1 when ~10 galaxies arcmin–2 are measured in the lensing survey and all halos with M > Mmin = 1013h–1M⊙ have spectra. For the gravitational growth parameter parameter γ (f = Ωγm), combining the lensing information with RSD analysis of non-transverse modes yields accuracy σ(γ) ≈ 0.01. Adding lensing information to the RSD survey improves \\sigma(\\gamma) by an amount equivalent to a 3x (10x) increase in RSD survey area when the spectroscopic survey extends down to halo mass 1013.5 (1014) h–1 M⊙. We also find that the σ(γ) of overlapping surveys is equivalent to that of surveys 1.5-2 times larger if they are separated on the sky. This gain is greatest when the spectroscopic mass threshold is 1013 -1014 h–1 M⊙, similar to LRG surveys. The gain of overlapping surveys is reduced for very deep or very shallow spectroscopic surveys, but any practical surveys are more powerful when overlapped than when separated. As a result, the gain of overlapped surveys is larger in the case when the primordial power spectrum normalization is uncertain by > 0.5%.« less

  9. Combining weak-lensing tomography and spectroscopic redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-05-11

    Redshift space distortion (RSD) is a powerful way of measuring the growth of structure and testing General Relativity, but it is limited by cosmic variance and the degeneracy between galaxy bias b and the growth rate factor f. The cross-correlation of lensing shear with the galaxy density field can in principle measure b in a manner free from cosmic variance limits, breaking the f-b degeneracy and allowing inference of the matter power spectrum from the galaxy survey. We analyze the growth constraints from a realistic tomographic weak lensing photo-z survey combined with a spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey over the same sky area. For sky coverage fsky = 0.5, analysis of the transverse modes measures b to 2-3% accuracy per Δz = 0.1 bin at z < 1 when ~10 galaxies arcmin–2 are measured in the lensing survey and all halos with M > Mmin = 1013h–1M have spectra. For the gravitational growth parameter parameter γ (f = Ωγm), combining the lensing information with RSD analysis of non-transverse modes yields accuracy σ(γ) ≈ 0.01. Adding lensing information to the RSD survey improves \\sigma(\\gamma) by an amount equivalent to a 3x (10x) increase in RSD survey area when the spectroscopic survey extends down to halo mass 1013.5 (1014) h–1 M. We also find that the σ(γ) of overlapping surveys is equivalent to that of surveys 1.5-2 times larger if they are separated on the sky. This gain is greatest when the spectroscopic mass threshold is 1013 -1014 h–1 M, similar to LRG surveys. The gain of overlapping surveys is reduced for very deep or very shallow spectroscopic surveys, but any practical surveys are more powerful when overlapped than when separated. As a result, the gain of overlapped surveys is larger in the case when the primordial power spectrum normalization is

  10. Removing the ISW-lensing bias from the local-form primordial non-Gaussianity estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaiseung; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Rotti, Aditya E-mail: aditya@iucaa.ernet.in

    2013-04-01

    The Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect produces a secondary temperature aniso\\-tropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), as CMB photons travel through time-varying potentials along the line-of-sight. The main contribution comes from redshifts z∼<2, where dark energy leads to a decay of potentials. As the same photons are gravitationally lensed by these decaying potentials, there exists a high degree of correlation between the ISW effect and CMB lensing, leading to a non-zero three-point correlation (bispectrum) of the observed temperature anisotropy. This ISW-lensing bispectrum, whose shape resembles that of the so-called ''local-form'' primordial bispectrum parametrized by f{sub NL}, is known to be the largest contamination of f{sub NL}. In order to avoid a spurious detection of primordial non-Gaussianity, we need to remove the ISW-lensing bias. In this work, we investigate three debiasing methods: (I) subtraction of an expected, ensemble average of the ISW-lensing bispectrum; (II) subtraction of a measured ISW-lensing bispectrum; and (III) direct subtraction of an estimated ISW signal from an observed temperature map. One may use an estimation of the ISW map from external non-CMB data or that from the CMB data themselves. As the methods II and III are based on fewer assumptions about the nature of dark energy, they are preferred over the method I. While the methods I and II yield unbiased estimates of f{sub NL} with comparable error bars, the method III yields a biased result when the underlying primordial f{sub NL} is non-zero and the ISW map is estimated from a lensing potential reconstructed from the observed temperature map. One of the sources of the bias is a lensing reconstruction noise bias which is independent of f{sub NL} and can be calculated precisely, but other f{sub NL}-dependent terms are difficult to compute reliably. We thus conclude that the method II is the best, model-independent way to remove the ISW-lensing bias of f{sub NL

  11. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  12. Measuring the cosmic microwave background gravitational lensing potential from 500 deg2 of SPTpol data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocanu, Laura Monica; South Pole Telescope Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Weak gravitational lensing by large-scale structure in the universe causes deflections in the paths of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. This effect introduces non-Gaussian correlations in the observed CMB temperature and polarization fields. The signature of lensing can be used to reconstruct the projected gravitational lensing potential with a quadratic estimator technique; this provides a measure of the integrated mass distribution out to the surface of last scattering, sourced primarily from redshifts between 0.1 and 5. The power spectrum of the lensing potential encodes information about the geometry of the universe and the growth of structure and can be used to place constraints on the sum of neutrino masses and dark energy. High signal-to-noise mass maps from CMB lensing are also powerful for cross-correlating with other tracers of large-scale structure and for delensing the CMB in search for primordial gravitational waves. This poster will describe recent progress on measuring the CMB gravitational lensing potential and its power spectrum using data from 500 deg2 of sky observed with the polarization-sensitive receiver installed on the South Pole Telescope, SPTpol.

  13. Seeing in the Dark: Weak Lensing from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Eric Michael

    Statistical weak lensing by large-scale structure { cosmic shear { is a promising cosmological tool, which has motivated the design of several large upcoming astronomical surveys. This Thesis presents a measurement of cosmic shear using coadded Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging in 168 square degrees of the equatorial region, with r < 23:5 and i < 22:5, a source number density of 2.2 per arcmin2 and median redshift of zmed = 0.52. These coadds were generated using a new rounding kernel method that was intended to minimize systematic errors in the lensing measurement due to coherent PSF anisotropies that are otherwise prevalent in the SDSS imaging data. Measurements of cosmic shear out to angular separations of 2 degrees are presented, along with systematics tests of the catalog generation and shear measurement steps that demonstrate that these results are dominated by statistical rather than systematic errors. Assuming a cosmological model corresponding to WMAP7 (Komatsu et al., 2011) and allowing only the amplitude of matter fluctuations sigma8 to vary, the best-t value of the amplitude of matter fluctuations is sigma 8=0.636+0.109-0.154 (1sigma); without systematic errors this would be sigma8=0.636+0.099 -0.137 (1sigma). Assuming a flat Λ CDM model, the combined constraints with WMAP7 are sigma8=0.784+0.028 -0.026 (1sigma). The 2sigma error range is 14 percent smaller than WMAP7 alone. Aside from the intrinsic value of such cosmological constraints from the growth of structure, some important lessons are identified for upcoming surveys that may face similar issues when combining multi-epoch data to measure cosmic shear. Motivated by the challenges faced in the cosmic shear measurement, two new lensing probes are suggested for increasing the available weak lensing signal. Both use galaxy scaling relations to control for scatter in lensing observables. The first employs a version of the well-known fundamental plane relation for early type galaxies. This

  14. Cosmology constraints from shear peak statistics in Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacprzak, T.; Kirk, D.; Friedrich, O.; Amara, A.; Refregier, A.; Marian, L.; Dietrich, J. P.; Suchyta, E.; Aleksić, J.; Bacon, D.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S. L.; Chang, C.; Eifler, T. F.; Hartley, W. G.; Huff, E. M.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Melchior, P.; Nicola, A.; Samuroff, S.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Weller, J.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Smith, I. Sevilla-Noarbe R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    Shear peak statistics has gained a lot of attention recently as a practical alternative to the two point statistics for constraining cosmological parameters. We perform a shear peak statistics analysis of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data, using weak gravitational lensing measurements from a 139 deg2 field. We measure the abundance of peaks identified in aperture mass maps, as a function of their signal-to-noise ratio, in the signal-to-noise range 0shear multiplicative bias and the error on the mean redshift of the galaxy sample. We introduce models of intrinsic alignments, blending, and source contamination by cluster members. These models indicate that peaks with mathcal {S} / mathcal {N}>4 would require significant corrections, which is why we do not include them in our analysis. We compare our results to the cosmological constraints from the two point analysis on the SV field and find them to be in good agreement in both the central value and its uncertainty. We discuss prospects for future peak statistics analysis with upcoming DES data.

  15. Gravitational Lensing Science with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarization Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Englen, Alexander; Atacama Cosmology Telescope Team

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) has emerged as a new probe of precision cosmology. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope is currently undergoing its second year surveying the CMB sky at arcminute angular resolution. CMB maps obtained from this survey can be used to reconstruct the density of dark matter along the line of sight between us and the CMB last-scattering surface. These maps can be used both on their own and in cross-correlation with other probes of large scale structure to trace the history of structure growth in the Universe. In this talk I will summarize recent results from these analyses, highlighting constraints on the neutrino mass and dark energy as well as the history of star formation obtained from cross-correlation with maps of the cosmic infrared background.

  16. Mesh-free free-form lensing - I. Methodology and application to mass reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, Julian

    2016-09-01

    Many applications and algorithms in the field of gravitational lensing make use of meshes with a finite number of nodes to analyse and manipulate data. Specific examples in lensing are astronomical CCD images in general, the reconstruction of density distributions from lensing data, lens-source plane mapping or the characterization and interpolation of a point spread function. We present a numerical framework to interpolate and differentiate in the mesh-free domain, defined by nodes with coordinates that follow no regular pattern. The framework is based on radial basis functions (RBFs) to smoothly represent data around the nodes. We demonstrate the performance of Gaussian RBF-based, mesh-free interpolation and differentiation, which reaches the sub-percent level in both cases. We use our newly developed framework to translate ideas of free-form mass reconstruction from lensing on to the mesh-free domain. By reconstructing a simulated mock lens we find that strong-lensing only reconstructions achieve <10 per cent accuracy in the areas where these constraints are available but provide poorer results when departing from these regions. Weak-lensing only reconstructions give <10 per cent accuracy outside the strong-lensing regime, but cannot resolve the inner core structure of the lens. Once both regimes are combined, accurate reconstructions can be achieved over the full field of view. The reconstruction of a simulated lens, using constraints that mimics real observations, yields accurate results in terms of surface-mass density, Navarro-Frenk-White profile (NFW) parameters, Einstein radius and magnification map recovery, encouraging the application of this method to real data.

  17. Weak lensing by galaxy troughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Galaxy troughs, i.e. underdensities in the projected galaxy field, are a weak lensing probe of the low density Universe with high signal-to-noise ratio. I present measurements of the radial distortion of background galaxy images and the de-magnification of the CMB by troughs constructed from Dark Energy Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxy catalogs. With high statistical significance and a relatively robust modeling, these probe gravity in regimes of density and scale difficult to access for conventional statistics.

  18. Gravitational Lensing Extends SETI Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Factor, Richard

    Microwave SETI (The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) focuses on two primary strategies, the "Targeted Search" and the "All-Sky Survey." Although the goal of both strategies is the unequivocal discovery of a signal transmitted by intelligent species outside our solar system, they pursue the strategies in very different manners and have vastly different requirements. This chapter introduces Gravitational Lensing SETI (GL-SETI), a third strategy. Its goal is the unequivocal discovery of an extraterrestrial signal, with equipment and data processing requirements that are substantially different from the commonly-used strategies. This strategy is particularly suitable for use with smaller radio telescopes and has budgetary requirements suitable for individual researchers.

  19. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background polarization lensing power spectrum with the POLARBEAR experiment.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Linder, E; Leitch, E M; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2014-07-11

    Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale B-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity E- and B-mode polarization mapped over ∼30 square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing B modes is found at 4.2σ (stat+sys) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of 27%, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda cold dark matter cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing B-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves. PMID:25062161

  20. Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Lensing Power Spectrum with the POLARBEAR Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Anthony, A. E.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Flanigan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Linder, E.; Leitch, E. M.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Meng, X.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Quealy, E.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Schanning, I.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B.; Shimizu, A.; Shimmin, C.; Shimon, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Takakura, S.; Tomaru, T.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.; Polarbear Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale B-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity E- and B-mode polarization mapped over ˜30 square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing B modes is found at 4.2σ (stat +sys) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of 27%, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda cold dark matter cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing B-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves.

  1. Future detectability of gravitational-wave induced lensing from high-sensitivity CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Taruya, Atsushi

    2015-02-01

    We discuss the future detectability of gravitational-wave induced lensing from high-sensitivity cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. Gravitational waves can induce a rotational component of the weak-lensing deflection angle, usually referred to as the curl mode, which would be imprinted on the CMB maps. Using the technique of reconstructing lensing signals involved in CMB maps, this curl mode can be measured in an unbiased manner, offering an independent confirmation of the gravitational waves complementary to B-mode polarization experiments. Based on the Fisher matrix analysis, we first show that with the noise levels necessary to confirm the consistency relation for the primordial gravitational waves, the future CMB experiments will be able to detect the gravitational-wave induced lensing signals. For a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r ≲0.1 , even if the consistency relation is difficult to confirm with a high significance, the gravitational-wave induced lensing will be detected at more than 3 σ significance level. Further, we point out that high-sensitivity experiments will be also powerful to constrain the gravitational waves generated after the recombination epoch. Compared to the B-mode polarization, the curl mode is particularly sensitive to gravitational waves generated at low redshifts (z ≲10 ) with a low frequency (k ≲1 0-3 Mpc-1 ), and it could give a much tighter constraint on their energy density ΩGW by more than 3 orders of magnitude.

  2. Constraining modified gravitational theories by weak lensing with Euclid

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, Matteo; Calabrese, Erminia; De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Scaramella, Roberto

    2011-01-15

    Future proposed satellite missions such as Euclid can offer the opportunity to test general relativity on cosmic scales through mapping of the galaxy weak-lensing signal. In this paper we forecast the ability of these experiments to constrain modified gravity scenarios such as those predicted by scalar-tensor and f(R) theories. We find that Euclid will improve constraints expected from the Planck satellite on these modified theories of gravity by 2 orders of magnitude. We discuss parameter degeneracies and the possible biases introduced by modifications to gravity.

  3. A note on a linearized approach to gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, S. J.; Forbes, L. K.

    2011-10-01

    A recent paper by Walters, Forbes and Jarvis presented new kinematic formulae for ray tracing in gravitational lensing models. The approach can generate caustic maps, but is computationally expensive. Here, a linearized approximation to that formulation is presented. Although still complicated, the linearized equations admit a remarkable closed-form solution. As a result, linearized approximations to the caustic patterns may be generated extremely rapidly, and are found to be in good agreement with the results of full non-linear computation. The usual Einstein-angle approximation is derived as a small angle approximation to the solution presented here.

  4. The SuperCLASS Weak Lensing Deep Field Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Ian; Superclass Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    SuperCLASS is a survey of 1.75 square degrees of the Northern sky using the e-MERLIN telescope array at a frequency of 1.4GHz, aiming to reach an image noise RMS level of 4 micro-Jy/beam. The primary goal is to use the expected source density of ~1 per square arcminute (giving a total of ~10,000), ~150 milli-arcsecond resolution and presence in the survey region of 5 massive Abell clusters to measure a significant weak lensing effect in the radio band for only the second time, proving the potential of radio weak lensing as a powerful tool for mapping dark matter and constraining cosmological models. In doing this we will also learn a significant amount about the source population (star forming galaxies and radio AGN) themselves and their polarisation properties. SuperCLASS will not only require development of a pipeline for making the highly accurate determination of shapes of a large number of sources for performing standard weak lensing measurements, but will also form a test bed for new methods, such as the use of polarisation information to mitigate the biasing effect of intrinsic alignments between galaxies, which will be a key systematic for future weak lensing surveys. Whilst the challenges of the necessary shape measurement in image plane optical data are relatively well-explored, there is little experience in meeting those involved in the use of data from radio interferometers. The knowledge gained about efficient and accurate techniques for large scale radio astronomy from SuperCLASS will be invaluable in the build up to the next generation of experiments.

  5. Gravitational Lensing in TeVe S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Mu-Chen; Ko, Chung-Ming; Tian, Yong

    Gravitational Lensing is an important tool to understand the "missing mass" problem, especially for Modified Gravity. Recently, Bekenstein proposed a relativistic gravitation theory for Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) paradigm which resolves the "missing mass" problem well on abnormal dynamical behaviors in extragalactic region. Our work follow Bekenstein's approach to investigating gravitational lensing to get theoretical prediction.

  6. Offset lenses add versatility to phototypesetting machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, A. M.

    1966-01-01

    Offset lenses facilitate the composition of inputs of other than straight baseline characters on the Photon phototypesetting machine. A number of lenses in the turret are mounted in an offset pattern that causes characters projected through them to fall on the photographic paper in the magazine above and below the baseline.

  7. Magnification bias corrections to galaxy-lensing cross-correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Ziour, Riad; Hui, Lam

    2008-12-15

    Galaxy-galaxy or galaxy-quasar lensing can provide important information on the mass distribution in the Universe. It consists of correlating the lensing signal (either shear or magnification) of a background galaxy/quasar sample with the number density of a foreground galaxy sample. However, the foreground galaxy density is inevitably altered by the magnification bias due to the mass between the foreground and the observer, leading to a correction to the observed galaxy-lensing signal. The aim of this paper is to quantify this correction. The single most important determining factor is the foreground redshift z{sub f}: the correction is small if the foreground galaxies are at low redshifts but can become non-negligible for sufficiently high redshifts. For instance, we find that for the multipole l=1000, the correction is above 1%x(5s{sub f}-2)/b{sub f} for z{sub f} > or approx. 0.37, and above 5%x(5s{sub f}-2)/b{sub f} for z{sub f} > or approx. 0.67, where s{sub f} is the number count slope of the foreground sample and b{sub f} its galaxy bias. These considerations are particularly important for geometrical measures, such as the Jain and Taylor ratio or its generalization by Zhang et al. Assuming (5s{sub f}-2)/b{sub f}=1, we find that the foreground redshift should be limited to z{sub f} < or approx. 0.45 in order to avoid biasing the inferred dark energy equation of state w by more than 5%, and that even for a low foreground redshift (<0.45), the background samples must be well separated from the foreground to avoid incurring a bias of similar magnitude. Lastly, we briefly comment on the possibility of obtaining these geometrical measures without using galaxy shapes, using instead magnification bias itself.

  8. Aberrations in asymmetrical electron lenses.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J P S; Word, R C; Könenkamp, R

    2012-08-01

    Starting from well established knowledge in light-optics we explore the question if electron-optical aberration can be improved in asymmetrical electron lenses. We show that spherical as well as chromatic aberration coefficients are reduced in asymmetric electrostatic einzel lenses when the center electrode is moved away from the center position towards the entrance electrode. Relative improvements up to 40% for both the chromatic and the spherical aberration coefficients can be obtained. We use analytical and numerical calculations to confirm this result for exemplary cases of a lens with fixed length and working distance. The agreement of the two calculation methods is very good. We then derive an estimate for the electron-optical aberration coefficients from light-optics. The derived expressions for chromatic and spherical aberrations are somewhat simpler than the ones derived from electron-optics as they involve integrals only over the electrostatic potential, not over the electron paths. The estimated formulas still agree well with the electron optical calculations. Overall, we are tempted to suggest that the enormous knowledge base of light optics can provide considerable guidance for electron-optical applications. PMID:22206603

  9. Time delay in Swiss cheese gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.; Kantowski, R.; Dai, X.

    2010-08-15

    We compute time delays for gravitational lensing in a flat {Lambda} dominated cold dark matter Swiss cheese universe. We assume a primary and secondary pair of light rays are deflected by a single point mass condensation described by a Kottler metric (Schwarzschild with {Lambda}) embedded in an otherwise homogeneous cosmology. We find that the cosmological constant's effect on the difference in arrival times is nonlinear and at most around 0.002% for a large cluster lens; however, we find differences from time delays predicted by conventional linear lensing theory that can reach {approx}4% for these large lenses. The differences in predicted delay times are due to the failure of conventional lensing to incorporate the lensing mass into the mean mass density of the universe.

  10. Spherical aberration in electrically thin flat lenses.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, Miguel; Ramahi, Omar M

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the spherical aberration of a new generation of lenses made of flat electrically thin inhomogeneous media. For such lenses, spherical aberration is analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively, and comparison is made to the classical gradient index rod. Both flat thin and thick lenses are made of gradient index materials, but the physical mechanisms and design equations are different. Using full-wave three-dimensional numerical simulation, we evaluate the spherical aberrations using the Maréchal criterion and show that the thin lens gives significantly better performance than the thick lens (rod). Additionally, based on ray tracing formulation, third-order analysis for longitudinal aberration and optical path difference are presented, showing strong overall performance of thin lenses in comparison to classical rod lenses. PMID:27505651

  11. The structure of the Hallstatt evaporite body (Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria): A compressive diapir superposed by strike-slip shear?☆

    PubMed Central

    Schorn, Anja; Neubauer, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Based on old detailed mining maps and own observations in the Hallstatt salt mine, we reinterpret the structure of the Hallstatt evaporite body of the Upper Permian to Lower Triassic Haselgebirge Fm. within the Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA). The Haselgebirge Fm. represents a rocksalt mylonite with abundant lenses of sulphates, mudstones and limestones. In comparison to published results of analogue modeling we interpret the present shape of the Hallstatt body as a WNW–ESE elongated compressive teardrop-like diapir. This is overprinted by NNE–SSW shortening and dominantly sinistral shearing along a W-trending shear zone. The internal structure shows steeply dipping rock units and foliation. Earlier dextral ductile shear fabrics of likely late Early Cretaceous age are preserved in sulphate rocks and are subsequently overprinted by mylonitic fabrics in rocksalt and cataclastic fabrics in other rocks. The low strength of halite results in recent subvertical shortening and a strain rate ε˙ of 8 × 10−10 [s−1] is deduced from deformed subhorizontal boreholes. This value is similar to such strain rates (10−10 to 10−9 s−1) estimated by the halite grain size distribution from other salt mines in the NCA and thus indicative of sub-recent formation of the halite microfabrics. PMID:26806998

  12. Non-homogeneous flow profiles in sheared bacterial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Devranjan; Cheng, Xiang

    Bacterial suspensions under shear exhibit interesting rheological behaviors including the remarkable ``superfluidic'' state with vanishing viscosity at low shear rates. Theoretical studies have shown that such ``superfluidic'' state is linked with non-homogeneous shear flows, which are induced by coupling between nematic order of active fluids and hydrodynamics of shear flows. However, although bulk rheology of bacterial suspensions has been experimentally studied, shear profiles within bacterial suspensions have not been explored so far. Here, we experimentally investigate the flow behaviors of E. coli suspensions under planar oscillatory shear. Using confocal microscopy and PIV, we measure velocity profiles across gap between two shear plates. We find that with increasing shear rates, high-concentration bacterial suspensions exhibit an array of non-homogeneous flow behaviors like yield-stress flows and shear banding. We show that these non-homogeneous flows are due to collective motion of bacterial suspensions. The phase diagram of sheared bacterial suspensions is systematically mapped as functions of shear rates an bacterial concentrations. Our experiments provide new insights into rheology of bacterial suspensions and shed light on shear induced dynamics of active fluids. Chemical Engineering and Material Science department.

  13. Comb-push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (CUSE): A Novel Method for Two-dimensional Shear Elasticity Imaging of Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Manduca, Armando; Urban, Matthew W.; Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2012-01-01

    Fast and accurate tissue elasticity imaging is essential in studying dynamic tissue mechanical properties. Various ultrasound shear elasticity imaging techniques have been developed in the last two decades. However, to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2D shear elasticity map, multiple data acquisitions are typically required. In this paper, a novel shear elasticity imaging technique, comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE), is introduced in which only one rapid data acquisition (less than 35 ms) is needed to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2D shear wave speed map (40 mm × 38 mm). Multiple unfocused ultrasound beams arranged in a comb pattern (comb-push) are used to generate shear waves. A directional filter is then applied upon the shear wave field to extract the left-to-right (LR) and right-to-left (RL) propagating shear waves. Local shear wave speed is recovered using a time-of-flight method based on both LR and RL waves. Finally a 2D shear wave speed map is reconstructed by combining the LR and RL speed maps. Smooth and accurate shear wave speed maps are reconstructed using the proposed CUSE method in two calibrated homogeneous phantoms with different moduli. Inclusion phantom experiments demonstrate that CUSE is capable of providing good contrast (contrast-to-noise-ratio ≥ 25 dB) between the inclusion and background without artifacts and is insensitive to inclusion positions. Safety measurements demonstrate that all regulated parameters of the ultrasound output level used in CUSE sequence are well below the FDA limits for diagnostic ultrasound. PMID:22736690

  14. A new method for shear wave speed estimation in shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Engel, Aaron J; Bashford, Gregory R

    2015-12-01

    Visualization of mechanical properties of tissue can aid in noninvasive pathology diagnosis. Shear wave elastography (SWE) measures the elastic properties of soft tissues by estimation of local shear wave propagation speed. In this paper, a new robust method for estimation of shear wave speed is introduced which has the potential for simplifying continuous filtering and real-time elasticity processing. Shear waves were generated by external mechanical excitation and imaged at a high frame rate. Three homogeneous phantoms of varying elastic moduli and one inclusion phantom were imaged. Waves propagating in separate directions were filtered and shear wave speed was estimated by inversion of the 1-D first-order wave equation. Final 2-D shear wave speed maps were constructed by weighted averaging of estimates from opposite traveling directions. Shear wave speed results for phantoms with gelatin concentrations of 5%, 7%, and 9% were 1.52 ± 0.10 m/s, 1.86 ± 0.10 m/s, and 2.37 ± 0.15 m/s, respectively, which were consistent with estimates computed from three other conventional methods, as well as compression tests done with a commercial texture analyzer. The method was shown to be able to reconstruct a 2-D speed map of an inclusion phantom with good image quality and variance comparable to conventional methods. Suggestions for further work are given. PMID:26670851

  15. Detecting Particle Dark Matter Signatures via Cross-Correlation of Gamma-Ray Anisotropies and Cosmic Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camera, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Similarly to gravitational lensing effects like cosmic shear, cosmological γ-ray emission too is to some extent a tracer of the distribution of dark matter (DM) in the Universe. Intervening DM structures source gravitational lensing distortions of distant galaxy images, and those same galaxies can emit γ rays, either because they host astrophysical sources, or directly by particle DM annihilations or decays occurring in the galactic halo. If such γ rays exhibit correlation with the cosmic shear signal, this will provide novel information on the composition of the extragalactic γ-ray background.

  16. Scanning Miniature Microscopes without Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts some alternative designs of proposed compact, lightweight optoelectronic microscopes that would contain no lenses and would generate magnified video images of specimens. Microscopes of this type were described previously in Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO - 20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43 and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO 20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 1999), page 6a. To recapitulate: In the design and construction of a microscope of this type, the focusing optics of a conventional microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. Elimination of focusing optics reduces the size and weight of the instrument and eliminates the need for the time-consuming focusing operation. The microscopes described in the cited prior articles contained two-dimensional CCDs registered with two-dimensional arrays of microchannels and, as such, were designed to produce full two-dimensional images, without need for scanning. The microscopes of the present proposal would contain one-dimensional (line image) CCDs registered with linear arrays of microchannels. In the operation of such a microscope, one would scan a specimen along a line perpendicular to the array axis (in other words, one would scan in pushbroom fashion). One could then synthesize a full two-dimensional image of the specimen from the line-image data acquired at one-pixel increments of position along the scan. In one of the proposed microscopes, a beam of unpolarized light for illuminating the specimen would enter from the side. This light would be reflected down onto the specimen by a nonpolarizing beam splitter attached to the microchannels at their lower ends. A portion of the light incident on the specimen would be reflected upward, through the beam splitter and along the microchannels, to form an image on the CCD. If the

  17. Shearing stability of lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  18. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: II. Shear wave imaging of thermal lesions.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-08-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is currently hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to a precise mapping of the lesion. HIFU treatment and monitoring were respectively performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single element transducer focused at 34 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Ultrasound-based strain imaging was combined with shear wave imaging on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created with pushing beams of 100 μs at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Thus, elasticity and strain mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to real-time monitoring of the treatment. When thermal damage occurs, tissue stiffness was found to increase up to 4-fold and strain imaging showed strong shrinkages that blur the temperature information. We show that strain imaging elastograms are not easy to interpret for accurate lesion characterization, but SWI provides a quantitative mapping of the thermal lesion. Moreover, the concept of shear wave thermometry (SWT) developed in the companion paper allows mapping temperature with the same method. Combined SWT and shear wave imaging can map the lesion stiffening and temperature outside the lesion, which could be used to predict the eventual lesion growth by thermal dose calculation. Finally, SWI is shown to be robust to motion and reliable in vivo on sheep muscle. PMID:21859579

  19. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cross-Correlation of Cosmic Microwave Background Lensing and Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwin, Blake D; Das, Sudeep; Haijian, Amir; Addison, Graeme; Bond, Richard; Crichton, Devin; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Gralla, Megan B.; Halpern, Mark; Hill, J. Colin; Hincks, Adam D.; Hughes, John P.; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hlozek, Renee; Kosowsky, Arthur; Louis, Thibaut; Marriage, Tobias A.; Marsden, Danica; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Reese. Erik D.; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Jon; Sifon, Cristobal; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Switzer, Eric R.; Wollack, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    We measure the cross-correlation of Atacama cosmology telescope cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence maps with quasar maps made from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR8 SDSS-XDQSO photometric catalog. The CMB lensing quasar cross-power spectrum is detected for the first time at a significance of 3.8 sigma, which directly confirms that the quasar distribution traces the mass distribution at high redshifts z > 1. Our detection passes a number of null tests and systematic checks. Using this cross-power spectrum, we measure the amplitude of the linear quasar bias assuming a template for its redshift dependence, and find the amplitude to be consistent with an earlier measurement from clustering; at redshift z ap 1.4, the peak of the distribution of quasars in our maps, our measurement corresponds to a bias of b = 2.5 +/- 0.6. With the signal-to-noise ratio on CMB lensing measurements likely to improve by an order of magnitude over the next few years, our results demonstrate the potential of CMB lensing crosscorrelations to probe astrophysics at high redshifts.

  20. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  1. Shear Thinning in Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergm Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Yao, Minwu; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    We measured shear thinning, a viscosity decrease ordinarily associated with complex liquids such as molten plastics or ketchup, near the critical point of xenon. The data span a wide range of dimensionless shear rate: the product of the shear rate and the relaxation time of critical fluctuations was greater than 0.001 and was less than 700. As predicted by theory, shear thinning occurred when this product was greater than 1. The measurements were conducted aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia to avoid the density stratification caused by Earth's gravity.

  2. Investigations of Galaxy Clusters Using Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, Matthew P.

    2014-08-01

    In this dissertation, we discuss the properties of galaxy clusters that have been determined using strong and weak gravitational lensing. A galaxy cluster is a collection of galaxies that are bound together by the force of gravity, while gravitational lensing is the bending of light by gravity. Strong lensing is the formation of arcs or rings of light surrounding clusters and weak lensing is a change in the apparent shapes of many galaxies. In this work we examine the properties of several samples of galaxy clusters using gravitational lensing. In Chapter 1 we introduce astrophysical theory of galaxy clusters and gravitational lensing. In Chapter 2 we examine evidence from our data that galaxy clusters are more concentrated than cosmology would predict. In Chapter 3 we investigate whether our assumptions about the number of galaxies in our clusters was valid by examining new data. In Chapter 4 we describe a determination of a relationship between mass and number of galaxies in a cluster at higher redshift than has been found before. In Chapter 5 we describe a model of the mass distribution in one of the ten lensing systems discovered by our group at Fermilab. Finally in Chapter 6 we summarize our conclusions.

  3. HST Observations of New Class Gravitational Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Neal

    1995-07-01

    We propose to examine a few of the very best lens candidates from a new gravitational lens survey, the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS) made with the VLA. We are virtually certain that we have one new lens system (1600+434) and another (1609+655) has a radio configuration which almost invariably indicates gravitational lensing. The other cases are systems which have a high probability of being lenses (statistically we would expect at least 5 of the 10 objects should be lensed, since we have imaged >3000 radio sources and experience shows that 1 in 500 are lensed). All have separations which make them difficult to study from the ground and therefore uniquely suited to the capabilities of the HST. In this investigation we will study 1600+434 and 1609+655 and attempt to image the lensing galaxy. We will image the remainder in an attempt to confirm their lens status (which requires 0.1" resolution imaging typically) and search for lensing galaxies and/or clusters in those found to be lensed systems.

  4. Cosmological Applications of Strong Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraficz, Danuta

    2009-11-01

    One of the most intriguing recent results in physics is the growing evidence that an unknown energy field and an unknown kind of matter are the major components of the Universe (70% and 30%, respectively; see e.g. Riess et al. 1998, Spergel et al. 2007). Understanding and estimating the precise value of the energy density of the two above components, together with measuring the Hubble constant that determines the age of the Universe, is a major goal of modern astrophysics. An interesting method for estimating these parameters is strong gravitational lensing of quasars (QSOs). As shown by Refsdal (1964), H0, !m and !! can be measured based on the time delay ("t) between multiply lensed images of QSOs, because "t depends on H0 and on the distances to lens and source, hence!m and !!. Determination of cosmological parameters using gravitational lensing suffers from some degeneracies, but it is based on well understood physics and unlike distance ladder methods there are no calibration issues. Moreover, it has an advantage over some of the leading methods (such as Type Ia SNe) in that it is a purely cosmological approach. In this thesis, the property of strong gravitational lensing - time delay - is extensively explored. Strong gravitational lensing, and in particular time delays, are investigated here both theoretically and observationally. The focus is on the time delay as a cosmological and astrophysical tool to constrain H0, !m, !!, and to measure the masses of lensing galaxies. The first Chapter presents a historical background of gravitational lensing. It explains the process involved in creating the theory of gravitational lenses. It shows how Newton and then Einstein developed the concept and how Refsdal and others made it a cosmological tool. We present in more detail how gravitational lensing influenced the history of physics by being the first proof of Einstein's theory of gravity. The Chapter ends by discussing the first observational discovery of a strong

  5. Freeform lenses for illumination of specific shapes in ( u, v) coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Dianhong

    2016-02-01

    Lens for rectangular illumination has been designed in ( u, v) coordinate system already. Because of light source in ( u, v) coordinate system can be divided into two identical parts, we have found that it is possible to design lenses for illumination of specific shapes. Specific shapes include triangles, as well as quadrangles which can be divided into two equal-area parts by one of the diagonals. We partition two equal-area parts into grids separately with equivalent luminous flux as well as light source, after that we construct freeform lenses by ray mapping method. Simulation results show that lenses for illumination of specific shapes are obtained with a Lambertian point source and favorable efficiency is over 0.86.

  6. Simulation of a Combined SZE and Weak Lensing Cluster Survey for Amiba Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetsu, Keiichi; Chiueh, Tzihong; Lin, Kai-Yang; Wu, Jun-Mein; Tseng, Yao-Huan

    We present simulations of interferometric Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) and optical weak lenisng observations for the forthcoming AMiBA experiment, aiming at searching for high-redshift clusters of galaxies. On the basis of simulated sky maps, we have derived theoretical halo number counts and redshift distributions of selected halo samples for an AMiBA SZE survey and a weak lensing follow-up survey. By utilizing the conditional number counts of weak lensing halos with the faint SZE detection, we show that a combined SZE and weak lensing survey can gain an additional fainter halo sample at a given false positive rate, which cannot be obtained from either survey alone.

  7. CCTV lenses for video meteor astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewski, M.; Olech, A.; Krasnowski, M.; Zloczewski, K.; Mularczyk, K.; Kedzierski, P.; Jonderko, W.

    2005-02-01

    We present the results of CCTV lens tests made last year at the Ostrowik Observatory by observers of the Comets and Meteors Workshop. A total of 13 lenses with different parameters were tested. The limiting magnitudes, size of field of view, distortion and off-axis aberrations were measured. The Computar f/1.2, f=4 mm appeared to be the best lens tested. We also note the good marks of both Ernitecs which were finally chosen as the lenses which will be used in our projects. Surprisingly, the very fast lenses which are popular in video meteor astronomy seem to be much worse that their f/1.2 rivals.

  8. Edge shape and comfort of rigid lenses.

    PubMed

    La Hood, D

    1988-08-01

    One of the main factors determining the comfort of a rigid contact lens is the shape of the edge. The comfort of four different contact lens edge shapes was assessed with four unadapted subjects in a randomized masked trial. Lenses with well rounded anterior edge profiles were found to be significantly more comfortable than lenses with square anterior edges. There was no significant difference in subjective comfort between a rounded and square posterior edge profile. The results suggest that the interaction of the edge with the eyelid is more important in determining comfort than edge effects on the cornea, when lenses are fitted according to a corneal alignment philosophy. PMID:3177585

  9. Wettability and silicone hydrogel lenses: a review.

    PubMed

    Keir, Nancy; Jones, Lyndon

    2013-01-01

    One of the major breakthroughs in the development of silicone hydrogel contact lenses has related to the ability of manufacturers to overcome the surface hydrophobicity that occurred with silicone elastomer lenses. However, the wettability of silicone hydrogel lenses continues to be of interest as a potential link between in vivo lens performance and contact lens-related comfort. This article will review some of the knowledge we have gained in the area of contact lens wettability over the past decade and will discuss some of the challenges related to its measurement. PMID:23274760

  10. Twin axial vortices generated by Fibonacci lenses.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Arnau; Ferrando, Vicente; Remón, Laura; Furlan, Walter D; Monsoriu, Juan A

    2013-04-22

    Optical vortex beams, generated by Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs), are capable of creating optical traps and other multi-functional micromanipulators for very specific tasks in the microscopic scale. Using the Fibonacci sequence, we have discovered a new family of DOEs that inherently behave as bifocal vortex lenses, and where the ratio of the two focal distances approaches the golden mean. The disctintive optical properties of these Fibonacci vortex lenses are experimentally demonstrated. We believe that the versatility and potential scalability of these lenses may allow for new applications in micro and nanophotonics. PMID:23609732

  11. Tevatron Electron Lenses: Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kozub, Sergei; Kufer, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Martinez, Alexander; Olson, Marvin; Pfeffer, Howard; Saewert, Greg; Scarpine, Vic; /Fermilab /SLAC /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Novosibirsk, IYF /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    The beam-beam effects have been the dominating sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider [1]. Electron lenses were originally proposed for compensation of electromagnetic long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions of proton and antiproton beams [2]. Results of successful employment of two electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron are reported in [3,4,5]. In this paper we present design features of the Tevatron electron lenses (TELs), discuss the generation of electron beams, describe different modes of operation and outline the technical parameters of various subsystems.

  12. Adjustable fluidic lenses for ophthalmic corrections

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Randall; Mathine, David L.; Peyman, Gholam; Schwiegerling, Jim; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2010-01-01

    We report on two fluidic lenses that have been developed for ophthalmic applications. The lenses use a circular aperture to demonstrate optical powers between −20 and +20 D and a rectangular aperture to demonstrate astigmatism with values ranging from 0 to 8 D. Measurements of image quality were made with the fluidic lens using a model eye. Both lenses were variable and controllable by adjusting the fluid volume of the lens. To the best of our knowledge this is the first demonstration of a continuously variable lens for control of astigmatism. PMID:19373359

  13. Joint Analysis of Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing and Galaxy Clustering: Methodology and Forecasts for DES

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.

    2015-07-19

    The joint analysis of galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering is a promising method for inferring the growth function of large scale structure. Our analysis will be carried out on data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), with its measurements of both the distribution of galaxies and the tangential shears of background galaxies induced by these foreground lenses. We develop a practical approach to modeling the assumptions and systematic effects affecting small scale lensing, which provides halo masses, and large scale galaxy clustering. Introducing parameters that characterize the halo occupation distribution (HOD), photometric redshift uncertainties, and shear measurement errors, we study how external priors on different subsets of these parameters affect our growth constraints. Degeneracies within the HOD model, as well as between the HOD and the growth function, are identified as the dominant source of complication, with other systematic effects sub-dominant. The impact of HOD parameters and their degeneracies necessitate the detailed joint modeling of the galaxy sample that we employ. Finally, we conclude that DES data will provide powerful constraints on the evolution of structure growth in the universe, conservatively/optimistically constraining the growth function to 7.9%/4.8% with its first-year data that covered over 1000 square degrees, and to 3.9%/2.3% with its full five-year data that will survey 5000 square degrees, including both statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  14. Constraining gravity at the largest scales through CMB lensing and galaxy velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Alam, Shadab; He, Siyu; Ho, Shirley

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a new method to constrain gravity on the largest cosmological scales by combining measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing and the galaxy velocity field. $E_G$ is a statistic, constructed from a gravitational lensing tracer and a measure of velocities such as redshift-space distortions (RSD), that can discriminate between gravity models while being independent of clustering bias and $\\sigma_8$. While traditionally, the lensing field for $E_G$ has been probed through galaxy lensing, CMB lensing has been proposed as a more robust tracer of the lensing field for $E_G$ at higher redshifts while avoiding intrinsic alignments. We perform the largest-scale measurement of $E_G$ ever, up to 150 Mpc/$h$, by cross-correlating the Planck CMB lensing map with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) CMASS galaxy sample and combining this with our measurement of the CMASS auto-power spectrum and the RSD parameter $\\beta$. We report $E_G(z=0.57)=0.243\\pm0.060$ (stat) $\\pm0.013$ (sys), a measurement in tension with the general relativity prediction at a level of 2.6$\\sigma$. Note that our $E_G$ measurement deviates from GR only at scales greater than 80 Mpc/$h$, scales which have not been probed by previous $E_G$ tests. Upcoming surveys, which will provide an order-of-magnitude reduction in statistical errors, can significantly constrain alternative gravity models when combined with better control of systematics.

  15. Electrically-tunable liquid crystal lenses and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Hung-Shan; Chen, Ming-Syuan

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the electrically-tunable liquid crystal (LC) lenses and the applications are reviewed. We introduce the basic mechanism of LC phase modulation first. LC lenses are categorized based on different operating principles: 1) Gradient Index (GRIN) LC lenses with a homogeneous cell gap, 2) non-GRIN LC lenses with an inhomogeneous cell gap, 3) diffractive LC lenses, and 4) LC lenses controlled by polarizations. To remove the polarization independency, we also summarize polarization independent LC phase modulations. Many promising applications based on LC lenses are also summarized, such as imaging system, pico projectors, optical zoom systems, ophthalmic applications, and solar systems.

  16. Gravitational lensing beyond the weak-field approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Perlick, Volker

    2014-01-14

    Gravitational lensing is considered in the full spacetime formalism of general relativity, assuming that the light rays are lightlike geodesics in a Lorentzian manifold. The review consists of three parts. The first part is devoted to spherically symmetric and static spacetimes. In particular, an exact lens map for this situation is discussed. The second part is on axisymmetric and stationary spacetimes. It concentrates on the investigation of the photon region, i.e., the region filled by spherical lightlike geodesics, in the Kerr spacetime. The photon region is of crucial relevance for the formation of a shadow. Finally, the third part briefly addresses two topics that apply to spacetimes without symmetry, namely Fermat’s principle and the exact lens map of Frittelli and Newman.

  17. Gravitational lensing beyond the weak-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlick, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational lensing is considered in the full spacetime formalism of general relativity, assuming that the light rays are lightlike geodesics in a Lorentzian manifold. The review consists of three parts. The first part is devoted to spherically symmetric and static spacetimes. In particular, an exact lens map for this situation is discussed. The second part is on axisymmetric and stationary spacetimes. It concentrates on the investigation of the photon region, i.e., the region filled by spherical lightlike geodesics, in the Kerr spacetime. The photon region is of crucial relevance for the formation of a shadow. Finally, the third part briefly addresses two topics that apply to spacetimes without symmetry, namely Fermat's principle and the exact lens map of Frittelli and Newman.

  18. Multi Dark Lens Simulations: weak lensing light-cones and data base presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giocoli, Carlo; Jullo, Eric; Metcalf, R. Benton; de la Torre, Sylvain; Yepes, Gustavo; Prada, Francisco; Comparat, Johan; Göttlober, Stefan; Kyplin, Anatoly; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Petkova, Margarita; Shan, Huan Yuan; Tessore, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present a large data base of weak lensing light cones constructed using different snapshots from the Big MultiDark simulation (BigMDPL). The ray-tracing through different multiple plane has been performed with the GLAMER code accounting both for single source redshifts and for sources distributed along the cosmic time. This first paper presents weak lensing forecasts and results according to the geometry of the VIPERS-W1 and VIPERS-W4 field of view. Additional fields will be available on our data base and new ones can be run upon request. Our data base also contains some tools for lensing analysis. In this paper we present results for convergence power spectra, one point and high order weak lensing statistics useful for forecasts and for cosmological studies. Covariance matrices have also been computed for the different realizations of the W1 and W4 fields. In addition we compute also galaxy-shear and projected density contrasts for different halo masses at two lens redshift according to the CFHTLS source redshift distribution both using stacking and cross-correlation techniques, finding very good agreement.

  19. General requirements on matter power spectrum predictions for cosmology with weak lensing tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Ma, Zhaoming E-mail: zentner@pitt.edu

    2012-04-01

    Forthcoming projects such as DES, LSST, WFIRST, and Euclid aim to measure weak lensing shear correlations with unprecedented precision, constraining the dark energy equation of state at the percent level. Reliance on photometrically-determined redshifts constitutes a major source of uncertainty for these surveys. Additionally, interpreting the weak lensing signal requires a detailed understanding of the nonlinear physics of gravitational collapse. We present a new analysis of the stringent calibration requirements for weak lensing analyses of future imaging surveys that addresses both photo-z uncertainty and errors in the calibration of the matter power spectrum. We find that when photo-z uncertainty is taken into account the requirements on the level of precision in the prediction for the matter power spectrum are more stringent than previously thought. Including degree-scale galaxy clustering statistics in a joint analysis with weak lensing not only strengthens the survey's constraining power by ∼ 20%, but can also have a profound impact on the calibration demands, decreasing the degradation in dark energy constraints with matter power spectrum uncertainty by a factor of 2-5. Similarly, using galaxy clustering information significantly relaxes the demands on photo-z calibration. We compare these calibration requirements to the contemporary state-of-the-art in photometric redshift estimation and predictions of the power spectrum and suggest strategies to utilize forthcoming data optimally.

  20. MultiDarkLens Simulations: weak lensing light-cones and data base presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giocoli, Carlo; Jullo, Eric; Metcalf, R. Benton; de la Torre, Sylvain; Yepes, Gustavo; Prada, Francisco; Comparat, Johan; Göttlober, Stefan; Kyplin, Anatoly; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Petkova, Margarita; Shan, HuanYuan; Tessore, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present a large database of weak lensing light cones constructed using different snapshots from the Big MultiDark simulation (BigMDPL). The ray-tracing through different multiple plane has been performed with the GLAMER code accounting both for single source redshifts and for sources distributed along the cosmic time. This first paper presents weak lensing forecasts and results according to the geometry of the VIPERS-W1 and VIPERS-W4 field of view. Additional fields will be available on our database and new ones can be run upon request. Our database also contains some tools for lensing analysis. In this paper we present results for convergence power spectra, one point and high order weak lensing statistics useful for forecasts and for cosmological studies. Covariance matrices have also been computed for the different realisations of the W1 and W4 fields. In addition we compute also galaxy-shear and projected density contrasts for different halo masses at two lens redshift according to the CFHTLS source redshift distribution both using stacking and cross-correlation techniques, finding very good agreement.

  1. Design principles and limitations of wave-front guided contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Thibos, Larry N; Cheng, Xu; Bradley, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    The concept of the wave-front guided design of contact lenses is presented from three vantage points: ray optics, wave front aberrations, and optical path-length errors. We argue that the goal of contact lenses is to make all of the optical paths from a distant object to the retina equal in length, regardless of where the path intersects the plane of the eye's pupil. The aberration map of an eye is a prescription for such a lens. Unfortunately, variability of measured aberration maps is a fundamental limit to our knowledge of the true aberration structure of an eye. Variability arises because the eye is a biologic system that changes over time for normal, physiologic reasons. Furthermore, uncertainty in our measurement of the aberration map because of such variable factors, such as alignment of the aberrometer to the eye by the clinician or small fixation errors committed by the patient, will make it difficult to achieve a full measure of success with aberration-correcting contact lenses. The clinical implication of these findings is that multiple measurements of the aberration map should be collected using a protocol that includes realignment of the instrument and then averaging the aberration maps to reduce the level of uncertainty associated with any single measurement. PMID:12772758

  2. Gravitational lensing of supernovae by dark matter candidates of mass M greater than about 0.001 solar masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagoner, Robert V.; Linder, Eric V.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented concerning the gravitational lensing of supernovae by intervening condensed objects, including dark matter candidates such as dim stars and black holes. the expansion of the supernova beam within the lens produces characteristic time-dependent amplification and polarization which depend upon the mass of the lens. The effects of the shearing of the beam due to surrounding masses are considered, although the study of these effects is confined to isolated masses whose size is much less than that of the supernova (about 10 to the 15th cm). Equations for the effects of lensing and graphs comparing these effects in different classes of supernovae are compared. It is found that candidates for lensing would be those supernovae at least as bright as their parent galaxy, or above the range of luminosities expected for their spectral class.

  3. Shear flexibility for structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stangeland, Maynard L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    This device comprises a flexible sheet member having cross convolutions oriented 45.degree. to the shear vector with spherical reliefs at the convolution junctions. The spherical reliefs are essential to the shear flexibility by interrupting the principal stress lines that act along the ridges of the convolutions. The spherical reliefs provide convolutions in both directions in the plane of the cross-convolution ridges.

  4. Shear flexibility for structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stangeland, Maynard L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    This device comprises a flexible sheet member having cross convolutions oriented 45.degree. to the shear vector with spherical reliefs at the convolution junctions. The spherical reliefs are essential to the shear flexibility by interrupting the principal stress lines that act along the ridges of the convolutions. The spherical reliefs provide convolutions in both directions in the plane of the cross-convolution ridges.

  5. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: I. shear wave thermometry.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-02-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is today hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to the 2-D mapping of temperature changes during HIFU treatments. This new concept of shear wave thermometry is experimentally implemented here using conventional ultrasonic imaging probes. HIFU treatment and monitoring were, respectively, performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single-element transducer focused at 30 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Thermocouple measurements and ultrasound-based thermometry were used as a gold standard technique and were combined with SWI on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created using 100-μs pushing beams at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Elasticity and temperature mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to realtime monitoring of the treatment. Tissue stiffness was found to decrease in the focal zone for temperatures up to 43°C. Ultrasound-based temperature estimation was highly correlated to stiffness variation maps (r² = 0.91 to 0.97). A reversible calibration phase of the changes of elasticity with temperature can be made locally using sighting shots. This calibration process allows for the derivation of temperature maps from shear wave imaging. Compared with conventional ultrasound-based approaches, shear wave thermometry is found to be much more robust to motion artifacts. PMID:21342822

  6. The imprint of f(R) gravity on weak gravitational lensing I: Connection between observables and large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Yuichi; Shirasaki, Masato

    2016-04-01

    We study the effect of f(R) gravity on the statistical properties of various large-scale structures which can be probed in weak gravitational lensing measurements. A set of ray-tracing simulations of gravitational lensing in f(R) gravity enables us to explore cosmological information on (i) stacking analyses of weak lensing observables and (ii) peak statistics in reconstructed lensing mass maps. For the f(R) model proposed by Hu & Sawicki, the measured lensing signals of dark matter haloes in the stacking analysis would show a ≲ 10% difference between the standard ΛCDM and the f(R) model when the additional degree of freedom in f(R) model would be |fR0| ˜ 10-5. Among various large-scale structures to be studied in stacking analysis, troughs, i.e, underdensity regions in projected plane of foreground massive haloes, could be promising to constrain the model with |fR0| ˜ 10-5, while stacking analysis around voids is found to be difficult to improve the constraint of |fR0| even in future lensing surveys with a sky coverage of ˜1000 square degrees. On the peak statistics, we confirm the correspondence between local maxima and dark matter haloes along the line of sight, regardless of the modification of gravity in our simulation. Thus, the number count of high significance local maxima would be useful to probe the mass function of dark matter haloes even in the f(R) model with |f_R0| ≲ 10^{-5}. We also find that including local minima in lensing mass maps would be helpful to improve the constant on f(R) gravity down to |fR0| = 10-5 in ongoing weak lensing surveys.

  7. The imprint of f(R) gravity on weak gravitational lensing - I. Connection between observables and large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Yuichi; Shirasaki, Masato

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of f(R) gravity on the statistical properties of various large-scale structures which can be probed in weak gravitational lensing measurements. A set of ray-tracing simulations of gravitational lensing in f(R) gravity enables us to explore cosmological information on (i) stacking analyses of weak lensing observables and (ii) peak statistics in reconstructed lensing mass maps. For the f(R) model proposed by Hu & Sawicki, the measured lensing signals of dark matter haloes in the stacking analysis would show a ≲10 per cent difference between the standard Λcold dark matter and the f(R) model when the additional degree of freedom in f(R) model would be |fR0| ˜ 10-5. Among various large-scale structures to be studied in stacking analysis, troughs, i.e. underdensity regions in projected plane of foreground massive haloes, could be promising to constrain the model with |fR0| ˜ 10-5, while stacking analysis around voids is found to be difficult to improve the constraint of |fR0| even in future lensing surveys with a sky coverage of ˜1000 deg2. On the peak statistics, we confirm the correspondence between local maxima and dark matter haloes along the line of sight, regardless of the modification of gravity in our simulation. Thus, the number count of high significance local maxima would be useful to probe the mass function of dark matter haloes even in the f(R) model with |fR0| ≲ 10-5. We also find that including local minima in lensing mass maps would be helpful to improve the constant on f(R) gravity down to |fR0| = 10-5 in ongoing weak lensing surveys.

  8. The Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Shear Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Michael; Sheldon, Erin; Zuntz, Joe; Bridle, Sarah; Kacprzak, Tomasz; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    We present results of the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data. The science verification (SV) data use the same telescope and camera as the full DES is using, but the data were taken during commissioning time the year prior to the start of the DES. We have undergone a large battery of null tests to look for systematic errors in the shear values. The catalogs pass all tests at the levels required for doing weak lensing science with the SV data. We will show here the results of some of the more interesting tests. We will mention briefly some plans for improvements to the pipeline to help meet the more stringent demands of the full 5-year DES survey.

  9. Tear exchange and contact lenses: A review

    PubMed Central

    Muntz, Alex; Subbaraman, Lakshman N.; Sorbara, Luigina; Jones, Lyndon

    2015-01-01

    Tear exchange beneath a contact lens facilitates ongoing fluid replenishment between the ocular surface and the lens. This exchange is considerably lower during the wear of soft lenses compared with rigid lenses. As a result, the accumulation of tear film debris and metabolic by-products between the cornea and a soft contact lens increases, potentially leading to complications. Lens design innovations have been proposed, but no substantial improvement in soft lens tear exchange has been reported. Researchers have determined post-lens tear exchange using several methods, notably fluorophotometry. However, due to technological limitations, little remains known about tear hydrodynamics around the lens and, to-date, true tear exchange with contact lenses has not been shown. Further knowledge regarding tear exchange could be vital in aiding better contact lens design, with the prospect of alleviating certain adverse ocular responses. This article reviews the literature to-date on the significance, implications and measurement of tear exchange with contact lenses. PMID:25575892

  10. Gravitational lensing of active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, J N

    1995-01-01

    Most of the known cases of strong gravitational lensing involve multiple imaging of an active galactic nucleus. The properties of lensed active galactic nuclei make them promising systems for astrophysical applications of gravitational lensing; in particular, they show structure on scales of milliseconds of arc to tens of seconds of arc, they are variable, and they are polarized. More than 20 cases of strong gravitational lenses are now known, and about half of them are radio sources. High-resolution radio imaging is making possible the development of well-constrained lens models. Variability studies at radio and optical wavelengths are beginning to yield results of astrophysical interest, such as an independent measure of the distance scale and limits on source sizes. PMID:11607613

  11. Contact lenses and the work environment.

    PubMed

    Mäkitie, J

    1984-01-01

    Controversial opinions have been presented about the use of contact lenses in industrial environments. Work environments contain few obstacles to the use of contact lenses, but many occupations are associated with the risk of excessive difficulties, spoilation , irritation, or complications. From the radiant energy the shorter (280 nm) ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths and the longer (1300 nm) infra-red (IR) wavelengths are absorbed by contact lenses, the absorption increases their temperature and may cause corneal complications. Protective glasses, however, absorb more than 99.5% of the UV and IR energy and thus provide sufficient protection for contact lens wearers exposed to UV or IR radiation. The advantages and risks of contact lenses in industrial work are discussed. PMID:6328841

  12. Current indications for scleral contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Foss, A J; Trodd, T C; Dart, J K

    1994-04-01

    Scleral contact lenses have been largely superseded by corneal contact lenses, but they still retain a role as a treatment of choice for a small group of patients who have tried other types of contact lens wear without success and who are not good candidates for surgery. We performed a cross sectional survey of 44 patients attending clinics at Moorfields Eye Hospital who were successful long-term scleral contact lens wearers and reviewed their indications. Twenty-one patients had been fit to improve visual acuity, 20 for therapeutic indications, and three for cosmetic reasons. Scleral lenses were most useful were with patients with ocular surface disorders, such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and for visual rehabilitation of patients with grossly irregular corneal topography. All patients were benefiting from scleral contact lens wear, and none had serious complications as a result of the scleral lens wear. We conclude that all ophthalmic departments should have access to these lenses. PMID:8044976

  13. Nanofocusing Parabolic Refractive X-Ray Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Schroer, C.G.; Kuhlmann, M.; Hunger, U.T.; Guenzler, T.F.; Kurapova, O.; Feste, S.; Lengeler, B.; Drakopoulos, M.; Somogyi, A.; Simionovici, A. S.; Snigirev, A.; Snigireva, I.

    2004-05-12

    Parabolic refractive x-ray lenses with short focal distance can generate intensive hard x-ray microbeams with lateral extensions in the 100nm range even at short distance from a synchrotron radiation source. We have fabricated planar parabolic lenses made of silicon that have a focal distance in the range of a few millimeters at hard x-ray energies. In a crossed geometry, two lenses were used to generate a microbeam with a lateral size of 330nm by 110nm at 25keV in a distance of 41.8m from the synchrotron radiation source. First microdiffraction and fluorescence microtomography experiments were carried out with these lenses. Using diamond as lens material, microbeams with lateral size down to 20nm and below are conceivable in the energy range from 10 to 100keV.

  14. Cooking with Strong Lenses and Other Ingredients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Adam; SLACS; BELLS; SDSS-III

    2013-07-01

    Strong lensing offers the most direct method for constraining the distribution of mass in galaxies at cosmological distances. The combination of strong lensing with other observables increases its power, but often in ways that are model-dependent and resistant to intuition. In this talk, I will unpack the information content of spectroscopic, photometric, kinematic, and strong-lensing observables as they translate into constraints on the macroscopic distribution of luminous and dark matter in massive elliptical galaxies. I will also highlight how the choice of priors and analysis methods affects the conclusions drawn from a given set of observations. Finally, in this context I will present the latest results from observational efforts to extend strong-lensing analyses to lower mass galaxies in the Sloan Lens ACS Survey (SLACS) and to earlier cosmic times in the BOSS Emission-Line Lens Survey (BELLS).

  15. Three gravitationally lensed supernovae behind clash galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Brandon; McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W.; Holoien, Thomas W.-S.; Rodney, Steven A.; Jones, David O.; Graur, Or; Riess, Adam G.; Merten, Julian; Zitrin, Adi; Matheson, Thomas; Sako, Masao; Postman, Marc; Coe, Dan; Bradley, Larry; Bartelmann, Matthias; Balestra, Italo; Benítez, Narciso; Bouwens, Rychard; Broadhurst, Tom; and others

    2014-05-01

    We report observations of three gravitationally lensed supernovae (SNe) in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. These objects, SN CLO12Car (z = 1.28), SN CLN12Did (z = 0.85), and SN CLA11Tib (z = 1.14), are located behind three different clusters, MACSJ1720.2+3536 (z = 0.391), RXJ1532.9+3021 (z = 0.345), and A383 (z = 0.187), respectively. Each SN was detected in Hubble Space Telescope optical and infrared images. Based on photometric classification, we find that SNe CLO12Car and CLN12Did are likely to be Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), while the classification of SN CLA11Tib is inconclusive. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was ∼1.0 ± 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is ∼0.2 ± 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. We derive independent estimates of the predicted magnification from CLASH strong+weak-lensing maps of the clusters (in magnitude units, 2.5 log{sub 10}μ): 0.83 ± 0.16 mag for SN CLO12Car, 0.28 ± 0.08 mag for SN CLN12Did, and 0.43 ± 0.11 mag for SN CLA11Tib. The two SNe Ia provide a new test of the cluster lens model predictions: we find that the magnifications based on the SN Ia brightness and those predicted by the lens maps are consistent. Our results herald the promise of future observations of samples of cluster-lensed SNe Ia (from the ground or space) to help illuminate the dark-matter distribution in clusters of galaxies, through the direct determination of absolute magnifications.

  16. Electron lenses for particle collimation in LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, v.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Electron Lenses built and installed in Tevatron have proven themselves as safe and very reliable instruments which can be effectively used in hadron collider operation for a number of applications, including compensation of beam-beam effects [1], DC beam removal from abort gaps [2], as a diagnostic tool. In this presentation we - following original proposal [3] - consider in more detail a possibility of using electron lenses with hollow electron beam for ion and proton collimation in LHC.

  17. Properties of Weak Lensing Clusters Detected on Hyper Suprime-Cam’s 2.3 deg2 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Satoshi; Oguri, Masamune; Hamana, Takashi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Miller, Lance; Utsumi, Yousuke; Komiyama, Yutaka; Furusawa, Hisanori; Sakurai, Junya; Kawanomoto, Satoshi; Nakata, Fumiaki; Uraguchi, Fumihiro; Koike, Michitaro; Tomono, Daigo; Lupton, Robert; Gunn, James E.; Karoji, Hiroshi; Aihara, Hiroaki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Takada, Masahiro

    2015-07-01

    We present properties of moderately massive clusters of galaxies detected by the newly developed Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope using weak gravitational lensing. Eight peaks exceeding a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 4.5 are identified on the convergence S/N map of a 2.3 deg2 field observed during the early commissioning phase of the camera. Multi-color photometric data are used to generate optically selected clusters using the Cluster finding algorithm based on the Multiband Identification of Red-sequence galaxies algorithm. The optical cluster positions were correlated with the peak positions from the convergence map. All eight significant peaks have optical counterparts. The velocity dispersion of clusters is evaluated by adopting the Singular Isothemal Sphere fit to the tangential shear profiles, yielding virial mass estimates, {M}{500c}, of the clusters which range from 2.7 × 1013 to 4.4 × 10 {}14 {M}⊙ . The number of peaks is considerably larger than the average number expected from ΛCDM cosmology but this is not extremely unlikely if one takes the large sample variance in the small field into account. We could, however, safely argue that the peak count strongly favors the recent Planck result suggesting a high {σ }8 value of 0.83. The ratio of stellar mass to the dark matter halo mass shows a clear decline as the halo mass increases. If the gas mass fraction, fg, in halos is universal, as has been suggested in the literature, the observed baryon mass in stars and gas shows a possible deficit compared with the total baryon density estimated from the baryon oscillation peaks in anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background.

  18. Ophthalmic glucose monitoring using disposable contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Chris

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a range of disposable and colorless tear glucose sensing contact lenses, using off-the-shelf lenses embedded with new water soluble, highly fluorescent and glucose sensitive boronic acid containing fluorophores. The new lenses are readily able to track tear glucose levels and therefore blood glucose levels, which are ideally suited for potential use by diabetics. The fluorescence responses from the lenses can be monitored using simple excitation and emission detection devices. The novelty of our approach is two fold. Firstly, the notion of sensing extremely low glucose concentrations in tears, which track blood levels, by our contact lens approach, and secondly, the unique compatibility of our new glucose signaling probes with the internal mildly acidic contact lens environment. The new lenses are therefore ideal for the noninvasive and continuous monitoring of tear glucose, with a 15 minute response time, and a measured shelf life in excess of 3 months. In this invited article, we show that fluorescence based signaling using plastic disposable lenses, which have already been industrially optimized with regard to vision correction and oxygen / analyte permeability etc, may a notable alternative to invasive and random finger pricking, the most widely used glucose monitoring technology by diabetics. PMID:17271473

  19. Perspective projection camera model for zoom lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, Reg G.; Shafer, Steven A.

    1994-03-01

    To effectively use automated zoom lenses for machine vision we need camera models that are valid over continuous ranges of lens settings. While camera calibration has been the subject of much research in machine vision and photogrammetry, for the most part the resulting models and calibration techniques have been for cameras with fixed parameter lenses where the lens' imaging process is static. For cameras with automated lenses the image formation process is a dynamic function of the lens control parameters. The complex nature of the relationships between the control parameters and the imaging process plus the need to calibrate them over a continuum of lens settings makes both the modeling and the calibration of cameras with automated zoom lenses fundamentally more difficult than that of cameras with fixed parameter lenses. In this paper we illustrate some of the problems involved with the modeling and calibration of cameras with variable parameter lenses. We then show how an iterative, empirical approach to modeling and calibration can produce a dynamic camera model of perspective projection that holds calibration across a continuous range of zoom.

  20. Cosmological test using strong gravitational lensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C. C.; Wang, F. Y.

    2015-09-01

    As one of the probes of universe, strong gravitational lensing systems allow us to compare different cosmological models and constrain vital cosmological parameters. This purpose can be reached from the dynamic and geometry properties of strong gravitational lensing systems, for instance, time-delay Δτ of images, the velocity dispersion σ of the lensing galaxies and the combination of these two effects, Δτ/σ2. In this paper, in order to carry out one-on-one comparisons between ΛCDM universe and Rh = ct universe, we use a sample containing 36 strong lensing systems with the measurement of velocity dispersion from the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys (SLACS) and Lens Structure and Dynamic survey (LSD) survey. Concerning the time-delay effect, 12 two-image lensing systems with Δτ are also used. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations are used to compare the efficiency of the three methods as mentioned above. From simulations, we estimate the number of lenses required to rule out one model at the 99.7 per cent confidence level. Comparing with constraints from Δτ and the velocity dispersion σ, we find that using Δτ/σ2 can improve the discrimination between cosmological models. Despite the independence tests of these methods reveal a correlation between Δτ/σ2 and σ, Δτ/σ2 could be considered as an improved method of σ if more data samples are available.

  1. A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Gravitational Lensing Potential from 100 Square Degrees of SPTpol Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, K. T.; Hanson, D.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aird, K. A.; Austermann, J. E.; Beall, J. A.; Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Cho, H.-M.; Citron, R.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Everett, W.; Gallicchio, J.; Gao, J.; George, E. M.; Gilbert, A.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Li, D.; Liang, C.; Luong-Van, D.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Montroy, T. E.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J. P.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Smecher, G.; Stark, A. A.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Zahn, O.

    2015-09-01

    We present a measurement of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) gravitational lensing potential using data from the first two seasons of observations with SPTpol, the polarization-sensitive receiver currently installed on the South Pole Telescope. The observations used in this work cover 100 deg2 of sky with arcminute resolution at 150 GHz. Using a quadratic estimator, we make maps of the CMB lensing potential from combinations of CMB temperature and polarization maps. We combine these lensing potential maps to form a minimum-variance (MV) map. The lensing potential is measured with a signal-to-noise ratio of greater than one for angular multipoles between 100\\lt L\\lt 250. This is the highest signal-to-noise mass map made from the CMB to date and will be powerful in cross-correlation with other tracers of large-scale structure. We calculate the power spectrum of the lensing potential for each estimator, and we report the value of the MV power spectrum between 100\\lt L\\lt 2000 as our primary result. We constrain the ratio of the spectrum to a fiducial ΛCDM model to be AMV = 0.92 ± 0.14 (Stat.) ± 0.08 (Sys.). Restricting ourselves to polarized data only, we find APOL = 0.92 ± 0.24 (Stat.) ± 0.11 (Sys.). This measurement rejects the hypothesis of no lensing at 5.9σ using polarization data alone, and at 14σ using both temperature and polarization data.

  2. Study of process parameters on optical qualities for injection-molded plastic lenses.

    PubMed

    Lai, Huai En; Wang, Pei Jen

    2008-04-20

    Numerical simulations for mold-flow analysis and experimental measurements of injection-molded plastic lenses have been conducted for investigation of optical qualities, residual birefringence, and form accuracy resulting from various pertinent process conditions. First, residual birefringence distributions on the lens have been predicted and verified experimentally. Furthermore, full-scale factorial design of experiments was conducted to comprehend the influences of qualities, such as shear stresses, form accuracy, and volumetric deviation, on the measured primary or Seidel aberrations. In conclusion, residual birefringence induced by stresses represented by photoelasticity measurements agrees well with the numerical predictions and the experimental results indicate that the residual birefringence is mainly generated during the mold-filling stage. In addition, spherical aberration of the injection-molded plastic lenses is more sensitive to the pertinent qualities as compared to coma and astigmatism. PMID:18425174

  3. THE WEIGHT OF EMPTINESS: THE GRAVITATIONAL LENSING SIGNAL OF STACKED VOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Elisabeth; Dore, Olivier; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Umetsu, Keiichi

    2013-01-10

    The upcoming new generation of spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys will provide large samples of cosmic voids, large distinct, underdense structures in the universe. Combining these with future galaxy imaging surveys, we study the prospects of probing the underlying matter distribution in and around cosmic voids via the weak gravitational lensing effects of stacked voids, utilizing both shear and magnification information. The statistical precision is greatly improved by stacking a large number of voids along different lines of sight, even when taking into account the impact of inherent miscentering and projection effects. We show that Dark Energy Task Force Stage IV surveys, such as the Euclid satellite and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, should be able to detect the void lensing signal with sufficient precision from stacking abundant medium-sized voids, thus providing direct constraints on the matter density profile of voids independent of assumptions on galaxy bias.

  4. Equatorial potassium currents in lenses.

    PubMed

    Wind, B E; Walsh, S; Patterson, J W

    1988-02-01

    Earlier work with the vibrating probe demonstrated the existence of outward potassium currents at the equator and inward sodium currents at the optical poles of the lens. By adding microelectrodes to the system, it is possible to relate steady currents (J) to the potential difference (PD) measured with a microelectrode. By injecting an outward current (I), it is possible to determine resistances and also the PD at which the steady outward potassium current becomes zero (PDJ = 0). At this PD the concentration gradient for potassium efflux and the electrical gradient for potassium influx are balanced so that there is no net flow of potassium across the membranes associated with the production of J. The PDJ = 0 for 18 rat lenses was 86 mV and that for 12 frogs lenses was -95 mV. This agrees with the potassium equilibrium potential and provides strong evidence to support the view that the outward equatorial current, J, is a potassium current. With the injection of outward current, I, the PD becomes more negative, the outward equatorial current, J, decreases, and the inward current at the optical poles increases. This suggests that there are separate electrical loops for K+ and Na+ that are partially linked by the Na, K-pump. Using Ohm's law, it is possible to calculate the input resistance (R = delta PD/I), the resistance related to the production of J (RJ = delta PD/delta J), and the effect of the combined resistances (delta J/I). The driving force for J can be estimated (PDJ = 0-PD). The relationships among currents, voltages and resistance can be used to determine the characteristics of the membranes that are associated with the outward potassium current observed at the equator. The effects of graded deformation of the lens were determined. The effects were reversible. The sites of inward and outward currents were not altered. Following deformation, the equatorial current, J, increased, and the PD became less negative. The PDJ = 0 remains the same so the ratio of K

  5. Role of brittle deformation during the initiation of ductile HP-LT shear zone in a metarhyolite (Suretta nappe, Eastern Central Alps).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poilvet, Jean-Charles; Goncalves, Philippe; Oliot, Emilien; Marquer, Didier

    2014-05-01

    Although ductile shear zones are common deformation structures in the middle to deep continental lithosphere, the initiation of such structures among homogeneous and isotropic protolith (e.g. granitoid bodies) is still a matter of debate. Indeed, the lack of consensus concerns the presence and the nature of a preexisting heterogeneity (structural or compositional, such as dykes, joints or cracks). This is mainly due to the lack of observation of preserved precursors, which, if they were present initially, are generally obliterated by subsequent intense deformation. Different conceptual models require a structural precursor, which enables fluids to flow and promotes metamorphic and metasomatic reactions via fluid-rock interactions. Those fluid-rock interactions are commonly presented as a key factor controlling strain localization or lateral propagation. The main goal of this contribution is to present the first observations, to our knowledge, of a preserved brittle precursor of a millimeter scale shear zone under blueschist facies metamorphic conditions. This work provides new evidences into how ductile shear zones occurring within homogeneous and isotropic protolith nucleate and develop. The present study exposes shear zones from the Roffna metarhyolite, a subvolcanic intrusion representing most of the northern part of the Suretta nappe (Penninic domain, Eastern Central Alps). This early Permian massif intruded an older basement and was affected only by Tertiary Alpine tectonics. The heterogeneous strain pattern consists, at all scales of anastomosing shear zones surrounding lenses of nearly undeformed rocks The investigated outcrop is characterized by the presence of a shear zone network from millimetric to plurimetric scale developed under blueschist facies conditions related to continental subduction of the European plate. A combined study including field observations, EBSD analysis, SEM-CL and conventional imaging together with thermodynamic modeling of phase

  6. Weak Lensing PSF Correction of Wide-field CCD Mosaic Images (SULI Paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Cevallos, Marissa; /Caltech /SLAC

    2006-01-04

    Gravitational lensing provides some of the most compelling evidence for the existence of dark matter. Dark matter on galaxy cluster scales can be mapped due to its weak gravitational lensing effect: a cluster mass distribution can be inferred from the net distortion of many thousands of faint background galaxies that it induces. Because atmospheric aberration and defects in the detector distort the apparent shape of celestial objects, it is of great importance to characterize accurately the point spread function (PSF) across an image. In this research, the PSF is studied in images from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), whose camera is divided into 12 CCD chips. Traditional weak lensing methodology involves averaging the PSF across the entire image: in this work we investigate the effects of measuring the PSF in each chip independently. This chip-by-chip analysis was found to reduce the strength of the correlation between star and galaxy shapes, and predicted more strongly the presence of known galaxy clusters in mass maps. These results suggest correcting the CFHT PSF on an individual chip basis significantly improves the accuracy of detecting weak lensing.

  7. Distinguishing general relativity and f (R ) gravity with the gravitational lensing Minkowski functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Chenxiaoji; Wang, Qiao; Li, Ran; Li, Baojiu; Wang, Jie; Gao, Liang

    2015-09-01

    We explore the Minkowski functionals (MFs) of weak lensing convergence map to distinguish between f (R ) gravity and the general relativity (GR). The mock weak lensing convergence maps are constructed with a set of high-resolution simulations assuming different gravity models. It is shown that the lensing MFs of f (R ) gravity can be considerably different from that of GR because of the environmentally dependent enhancement of structure formation. We also investigate the effect of lensing noise on our results, and find that it is likely to distinguish F5, F6, and GR gravity models with a galaxy survey of ˜3000 degree2 and with a background source number density of ng=30 arcmin-2 , comparable to an upcoming survey dark energy survey (DES).We also find that the f (R ) signal can be partially degenerate with the effect of changing cosmology, but combined use of other observations, such as the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, can help break this degeneracy.

  8. Probing Primordial Non-Gaussianity with Weak-lensing Minkowski Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki; Hamana, Takashi; Nishimichi, Takahiro

    2012-11-01

    We study the cosmological information contained in the Minkowski functionals (MFs) of weak gravitational lensing convergence maps. We show that the MFs provide strong constraints on the local-type primordial non-Gaussianity parameter f NL. We run a set of cosmological N-body simulations and perform ray-tracing simulations of weak lensing to generate 100 independent convergence maps of a 25 deg2 field of view for f NL = -100, 0 and 100. We perform a Fisher analysis to study the degeneracy among other cosmological parameters such as the dark energy equation of state parameter w and the fluctuation amplitude σ8. We use fully nonlinear covariance matrices evaluated from 1000 ray-tracing simulations. For upcoming wide-field observations such as those from the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam survey with a proposed survey area of 1500 deg2, the primordial non-Gaussianity can be constrained with a level of f NL ~ 80 and w ~ 0.036 by weak-lensing MFs. If simply scaled by the effective survey area, a 20,000 deg2 lensing survey using the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will yield constraints of f NL ~ 25 and w ~ 0.013. We show that these constraints can be further improved by a tomographic method using source galaxies in multiple redshift bins.

  9. PROBING PRIMORDIAL NON-GAUSSIANITY WITH WEAK-LENSING MINKOWSKI FUNCTIONALS

    SciTech Connect

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Hamana, Takashi

    2012-11-20

    We study the cosmological information contained in the Minkowski functionals (MFs) of weak gravitational lensing convergence maps. We show that the MFs provide strong constraints on the local-type primordial non-Gaussianity parameter f {sub NL}. We run a set of cosmological N-body simulations and perform ray-tracing simulations of weak lensing to generate 100 independent convergence maps of a 25 deg{sup 2} field of view for f {sub NL} = -100, 0 and 100. We perform a Fisher analysis to study the degeneracy among other cosmological parameters such as the dark energy equation of state parameter w and the fluctuation amplitude {sigma}{sub 8}. We use fully nonlinear covariance matrices evaluated from 1000 ray-tracing simulations. For upcoming wide-field observations such as those from the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam survey with a proposed survey area of 1500 deg{sup 2}, the primordial non-Gaussianity can be constrained with a level of f {sub NL} {approx} 80 and w {approx} 0.036 by weak-lensing MFs. If simply scaled by the effective survey area, a 20,000 deg{sup 2} lensing survey using the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will yield constraints of f {sub NL} {approx} 25 and w {approx} 0.013. We show that these constraints can be further improved by a tomographic method using source galaxies in multiple redshift bins.

  10. ON THE ACCURACY OF WEAK-LENSING CLUSTER MASS RECONSTRUCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Matthew R.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2011-10-10

    We study the bias and scatter in mass measurements of galaxy clusters resulting from fitting a spherically symmetric Navarro, Frenk, and White model to the reduced tangential shear profile measured in weak-lensing (WL) observations. The reduced shear profiles are generated for {approx}10{sup 4} cluster-sized halos formed in a {Lambda}CDM cosmological N-body simulation of a 1 h{sup -1} Gpc box. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the scatter in the WL masses derived using this fitting method has irreducible contributions from the triaxial shapes of cluster-sized halos and uncorrelated large-scale matter projections along the line of sight. Additionally, we find that correlated large-scale structure within several virial radii of clusters contributes a smaller, but nevertheless significant, amount to the scatter. The intrinsic scatter due to these physical sources is {approx}20% for massive clusters and can be as high as {approx}30% for group-sized systems. For current, ground-based observations, however, the total scatter should be dominated by shape noise from the background galaxies used to measure the shear. Importantly, we find that WL mass measurements can have a small, {approx}5%-10%, but non-negligible amount of bias. Given that WL measurements of cluster masses are a powerful way to calibrate cluster mass-observable relations for precision cosmological constraints, we strongly emphasize that a robust calibration of the bias requires detailed simulations that include more observational effects than we consider here. Such a calibration exercise needs to be carried out for each specific WL mass estimation method, as the details of the method determine in part the expected scatter and bias. We present an iterative method for estimating mass M{sub 500c} that can eliminate the bias for analyses of ground-based data.

  11. Fighting wind shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A “coherent and sustained program” of improved radar detection of weather, pilot training, and better communication between pilots and air controllers can greatly reduce the risk of wind shear to airplanes landing or taking off, according to a National Research Council (NRC) committee.Wind shear, characterized by winds rapidly changing direction and speed, has caused several serious accidents in recent years; among the most notable is the July 8, 1982, crash of a Pan American World Airlines jetliner at the New Orleans International Airport, which killed 153 persons. Following the accident, Congress directed the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to contract with the NRC to study wind shear.

  12. Surface Modification of Intraocular Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qi; Cheng, George Pak-Man; Chiu, Kin; Wang, Gui-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This paper aimed to review the current literature on the surface modification of intraocular lenses (IOLs). Data Sources: All articles about surface modification of IOLs published up to 2015 were identified through a literature search on both PubMed and ScienceDirect. Study Selection: The articles on the surface modification of IOLs were included, but those on design modification and surface coating were excluded. Results: Technology of surface modification included plasma, ion beam, layer-by-layer self-assembly, ultraviolet radiation, and ozone. The main molecules introduced into IOLs surface were poly (ethylene glycol), polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine, TiO2, heparin, F-heparin, titanium, titanium nitride, vinyl pyrrolidone, and inhibitors of cytokines. The surface modification either resulted in a more hydrophobic lens, a more hydrophilic lens, or a lens with a hydrophilic anterior and hydrophobic posterior surface. Advances in research regarding surface modification of IOLs had led to a better biocompatibility in both in vitro and animal experiments. Conclusion: The surface modification is an efficient, convenient, economic and promising method to improve the biocompatibility of IOLs. PMID:26830993

  13. Multifocal intraocular lenses and glare.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, H; Legge, G E; Luebker, A; Lindstrom, R L; Zabel, R W; Kirby, V M

    1993-06-01

    In a previous paper, we reported finding deficits in the contrast sensitivity functions of patients with diffractive multifocal intraocular lenses (IOL's). The results were consistent with optical measurements of the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the IOL. When this MTF is treated as a linear spatial frequency filter, it predicts the existence of a glare effect; contrast threshold for the recognition of target letters should be elevated by a bright, adjacent stimulus. We tested this prediction by measuring contrast thresholds for recognizing 0.2 degrees Sloan letters on a background luminance of 11.2 cd/m2. The letters were presented inside bright (300 cd/m2) annular rings with inner diameters ranging from 0.42 to 1.22 degrees. Thresholds were measured for seven multifocal subjects, age-matched groups of monofocal subjects and phakic-control subjects, and a young group. Multifocal subjects exhibited a greater glare effect than monofocal subjects, and they in turn exhibited a greater effect than phakic-control subjects. The observed glare effect for multifocal subjects was about twice that expected from the spatial filtering property of the multifocal IOL. PMID:8336911

  14. Galaxy-CMB and galaxy-galaxy lensing on large scales: Sensitivity to primordial non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Donghui; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2009-12-01

    A convincing detection of primordial non-Gaussianity in the local form of the bispectrum, whose amplitude is given by the fNL parameter, offers a powerful test of inflation. In this paper, we calculate the modification of two-point cross-correlation statistics of weak lensing—galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy-cosmic microwave background (CMB) crosscorrelation—due to fNL. We derive and calculate the covariance matrix of galaxy-galaxy lensing, including cosmic variance terms. We focus on large scales (l<100) for which the shape noise of the shear measurement becomes irrelevant and cosmic variance dominates the error budget. For a modest degree of non-Gaussianity, fNL=±50 modifications of the galaxy-galaxy-lensing signal at the 10% level are seen on scales R˜300Mpc, and grow rapidly toward larger scales as ∝R2. We also see a clear signature of the baryonic acoustic oscillation feature in the matter power spectrum at ˜150Mpc, which can be measured by next-generation lensing experiments. In addition, we can probe the local-form primordial non-Gaussianity in the galaxy-CMB lensing signal by correlating the lensing potential reconstructed from CMB with high-z galaxies. For example, for fNL=±50, we find that the galaxy-CMB lensing cross-power spectrum is modified by ˜10% at l˜40, and by a factor of 2 at l˜10, for a population of galaxies at z=2 with a bias of 2. The effect is greater for more highly biased populations at larger z; thus, high-z galaxy surveys cross correlated with CMB offer a yet another probe of primordial non-Gaussianity.

  15. CALCLENS: Curved-sky grAvitational Lensing for Cosmological Light conE simulatioNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Matthew R.

    2012-10-01

    CALCLENS, written in C and employing widely available software libraries, efficiently computes weak gravitational lensing shear signals from large N-body light cone simulations over a curved sky. The algorithm properly accounts for the sky curvature and boundary conditions, is able to produce redshift-dependent shear signals including corrections to the Born approximation by using multiple-plane ray tracing, and properly computes the lensed images of source galaxies in the light cone. The key feature of this algorithm is a new, computationally efficient Poisson solver for the sphere that combines spherical harmonic transform and multgrid methods. As a result, large areas of sky (~10,000 square degrees) can be ray traced efficiently at high-resolution using only a few hundred cores on widely available machines. Coupled with realistic galaxy populations placed in large N-body light cone simulations, CALCLENS is ideally suited for the construction of synthetic weak lensing shear catalogs to be used to test for systematic effects in data analysis procedures for upcoming large-area sky surveys.

  16. Consequences of CCD Imperfections for Cosmology Determined by Weak Lensing Surveys: From Laboratory Measurements to Cosmological Parameter Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okura, Yuki; Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Plazas, Andrés A.; Tamagawa, Toru

    2016-07-01

    Weak gravitational lensing causes subtle changes in the apparent shapes of galaxies due to the bending of light by the gravity of foreground masses. By measuring the shapes of large numbers of galaxies (millions in recent surveys, up to tens of billions in future surveys) we can infer the parameters that determine cosmology. Imperfections in the detectors used to record images of the sky can introduce changes in the apparent shapes of galaxies, which in turn can bias the inferred cosmological parameters. In this paper we consider the effect of two widely discussed sensor imperfections: tree rings, due to impurity gradients that cause transverse electric fields in the charge-coupled devices (CCDs), and pixel size variation, due to periodic CCD fabrication errors. These imperfections can be observed when the detectors are subject to uniform illumination (flat-field images). We develop methods to determine the spurious shear and convergence (due to the imperfections) from the flat-field images. We calculate how the spurious shear when added to the lensing shear will bias the determination of cosmological parameters. We apply our methods to candidate sensors of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) as a timely and important example, analyzing flat-field images recorded with LSST prototype CCDs in the laboratory. We find that tree rings and periodic pixel size variation present in the LSST CCDs will introduce negligible bias to cosmological parameters determined from the lensing power spectrum, specifically w, {{{Ω }}}m, and {σ }8.

  17. Viscous shear dampers

    SciTech Connect

    Zilahi-Szabo, I.

    1980-10-07

    In a viscous shear damper, the seismic mass is chamfered at all its corners. Thus, the clearances between the seismic mass and its casing are gaps with oppositely widening out sections separated by middle sections of smallest widths.

  18. Molding aspheric lenses for low-cost production versus diamond turned lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogburn, Gabriel; Mertus, Louis; Symmons, Alan

    2010-04-01

    As lens design using aspheric diffractive lenses has become more popular in designing faster, low F/# infrared (IR) optical systems; the increased quantities manufactured of these glass lenses is following suit. Historically, Single Point Diamond Turning (SPDT) has been the method of choice in producing high quality glass aspheric and diffractive lenses, but with the volume of lenses produced and technological advances in Precision Molded Optics (PMO), it is now becoming highly cost efficient to use molding as a means of producing these glass optic lenses. This paper will discuss lens shapes, tolerances, present and future optic lens sizes that are being done using PMO as well as present an experiment conducted comparing the surface quality of a chalcogenide lens manufactured with SPDT and PMO.

  19. Measuring distance ratios with CMB-galaxy lensing cross-correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N.

    2009-02-15

    We propose a method for cosmographic measurements by combining gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with cosmic shear surveys. We cross-correlate the galaxy counts in the lens plane with two different source planes: the CMB at z{approx}1100 and galaxies at an intermediate redshift. The ratio of the galaxy count/CMB lensing cross-correlation to the galaxy count/galaxy lensing cross-correlation is shown to be a purely geometric quantity, depending only on the distribution function of the source galaxies. By combining Planck, the Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the ratio can be measured to {approx}4% accuracy, whereas a future polarization-based experiment like CMBPOL can make a more precise ({approx}1%) measurement. For cosmological models where the curvature and the equation of state parameter are allowed to vary, the direction of degeneracy defined by the measurement of this ratio is different from that traced out by baryon acoustic oscillation measurements. Combining this method with the stacked cluster mass reconstruction cosmography technique as proposed by Hu, Holz, and Vale (2007), the uncertainty in the ratio can be further reduced, improving the constraints on cosmological parameters. We also study the implications of the lensing-ratio measurement for early dark energy models, in the context of the parametrization proposed by Doran and Robbers (2006). For models which are degenerate with respect to the CMB, we find both baryon acoustic oscillation and lensing-ratio measurements to be insensitive to the early component of the dark energy density.

  20. Self-calibration of photometric redshift scatter in weak-lensing surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengjie; Pen, Ue -Li; Bernstein, Gary

    2010-06-11

    Photo-z errors, especially catastrophic errors, are a major uncertainty for precision weak lensing cosmology. We find that the shear-(galaxy number) density and density-density cross correlation measurements between photo-z bins, available from the same lensing surveys, contain valuable information for self-calibration of the scattering probabilities between the true-z and photo-z bins. The self-calibration technique we propose does not rely on cosmological priors nor parameterization of the photo-z probability distribution function, and preserves all of the cosmological information available from shear-shear measurement. We estimate the calibration accuracy through the Fisher matrix formalism. We find that, for advanced lensing surveys such as the planned stage IV surveys, the rate of photo-z outliers can be determined with statistical uncertainties of 0.01-1% for z < 2 galaxies. Among the several sources of calibration error that we identify and investigate, the galaxy distribution bias is likely the most dominant systematic error, whereby photo-z outliers have different redshift distributions and/or bias than non-outliers from the same bin. This bias affects all photo-z calibration techniques based on correlation measurements. As a result, galaxy bias variations of O(0.1) produce biases in photo-z outlier rates similar to the statistical errors of our method, so this galaxy distribution bias may bias the reconstructed scatters at several-σ level, but is unlikely to completely invalidate the self-calibration technique.

  1. Self-calibration of photometric redshift scatter in weak-lensing surveys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Pengjie; Pen, Ue -Li; Bernstein, Gary

    2010-06-11

    Photo-z errors, especially catastrophic errors, are a major uncertainty for precision weak lensing cosmology. We find that the shear-(galaxy number) density and density-density cross correlation measurements between photo-z bins, available from the same lensing surveys, contain valuable information for self-calibration of the scattering probabilities between the true-z and photo-z bins. The self-calibration technique we propose does not rely on cosmological priors nor parameterization of the photo-z probability distribution function, and preserves all of the cosmological information available from shear-shear measurement. We estimate the calibration accuracy through the Fisher matrix formalism. We find that, for advanced lensing surveys such as themore » planned stage IV surveys, the rate of photo-z outliers can be determined with statistical uncertainties of 0.01-1% for z < 2 galaxies. Among the several sources of calibration error that we identify and investigate, the galaxy distribution bias is likely the most dominant systematic error, whereby photo-z outliers have different redshift distributions and/or bias than non-outliers from the same bin. This bias affects all photo-z calibration techniques based on correlation measurements. As a result, galaxy bias variations of O(0.1) produce biases in photo-z outlier rates similar to the statistical errors of our method, so this galaxy distribution bias may bias the reconstructed scatters at several-σ level, but is unlikely to completely invalidate the self-calibration technique.« less

  2. HerMES: CANDIDATE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED GALAXIES AND LENSING STATISTICS AT SUBMILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Wardlow, Julie L.; Cooray, Asantha; De Bernardis, Francesco; Calanog, J.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Aussel, H.; Bethermin, M.; Blundell, R.; Bussmann, R. S.; Bock, J.; Bridge, C.; Carpenter, J. M.; Boselli, A.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Casey, C. M.; and others

    2013-01-01

    We present a list of 13 candidate gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) from 95 deg{sup 2} of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, a surface density of 0.14 {+-} 0.04 deg{sup -2}. The selected sources have 500 {mu}m flux densities (S {sub 500}) greater than 100 mJy. Gravitational lensing is confirmed by follow-up observations in 9 of the 13 systems (70%), and the lensing status of the four remaining sources is undetermined. We also present a supplementary sample of 29 (0.31 {+-} 0.06 deg{sup -2}) gravitationally lensed SMG candidates with S {sub 500} = 80-100 mJy, which are expected to contain a higher fraction of interlopers than the primary candidates. The number counts of the candidate lensed galaxies are consistent with a simple statistical model of the lensing rate, which uses a foreground matter distribution, the intrinsic SMG number counts, and an assumed SMG redshift distribution. The model predicts that 32%-74% of our S {sub 500} {>=} 100 mJy candidates are strongly gravitationally lensed ({mu} {>=} 2), with the brightest sources being the most robust; this is consistent with the observational data. Our statistical model also predicts that, on average, lensed galaxies with S {sub 500} = 100 mJy are magnified by factors of {approx}9, with apparently brighter galaxies having progressively higher average magnification, due to the shape of the intrinsic number counts. 65% of the sources are expected to have intrinsic 500 {mu}m flux densities less than 30 mJy. Thus, samples of strongly gravitationally lensed SMGs, such as those presented here, probe below the nominal Herschel detection limit at 500 {mu}m. They are good targets for the detailed study of the physical conditions in distant dusty, star-forming galaxies, due to the lensing magnification, which can lead to spatial resolutions of {approx}0.''01 in the source plane.

  3. DEMNUni: ISW, Rees-Sciama, and weak-lensing in the presence of massive neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Carmelita; Petkova, Margarita; Dolag, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    We present, for the first time in the literature, a full reconstruction of the total (linear and non-linear) ISW/Rees-Sciama effect in the presence of massive neutrinos, together with its cross-correlations with CMB-lensing and weak-lensing signals. The present analyses make use of all-sky maps extracted via ray-tracing across the gravitational potential distribution provided by the ``Dark Energy and Massive Neutrino Universe'' (DEMNUni) project, a set of large-volume, high-resolution cosmological N-body simulations, where neutrinos are treated as separate collisionless particles. We correctly recover, at 1–2% accuracy, the linear predictions from CAMB. Concerning the CMB-lensing and weak-lensing signals, we also recover, with similar accuracy, the signal predicted by Boltzmann codes, once non-linear neutrino corrections to HALOFIT are accounted for. Interestingly, in the ISW/Rees-Sciama signal, and its cross correlation with lensing, we find an excess of power with respect to the massless case, due to free streaming neutrinos, roughly at the transition scale between the linear and non-linear regimes. The excess is ~ 5 – 10% at l ~ 100 for the ISW/Rees-Sciama auto power spectrum, depending on the total neutrino mass Mν, and becomes a factor of ~ 4 for Mν = 0.3 eV, at l ~ 600, for the ISW/Rees-Sciama cross power with CMB-lensing. This effect should be taken into account for the correct estimation of the CMB temperature bispectrum in the presence of massive neutrinos.

  4. The Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS): HST Frontier Field Coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, Eiichi

    2015-08-01

    The Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS; PI: Egami) is a large Far-IR/Submm imaging survey of massive galaxy clusters using the Herschel Space Observatory. Its main goal is to detect and study IR/Submm galaxies that are below the nominal confusion limit of Herschel by taking advantage of the strong gravitational lensing power of massive galaxy clusters. HLS has obtained deep PACS (100/160 um) and SPIRE (250/350/500 um) images for 54 cluster fields (HLS-deep) as well as shallower but nearly confusion-limited SPIRE-only images for 527 cluster fields (HLS-snapshot) with a total observing time of ~420 hours. Extensive multi-wavelength follow-up studies are currently on-going with a variety of observing facilities including ALMA.Here, I will focus on the analysis of the deep Herschel PACS/SPIRE images obtained for the 6 HST Frontier Fields (5 observed by HLS-deep; 1 observed by the Herschel GT programs). The Herschel/SPIRE maps are wide enough to cover the Frontier-Field parallel pointings, and we have detected a total of ~180 sources, some of which are strongly lensed. I will present the sample and discuss the properties of these Herschel-detected dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) identified in the Frontier Fields. Although the majority of these Herschel sources are at moderate redshift (z<3), a small number of extremely high-redshift (z>6) candidates can be identified as "Herschel dropouts" when combined with longer-wavelength data. We have also identified ~40 sources as likely cluster members, which will allow us to study the properties of DSFGs in the dense cluster environment.A great legacy of our HLS project will be the extensive multi-wavelength database that incorporates most of the currently available data/information for the fields of the Frontier-Field, CLASH, and other HLS clusters (e.g., HST/Spitzer/Herschel images, spectroscopic/photometric redshifts, lensing models, best-fit SED models etc.). Provided with a user-friendly GUI and a flexible search engine, this

  5. Plasma lenses for focusing relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Wheeler, S.; Leemans, W.

    1997-04-01

    The next generation of colliders require tightly focused beams with high luminosity. To focus charged particle beams for such applications, a plasma focusing scheme has been proposed. Plasma lenses can be overdense (plasma density, n{sub p} much greater than electron beam density, n{sub b}) or underdense (n{sub p} less than 2 n{sub b}). In overdense lenses the space-charge force of the electron beam is canceled by the plasma and the remaining magnetic force causes the electron beam to self-pinch. The focusing gradient is nonlinear, resulting in spherical aberrations. In underdense lenses, the self-forces of the electron beam cancel, allowing the plasma ions to focus the beam. Although for a given beam density, a uniform underdense lens produces smaller focusing gradients than an overdense lens, it produces better beam quality since the focusing is done by plasma ions. The underdense lens can be improved by tapering the density of the plasma for optimal focusing. The underdense lens performance can be enhanced further by producing adiabatic plasma lenses to avoid the Oide limit on spot size due to synchrotron radiation by the electron beam. The plasma lens experiment at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) is designed to study the properties of plasma lenses in both overdense and underdense regimes. In particular, important issues such as electron beam matching, time response of the lens, lens aberrations and shot-to-shot reproducibility are being investigated.

  6. Gravitational lensing statistics of amplified supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linder, Eric V.; Wagoner, Robert V.; Schneider, P.

    1988-01-01

    Amplification statistics of gravitationally lensed supernovae can provide a valuable probe of the lensing matter in the universe. A general probability distribution for amplification by compact objects is derived which allows calculation of the lensed fraction of supernovae at or greater than an amplification A and at or less than an apparent magnitude. Comparison of the computed fractions with future results from ongoing supernova searches can lead to determination of the mass density of compact dark matter components with masses greater than about 0.001 solar mass, while the time-dependent amplification (and polarization) of the expanding supernovae constrain the individual masses. Type II supernovae are found to give the largest fraction for deep surveys, and the optimum flux-limited search is found to be at approximately 23d magnitude, if evolution of the supernova rate is neglected.

  7. Functionalized patchy particles using colloidal lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Christine

    2014-03-01

    Colloidal assembly had been limited by the isotropic, nonspecific nature of interactions between spherical colloidal particles. By giving particles patches functionalized with single stranded DNA, these interactions can be made both directional and specific. We create patchy particles by adding patches to spherical emulsion droplets using the depletion interaction. First we make polystyrene particles in the shape of contact lenses to be the patches. The lenses are functionalized with single stranded DNA on their convex side. Then we put the lenses on the surface of oil emulsion droplets using the depletion interaction, creating a patch (or multiple patches) on the surface of each emulsion droplet. The emulsion droplets can now interact with each other in a specific, directional way through DNA functionalized patches.

  8. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack. This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.

  9. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack.more » This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.« less

  10. Integrating GIS-based geologic mapping, LiDAR-based lineament analysis and site specific rock slope data to delineate a zone of existing and potential rock slope instability located along the grandfather mountain window-Linville Falls shear zone contact, Southern Appalachian Mountains, Watauga County, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillon, K.A.; Wooten, R.M.; Latham, R.L.; Witt, A.W.; Douglas, T.J.; Bauer, J.B.; Fuemmeler, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Landslide hazard maps of Watauga County identify >2200 landslides, model debris flow susceptibility, and evaluate a 14km x 0.5km zone of existing and potential rock slope instability (ZEPRSI) near the Town of Boone. The ZEPRSI encompasses west-northwest trending (WNWT) topographic ridges where 14 active/past-active rock/weathered rock slides occur mainly in rocks of the Grandfather Mountain Window (GMW). The north side of this ridgeline is the GMW / Linville Falls Fault (LFF) contact. Sheared rocks of the Linville Falls Shear Zone (LFSZ) occur along the ridge and locally in the valley north of the contact. The valley is underlain principally by layered granitic gneiss comprising the Linville Falls/Beech Mountain/Stone Mountain Thrust Sheet. The integration of ArcGIS??? - format digital geologic and lineament mapping on a 6m LiDAR (Light Detecting and Ranging) digital elevation model (DEM) base, and kinematic analyses of site specific rock slope data (e.g., presence and degree of ductile and brittle deformation fabrics, rock type, rock weathering state) indicate: WNWT lineaments are expressions of a regionally extensive zone of fractures and faults; and ZEPRSI rock slope failures concentrate along excavated, north-facing LFF/LFSZ slopes where brittle fabrics overprint older metamorphic foliations, and other fractures create side and back release surfaces. Copyright 2009 ARMA, American Rock Mechanics Association.

  11. Simulating Gravity: Dark Matter and Gravitational Lensing in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Jes; Stang, Jared; Anderson, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    Dark matter makes up most of the matter in the universe but very little of a standard introductory physics curriculum. Here we present our construction and use of a spandex sheet-style gravity simulator to qualitatively demonstrate two aspects of modern physics related to dark matter. First, we describe an activity in which students explore the dependence of orbital velocities on the central mass of a system, in a demonstration of how scientists first discovered dark matter. Second, we discuss the use of the gravity simulator as a visualization of gravitational lensing, a current astronomical technique for mapping dark matter in the sky. After providing the necessary background for the phenomena of interest, we describe our construction of the gravity simulator and detail our facilitation of these two activities. Together, these activities provide a conceptual visualization of gravitational phenomena related to indirect detection techniques for studying dark matter.

  12. Microbeam production using compound refractive lenses: beam characterization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, Christian G.; Lengeler, Bruno; Benner, Boris; Guenzler, Til F.; Kuhlmann, Marion; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Bohic, Sylvain; Drakopoulos, Michael; Snigirev, Anatoly A.; Snigireva, Irina; Schroeder, Walter H.

    2001-12-01

    Parabolic compound refractive lenses (PCRLs) are high quality hard x-ray imaging optics that can be used to image a synchrotron source onto a sample in a strongly demagnifying setup. This allows to produce an intensive microbeam with lateral extensions in the (sub-)micrometer range. Aluminium PCRLs can be operated in an energy range from about 10keV to 60keV and withstand the high heat load of the white beam of an ESRF undulator source. The microbeam properties using monochromatic and single undulator harmonic (pink) radiation are discussed, focusing on beam size, depth of field, background, flux, and gain. The large depth of focus allows to scan fairly large samples (a few millimeters in thickness) with a beam of constant lateral extension. This makes tomographic scanning techniques, such as fluorescence microtomography possible. As applications, fluorescence microtomography of plant samples with sub-cellular resolution and the mapping of trace elements in single cancer cells is shown.

  13. THE HUBBLE CONSTANT INFERRED FROM 18 TIME-DELAY LENSES

    SciTech Connect

    Paraficz, Danuta; Hjorth, Jens

    2010-04-01

    We present a simultaneous analysis of 18 galaxy lenses with time-delay measurements. For each lens, we derive mass maps using pixelated simultaneous modeling with shared Hubble constant. We estimate the Hubble constant to be 66{sup +6}{sub -4} km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1} (for a flat universe with OMEGA{sub m} = 0.3, OMEGA{sub L}AMBDA = 0.7). We have also selected a subsample of five relatively isolated early-type galaxies, and by simultaneous modeling with an additional constraint on isothermality of their mass profiles, we get H{sub 0} = 76{sup +3}{sub -3} km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}.

  14. 'Colored' and Decorative Contact Lenses: A Prescription Is a Must

    MedlinePlus

    ... labeling. (See additional information about cleaning solutions with hydrogen peroxide on the FDA website.) See your eye ... For More Information Decorative Contact Lenses Contact Lenses Hydrogen Peroxide Solution Related Consumer Updates Focusing on Contact ...

  15. What To Know If Your Child Wants Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... For More Information Decorative Contact Lenses Contact Lenses Hydrogen Peroxide Solution Consumer Updates Focusing on Contact Lens ... Prescription Is A Must Contact Lens Solutions With Hydrogen Peroxide: To Avoid Injury, Follow All Instructions Five ...

  16. Research and analysis on new test lenses for calibration of focimeters used for measuring contact lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiyan; Wang, Liru; Ma, Zhenya

    2006-11-01

    A focimeter is one of the basic ophthalmic instruments used in every optometric practice, and verification of the accuracy and calibration of the instrument are of the utmost importance. For many years the International Standardization for Organization requires that calibrations for all kinds of focimeters shall be accomplished by using test lenses described in ISO 9342:1996. These test lenses must be of high quality and of nominal back vertex power that is known with high accuracy. With the development of science and technology, ISO 9342 was revised in 2005. A new part ISO 9342-2 had been drafted for test lenses used to calibrate focimeters with contact lens measurement, and the original ISO 9342 was turned into the current ISO 9342-1, which could only be used to calibrate fociemters with spectacle lens measurement. As one of the standard drafters, the background for the newly published ISO 9342-2 is introduced in this study, and comparison between test lenses of ISO 9342-1 and ISO 9342-2 is made. Further, the influence of tolerance and uncertainty in design and production of standard test lenses of ISO 9342-2 is analyzed. The paraxial approximation is used to relate the lens parameters with back vertex power and to calculate the uncertainty budget. Moreover, one set of test lenses conforming to ISO 9342-2 is manufactured and experiments are done with it. Results show that test lenses described in ISO 9342-2 can correct the measurement errors of focimeters used for measuring contact lenses well, especially for spherical aberration, and the correction is more effective for spherical contact lenses with high back vertex power.

  17. Converging shear rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyung M.; Mix, Adam W.; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    For highly viscous fluids that slip in parallel sliding plate rheometers, we want to use a slightly converging flow to suppress this wall slip. In this work, we first attack the steady shear flow of a highly viscous Newtonian fluid between two gently converging plates with no slip boundaries using the equation of motion in cylindrical coordinates, which yields no analytical solution. Then we treat the same problem using the lubrication approximation in Cartesian coordinates to yield exact, explicit solutions for dimensionless velocity, pressure and shear stress. This work deepens our understanding of a drag flow through a gently converging slit of arbitrary convergence angle. We also employ the corotational Maxwell model to explore the role of viscoelasticity in this converging shear flow. We then compare these analytical solutions to finite element calculations for both Newtonian and corotational Maxwell cases. A worked example for determining the Newtonian viscosity using a converging shear rheometer is also included. With this work, we provide the framework for exploring other constitutive equations or other boundary conditions in future work. Our results can also be used to design the linear bearings used for the parallel sliding plate rheometer (SPR). This work can also be used to evaluate the error in the shear stress that is caused by bearing misalignment and specify the parallelism tolerance for the linear bearings incorporated into a SPR.

  18. From supersonic shear wave imaging to full-field optical coherence shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahas, Amir; Tanter, Mickaël; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Fink, Mathias; Claude Boccara, A.

    2013-12-01

    Elasticity maps of tissue have proved to be particularly useful in providing complementary contrast to ultrasonic imaging, e.g., for cancer diagnosis at the millimeter scale. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers an endogenous contrast based on singly backscattered optical waves. Adding complementary contrast to OCT images by recording elasticity maps could also be valuable in improving OCT-based diagnosis at the microscopic scale. Static elastography has been successfully coupled with full-field OCT (FF-OCT) in order to realize both micrometer-scale sectioning and elasticity maps. Nevertheless, static elastography presents a number of drawbacks, mainly when stiffness quantification is required. Here, we describe the combination of two methods: transient elastography, based on speed measurements of shear waves induced by ultrasonic radiation forces, and FF-OCT, an en face OCT approach using an incoherent light source. The use of an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner and an ultrafast camera working at 10,000 to 30,000 images/s made it possible to follow shear wave propagation with both modalities. As expected, FF-OCT is found to be much more sensitive than ultrafast ultrasound to tiny shear vibrations (a few nanometers and micrometers, respectively). Stiffness assessed in gel phantoms and an ex vivo rat brain by FF-OCT is found to be in good agreement with ultrasound shear wave elastography.

  19. Gravitational lensing by straight cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotvytskiy, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    We consider effects due to gravitational lensing by hypothetical cosmic strings. We briefly review facts concerning infinite straight strings, obtain the equation for a gravitational lens produced by an infinite string in the classical form, and analyze features of the gravitational lensing for a given object in detail. We consider a finite straight string. We present caustics and critical curves for strings with different lengths and also some images produced by the considered gravitational lens. We propose a method for constructing brightness curves numerically. As an example of the working capacity of this method, we construct a concrete brightness curve for certain gravitational lens parameters.

  20. Achromatic Cooling Channel with Li Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.

    2002-04-29

    A linear cooling channel with Li lenses, solenoids, and 201 MHz RF cavities is considered. A special lattice design is used to minimize chromatic aberrations by suppression of several betatron resonances. Transverse emittance of muon beam decreases from 2 mm to 0.5 mm at the channel of about 110 m length. Longitudinal heating is modest, therefore transmission of the channel is rather high: 96% without decay and 90% with decay. Minimal beam emittance achievable by similar channel estimated as about 0.25 mm at surface field of Li lenses 10 T.

  1. Cosmic string lensing and closed timelike curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlaer, Benjamin; Tye, S.-H. Henry

    2005-08-01

    In an analysis of the gravitational lensing by two relativistic cosmic strings, we argue that the formation of closed timelike curves proposed by Gott is unstable in the presence of particles (e.g. the cosmic microwave background radiation). Because of the attractorlike behavior of the closed timelike curve, we argue that this instability is very generic. A single graviton or photon in the vicinity, no matter how soft, is sufficient to bend the strings and prevent the formation of closed timelike curves. We also show that the gravitational lensing due to a moving cosmic string is enhanced by its motion, not suppressed.

  2. The Design And Performance Of Aspheric Ophthalmic Lenses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G.

    1986-05-01

    The significant aberrations in ophthalmic lenses are (oblique) astigmatism (spectacle lenses) and spherical aberration (contact and intra-ocular lenses). In many cases, they cannot be eliminated or sufficiently controlled by bending. Fortunately, aspherizing one or both surfaces allows much greater control over either of these aberrations and in the case of contact and intra-ocular lenses, allows the balancing of the spherical aberration in the eye itself.

  3. MEASURING THE GEOMETRY OF THE UNIVERSE FROM WEAK GRAVITATIONAL LENSING BEHIND GALAXY GROUPS IN THE HST COSMOS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, James E.; Massey, Richard J.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Tanaka, Masayuki; George, Matthew R.; Rhodes, Jason; Ellis, Richard; Scoville, Nick; Kitching, Thomas D.; Capak, Peter; Finoguenov, Alexis; Ilbert, Olivier; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Jullo, Eric; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2012-04-20

    Gravitational lensing can provide pure geometric tests of the structure of spacetime, for instance by determining empirically the angular diameter distance-redshift relation. This geometric test has been demonstrated several times using massive clusters which produce a large lensing signal. In this case, matter at a single redshift dominates the lensing signal, so the analysis is straightforward. It is less clear how weaker signals from multiple sources at different redshifts can be stacked to demonstrate the geometric dependence. We introduce a simple measure of relative shear which for flat cosmologies separates the effect of lens and source positions into multiplicative terms, allowing signals from many different source-lens pairs to be combined. Applying this technique to a sample of groups and low-mass clusters in the COSMOS survey, we detect a clear variation of shear with distance behind the lens. This represents the first detection of the geometric effect using weak lensing by multiple, low-mass groups. The variation of distance with redshift is measured with sufficient precision to constrain the equation of state of the universe under the assumption of flatness, equivalent to a detection of a dark energy component {Omega}{sub X} at greater than 99% confidence for an equation-of-state parameter -2.5 {<=} w {<=} -0.1. For the case w = -1, we find a value for the cosmological constant density parameter {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.85{sup +0.044}{sub -}0{sub .19} (68% CL) and detect cosmic acceleration (q{sub 0} < 0) at the 98% CL. We consider the systematic uncertainties associated with this technique and discuss the prospects for applying it in forthcoming weak-lensing surveys.

  4. Mapping the Galaxy Color-Redshift Relation: Optimal Photo-z Calibration Strategies for Cosmology Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Daniel C.; Capak, Peter L.; Stern, Daniel; Rhodes, Jason; Mobasher, Bahram; Schmidt, Samuel; Steinhardt, Charles L.; Faisst, Andreas; Speagle, Josh S.

    2016-01-01

    A primary objective of the upcoming dark energy surveys LSST, Euclid, and WFIRST is to map the 3D distribution of matter over a significant fraction of the universe via the weak lensing cosmic shear field. Doing so will require accurate distance estimates to billions of faint galaxies, meaning that photo-z's will be essential for the ultimate scientific success of these missions. Because galaxy colors drive photo-z estimates, spectroscopic calibration samples must at least be representative in color. Here we present a technique, based on the self-organizing map (Kohonen 1990), to map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the high-dimensional color space of a given survey. We apply the technique to Euclid-like data for ~131k galaxies from the COSMOS survey, allowing us to determine where - in galaxy color space - spectroscopic coverage exists and where it is systematically missing. We show that the mapping technique lets us develop efficient spectroscopic sampling strategies to measure the color-redshift relation by focusing effort on poorly constrained regions of multicolor space. We discuss the nature of the galaxies in un-sampled regions of galaxy color space, and show that a fiducial survey with Keck (making use of LRIS, DEIMOS, and MOSFIRE) could meet the Euclid calibration requirements in ~40 nights of observing.

  5. Free volume under shear.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H A; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-14

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems - particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior. PMID:26472384

  6. Imaging and characterizing shear wave and shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force excitation using OCT Doppler variance method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    We report on a novel acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) technique for imaging shear wave and quantifying shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) Doppler variance method. The ARF perpendicular to the OCT beam is produced by a remote ultrasonic transducer. A shear wave induced by ARF excitation propagates parallel to the OCT beam. The OCT Doppler variance method, which is sensitive to the transverse vibration, is used to measure the ARF-induced vibration. For analysis of the shear modulus, the Doppler variance method is utilized to visualize shear wave propagation instead of Doppler OCT method, and the propagation velocity of the shear wave is measured at different depths of one location with the M scan. In order to quantify shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth, we move ARF to a deeper layer at a known step and measure the time delay of the shear wave propagating to the same OCT imaging depth. We also quantitatively map the shear modulus of a cross-section in a tissue-equivalent phantom after employing the B scan. PMID:25927794

  7. Imaging and characterizing shear wave and shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force excitation using OCT Doppler variance method

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiang; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    We report on a novel acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) technique for imaging shear wave and quantifying shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) Doppler variance method. The ARF perpendicular to the OCT beam is produced by a remote ultrasonic transducer. A shear wave induced by ARF excitation propagates parallel to the OCT beam. The OCT Doppler variance method, which is sensitive to the transverse vibration, is used to measure the ARF-induced vibration. For analysis of the shear modulus, the Doppler variance method is utilized to visualize shear wave propagation instead of Doppler OCT method, and the propagation velocity of the shear wave is measured at different depths of one location with the M scan. In order to quantify shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth, we move ARF to a deeper layer at a known step and measure the time delay of the shear wave propagating to the same OCT imaging depth. We also quantitatively map the shear modulus of a cross-section in a tissue-equivalent phantom after employing the B scan. PMID:25927794

  8. Conjugate-shear folding: A model for the relationships between foliations, folds and shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerden, Domingo G. A. M.; Sayab, Mohammad; Bouybaouene, Mohamed L.

    2010-08-01

    Microstructural mapping of whole thin sections cut from two samples of micaschist containing cm-scale folds plus garnet porphyroblasts has provided new insight in the relationships between folding, shearing and foliation development. The garnets exhibit coherent inclusion-trail patterns that place important constraints on the kinematic development of both samples, which are shown to be representative of coaxial versus non-coaxial deformation in rocks containing a pre-existing schistosity. A comparison of crenulations-cleavages geometries in both samples and a review of the geometry of natural and experimental multilayer folds leads to the conclusion that folding involves conjugate shearing at different scales. At microscopic scales, crenulation cleavages nucleate as conjugate-kink or shear instabilities and develop further as a function of the macroscopic partitioning of deformation. In fold-hinge domains, bulk-coaxial deformation results in equal development of conjugate crenulations that progressively coalescence into symmetrical crenulation patterns so that, macroscopically, parallelism is achieved between foliation, fold-axial planes and long axes of strain ellipses. Fold-limb domains represent a system of conjugate-shear zones where single sets of crenulation instabilities with synthetic shearing component preferentially develop producing oblique relationships between the aforementioned elements. Cleavage fanning is inferred as a direct consequence of this conjugate-shear origin of folds. The model implies that crenulation cleavages and S-C fabrics in shear zones form by analogous processes, in both cases involving a component of shearing along foliation planes. The development of conjugate sets of foliation planes surrounding porphyroblasts during early, relatively coaxial stages of deformation explains continued "gyrostatic" behaviour during more advanced non-coaxial stages, as indicated by consistently oriented inclusion trails in the studied samples.

  9. Metal shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A metal shearing energy absorber is described. The absorber is composed of a flat thin strip of metal which is pulled through a slot in a cutter member of a metal, harder than the metal of the strip. The slot's length, in the direction perpendicular to the pull direction, is less than the strip's width so that as the strip is pulled through the slot, its edges are sheared off, thereby absorbing some of the pulling energy. In one embodiment the cutter member is a flat plate of steel, while in another embodiment the cutter member is U-shaped with the slot at its base.

  10. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

    1984-04-11

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  11. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  12. Relativistic weak lensing from a fully non-linear cosmological density field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. B.; Bruni, M.; Wands, D.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we examine cosmological weak lensing on non-linear scales and show that there are Newtonian and relativistic contributions and that the latter can also be extracted from standard Newtonian simulations. We use the post-Friedmann formalism, a post-Newtonian type framework for cosmology, to derive the full weak-lensing deflection angle valid on non-linear scales for any metric theory of gravity. We show that the only contributing term that is quadratic in the first order deflection is the expected Born correction and lens-lens coupling term. We use this deflection angle to analyse the vector and tensor contributions to the E- and B- mode cosmic shear power spectra. In our approach, once the gravitational theory has been specified, the metric components are related to the matter content in a well-defined manner. Specifying General Relativity, we write down a complete set of equations for a GR+ΛCDM universe for computing all of the possible lensing terms from Newtonian N-body simulations. We illustrate this with the vector potential and show that, in a GR+ΛCDM universe, its contribution to the E-mode is negligible with respect to that of the conventional Newtonian scalar potential, even on non-linear scales. Thus, under the standard assumption that Newtonian N-body simulations give a good approximation of the matter dynamics, we show that the standard ray tracing approach gives a good description for a ΛCDM cosmology.

  13. Lensing measurements of the ellipticity of luminous red galaxies dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, Joseph; Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2016-04-01

    Lensing measurements of the shapes of dark matter haloes can provide tests of gravity theories and possible dark matter interactions. We measure the quadrupole weak lensing signal from the elliptical haloes of 70 000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey luminous red galaxies. We use a new estimator that nulls the spherical halo lensing signal, isolating the shear due to anisotropy in the dark matter distribution. One of the two Cartesian components of our estimator is insensitive to the primary systematic, a spurious alignment of lens and source ellipticities, allowing us to make robust measurements of halo ellipticity. Our best-fitting value for the ellipticity of the surface mass density is 0.24 ± 0.06, which translates to an axis ratio of 0.78. We rule out the hypothesis of no ellipticity at the 4σ confidence level, and ellipticity <0.12 (axis ratio >0.89) at the 2σ level. We discuss how our measurements of halo ellipticity are revised to higher values using estimates of the misalignment of mass and light from simulations. Finally, we apply the same techniques to a smaller sample of redMaPPer galaxy clusters and obtain a 3σ measurement of cluster ellipticity. We discuss how the improved signal-to-noise ratio properties of our estimator can enable studies of halo shapes for different galaxy populations with upcoming surveys.

  14. Weak gravitational lensing due to large-scale structure of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaroszynski, Michal; Park, Changbom; Paczynski, Bohdan; Gott, J. Richard, III

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the large-scale structure of the universe on the propagation of light rays is studied. The development of the large-scale density fluctuations in the omega = 1 universe is calculated within the cold dark matter scenario using a smooth particle approximation. The propagation of about 10 to the 6th random light rays between the redshift z = 5 and the observer was followed. It is found that the effect of shear is negligible, and the amplification of single images is dominated by the matter in the beam. The spread of amplifications is very small. Therefore, the filled-beam approximation is very good for studies of strong lensing by galaxies or clusters of galaxies. In the simulation, the column density was averaged over a comoving area of approximately (1/h Mpc)-squared. No case of a strong gravitational lensing was found, i.e., no 'over-focused' image that would suggest that a few images might be present. Therefore, the large-scale structure of the universe as it is presently known does not produce multiple images with gravitational lensing on a scale larger than clusters of galaxies.

  15. Electron Lenses for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua, Belen

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. This project is moving towards a technical design in 2014, with the goal to build the devices in 2015-2017, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles.

  16. Zoom microscope objective using electrowetting lenses.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Wang, Di; Liu, Chao; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2016-02-01

    We report a zoom microscope objective which can achieve continuous zoom change and correct the aberrations dynamically. The objective consists of three electrowetting liquid lenses and two glass lenses. The magnification is changed by applying voltages on the three electrowetting lenses. Besides, the three electrowetting liquid lenses can play a role to correct the aberrations. A digital microscope based on the proposed objective is demonstrated. We analyzed the properties of the proposed objective. In contrast to the conventional objectives, the proposed objective can be tuned from ~7.8 × to ~13.2 × continuously. For our objective, the working distance is fixed, which means no movement parts are needed to refocus or change its magnification. Moreover, the zoom objective can be dynamically optimized for a wide range of wavelength. Using such an objective, the fabrication tolerance of the optical system is larger than that of a conventional system, which can decrease the fabrication cost. The proposed zoom microscope objective cannot only take place of the conventional objective, but also has potential application in the 3D microscopy. PMID:26906860

  17. Teaching the Theory of Real Lenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walther, A.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an approach to the study of real lenses that would not contradict Fermat's principle. Shows how the rudiments of the correct theory can be incorporated into courses to provide students a clearer notion of what they can expect in laboratory situations. (DDR)

  18. Software for Fermat's principle and lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihas, Pavlos

    2012-05-01

    Fermat's principle is considered as a unifying concept. It is usually presented erroneously as a 'least time principle'. In this paper we present some software that shows cases of maxima and minima and the application of Fermat's principle to the problem of focusing in lenses.

  19. Software for Fermat's Principle and Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihas, Pavlos

    2012-01-01

    Fermat's principle is considered as a unifying concept. It is usually presented erroneously as a "least time principle". In this paper we present some software that shows cases of maxima and minima and the application of Fermat's principle to the problem of focusing in lenses. (Contains 12 figures.)

  20. Formation of Lenses by Liquid Interfacial Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Charlotte; Cerjan, Benjamin; Baylor, Martha-Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we examined the geometry of polymer lenses formed by liquid interfacial surfaces. We formed lenses by dropping hydrophobic photo-curable monomer on the surface of various hydrophilic liquid substrates. Due to intermolecular forces between the monomer and the substrate liquid, the interface is pulled into a curved shape. Upon exposure to UV light, the monomer solidifies while maintaining the boundary interface. The result is a plano-convex, optically-smooth polymer lens. The interfacial surface tension is manipulated by altering the amount of thin film present on the surface of the hydrophilic liquid, producing lenses of different curvatures. The lens curvature is further modified by using various salts that change the polarity of the substrate solution. We will present data demonstrating modification of the lens shape due to specific changes made to the physical and chemical properties of the hydrophilic liquid. We believe this liquid interfacial fabrication technique offers an alternative to current molding techniques for forming polymer lenses.

  1. Strong Lensing Mass Reconstruction: from Frontier Fields to the Typical Lensing Clusters of Future Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharon, Keren

    2015-08-01

    Driven by the unprecedented wealth of high quality data that is accumulating for the Frontier Fields, they are becoming some of the best-studied strong lensing clusters to date, and probably the next few years. As will be discussed intensively in this focus meeting, the FF prove transformative for many fields: from studies of the high redshift Universe, to the assembly and structure of the clusters themselves. The FF data and the extensive collaborative effort around this program will also allow us to examine and improve upon current lens modeling techniques. Strong lensing is a powerful tool for mass reconstruction of the cores of galaxy clusters of all scales, providing an estimate of the total (dark and seen) projected mass density distribution out to ~0.5 Mpc. Though SL mass may be biased by contribution from structures along the line of sight, its strength is that it is relatively insensitive to assumptions on cluster baryon astrophysics and dynamical state. Like the Frontier Fields clusters, the most "famous" strong lensing clusters are at the high mass end; they lens dozens of background sources into multiple images, providing ample lensing constraints. In this talk, I will focus on how we can leverage what we learn from modeling the FF clusters in strong lensing studies of the hundreds of clusters that will be discovered in upcoming surveys. In typical clusters, unlike the Frontier Fields, the Bullet Cluster and A1689, we observe only one to a handful of background sources, and have limited lensing constraints. I will describe the limitations that such a configuration imposes on strong lens modeling, highlight measurements that are robust to the richness of lensing evidence, and address the sources of uncertainty and what sort of information can help reduce those uncertainties. This category of lensing clusters is most relevant to the wide cluster surveys of the future.

  2. Sheared Electroconvective Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Lim, Kiang Meng; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-11-01

    Recently, ion concentration polarization (ICP) and related phenomena draw attention from physicists, due to its importance in understanding electrochemical systems. Researchers have been actively studying, but the complexity of this multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon has been limitation for gaining a detailed picture. Here, we consider electroconvective(EC) instability initiated by ICP under pressure-driven flow, a scenario often found in electrochemical desalinations. Combining scaling analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling, we reveal unique behaviors of sheared EC: unidirectional vortex structures, its size selection and vortex propagation. Selected by balancing the external pressure gradient and the electric body force, which generates Hagen-Poiseuille(HP) flow and vortical EC, the dimensionless EC thickness scales as (φ2 /UHP)1/3. The pressure-driven flow(or shear) suppresses unfavorably-directed vortices, and simultaneously pushes favorably-directed vortices with constant speed, which is linearly proportional to the total shear of HP flow. This is the first systematic characterization of sheared EC, which has significant implications on the optimization of electrodialysis and other electrochemical systems.

  3. WEAK LENSING MEASUREMENT OF GALAXY CLUSTERS IN THE CFHTLS-WIDE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Shan Huanyuan; Tao Charling; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Jauzac, Mathilde; Limousin, Marceau; Fan Zuhui; Massey, Richard; Rhodes, Jason; Thanjavur, Karun; McCracken, Henry J.

    2012-03-20

    We present the first weak gravitational lensing analysis of the completed Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). We study the 64 deg{sup 2} W1 field, the largest of the CFHTLS-Wide survey fields, and present the largest contiguous weak lensing convergence 'mass map' yet made. 2.66 million galaxy shapes are measured, using the Kaiser Squires and Broadhurst Method (KSB) pipeline verified against high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging that covers part of the CFHTLS. Our i'-band measurements are also consistent with an analysis of independent r'-band imaging. The reconstructed lensing convergence map contains 301 peaks with signal-to-noise ratio {nu} > 3.5, consistent with predictions of a {Lambda}CDM model. Of these peaks, 126 lie within 3.'0 of a brightest central galaxy identified from multicolor optical imaging in an independent, red sequence survey. We also identify seven counterparts for massive clusters previously seen in X-ray emission within 6 deg{sup 2} XMM-LSS survey. With photometric redshift estimates for the source galaxies, we use a tomographic lensing method to fit the redshift and mass of each convergence peak. Matching these to the optical observations, we confirm 85 groups/clusters with {chi}{sup 2}{sub reduced} < 3.0, at a mean redshift (z{sub c} ) = 0.36 and velocity dispersion ({sigma}{sub c}) = 658.8 km s{sup -1}. Future surveys, such as DES, LSST, KDUST, and EUCLID, will be able to apply these techniques to map clusters in much larger volumes and thus tightly constrain cosmological models.

  4. Detection of thermal SZ-CMB lensing cross-correlation in Planck nominal mission data

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J. Colin; Spergel, David N. E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-02-01

    The nominal mission maps from the Planck satellite contain a wealth of information about secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), including those induced by the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect and gravitational lensing. As both the tSZ and CMB lensing signals trace the large-scale matter density field, the anisotropies sourced by these processes are expected to be correlated. We report the first detection of this cross-correlation signal, which we measure at 6.2σ significance using the Planck data. We take advantage of Planck's multifrequency coverage to construct a tSZ map using internal linear combination techniques, which we subsequently cross-correlate with the publicly-released Planck CMB lensing potential map. The cross-correlation is subject to contamination from the cosmic infrared background (CIB), which is known to correlate strongly with CMB lensing. We correct for this contamination via cross-correlating our tSZ map with the Planck 857 GHz map and confirm the robustness of our measurement using several null tests. We interpret the signal using halo model calculations, which indicate that the tSZ-CMB lensing cross-correlation is a unique probe of the physics of intracluster gas in high-redshift, low-mass groups and clusters. Our results are consistent with extrapolations of existing gas physics models to this previously unexplored regime and show clear evidence for contributions from both the one- and two-halo terms, but no statistically significant evidence for contributions from diffuse, unbound gas outside of collapsed halos. We also show that the amplitude of the signal depends rather sensitively on the amplitude of fluctuations (σ{sub 8}) and the matter density (Ω{sub m}), scaling as σ{sub 8}{sup 6.1}Ω{sub m}{sup 1.5} at ℓ = 1000. We constrain the degenerate combination σ{sub 8}(Ω{sub m}/0.282){sup 0.26} = 0.824±0.029, a result that is in less tension with primordial CMB constraints than some recent t

  5. Compound lensing: Einstein zig-zags and high-multiplicity lensed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, Thomas E.; Bacon, David J.

    2016-02-01

    Compound strong gravitational lensing is a rare phenomenon, but a handful of such lensed systems are likely to be discovered in forthcoming surveys. In this work, we use a double singular isothermal sphere lens model to analytically understand how the properties of the system impact image multiplicity for the final source. We find that up to six images of a background source can form, but only if the second lens is multiply imaged by the first and the Einstein radius of the second lens is comparable to, but does not exceed that of the first. We then build a model of compound lensing masses in the Universe, using singular isothermal ellipsoid (SIE) lenses, and assess how the optical depth for multiple imaging by a galaxy-galaxy compound lens varies with source redshift. For a source redshift of 4, we find optical depths of 6 × 10-6 for multiple imaging and 5 × 10-8 for multiplicity of 6 or greater. We find that extreme magnifications are possible, with magnifications of 100 or more for 6 × 10-9 of z = 10 sources with 0.1 kpc radii. We show some of the image configurations that can be generated by compound lenses, and demonstrate that they are qualitatively different to those generated by single-plane lenses; dedicated compound lens finders will be necessary if these systems are to be discovered in forthcoming surveys.

  6. BIAS-FREE SHEAR ESTIMATION USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.; Seitz, S.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Riffeser, A.

    2010-09-01

    Bias due to imperfect shear calibration is the biggest obstacle when constraints on cosmological parameters are to be extracted from large area weak lensing surveys such as Pan-STARRS-3{pi}, DES, or future satellite missions like EUCLID. We demonstrate that bias present in existing shear measurement pipelines (e.g., KSB) can be almost entirely removed by means of neural networks. In this way, bias correction can depend on the properties of the individual galaxy instead of being a single global value. We present a procedure to train neural networks for shear estimation and apply this to subsets of simulated GREAT08 RealNoise data. We also show that circularization of the point-spread function (PSF) before measuring the shear reduces the scatter related to the PSF anisotropy correction and thus leads to improved measurements, particularly on low and medium signal-to-noise data. Our results are competitive with the best performers in the GREAT08 competition, especially for the medium and higher signal-to-noise sets. Expressed in terms of the quality parameter defined by GREAT08, we achieve a Q{approx} 40, 140, and 1300 without and 50, 200, and 1300 with circularization for low, medium, and high signal-to-noise data sets, respectively.

  7. Terahertz lenses made by compression molding of micropowders.

    PubMed

    Scherger, Benedikt; Scheller, Maik; Jansen, Christian; Koch, Martin; Wiesauer, Karin

    2011-05-20

    We present a simple and versatile approach for fabricating terahertz lenses based on compression molding of micropowder polymer materials in a tabletop hydraulic press. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, a biconvex lens shape is calculated using a ray-tracing algorithm and lenses based on two different micropowders are fabricated. As the powder materials have different refractive indices, the resulting lenses share the same geometric shape but differ in their respective focal length. The focusing properties of the lenses are evaluated by transversal and sagittal beam profile measurements in a fiber-coupled terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system, confirming the excellent imaging qualities of the compression molded lenses. PMID:21614120

  8. An Instrumentation Systematic for Weak Lensing from WFIRST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Arun; Shapiro, Charles; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Hirata, Christopher M.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Rhodes, Jason

    2016-06-01

    The Wide Field Infra-Red Space Telescope (WFIRST), which is planned to be launched in 2025, will image the Universe in the near-Infrared bands and help measure shapes of ~400M galaxies according to the current survey design. Given such a big dataset, in order to be able to make precise weak lensing measurements and thereby understand the dark sectors of the Universe, it is necessary to not be biased by systematic effects. An understanding of systematic effects that arise from both astrophysical situations and from the instrumentation becomes crucial. The detectors used in WFIRST are made of HgCdTe and have CMOS based readout electronics, thus suffering from systematic effects that are different from that of CCDs. In this talk, I will focus on one such effect called the 'Interpixel Capacitance' (IPC) effect, which is a form of electrical crosstalk between neighboring pixels. I will show some results on how the shape of observed PSF, which will include the effect of IPC, varies as a function of the IPC parameters. I will also show how the shear measurement bias is affected if the IPC in the individual exposures is not perfectly corrected for, due to the misestimation of the IPC parameters. The requirements on PSF shapes and measurement biases can be translated into requirements on the IPC parameters and thus be used to specify the desired level of detector performance.

  9. Strategies for active alignment of lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langehanenberg, Patrik; Heinisch, Josef; Wilde, Chrisitan; Hahne, Felix; Lüerß, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    Today's optical systems require up-to-date assembly and joining technology. The trend of keeping dimensions as small as possible while maintaining or increasing optical imaging performance leaves little to no room for mechanical lens adjustment equipment that may remain in the final product. In this context active alignment of optical elements opens up possibilities for the fast and cost-economic manufacturing of lenses and lens assemblies with highest optical performance. Active alignment for lens manufacturing is the precise alignment of the optical axis of a lens with respect to an optical or mechanical reference axis (e.g. housing) including subsequent fixation by glue. In this contribution we will describe different approaches for active alignment and outline strengths and limitations of the different methods. Using the SmartAlign principle, highest quality cemented lenses can be manufactured without the need for high precision prealignment, while the reduction to a single alignment step greatly reduces the cycle time. The same strategies can also be applied to bonding processes. Lenses and lens groups can be aligned to both mechanical and optical axes to maximize the optical performance of a given assembly. In hybrid assemblies using both mechanical tolerances and active alignment, SmartAlign can be used to align critical lens elements anywhere inside the system for optimized total performance. Since all geometrical parameters are re-measured before each alignment, this process is especially suited for complex and time-consuming production processes where the stability of the reference axis would otherwise be critical. For highest performance, lenses can be actively aligned using up to five degrees of freedom. In this way, SmartAlign enables the production of ultra-precise mounted lenses with an alignment precision below 1 μm.

  10. New insights into peculiar thermonuclear supernovae and line of sight effects in gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCully, Curtis

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and gravitational lensing are important cosmological probes, but both are limited by theoretical, systematic uncertainties. One key uncertainty in distances derived using SNe Ia is our lack of understanding of the explosion mechanism for normal SNe Ia. We have studied peculiar type Iax supernovae that appear to be related to normal SNe Ia with the goal of understanding white dwarf explosions as a whole. In Chapter 2, using late-time Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of SN 2008A and SN 2005hk, both prototypical SNe Iax, we argue that these objects are pure deflagration explosions that do not unbind the white dwarf. In Chapter 3, we present observations of the type Iax SN 2012Z, one of the nearest ever discovered. Fortunately for us, its host galaxy, NGC 1309, was observed extensively with HST/ACS (to measure a Cepheid distance), giving us incredibly deep pre-explosion images of the site of SN 2012Z. We find that there is a source coincident with the position of the SN. We argue that the source is likely a helium star companion to the white dwarf that exploded. In galaxy-scale gravitational lenses, one of the largest systematic uncertainties arises due to other mass in the environment of the lens or along the line of sight (LOS). In Chapter 4, we develop an analytic framework to account for LOS effects. Our framework employs a hybrid approach treating a few perturbing galaxies as strong lenses, making it accurate, while treating the rest in the weak lensing approximation, making it also computationally efficient. In Chapter 5, we test our framework using simulations of realistic mass models. We suggest a method to characterize the strength of the LOS effects allowing us to systematically test when the weak lensing approximation is valid. We show that LOS effects are not equivalent to a single shear, but these non-linear effects are correctly captured by our framework. Our new methodology can be used to constrain cosmological

  11. Direct observation of dynamic shear jamming in dense suspensions.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ivo R; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-04-14

    Liquid-like at rest, dense suspensions of hard particles can undergo striking transformations in behaviour when agitated or sheared. These phenomena include solidification during rapid impact, as well as strong shear thickening characterized by discontinuous, orders-of-magnitude increases in suspension viscosity. Much of this highly non-Newtonian behaviour has recently been interpreted within the framework of a jamming transition. However, although jamming indeed induces solid-like rigidity, even a strongly shear-thickened state still flows and thus cannot be fully jammed. Furthermore, although suspensions are incompressible, the onset of rigidity in the standard jamming scenario requires an increase in particle density. Finally, whereas shear thickening occurs in the steady state, impact-induced solidification is transient. As a result, it has remained unclear how these dense suspension phenomena are related and how they are connected to jamming. Here we resolve this by systematically exploring both the steady-state and transient regimes with the same experimental system. We demonstrate that a fully jammed, solid-like state can be reached without compression and instead purely with shear, as recently proposed for dry granular systems. This state is created by transient shear-jamming fronts, which we track directly. We also show that shear stress, rather than shear rate, is the key control parameter. From these findings we map out a state diagram with particle density and shear stress as variables. We identify discontinuous shear thickening with a marginally jammed regime just below the onset of full, solid-like jamming. This state diagram provides a unifying framework, compatible with prior experimental and simulation results on dense suspensions, that connects steady-state and transient behaviour in terms of a dynamic shear-jamming process. PMID:27042934

  12. Direct observation of dynamic shear jamming in dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-04-01

    Liquid-like at rest, dense suspensions of hard particles can undergo striking transformations in behaviour when agitated or sheared. These phenomena include solidification during rapid impact, as well as strong shear thickening characterized by discontinuous, orders-of-magnitude increases in suspension viscosity. Much of this highly non-Newtonian behaviour has recently been interpreted within the framework of a jamming transition. However, although jamming indeed induces solid-like rigidity, even a strongly shear-thickened state still flows and thus cannot be fully jammed. Furthermore, although suspensions are incompressible, the onset of rigidity in the standard jamming scenario requires an increase in particle density. Finally, whereas shear thickening occurs in the steady state, impact-induced solidification is transient. As a result, it has remained unclear how these dense suspension phenomena are related and how they are connected to jamming. Here we resolve this by systematically exploring both the steady-state and transient regimes with the same experimental system. We demonstrate that a fully jammed, solid-like state can be reached without compression and instead purely with shear, as recently proposed for dry granular systems. This state is created by transient shear-jamming fronts, which we track directly. We also show that shear stress, rather than shear rate, is the key control parameter. From these findings we map out a state diagram with particle density and shear stress as variables. We identify discontinuous shear thickening with a marginally jammed regime just below the onset of full, solid-like jamming. This state diagram provides a unifying framework, compatible with prior experimental and simulation results on dense suspensions, that connects steady-state and transient behaviour in terms of a dynamic shear-jamming process.

  13. Metamorphic textures and geochemistry of the Cyprus-type massive sulfide lenses at Zurabad, Khoy, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftabi, A.; Ghodrati, Z.; MacLean, W. H.

    2006-09-01

    The Upper Cretaceous volcanogenic-exhalative Fe-Cu massive sulfide lenses at Zurabad, Iran occur within spilitized basalts of the Khoy ophiolite. Both the host rocks and the sulfide lenses are metamorphosed to greenschist facies and have been subjected to weak deformation causing textural changes in the ore. The presence of preserved banded pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite and sphalerite in a matrix rich in chlorite indicates that the ore was a primary facies of synvolcanic hydrothermal massive sulfide mineralization, similar to those formed in modern seafloor environments and in Cyprus-type ophiolite deposits. Coarse-grained pyrite porphyroblasts or crystalloblasts, recrystallized pyrrhotite and chalcopyrite, together with regional silicate-sulfide foliation were produced by sub-seafloor metamorphism followed by regional metamorphism and ophiolite obduction. Brittle deformation and shearing produced cataclastic textures in pyrite, which were filled by chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite. Post-obduction and or post-metamorphic events produced late veinlets of pyrite-chalcopyrite and gangue minerals. Supergene processes related to gossan formation converted pyrite, pyrrhotite and chalcopyrite to marcasite and birdseye pyrite. Primary sphalerite contains an average of 14 mole % FeS, which shows equilibration at temperatures below 240 °C, and a pressure less than 1 kilobar. Based on its equilibrated textures with other sulfides and silicates in the foliation, pyrrhotite was a primary mineral in the Zurabad volcanogenic massive sulfide lenses. Therefore, pyrrhotite can be primary, and with pyrite forms a buffer that constrains sulphur fugacity during regional metamorphism. On the evidence of textures, mineralogy and geochemistry, pyrite is stable in the greenschist facies, provided that the activity of sulphur remains high. Of prime importance in exploration of the massive sulfide lenses in the Zurabad area has been the recognition of banded gossans and coarse pyrite

  14. LensPerfect: Gravitational Lens Mass Map Reconstructions Yielding Exact Reproduction of All Multiple Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, D.; Fuselier, E.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Frye, B.; Ford, H.

    2008-07-01

    We present a new approach to gravitational lens mass map reconstruction. Our mass map solutions perfectly reproduce the positions, fluxes, and shears of all multiple images, and each mass map accurately recovers the underlying mass distribution to a resolution limited by the number of multiple images detected. We demonstrate our technique given a mock galaxy cluster similar to Abell 1689, which gravitationally lenses 19 mock background galaxies to produce 93 multiple images. We also explore cases in which as few as four multiple images are observed. Mass map solutions are never unique, and our method makes it possible to explore an extremely flexible range of physical (and unphysical) solutions, all of which perfectly reproduce the data given. Each reconfiguration of the source galaxies produces a new mass map solution. An optimization routine is provided to find those source positions (and redshifts, within uncertainties) that produce the "most physical" mass map solution, according to a new figure of merit developed here. Our method imposes no assumptions about the slope of the radial profile or mass following light. However, unlike "nonparametric" grid-based methods, the number of free parameters that we solve for is only as many as the number of observable constraints (or slightly greater if fluxes are constrained). For each set of source positions and redshifts, mass map solutions are obtained "instantly" via direct matrix inversion by smoothly interpolating the deflection field using a recently developed mathematical technique. Our LensPerfect software is straightforward and easy to use, and is publicly available on our Web site.

  15. Visualizing ultrasonically-induced shear wave propagation using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography for dynamic elastography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shaozhen; Arnal, Bastien; Huang, Zhihong; O’Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the use of phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) to detect and track temporally and spatially shear wave propagation within tissue induced by ultrasound radiation force. Kilohertz-range shear waves are remotely generated in sample using focused ultrasound emission and their propagation is tracked using PhS-OCT. Cross-sectional maps of the local shear modulus are reconstructed from local estimates of shear wave speed in tissue-mimicking phantoms. We demonstrate the feasibility of combining ultrasound radiation force and PhS-OCT to perform high-resolution mapping of the shear modulus. PMID:24562220

  16. A weak-lensing analysis of the Abell 383 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Radovich, M.; Grado, A.; Puddu, E.; Romano, A.; Limatola, L.; Fu, L.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We use deep CFHT and SUBARU uBVRIz archival images of the Abell 383 cluster (z = 0.187) to estimate its mass by weak-lensing. Methods: To this end, we first use simulated images to check the accuracy provided by our Kaiser-Squires-Broadhurst (KSB) pipeline. These simulations include shear testing programme (STEP) 1 and 2 simulations, as well as more realistic simulations of the distortion of galaxy shapes by a cluster with a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile. From these simulations we estimate the effect of noise on shear measurement and derive the correction terms. The R-band image is used to derive the mass by fitting the observed tangential shear profile with an NFW mass profile. Photometric redshifts are computed from the uBVRIz catalogs. Different methods for the foreground/background galaxy selection are implemented, namely selection by magnitude, color, and photometric redshifts, and the results are compared. In particular, we developed a semi-automatic algorithm to select the foreground galaxies in the color-color diagram, based on the observed colors. Results: Using color selection or photometric redshifts improves the correction of dilution from foreground galaxies: this leads to higher signals in the inner parts of the cluster. We obtain a cluster mass Mvir = 7.5+2.7_{-1.9 × 1014} M⊙: this value is 20% higher than previous estimates and is more consistent the mass expected from X-ray data. The R-band luminosity function of the cluster is computed and gives a total luminosity Ltot = (2.14 ± 0.5) × 1012 L⊙ and a mass-to-luminosity ratio M/L 300 M⊙/L⊙. Based on: data collected with the Subaru Telescope (University of Tokyo) and obtained from the SMOKA, which is operated by the Astronomy Data Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada

  17. CAT LIDAR wind shear studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goff, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The studies considered the major meteorological factors producing wind shear, methods to define and classify wind shear in terms significant from an aircraft perturbation standpoint, the significance of sensor location and scan geometry on the detection and measurement of wind shear, and the tradeoffs involved in sensor performance such as range/velocity resolution, update frequency and data averaging interval.

  18. Cosmological constraints from the 100-deg2 weak-lensing survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Jonathan; Heymans, Catherine; Semboloni, Elisabetta; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Hoekstra, Henk; Erben, Thomas; Gladders, Michael D.; Hetterscheidt, Marco; Mellier, Yannick; Yee, H. K. C.

    2007-10-01

    We present a cosmic shear analysis of the 100-deg2 weak-lensing survey, combining data from the CFHTLS-Wide, RCS, VIRMOS-DESCART and GaBoDS surveys. Spanning ~100 deg2, with a median source redshift z ~ 0.78, this combined survey allows us to place tight joint constraints on the matter density parameter Ωm, and the amplitude of the matter power spectrum σ8, finding σ8(Ωm/0.24)0.59 = 0.84 +/- 0.05. Tables of the measured shear correlation function and the calculated covariance matrix for each survey are included as supplementary material to the online version of this article. The accuracy of our results is a marked improvement on previous work owing to three important differences in our analysis; we correctly account for sample variance errors by including a non-Gaussian contribution estimated from numerical simulations; we correct the measured shear for a calibration bias as estimated from simulated data; we model the redshift distribution, n(z), of each survey from the largest deep photometric redshift catalogue currently available from the CFHTLS-Deep. This catalogue is randomly sampled to reproduce the magnitude distribution of each survey with the resulting survey-dependent n(z) parametrized using two different models. While our results are consistent for the n(z) models tested, we find that our cosmological parameter constraints depend weakly (at the 5 per cent level) on the inclusion or exclusion of galaxies with low-confidence photometric redshift estimates (z > 1.5). These high-redshift galaxies are relatively few in number but contribute a significant weak-lensing signal. It will therefore be important for future weak-lensing surveys to obtain near-infrared data to reliably determine the number of high-redshift galaxies in cosmic shear analyses. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada (NRCC), the Institut des Sciences de l'Univers (INSU) of the Centre

  19. CFHTLenS and RCSLenS cross-correlation with Planck lensing detected in fourier and configuration space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Tröster, Tilman; Hojjati, Alireza; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Asgari, Marika; Choi, Ami; Erben, Thomas; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Kitching, Thomas D.; Miller, Lance; Nakajima, Reiko; Viola, Massimo; Arnouts, Stéphane; Coupon, Jean; Moutard, Thibaud

    2016-07-01

    We measure the cross-correlation signature between the Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing map and the weak lensing observations from both the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey. In addition to a Fourier analysis, we include the first configuration-space detection, based on the estimators <κCMBκgal> and <κCMBγt>. Combining 747.2 deg2 from both surveys, we find a detection significance that exceeds 4.2σ in both Fourier- and configuration-space analyses. Scaling the predictions by a free parameter A, we obtain A^Planck_CFHT= 0.68± 0.31 and A^Planck_RCS= 1.31± 0.33. In preparation for the next generation of measurements similar to these, we quantify the impact of different analysis choices on these results. First, since none of these estimators probes the exact same dynamical range, we improve our detection by combining them. Secondly, we carry out a detailed investigation on the effect of apodization, zero-padding and mask multiplication, validated on a suite of high-resolution simulations, and find that the latter produces the largest systematic bias in the cosmological interpretation. Finally, we show that residual contamination from intrinsic alignment and the effect of photometric redshift error are both largely degenerate with the characteristic signal from massive neutrinos, however the signature of baryon feedback might be easier to distinguish. The three lensing data sets are publicly available.

  20. CFHTLenS and RCSLenS Cross-Correlation with Planck Lensing Detected in Fourier and Configuration Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Tröster, Tilman; Hojjati, Alireza; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Asgari, Marika; Choi, Ami; Erben, Thomas; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Kitching, Thomas D.; Miller, Lance; Nakajima, Reiko; Viola, Massimo; Arnouts, Stéphane; Coupon, Jean; Moutard, Thibaud

    2016-04-01

    We measure the cross-correlation signature between the Planck CMB lensing map and the weak lensing observations from both the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS) and the Canada-France-Hawai Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). In addition to a Fourier analysis, we include the first configuration-space detection, based on the estimators <κCMBκgal> and <κCMBγt>. Combining 747.2 deg2 from both surveys, we find a detection significance that exceeds 4.2σ in both Fourier- and configuration-space analyses. Scaling the predictions by a free parameter A, we obtain A^Planck_CFHT= 0.68± 0.31 and A^Planck_RCS= 1.31± 0.33. In preparation for the next generation of measurements similar to these, we quantify the impact of different analysis choices on these results. First, since none of these estimators probes the exact same dynamical range, we improve our detection by combining them. Second, we carry out a detailed investigation on the effect of apodization, zero-padding and mask multiplication, validated on a suite of high-resolution simulations, and find that the latter produces the largest systematic bias in the cosmological interpretation. Finally, we show that residual contamination from intrinsic alignment and the effect of photometric redshift error are both largely degenerate with the characteristic signal from massive neutrinos, however the signature of baryon feedback might be easier to distinguish. The three lensing dataset are publicly available.

  1. Weak Gravitatational Lensing by Illustris-1 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brainerd, Tereasa G.; Koh, Patrick H.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the weak gravitational lensing signal of isolated, central galaxies obtained from the z=0.5 timestep of the ΛCDM Illustris-1 simulation. The galaxies have stellar masses ranging from 9.5 ≤ log10(M*/Msun) ≤ 11.0 and are located outside cluster and rich group environments. Although there is local substructure present in the form of small, luminous satellite galaxies, the central galaxies are the dominant objects within the virial radii (r200), and each central galaxy is at least 5 times brighter than any other luminous galaxy within the friends-of-friends halo. We compute the weak lensing signal within projected radii 0.05 < rp/r200 < 1.5 and investigate the degree to which the weak lensing signal is anisotropic. Since CDM halos are non-spherical, the weak lensing signal is expected to be anisotropic; however, the degree of anisotropy that is observed depends upon the symmetry axes that are used to define the geometry. The anisotropy is expected to be maximized when the major axis of the projected dark matter mass distribution is used to define the geomety. In practice in the observed universe, one must necessarily use the projected distribution of the luminous mass to define the geometry. If mass and light are not well-aligned, this results in a suppression of the weak lensing anistropy. Our initial analysis shows that the ellipticity of the projected dark matter halo is uncorrelated with the ellipticity of the projected stellar mass. That is εhalo ≠ f × εlight, where f is a constant multiplicative factor. In addition, in projection on the sky, the major axis of the dark matter mass is offset from that of the stellar mass by ∼40o on average. On scales rp ≤ 0.15 r200, the weak lensing anisotropy obtained when using the stellar mass to define the geometry is of order 7% and agrees well with the anisotropy obtained when using the dark matter mass to define the geometry. On scales rp ∼ r200, the anisotropy obtained when using the stellar mass

  2. Shear-thinning Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Whipped cream and the filling for pumpkin pie are two familiar materials that exhibit the shear-thinning effect seen in a range of industrial applications. It is thick enough to stand on its own atop a piece of pie, yet flows readily when pushed through a tube. This demonstrates the shear-thinning effect that was studied with the Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002. CVX observed the behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The principal investigator was Dr. Robert Berg of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD.

  3. Gelation under shear

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, B.D.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Straty, G.C.; Muzny, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of dense silica gels, prepared from suspensions of 24 nm colloidal silica particles at several volume fractions {theta} is discussed. Provided that {theta}{approx_lt}0.18, the scattered intensity at small wave vectors q increases as the gelation proceeds, and the structure factor S(q, t {yields} {infinity}) of the gel exhibits apparent power law behavior. Power law behavior is also observed, even for samples with {theta}>0.18, when the gel is formed under an applied shear. Shear also enhances the diffraction maximum corresponding to the inter-particle contact distance of the gel. Difficulties encountered when trying to interpret SANS data from these dense systems are outlined. Results of computer simulations intended to mimic gel formation, including computations of S(q, t), are discussed. Comments on a method to extract a fractal dimension characterizing the gel are included.

  4. GREAT3 results - I. Systematic errors in shear estimation and the impact of real galaxy morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Armstrong, Robert; Bard, Deborah; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bosch, James; Boutigny, Dominique; Courbin, Frederic; Dawson, William A.; Donnarumma, Annamaria; Fenech Conti, Ian; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Gentile, Marc; Gill, Mandeep S. S.; Hogg, David W.; Huff, Eric M.; Jee, M. James; Kacprzak, Tomasz; Kilbinger, Martin; Kuntzer, Thibault; Lang, Dustin; Luo, Wentao; March, Marisa C.; Marshall, Philip J.; Meyers, Joshua E.; Miller, Lance; Miyatake, Hironao; Nakajima, Reiko; Ngolé Mboula, Fred Maurice; Nurbaeva, Guldariya; Okura, Yuki; Paulin-Henriksson, Stéphane; Rhodes, Jason; Schneider, Michael D.; Shan, Huanyuan; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simet, Melanie; Starck, Jean-Luc; Sureau, Florent; Tewes, Malte; Zarb Adami, Kristian; Zhang, Jun; Zuntz, Joe

    2015-07-01

    We present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by ˜1 per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the Sérsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods' results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.

  5. GREAT3 results - I. Systematic errors in shear estimation and the impact of real galaxy morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Armstrong, Robert; Bard, Deborah; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bosch, James; Boutigny, Dominique; Courbin, Frederic; Dawson, William A.; Donnarumma, Annamaria; Fenech Conti, Ian; Gavazzi, Raphael; Gentile, Marc; Gill, Mandeep S. S.; Hogg, David W.; Huff, Eric M.; Jee, M. James; Kacprzak, Tomasz; Kilbinger, Martin; Kuntzer, Thibault; Lang, Dustin; Luo, Wentao; March, Marisa C.; Marshall, Philip J.; Meyers, Joshua E.; Miller, Lance; Miyatake, Hironao; Nakajima, Reiko; Ngole Mboula, Fred Maurice; Nurbaeva, Guldariya; Okura, Yuki; Paulin-Henriksson, Stephane; Rhodes, Jason; Schneider, Michael D.; Shan, Huanyuan; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simet, Melanie; Starck, Jean -Luc; Sureau, Florent; Tewes, Malte; Zarb Adami, Kristian; Zhang, Jun; Zuntz, Joe

    2015-05-11

    The study present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by ~1 per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the Sérsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods’ results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.

  6. GREAT3 results - I. Systematic errors in shear estimation and the impact of real galaxy morphology

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Armstrong, Robert; Bard, Deborah; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bosch, James; Boutigny, Dominique; Courbin, Frederic; Dawson, William A.; Donnarumma, Annamaria; et al

    2015-05-11

    The study present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty aboutmore » a spatially varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by ~1 per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the Sérsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods’ results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.« less

  7. Fiber optic plantar pressure/shear sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soetanto, William; Nguyen, Ngoc T.; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2011-04-01

    A full-scale foot pressure/shear sensor that has been developed to help diagnose the cause of ulcer formation in diabetic patients is presented. The design involves a tactile sensor array using intersecting optical fibers embedded in soft elastomer. The basic configuration incorporates a mesh that is comprised of two sets of parallel optical fiber plane; the planes are configured so the parallel rows of fiber of the top and bottom planes are perpendicular to each other. Threedimensional information is determined by measuring the loss of light from each of the waveguide to map the overall pressure distribution and the shifting of the layers relative to each other. In this paper we will present the latest development on the fiber optic plantar pressure/shear sensor which can measure normal force up from 19.09 kPa to 1000 kPa.

  8. Bac clones generated from sheared dna

    SciTech Connect

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Vessere, Gery M.; Shu, Chung Li; Hoskins,Roger A.; Abad, Jose P.; de Pablos, Beatriz; Villasante, Alfredo; deJong, Pieter J.

    2006-08-09

    BAC libraries generated from restriction-digested genomic DNA display representational bias and lack some sequences. To facilitate completion of genome projects, procedures have been developed to create BACs from DNA physically sheared to create fragments extending up to 200kb. The DNA fragments were repaired to create blunt ends and ligated to a new BAC vector. This approach has been tested by generating BAC libraries from Drosophila DNA, with insert lengths of 50 kb to 150 kb. The libraries lack chimeric clone problems as determined by mapping paired BAC-end sequences of one library to the D. melanogaster genome sequence. The utility of ''sheared'' libraries was demonstrated by closure of a previous clone gap and by isolation of clones from telomeric regions, which were notably absent from previous Drosophila BAC libraries.

  9. Micromechanics of shear banding

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  10. Perfect Lensing