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Sample records for leo npinen lo

  1. Leo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Lion; abbrev. Leo, gen. Leonis; area 947 sq. deg.) A northern zodiacal constellation which lies between Cancer and Virgo, and culminates at midnight in early March. It represents the Nemean lion that, in Greek mythology, Hercules killed as the first of his 12 labors. Its brightest stars were cataloged by Ptolemy (c. AD 100-175) in the Almagest....

  2. Leo Minor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Lesser Lion; abbrev. LMi, gen. Leonis Minoris; area 232 sq.deg.) A northern constellation which lies between Ursa Major and Leo, and culminates at midnight in late February. It was introduced by the astronomer Johannes Hevelius (1611-87) of Danzig (Gdansk), who included it in his atlas Firmamentum Sobiescianum sive Uranographia of 1687....

  3. LEO Spacecraft Charging Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillard, G. B.; Ferguson, D. C.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past decade, Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) spacecraft have gradually required ever-increasing power levels. As a rule, this has been accomplished through the use of high voltage systems. Recent failures and anomalies on such spacecraft have been traced to various design practices and materials choices related to the high voltage solar arrays. NASA Glenn has studied these anomalies including plasma chamber testing on arrays similar to those that experienced difficulties on orbit. Many others in the community have been involved in a comprehensive effort to understand the problems and to develop practices to avoid them. The NASA Space Environments and Effects program, recognizing the timeliness of this effort, has commissioned and funded a design guidelines document intended to capture the current state of understanding. We present here an overview of this document, which is now nearing completion.

  4. GFEChutes Lo-Fi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gist, Emily; Turner, Gary; Shelton, Robert; Vautier, Mana; Shaikh, Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    NASA needed to provide a software model of a parachute system for a manned re-entry vehicle. NASA has parachute codes, e.g., the Descent Simulation System (DSS), that date back to the Apollo Program. Since the space shuttle did not rely on parachutes as its primary descent control mechanism, DSS has not been maintained or incorporated into modern simulation architectures such as Osiris and Antares, which are used for new mission simulations. GFEChutes Lo-Fi is an object-oriented implementation of conventional parachute codes designed for use in modern simulation environments. The GFE (Government Furnished Equipment), low-fidelity (Lo-Fi) parachute model (GFEChutes Lo-Fi) is a software package capable of modeling the effects of multiple parachutes, deployed concurrently and/or sequentially, on a vehicle during the subsonic phase of reentry into planetary atmosphere. The term "low-fidelity" distinguishes models that represent the parachutes as simple forces acting on the vehicle, as opposed to independent aerodynamic bodies. GFEChutes Lo-Fi was created from these existing models to be clean, modular, certified as NASA Class C software, and portable, or "plug and play." The GFE Lo-Fi Chutes Model provides basic modeling capability of a sequential series of parachute activities. Actions include deploying the parachute, changing the reefing on the parachute, and cutting away the parachute. Multiple chutes can be deployed at any given time, but all chutes in that case are assumed to behave as individually isolated chutes; there is no modeling of any interactions between deployed chutes. Drag characteristics of a deployed chute are based on a coefficient of drag, the face area of the chute, and the local dynamic pressure only. The orientation of the chute is approximately modeled for purposes of obtaining torques on the vehicle, but the dynamic state of the chute as a separate entity is not integrated - the treatment is simply an approximation. The innovation in GFEChutes

  5. Leo space plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    1991-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays interact with the low earth orbit (LEO) space plasma in two fundamentally different ways. One way is the steady collection of current from the plasma onto exposed conductors and semiconductors. The relative currents collected by different parts of the array will then determine the floating potential of the spacecraft. In addition, these steady state collected currents may lead to sputtering or heating of the array by the ions or electrons collected, respectively. The second kind of interaction is the short time scale arc into the space plasma, which may deplete the array and/or spacecraft of stored charge, damage solar cells, and produce EMI. Such arcs only occur at high negative potentials relative to the space plasma potential, and depend on the steady state ion currents being collected. New high voltage solar arrays being incorporated into advanced spacecraft and space platforms may be endangered by these plasma interactions. Recent advances in laboratory testing and current collection modeling promise the capability of controlling, and perhaps even using, these space plasma interactions to enable design of reliable high voltage space power systems. Some of the new results may have an impact on solar cell spacing and/or coverslide design. Planned space flight experiments are necessary to confirm the models of high voltage solar array plasma interactions. Finally, computerized, integrated plasma interactions design tools are being constructed to place plasma interactions models into the hands of the spacecraft designer.

  6. Leo Tolstoy the Spiritual Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulin, Dan

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the often overlooked religious and educational works of the Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910). After outlining Tolstoy's life, religious and educational views, it is argued that Tolstoy has much to offer spiritual educators today. In particular, it suggests Tolstoy's insistence on the absolute and eternal nature of…

  7. The Year of Leo Lionni.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuade, Molly

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the picture books of Leo Lionni and describes how Vivian Gussin Paley, a Chicago elementary school teacher, used his books for an entire year's curriculum in her kindergarten class. Highlights include children's engagement with literature, and other learning activities based on the books. (LRW)

  8. Wave optics-based LEO-LEO radio occultation retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the theory for performing retrieval of radio occultations that use probing frequencies in the XK and KM band. Normally, radio occultations use frequencies in the L band, and GPS satellites are used as the transmitting source, and the occultation signals are received by a GPS receiver on board a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite. The technique is based on the Doppler shift imposed, by the atmosphere, on the signal emitted from the GPS satellite. Two LEO satellites are assumed in the occultations discussed in this paper, and the retrieval is also dependent on the decrease in the signal amplitude caused by atmospheric absorption. The radio wave transmitter is placed on one of these satellites, while the receiver is placed on the other LEO satellite. One of the drawbacks of normal GPS-based radio occultations is that external information is needed to calculate some of the atmospheric products such as the correct water vapor content in the atmosphere. These limitations can be overcome when a proper selected range of high-frequency waves are used to probe the atmosphere. Probing frequencies close to the absorption line of water vapor have been included, thus allowing the retrieval of the water vapor content. Selecting the correct probing frequencies would make it possible to retrieve other information such as the content of ozone. The retrieval is performed through a number of processing steps which are based on the Full Spectrum Inversion (FSI) technique. The retrieval chain is therefore a wave optics-based retrieval chain, and it is therefore possible to process measurements that include multipath. In this paper simulated LEO to LEO radio occultations based on five different frequencies are used. The five frequencies are placed in the XK or KM frequency band. This new wave optics-based retrieval chain is used on a number of examples, and the retrieved atmospheric parameters are compared to the parameters from a global European Centre for Medium

  9. New NASA SEE LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Guidelines: How to Survive in LEO Rather Than GEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Hillard, G. Barry

    2003-01-01

    It has been almost two solar cycles since the 1984 GEO Guidelines of Purvis, Garrett, Whittlesey, and Stevens were published. In that time, interest in high voltage LEO systems has increased. Correct and conventional wisdom has been that LEO conditions are sufficiently different from GEO that the GEO Guidelines (and other GEO and POLAR documents produced since then) should not be used for LEO spacecraft. Because of significant recent GEO spacecraft failures that have been shown in ground testing to be likely to also occur on LEO spacecraft, the SEE program commissioned the production of the new LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Guidelines. Now available in CD-ROM form, the LEO Guidelines highlight mitigation techniques to prevent spacecraft arcing on LEO solar arrays and other systems. We compare and contrast the mitigation techniques for LEO and GEO in this paper. We also discuss the extensive bibliography included in the LEO Guidelines, so results can be found in their primary sources.

  10. Raising a Child in the Punana Leo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iokepa-Guerrero, Noelani

    2008-01-01

    At the Punana Leo everyone, "'Anakala", uncle--a male teacher, "'Anake," aunty--a female teacher, and the "keiki," children all play important roles in the educational program of the school. Each and all are responsible for the learning that takes place and the success of the program. In this article, the author describes the Punana Leo, the only…

  11. Michigan Turns to Leo Goldberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Rudi P.

    2006-12-01

    The death of Heber D. Curtis at the beginning of 1942 emphasized the difficult circumstances facing Michigan's astronomy program. There were no funds to figure or mount the 98" pyrex blank; the 37" reflector labored under floodlights; and the war sapped the graduate program. For a number of years the staff argued over the best path for the future, goaded by the unwelcome intervention of the "amateurs" McMath and Hulbert. The administration brought in outside consultants, attempted to prevent the observatory staff from making separate arrangements, trawled in western waters without success, and took conflicting advice on the future direction of the science. In 1946 the university leadership had, as well, to consider the aftermath of the war: new possibilities in physics, new funding opportunities, a booming student population, and the encapsulation of the observatory within the medical campus. At this time, Leo Goldberg was on the McMath-Hulbert staff, had little to do with the Ann Arbor community, and was considered to be an outsider, beholden to astrophysical theory and his promoters at Harvard. Leo Goldberg's rise from relative obscurity, his transformation from assistant to leader, and the university leadership's assessment of the possibilities for the transformation of a midwest, urban, and traditional program form the topic of this paper, based upon the Michigan and Harvard archives as well as the memories of Goldberg's cohort.

  12. New NASA SEE LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Guidelines: How to Survive in LEO Rather than GEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Hillard, G. Barry

    2004-01-01

    It has been almost two solar cycles since the GEO Guidelines of Purvis et al (1984) were published. In that time, interest in high voltage LEO systems has increased. The correct and conventional wisdom has been that LEO conditions are sufficiently different from GEO that the GEO Guidelines (and other GEO and POLAR documents produced since then) should not be used for LEO spacecraft. Because of significant recent GEO spacecraft failures that have been shown in ground testing to be likely to also occur on LEO spacecraft, the SEE program commissioned the production of the new LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Guidelines (hereafter referred to as the LEO Guidelines). Now available in CD-ROM form, the LEO Guidelines highlight mitigation techniques to prevent spacecraft arcing on LEO solar arrays and other systems. We compare and contrast the mitigation techniques for LEO and GEO in this paper. We also discuss the extensive bibliography included in the LEO Guidelines, so results can be found in their primary sources.

  13. XML Format for SESAME and LEOS

    SciTech Connect

    Durrenberger, J K; Neely, J R; Sterne, P A

    2009-04-29

    The objective of this document is to describe the XML format used by LLNL and LANL to represent the equation-of-state and related material information in the LEOS and SESAME data libraries. The primary purpose of this document is to describe a specific XML format for representing EOS data that is tailored to the nature of the underlying data and is amenable to conversion to both legacy SESAME and LEOS binary formats. The secondary purpose is to describe an XML format that lends itself to a 'natural' representation in a binary file format of the SESAME, pdb or hdf5 form so that this format and related tools can be used for the rapid and efficient development and implementation of prototype data structures. This document describes the XML format only. A working knowledge of LEOS and SESAME formats is assumed.

  14. NASA STD-4005: The LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    2006-01-01

    Power systems with voltages higher than about 55 volts may charge in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) enough to cause destructive arcing. The NASA STD-4005 LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Standard will help spacecraft designers prevent arcing and other deleterious effects on LEO spacecraft. The Appendices, an Information Handbook based on the popular LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Guidelines by Ferguson and Hillard, serve as a useful explanation and accompaniment to the Standard.

  15. NASA 4005: The LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    2006-01-01

    Power systems with voltages higher than about 55 volts may charge in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) enough to cause destructive arcing. The NASA 4005 LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Standard will help spacecraft designers prevent arcing and other deleterious effects on LEO spacecraft. The appendices, based on the popular LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Guidelines by Ferguson and Hillard, serve as a useful information handbook to explain and accompany the standard.

  16. Low-Cost Propellant Launch to LEO from a Tethered Balloon - 'Propulsion Depots' Not 'Propellant Depots'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.; Schneider, Evan G.; Vaughan, David A.; Hall, Jeffrey L.; Yu, Chi Yau

    2011-01-01

    As we have previously reported, it may be possible to launch payloads into low-Earth orbit (LEO) at a per-kilogram cost that is one to two orders of magnitude lower than current launch systems, using only a relatively small capital investment (comparable to a single large present-day launch). An attractive payload would be large quantities of high-performance chemical rocket propellant (e.g. Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Hydrogen (LO2/LH2)) that would greatly facilitate, if not enable, extensive exploration of the moon, Mars, and beyond.

  17. Astrometric Study of Lo 1339

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiramihardja, S. D.; Arifyanto, M. I.; Sugianto, Y.; Kunjaya, C.

    2010-10-01

    We presented a preliminary result of astrometric study of galactic cluster Lo 1339 using proper motion data from UCAC2 catalog. We applied the maximum likelihood method to determine cluster membership by using the proper motion data. The Padova isochrones lines with solar metallicity were fitted upon the Color Magnitude Diagram in near-infrared to derive physical parameters of the cluster, where we obtained the age of cluster log t = 8.4+/-0.2, the distance of 1284+/-140 pc, and the absorption AJ = 0.26+/-0.13 mag with cluster diameter of 4.9+/-0.5 pc.

  18. Leo Strauss: Education and the Body Politic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennell, Jon M.; Simpson, Timothy L.

    2008-01-01

    Leo Strauss is commonly cited as a seminal influence for the neoconservatism that, in the minds of many commentators, dominates the administration of George W. Bush. What intersection, if any, exists between Strauss's views and neoconservatism? This paper investigates that question by studying Strauss's writings on liberal education and assessing…

  19. The Philosophical Politics of Leo Strauss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Maurice

    1985-01-01

    Leo Strauss' views concerning the way to teach political philosophy are discussed. The essay begins with a summary of Strauss' general conception of classical political philosophy. The remainder of the essay discusses the content of Strauss' book "What is Political Philosophy?" (RM)

  20. Challenging Christianity: Leo Tolstoy and Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulin, Dan

    2009-01-01

    The religious thought of Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy is a well documented but often overlooked example of unorthodox Christianity. This paper uses the example of Tolstoy's religious thinking to question the integrity of the current representation of Christianity in UK schools. It also uses Tolstoy's criticism of orthodox Christianity to suggest a…

  1. A COLLISIONAL ORIGIN FOR THE LEO RING

    SciTech Connect

    Michel-Dansac, Leo; Emsellem, Eric; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Bournaud, Frederic; Oosterloo, Tom; Morganti, Raffaella; Serra, Paolo; Ibata, Rodrigo

    2010-07-10

    Extended H I structures around galaxies are of prime importance for probing galaxy formation scenarios. The giant H I ring in the Leo group is one of the largest and most intriguing H I structures in the nearby universe. Whether it consists of primordial gas, as suggested by the apparent absence of any optical counterpart and the absence of an obvious physical connection to nearby galaxies, or of gas expelled from a galaxy in a collision is actively debated. We present deep wide field-of-view optical images of the ring region obtained with MegaCam on the CFHT. They reveal optical counterparts to several H I and UV condensations along the ring, in the g', r', and i' bands, which likely correspond to stellar associations formed within the gaseous ring. Analyzing the spectral energy distribution of one of these star-forming regions, we found it to be typical for a star-forming region in pre-enriched tidal debris. We then use simulations to test the hypothesis that the Leo ring results from a head-on collision between Leo group members NGC 3384 and M96. According to our model which is able to explain, at least qualitatively, the main observational properties of the system, the Leo ring is consistent with being a collisional ring. It is thus likely another example of extended intergalactic gas made-up of pre-enriched collisional debris.

  2. What Happened to Leo P's Metals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of metal abundances in galaxies present a conundrum: compared to expectations, there are not nearly enough metals observed within galaxies. New observations of a nearby dwarf galaxy may help us understand where this enriched material went.Removal ProcessesStar formation is responsible for the build-up of metals (elements heavier than helium) in a galaxy. But when we use a galaxys star-formation history to estimate the amount of enriched material it should contain, our predictions are inconsistent with measured abundances: large galaxies contain only about 2025% of the expected metals, and small dwarf galaxies contain as little as 1%!So what happens to galaxies metals after they have been formed? The favored explanation is that metals are removed from galaxies via stellar feedback: stars that explode in violent supernovae can drive high-speed winds, expelling the enriched material from a galaxy. This process should be more efficient in low-mass galaxies due to their smaller gravitational wells, which would explain why low-mass galaxies have especially low metallicities.But external processes may also contribute to the removal of metals, such as tidal stripping during interactions between galaxies. To determine the role of stellar feedback alone, an ideal test would be to observe an isolated low-mass, star-forming galaxy i.e., one that is not affected by external processes.Luckily, such an isolated, low-mass galaxy has recently been discovered just outside of the Local Group: Leo P, a gas-rich dwarf galaxy with a total stellar mass of 5.6 x 105 solar masses.Isolated ResultsPercentage of oxygen lost in Leo P compared to the percentage of metals lost in three other, similar-size dwarfs that are not isolated. If the gas-phase oxygen in Leo P were removed, Leo Ps measurements would be consistent with those of the other dwarfs. [McQuinn et al. 2015]Led by Kristen McQuinn (University of Minnesota, University of Texas at Austin), a team of researchers has used

  3. Leo Kadanoff's legacy for turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Detlef

    Rayleigh-Benard (RB) convection -- the buoyancy-driven flow of a fluid heated from below and cooled from above -- is a classical problem in fluid dynamics. It played a crucial role in the development of stability theory in hydrodynamics (Rayleigh, Chandrasekhar) and had been paradigmatic in pattern formation and in the study of spatial-temporal chaos (Ahlers, Libchaber, and many other). It was Leo Kadanoff and his associates in Chicago who, in the 1980s and 1990s, propagated the RB system as paradigmatic for the physics of fully developed turbulence and contributed tremendously to today's understanding of thermally driven turbulence. He and his experimental coworkers (Libchaber et al.) revealed the importance of the thermal plumes and the large-scale wind, and elucidated the interplay between thermal boundary layers and bulk. His scaling analysis laid the basis for our present understanding of turbulent convection, which I will review in this talk, highlighting Leo's trailblazing contributions. Kadanoff session.

  4. The NUONCE engine for LEO networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Martin W.; Estabrook, Polly

    1995-01-01

    Typical LEO networks use constellations which provide a uniform coverage. However, the demand for telecom service is dynamic and unevenly distributed around the world. We examine a more efficient and cost effective design by matching the satellite coverage with the cyclical demand for service around the world. Our approach is to use a non-uniform satellite distribution for the network. We have named this constellation design NUONCE for Non Uniform Optimal Network Communications Engine.

  5. Shielded radiation protection quantities beyond LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clowdsley, M. S.; Wilson, J. W.; Kim, M. Y.; Anderson, B. M.; Nealy, J. E.

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has recommended that the quantities used to evaluate health risk to astronauts due to radiation exposure be effective dose and gray-equivalent. The NCRP recommends that effective dose be the limiting quantity for prevention of stochastic effects. Effective dose is a measure of whole body exposure, a weighted average of dose equivalent to a number body tissues for which the NCRP has adopted tissue weighting factors recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). For deterministic effects, the NCRP has recommended that gray-equivalent be used. Gray-equivalent is evaluated for specific critical organs and is the weighted sum of absorbed dose from field components to that organ using the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) number for that field component. RBE numbers recommended by the NCRP are used. The NCRP has provided effective dose limits as well as limits for gray-equivalent to eyes, skin, and blood forming organs (BFO) for astronauts in low earth orbit (LEO). As yet, no such limits have been defined for astronaut operations beyond LEO. In this study, the radiation protection quantities, effective dose and gray-equivalent to the eyes, skin, and BFO, are calculated for several environments beyond LEO. The lunar surface and Martian environments are included. For each environment, these radiation protection quantities are calculated behind varying amounts of various types of shielding materials. The results are compared to the exposure limits for LEO, since limits have not yet been defined for interplanetary missions. The benefits of using shielding material containing hydrogen and choosing optimal mission times are discussed.

  6. Nickel metal hydride LEO cycle testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, Eric

    1995-01-01

    The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is working to characterize aerospace AB5 Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) cells. The cells are being evaluated in terms of storage, low earth orbit (LEO) cycling, and response to parametric testing (high rate charge and discharge, charge retention, pulse current ability, etc.). Cells manufactured by Eagle Picher are the subjects of the evaluation. There is speculation that NiMH cells may become direct replacements for current Nickel Cadmium cells in the near future.

  7. Leo satellite-based telecommunication network concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, John G.; Swan, Peter A.; Leopold, Ray J.

    1991-01-01

    Design considerations are discussed for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite based telecommunications networks. The satellites are assumed to be connected to each other via intersatellite links. They are connected to the end user either directly or through gateways to other networks. Frequency reuse, circuit switching, packet switching, call handoff, and routing for these systems are discussed by analogy with terrestrial cellular (mobile radio) telecommunication systems.

  8. Leo Satellite Communication through a LEO Constellation using TCP/IP Over ATM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foore, Lawrence R.; Konangi, Vijay K.; Wallett, Thomas M.

    1999-01-01

    The simulated performance characteristics for communication between a terrestrial client and a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite server are presented. The client and server nodes consist of a Transmission Control Protocol /Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) over ATM configuration. The ATM cells from the client or the server are transmitted to a gateway, packaged with some header information and transferred to a commercial LEO satellite constellation. These cells are then routed through the constellation to a gateway on the globe that allows the client/server communication to take place. Unspecified Bit Rate (UBR) is specified as the quality of service (QoS). Various data rates are considered.

  9. Instability of the Present LEO Satellite Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2006-01-01

    Several studies conducted during 1991-2001 demonstrated, with some assumed launch rates, the future unintended growth potential of the Earth satellite population, resulting from random, accidental collisions among resident space objects. In some low Earth orbit (LEO) altitude regimes where the number density of satellites is above a critical spatial density, the production rate of new breakup debris due to collisions would exceed the loss of objects due to orbital decay. A new study has been conducted in the Orbital Debris Program Office at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, using higher fidelity models to evaluate the current debris environment. The study assumed no satellites were launched after December 2005. A total of 150 Monte Carlo runs were carried out and analyzed. Each Monte Carlo run simulated the current debris environment and projected it 200 years into the future. The results indicate that the LEO debris environment has reached a point such that even if no further space launches were conducted, the Earth satellite population would remain relatively constant for only the next 50 years or so. Beyond that, the debris population would begin to increase noticeably, due to the production of collisional debris. Detailed analysis shows that this growth is primarily driven by high collision activities around 900 to 1000 km altitude - the region which has a very high concentration of debris at present. In reality, the satellite population growth in LEO will undoubtedly be worse than this study indicates, since spacecraft and their orbital stages will continue to be launched into space. Postmission disposal of vehicles (e.g., limiting postmission orbital lifetimes to less than 25 years) will help, but will be insufficient to constrain the Earth satellite population. To preserve better the near-Earth environment for future space activities, it might be necessary to remove existing large and massive objects from regions where high collision activities are

  10. Leo Szilard. Toward A Livable World.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerjuoy, Edward

    1998-04-01

    For essentially his entire adult life Leo Szilard sought to increase the likelihood that the results of basic scientific research, which especially since World War II have so greatly increased humanity's ability to manipulate the natural world, would be used for humanity's benefit. This talk will review and assess Szilard's endeavors in this quest, to which he so unwaveringly devoted his energies and talents. I also will reflect on the significance of that quest for this audience of scientists who, thirty four years after Szilard's death, have assembled today to honor him.

  11. CDDIS Support of IGS LEO Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Carey E.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) has served as a global data center for the International GPS Service (IGS) since its start in June 1992, providing on-line access to data from over 175 sites on a daily and hourly basis. This paper will present an overview about the current status of the CDDIS GPS data and products archive with a look to the future support of LEO (Low Earth Orbiting missions), including the archive of high-rate data and on-board GPS receiver data.

  12. Individual Pressure Vessel (PV) and Common Pressure Vessel (CPV) Nickel-Hydrogen Battery Performance Under LEO Cycling Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Thomas B.; Lewis, Harlan L.

    2004-01-01

    LEO life cycle testing of Individual Pressure Vessel (PV) and Common Pressure Vessel (CPV) nickel-hydrogen cell packs have been sponsored by the NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Program. The cell packs have cycled under both 35% and 60% depth-of- discharge and temperature conditions of -5 C and +lO C. The packs have been on test since as early as 1992 and have generated a substantial database. This report will provide insight into performance trends as a function of the specific cell configuration and manufacturer for eight separate nickel-hydrogen battery cell packs.

  13. 20 CFR 10.737 - How is a LEO claim filed, and who can file a LEO claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is a LEO claim filed, and who can file a LEO claim? 10.737 Section 10.737 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS...' COMPENSATION ACT, AS AMENDED Special Provisions Non-Federal Law Enforcement Officers § 10.737 How is a...

  14. LEO Flight Experience On MPS Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reulier, D.; Remy, S.; Mosset, E.; Carre, A.

    2011-10-01

    5 years after the qualification of the MPS176065 Li-ion battery for microsatellite, achieved with CNES Toulouse support, the module has been embedded on board several spacecrafts. The qualified module in 8S3P arrangement has been also derived in similar 7S3P, 6S1P and 8S6P flight configurations. The different battery configurations and associated missions will be presented, at the same time as flight status. Some missions are already finished and completed with success, whereas some others are running, or are to be launched. The proven sustainable levels and associated margins will be remembered with also a status of the life tests results (more than 63000 cycles achieved today in LEO typical mission conditions). Taking into account that more than 50 battery modules have been manufactured at the present time, the paper will describe main lessons learnt on the technical, process and industrial point of view. On orbit available and disclosable data will be shown to confirm the real performances and reliability of the MPS batteries. A specific chapter will present the comparison of some telemetry flight data correlated with SLIM software model predictions during LEO orbits. At the end of this presentation, a logical transition will emphasize the reasons for VES16 Li-ion cells development. It will include the main benefits given by the VES16 Li-ion cell compared to the current MPS cell especially aiming to extend the mission duration up to more than 12 years.

  15. POSSIBLE CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN AD LEO

    SciTech Connect

    Buccino, Andrea P.; Petrucci, Romina; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Jofré, Emiliano

    2014-01-20

    AD Leo (GJ 388) is an active dM3 flare star that has been extensively observed both in the quiescent and flaring states. Since this active star is near the fully convective boundary, studying its long-term chromospheric activity in detail could be an appreciable contribution to dynamo theory. Here, using the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, we analyze the Ca II K line-core fluxes derived from CASLEO spectra obtained between 2001 and 2013 and the V magnitude from the ASAS database between 2004 and 2010. From both of these totally independent time series, we obtain a possible activity cycle with a period of approximately seven years and a less significant shorter cycle of approximately two years. A tentative interpretation is that a dynamo operating near the surface could be generating the longer cycle, while a second dynamo operating in the deep convection zone could be responsible for the shorter one. Based on the long duration of our observing program at CASLEO and the fact that we observe different spectral features simultaneously, we also analyze the relation between simultaneous measurements of the Na I index (R{sub D}{sup ′}), Hα, and Ca II K fluxes at different activity levels of AD Leo, including flares.

  16. LoWMob: Intra-PAN Mobility Support Schemes for 6LoWPAN.

    PubMed

    Bag, Gargi; Raza, Muhammad Taqi; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Yoo, Seung-Wha

    2009-01-01

    Mobility in 6LoWPAN (IPv6 over Low Power Personal Area Networks) is being utilized in realizing many applications where sensor nodes, while moving, sense and transmit the gathered data to a monitoring server. By employing IEEE802.15.4 as a baseline for the link layer technology, 6LoWPAN implies low data rate and low power consumption with periodic sleep and wakeups for sensor nodes, without requiring them to incorporate complex hardware. Also enabling sensor nodes with IPv6 ensures that the sensor data can be accessed anytime and anywhere from the world. Several existing mobility-related schemes like HMIPv6, MIPv6, HAWAII, and Cellular IP require active participation of mobile nodes in the mobility signaling, thus leading to the mobility-related changes in the protocol stack of mobile nodes. In this paper, we present LoWMob, which is a network-based mobility scheme for mobile 6LoWPAN nodes in which the mobility of 6LoWPAN nodes is handled at the network-side. LoWMob ensures multi-hop communication between gateways and mobile nodes with the help of the static nodes within a 6LoWPAN. In order to reduce the signaling overhead of static nodes for supporting mobile nodes, LoWMob proposes a mobility support packet format at the adaptation layer of 6LoWPAN. Also we present a distributed version of LoWMob, named as DLoWMob (or Distributed LoWMob), which employs Mobility Support Points (MSPs) to distribute the traffic concentration at the gateways and to optimize the multi-hop routing path between source and destination nodes in a 6LoWPAN. Moreover, we have also discussed the security considerations for our proposed mobility schemes. The performance of our proposed schemes is evaluated in terms of mobility signaling costs, end-to-end delay, and packet success ratio. PMID:22346730

  17. Advanced propulsion for LEO-Moon transport. 2: Tether configurations in the LEO-Moon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. R.; Thompson, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    This brief work discusses a possible application of a tether as a dynamical element in a low Earth orbit (LEO)-Moon transport system, and is a part of the Cal Space study of that transport system. To be specific, that study concentrated on the downward transport of O2 from the Moon to LEO, where it is stored for use as a rocket propellant, thus reducing Earth liftoff mass requirements by a factor of about 8. Moreover, in order to display clearly the role of advanced technology, only one novel technology was introduced at a single node in the transport system, the rest being 'conventional' rocket transport. Tethers were found useful in several different roles: hanging from platforms in lunar orbits, as supports for elevators, spinning in LEO, or spinning in a tether transport orbit, an elliptical orbit with perigee at approximately 600 km. This last use is considered here. Presented are the usefulness of the tether, nature of the tether system, the apparatus needed to support, deploy, and control it, and a discussion of needed developments.

  18. Demonstration of Uncued Optical Surveillance of LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, P.; Ackermann, M.; McGraw, J.

    2014-09-01

    J.T. McGraw and Associates, LLC, in collaboration with the University of New Mexico (UNM), has built and is operating two proof-of-concept wide-field imaging systems to test novel techniques for uncued surveillance of LEO. The imaging systems are built from off-the-shelf optics and detectors resulting in a 350mm aperture and a 6 square degree field of view. For streak detection, field of view is of critical importance because the maximum exposure time on the object is limited by its crossing time and measurements of apparent angular motion are better constrained with longer streaks. The current match of the detector to the optical system is optimized for detection of objects at altitudes above 450km, which for a circular orbit, corresponds to apparent motions of approximately 1 deg./sec. Using our GPU-accelerated detection scheme, the proof-of-concept systems have detected objects fainter than V=12.3, which approximately corresponds to a 24 cm object at 1000 km altitude at better than 6 sigma significance, from sites near and within Albuquerque, NM. This work demonstrates scalable optical systems designed for near real time detection of fast moving objects, which can be then handed off to other instruments capable of tracking and characterizing them. The two proof-of-concept systems, separated by ~30km, work together by taking simultaneous images of the same orbital volume to constrain the orbits of detected objects using parallax measurements. These detections are followed-up by photometric observations taken at UNM to independently assess the objects and the quality of the derived orbits. We believe this demonstrates the potential of small telescope arrays for detecting and cataloguing heretofore unknown LEO objects.

  19. Specialized and independent processing of orientation and shape in visual field maps LO1 and LO2.

    PubMed

    Silson, Edward H; McKeefry, Declan J; Rodgers, Jessica; Gouws, Andre D; Hymers, Mark; Morland, Antony B

    2013-03-01

    We identified human visual field maps, LO1 and LO2, in object-selective lateral occipital cortex. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we assessed the functions of these maps in the perception of orientation and shape. TMS of LO1 disrupted orientation, but not shape, discrimination, whereas TMS of LO2 disrupted shape, but not orientation, discrimination. This double dissociation suggests that specialized and independent processing of different visual attributes occurs in LO1 and LO2. PMID:23377127

  20. Leo P: An Unquenched Very Low-mass Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew; Cannon, John M.; Salzer, John J.; Rhode, Katherine L.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Berg, Danielle; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Girardi, Léo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2015-10-01

    Leo P is a low-luminosity dwarf galaxy discovered through the blind H i Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey. The H i and follow-up optical observations have shown that Leo P is a gas-rich dwarf galaxy with active star formation, an underlying older population, and an extremely low oxygen abundance. We have obtained optical imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope to two magnitudes below the red clump in order to study the evolution of Leo P. We refine the distance measurement to Leo P to be 1.62 ± 0.15 Mpc, based on the luminosity of the horizontal branch stars and 10 newly identified RR Lyrae candidates. This places the galaxy at the edge of the Local Group, ˜0.4 Mpc from Sextans B, the nearest galaxy in the NGC 3109 association of dwarf galaxies of which Leo P is clearly a member. The star responsible for ionizing the H ii region is most likely an O7V or O8V spectral type, with a stellar mass ≳25 M⊙. The presence of this star provides observational evidence that massive stars at the upper end of the initial mass function are capable of being formed at star formation rates as low as ˜10-5 M⊙ yr-1. The best-fitting star formation history (SFH) derived from the resolved stellar populations of Leo P using the latest PARSEC models shows a relatively constant star formation rate over the lifetime of the galaxy. The modeled luminosity characteristics of Leo P at early times are consistent with low-luminosity dSph Milky Way satellites, suggesting that Leo P is what a low-mass dSph would look like if it evolved in isolation and retained its gas. Despite the very low mass of Leo P, the imprint of reionization on its SFH is subtle at best, and consistent with being totally negligible. The isolation of Leo P, and the total quenching of star formation of Milky Way satellites of similar mass, implies that the local environment dominates the quenching of the Milky Way satellites. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST), obtained from the

  1. Leo Szilard In Physics and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwin, Richard

    2014-03-01

    The excellent biography by William Lanouette, ``Genius in the Shadows,'' tells it the way it was, incredible though it may seem. The 1972 ``Collected Works of Leo Szilard: Scientific Papers'' Bernard T. Feld and Getrude W. Szilard, Editors, gives the source material both published and unpublished. Szilard's path-breaking but initially little-noticed 1929 paper, ``On the Decrease of Entropy in a Thermodynamic System by the Intervention of Intelligent Beings'' spawned much subsequent research. It connected what we now call a bit of information with a quantity k ln 2 of entropy, and showed that the process of acquiring, exploiting, and resetting this information in a one-molecule engine must dissipate at least kT ln 2 of energy at temperature T. His 1925 paper, ``On the Extension of Phenomenological Thermodynamics to Fluctuation Phenomena,'' showed that fluctuations were consistent with and predicted from equilibrium thermodynamics and did not depend on atomistic theories. His work on physics and technology, demonstrated an astonishing range of interest, ingenuity, foresight, and practical sense. I illustrate this with several of his fundamental contributions nuclear physics, to the neutron chain reaction and to nuclear reactors, and also to electromagnetic pumping of liquid metals.

  2. Precision Pointing of IBEX-Lo Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hłond, M.; Bzowski, M.; Möbius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Heirtzler, D.; Schwadron, N. A.; O'Neill, M. E.; Clark, G.; Crew, G. B.; Fuselier, S.; McComas, D. J.

    2012-02-01

    Post-launch boresight of the IBEX-Lo instrument on board the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is determined based on IBEX-Lo Star Sensor observations. Accurate information on the boresight of the neutral gas camera is essential for precise determination of interstellar gas flow parameters. Utilizing spin-phase information from the spacecraft attitude control system (ACS), positions of stars observed by the Star Sensor during two years of IBEX measurements were analyzed and compared with positions obtained from a star catalog. No statistically significant differences were observed beyond those expected from the pre-launch uncertainty in the Star Sensor mounting. Based on the star observations and their positions in the spacecraft reference system, pointing of the IBEX satellite spin axis was determined and compared with the pointing obtained from the ACS. Again, no statistically significant deviations were observed. We conclude that no systematic correction for boresight geometry is needed in the analysis of IBEX-Lo observations to determine neutral interstellar gas flow properties. A stack-up of uncertainties in attitude knowledge shows that the instantaneous IBEX-Lo pointing is determined to within ~0fdg1 in both spin angle and elevation using either the Star Sensor or the ACS. Further, the Star Sensor can be used to independently determine the spacecraft spin axis. Thus, Star Sensor data can be used reliably to correct the spin phase when the Star Tracker (used by the ACS) is disabled by bright objects in its field of view. The Star Sensor can also determine the spin axis during most orbits and thus provides redundancy for the Star Tracker.

  3. PRECISION POINTING OF IBEX-Lo OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hlond, M.; Bzowski, M.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Heirtzler, D.; Schwadron, N. A.; Neill, M. E. O'; Clark, G.; Crew, G. B.; Fuselier, S.; McComas, D. J. E-mail: eberhard.moebius@unh.edu E-mail: stephen.a.fuselier@linco.com E-mail: DMcComas@swri.edu

    2012-02-01

    Post-launch boresight of the IBEX-Lo instrument on board the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is determined based on IBEX-Lo Star Sensor observations. Accurate information on the boresight of the neutral gas camera is essential for precise determination of interstellar gas flow parameters. Utilizing spin-phase information from the spacecraft attitude control system (ACS), positions of stars observed by the Star Sensor during two years of IBEX measurements were analyzed and compared with positions obtained from a star catalog. No statistically significant differences were observed beyond those expected from the pre-launch uncertainty in the Star Sensor mounting. Based on the star observations and their positions in the spacecraft reference system, pointing of the IBEX satellite spin axis was determined and compared with the pointing obtained from the ACS. Again, no statistically significant deviations were observed. We conclude that no systematic correction for boresight geometry is needed in the analysis of IBEX-Lo observations to determine neutral interstellar gas flow properties. A stack-up of uncertainties in attitude knowledge shows that the instantaneous IBEX-Lo pointing is determined to within {approx}0.{sup 0}1 in both spin angle and elevation using either the Star Sensor or the ACS. Further, the Star Sensor can be used to independently determine the spacecraft spin axis. Thus, Star Sensor data can be used reliably to correct the spin phase when the Star Tracker (used by the ACS) is disabled by bright objects in its field of view. The Star Sensor can also determine the spin axis during most orbits and thus provides redundancy for the Star Tracker.

  4. Leishmania infantum infection in two captive barbary lions (Panthera leo leo).

    PubMed

    Libert, Cédric; Ravel, Christophe; Pratlong, Francine; Lami, Patrick; Dereure, Jacques; Keck, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    A female barbary lion (Panthera leo leo) from the Montpellier Zoological Park (France) showing colitis, epistaxis, and lameness with pad ulcers was positive by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Leishmania infantum. Further indirect immunofluorescence (IFAT) tests on the banked sera from all lions of the park detected another infected but asymptomatic female, which was confirmed by PCR on ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) blood sample. Leishmania infantum zymodeme MON-1 was cultured from EDTA bone marrow samples sampled from this second animal. The first female was successfully treated with marbofloxacine at 2 mg/kg s.i.d. for 28 days (Marbocyl, Vetoquinol 70204 Lure, France) and allopurinol at 30 mg/kg s.i.d. for 3 mo (Allopurinol Mylan, Mylan SAS, 69800 Saint-Priest, France) and then 1 wk/mo. Both positive animals were born at the Rabat Zoological Park, Morocco, and arrived together at Montpellier in 2003. The chronicity and source of this current infection are unknown since Morocco and southern France are well-known to be enzootic for leishmaniasis. PMID:23082544

  5. TT and C - First TDRSS, Then Commercial GEO and Big LEO and Now through LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Dwayne; Bull, Barton; Grant, Charles; Streich, Ronald; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The advent of low earth orbit (LEO) commercial communications satellites provides an opportunity to dramatically reduce Telemetry Tracking and Control (TT&C) costs of launch vehicles and Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) by reducing or eliminating ground infrastructure. Personnel from the Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC/WFF) in Virginia have successfully used commercial GEO & Big LEO communications satellites for Long Duration Balloon flight TT&C. In addition, TDRSS capability for these balloons has been developed by WFF for the Ultra Long Duration Balloons with the first test flight launch in January 2001 for one global circumnavigation at 120,000 feet altitude launched from Alice Springs. Australia. Numerous other low cost applications can new utilize the commercial LEO satellites for TT&C. The Flight Modern became a GSFC/WFF Advanced Range Technology Initiative (ARTI) in an effort to streamline TT&C capability to the user community at low cost. Phase I ground tests of The Flight Modem verified downlink communications quality of service and measured transmission latencies. These tests were completed last year, Phase II consisting of aircraft flight tests provide much of the data presented in this paper. Phase III of the Flight Modern baseline test program is a demonstration of the ruggedized version of the WFF Flight Modem flown on one sounding rocket launched from Sweden. Flights of opportunity have been and are being actively pursued with other centers, ranges and users at universities. The WFF goal is to reduce TT&C costs by providing a low cost COTS Flight Modem with a User Handbook containing system capability and limitation descriptions. Additionally, since data transmission is by packetized Internet Protocol (IP), data can be received and commands initialed from practically any location with no infrastructure. The WFF, like most ranges, has been using GPS receivers on sounding rockets and long duration balloons for several years

  6. System using leo satellites for centimeter-level navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabinowitz, Matthew (Inventor); Parkinson, Bradford W. (Inventor); Cohen, Clark E. (Inventor); Lawrence, David G. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a system for rapidly resolving position with centimeter-level accuracy for a mobile or stationary receiver [4]. This is achieved by estimating a set of parameters that are related to the integer cycle ambiguities which arise in tracking the carrier phase of satellite downlinks [5,6]. In the preferred embodiment, the technique involves a navigation receiver [4] simultaneously tracking transmissions [6] from Low Earth Orbit Satellites (LEOS) [2] together with transmissions [5] from GPS navigation satellites [1]. The rapid change in the line-of-sight vectors from the receiver [4] to the LEO signal sources [2], due to the orbital motion of the LEOS, enables the resolution with integrity of the integer cycle ambiguities of the GPS signals [5] as well as parameters related to the integer cycle ambiguity on the LEOS signals [6]. These parameters, once identified, enable real-time centimeter-level positioning of the receiver [4]. In order to achieve high-precision position estimates without the use of specialized electronics such as atomic clocks, the technique accounts for instabilities in the crystal oscillators driving the satellite transmitters, as well as those in the reference [3] and user [4] receivers. In addition, the algorithm accommodates as well as to LEOS that receive signals from ground-based transmitters, then re-transmit frequency-converted signals to the ground.

  7. A Novel Spacecraft Charge Monitor for LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goembel, Luke

    2004-01-01

    Five years ago we introduced a new method for measuring spacecraft chassis floating potential relative to the space plasma (absolute spacecraft potential) in low Earth orbit. The method, based on a straightforward interpretation of photoelectron spectra, shows promise for numerous applications, but has not yet been tried. In the interest of testing the method, and ultimately supplying another tool for measuring absolute spacecraft charge, we are producing a flight prototype Spacecraft Charge Monitor (SCM) with support from NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. Although insight into the technique came from data collected in space over two decades ago, very little data are available. The data indicate that it may be possible to determine spacecraft floating potential to within 0.1 volt each with the SCM second under certain conditions. It is debatable that spacecraft floating potential has ever been measured with such accuracy. The compact, easily deployed SCM also offers the advantage of long-term stability in calibration. Accurate floating potential determinations from the SCM could be used to correct biases in space plasma measurements and evaluate charge mitigation and/or sensing devices. Although this paper focuses on the device's use in low Earth orbit (LEO), the device may also be able to measure spacecraft charge at higher altitudes, in the solar wind, and in orbits around other planets. The flight prototype SCM we are producing for delivery to NASA in the third quarter of 2004 will measure floating potential from 0 to -150 volts with 0.1 volt precision, weigh approximately 600-700 grams, consume approximately 2 watts, and will measure approximately 8 x 10 x 17 cm.

  8. An Update on the Effectiveness of Postmission Disposal in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C; Krisko, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Orbital debris mitigation measures have been developed to reduce the growth of the future debris population by the international space community over the past two decades. A major component in the overall mitigation strategy is postmission disposal (PMD). A key PMD element for the low Earth orbit (LEO, the region below 2000 km altitude) satellites is the 25-year decay rule. It is intended to limit the long-term presence of massive intact objects - rocket bodies (R/Bs) and spacecraft (S/C) in the environment. The effectiveness of the 25-year rule was well demonstrated and documented during the development of the mitigation measures. The orbital debris population in LEO, unfortunately, has significantly increased since that time. The objectives of this paper are to provide an updated assessment based on the 2012 LEO environment and to highlight the importance of the global compliance of the 25-year decay rule.

  9. Solar Array Arcing in LEO How Much Charge is Discharged?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.; Vayner, B. V.; Galofaro, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    It is often said that only the solar array or spacecraft surface that can be reached by an arc plume are discharged in a solar array arc in LEO (Low Earth Orbit). We present definitive results from ground test experiments done in the National Plasma Interactions (N-PI) facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center that this idea is mistaken. All structure surfaces in contact with the surrounding plasma and connected to spacecraft ground are discharged, whether the arc plasma can reach them or not. Implications from the strength and damaging effects of areas on LEO spacecraft are discussed, and mitigation techniques are proposed.

  10. Leo I - The youngest Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Myung G.; Freedman, Wendy; Mateo, Mario; Thompson, Ian; Roth, Miguel; Ruiz, Maria-Teresa

    1993-01-01

    Deep CCD photometry of about 16,000 stars in the Milky Way's Leo I spheroidal galaxy satellite is reported. An account is given of the features observed in the color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) derived therefrom. A very blue and well-defined red giant branch (RGB) is noted. The CMDs of Leo I shows about 50 anomalous Cepheid candidates; there are another 50 or so asymptotic giant branch stars above the tip of the RGB, including 15 known carbon stars. The mean color of the RGB is estimated at M sub I = -3.5 mag.

  11. Variable stars in the Leo A dwarf galaxy (DDO 69)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoessel, John G.; Saha, A.; Krist, John; Danielson, G. Edward

    1994-01-01

    Observations of the Leo A dwarf galaxy, obtained over the period from 1980 to 1991 are reported. Forty two separate Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) frames were searched for variable stars. A total of 14 suspected variables were found, 9 had sufficient coverage for period determination, and 5 had Cepheid light curves. Four of these stars fit well on a P-L relation and yield a distance modulus, after correction for Galactic foreground extinction, of m-M = 26.74. This corresponds to a distance of 2.2 Mpc, placing Leo A near the Local Group zero-velocity surface.

  12. Lo Gnomone Clementino Astronomia Meridiana in Basilica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2014-05-01

    Costruito per chiara volontà del papa 70 anni dopo il caso Galileo, lo Gnomone Clementino è un grande telescopio solare che non fa uso di lenti a 92 anni dall’invenzione del cannocchiale. Queste due caratteristiche basterebbero da sole a giustificare l’interesse verso questo strumento. L’astronomia meridiana è alla base dell’astrometria e dell’astrofisica moderna. Lo Gnomone Clementino sta oggi all’astronomia, come il veliero “Amerigo Vespucci” sta alla Marina Italiana. E’ possibile svolgere ogni genere di osservazione e studio su questo strumento, e dal 2002 vi tengo lezioni teorico-pratiche del corso di Storia dell’Astronomia e La Terra nel Sistema Solare della Sapienza, Università di Roma, Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia. Questo testo aggiunge alcuni tasselli alla ricerca storica sulla meridiana, appoggiandosi, com’è naturale, sulle spalle di giganti che mi hanno preceduto in questi studi. In particolare la misura dell’azimut della meridiana, ed il suo inquadramento tra gli strumenti simili ed alcuni studi di astrometria sui dati del 1701-1703 di Bianchini, che sono apparsi fin’ora soltanto su riviste specializzate ed in Inglese vengono qui proposti in Italiano e semplificati, per valorizzare sempre più questa straordinaria opera d’arte e di scienza.

  13. Starspots on LO Pegasi, 2006-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Chalmers, Mark; Geda, Robel; Henry, Brandi; Sliupas, Viesulas

    2016-01-01

    LO Pegasi is a rapidly rotating (P = 10.154 hr) young solar analog (spectral class K5-7V) variable star of BY Dra type that exhibits dark starspots on its surface that modulate its brightness as they are carried into and out of view by the star's rotation. Surface maps of the spot distribution were produced based on BVRI photometry obtained at Perkins Observatory from 2006-2015. The maps were generated from the light curves via a non-linear inversion algorithm that uses the differences in the limb darkening through different filter passbands to improve the latitude resolution of the maps. We present an analysis of variations in the size of a polar spot suggested by changes in the average brightness and the amplitude of the rotational modulation from year to year.

  14. Starspots on LO Pegasi, 2006-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Berry, Dominique; Chalmers, Mark; Denison, Josh; Stevens, Don; Yuhas, Kaylee

    2015-01-01

    BVRI light curves of LO Pegasi obtained at Perkins Observatory (Ohio Wesleyan University) from 2006-2014 were used to study the evolution of starspots on its surface over that interval. We present surface maps obtained via a constrained non-linear inversion algorithm that uses variations in limb darkening as seen through different filters to improve the latitude resolution of the reconstructions. In addition, a detailed period analysis of the entire data set using the ANOVA method was performed to search for variations associated with differential rotation. No evidence of period change was found, as the periods for each year were equal to within their uncertainties. For the data set as a whole, the period of rotation was determined to be 10.1538 ± 0.0009 hr, in agreement with previously published results.

  15. Stellar Surface Imaging of LO Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Rachel; Moore, Conrad; Harmon, Robert

    2008-10-01

    We present images of dark starspots on the surface of the K8 main-sequence star LO Pegasi. CCD camera images of the star and surrounding field were acquired through B, V, R and I filters at Perkins Observatory in Delaware, OH on clear nights in June and July, 2008. The images were dark-subtracted and flat-fielded and then aperture photometry was performed to yield light curves through each of the four filters. These light curves were then simultaneously inverted via an algorithm devised by one of us (Harmon) so as to yield images of the spots based on the rotational modulation they produced in the light curves. The use of multiple filters significantly improves the latitude resolution of the reconstructions. Comparison of our results with results from 2006 and 2007 shows that the spot structure was more complex in 2008 than in the prior years.

  16. Neoconservatism and Leo Strauss: The Place of a Liberal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, J. G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the work of Leo Strauss, specifically his two essays on liberal education. Strauss is often claimed to be a founding thinker of neoconservatism and while much scholarship has been produced analyzing his work, very little discusses his essays on liberal education and how these fit within his larger project. This essay…

  17. Saint Leo University: A Values-Based Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Beth H.

    2009-01-01

    Saint Leo University is committed to integrating values in its curriculum and activities; however, there is little information available to determine if it is meeting its goals. The institution offers both a traditional program and nontraditional accelerated program. Therefore, it is important for the institution to determine if it is instilling…

  18. Sowing the Seeds of the Autism Field: Leo Kanner (1943)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blacher, Jan; Christensen, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    More than 65 years after Leo Kanner published his seminal article, research on autism continues to be an area of increasing interest. Although much progress has been made, this field is still in its infancy, and many avenues of research are just beginning to be pursued. Despite the time that has passed, the syndrome Kanner identified and his…

  19. Global regulation of heterochromatin spreading by Leo1

    PubMed Central

    Verrier, Laure; Taglini, Francesca; Barrales, Ramon R.; Webb, Shaun; Urano, Takeshi; Braun, Sigurd; Bayne, Elizabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    Heterochromatin plays important roles in eukaryotic genome regulation. However, the repressive nature of heterochromatin combined with its propensity to self-propagate necessitates robust mechanisms to contain heterochromatin within defined boundaries and thus prevent silencing of expressed genes. Here we show that loss of the PAF complex (PAFc) component Leo1 compromises chromatin boundaries, resulting in invasion of heterochromatin into flanking euchromatin domains. Similar effects are seen upon deletion of other PAFc components, but not other factors with related functions in transcription-associated chromatin modification, indicating a specific role for PAFc in heterochromatin regulation. Loss of Leo1 results in reduced levels of H4K16 acetylation at boundary regions, while tethering of the H4K16 acetyltransferase Mst1 to boundary chromatin suppresses heterochromatin spreading in leo1Δ cells, suggesting that Leo1 antagonises heterochromatin spreading by promoting H4K16 acetylation. Our findings reveal a previously undescribed role for PAFc in regulating global heterochromatin distribution. PMID:25972440

  20. LittLEO: A commercial European small launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, S.

    1989-05-01

    A small satellite laucher based on existing components and technology is being planned by a group of European companies. From its first operational base in Andoya, in northern Norway. LittLEO will put over 700 kg into a 300 km polar orbit. The equatorial capability will be nearly one ton. The development plan leading to a first launch in three years is discussed.

  1. Satellite Telemetry and Command using Big LEO Mobile Telecommunications Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huegel, Fred

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with satellite telemetry and command using Big LEO mobile telecommunications systems are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Commercial Satellite system overviews: Globalstar, ICO, and Iridium; 2) System capabilities and cost reduction; 3) Satellite constellations and contact limitations; 4) Capabilities of Globalstar, ICO and Iridium with emphasis on Globalstar; and 5) Flight transceiver issues and security.

  2. Severe intestinal coccidiosis in a newborn lion (Panthera leo)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe coccidiosis was found in sections of small intestine of a less than 2 day old lion (Panthera leo) born in captivity. Schizonts, merozoites, gamonts, and unsporulated oocysts were located in epithelial cells of ileum. Ultrastructural examination indicated that schizonts divided by schizogony. ...

  3. Exploiting link dynamics in LEO-to-ground communications

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Joseph Mcrae; Caffrey, Michael P

    2009-01-01

    The high dynamics of the LEO-to-ground radio channel are described. An analysis shows how current satellite radio systems largely underutilize the available radio link, and that a radio that can adaptively vary the bit rate can more fully exploit it, resulting in increased data throughput and improved power efficiency. We propose one method for implementing the adaptivity, and present simulation results.

  4. Starspots on LO Pegasi, 2006-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Cole, B.; Denison, J.; Gray, K.

    2014-01-01

    LO Pegasi is a K8 main-sequence variable of BY Dra type, exhibiting dark starspots on its surface which modulate its brightness as they are carried into and out of view by the star's rotation. We present the results of BVRI photometry obtained at Perkins Observatory in Delaware, OH from 2006-2013. The light curve shape and by implication the spot configuration is stable on a time scale of several months, but shows substantial year-to-year variations. In particular, the V modulation was a maximum of approximately 0.15 mag in June-July 2011, and a minimum of approximately 0.04 mag in 2012 and 2013. In addition, the mean brightness was lowest in 2012, suggesting the growth of a large spot on the visible rotation pole, which would simultaneously account for the small modulation and lowered mean brightness. In 2013, the mean brightness increased by about 0.05 mag compared to 2012, suggesting that the polar spot is shrinking in size.

  5. Advances in LO2 Propellant Conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Gopal; Orth, Michael; Stone, William; Perry, Gretchen; Holt, Kimberly; Suter, John

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the cryogenic testing and analysis that has recently been completed as part of a multi-year effort to develop a new, more robust and operable LO2 propellant conditioning system. Phase 1 of the program consisted of feasibility demonstrations ot four novel propellant conditioning concepts. A no-bleed, passive propellant conditioning option was shown for the first time to successfully provide desired propellant inlet conditions. The benefits of passive conditioning are reduced operations costs, decreased hardware costs, enhanced operability and increased reliability on future expendable launch vehicles In Phase 2 of the test program, effects of major design parameters were studied and design correlation for future vehicle design were developed. Simultaneously, analytical models were developed and validated. Over 100 tests were conducted with a full-scale feedline using LN2 as the test fluid. A circulation pump provided a range of pressure and flow conditions. The test results showed that the passive propellant conditioning system is insensitive to variations in many of the parameters. The test program provides the validation necessary to incorporate the passive conditioning system into the baseline of future vehicles. Modeling of these systems using computational fluid dynamics seems highly promising.

  6. Stellar Populations in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Leo I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Filippina; Cassisi, Santi; Castellani, Marco; Marconi, Gianni; Santolamazza, Patrizia

    1999-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Leo I, based on archival Hubble Space Telescope data. Our photometric analysis, confirming previous results on the brighter portion of the CMD, also allow us to obtain an accurate sampling of the stellar populations at the faint magnitudes corresponding to the main sequence. By adopting a homogeneous and consistent theoretical scenario for both hydrogen and central helium-burning evolutionary phases, the various features observed in the CMD are interpreted and reliable estimates for both the distance modulus and the age(s) of the main stellar components of Leo I are derived. In more detail, from the upper luminosity of the red giant branch and the lower luminosity of the subgiant branch we simultaneously constrain the galaxy distance and the age of the oldest stellar population in Leo I. In this way we obtain a distance modulus (m-M)_V=22.00+/-0.15 mag and an age of 10-15 Gyr or 9-13 Gyr, adopting a metallicity of Z=0.0001 or 0.0004, respectively. The reliability of this distance modulus has been tested by comparing the observed distribution of the Leo I anomalous Cepheids in the period-magnitude diagram with the predicted boundaries of the instability strip as given by convective pulsating models. A detailed investigation of the age(s) of the Leo I stellar populations is then performed by comparing the CMD with a suitable set of theoretical isochrones and central helium-burning models. By taking into account all the various features, including the lack of RR Lyrae variables, we conclude that the star formation process in Leo I started ~10 Gyr (with Z=0.0001) or ~13 Gyr (with Z=0.0004) ago, and stopped about 1 Gyr ago. Some evidence is reported supporting the mild metal deficiency (Z=0.0004), whereas no clear indication has been found supporting a star formation history characterized by episodic bursts. The adoption of updated physics, including the inward diffusion of

  7. Carbon deposition characteristics of LO2/HC propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Rosemary; Mercer, Steve D.

    1987-01-01

    The generation and deposition of carbon have been studied using subscale hardware with LO2/RP-1, LO2/propane, and LO2/methane at low mixture ratio conditions. The deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60, and at chamber pressures from 720 to 1650 psia. The carbon-deposition rate is a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. There is a mixture ratio that will minimize deposition for LO2/RP-1; a threshold mixture ratio for LO2/propane; and no deposition for LO2/methane at any mixture ratio tested. The turbine drive operating limits were defined for each fuel tested.

  8. LEO to ground optical communications from a small satellite platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, T. S.; Janson, S. W.; LaLumondiere, S.; Werner, N.; Hinkley, D. H.; Rowen, D. W.; Fields, R. A.; Welle, R. P.

    2015-03-01

    A pair of 2.2 kg CubeSats using COTS hardware is being developed for a proof-of-principle optical communications demo from a 450-600 km LEO orbit to ground. The 10x10x15 cm platform incorporates a 25% wall-plug efficient 10-W Yb fiber transmitter emitting at 1.06 μm. Since there are no gimbals on board, the entire spacecraft is body-steered toward the ground station. The pointing accuracy of the LEO craft, which governs the data rate capability, is expected to be ~ 0.1-0.2 deg. Two optical ground stations, located at the Mt. Wilson observatory, have receiver apertures of 30 and 80 cm. Launch of the CubeSat pair is anticipated to be mid to late 2015.

  9. LEO high voltage solar array arcing response model, continuation 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metz, Roger N.

    1989-01-01

    The modeling of the Debye Approximation electron sheaths in the edge and strip geometries was completed. Electrostatic potentials in these sheaths were compared to NASCAP/LEO solutions for similar geometries. Velocity fields, charge densities and particle fluxes to the biased surfaces were calculated for all cases. The major conclusion to be drawn from the comparisons of our Debye Approximation calculations with NASCAP-LEO output is that, where comparable biased structures can be defined and sufficient resolution obtained, these results are in general agreement. Numerical models for the Child-Langmuir, high-voltage electron sheaths in the edge and strip geometries were constructed. Electrostatic potentials were calculated for several cases in each of both geometries. Velocity fields and particle fluxes were calculated. The self-consistent solution process was carried through one cycle and output electrostatic potentials compared to NASCAP-type input potentials.

  10. Leo Szilard: Physics, Politics, and the Narrow Margin of Hope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanouette, William

    1998-04-01

    Leo Szilard (1898-1964) was a creative physicist and biologist. But concern about how scientific discoveries might affect humanity also led him to seek political solutions to enlarge the benefits and limit the damage caused by his work. This disposition to save the world came to Szilard by the age of 10, when he read The Tragedy of Man, a Hungarian epic poem in which humanity faces extinction yet continues to survive by maintaining a narrow margin of hope. With this hope Szilard brought about improbable scientific and political feats (such as the nuclear chain reaction and the Moscow-Washington Hotline). This talk focuses on Szilard's many attempts in 1945 to prevent the atomic bombing of Japan. William Lanouette, a writer and public policy analyst, is the author of Genius in the Shadows: A Biography of Leo Szilard, The Man Behind the Bomb. (University of Chicago Press, 1994)

  11. Arcing in Leo and Geo Simulated Environments: Comparative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris V.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Galofaro, Joel TY.

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive tests of two solar array samples in simulated Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) environments have demonstrated that the arc inception voltage was 2-3 times lower in the LEO plasma than in the GEO vacuum. Arc current pulse wave forms are also essentially different in these environments. Moreover, the wide variations of pulse forms do not allow introducing the definition of a "standard arc wave form" even in GEO conditions. Visual inspection of the samples after testing in a GEO environment revealed considerable damage on coverglass surfaces and interconnects. These harmful consequences can be explained by the discharge energy being one order of magnitude higher in vacuum than in background plasma. The tests also revealed a potential danger of powerful electrostatic discharges that could be initiated on the solar array surface of a satellite in GEO during the ignition of an arcjet thruster.

  12. A novel unicast routing algorithm for LEO satellite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuegui; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Jun; Cheng, Lianzhen

    2005-11-01

    One of research challenges in low earth orbit (LEO) satellite networks is to develop specialized and efficient routing algorithms. In this paper, a dynamic source routing algorithm (DSRA) for LEO satellite networks is presented to achieve short end-to-end delay and low computation overhead under the condition that a logical location concept is adopted to hide satellite mobility. In this algorithm, the path between source and destination with minimum propagation delay is designated by source satellite in packet header by an efficient metric < D0, n0; D1, n1; D2, n2 >. Then the packet is forwarded to its destination by intermediate nodes according to the metric. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated through simulation and its computation complexity is analyzed to validate algorithm efficiency.

  13. Complete mitochondrial genome of a Asian lion (Panthera leo goojratensis).

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Fei; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Jian-ning

    2016-01-01

    The entire mitochondrial genome of this Asian lion (Panthera leo goojratensis) was 17,183 bp in length, gene composition and arrangement conformed to other lions, which contained the typical structure of 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs, 13 protein-coding genes and a non-coding region. The characteristic of the mitochondrial genome was analyzed in detail. PMID:24937568

  14. Parameter Calibration of Mini-LEO Hill Slope Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, H.

    2015-12-01

    The mini-LEO hill slope, located at Biosphere 2, is a small-scale catchment model that is used to study the ways landscapes change in response to biological, chemical, and hydrological processes. Previous experiments have shown that soil heterogeneity can develop as a result of groundwater flow; changing the characteristics of the landscape. To determine whether or not flow has caused heterogeneity within the mini-LEO hill slope, numerical models were used to simulate the observed seepage flow, water table height, and storativity. To begin a numerical model of the hill slope was created using CATchment Hydrology (CATHY). The model was then brought to an initial steady state by applying a rainfall event of 5mm/day for 180 days. Then a specific rainfall experiment of alternating intensities was applied to the model. Next, a parameter calibration was conducted, to fit the model to the observed data, by changing soil parameters individually. The parameters of the best fitting calibration were taken to be the most representative of those present within the mini-LEO hill slope. Our model concluded that heterogeneities had indeed arisen as a result of the rainfall event, resulting in a lower hydraulic conductivity downslope. The lower hydraulic conductivity downslope in turn caused in an increased storage of water and a decrease in seepage flow compared to homogeneous models. This shows that the hydraulic processes acting within a landscape can change the very characteristics of the landscape itself, namely the permeability and conductivity of the soil. In the future results from the excavation of soil in mini-LEO can be compared to the models results to improve the model and validate its findings.

  15. Reinforcement learning for resource allocation in LEO satellite networks.

    PubMed

    Usaha, Wipawee; Barria, Javier A

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we develop and assess online decision-making algorithms for call admission and routing for low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite networks. It has been shown in a recent paper that, in a LEO satellite system, a semi-Markov decision process formulation of the call admission and routing problem can achieve better performance in terms of an average revenue function than existing routing methods. However, the conventional dynamic programming (DP) numerical solution becomes prohibited as the problem size increases. In this paper, two solution methods based on reinforcement learning (RL) are proposed in order to circumvent the computational burden of DP. The first method is based on an actor-critic method with temporal-difference (TD) learning. The second method is based on a critic-only method, called optimistic TD learning. The algorithms enhance performance in terms of requirements in storage, computational complexity and computational time, and in terms of an overall long-term average revenue function that penalizes blocked calls. Numerical studies are carried out, and the results obtained show that the RL framework can achieve up to 56% higher average revenue over existing routing methods used in LEO satellite networks with reasonable storage and computational requirements. PMID:17550108

  16. NASA-STD-4005 and NASA-HDBK-4006, LEO Spacecraft Solar Array Charging Design Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    2007-01-01

    Two new NASA Standards are now official. They are the NASA LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Standard (NASA-STD-4005) and the NASA LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Handbook (NASA-HDBK-4006). They give the background and techniques for controlling solar array-induced charging and arcing in LEO. In this paper, a brief overview of the new standards is given, along with where they can be obtained and who should be using them.

  17. An Update on the Effectiveness of Postmission Disposal in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.

    2013-01-01

    The commonly-adopted orbital debris mitigation measures were developed to reduce the growth of the future debris population. A major component in debris mitigation is post-mission disposal (PMD). The key PMD element for LEO satellites is the 25-year rule. It is intended to limit the long-term presence of rocket bodies (R/Bs) and spacecraft (S/C), as well as mission-related debris, in the environment. The effectiveness of PMD has been demonstrated and documented since the development of mitigation measures began in the 1990s. This paper summarizes an updated study, based on the current environment, using the NASA LEGEND model. The study focused on the > or = 10 cm population in LEO. The historical simulation covered 1957 through 2011 and followed the recorded launches and known breakup events. The future projection was carried out for 200 years. An eight-year launch traffic, 2004 - 2011, was repeated during the projection period. An eight-year mission lifetime was assumed for future S/C. No stationkeeping and no collision avoidance maneuver were implemented. Only objects 10 cm and larger were included in collision consideration. No explosion was allowed for R/Bs and S/C launched after 2011. The 25-year PMD rule success rates were set at 0%, 10%, 50%, 75%, and 95%, respectively, for the 5 study scenarios. Results of the simulations were analyzed to quantify the differences among the different compliance rates. As expected, the 0% PMD projection followed a rapid and non-linear increase in the next 200 years. The LEO population, on average, more than tripled at the end of the simulations. With a 50% compliance of the 25-year rule, the population growth was reduced approximately by half. However, even with a 95% compliance of the 25-year rule, the LEO debris population would still increase by an average of more than 50% in 200 years. These simulation results provide an updated assessment of the effectiveness of the 25-year rule. It is the first and the most cost

  18. Performance of Duplex Communication between a Leo Satellite and Terrestrial Location Using a Geo Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.; Konangi, Vijay K.; Wallett, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    A network comprised of a terrestrial site, a constellation of three GEO satellites and a LEO satellite is modeled and simulated. Continuous communication between the terrestrial site and the LEO satellite is facilitated by the GEO satellites. The LEO satellite has the orbital characteristics of the International Space Station. Communication in the network is based on TCP/IP over ATM, with the ABR service category providing the QoS, at OC-3 data rate. The OSPF protocol is used for routing. We simulate FTP file transfers, with the terrestrial site serving as the client and the LEO satellite being the server. The performance characteristics are presented.

  19. Como Lo Hago Yo: Mielomeningocele En Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Dabdoub, Carlos F.; Dabdoub, Carlos B.; Villavicencio, Ramiro; Quevedo, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: Las malformaciones del tubo neural (MTN) representan la segunda causa más frecuente de anomalías congénitas, luego de las cardiopatías. En este grupo se destaca el mielomeningocele (MMC) por su mayor incidencia, y por ser la más incapacitante y la más compleja entre todas las demás malformaciones del sistema nervioso c`entral (SNC). En Bolivia, como en muchos países de Sudamérica, los bajos niveles socio-culturales y la debilidad en el sistema sanitario, hacen que su incidencia y su morbilidad, sean mayores que en las naciones más desarrolladas. Material y Métodos: Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo y descriptivo de 70 casos de MMC, atendidos por un equipo multidisciplinario en el Hospital Universitario Japonés (HUJ) de Santa Cruz de la Sierra, entre 2008-2011. De ellos, 60 fueron intervenidos quirúrgicamente. Resultados: Se realizaron controles prenatales sólo en 27 mujeres (38.6%), diagnosticándose una disrafia espinal en apenas dos casos (7.4%). La edad de ingreso del MMC en su mayoría fue después de las 24 horas (65.6%), predominando su localización en la región lumbosacra (64.3%). De ellos, 67.2% eran abiertos, presentando un 32.9% un daño neurológico motor parcial mientras que 47.1% tenían paraplejia por debajo de la lesión. De los 70 casos, tres (4.3%) no fueron intervenidos, por presentar defectos congénitos severos o estado general grave. Las principales complicaciones posoperatorias inmediatas fueron: dehiscencia de sutura y/o infección de la herida (16.6%), fístula de líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR) (10%) e infección del SNC (11.7%). La mortalidad general y postoperatoria fue de 7.1% y 3.3%, respectivamente. Al mes de vida presentaban hidrocefalia un 80% de los pacientes operados, colocándose una derivación ventriculoperitoneal (DVP) de presión media. De 9 pacientes que tuvieron un acompanamiento de dos o más años, seis presentaron una médula anclada, que fueron intervenidas quirúrgicamente. Conclusi

  20. Lo/Ld phase coexistence modulation induced by GM1.

    PubMed

    Puff, Nicolas; Watanabe, Chiho; Seigneuret, Michel; Angelova, Miglena I; Staneva, Galya

    2014-08-01

    Lipid rafts are assumed to undergo biologically important size-modulations from nanorafts to microrafts. Due to the complexity of cellular membranes, model systems become important tools, especially for the investigation of the factors affecting "raft-like" Lo domain size and the search for Lo nanodomains as precursors in Lo microdomain formation. Because lipid compositional change is the primary mechanism by which a cell can alter membrane phase behavior, we studied the effect of the ganglioside GM1 concentration on the Lo/Ld lateral phase separation in PC/SM/Chol/GM1 bilayers. GM1 above 1mol % abolishes the formation of the micrometer-scale Lo domains observed in GUVs. However, the apparently homogeneous phase observed in optical microscopy corresponds in fact, within a certain temperature range, to a Lo/Ld lateral phase separation taking place below the optical resolution. This nanoscale phase separation is revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy, including C12NBD-PC self-quenching and Laurdan GP measurements, and is supported by Gaussian spectral decomposition analysis. The temperature of formation of nanoscale Lo phase domains over an Ld phase is determined, and is shifted to higher values when the GM1 content increases. A "morphological" phase diagram could be made, and it displays three regions corresponding respectively to Lo/Ld micrometric phase separation, Lo/Ld nanometric phase separation, and a homogeneous Ld phase. We therefore show that a lipid only-based mechanism is able to control the existence and the sizes of phase-separated membrane domains. GM1 could act on the line tension, "arresting" domain growth and thereby stabilizing Lo nanodomains. PMID:24835016

  1. The Sublime Corpse in Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda's Women's Journal "Album Cubano de lo Bueno y lo Bello" (1860)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaGreca, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This article examines Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda's choice to include articles depicting the advanced decay of cadavers, which are simultaneously horrible and awesome, in her women's periodical "Album Cubano de lo Bueno y lo Bello". Background on Avellaneda's biography, women's print culture, and theories of the sublime provide a frame for the…

  2. 77 FR 50185 - LoCorr Fund Management, LLC and LoCorr Investment Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... standard. 3. Applicants assert that the shareholders expect the Adviser and the Board to select the... shareholder approval. Applicants: LoCorr Fund Management, LLC (``LFM'' or the ``Adviser'') and LoCorr... materially amend Subadvisory Agreements without obtaining shareholder approval. The requested relief will...

  3. Evaluations of University of Wisconsin Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitors 300 LO and 400 LO B

    SciTech Connect

    K. L. Davis; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; B. M. Chase; T. C. Unruh

    2011-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors 05R4-02-A KG1403 (300 LO) and 05R4-01-A KG1415 (400 LO B) were evaluated at the High Temperature Test Lab (HTTL) to determine their peak irradiation temperatures. HTTL measurements indicate that the peak irradiation temperature for the 300 LO monitor was 295 {+-} 20 C and the peak irradiation temperature for the 400 LO B monitor was 294 {+-} 25 C. Two silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) were evaluated at the High Temperature Test Lab (HTTL) to determine their peak temperature during irradiation. These monitors were irradiated as part of the University of Wisconsin Pilot Project with a target dose of 3 dpa. Temperature monitors were fabricated from high density (3.203 g/cm3) SiC manufactured by Rohm Haas with a nominal size of 12.5 mm x 1.0 mm x 0.75 mm (see Attachment A). Table 1 provides identification for each monitor with an expected peak irradiation temperature range based on preliminary thermal analysis (see Attachment B). Post irradiation calculations are planned to reduce uncertainties in these calculated temperatures. Since the early 1960s, SiC has been used as a post-irradiation temperature monitor. As noted in Reference 2, several researchers have observed that neutron irradiation induced lattice expansion of SiC annealed out when the post-irradiation annealing temperature exceeds the peak irradiation temperature. As noted in Reference 3, INL uses resistivity measurements to infer peak irradiation temperature from SiC monitors. Figure 1 depicts the equipment at the HTTL used to evaluate the SiC monitors. The SiC monitors are heated in the annealing furnace using isochronal temperature steps that, depending on customer needs, can range from 50 to 800 C. This furnace is located under a ventilation hood within the stainless steel enclosure. The ventilation system is activated during heating so that any released vapors are vented through this system. Annealing

  4. Massive star formation within the Leo 'primordial' ring.

    PubMed

    Thilker, David A; Donovan, Jennifer; Schiminovich, David; Bianchi, Luciana; Boissier, Samuel; de Paz, Armando Gil; Madore, Barry F; Martin, D Christopher; Seibert, Mark

    2009-02-19

    Few intergalactic, plausibly primordial clouds of neutral atomic hydrogen (H(i)) have been found in the local Universe, suggesting that such structures have either dispersed, become ionized or produced a stellar population on gigayear timescales. The Leo ring, a massive (M(H(i)) approximately 1.8 x 10(9)M[symbol: see text], M[symbol: see text] denoting the solar mass), 200-kpc-wide structure orbiting the galaxies M105 and NGC 3384 with a 4-Gyr period, is a candidate primordial cloud. Despite repeated atttempts, it has previously been seen only from H i emission, suggesting the absence of a stellar population. Here we report the detection of ultraviolet light from gaseous substructures of the Leo ring, which we attribute to recent massive star formation. The ultraviolet colour of the detected complexes is blue, implying the onset of a burst of star formation or continuous star formation of moderate (approximately 10(8)-yr) duration. Measured ultraviolet-visible photometry favours models with low metallicity (Z approximately Z[symbol: see text]/50-Z[symbol: see text]/5, Z[symbol: see text] denoting the solar metallicity), that is, a low proportion of elements heavier than helium, although spectroscopic confirmation is needed. We speculate that the complexes are dwarf galaxies observed during their formation, but distinguished by their lack of a dark matter component. In this regard, they resemble tidal dwarf galaxies, although without the enrichment preceding tidal stripping. If structures like the Leo ring were common in the early Universe, they may have produced a large, yet undetected, population of faint, metal-poor, halo-lacking dwarf galaxies. PMID:19225520

  5. LEO effects on candidate solar cell cover materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.

    1993-01-01

    In 1984, the LDEF (Long Duration Exposure Facility) was placed in LEO (Low Earth Orbit) for a mission planned to last approximately one year. Due to a number of factors, retrieval was delayed until 1990. An experiment, prepared under the direction of JPL, consisted of a test plate with thirty (30) individual thin silicon solar cell/cover samples. The covers consisted of conventional cerium doped microsheet platelets and potential candidate materials, such as FEP Teflon, silicon RTV's, glass resins, polyimides, and a silicone-polyimide copolymer encapsulant. The effects of the LDEF mission environment (micrometeorite/debris impacts, atomic oxygen, UV, and particulate radiation) on the samples are discussed.

  6. LEO effects on conventional and unconventional solar cell cover materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    In 1984, the LDEF (Long Duration Exposure Facility) was placed in LEO (low earth orbit) for a mission planned to last approximately one year. The effects of the LDEF mission environment (micrometeorite/debris impacts, atomic, atomic oxygen, UV, and particulate radiation) on the samples are described. The relative importance of these interactions is highly dependent on orbital altitude. There is no evidence that the impacts with the test samples (including solar cells) caused any electrical degradation. Evidence from a number of LDEF experiments suggests that the majority of the impacts observed on this experiment were of space debris, rather than micrometeorite origin.

  7. Haemangiosarcoma in a captive Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica)

    PubMed Central

    Vercammen, F.; Brandt, J.; Brantegem, L. Van; Bosseler, L.; Ducatelle, R.

    2015-01-01

    A 2.7-year-old male captive Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica) died unexpectedly without preceding symptoms. Gross necropsy revealed liver and lung tumours, which proved to be haemangiosarcomas by histopathology. Some of the liver tumours were ruptured, leading to massive intra-abdominal haemorrhage and death. Haemangiosarcomas are rare in domestic and exotic felids, occurring in skin, thoracic-abdominal cavity and bones. Although these tumours mainly appear to be occurring in older cats, they are sometimes observed in younger animals, as in the present case. This is the first description of haemangiosarcoma in a young Asiatic lion. PMID:26623366

  8. LEO: A Learning Environment Organizer to Support Computer-Mediated Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, John W.; Canas, Alberto J.

    2003-01-01

    This article contains a description of a network-based Learning Environment Organizer entitled LEO, which takes its impetus from the Assimilation Theory of meaningful learning. LEO represents a new approach to computer-mediated augmentation of face-to-face, or hybrid courses, and a different approach to distance learning course delivery. LEO…

  9. 20 CFR 10.736 - What are the time limits for filing a LEO claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the time limits for filing a LEO claim? 10.736 Section 10.736 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF... limits for filing a LEO claim? OWCP must receive a claim for benefits under 5 U.S.C. 8191 within...

  10. 20 CFR 10.741 - How are benefits calculated in LEO claims?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How are benefits calculated in LEO claims? 10.741 Section 10.741 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... calculated in LEO claims? (a) Except for continuation of pay, eligible officers and survivors are entitled...

  11. 20 CFR 10.738 - Under what circumstances are benefits payable in LEO claims?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Under what circumstances are benefits payable in LEO claims? 10.738 Section 10.738 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS... circumstances are benefits payable in LEO claims? (a) Benefits are payable when an officer is injured...

  12. Judicial Rhetoric in a Fragmentary World: "Character" and Storytelling in the Leo Frank Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasian, Marouf, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Uses the 1913 murder trial of Leo Frank to examine the ways in which "characters" are developed in legal discourse. Focuses attention on the ways in which race, class, and gender are constructed in discussions of Leo Frank's guilt or innocence. Highlights the rhetorical dimensions of direct and cross-examination, closing statements, and press…

  13. Telemetry Tracking & Control (TT&C) - First TDRSS, then Commercial GEO & Big LEO and Now Through LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Dwayne R.; Streich, Ron G.; Bull, Barton; Grant, Chuck; Power, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The advent of low earth orbit (LEO) commercial communication satellites provides an opportunity to dramatically reduce Telemetry, Tracking and Control (TT&C) costs of launch vehicles, Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), Research Balloons and spacecraft by reducing or eliminating ground infrastructure. Personnel from the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC\\WFF) have successfully used commercial Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) and Big LEO communications satellites for Long Duration Balloon Flight TT&C. The Flight Modem is a GSFC\\WFF Advanced Range Technology initiative (ARTI) designed to streamline TT&C capability in the user community of these scientific data gathering platforms at low cost. Making use of existing LEO satellites and adapting and ruggedized commercially available components; two-way, over the horizon communications may be established with these vehicles at great savings due to reduced infrastructure. Initially planned as a means for permitting GPS data for tracking and recovery of sounding rocket and balloon payloads, expectations are that the bandwidth can soon be expanded to allow more comprehensive data transfer. The system architecture which integrates antennas, GPS receiver, commercial satellite packet data modem and a single board computer with custom software is described and technical challenges are discussed along with the plan for their resolution. A three-phase testing and development plan is outlined and the current results are reported. Results and status of ongoing flight tests on aircraft and sounding rockets are reported. Future applications on these platforms and the potential for satellite support are discussed along with an analysis of cost effectiveness of this method vs. other tracking and data transmission schemes.

  14. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF WEST ABUTMENT AT Lo, SHOWING BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF WEST ABUTMENT AT Lo, SHOWING BRIDGE SEAT, TIMBER PILES, STEEL SILL AND BACKWALL/WlNGWALL BOARDS, LOOKING NORTH - Cottonville Bridge, County Road D-61 at Farmer's Creek, Maquoketa, Jackson County, IA

  15. Chemical Abundances in the Stellar Populations of the Leo I and Leo II dSph Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosler, T. L.; Smecker-Hane, T. A.; Stetson, P. B.

    2002-05-01

    Our goal is to map the chemical abundance distribution of the stellar populations of the Leo I and Leo II dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies to constrain the physical processes that regulate their evolution. The dSphs are particularly interesting galaxies because their star formation histories (SFHs) appear to be much more complicated than theory would predict for such low mass, low luminosity, low surface-brightness galaxies. Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of these dSphs have shown that they formed stars over many Gyr. In order to understand the true spread in stellar ages and chemical abundances we need more precise abundance indicators than can be inferred from CMD analysis: abundances based upon the broad-band colors of red giants are subject to large systematic errors because of limitations in convection theory, and poorly determined color--effective temperature relations produce sizable uncertainties in the derived shapes of theoretical red giant branches. Therefore we are measuring the abundance distribution of the Leo I and Leo II dSphs from spectroscopy of individual red giant stars using the Ca II absorption lines in the near infrared (8498, 8542, and 8662 Å). Our observations are made on the Keck I 10-meter Telescope using the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer. One night of successful observations yielded spectra of approximately 40 stars in each dSph from which abundances with random uncertainties of ≈ 0.1 dex will be derived. Calibration of the Ca II strengths to [Fe/H] has been done by Rutledge, et al. (1997, PASP, 109, 907) using Galactic globular clusters. We are also deriving a new calibration for [Ca/H]. This new calibration will remove the dependence on SFH built into the Rutledge, et al. calibration, i.e., the assumptions of a unique age for the system and a Galactic [Ca/Fe]--[Fe/H] relationship. Financial support for this project was provided by NSF grant AST-0070985 to TSH, and an ARCS Foundation fellowship to TB.

  16. Low-z LoBAL QSOs: orientation or evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarova, M.

    2015-09-01

    Low-ionization Broad Absorption Line QSOs (LoBALs) are redder type-1 QSOs characterized by broad, blue-shifted absorptions of Mg II, indicating gas outflows at velocities up to 0.2c. There is still much debate regarding the nature of these objects. In the orientation paradigm, LoBALs are present in all QSOs, but can only be observed along limited lines of sight that skim the obscuring torus. Conversely, in the evolution paradigm LoBALS have been interpreted as being a short phase in the early stages of the QSO lifecycle, when QSO-driven winds are expelling gas and dust from the central regions. To explore the suggestion by previous work that LoBALS are more likely to be observed in mergers and recently fueled QSOs, we conducted a morphological analysis of a volume-limited sample of 22 SDSS-selected LoBALs at 0.5 < z < 0.6 using HST/WFC3. We find signs of recent or ongoing tidal interaction in 2/3 of the host galaxies, and detailed surface brightness analysis with GALFIT indicates that the vast majority have early-type morphologies. Our results confirm the high rate of mergers in LoBAL hosts and they further show that LoBALs can be observed at any stage of the merger when QSO activity is expected, according to numerical simulations. While the morphologies of these objects may support the evolution paradigm, their SEDs do not suggest they are a population of QSOs statistically different from optically-selected type-1 QSOs. We discuss the two possible explanations for LoBALs implied by our results.

  17. An autonomous orbit determination method for MEO and LEO satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jin; Yu, Guobin; Zhong, Jie; Lin, Ling

    2014-09-01

    A reliable and secure navigation system and assured autonomous capability of satellite are in high demand in case of emergencies in space. This paper introduces a novel autonomous orbit determination method for Middle-Earth-Orbit and Low-Earth-Orbit (MEO and LEO) satellite by observing space objects whose orbits are known. Generally, the geodetic satellites, such as LAGEOS and ETALONS, can be selected as the space objects here. The precision CCD camera on tracking gimbal can make a series of photos of the objects and surrounding stars when MEO and LEO satellite encounters the space objects. Then the information processor processes images and attains sightings and angular observations of space objects. Several clusters of such angular observations are incorporated into a batch least squares filter to obtain an orbit determination solution. This paper describes basic principle and builds integrated mathematical model. The accuracy of this method is analyzed by means of computer simulation. Then a simulant experiment system is built, and the experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method. The experimental results show that this method can attain the accuracy of 150 meters with angular observations of 1 arcsecond system error.

  18. Beller Lecture: The Roots of Leo Szilard and his Interdisciplinarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, George

    1998-04-01

    A Central European among the whites was said about Leo Szilard who originated from a polycultural family. In the early 20th century he grew up in Hungary, at the crossroads of history, where political regimes, national borders, ideological doctrines, ``final truths'' changed in a dizzying cavalcade. Instead of conservative dogmatism this social environment required critical thinking in order to survive. World War I was the school of Theodore von Kármán, John von Neumann, Eugene P. Wigner and Leo Szilard; each of them learned trespassing political and disciplinary boundaries without inhibition. Their sensitivity for trends had been utilized by the United States when war efforts and high tech required orientation under new horizons. Szilard's interest ranged from statistical physics through information theory to biological evolution, from life phenomena through hot atoms to nuclear strategy. His intellectual adventures might look crazy jumps for specialists. But now, looking back to the political and technological history of the 20th century one can see than it was a consequent progress of a future-sensitive mind.

  19. Spectrometric and photometric study of the eclipsing variable AM Leo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorda, S. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The results of quasi-simultaneous spectroscopic and photometric observations of a W UMatype eclipsing variable star AM Leo are presented. The observations were carried out with a 1.2-m telescope equipped with a high-resolution echelle spectrometer, and a telescope-reflector ( D = 0.45m) of the Kourovka Astronomical Observatory of Ural Federal University. New values of semi-amplitudes of the radial velocity curves of the components, K 1 = 109.6kms-1 and K 2 = 252.4kms-1 and the systemic radial velocity V 0 =-9.3 kms-1 are obtained, comparable to the data published in the literature. The semi-amplitude of the radial velocity curve of a more massive component K 1 and the mass ratio of the components q = 0.412 appeared to be slightly smaller than the values obtained by other authors. An assumption wasmade that a possible reason of this is the presence of hot and/or cold spots on the surface of the components, shifting the effective center of brightness of the visible disk of the component with respect to its center of mass position. It was shown that the AM Leo light curve variations on the time scales of one and more days, registered within the photometric part of the study may be described by the choice of appropriate model of the spot structure.

  20. Solar concentrator degradation in Low Earth Orbit (LEO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The use of parabolically or spherically-shaped mirrors is being considered in order to increase the solar energy intensity on solar cells. Their use will significantly decrease the size and number of the cells needed for a particular application, hence the total array cost. Questions arise, however, regarding the long-term (five to ten years) efficiency of these devices. Performance degradation of the mirror surfaces might result from known hostile elements in the low earth orbit (LEO) environment (150-350 nautical miles). The degradation issue is addressed in light of present knowledge of this environment. The following characteristics of the LEO environment are identified for study: (1) the vacuum of space; (2) sputtering by the residual atoms and particles in space; (3) solar electromagnetic radiation; (4) contamination of the mirror surface; (5) atomic oxygen interactions with the surface; (6) bombardment of the surface by meteoroids; and (7) irradiation of the surface by ionizing particles (protons). Using the best available information for the magnitudes of the necessary quantities, a mathematical analysis was carried out, where possible, to determine the degradation in reflectance or other loss caused by each characteristic. Otherwise, reasonable estimates are made of corresponding losses, based on already published data.

  1. Exploration Atmospheres for Beyond-LEO Human Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, Donald, L.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure and oxygen concentration of human-occupied space vehicles and habitats are an important life support parameter. The atmosphere is critical in terms of not only safety but also in terms of maximizing human capabilities at the point of scientific discovery. Human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit (LEO) will include extravehicular activity (EVA). EVAs are carried out in low pressure (4.3 psi/29.6 kilopascals) space suits running at 100 percent oxygen. New suits currently in development will be capable of running at a range of pressures between approximately 8.2 psi/56.5 kilopascals and 4.3 psi/29.6 kilopascals. In order to carry out high-frequency EVA phases of a mission safely and more efficiently, it is advantageous to have cabin or vehicle atmospheres at lower total pressure and higher oxygen concentrations. This allows for much reduced pre-breathe times for a fixed risk of decompression sickness and thus more efficient EVAs. The recommended oxygen concentration is 32% and represents a trade with respect to controlling the risk of decompression sickness and risk of fire. Work carried out by NASA in 2006 and continued in 2012 established an atmospheric pressure and oxygen concentration to optimize EVA. This paper will review previous work and describe current recommendations for beyond-LEO human exploration missions.

  2. MEMS Reaction Control and Maneuvering for Picosat Beyond LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexeenko, Alina

    2016-01-01

    The MEMS Reaction Control and Maneuvering for Picosat Beyond LEO project will further develop a multi-functional small satellite technology for low-power attitude control, or orientation, of picosatellites beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The Film-Evaporation MEMS Tunable Array (FEMTA) concept initially developed in 2013, is a thermal valving system which utilizes capillary forces in a microchannel to offset internal pressures in a bulk fluid. The local vapor pressure is increased by resistive film heating until it exceeds meniscus strength in a nozzle which induces vacuum boiling and provides a stagnation pressure equal to vapor pressure at that point which is used for propulsion. Interplanetary CubeSats can utilize FEMTA for high slew rate attitude corrections in addition to desaturating reaction wheels. The FEMTA in cooling mode can be used for thermal control during high-power communication events, which are likely to accompany the attitude correction. Current small satellite propulsion options are limited to orbit correction whereas picosatellites are lacking attitude control thrusters. The available attitude control systems are either quickly saturated reaction wheels or movable high drag surfaces with long response times.

  3. LoFASM's FPGA-based Digital Acquisition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartez, Louis P.; Jenet, F.; Creighton, T. D.; Ford, A. J.; Hicks, B.; Hinojosa, J.; Kassim, N. E.; Price, R. H.; Stovall, K.; Ray, P. S.; Taylor, G. B.

    2014-01-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a distributed array of dipole antennas that are sensitive to radio frequencies from 10 to 88 MHz. LoFASM consists of antennas and front end electronics that were originally developed for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) by the U.S. Naval Research Lab, the University of New Mexico, Virginia Tech, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. LoFASM, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, will initially consist of 4 stations, each consisting of 12 dual-polarization dipole antenna stands. The primary science goals of LoFASM will be the detection and study of low-frequency radio transients, a high priority science goal as deemed by the National Research Council's decadal survey. The data acquisition system for the LoFASM antenna array will be using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology to implement a real time full Stokes spectrometer and data recorder. This poster presents an overview of the current design and digital architecture of a single station of the LoFASM array as well as the status of the entire project.

  4. Charging of space debris in the LEO and GEO regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Abhijit; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar

    The near exponential rise of space debris at the satellite orbital altitudes (particularly in the low earth orbit (LEO) region) and the risk they pose for space assets is a source of major concern for all nations engaged in space activities. Considerable efforts are therefore being expended into accurate modeling and tracking of these objects and various ideas for the safe removal of these debris are being explored. The debris objects are likely to acquire a large amount of charge since they are typically found in a plasma environment - such as the earth’s ionospheric plasma in the LEO region (100 kms to 1000 kms) and the radiation belts in the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) region. The consequent flow of electron and ion currents on them lead to the accumulation of a large amount of surface charge and the development of a surface potential on these objects. The influence of the plasma environment on the dynamics and charging of the debris is a relatively unexplored area of Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and Space Debris (SD) research and can be potentially important for the accurate prediction of the long-term evolution of debris orbits and their collision probabilities with other space objects. In this paper we will report on the charging of space debris under a variety of orbital conditions in the LEO and GEO regions using both analytic and particle-in-cell (PIC) modeling. The analytic estimates are obtained using refined Orbit Motion Limited (OML) modeling while the simulation studies are carried out using the SPIS code [1]. In the GEO region account is taken of charging due to photoemission processes as well as energetic beam charging. The PIC approach enables us to study charging of irregularly shaped debris objects as well as differential charging on objects that are composed of patches of conducting and insulated regions. The dynamical consequences of the debris charging on their orbital trajectories and rotational characteristics will be discussed. [1] J

  5. THE ARECIBO LEGACY FAST ALFA SURVEY. IX. THE LEO REGION H I CATALOG, GROUP MEMBERSHIP, AND THE H I MASS FUNCTION FOR THE LEO I GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Stierwalt, Sabrina; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Martin, Ann M.; Kent, Brian R.; Saintonge, Amelie; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Karachentseva, Valentina E. E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: amartin@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: amelie@physik.uzh.ch E-mail: vkarach@observ.univ.kiev.ua

    2009-08-15

    We present the catalog of H I sources extracted from the ongoing Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) extragalactic H I line survey, found within the sky region bounded by 9{sup h}36{sup m} < {alpha} < 11{sup h}36{sup m} and +08{sup 0} < {delta} < +12{sup 0}. The H I catalog presented here for this 118 deg{sup 2} region is combined with the ones derived from surrounding regions also covered by the ALFALFA survey to examine the large-scale structure in the complex Leo region. Because of the combination of wide sky coverage and superior sensitivity, spatial and spectral resolution, the ALFALFA H I catalog of the Leo region improves significantly on the numbers of low H I mass sources as compared with those found in previous H I surveys. The H I mass function of the Leo I group presented here is dominated by low-mass objects: 45 of the 65 Leo I members have M{sub H{sub l}}<10{sup 8} M-odot, yielding tight constraints on the low-mass slope of the Leo I H I mass function. The best-fit slope is {alpha} {approx_equal} -1.41 + 0.2 - 0.1. A direct comparison between the ALFALFA H I line detections and an optical search of the Leo I region proves the advantage of the ALFALFA strategy in finding low-mass, gas-rich dwarfs. These results suggest the existence of a significant population of low surface brightness, gas-rich, yet still very low H I mass galaxies, and may reflect the same type of morphological segregation as is seen in the Local Group. While the low-mass end slope of the Leo I H I mass function is steeper than that determined for luminosity functions of the group, the slope still falls short of the values predicted by simulations of structure formation in the lambda cold dark matter paradigm.

  6. Global tracking and inventory of military hardware via LEO satellite: A system approach and likely scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, David; Estabrook, Polly; Romer, Richard

    1995-01-01

    A system for global inventory control of electronically tagged military hardware is achievable using a LEO satellite constellation. An equipment Tag can communicate directly to the satellite with a power of 5 watts or less at a data rate of 2400 to 50,000 bps. As examples, two proposed commercial LEO systems, IRIDIUM and ORBCOMM, are both capable of providing global coverage but with dramatically different telecom capacities. Investigation of these two LEO systems as applied to the Tag scenario provides insight into satellite design trade-offs, constellation trade-offs and signal dynamics that effect the performance of a satellite-based global inventory control system.

  7. NOAA 26.5 Ah LEO characterization test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, G. W.

    1986-01-01

    The General Electric (GE) 26.5 Ah NOAA-G flight nickel-cadmium cells were obtained from RCA-Astro Electronics to undergo performance characterization testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This lot of cells was manufactured with passivated positive plate, to control nickel structure attack duing active material impregnation, and less electrolyte than normal (less than 3cc/Ah). The cells were tested in a parametric low Earth orbit (LEO) cycling regime that was previously used to test and characterize standard 50 Ah cells. Life cycle testing at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC), in Crane, followed. The results of the test showed nominal performance in comparison with previous test data on the standard 50. Life cycle testing in the NOAA orbital regime is continuing at NWSC.

  8. CLINICOPATHOLOGIC FEATURES OF MAMMARY MASSES IN CAPTIVE LIONS (PANTHERA LEO).

    PubMed

    Sadler, Ryan A; Craig, Linden E; Ramsay, Edward C; Helmick, Kelly; Collins, Darin; Garner, Michael M

    2016-03-01

    A multi-institutional retrospective analysis of 330 pathology accessions from 285 different lions found 15 captive, female African lions (Panthera leo) with confirmed mammary masses. Aside from the presence of a mammary mass, the most common initial clinical sign was inappetence. Histologic diagnoses were predominantly adenocarcinoma (n = 12), though two benign masses (mammary hyperplasia and a mammary cyst) and one squamous cell carcinoma were identified. Nine of 13 malignant tumors had metastasized to lymph nodes or viscera at the time of necropsy. Six lions with adenocarcinoma and two lions with benign mammary masses had received hormonal contraception, though little evidence of mammary lobular hyperplasia was seen in association with the adenocarcinomas. The most common concurrent disease processes found at necropsy were chronic urinary tract disease and other malignancies. These cases demonstrate that mammary malignancies occur in captive lions and frequently metastasize. PMID:27010273

  9. Next Generation Grating Spectrometer Sounders for LEO and GEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    AIRS and MODIS are widely used for weather, climate, composition, carbon cycle, cross-calibration, and applications. The community asking for new capability in the 2020 timeframe, capabilities desired: (1) Hyperspectral UV to LWIR, High Spatial ?1km IFOV (2) Maximize Synergies of Solar Reflected and IR. Synergies with OCO-2. We expect more users and applications of next gen LEO IR Sounder than GEO. These include: weather, climate, GHG monitoring, aviation, disaster response. There is a new direction for imagers and sounders: (1) Separate Vis/NIR/SWIR from MWIR/LWIR instruments reduces technology risk and complexity. (2) Expect Costs to be lower than CrIS & VIIRS Some additional ideas to reduce costs include: (1) minimum set of requirements (2) mini-grating spectrometers. supports constellation for higher revisit (3) new technology to reduce instrument size (large format fpa's) (4) hosted payloads

  10. LEO atomic oxygen effects on spacecraft materials: STS-5 results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.

    1984-01-01

    Effects of low Earth orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen were measured on a variety of spacecraft materials which obtained exposure on STS-5. Material degradation dependency on temperature was found in one material. Of the five paints flown, only S13GLO was unaffected. Generally, the glossy paints became Lambertian and the diffuse coatings improved. Scanning electron microscope examinations indicated removal of urethane and epoxy paint binder materials. Reaction products were evident on the surfaces of Z302 paint and Mylar. Thin films showed thickness losses ranging from negligible loss in Teflon to considerable loss in Mylar and Kapton. Glossy films such as black Kapton and white Tedlar became diffused. Kevlar 29 rope lost tensile strength and silver solar cell interconnect material oxidized. Oxidation on the backside of an elevated specimen indicated that reflections of oxygen atoms were occurring and that reflecting surfaces, probably Kapton, were not fully accommodating the incident atoms.

  11. LEO high voltage solar array arcing response model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metz, Roger N.

    1987-01-01

    A series of mathematical models were developed that describe the electrical behavior of a large solar cell array floating electrically in the low Earth orbit (LEO) space plasma and struck by an arc at a point of negative bias. There are now three models in this series: ARCII, which is a fully analytical, linearized model; ARCIII, which is an extension of ARCIII that includes solar cell inductance as well as load reactance; Nonlinear ARC, which is a numerical model able to treat effects such as non-linearized, i.e., logarithmic solar cell I/V characteristics, conductance switching as a solar cell crosses plasma ground on a voltage excursion and non-ohmic plasma leakage current collection.

  12. Blood thiamine values in captive adult African lions (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    Hoover, John P; DiGesualdo, Cynthia L

    2005-09-01

    Heparinized whole-blood samples from 22 adult African lions (Panthera leo) fed diets considered nutritionally adequate in 10 American Zoo and Aquarium Association member zoos in North America were provided for this study. Blood thiamine values were estimated using a standard microbiological assay method. The mean +/- standard deviation for blood thiamine values was 249.3 +/- 43.5 nmol/L with a range in values from 160 to 350 nmol/L after exclusion of one outlier. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in the mean blood thiamine values of male and female lions, or of lions that were over and under 10 yr of age. This range (160 to 350 nmol/L) is proposed as a reasonable estimate of the expected range in blood thiamine values for captive adult African lions as currently fed in North American zoos. PMID:17312758

  13. Leo Spacecraft Charging Design Guidelines: A Proposed NASA Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillard, G. B.; Ferguson, D. C.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) spacecraft have gradually required ever-increasing power levels. As a rule, this has been accomplished through the use of high voltage systems. Recent failures and anomalies on such spacecraft have been traced to various design practices and materials choices related to the high voltage solar arrays. NASA Glenn has studied these anomalies including plasma chamber testing on arrays similar to those that experienced difficulties on orbit. Many others in the community have been involved in a comprehensive effort to understand the problems and to develop practices to avoid them. The NASA Space Environments and Effects program, recognizing the timeliness of this effort, commissioned and funded a design guidelines document intended to capture the current state of understanding. This document, which was completed in the spring of 2003, has been submitted as a proposed NASA standard. We present here an overview of this document and discuss the effort to develop it as a NASA standard.

  14. The final analysis Little Leo: A system and service overview

    SciTech Connect

    Fatig, M.

    1997-01-01

    There is an emerging commercial space industry consisting of constellations of low earth orbiting satellites to that will provide global telecommunications services. Within the set of proposed low earth orbiting satellite systems, there exists two distinct classes. One class provides high bandwidth digital voice and data services, and the other provides narrowband store and forward digital data services. The digital data service systems are called Little LEOs or Infosats. These systems will provide a variety of personal, business, environmental, and industrial digital data services on a global scale. Infosat systems provide a niche telecommunications infrastructure that benefit industries and governments of the world whether developing or industrialized; geographically homogeneous or diverse; or low, middle, or high income. The flexible nature of the service allows it to be applied in many ways to meet changing needs. This paper provides an overview of the Final Analysis Infosat system. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. LEGEND, a LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer Chyi; Hall, Doyle T.

    2013-01-01

    LEGEND (LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris model) is a three-dimensional orbital debris evolutionary model that is capable of simulating the historical and future debris populations in the near-Earth environment. The historical component in LEGEND adopts a deterministic approach to mimic the known historical populations. Launched rocket bodies, spacecraft, and mission-related debris (rings, bolts, etc.) are added to the simulated environment. Known historical breakup events are reproduced, and fragments down to 1 mm in size are created. The LEGEND future projection component adopts a Monte Carlo approach and uses an innovative pair-wise collision probability evaluation algorithm to simulate the future breakups and the growth of the debris populations. This algorithm is based on a new "random sampling in time" approach that preserves characteristics of the traditional approach and captures the rapidly changing nature of the orbital debris environment. LEGEND is a Fortran 90-based numerical simulation program. It operates in a UNIX/Linux environment.

  16. Discovery of a tidal dwarf galaxy in the Leo Triplet

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiel-Wroczyński, B.; Soida, M.; Urbanik, M.; Bomans, D. J. E-mail: soida@oa.uj.edu.pl E-mail: bomans@astro.rub.de

    2014-05-10

    We report the discovery of a dwarf galaxy in the Leo Triplet. Analysis of the neutral hydrogen distribution shows that it rotates independently of the tidal tail of NGC 3628, with a radial velocity gradient of 35-40 km s{sup –1} over approximately 13 kpc. The galaxy has an extremely high neutral gas content, accounting for a large amount of its total dynamic mass and suggesting a low amount of dark matter. It is located at the tip of the gaseous tail, which strongly suggests a tidal origin. If this is the case, it would be one of the most confident and nearest (to the Milky Way) detections of a tidal dwarf galaxy and, at the same time, the object most detached from its parent galaxy (≈140 kpc) of this type.

  17. A LEO concept for millimeter wave satellite communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. H.; Christopher, P.

    1995-01-01

    A conceptual 60 satellite LEO constellation for millimeter wave communication is discussed. It could be launched in segments, with the first 30 satellites providing high elevation angles for all time in the Northern latitudes between Miami and Thule. The second set of 30 satellites would complete the worldwide coverage with emphasis on high ground elevation angles in the densely populated temperate zones. Full earth searches for all time are used to generate probability density functions for elevation angle. The density functions are used to derive optimum frequencies for random elevation systems. The 55 degree average elevation angle and 14 degree standard deviation are seen to be acceptable for 0.997 rain availability in Washington, DC for the 40 to 47 GHz region. The 40 to 47 GHz region is nearly optimum, if 0.99 rain availability is acceptable.

  18. Telemetry Tracking and Control Through Commercial LEO Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streich, Ronald C.; Morgan, Dwayne R.; Bull, Barton B.; Grant, Charles E.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Personnel from the Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC/WFF in Virginia have successfully tested commercial LEO communications satellites for sounding rocket, balloon and aircraft flight TT&C. The Flight Modern became a GSFC/WFF Advanced Range Technology Initiative (ARTI) in an effort to streamline TT&C capability to the user community at low cost. Ground tests of the Flight Modem verified duplex communications quality of service and measured transmission latencies. These tests were completed last year and results reported in the John Hopkins University (JHU) Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) 4th International Symposium on Reducing Spacecraft Costs for Ground Systems and Operations. The second phase of the Flight Modem baseline test program was a demonstration of the ruggedized version of the WFF Flight Modem flown on a sounding rocket launched it the Swedish rocket range (Esrangc) near Kiruna, Sweden, with results contained in this paper. Aircraft flight tests have been and continue to be conducted. Flights of opportunity are being actively pursued with other centers, ranges and users at universities. The WFF Flight Modem contains a CPS receiver to provide vehicle position for tracking and vehicle recovery. The system architecture, which integrates antennas, CPS receiver, commercial satellite packet data modem and a single board computer with custom software, is described. Small satellite use of the WFF Flight Modem is also being investigated, The Flight Modem provides an independent vehicle position source for Range Safety applications. The LEO communication system contains a coarse position location system, which is compared to GPS ace acy. This comparison allows users, to determine the need for a CPS receiver in addition to the satellite packet data modem for their application.

  19. Archean evolution of the Leo Rise and its Eburnean reworking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiéblemont, Denis; Goujou, Jean Christian; Egal, Emmanuel; Cocherie, Alain; Delor, Claude; Lafon, Jean Michel; Fanning, C. Mark

    2004-06-01

    Recent geological mapping in southeastern Guinea, supported by zircon dating, has called into question traditional understanding concerning the evolution of the Leo Rise. Gneiss dated at about 3540 Ma appears to constitute the earliest evidence for continental accretion within the Leo Rise. The existence of a Leonian depositional cycle at about 3000 Ma is confirmed, marked by volcanic and sedimentary rocks that can be correlated with the Loko Group in Sierra Leone. The span of ages (3244-3050 Ma) suggests that the Leonian cycle comprises different episodes whose respective chronology is as yet uncertain. Clearly distinct from the Leonian cycle, the Liberian cycle (˜2900-2800 Ma) is represented in Guinea by granite and migmatite (˜2910-2800 Ma), reflecting remobilization of the ancient Archean basement and deformation of the Leonian rocks; no deposition is associated with this cycle. After the Liberian, the Nimba and Simandou successions, containing Liberian detrital zircons, are assigned to the Birimian (˜2200-2000 Ma). Finally, Eburnean tectonism caused intense deformation of the Archean craton, accompanied by high-grade metamorphism and the intrusion of granite and syenite with ages between 2080 and 2020 Ma. The evolution of the Kénéma-Man domain, attributed to the cumulated effect of the Leonian and Liberian cycles, is thus in part Eburnean. We can suppose, therefore, that the NNE-SSW-trending structures attributed to the Liberian in Sierra Leone are, in fact, Eburnean. The Kambui Supergroup, also affected by this tectonism, should thus be assigned to the Birimian rather than the Liberian, which would explain its similarities with the Nimba and Simandou successions.

  20. Quadrature Mixer LO Leakage Suppression Through Quadrature DC Bias

    SciTech Connect

    BALDWIN, JESSE G; DUBBERT, DALE F.

    2002-05-01

    A new concept has been developed which allows direct-to-RF conversion of digitally synthesized waveforms. The concept named Quadrature Error Corrected Digital Waveform Synthesis (QECDWS) employs quadrature amplitude and phase predistortion to the complex waveform to reduce the undesirable quadrature image. Another undesirable product of QECDWS-based RF conversion is the Local Oscillator (LO) leakage through the quadrature upconverter (mixer). A common technique for reducing this LO leakage is to apply a quadrature bias to the mixer I and Q inputs. This report analyzes this technique through theory, lab measurement, and data analysis for a candidate quadrature mixer for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) applications.

  1. Seismic amplitude anomalies associated with thick First Leo sandstone lenses, eastern Powder River basin, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balch, A.H.; Lee, M.W.; Miller, J.J.; Ryder, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Several new discoveries of oil production in the Leo sandstone, an economic unit in the Pennsylvanian middle member of the Minnelusa formation, eastern Powder River basin, Wyoming-Nebraska-South Dakota, have renewed exploration interest in this area. Vertical seismic profiles (VSP) and model studies suggested that a measurable seismic amplitude anomaly is frequently associated with the thick First Leo sandstone lenses. To test this concept, a surface reflection seismic profile was run between two wells about 12 miles apart. The First Leo was present and productive in one well and thin and barren in the other. The surface profile shows the predicted amplitude anomaly at the well where a thick lens is known to exist. Two other First Leo amplitude anomalies also appear on the surface seismic profile between the two wells, which may indicate the presence of additional lenses.-Authors

  2. Celebrating a centennial-Leo Szilárd (1898-1964)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinner, Arthur

    1998-04-01

    In the long list of gifted Hungarian scientists and mathematicians active in the first half of this century, the name of Leo Szilárd rises to the top. This year we celebrate the centennial of his birth.

  3. NEW EMPLOYEE ON THE JOB - LEO C FRANCISCUS MISSIONS ANALYSIS BRANCH WORKING ON RECOVERABLE BOOSTERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    NEW EMPLOYEE ON THE JOB - LEO C FRANCISCUS MISSIONS ANALYSIS BRANCH WORKING ON RECOVERABLE BOOSTERS - PERFORM MISSION ANALYSIS STUDIES - AT PRESENT TIME STUDYING SUBSONIC AND SUPERSONIC COMBUSTION RAM JET ENGINES - ALSO PERFORMING ANALYTICAL STUDIES

  4. Celebrating Diversity through Children's Literature: An Interview with Leo and Diane Dillon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavonetti, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with the illustrators Leo and Diane Dillon. Concludes that they hope their illustrations will bring to children a feeling of pride and understanding that they are all important and are all part of one world. (SG)

  5. Satellite power system LEO vs GEO assembly issues. [construction in Low Earth Orbits vs GEosynchronous Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mockovciak, J., Jr.; Adornato, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    A strawman crystal-silicon 5-GW Satellite Power System (SPS) concept formed the basis of a study of construction concepts for building a complete SPS in low earth orbit (LEO) or geosynchronous orbit (GEO). Construction scenarios were evolved, including factory-in-space concepts and operations. Design implications imposed on the SPS satellite as a consequence of in-orbit assembly operations, and related attitude control requirements during assembly in LEO or GEO environments, were also evaluated. Results are presented indicating that complete assembly of an operational SPS in LEO, followed by transport to GEO, does not appear technically desirable. The best mix, however, of LEO versus GEO construction activity remains to be resolved.

  6. Low energy neutron deuteron scattering to N3LO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaryan, Arman; Vanasse, Jared; Springer, Roxanne

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO) nd scattering amplitude in the framework of nonrelativistic pionless effective field theory (EFTπ/). This theory is only valid when the typical momentum exchange in the scattering is smaller then the mass of the pion. The power counting parameter for EFTπ/ is the ratio Q/Λπ /, where Q is the typical momentum exchange in the scattering and Λπ / is the EFTπ/ breakdown scale, Λπ / LO. At N3LO new 2-body forces appear, which introduce four new EFTπ/ coefficients. These coefficients are fixed by the 3PJ and 1P1 phase shifts of NN scattering. We find that these terms have an important impact. The results of this calculation at N3LO will be important for understanding spin polarization observables in nd scattering, in particular the longstanding Ay puzzle. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Award Number DE-FG02-05ER41368.

  7. BabeLO--An Extensible Converter of Programming Exercises Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queiros, R.; Leal, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, there was a proliferation of programming exercise formats that hinders interoperability in automatic assessment. In the lack of a widely accepted standard, a pragmatic solution is to convert content among the existing formats. BabeLO is a programming exercise converter providing services to a network of heterogeneous…

  8. A DEEPER LOOK AT LEO IV: STAR FORMATION HISTORY AND EXTENDED STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Sand, David J.; Seth, Anil; Olszewski, Edward W.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Willman, Beth; Kallivayalil, Nitya

    2010-07-20

    We present MMT/Megacam imaging of the Leo IV dwarf galaxy in order to investigate its structure and star formation history, and to search for signs of association with the recently discovered Leo V satellite. Based on parameterized fits, we find that Leo IV is round, with {epsilon} < 0.23 (at the 68% confidence limit) and a half-light radius of r{sub h} {approx_equal} 130 pc. Additionally, we perform a thorough search for extended structures in the plane of the sky and along the line of sight. We derive our surface brightness detection limit by implanting fake structures into our catalog with stellar populations identical to that of Leo IV. We show that we are sensitive to stream-like structures with surface brightness {mu}{sub r} {approx}< 29.6 mag arcsec{sup -2}, and at this limit we find no stellar bridge between Leo IV (out to a radius of {approx}0.5 kpc) and the recently discovered, nearby satellite Leo V. Using the color-magnitude fitting package StarFISH, we determine that Leo IV is consistent with a single age ({approx}14 Gyr), single metallicity ([Fe/H] {approx} -2.3) stellar population, although we cannot rule out a significant spread in these values. We derive a luminosity of M{sub V} = -5.5 {+-} 0.3. Studying both the spatial distribution and frequency of Leo IV's 'blue plume' stars reveals evidence for a young ({approx}2 Gyr) stellar population which makes up {approx}2% of its stellar mass. This sprinkling of star formation, only detectable in this deep study, highlights the need for further imaging of the new Milky Way satellites along with theoretical work on the expected, detailed properties of these possible 'reionization fossils'.

  9. AGB stars in Leo P and their use as metallicity probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee ( ), Chien-Hsiu

    2016-09-01

    Leo P is the most metal-poor yet star-forming galaxy in the local volume, and has the potential to serve as a local counterpart to interpret the properties of distant galaxies in the early universe. We present a comprehensive search of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in Leo P using deep infrared imaging. AGB stars are the major dust contributors; the metal poor nature of Leo P can help to shed light on the dust formation process in very low-metallicity environments, similar to the early Universe. We select and classify oxygen-rich and carbon-rich candidate AGB stars using J - K versus K colour-magnitude diagram. To filter out contaminations from background galaxies, we exploit the high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging and identify 9 oxygen-rich AGBs and 13 carbon-rich AGB stars in Leo P. We then use the ratio of carbon-rich and oxygen-rich AGB stars (C/M ratio) as an indicator of on-site metallicity and derive the global metallicity [Fe/H] = -1.8 dex for Leo P, in good agreement with previous studies using isochrone fitting. Follow-up observations of these Leo P AGB stars in the mid-infrared [e.g. Spitzer, James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)] will be invaluable to measure the dust formation rates using Spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting.

  10. Depositional environments of middle Minnelusa Leo (Middle and Upper Pennsylvanian), Wyoming, South Dakota, and Nebraska

    SciTech Connect

    Tromp, P.L.

    1983-08-01

    The informal middle member of the Minnelusa Formation, commonly known as Leo, consists of a spectrum of sediments including sandstone, dolomite, anhydrite, bedded chert, limestone, and radioactive carbonaceous shale. Deposition within the upper Paleozoic alliance basin of the present day tri-state area of South Dakota, Wyoming, and Nebraska occurred in sabkha, tidal flat, and shallow subtidal environments. Major and minor cycles of eustatic sea level changes are manifest by the Leo section. Early Desmoinesian (lowermost Leo) sediments are open marine, upper subtidal limestone interbedded with restricted marine upper subtidal dolomite, anhydrite, and radioactive organic-rich dolomite. During the upper Desmoinesian and lower Missourian, most of the Alliance basin was a restricted carbonate tidal flat. Throughout the remainder of the Pennsylvanian, the prevalent environment was a restricted coastal to inland sabkha with episodic inundations intercalating intertidal dolomite and lagoonal black shale with the sabkha sediments. Prolonged periods of exposure allowed migration of eolian bypass with only isolated patches of dunes being trapped by rare topographic relief. Criteria suggesting windblown deposition of the majority of Leo sandstone include deflationary lag surfaces, low-amplitude ripples, subcritically climbing translatent cross-stratification, and sand-flow toes. Isolated eolian sandstones provide excellent stratigraphic traps for hydrocarbons generated in the organic-rich shales. The current flurry of Leo drilling that began in 1978, has affirmed the inherent potential of this play. Definition of paleodepositional trends and seismic recognition of isolated dunes are the keys to Leo exploration success.

  11. GNSS VTEC calibration using satellite altimetry and LEO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, M. Mahdi; Schuh, Harald

    2015-04-01

    Among different systems remote sensing the ionosphere, space geodetic techniques have turned into a promising tool for monitoring and modeling the ionospheric parameters. Due to the fact that ionosphere is a dispersive medium, the signals travelling through this medium provide information about the parameters of the ionosphere in terms of Total Electron Content (TEC) or electron density along the ray path. The classical input data for development of Global Ionosphere Maps (GIM) of the Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) is obtained from the dual-frequency Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) ground-based observations. Nevertheless due to the fact that GNSS ground stations are in-homogeneously distributed with poor coverage over the oceans (namely southern Pacific and southern Atlantic) and also parts of Africa, the precision of VTEC maps are rather low in these areas. From long term analyses it is believed that the International GNSS Service (IGS) VTEC maps have an accuracy of 1-2 TECU in areas well covered with GNSS receivers; conversely, in areas with poor coverage the accuracy can be degraded by a factor of up to five. On the other hand dual-frequency satellite altimetry missions (such as Jason-1&2) provide direct VTEC values exactly over the oceans, and furthermore the Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites such as the Formosat-3/COSMIC (F/C) provide about a great number of globally distributed occultation measurements per day, which can be used to obtain VTEC values. Combining these data with the ground-based data improves the accuracy and reliability of the VTEC maps by closing of observation gaps that arise when using ground-based data only. In this approach an essential step is the evaluation and calibration of the different data sources used for the combination procedure. This study investigates the compatibility of calibrated TEC observables derived from GNSS dual-frequency data, recorded at global ground-based station networks, with space-based TEC

  12. The Many Worlds of Leo Szilard: Physicist, Peacemaker, Provocateur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanouette, William

    2014-03-01

    Best known for being the first to conceive and patent the nuclear chain reaction in the 1930s, Leo Szilard should also be remembered for other insights in both physics and biology, and for historical initiatives to control the A-bomb he helped create. In physics, Szilard applied entropy to data in a seminal 1929 paper that laid the basis for ``information theory.'' Szilard co-designed an electromagnetic refrigerator pump with Einstein in the 1920s, in 1939 he co-designed the first nuclear reactor with Enrico Fermi, and he later thought up and named the nuclear ``breeder'' reactor. Biologist Francois Jacob called Szilard an ``intellectual bumblebee'' for the many novel ideas he shared, including one that earned Jacob and others the Nobel Prize. James D. Watson said that for intellectual stimulation he liked being around Szilard because ``Leo got excited about something before it was true.'' A political activist, Szilard proposed and drafted the 1939 letter Einstein sent to President Franklin Roosevelt that warned of German A-bomb work and led to the Manhattan Project - where Szilard was ``Chief Physicist.'' Yet Szilard then worked tirelessly to curb nuclear weapons, organizing a scientists' petition to President Truman and lobbying Congress for civilian control of the atom. Szilard loved dreaming up new institutions. He helped to create the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, and founded the Council for a Livable World - the first political action committee for arms control. In biology, Szilard proposed the European Molecular Biology Organization modeled on CERN, and helped create the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, where he was one of the first fellows. Shy, witty, and eccentric, Szilard wrote a political satire in 1960 that predicted when the US-Soviet nuclear arms race would end in the late 1980s. Another satire, ``My Trial as a War Criminal'' about scientists' responsibilities for weapons of mass destruction, is credited with prompting

  13. Robust and precise baseline determination of distributed spacecraft in LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende-Alba, Gerardo; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Recent experience with prominent formation flying missions in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), such as GRACE and TanDEM-X, has shown the feasibility of precise relative navigation at millimeter and sub-millimeter levels using GPS carrier phase measurements with fixed integer ambiguities. However, the robustness and availability of the solutions provided by current algorithms may be highly dependent on the mission profile. The main challenges faced in the LEO scenario are the resulting short continuous carrier phase tracking arcs along with the observed rapidly changing ionospheric conditions, which in the particular situation of long baselines increase the difficulty of correct integer ambiguity resolution. To reduce the impact of these factors, the present study proposes a strategy based on a reduced-dynamics filtering of dual-frequency GPS measurements for precise baseline determination along with a dedicated scheme for integer ambiguity resolution, consisting of a hybrid sequential/batch algorithm based on the maximum a posteriori and integer aperture estimators. The algorithms have been tested using flight data from the GRACE, TanDEM-X and Swarm missions in order to assess their robustness to different formation and baseline configurations. Results with the GRACE mission show an average 0.7 mm consistency with the K/Ka-band ranging measurements over a period of more than two years in a baseline configuration of 220 km. Results with TanDEM-X data show an average of 3.8 mm consistency of kinematic and reduced-dynamic solutions in the along-track component over a period of 40 days in baseline configurations of 500 m and 75 km. Data from Swarm A and Swarm C spacecraft are largely affected by atmospheric scintillation and contain half cycle ambiguities. The results obtained under such conditions show an overall consistency between kinematic and reduced-dynamic solutions of 1.7 cm in the along-track component over a period of 30 days in a variable baseline of approximately 60

  14. 77 FR 2715 - D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on December 29, 2011, D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC (D'Lo), 1002 East St. Mary Blvd., Lafayette, Louisiana 70503, filed in... D'Lo to construct, operate, and maintain a new natural gas storage project to be located in...

  15. THE SPACE MOTION OF LEO I: HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PROPER MOTION AND IMPLIED ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Besla, Gurtina; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Majewski, Steven R.

    2013-05-10

    We present the first absolute proper motion measurement of Leo I, based on two epochs of Hubble Space Telescope ACS/WFC images separated by {approx}5 years in time. The average shift of Leo I stars with respect to {approx}100 background galaxies implies a proper motion of ({mu}{sub W}, {mu}{sub N}) = (0.1140 {+-} 0.0295, -0.1256 {+-} 0.0293) mas yr{sup -1}. The implied Galactocentric velocity vector, corrected for the reflex motion of the Sun, has radial and tangential components V{sub rad} = 167.9 {+-} 2.8 km s{sup -1} and V{sub tan} = 101.0 {+-} 34.4 km s{sup -1}, respectively. We study the detailed orbital history of Leo I by solving its equations of motion backward in time for a range of plausible mass models for the Milky Way (MW) and its surrounding galaxies. Leo I entered the MW virial radius 2.33 {+-} 0.21 Gyr ago, most likely on its first infall. It had a pericentric approach 1.05 {+-} 0.09 Gyr ago at a Galactocentric distance of 91 {+-} 36 kpc. We associate these timescales with characteristic timescales in Leo I's star formation history, which shows an enhanced star formation activity {approx}2 Gyr ago and quenching {approx}1 Gyr ago. There is no indication from our calculations that other galaxies have significantly influenced Leo I's orbit, although there is a small probability that it may have interacted with either Ursa Minor or Leo II within the last {approx}1 Gyr. For most plausible MW masses, the observed velocity implies that Leo I is bound to the MW. However, it may not be appropriate to include it in models of the MW satellite population that assume dynamical equilibrium, given its recent infall. Solution of the complete (non-radial) timing equations for the Leo I orbit implies an MW mass M{sub MW,vir} = 3.15{sub -1.36}{sup +1.58} x 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }, with the large uncertainty dominated by cosmic scatter. In a companion paper, we compare the new observations to the properties of Leo I subhalo analogs extracted from cosmological

  16. Effect of KOH concentration on LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells. An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    An update of validation test results confirming the breakthrough in LEO cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte is presented. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen cells is reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH.

  17. Effect of KOH concentration on LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells - An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    An update of validation test results confirming the breakthrough in LEO cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte is presented. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen cells is reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH.

  18. Effect of LEO cycling on 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells - An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    An update of validation test results confirming the breakthrough in LEO cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte is presented. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen cells is reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH.

  19. Arcing in LEO: Does the Whole Array Discharge?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T.; Hillard, G. Barry

    2005-01-01

    The conventional wisdom about solar array arcing in LEO is that only the parts of the solar array that are swept over by the arc-generated plasma front are discharged in the initial arc. This limits the amount of energy that can be discharged. Recent work done at the NASA Glenn Research Center has shown that this idea is mistaken. In fact, the capacitance of the entire solar array may be discharged, which for large arrays leads to very large and possibly debilitating arcs, even if no sustained arc occurs. We present the laboratory work that conclusively demonstrates this fact by using a grounded plate that prevents the arc-plasma front from reaching certain array strings. Finally, we discuss the dependence of arc strength and arc pulse width on the capacitance that is discharged, and provide a physical mechanism for discharge of the entire array, even when parts of the array are not accessible to the arc-plasma front. Mitigation techniques are also presented.

  20. A Metapopulation Approach to African Lion (Panthera leo) Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Dolrenry, Stephanie; Stenglein, Jennifer; Hazzah, Leela; Lutz, R. Scott; Frank, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Due to anthropogenic pressures, African lion (Panthera leo) populations in Kenya and Tanzania are increasingly limited to fragmented populations. Lions living on isolated habitat patches exist in a matrix of less-preferred habitat. A framework of habitat patches within a less-suitable matrix describes a metapopulation. Metapopulation analysis can provide insight into the dynamics of each population patch in reference to the system as a whole, and these analyses often guide conservation planning. We present the first metapopulation analysis of African lions. We use a spatially-realistic model to investigate how sex-biased dispersal abilities of lions affect patch occupancy and also examine whether human densities surrounding the remaining lion populations affect the metapopulation as a whole. Our results indicate that male lion dispersal ability strongly contributes to population connectivity while the lesser dispersal ability of females could be a limiting factor. When populations go extinct, recolonization will not occur if distances between patches exceed female dispersal ability or if females are not able to survive moving across the matrix. This has profound implications for the overall metapopulation; the female models showed an intrinsic extinction rate from five-fold to a hundred-fold higher than the male models. Patch isolation is a consideration for even the largest lion populations. As lion populations continue to decline and with local extinctions occurring, female dispersal ability and the proximity to the nearest lion population are serious considerations for the recolonization of individual populations and for broader conservation efforts. PMID:24505385

  1. Arcing in LEO - Does the Whole Array Discharge?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T.; Hillard, G. Barry

    2005-01-01

    The conventional wisdom about solar array arcing in LEO is that only the parts the solar array that are swept over by the arc-generated plasma front are discharged in the initial arc. This limits the amount of energy that can be discharged. Recent work done at the NASA Glenn Research Center has shown that this idea is mistaken. In fact, the capacitance of the entire solar array may be discharged, which for large arrays leads to very large and possibly debilitating arcs, even if no sustained arc occurs. We present the laboratory work that conclusively demonstrates this fact by using a grounded plate that prevents the arc-plasma front from reaching certain array strings. Finally, we discuss the dependence of arc strength and arc pulse width on the capacitance that is discharged, and provide a physical mechanism for discharge of the entire array, even when parts of the array are not accessible to the arc-plasma front. Mitigation techniques are also presented.

  2. A SEARCH FOR DUST EMISSION IN THE LEO INTERGALACTIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Bot, Caroline; Helou, George; Puget, Jeremie; Latter, William B.; Schneider, Stephen; Terzian, Yervant

    2009-08-15

    We present a search for infrared dust emission associated with the Leo cloud, a large intergalactic cloud in the M96 group. Mid-infrared and far-infrared images were obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our analysis of these maps is done at each wavelength relative to the H I spatial distribution. We observe a probable detection at 8 {mu}m and a marginal detection at 24 {mu}m associated with the highest H I column densities in the cloud. At 70 and 160 {mu}m, upper limits on the dust emission are deduced. The level of the detection is low so that the possibility of a fortuitous cirrus clump or of an overdensity of extragalactic sources along the line of sight cannot be excluded. If this detection is confirmed, the quantities of dust inferred imply a dust-to-gas ratio in the intergalactic cloud up to a few times solar but no less than 1/20 solar. A confirmed detection would therefore exclude the possibility that the intergalactic cloud has a primordial origin. Instead, this large intergalactic cloud could therefore have been formed through interactions between galaxies in the group.

  3. Detection of starquakes on the red dwarf AD Leo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, M. E.; Avgoloupis, S. J.; Seiradakis, J. H.; Papantoniou, Ch.

    2016-07-01

    The results of the analysis of the one color (B) observations of the Stefanion Observatory for the red dwarf AD Leo at any stage of the stellar activity (quiescence, weak flares, strong flares),indicate that: (1) Transient high frequency oscillations occur during the flare event and during the quiet-star phase as well; (2) The Observed frequencies range between 0.0005Hz (period 33min) and 0.3 Hz (period 3s) not rigorously bounded; However, the quiescence parts of the light-curve which were analyzed belong to the pre- or after- flare state i.e. are connected with a major magnetic even (the observed flare). In this work we find that transient oscillations appear far apart from the observed flares, during the quiet state of the stars, as a result of the general magnetic activity of the star. The power spectrum of these oscillations resembles that of the solar like oscillation spectra i.e the sunquakes spectra. Finally a tentative estimation of the main physical parameters of the star, using asteroseismic analysis, was performed.

  4. Imaging Starspots on LO Pegasi via Light-curve Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Deskins, R.; Vutisalchavakul, N.

    2007-12-01

    We present maps of the star LO Pegasi obtained via Light-curve Inversion, a computational technique which produces an image of a star's surface features based on variations in the star's observed brightness as dark starspots rotate into and out of view from Earth. LO Pegasi is a rapidly rotating (P=10.17 hr) K8V young solar analog. We inverted BVRI light curves obtained from CCD images acquired on July 7-9 and July 22-23, 2007 at Perkins Observatory in Delaware, OH. Using multiple filters significantly improves the latitude resolution of our maps. Our inversions revealed the presence of a large mid-latitude spot or spotted region on the map from July 7-9, which appears to have evolved into a more complex two-spot configuration by July 22-23. The authors wish to acknowledge the support of the NSF REU Program and the Ohio Wesleyan University Summer Science Research Program.

  5. Liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning concept testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Gretchen L. E.; Orth, Michael S.; Mehta, Gopal K.

    1993-01-01

    Testing of a simplified LO2 propellant conditioning concept for future expendable launch vehicles is discussed. Four different concepts are being investigated: no-bleed, low-bleed, use of a recirculation line, and He bubbling. A full-scale test article, which is a facsimile of a propellant feed duct with an attached section to simulate heat input from an LO2 turbopump, is to be tested at the Cold Flow Facility of the Marshall Space Flight Center West Test Area. Work to date includes: design and fabrication of the test article, design of the test facility and initial fabrication, development of a test matrix and test procedures, initial predictions of test output, and heat leak calibration and heat exchanger tests on the test articles.

  6. Liquid Oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning concept testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Gretchen L. E.; Orth, Michael S.; Mehta, Gopal K.

    1993-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and industry contractors have undertaken activities to develop a simplified liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning concept for future expendable launch vehicles. The objective of these activities is to reduce operations costs and timelines and to improve safety of these vehicles. The approach followed has been to identify novel concepts through system level studies and demonstrate the feasibility of these concepts through small-scale and full-scale testing. Testing will also provide data for design guidelines and validation of analytical models. Four different concepts are being investigated: no-bleed, low-bleed, use of a recirculation line, and helium (He) bubbling. This investigation is being done under a Joint Institutional Research and Development (JIRAD) program currently in effect between MSFC and General Dynamics Space Systems (GDSS). A full-scale test article, which is a facsimile of a propellant feed duct with an attached section to simulate heat input from a LO2 turbopump, will be tested at the Cold Flow Facility at MSFC's West Test Area. Liquid nitrogen (LN2), which has similar properties to LO2, will be used in place of LO2 for safety and budget reasons. Work to date includes design and fabrication of the test article, design of the test facility and initial fabrication, development of a test matrix and test procedures, initial predictions of test output, and heat leak calibration and heat exchanger tests on the test article. The tests for all propellant conditioning concepts will be conducted in the summer of 1993, with the final report completed by October, 1993.

  7. LoCuSS: Testing hydrostatic equilibrium in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. P.; Mazzotta, P.; Okabe, N.; Ziparo, F.; Mulroy, S. L.; Babul, A.; Finoguenov, A.; McCarthy, I. G.; Lieu, M.; Bahé, Y. M.; Bourdin, H.; Evrard, A. E.; Futamase, T.; Haines, C. P.; Jauzac, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Martino, R.; May, P. E.; Taylor, J. E.; Umetsu, K.

    2016-02-01

    We test the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium in an X-ray luminosity selected sample of 50 galaxy clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.3 from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS). Our weak-lensing measurements of M500 control systematic biases to sub-4 per cent, and our hydrostatic measurements of the same achieve excellent agreement between XMM-Newton and Chandra. The mean ratio of X-ray to lensing mass for these 50 clusters is β_X= 0.95± 0.05, and for the 44 clusters also detected by Planck, the mean ratio of Planck mass estimate to LoCuSS lensing mass is β_P= 0.95± 0.04. Based on a careful like-for-like analysis, we find that LoCuSS, the Canadian Cluster Comparison Project, and Weighing the Giants agree on β_P ≃ 0.9-0.95 at 0.15 < z < 0.3. This small level of hydrostatic bias disagrees at ˜5σ with the level required to reconcile Planck cosmology results from the cosmic microwave background and galaxy cluster counts.

  8. Quadrature mixture LO suppression via DSW DAC noise dither

    DOEpatents

    Dubbert, Dale F.; Dudley, Peter A.

    2007-08-21

    A Quadrature Error Corrected Digital Waveform Synthesizer (QECDWS) employs frequency dependent phase error corrections to, in effect, pre-distort the phase characteristic of the chirp to compensate for the frequency dependent phase nonlinearity of the RF and microwave subsystem. In addition, the QECDWS can employ frequency dependent correction vectors to the quadrature amplitude and phase of the synthesized output. The quadrature corrections cancel the radars' quadrature upconverter (mixer) errors to null the unwanted spectral image. A result is the direct generation of an RF waveform, which has a theoretical chirp bandwidth equal to the QECDWS clock frequency (1 to 1.2 GHz) with the high Spurious Free Dynamic Range (SFDR) necessary for high dynamic range radar systems such as SAR. To correct for the problematic upconverter local oscillator (LO) leakage, precision DC offsets can be applied over the chirped pulse using a pseudo-random noise dither. The present dither technique can effectively produce a quadrature DC bias which has the precision required to adequately suppress the LO leakage. A calibration technique can be employed to calculate both the quadrature correction vectors and the LO-nulling DC offsets using the radar built-in test capability.

  9. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF LEO T FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Zucker, Daniel B.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Martin, Nicolas F.; De Jong, Jelte T. A.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Bell, Eric F.; Belokurov, Vasily; Evans, N. Wyn

    2012-04-01

    We present the star formation history (SFH) of the faintest known star-forming galaxy, Leo T, based on deep imaging taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). The HST/WFPC2 color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of Leo T is exquisitely deep, extending {approx}2 mag below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, permitting excellent constraints on star formation at all ages. We use a maximum likelihood CMD fitting technique to measure the SFH of Leo T assuming three different sets of stellar evolution models: Padova (solar-scaled metallicity) and BaSTI (both solar-scaled and {alpha}-enhanced metallicities). The resulting SFHs are remarkably consistent at all ages, indicating that our derived SFH is robust to the choice of stellar evolution model. From the lifetime SFH of Leo T, we find that 50% of the total stellar mass formed prior to z {approx} 1 (7.6 Gyr ago). Subsequent to this epoch, the SFH of Leo T is roughly constant until the most recent {approx}25 Myr, where the SFH shows an abrupt drop. This decrease could be due to a cessation of star formation or stellar initial mass function sampling effects, but we are unable to distinguish between the two scenarios. Overall, our measured SFH is consistent with previously derived SFHs of Leo T. However, the HST-based solution provides improved age resolution and reduced uncertainties at all epochs. The SFH, baryonic gas fraction, and location of Leo T are unlike any of the other recently discovered faint dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, and instead bear strong resemblance to gas-rich dwarf galaxies (irregular or transition), suggesting that gas-rich dwarf galaxies may share common modes of star formation over a large range of stellar mass ({approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }).

  10. Study of LEO-SAT microwave link for broad-band mobile satellite communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujise, Masayuki; Chujo, Wataru; Chiba, Isamu; Furuhama, Yoji; Kawabata, Kazuaki; Konishi, Yoshihiko

    1993-01-01

    In the field of mobile satellite communications, a system based on low-earth-orbit satellites (LEO-SAT's) such as the Iridium system has been proposed. The LEO-SAT system is able to offer mobile telecommunication services in high-latitude areas. Rain degradation, fading and shadowing are also expected to be decreased when the system is operated at a high elevation angle. Furthermore, the propagation delay generated in the LEO-SAT system is less pronounced than that in the geostationary orbit satellite (GEO-SAT) system and, in voice services, the effect of the delay is almost negligible. We proposed a concept of a broad-band mobile satellite communication system with LEO-SAT's and Optical ISL. In that system, a fixed L-band (1.6/1.5 GHz) multibeam is used to offer narrow band service to the mobile terminals in the entire area covered by a LEO-SAT and steerable Ka-band (30/20 GHz) spot beams are used for the wide band service. In this paper, we present results of a study of LEO-SAT microwave link between a satellite and a mobile terminal for a broad-band mobile satellite communication system. First, the results of link budget calculations are presented and the antennas mounted on satellites are shown. For a future mobile antenna technology, we also show digital beamforming (DBF) techniques. DBF, together with modulation and/or demodulation, is becoming a key technique for mobile antennas with advanced functions such as antenna pattern calibration, correction, and radio interference suppression. In this paper, efficient DBF techniques for transmitting and receiving are presented. Furthermore, an adaptive array antenna system suitable for this LEO-SAT is presented.

  11. An Abel transform for deriving line-of-sight wind profiles from LEO-LEO infrared laser occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syndergaard, S.; Kirchengast, G.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a formula for the retrieval of the line-of-sight (l.o.s.) wind speed from future low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite-to-satellite infrared laser occultation measurements. The formula involves an Abelian integral transform akin to the Abel transform widely used for deriving refractive index from bending angle in Global Navigation Satellite System radio occultation measurements. Besides the Abelian integral transform, the formula is derived from a truncated series expansion of the volume absorption coefficient as a function of frequency and includes a simple absorption-line-asymmetry correction term. A first-order formulation (referred to as the standard formula) is complemented by higher-order terms that can be used for high-accuracy computations. Under the assumptions of spherical symmetry and perfect knowledge of spectroscopy, the residual l.o.s. wind error from using the standard formula rather than the high-accuracy formula is assessed to be small compared to that anticipated from measurement errors in a real experiment. Applying the new formula just in standard form to future infrared laser transmission profiles would therefore enable the retrieval of l.o.s. stratospheric wind profiles with an accuracy limited mainly by measurement errors, residual spectroscopic errors, and deviations from spherical symmetry.

  12. Faster than fiber: Advantages and challenges of LEO communications satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanella, S. Joseph; Kirkwood, Timothy J.

    1995-01-01

    Low Earth Orbit (LEO) communications satellite systems are emerging as attractive alternatives to the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) systems. GEO satellites have largely dominated the commercial and government communications satellite systems for telecommunications services since the early 1960's. A principal driver behind the move to LEO satellites is the competition to long propagation delay geostationary orbit satellite systems created by rapid expansion of short propagation delay terrestrial land and undersea fiber optic cable links for national and global connectivity. Communication paths over LEO satellites can have shorter propagation delay than terrestrial fiber. This is because the speed of electromagnetic wave propagation via LEO satellites is 50% greater than that of light in fiber optic cable. This fact eliminates the long propagation delay property that has become synonymous with GEO communications satellite systems. Other drivers are the use of small portable and hand-held earth terminals and the promise of lower launch cost of small satellites to low earth orbits. The paper expands on the properties that promise to make LEO communications satellite systems the choice of the future.

  13. Low-Earth-Orbiter resource allocation and capacity planning for the DSN using LEO4CAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G.; Borden, C.

    1994-01-01

    The Deep Space Network provides tracking and communication services for a number of U.S. and international low-Earth-orbiting (LEO) and near-Earth missions. This service is supplied by the 26-m subnet (located at each of the DSN complexes), the 9-m and the 34-m Antenna Research System antennas at Goldstone, and the 11-m antennas (following the orbital VLBI mission). An increasing number of LEO missions are planned for DSN support, which will result in increasingly complex ground resource allocation and mission support trades. To support TDA decision making on mission support and cost-effective ground system evolution for this 26-m subnet, LEO4CAST has been developed. LEO4CAST is a tool that uses statistical approaches to provide useful information for long-term ground system capacity planning and near-term resource allocation (prior to detailed time-of-day scheduling). LEO4CAST is currently beta-test software and is being exercised by both the Office of Telecommunications and Data Acquisition (TDA) and the JPL Systems Division.

  14. An Assessment of the Current LEO Debris Environment and the Need for Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2010-01-01

    The anti-satellite test on the Fengun-1 C weather satellite in early 2007 and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 in 2009 dramatically altered the landscape of the human-made orbital debris environment in the low Earth orbit (LEO). The two events generated approximately 5500 fragments large enough to be tracked by the U.S. Space Surveillance Network. Those fragments account for more than 60% increase to the debris population in LEO. However, even before the ASAT test, model analyses already indicated that the debris population (for those larger than 10 cm) in LEO had reached a point where the population would continue to increase, due to collisions among existing objects, even without any future launches. The conclusion implies that as satellites continue to be launched and unexpected breakup events continue to occur, commonly-adopted mitigation measures will not be able to stop the collision-driven population growth. To remediate the debris environment in LEO, active debris removal must be considered. This presentation will provide an updated assessment of the debris environment after the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 collision, an analysis of several future environment projections based on different scenarios, and a projection of collision activities in LEO in the near future. The need to use active debris removal to stabilize future debris environment will be demonstrated and the effectiveness of various active debris removal strategies will be quantified.

  15. The effect of solar forcing induced atmospheric perturbations on LEO satellites' nominal aerodynamic drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Weigel, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric drag is the strongest force perturbing the motion of satellites in low Earth orbits LEO, and could cause re-entry of satellites, difficulty in identifying and tracking of the satellites and other space objects, manuvering and prediction of lifetime and re-entry. Solar activities influence the temperature, density and composition of the upper atmosphere. These effects thus strongly depend on the phase of a solar cycle. The frequency of intense flares and storms increase during solar maximum. Heating up of the atmosphere causes its expansion eventually leading to accelerated drag of orbiting satellites, especially those in LEO. In this paper, we present the model of the atmospheric drag effect on the trajectory of hypothetical LEO satellites of different ballistic coefficients. We investigate long-term trend of atmospheric drag on LEO satellites due to solar forcing induced atmospheric perturbations and heating at different phases of the solar cycle, and during interval of strong geomagnetic disturbances or storms. We show the dependence of orbital decay on severity of both the solar cycle and phase, and the extent of geomagnetic perturbations. The result of the model compares well with the observed decay profile of existing LEO satellites and provides a better understanding of the issue of the orbital decay. Our result may also be useful for selection of launch window of satellites for an extended lifetime in the orbit.

  16. Water vapor retrieval by LEO and GEO SAR: techniques and performance evaluation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi, Alessandro; Silvio Marzano, Frank; Monti Guarnieri, Andrea; Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Realini, Eugenio; Venuti, Giovanna

    2016-04-01

    The millimetric sensitivity of SAR interferometry has been proved fruitful in estimating water-vapor maps, that can then be processed into higher level ZWD and PWV products. In the paper, we consider two different SAR surveys: Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) SAR, like ESA Sentinel-1, and Geosynchronous Earth Orbiting SAR. The two system are complementary, where LEO coverage is world-wide, while GEO is regional. On the other hand, LEO revisit is daily-to weekly, whereas GEO provides images in minutes to hours. Finally, LEO synthetic aperture is so short, less than a second, that the water-vapor is mostly frozen, whereas in the long GEO aperture the atmospheric phase screen would introduce a total decorrelation, if not compensated for. In the paper, we first review the Differential Interferometric techniques to get differential delay maps - to be then converted into water-vapor products, and then evaluate the quality in terms of geometric resolution, sensitivity, percentage of scene coverage, revisit, by referring to L and C band system, for both LEO and GEO. Finally, we discuss an empirical model for time-space variogram, and show a preliminary validation by campaign conducted with Ground Based Radar, as a proxy of GEO-SAR, capable of continuous scanning wide areas (up to 15 km) with metric resolution.

  17. On the LO-polaron dispersion in D dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, B.; Kalina, F.; Smondyrev, M.

    2003-05-01

    We discuss the (LO)polaron dispersion for arbitrary spatial dimension D. Firstly, we review the existing literature; recent numerical work is critically analyzed. Secondly, we derive novel upper bounds for the dispersion, which incorporate the correct behaviour of the dispersion up to third order of the coupling constant . A totally analytical evaluation is performed in the case D = 1. We compare the upper bounds with previously published lower bounds. Apart from a surrounding of zero dispersion, the relative deviation is on a few-percent scale.

  18. Photometry of LO Pegasi in B, V, R colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csorvási, R.

    2006-09-01

    Variable magnetic activity manifested by starspot distribution is investigated on the single K5-K7 dwarf LO Peg, using one month long photometric observations. We supposed three circular spots for light curve solution. We find variable spot temperature, whose average is 3960 K. The sizes of spots were stable for two spots and one spot showed a significant decrease. Different migration periods on two spots indicate differential rotation, the magnitude of the migration is slow. During the measured 90 stellar rotations (38.5 days) the location of the activity remained on the same hemisphere of the star.

  19. Compensation of an attitude disturbance torque caused by magnetic substances in LEO satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamori, Takaya; Wang, Jihe; Saisutjarit, Phongsatorn; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

    This research considers an attitude disturbance torque caused by ferromagnetic substances in a LEO satellite. In most LEO satellite missions, a gravity gradient torque, solar pressure torque, aerodynamic torque, and magnetic dipole moment torque are considered for their attitude control systems, however, the effect of the ferromagnetic substances causing a disturbance torque in the geomagnetic field is not considered in previous satellite missions. The ferromagnetic substances such as iron cores of MTQs and a magnetic hysteresis damper for a passive attitude control system are used in various small satellites. These substances cause a disturbance torque which is almost the same magnitude of the dipole magnetic disturbance and the dominant disturbance in the worst cases. This research proposes a method to estimate and compensate for the effect of the ferromagnetic substances using an extended Kalman filter. From simulation results, the research concludes that the proposed method is useful and attractive for precise attitude control for LEO satellite missions.

  20. Handover aspects for a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) CDMA Land Mobile Satellite (LMS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, P.; Beach, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of handoff in a land mobile satellite (LMS) system between adjacent satellites in a low earth orbit (LEO) constellation. In particular, emphasis is placed on the application of soft handoff in a direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) LMS system. Soft handoff is explained in terms of terrestrial macroscopic diversity, in which signals transmitted via several independent fading paths are combined to enhance the link quality. This concept is then reconsidered in the context of a LEO LMS system. A two-state Markov channel model is used to simulate the effects of shadowing on the communications path from the mobile to each satellite during handoff. The results of the channel simulation form a platform for discussion regarding soft handoff, highlighting the potential merits of the scheme when applied in a LEO LMS environment.

  1. A novel data association scheme for LEO space debris surveillance based on a double fence radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; Hu, Weidong; Xin, Qin; Guo, Weiwei

    2012-12-01

    The increasing amount of space debris threatens to seriously deteriorate and damage space-based instruments in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environments. Therefore, LEO space debris surveillance systems must be developed to provide situational awareness in space and issue warnings of collisions with LEO space debris. In this paper, a double fence radar system is proposed as an emerging paradigm for LEO space debris surveillance. This system exhibits several unique and promising characteristics compared with existing surveillance systems. In this paper, we also investigate the data association scheme for LEO space debris surveillance based on a double fence radar system. We also perform a theoretical analysis of the performance of our proposed scheme. The superiority and the effectiveness of our novel data association scheme is demonstrated by experimental results. The data used in our experiments is the LEO space debris catalog produced by the North American Air Defense Command (NORAD) up to 2009, especially for scenarios with high densities of LEO space debris, which were primarily produced by the collisions between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251. We hope that our work will stimulate and benefit future work on LEO space debris surveillance approaches and enable construction of the double fence radar system.

  2. 20 CFR 10.735 - When is a non-Federal law enforcement officer (LEO) covered under the FECA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When is a non-Federal law enforcement officer (LEO) covered under the FECA? 10.735 Section 10.735 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... When is a non-Federal law enforcement officer (LEO) covered under the FECA? (a) A law...

  3. A Study to Identify Areas of Relative Strength and Weakness in Support for the Saint Leo College Library Acquisitions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Stephen G.

    The practicum sought to identify areas of relative strength and weakness in support for the Saint Leo College (Florida) Library Acquisitions Project, a project to improve library support to the Military Education Program administered by Saint Leo College on military installations throughout the Southeast. Using the Interactive Forces Theory of…

  4. Materials selection for long life in LEO: A critical evaluation of atomic oxygen testing with thermal atom systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, S. L.; Kuminecz, J.; Leger, L.; Nordine, P.

    1988-01-01

    The use of thermal atom test methods as a materials selection and screening technique for low-Earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft is critically evaluated. The chemistry and physics of thermal atom environments are compared with the LEO environment. The relative reactivities of a number of materials determined to be in thermal atom environments are compared to those observed in LEO and in high quality LEO simulations. Reaction efficiencies measured in a new type of thermal atom apparatus are one-hundredth to one-thousandth those observed in LEO, and many materials showing nearly identical reactivities in LEO show relative reactivities differing by as much as a factor of 8 in thermal atom systems. A simple phenomenological kinetic model for the reaction of oxygen atoms with organic materials can be used to explain the differences in reactivity in different environments. Certain specific thermal test environments can be used as reliable materials screening tools. Using thermal atom methods to predict material lifetime in LEO requires direct calibration of the method against LEO data or high quality simulation data for each material.

  5. THE SPACE MOTION OF LEO I: THE MASS OF THE MILKY WAY'S DARK MATTER HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Besla, Gurtina

    2013-05-10

    We combine our Hubble Space Telescope measurement of the proper motion of the Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxy (presented in a companion paper) with the highest resolution numerical simulations of Galaxy-size dark matter halos in existence to constrain the mass of the Milky Way's dark matter halo (M{sub vir,MW}). Despite Leo I's large Galactocentric space velocity (200 km s{sup -1}) and distance (261 kpc), we show that it is extremely unlikely to be unbound if Galactic satellites are associated with dark matter substructure, as 99.9% of subhalos in the simulations are bound to their host. The observed position and velocity of Leo I strongly disfavor a low-mass Milky Way: if we assume that Leo I is the least bound of the Milky Way's classical satellites, then we find that M{sub vir,MW} > 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} at 95% confidence for a variety of Bayesian priors on M{sub vir,MW}. In lower mass halos, it is vanishingly rare to find subhalos at 261 kpc moving as fast as Leo I. Should an additional classical satellite be found to be less bound than Leo I, this lower limit on M{sub vir,MW} would increase by 30%. Imposing a mass-weighted {Lambda}CDM prior, we find a median Milky Way virial mass of M{sub vir,MW} = 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }, with a 90% confidence interval of [1.0-2.4] Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }. We also confirm a strong correlation between subhalo infall time and orbital energy in the simulations and show that proper motions can aid significantly in interpreting the infall times and orbital histories of satellites.

  6. Effect of KOH concentration on LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen flight battery cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1990-01-01

    A breakthrough in low earth orbit (LEO) cycle life of individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel hydrogen battery cells was reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. The effect of KOH concentration on cycle life was studied. The cycle regime was a stressful accelerated LEO, which consisted of a 27.5 min charge followed by a 17.5 min charge (2 x normal rate). The depth of discharge (DOD) was 80 percent. The cell temperature was maintained at 23 C. The next step is to validate these results using flight hardware and a real time LEO test. NASA Lewis has a contract with the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC), Crane, Indiana, to validate the boiler plate test results. Six 48 A-hr Hughes recirculation design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight battery cells are being evaluated. Three of the cells contain 26 percent KOH (test cells) and three contain 31 percent KOH (control cells). They are undergoing real time LEO cycle life testing. The cycle regime is a 90-min LEO orbit consisting of a 54-min charge followed by a 36-min discharge. The depth-of-discharge is 80 percent. The cell temperature is maintained at 10 C. The cells were cycled for over 8000 cycles in the continuing test. There were no failures for the cells containing 26 percent KOH. There was two failures, however, for the cells containing 31 percent KOH.

  7. The Space Motion of Leo I: The Mass of the Milky Way's Dark Matter Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Besla, Gurtina; van der Marel, Roeland P.

    2013-05-01

    We combine our Hubble Space Telescope measurement of the proper motion of the Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxy (presented in a companion paper) with the highest resolution numerical simulations of Galaxy-size dark matter halos in existence to constrain the mass of the Milky Way's dark matter halo (M vir, MW). Despite Leo I's large Galactocentric space velocity (200 km s-1) and distance (261 kpc), we show that it is extremely unlikely to be unbound if Galactic satellites are associated with dark matter substructure, as 99.9% of subhalos in the simulations are bound to their host. The observed position and velocity of Leo I strongly disfavor a low-mass Milky Way: if we assume that Leo I is the least bound of the Milky Way's classical satellites, then we find that M vir, MW > 1012 M ⊙ at 95% confidence for a variety of Bayesian priors on M vir, MW. In lower mass halos, it is vanishingly rare to find subhalos at 261 kpc moving as fast as Leo I. Should an additional classical satellite be found to be less bound than Leo I, this lower limit on M vir, MW would increase by 30%. Imposing a mass-weighted ΛCDM prior, we find a median Milky Way virial mass of M vir, MW = 1.6 × 1012 M ⊙, with a 90% confidence interval of [1.0-2.4] × 1012 M ⊙. We also confirm a strong correlation between subhalo infall time and orbital energy in the simulations and show that proper motions can aid significantly in interpreting the infall times and orbital histories of satellites.

  8. Effect of KOH concentration on LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen flight battery cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1990-01-01

    A breakthrough in the low-earth-orbit (LEO) cycle life of individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel hydrogen battery cells is reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. The effect of KOH concentration on cycle life was studied. The cycle regime was a stressful accelerated LEO, which consisted of a 27.5 min charge followed by a 17.5 min charge (2 x normal rate). The depth of discharge (DOD) was 80 percent. The cell temperature was maintained at 23 C. The next step is to validate these results using flight hardware and real time LEO test. NASA Lewis has a contract with the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC), Crane, Indiana to validate the boiler plate test results. Six 48 A-hr Hughes recirculation design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight battery cells are being evaluated. Three of the cells contain 26 percent KOH (test cells) and three contain 31 percent KOH (control cells). They are undergoing real time LEO cycle life testing. The cycle regime is a 90-min LEO orbit consisting of a 54-min charge followed by a 36-min discharge. The depth-of-discharge is 80 percent. The cell temperature is maintained at 10 C. The cells were cycled for over 8000 cycles in the continuing test. There were no failures for the cells containing 26 percent KOH. There were two failures, however, for the cells containing 31 percent KOH.

  9. Fast optically sectioned fluorescence HiLo endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Daryl; Mertz, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We describe a nonscanning, fiber bundle endomicroscope that performs optically sectioned fluorescence imaging with fast frame rates and real-time processing. Our sectioning technique is based on HiLo imaging, wherein two widefield images are acquired under uniform and structured illumination and numerically processed to reject out-of-focus background. This work is an improvement upon an earlier demonstration of widefield optical sectioning through a flexible fiber bundle. The improved device features lateral and axial resolutions of 2.6 and 17 μm, respectively, a net frame rate of 9.5 Hz obtained by real-time image processing with a graphics processing unit (GPU) and significantly reduced motion artifacts obtained by the use of a double-shutter camera. We demonstrate the performance of our system with optically sectioned images and videos of a fluorescently labeled chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in the developing G. gallus embryo. HiLo endomicroscopy is a candidate technique for low-cost, high-speed clinical optical biopsies. PMID:22463023

  10. Volumetric HiLo microscopy employing an electrically tunable lens.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Katrin; Smolarski, André; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Fischer, Andreas; Stürmer, Moritz; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Czarske, Jürgen W

    2016-06-27

    Electrically tunable lenses exhibit strong potential for fast motion-free axial scanning in a variety of microscopes. However, they also lead to a degradation of the achievable resolution because of aberrations and misalignment between illumination and detection optics that are induced by the scan itself. Additionally, the typically nonlinear relation between actuation voltage and axial displacement leads to over- or under-sampled frame acquisition in most microscopic techniques because of their static depth-of-field. To overcome these limitations, we present an Adaptive-Lens-High-and-Low-frequency (AL-HiLo) microscope that enables volumetric measurements employing an electrically tunable lens. By using speckle-patterned illumination, we ensure stability against aberrations of the electrically tunable lens. Its depth-of-field can be adjusted a-posteriori and hence enables to create flexible scans, which compensates for irregular axial measurement positions. The adaptive HiLo microscope provides an axial scanning range of 1 mm with an axial resolution of about 4 μm and sub-micron lateral resolution over the full scanning range. Proof of concept measurements at home-built specimens as well as zebrafish embryos with reporter gene-driven fluorescence in the thyroid gland are shown. PMID:27410654

  11. Advanced liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning concept testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, G. L. E.; Suter, J. D.; Turner, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    Advanced methods of liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning were studied as part of an effort for increasing reliability and operability while reducing cost of future heavy lift launch vehicles. The most promising conditioning concept evaluated was no-bleed (passive recirculation) followed by low-bleed, helium injection, and use of a recirculation line. Full-scale cryogenic testing was performed with a sloped feedline test article to validate models of behavior of LO2 in the feedline and to prove no-bleed feasibility. Test data are also intended to help generate design guidelines for the development of a main propulsion system feed duct. A design-of-experiments matrix of over 100 tests was developed to test all four propellant conditioning concepts and the impact of design parameters on the concepts. Liquid nitrogen was used as the test fluid. The work for this project was conducted from October 1992 through January 1994 at the hydrogen cold flow facility of the west test area of MSFC. Test data have shown that satisfactory temperatures are being obtained for the no-bleed conditioning concept.

  12. A photometric study of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Leo IV and Bootes II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Haw

    A photometric study of the ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies Leo IV and Bootes II in the V and IC filters is here presented. The age of Leo IV relative to M92 were derived by fitting of Dartmouth isochrones, by a "standard" VHBTO method, and by the V HBTO method of VandenBerg et al. 2013. The age of Bootes II relative to M92 was derived by fitting of Dartmouth isochrones. Leo IV is found to be between 2 to 2.5 Gyr younger than M92 by these three methods. It is found to be predominantly old and metal poor and is well fit by isochrones of [Fe/H] = ---2.46 and [alpha/Fe] = 0.2 and 0.4. An age spread with a plausible value of ˜ 2 Gyr cannot be ruled out. A 10 Gyr old synthetic horizontal branch with [Fe/H] = ---1.70 and [alpha/Fe] of 0.2 is fit to Leo IV's red horizontal branch (RHB). The good fit of this model and its matching isochrone to Leo IV's CMD suggests that the RHB is real and not an observational artifact as proposed by Okamoto et al. 2012. Two RRab Lyraes previously observed by Moretti et al. 2009 were observed in Leo IV. One of the stars, V1, is observed to exhibit the Blazhko effect. No further RR Lyraes were uncovered in Leo IV. Comparison of the horizontal branch's observed V magnitude to the absolute magnitudes of the RR Lyraes yields a distance modulus of (m---M)0 = 21.01 +/- 0.07, in good agreement with previous studies. Leo IV's possible population of blue stragglers is found to show no signs of central concentration, though this study's sample and spatial coverage are too small for any detailed spatial distribution study. Bootes II's CMD is found to be consistent with that of a single age, mono-metallicity system. It is well fit by isochrones of [Fe/H] = ---1.79 and [alpha/Fe] = 0.2 and 0.4. Bootes II is found to be between 0.5 to 1.5 Gyr younger than M92. Distance was left as a free parameter in the fits. Bootes II is found to have distance modulus (m---M)0 lying between 18.02 to 18.15, in good agreement with previous studies. A single RRab Lyrae

  13. Standard for Solar Array Arc-Prevention in LEO - NASA 4005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    2006-01-01

    Spacecraft charging in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is commonly caused by the high voltage (>55 V) solar array power system. Conversely, arcing on the solar arrays is an undesirable consequence of the spacecraft charging. The new NASA Low Earth Orbit Spacecraft Charging Design Standard and Information Handbook (NASA-4005) presents a standard and all the necessary background information to understand how to eliminate solar array arcing on LEO spacecraft in the design stage, before the spacecraft is built, and before costly retrofits are needed.

  14. DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY LEO A: SUPRIME-CAM WIDE-FIELD STELLAR PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Stonkutė, Rima; Narbutis, Donatas; Vansevičius, Vladas; Arimoto, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Takashi; Tamura, Naoyuki

    2014-10-01

    We have surveyed a complete extent of Leo A—an apparently isolated gas-rich low-mass dwarf irregular galaxy in the Local Group. The B, V, and I passband CCD images (typical seeing ∼0.''8) were obtained with the Subaru Telescope equipped with the Suprime-Cam mosaic camera. The wide-field (20' × 24') photometry catalog of 38,856 objects (V ∼ 16-26 mag) is presented. This survey is also intended to serve as ''a finding chart'' for future imaging and spectroscopic observation programs of Leo A.

  15. A new concept for high-cycle-life LEO: Rechargeable MnO2-hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, A. J.; Dhar, H. P.; Kim, Y. J.; Murphy, O. J.

    1989-01-01

    The nickel-hydrogen secondary battery system, developed in the early 1970s, has become the system of choice for geostationary earth orbit (GEO) applications. However, for low earth orbit (LEO) satellites with long expected lifetimes the nickel positive limits performance. This requires derating of the cell to achieve very long cycle life. A new system, rechargeable MnO2-Hydrogen, which does not require derating, is described here. For LEO applications, it promises to have longer cycle life, high rate capability, a higher effective energy density, and much lower self-discharge behavior than those of the nickel-hydrogen system.

  16. Magnitude Standardization Procedure for OWL-Net Optical Observations of LEO Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Dong-Goo; Choi, Jin; Jo, Jung Hyun; Yim, Hong-Suh; Park, Sun-Youp; Park, Maru; Choi, Young-Jun; Bae, Young-Ho; Park, Young-Sik; Jang, Hyun-Jung; Cho, Sungki; Kim, Ji-Hye; Park, Jang-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    As a governmentally approved domestic entity for Space Situational Awareness, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) is developing and operating an optical telescopes system, Optical Wide-field PatroL (OWL) Network. During the test phase of this system, it is necessary to determine the range of brightness of the observable satellites. We have defined standard magnitude for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites to calibrate their luminosity in terms of standard parameters such as distance, phase angle, and angular rate. In this work, we report the optical brightness range of five LEO Satellites using OWL-Net.

  17. Human CD34(lo)CD133(lo) fetal liver cells support the expansion of human CD34(hi)CD133(hi) hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yong, Kylie Su Mei; Keng, Choong Tat; Tan, Shu Qi; Loh, Eva; Chang, Kenneth Te; Tan, Thiam Chye; Hong, Wanjin; Chen, Qingfeng

    2016-09-01

    We have recently discovered a unique CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cell population in the human fetal liver (FL) that gives rise to cells in the hepatic lineage. In this study, we further characterized the biological functions of FL CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells. Our findings show that these CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells express markers of both endodermal and mesodermal lineages and have the capability to differentiate into hepatocyte and mesenchymal lineage cells by ex vivo differentiation assays. Furthermore, we show that CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells express growth factors that are important for human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion: stem cell factor (SCF), insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12), and factors in the angiopoietin-like protein family. Co-culture of autologous FL HSCs and allogenic HSCs derived from cord blood with CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells supports and expands both types of HSCs.These findings are not only essential for extending our understanding of the HSC niche during the development of embryonic and fetal hematopoiesis but will also potentially benefit adult stem cell transplantations in clinics because expanded HSCs demonstrate the same capacity as primary cells to reconstitute the human immune system and mediate long-term hematopoiesis in vivo. Together, CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells not only serve as stem/progenitor cells for liver development but are also an essential component of the HSC niche in the human FL. PMID:27593483

  18. GPS-LEO orbiter occultation orbital analyses and event determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Rashid, Z. A.; Cheng, P. P.

    2003-04-01

    A good knowledge of the vertical profiles of temperature and humidity throughout the atmosphere are crucial to understand the present state of the Earth's atmosphere and it's modeling. The application of radio occultation technique has a heritage of over 2 decades in NASA's planetary exploration program to study the atmosphere of most of the major bodies in the solar system. Results from NASA's planetary program experiment have proven to be very effective at characterizing the atmosphere of a planet. However, the use of radio occultation technique to remote sensing the Earth's atmosphere is only practical to be implemented recently with the advent of the matured Global Positioning System (GPS). The GPS occultation technique is well suited to observe the Earth's atmosphere, due to it excellent geographical coverage, all weather capability, long-term stability, self-calibration and high vertical resolution. The GPS/MET (GPS Meteorology) experiment launched in April 1995 is the proof-of-concept of this technique. The results from this experiment is appealing and shown that the GPS occultation technique is a promising candidate to monitor the Earth's atmosphere. With the advancement of receiver technologies and lower system cost, the GPS occultation technique is a promising tool to predict the long-term climatic changes and numerical weather modeling of the Earth's atmosphere at a higher precision. This paper briefly describes the radio occultation concept and the GPS satellite systems, which form the basis understanding of this subject matter. This is followed by a detail description of the occultation geometries between the GPS satellites and a LEO orbiter. A method to determine the occultation event is discussed and thoroughly analyzed in terms of orbit inclinations, altitudes, receiver sampling rates, antenna positioning (aft and fore pointing), and antenna mask angles. A simulator is developed using MATLAB for the orbital analyses and occultation determination in

  19. Ever Ready to Go: The Multiple Exiles of Leo Szilard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Tibor

    2005-06-01

    I argue that to understand the life and work of Leo Szilard (1898 1964) we have to understand, first, that he was driven by events to numerous departures, escapes, and exiles, changing his religion, his language, his country of residence, and his scientific disciplines; second, that he was a man haunted by major moral dilemmas throughout his life, burdened by a sincere and grave sense of responsibility for the fate of the world; and third, that he experienced a terrible sense of déjà vu: his excessive sensitivity and constant alertness were products of his experiences as a young student in Budapest in 1919. The mature Szilard in Berlin of 1933, and forever after, was always ready to move. I proceed as follows:After a brief introduction to his family background, youth, and education in Budapest, I discuss the impact of his army service in the Great War and of the tumultous events in Hungary in 1918 1919 on his life and psyche, forcing him to leave Budapest for Berlin in late 1919. He completed his doctoral degree under Max von Laue (1879 1960) at the University of Berlin in 1922 and his Habilitationsschrift in 1925. During the 1920s and early 1930s, he filed a number of patents, several of them jointly with Albert Einstein (1879 1955). He left Berlin in March 1933 for London where he played a leading role in the rescue operations for refugee scientists and scholars from Nazi Germany. He also carried out notable research in nuclear physics in London and Oxford before immigrating to the United States at the end of 1938. He drafted Einstein’s famous letter of August 2, 1939, to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, worked in the Manhattan Project during World War II, initiated a petition to President Harry S. Truman not to use the bomb on Japan, and immediately after the war was a leader in the scientists’ movement that resulted in civilian control of nuclear energy. In 1946 he turned to biology, in which his most significant contribution was to formulate a theory of

  20. Leo de Ball and his contributions to international astronomical projects around 1900. (German Title: Leo de Ball und seine Beiträge zu internationalen Astronomieprojekten um 1900)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habison, Peter

    From 1891 until 1916 Leo de Ball was the director of the Kuffner Observatory in Vienna. Born in Germany in 1853, he studied at Berlin and Bonn. After having received his doctorate in 1877, he became assistant at Gotha. From 1881 to 1882 he worked at the observatory in Bothkamp, where he discovered the minor planet ``Athamantis''. In 1883, he followed an invitation to the Ougrée Observatory in Belgium. Here he published some quite remarkable papers on the mass of Saturn and was also introduced to meridian circle astronomy. In 1891 he received a call to Moriz von Kuffner's observatory in Vienna. During that time the Astronomische Gesellschaft called for an extension of the ``Zonenunternehmen'' to southern declinations from -2 ° to -23°. De Ball took over the zone -5°50´ to -10°50´. This work occupied most of his time from 1892 to 1896. In 1900 Leo de Ball initiated a project for determining relative parallaxes of 252 stars in collaboration with four observatories. Although the project was only partly executed, Leo de Ball published relative parallaxes of 16 stars, observed from 1901 to 1907 with the Vienna heliometer.

  1. Risk assessment of Cumberland unit 2 L-O blades

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, T.C.T.; Puri, A.

    1996-12-31

    Concern about the reliability of the 1,300 mw Cumberland steam turbine units after an unexpected blade tip failure in the fall of 1995 caused TVA to conduct an investigation into the current reliability of the L-O blades. A probabilistic model based on the measured frequencies, damping and material fatigue data was generated. The influence of significant erosion damage on the blade natural frequencies and on the local stresses was estimated. A probabilistic model of the local fatigue limit was generated based on test data. Monte Carlo simulation was employed to estimate the probability of blade failure by comparing the dynamic stress with the fatigue limit. Risk assessment of the blade failure is presented.

  2. Karhunen-Loéve expansion for random earthquake excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun

    2015-03-01

    This paper develops a trigonometric-basis-function based Karhunen-Loéve (KL) expansion for simulating random earthquake excitations with known covariance functions. The methods for determining the number of the KL terms and defining the involved random variables are described in detail. The simplified form of the KL expansion is given, whereby the relationship between the KL expansion and the spectral representation method is investigated and revealed. The KL expansion is of high efficiency for simulating long-term earthquake excitations in the sense that it needs a minimum number of random variables, as compared with the spectral representation method. Numerical examples demonstrate the convergence and accuracy of the KL expansion for simulating two commonly-used random earthquake excitation models and estimating linear and nonlinear random responses to the random excitations.

  3. Building an LO source at 1036 GHz for a receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Neal R.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the UMass work on this grant was to build an LO source at 1036 GHz for a receiver which was to be built at JPL. The 1 THz source will consist of a high power Gunn oscillator at 86 GHz followed by a cascaded pair of planar diode doublers and finally a whisker contacted tripler. All multipliers will use single mode waveguide mounts. This use of single mode waveguide even for the final mount is a departure from the original plan, and reflects the progress that has been made in fabricating small structures. The advantages to the use of waveguide over a quasi-optical approach are that the complete system is much more compact, and much easier to use.

  4. The reduction of the LO number for heterodyne coherent detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun; Chi, Nan; Dong, Ze; Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianguo

    2012-12-31

    Relative to homodyne coherent detection, heterodyne coherent detection has simple architecture because no 90° hybrid and only half number of photodiodes and analog-to-digital convertor (ADC) chips are required. We experimentally demonstrate that the architecture of heterodyne coherent receivers can be further simplified. When the frequency offset is one half of the channel frequency spacing, one local oscillator (LO) laser can be used for two neighboring wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) channels, and therefore the number of LO lasers can be reduced into half compared to homodyne detection. We experimentally demonstrate simplified heterodyne coherent detection of 4 × 196.8-Gb/s polarization-division-multiplexing carrier-suppressed return-to-zero quadrature-phase-shift-keying (PDM-CSRZ-QPSK) modulation after transmission over 1040-km single-mode fiber (SMF)-28 on a 50-GHz grid with bit-error ratio (BER) smaller than pre-forward-error-correction (pre-FEC) limit of 3.8 × 10(-3). To our best knowledge, 196.8 Gb/s is the highest bit rate per channel for heterodyne coherent WDM transmission system. An arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) instead of wavelength selective switch (WSS) is used at the transmitter to spectrally shape and multiplex the WDM signal. We also experimentally demonstrate that heterodyne detection causes 3-dB optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) penalty at the BER of 3.8 × 10(-3) for a certain single channel compared to homodyne detection. PMID:23388788

  5. Leo Strauss's Churchillian Speech and the Question of the Decline of the West.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffa, Harry V.

    1985-01-01

    Leo Strauss' views of the function of political philosophy as expressed in his book "Natural Right and History" are discussed. It is the function of political philosophy to distinguish good action from bad and promote the one and avert the other. (RM)

  6. ENR selects Leo P. Duffy as its 1993 man of the year

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, D.K.

    1993-02-15

    This article is a discussion of the appointment of Leo Duffy as the leader of the US DOE`s cleanup of its several nuclear weapons facilities. A professional sketch of Mr. Duffy is provided, and the problems that he will encounter are also outlined.

  7. Sizing of "Mother Ship and Catcher" Concepts for LEO Small Debris Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Most Low Earth Orbit (LEO) debris lies in a limited number of inclination "bands" associated with launch latitudes, or with specific useful orbit inclinations (such as polar orbits). Such narrow inclination bands generally have a uniform spread over all possible Right Ascensions of Ascending Node (RAANs), creating a different orbit plane for nearly every piece of debris. This complicates concept of rendezvous and capture for debris removal. However, a low-orbiting satellite will always phase in RAAN faster than debris objects in higher orbits at the same inclination, potentially solving the problem. Such a base can serve as a single space-based launch facility (a "mother ship") that can tend and then send tiny individual catcher devices for each debris object, as the facility drifts into the same RAAN as the higher object. This presentation will highlight characteristic system requirements of such an architecture, including structural and navigation requirements, power, mass and dV budgets for both the mother ship and the mass-produced common catcher devices that would clean out selected inclination bands. The altitude and inclination regime over which a band is to be cleared, the size distribution of the debris, and the inclusion of additional mission priorities all affect the sizing of the system. It is demonstrated that major LEO hazardous debris reductions can be realized in each band with a single LEO launch of a single mother ship, with simple attached catchers of total mass less than typical commercial LEO launch capability.

  8. Raising a Child in the Punana Leo: Everyone (Men and Women) Play an Important Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iokepa-Guerrero, Noelani

    2008-01-01

    Established in 1983 by a group of parents and teachers, the 'Aha Punana Leo ('APL) was formed. A grassroots organization, 'APL was established to respond to the dismal plight of the Hawaiian language. Just a mere 25 years ago, the Hawaiian language was on the verge of being lost forever. Through the dedicated efforts of a small group of friends…

  9. Leo Strauss and the Neoconservative Critique of the Liberal University: Postmodernism, Relativism and the Culture Wars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the neoconservative critique of the university and particularly the attack on multiculturalism and postmodernism that initiated the culture wars. It seeks to explain these developments by an analysis of the thought of Leo Strauss. The paper begins by providing an introduction to US neoconservatism and latest challenges to it…

  10. VARIABILITY AND STAR FORMATION IN LEO T, THE LOWEST LUMINOSITY STAR-FORMING GALAXY KNOWN TODAY

    SciTech Connect

    Clementini, Gisella; Cignoni, Michele; Ramos, Rodrigo Contreras; Federici, Luciana; Tosi, Monica; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Marconi, Marcella; Musella, Ilaria E-mail: rodrigo.contreras@oabo.inaf.it E-mail: monica.tosi@oabo.inaf.it E-mail: ripepi@na.astro.it E-mail: ilaria@na.astro.it

    2012-09-10

    We present results from the first combined study of variable stars and star formation history (SFH) of the Milky Way 'ultra-faint' dwarf (UFD) galaxy Leo T, based on F606W and F814W multi-epoch archive observations obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We have detected 14 variable stars in the galaxy. They include one fundamental-mode RR Lyrae star and 11 Anomalous Cepheids with periods shorter than 1 day, thus suggesting the occurrence of multiple star formation episodes in this UFD, of which one about 10 Gyr ago produced the RR Lyrae star. A new estimate of the distance to Leo T of 409{sup +29}{sub -27} kpc (distance modulus of 23.06 {+-} 0.15 mag) was derived from the galaxy's RR Lyrae star. Our V, V - I color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of Leo T reaches V {approx} 29 mag and shows features typical of a galaxy in transition between dwarf irregular and dwarf spheroidal types. A quantitative analysis of the SFH, based on the comparison of the observed V, V - I CMD with the expected distribution of stars for different evolutionary scenarios, confirms that Leo T has a complex SFH dominated by two enhanced periods about 1.5 and 9 Gyr ago, respectively. The distribution of stars and gas shows that the galaxy has a fairly asymmetric structure.

  11. An efficient QoS-aware routing algorithm for LEO polar constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xin; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik; Tian, Zhi; Shen, Dan; Chen, Genshe

    2013-05-01

    In this work, a Quality of Service (QoS)-aware routing (QAR) algorithm is developed for Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) polar constellations. LEO polar orbits are the only type of satellite constellations where inter-plane inter-satellite links (ISLs) are implemented in real world. The QAR algorithm exploits features of the topology of the LEO satellite constellation, which makes it more efficient than general shortest path routing algorithms such as Dijkstra's or extended Bellman-Ford algorithms. Traffic density, priority, and error QoS requirements on communication delays can be easily incorporated into the QAR algorithm through satellite distances. The QAR algorithm also supports efficient load balancing in the satellite network by utilizing the multiple paths from the source satellite to the destination satellite, and effectively lowers the rate of network congestion. The QAR algorithm supports a novel robust routing scheme in LEO polar constellation, which is able to significantly reduce the impact of inter-satellite link (ISL) congestions on QoS in terms of communication delay and jitter.

  12. Leo Kanner's Mention of 1938 in His Report on Autism Refers to His First Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmsted, Dan; Blaxill, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Leo Kanner begins his landmark 1943 case series on autistic children by stating the condition was first brought to his attention in 1938. Recent letters to "JADD" have described this reference as "mysterious" and speculated it refers to papers published that year by Despert or Asperger. In fact, as Kanner goes on to state, 1938…

  13. Establishing a Robotic, LEO-to-GEO Satellite Servicing Infrastructure as an Economic Foundation for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horsham, Gary A. P.; Schmidt, George R.; Gilland, James H.

    2010-01-01

    The strategy for accomplishing civilian exploration goals and objectives is in the process of a fundamental shift towards a potential new approach called Flexible Path. This paper suggests that a government-industry or public-private partnership in the commercial development of low Earth orbit to geostationary orbit (LEO-to-GEO (LTG)) space, following or in parallel with the commercialization of Earth-to-LEO and International Space Station (ISS) operations, could serve as a necessary, logical step that can be incorporated into the flexible path approach. A LTG satellite-servicing infrastructure and architecture concept is discussed within this new strategic context. The concept consists of a space harbor that serves as a transport facility for a fleet of specialized, fully- or semi-autonomous robotic servicing spacecraft. The baseline, conceptual system architecture is composed of a space harbor equipped with specialized servicer spacecraft; a satellite command, communication, and control system; a parts station; a fuel station or depot; and a fuel/parts replenishment transport. The commercial servicer fleet would consist of several types of spacecraft, each designed with specialized robotic manipulation subsystems to provide services such as refueling, upgrade, repair, inspection, relocation, and removal. The space harbor is conceptualized as an ISS-type, octagonal truss structure equipped with radiation tolerant subsystems. This space harbor would be primarily capable of serving as an operational platform for various commercially owned and operated servicer spacecraft positioned and docked symmetrically on four of the eight sides. Several aspects of this concept are discussed, such as: system-level feasibility in terms of ISS-truss-type infrastructure and subsystems emplacement and maintenance between LEO and GEO; infrastructure components assembly in LEO, derived from ISS assembly experience, and transfer to various higher orbital locations; the evolving Earth

  14. Multivariate Patterns in the Human Object-Processing Pathway Reveal a Shift from Retinotopic to Shape Curvature Representations in Lateral Occipital Areas, LO-1 and LO-2

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Richard J. W.; Gouws, André D.; Lawrence, Samuel J. D.; Wade, Alex R.

    2016-01-01

    Representations in early visual areas are organized on the basis of retinotopy, but this organizational principle appears to lose prominence in the extrastriate cortex. Nevertheless, an extrastriate region, such as the shape-selective lateral occipital cortex (LO), must still base its activation on the responses from earlier retinotopic visual areas, implying that a transition from retinotopic to “functional” organizations should exist. We hypothesized that such a transition may lie in LO-1 or LO-2, two visual areas lying between retinotopically defined V3d and functionally defined LO. Using a rapid event-related fMRI paradigm, we measured neural similarity in 12 human participants between pairs of stimuli differing along dimensions of shape exemplar and shape complexity within both retinotopically and functionally defined visual areas. These neural similarity measures were then compared with low-level and more abstract (curvature-based) measures of stimulus similarity. We found that low-level, but not abstract, stimulus measures predicted V1–V3 responses, whereas the converse was true for LO, a double dissociation. Critically, abstract stimulus measures were most predictive of responses within LO-2, akin to LO, whereas both low-level and abstract measures were predictive for responses within LO-1, perhaps indicating a transitional point between those two organizational principles. Similar transitions to abstract representations were not observed in the more ventral stream passing through V4 and VO-1/2. The transition we observed in LO-1 and LO-2 demonstrates that a more “abstracted” representation, typically considered the preserve of “category-selective” extrastriate cortex, can nevertheless emerge in retinotopic regions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Visual areas are typically identified either through retinotopy (e.g., V1–V3) or from functional selectivity [e.g., shape-selective lateral occipital complex (LOC)]. We combined these approaches to explore

  15. Ground-based simulation of LEO environment: Investigations of a select LDEF material: FEP Teflon (trademark)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Jon B.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has produced a wealth of data on materials degradation in the low earth orbit (LEO) space environment and has conclusively shown that surface chemistry (as opposed to surface physics-sputtering) is the key to understanding and predicting the degradation of materials in the LEO environment. It is also clear that materials degradation and spacecraft contamination are closely linked and that the fundamental mechanisms responsible for this linking are in general not well understood especially in the area of synergistic effects. The study of the fundamental mechanisms underlying materials degradation in LEO is hampered by the fact that the degradation process itself is not observed during the actual exposure to the environment. Rather the aftermath of the degradation process is studied, i.e., the material that remains after exposure is observed and mechanisms are proposed to explain the observed results. The EOIM-3 flight experiment is an attempt to bring sophisticated diagnostic equipment into the space environment and monitor the degradation process in real time through the use of mass spectrometry. More experiments of this nature which would include surface sensitive diagnostics (Auger and photoelectron spectroscopes) are needed to truly unravel the basic chemical mechanisms involved in the materials degradation process. Since these in-space capabilities will most likely not be available in the near future, ground-based LEO simulation facilities employing sophisticated diagnostics are needed to further advance the basic understanding of the materials degradation mechanisms. The LEO simulation facility developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been used to investigate the atomic oxygen/vacuum ultraviolet (AO/VUV) enhanced degradation of FEP Teflon. The results show that photo-ejection of polymer fragments occur at elevated temperature (200 C), that VUV synergistic rare gas sputtering of polymer fragments occur even at

  16. Leo P: How Many Metals Can a Very Low Mass, Isolated Galaxy Retain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew; Cannon, John M.; Salzer, John J.; Rhode, Katherine L.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Berg, Danielle; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2015-12-01

    Leo P is a gas-rich dwarf galaxy with an extremely low gas-phase oxygen abundance (3% solar). The isolated nature of Leo P enables a quantitative measurement of metals lost solely due to star formation feedback. We present an inventory of the oxygen atoms in Leo P based on the gas-phase oxygen abundance measurement, the star formation history (SFH), and the chemical enrichment evolution derived from resolved stellar populations. The SFH also provides the total amount of oxygen produced. Overall, Leo P has retained 5% of its oxygen; 25% of the retained oxygen is in the stars while 75% is in the gas phase. This is considerably lower than the 20%-25% calculated for massive galaxies, supporting the trend for less efficient metal retention for lower-mass galaxies. The retention fraction is higher than that calculated for other alpha elements (Mg, Si, Ca) in dSph Milky Way satellites of similar stellar mass and metallicity. Accounting only for the oxygen retained in stars, our results are consistent with those derived for the alpha elements in dSph galaxies. Thus, under the assumption that the dSph galaxies lost the bulk of their gas mass through an environmental process such as tidal stripping, the estimates of retained metal fractions represent underestimates by roughly a factor of four. Because of its isolation, Leo P provides an important datum for the fraction of metals lost as a function of galaxy mass due to star formation. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  17. Evaluation of Simultaneous GPS/LEO Orbit Estimation for Improved GPS Orbit Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, J. P.; Bertiger, W.; Desai, S. D.; Haines, B.; Sibthorpe, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present results for combined precise orbit determination of the GPS constellation and low-Earth orbiters (LEO) and assess the quality of the resulting GPS orbit and clock solutions. The addition of LEO-based GPS receivers to standard ground network/GPS processing is attractive for several reasons: they provide excellent tracking geometry over both hemispheres, their range measurements are not subject to tropospheric delays, and the LEO multipath environments are relatively benign. In this work we include both GRACE and Jason-2/OSTM in otherwise standard JPL IGS analysis center orbit processing and evaluate the impacts on the GPS solutions. We assess GPS orbit and clock accuracy by way of internal metrics for solution precision, ambiguity resolution performance, and postfit residuals, as well as comparisons to independent orbit and clock products. Initial results show that orbit precision improves from 1.4 cm to 1.2 cm in the median (1D) RMS sense, and clock estimate precision is reduced from 1.9 cm to 1.7 cm (median RMS). In addition, we compare the GPS-based terrestrial reference frame to ITRF/IGS08 and show improvements in the Z-origin in terms of both reduced annual signals and a 33% reduction in scatter with LEOs in the solution. We also analyze the frequency content of the orbit errors. Peaks at fortnightly and draconitic periods are of particular interest, and we take advantage of the LEOs unique spatio-temporal sampling of the GPS constellation to identify possible causes of these signals.

  18. Leo de Ball and his Contribution to International Astrometry Projects around 1900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habison, P.

    Leo de Ball was born in Lobberich at the German-Dutch border in 1853. From 1871 onwards he studied astronomy and physics at the universities in Berlin and Bonn. After having received his doctorate in 1877 he became assistant at the ``Herzogliche Sternwarte in Gotha''. From 1881-82 he spent two years at the ``Sternwarte des Kammerherrn von Bülow'' in Bothkamp. There he discovered the minor planet ``Athamantis'' on 3 September 1882. In 1883 he followed an invitation from Folie to the observatory Ougrée near Lüttich. There he published four remarkable papers on stellar and planetary astrometry. In 1891 he received a call to Moriz von Kuffners observatory in Vienna and was assigned director of this young institute. In the same year he started to participate in international projects. During that time it was suggested to extend the ``Zonenunternehmen der Astronomischen Gesellschaft'' also to southern declinations. Leo de Ball contributed to this project and Kuffner Observatory was assigned the southern declination zone from -6 to -10 degrees. This work occupied most of his time from 1892 to 1902. The catalogue of 8468 stars down to magnitude nine was finally published in 1904. In 1900 Leo de Ball initiated a new project for determining relative parallaxes of 252 stars in collaboration with four observatories in Europe and the United States. Although the project was only partly realized, Leo de Ball published relative parallaxes of 16 stars, observed from 1901-07 with the Vienna heliometer. The talk will give a brief overview of Leo de Ball's life and will then focus on his work and international collaborations from 1891-1916.

  19. Alfalfa discovery of the nearby gas-rich dwarf galaxy Leo P. IV. Distance measurement from LBT optical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Berg, Danielle; Cannon, John M.; Salzer, John J.; Rhode, Katherine L.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Dolphin, Andrew E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu

    2013-12-01

    Leo P is a low-luminosity dwarf galaxy discovered through the blind H I Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey. The H I and follow-up optical observations have shown that Leo P is a gas-rich dwarf galaxy with both active star formation and an underlying older population, as well as an extremely low oxygen abundance. Here, we measure the distance to Leo P by applying the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) distance method to photometry of the resolved stellar population from new Large Binocular Telescope V and I band imaging. We measure a distance modulus of 26.19{sub −0.50}{sup +0.17} mag corresponding to a distance of 1.72{sub −0.40}{sup +0.14} Mpc. Although our photometry reaches 3 mag below the TRGB, the sparseness of the red giant branch yields higher uncertainties on the lower limit of the distance. Leo P is outside the Local Group with a distance and velocity consistent with the local Hubble flow. While located in a very low-density environment, Leo P lies within ∼0.5 Mpc of a loose association of dwarf galaxies which include NGC 3109, Antlia, Sextans A, and Sextans B, and 1.1 Mpc away from its next nearest neighbor, Leo A. Leo P is one of the lowest metallicity star-forming galaxies known in the nearby universe, comparable in metallicity to I Zw 18 and DDO 68, but with stellar characteristics similar to dwarf spheriodals (dSphs) in the Local Volume such as Carina, Sextans, and Leo II. Given its physical properties and isolation, Leo P may provide an evolutionary link between gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies and dSphs that have fallen into a Local Group environment and been stripped of their gas.

  20. Phase center modeling for LEO GPS receiver antennas and its impact on precise orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäggi, Adrian; Dach, R.; Montenbruck, O.; Hugentobler, U.; Bock, H.; Beutler, G.

    2009-12-01

    Most satellites in a low-Earth orbit (LEO) with demanding requirements on precise orbit determination (POD) are equipped with on-board receivers to collect the observations from Global Navigation Satellite systems (GNSS), such as the Global Positioning System (GPS). Limiting factors for LEO POD are nowadays mainly encountered with the modeling of the carrier phase observations, where a precise knowledge of the phase center location of the GNSS antennas is a prerequisite for high-precision orbit analyses. Since 5 November 2006 (GPS week 1400), absolute instead of relative values for the phase center location of GNSS receiver and transmitter antennas are adopted in the processing standards of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The absolute phase center modeling is based on robot calibrations for a number of terrestrial receiver antennas, whereas compatible antenna models were subsequently derived for the remaining terrestrial receiver antennas by conversion (from relative corrections), and for the GNSS transmitter antennas by estimation. However, consistent receiver antenna models for space missions such as GRACE and TerraSAR-X, which are equipped with non-geodetic receiver antennas, are only available since a short time from robot calibrations. We use GPS data of the aforementioned LEOs of the year 2007 together with the absolute antenna modeling to assess the presently achieved accuracy from state-of-the-art reduced-dynamic LEO POD strategies for absolute and relative navigation. Near-field multipath and cross-talk with active GPS occultation antennas turn out to be important and significant sources for systematic carrier phase measurement errors that are encountered in the actual spacecraft environments. We assess different methodologies for the in-flight determination of empirical phase pattern corrections for LEO receiver antennas and discuss their impact on POD. By means of independent K-band measurements, we show that zero-difference GRACE orbits can be

  1. Overview of battery usage in NASA/GSFC LEO and GEO missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    In July, 1989, Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) will be launched from a Delta rocket to study the big bang theory. The COBE, which is in a LEO/Polar orbit, will have two 20 Ah NiCd batteries, and 18 cells per battery, made by McDonnell Douglas Company. In December, 1989, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA-D) will be launched from an Atlas rocket for weather observation purposes. NOAA-D, which is in a LEO/Polar morning orbit, will have two 26.5 Ah NiCd batteries, and 17 cells per battery, made by Ge-Astro East Windor. NOAA-I, which is scheduled for May, 1991 launch in a LEO/Polar afternoon orbit, will have three 26.5 Ah NiCd batteries, 17 cells per battery, made by GE-Astro East Windor. In April, 1990, Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) will be launched from STS37 to study the gamma ray radiation phenomenon. GRO, which is in a LEO orbit, will have two modular power systems (MPS) made by McDonnell Douglas, each MPS consisting of three 50 Ah NiCd batteries, 22 cells per battery. In July, 1990, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-I) will be launched from an Atlas I rocket for weather observation purposes. GOES-I, which is in a GEO orbit, will have two 12 Ah NiCd batteries, 28 cells per battery, made by Ford Aerospace and Communications Company. In December, 1990, Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-E) will be launched from STS43 for communication purposes. TDRS-E, which is in a GEO orbit, will have three 40 Ah NiCd batteries, 24 cells per battery, made by TRW. In August, 1991, Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) will be launched from a Delta rocket. EUVE, which is in a LEO orbit, will have one modular power system (MPS) made by McDonnell Douglas. In December, 1991, Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) will be launched from STS50 to study the Earth's ozone layer and other environmental concerns. UARS, which is in a 56 deg inclination LEO orbit, will have one modular power systems (MPS) made by McDonnell Douglas.

  2. The Coma-Leo I distance ratio and the Hubble constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Michael D.

    1997-03-01

    The diameter-velocity dispersion relation in B, V, and K for three early-type galaxies in the Leo I (M96) group is derived from published photometry and kinematic data. The relations in all three colors have slopes which agree well with those for the Coma cluster. The RMS scatter of the Leo I galaxies in each color is extremely small, consistent with the group's compactness. These relations yield estimates of the Coma-Leo I distance ratio of 9.01 ± 0.51, 8.77 ± 0.43, and 8.82 ± 0.31, respectively, with a weighted mean of 8.84 ± 0.23. The general agreement among the three colors indicates that the early-type galaxies in Leo I and Coma have similar stellar populations. The Coma-Leo I distance ratio coupled with estimates of the absolute distance to the Leo I group allows the Hubble constant to be determined, free of the uncertainties which arise when working with the Virgo cluster. Several high quality distance estimates are available from a variety of techniques: Cepheids in M96 (Tanvir, N.R., et al., 1995, Natur, 377, 27) and M95 (Graham, J.A., et al., 1997, ApJ, 477, 535), surface brightness fluctuations (Tonry, J.L., et al., 1997, ApJ, 475, 399), planetary nebulae luminosity functions (Ciardullo, R., et al., 1993, ApJ, 419, 479), and the luminosity of the red giant branch tip (Sakai, S., Freedman, W.L., & Madore, B.F., 1996, in: Formation of the Galactic Halo, Inside and Out, eds. H. Morrison & A. Sarajedini, PASP Conf. Series Vol. 92). Adopting a cosmic recession velocity of the Coma cluster in the microwave background frame of 7200 ± 300 km s -1, these distance estimates lead to values of the Hubble constant ranging from 70 to 81 km s -1 Mpc -1, with an unweighted mean of 75 ± 6 km s -1 Mpc -1.

  3. A FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE PROPER MOTION OF THE LEO II DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Lepine, Sebastien; Koch, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael; Kuijken, Konrad

    2011-11-10

    We use 14 year baseline images obtained with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to derive a proper motion for one of the Milky Way's most distant dwarf spheroidal companions, Leo II, relative to an extragalactic background reference frame. Astrometric measurements are performed in the effective point-spread function formalism using our own developed code. An astrometric reference grid is defined using 3224 stars that are members of Leo II and brighter than a magnitude of 25 in the F814W band. We identify 17 compact extragalactic sources, for which we measure a systemic proper motion relative to this stellar reference grid. We derive a proper motion [{mu}{sub {alpha},{mu}{delta}}] = [+104 {+-}113,-33 {+-} 151] {mu}as yr{sup -1} for Leo II in the heliocentric reference frame. Though marginally detected, the proper motion yields constraints on the orbit of Leo II. Given a distance of d {approx_equal} 230 kpc and a heliocentric radial velocity v{sub r} = +79 km s{sup -1}, and after subtraction of the solar motion, our measurement indicates a total orbital motion v{sub G} = 266.1 {+-} 128.7 km s{sup -1} in the Galactocentric reference frame, with a radial component v{sub r{sub G}}=21.5{+-}4.3 km s{sup -1} and tangential component v{sub t{sub G}} = 265.2 {+-} 129.4 km s{sup -1}. The small radial component indicates that Leo II either has a low-eccentricity orbit or is currently close to perigalacticon or apogalacticon distance. We see evidence for systematic errors in the astrometry of the extragalactic sources which, while close to being point sources, are slightly resolved in the HST images. We argue that more extensive observations at later epochs will be necessary to better constrain the proper motion of Leo II. We provide a detailed catalog of the stellar and extragalactic sources identified in the HST data which should provide a solid early-epoch reference for future astrometric measurements.

  4. The chemical abundances of the stellar populations in the Leo I and II dSph galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosler, Tammy L.; Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Stetson, Peter B.

    2007-06-01

    We have obtained calcium abundances and radial velocities for 102 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) and 74 RGB stars in the Leo II dSph using the low-resolution spectrograph (LRIS) on the Keck I 10-m telescope. We report on the calcium abundances [Ca/H] derived from the strengths of the CaII triplet absorption lines at 8498, 8542 and 8662 Å in the stellar spectra using a new empirical CaII triplet calibration to [Ca/H]. The two galaxies have different average [Ca/H] values of -1.34 +/- 0.02 for Leo I and -1.65 +/- 0.02 for Leo II with intrinsic abundance dispersions of 1.2 and 1.0 dex, respectively. The typical random and total errors in derived abundances are 0.10 and 0.17 dex per star. For comparison to the existing literature, we also converted our CaII measurements to [Fe/H] on the scale of Carretta and Gratton (1997) though we discuss why this may not be the best determinant of metallicity; Leo I has a mean [Fe/H] = -1.34 and Leo II has a mean [Fe/H] = -1.59. The metallicity distribution function of Leo I is approximately Gaussian in shape with an excess at the metal-rich end, while that of Leo II shows an abrupt cut-off at the metal-rich end. The lower mean metallicity of Leo II is consistent with the fact that it has a lower luminosity, hence lower the total mass than Leo I; thus, the evolution of Leo II may have been affected more by mass lost in galactic winds. Our direct and independent measurement of the metallicity distributions in these dSph will allow a more accurate star-formation histories to be derived from future analysis of their colour-magnitude diagrams(CMDs). Data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. E

  5. Extending the GPS satellite antenna patterns of the IGS to nadir angles beyond 14° using LEO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dach, R.; Jaeggi, A.; Bock, H.; Beutler, G.; Montenbruck, O.; Schmid, R.

    2010-12-01

    The absolute phase center model adopted by the International GNSS Service (IGS) in 2006 is based on robot calibrations for a number of terrestrial GNSS receiver antennas and consistent correction values for the GNSS transmitter antennas estimated from data of the global IGS tracking network. As the calibration of the satellite antennas is solely based on terrestrial measurements, the estimation of their phase patterns is limited to a nadir angle of 14°. This is not sufficient for the analysis of spaceborne GPS data collected by low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites that record observations at nadir angles of up to 17°. Moreover, phase center variation (PCV) estimates for nadir angles close to 14° derived from terrestrial measurements might be affected by uncertainties in the troposphere modeling. This drawback could also be overcome by the use of LEO data. We use GPS tracking data from several LEO missions to extend the IGS satellite antenna patterns to nadir angles beyond 14°. In order to achieve estimates that are consistent with the PCVs currently used within the IGS, GPS and LEO orbits are fixed to solutions obtained by adopting the IGS conventional values. Due to significant near-field multipath effects in the LEO spacecraft environment, it is necessary to solve for GPS (nadir-dependent only) and LEO (azimuth- and elevation-dependent) antenna patterns simultaneously. We analyze the separability of these parameters and discuss appropriate constraints. We assess the contribution of different LEO missions to a combined solution and analyze the impact of LEO orbit modeling errors.

  6. Effect of KOH concentration on LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cell - Update II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1992-01-01

    An update of validation test results confirming the breakthrough in LEO cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte is presented. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen cells has been previously reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles, compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. The cycle regime was a stressful accelerated LEO, which consisted of a 27.5 min charge followed by a 17.5 min discharge (2X normal rate). The depth-of-discharge was 80 percent. Six 48-Ah Hughes recirculation design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight battery cells are being evaluated. Three of the cells contain 26 percent KOH (test cells), and three contain 31 percent KOH (control cells). They are undergoing real time LEO cycle life testing. The cycle regime is a 90-min LEO orbit consisting of a 54-min charge followed by a 36-min discharge. The depth-of-discharge is 80 percent. The cell temperature is maintained at 10 C. The three 31 percent KOH cells failed (cycles 3729, 4165, and 11355). One of the 26 percent KOH cells failed at cycle 15314. The other two 26 percent KOH cells were cycled for over 16,000 cycles during the continuing test.

  7. Research on Long-Term Orbit Propagation for Space Debris in LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Keke; Pang, Baojun; Xiao, Weike

    2013-08-01

    Space debris long-term orbit propagation is one of the main problems for the space debris environment models. The evolution of space debris in low Earth orbit (LEO) is determined by a complex interplay of different perturbations. The aim of this paper is to investigate the long-term effects of the most dominating perturbations: Earth geopotential effects, atmospheric drag, luni-solar perturbations and solar radiation pressure. The atmospheric drag is the major non-gravitational perturbation in LEO. This article provides an average method of numerical integration on one revolution for rotating and stationary atmosphere, and then one can make use of various atmospheric densities to calculate the orbital evolution. Using this method, we have analyzed the effects of rotating and stationary atmospheric drag perturbation on orbital lifetime. The results show the effects of solar activity and geomagnetic index on orbital evolution are obvious. The lifetime difference in rotating atmosphere is mostly depending on inclinations of space debris.

  8. Super NiCd Open-Circuit Storage and Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Life Test Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, Jean Marie; Hwang, Warren C.; Ang, Valerie J.; Hayden, Jeff; Rao, Gopalakrishna; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation discusses Air Force tests performed on super NiCd cells to measure their performance under conditions simulating Low Earth Orbit (LEO) conditions. Super NiCd cells offer potential advantages over existing NiCd cell designs including advanced cell design with improved separator material and electrode making processes, but handling and storage requires active charging. These tests conclude that the super NiCd cells support generic Air Force qualifications for conventional LEO missions (up to five years duration) and that handling and storage may not actually require active charging as previously assumed. Topics covered include: Test Plan, Initial Characterization Tests, Open-Circuit Storage Tests, and post storage capacities.

  9. LENTICULAR GALAXIES AT THE OUTSKIRTS OF THE LEO II GROUP: NGC 3599 AND NGC 3626

    SciTech Connect

    Sil'chenko, O. K.; Shulga, A. P.; Moiseev, A. V. E-mail: alina.shulga@gmail.co

    2010-11-15

    We have studied unbarred S0 galaxies, NGC 3599 and NGC 3626, the members of the X-ray bright group Leo II, by means of three-dimensional spectroscopy, long-slit spectroscopy, and imaging, with the aim of identifying the epoch and mechanisms of their transformation from spirals. Both galaxies have appeared to bear complex features obviously resulting from minor merging: decoupled gas kinematics, nuclear star-forming rings, and multi-tiered oval large-scale stellar disks. The weak emission line nucleus of NGC 3599 bears all signs of Seyfert activity, according to the line-ratio diagnostics of the gas excitation mechanism. We conclude that the transformation of these lenticular galaxies took place about 1-2 Gyr ago, through gravitational mechanisms unrelated to the hot intragroup medium of Leo II.

  10. Time Serial Analysis of the Induced LEO Environment within the ISS 6A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.; Tomov, B. T.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Badavi, Frank F.; DeAngelis, Giovanni; Atwell, William; Leutke, N.

    2006-01-01

    Anisotropies in the low Earth orbit (LEO) radiation environment were found to influence the thermoluminescence detectors (TLD) dose within the (International Space Station) ISS 7A Service Module. Subsequently, anisotropic environmental models with improved dynamic time extrapolation have been developed including westward and northern drifts using AP8 Min & Max as estimates of the historic spatial distribution of trapped protons in the 1965 and 1970 era, respectively. In addition, a directional dependent geomagnetic cutoff model was derived for geomagnetic field configurations from the 1945 to 2020 time frame. A dynamic neutron albedo model based on our atmospheric radiation studies has likewise been required to explain LEO neutron measurements. The simultaneous measurements of dose and dose rate using four Liulin instruments at various locations in the US LAB and Node 1 has experimentally demonstrated anisotropic effects in ISS 6A and are used herein to evaluate the adequacy of these revised environmental models.

  11. GEO And LEO Life Tests Of Saft Lithium Ion Batteries After Ten Years Of Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, G.; Hendel, B.; Borthomieu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    In the period 1999 - 2000 several life tests were started to support the qualification of the SAFT VES140 S lithium ion cell for GEO and LEO applications. Most are still continuing and all have demonstrated excellent performance. For example a real-time GEO test after the equivalent of 10 years in orbit shows a cell internal resistance increase of less than 20% and the cell capacity and energy are still higher than the values measured after the first season.Accelerated GEO tests have reached 90 seasons. A real-time LEO test has exceeded 48000 cycles at 30% depth of discharge (DoD) and 108000 cycles under an accelerated variable DoD profile of between 10 and 30 %. The evolution of performance will be described and in particular measurements of cell internal resistance and can strain.

  12. Description and experimental results of a 58-lb portable LEO satellite tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansey, Richard J.; Campbell, Blair F.; Koumvakalis, Andrea; Dantowitz, R.; Kozubal, M.

    1998-11-01

    A portable low earth orbit satellite (LEO) tracking mount is described which has dimensions of 21' X 15' X 10' and weighs 58 pounds. Using 22 bit encoders on 9.5' worm gears, an integral microcontroller is capable of adjustable slew rates to six degrees per second. With a CCD and tracking software LEO pointing is demonstrated on f/10 eight inch telescope to less than 8 urad for periods of 10 seconds, and 50 urad for entire orbit passes. A closed loop one Hz video tracker is also described with automatic tracking of mag 7/8 satellites using a 12' telescope. Requiring only one operator, this system can be transported by a small car and be operational in a few hours. Possible uses and other recent work is also explained.

  13. Microvariability of line profiles in the spectra of OB stars: III. The supergiant ρ LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholtygin, A. F.; Fabrika, S. N.; Burlakova, T. E.; Valyavin, G. G.; Chuntonov, G. A.; Kudryavtsev, D. O.; Kang, D.; Yushkin, M. V.; Galazutdinov, G. A.

    2007-11-01

    We observed the bright supergiant ρ Leo (B1 lab) in January-February 2004 using the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory (Russia) and the 1.8-m telescope of the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (South Korea). 47 spectra with high time resolution (4-10 min), signal-to-noise ratios 300-1000, and spectral resolutions 45 000-60 000 were obtained. We detected variability in the HeI, SiII, SiIII, and NII line profiles, which may be due to rotational modulation of the profiles and photospheric pulsations of ρ Leo. The possible influence of the stellar magnetic field on the line-profile variations is discussed.

  14. Dexamethasone promotes tolerance in vivo by enriching CD11clo CD40lo tolerogenic macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoxing; Zhong, Shibo; Geng, Yajun; Munirathinam, Gnanasekar; Cha, Isaac; Reardon, Catherine; Getz, Godfrey S; van Rooijen, Nico; Kang, Youmin; Wang, Bin; Chen, Aoshuang

    2013-01-01

    We previously showed that antigen immunization in the presence of the immunosuppressant dexamethasone (a strategy we termed "suppressed immunization") could tolerize established recall responses of T cells. However, the mechanism by which dexamethasone acts as a tolerogenic adjuvant has remained unclear. In the present study, we show that dexamethasone enriches CD11c(lo) CD40(lo) macrophages in a dose-dependent manner in the spleen and peripheral lymph nodes of mice by depleting all other CD11c(+) CD40(+) cells including dendritic cells. The enriched macrophages display a distinct MHC class II (MHC II)(lo) CD86(hi) phenotype. Upon activation by antigen in vivo, CD11c(lo) CD40(lo) macrophages upregulate IL-10, a classic marker for tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells, and elicit a serum IL-10 response. When presenting antigen in vivo, these cells do not elicit recall responses from memory T cells, but rather stimulate the expansion of antigen-specific regulatory T cells. Moreover, the depletion of CD11c(lo) CD40(lo) macrophages during suppressed immunization diminishes the tolerogenic efficacy of the treatment. These results indicate that dexamethasone acts as a tolerogenic adjuvant partly by enriching the CD11c(lo) CD40(lo) tolerogenic macrophages. PMID:23001956

  15. Impact of sensor failure on the observability of flow dynamics at the Biosphere 2 LEO hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, Damiano; Niu, Guo-Yue; Pangle, Luke; Paniconi, Claudio; Putti, Mario; Troch, Peter A.

    2015-12-01

    The Biosphere 2 Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) has been developed to investigate hydrological, chemical, biological, and geological processes in a large-scale, controlled infrastructure. The experimental hillslopes at LEO are instrumented with a large number of different sensors that allow detailed monitoring of local and global dynamics and changes in the hydrological state and structure of the landscapes. Sensor failure, i.e., a progressive reduction in the number of active or working sensors, in such an evolving system can have a dramatic impact on observability of flow dynamics and estimation of the model parameters that characterize the soil properties. In this study we assess the retrieval of the spatial distributions of soil water content and saturated hydraulic conductivity under different scenarios of heterogeneity (different values of correlation length of the random field describing the hydraulic conductivity) and a variable number of active sensors. To avoid the influence of model structural errors and measurement bias, the analysis is based on a synthetic representation of the first hydrological experiment at LEO simulated with the physically-based hydrological model CATHY. We assume that the true hydraulic conductivity is a particular random realization of a stochastic field with lognormal distribution and exponential correlation length. During the true run, we collect volumetric water content measurements at an hourly interval. Perturbed observations are then used to estimate the total water storage via linear interpolation and to retrieve the conductivity field via the ensemble Kalman filter technique. The results show that when less than 100 out of 496 total sensors are active, the reconstruction of volumetric water content may introduce large errors in the estimation of total water storage. In contrast, retrieval of the saturated hydraulic conductivity distribution allows the CATHY model to reproduce the integrated hydrological response of

  16. Natural law Judaism? The genesis of bioethics in Hans Jonas, Leo Strauss, and Leon Kass.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    Leon Kass is much misunderstood. He is not simply a Republican ideologue who tailored his ideas to break out of the ivory tower and into the halls of power. Nor does he look simply to use human nature as a moral guide. When the full range of his writings is considered and set in the tradition of his teachers, Hans Jonas and Leo Strauss, what emerges is a natural law position colored by religious revelation. PMID:16776021

  17. Positive immunolabelling for feline infectious peritonitis in an African lion (Panthera leo) with bilateral panuveitis.

    PubMed

    Mwase, M; Shimada, K; Mumba, C; Yabe, J; Squarre, D; Madarame, H

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old male African lion (Panthera leo) was presented with blindness due to bilateral panuveitis with retinal detachment. Feline coronavirus (FCoV) antigen was identified immunohistochemically in ocular macrophages, consistent with a diagnosis of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) infection. This is the first report of FIP in an African lion and the first report of ocular FIP in a non-domestic felid. PMID:25678422

  18. A Search for Stellar Dust Production in Leo P, a Nearby Analog of High Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Martha; McDonald, Iain; McQuinn, Kristen; Skillman, Evan; Sonneborn, George; Srinivasan, Sundar; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Zijlstra, Albert; Sloan, Greg

    2016-08-01

    The origin of dust in the early Universe is a matter of debate. One of the main potential dust contributors are Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, and several studies have been devoted to investigating whether and how AGB dust production changes in metal-poor environments. Of particular interest are the most massive AGB stars (8-10 Msun), which can in principle enter the dust-producing phase <50 Myr after they form. However, these stars cannot produce their own condensable material (unlike carbon AGB stars), so the efficiency of dust production decreases with metallicity. Evidence for dust production in massive AGB stars more metal-poor than the Magellanic Clouds is scarce due both to the rarity of chemically-unevolved, star-forming systems reachable in the infrared and to the short lifetimes of these stars. The recently discovered galaxy Leo P provides an irresistible opportunity to search for these massive AGB stars: Leo P is a gas-rich, star-forming galaxy, it is nearby enough for resolved star photometry with Spitzer, and its interstellar medium is 0.4 dex more metal-poor than any other accessible star-forming galaxy. Models predict ~3 massive AGB stars may be present in Leo P, and optical HST observations reveal 7 candidates. We propose to use Spitzer to determine whether these stars are dusty, providing valuable constraints to the dust contribution from AGB stars up to at least redshift 3.2, or 11.7 Gyr ago, when massive spheroidals and Galactic globular clusters were still forming. This is a gain of 2.8 Gyr compared to other accessible galaxies. We also request 1 orbit of joint HST time to confirm whether the AGB candidates in Leo P are indeed massive AGB stars belonging to the galaxy. These observations will provide information crucial for potential JWST followup spectroscopy.

  19. The ACS LCID Project - VIII. The short-period Cepheids of Leo A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Edouard J.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Cassisi, Santi; Aparicio, Antonio; Cole, Andrew A.; Drozdovsky, Igor; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Skillman, Evan D.; Stetson, Peter B.; Tolstoy, Eline

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of a new search for variable stars in the Local Group dwarf galaxy Leo A, based on deep photometry from the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We detected 166 bona fide variables in our field, of which about 60 per cent are new discoveries and 33 candidate variables. Of the confirmed variables, we found 156 Cepheids, but only 10 RR Lyrae stars despite nearly 100 per cent completeness at the magnitude of the horizontal branch. The RR Lyrae stars include seven fundamental and three first-overtone pulsators, with mean periods of 0.636 and 0.366 d, respectively. From their position on the period-luminosity (PL) diagram and light-curve morphology, we classify 91, 58 and 4 Cepheids as fundamental, first-overtone and second-overtone mode Classical Cepheids (CC), respectively, and two as Population II Cepheids. However, due to the low metallicity of Leo A, about 90 per cent of the detected Cepheids have periods shorter than 1.5 d. Comparison with theoretical models indicate that some of the fainter stars classified as CC could be Anomalous Cepheids. We estimate the distance to Leo A using the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) and various methods based on the photometric and pulsational properties of the Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars. The distances obtained with the TRGB and RR Lyrae stars agree well with each other while that from the Cepheid PL relations is somewhat larger, which may indicate a mild metallicity effect on the luminosity of the short-period Cepheids. Due to its very low metallicity, Leo A thus serves as a valuable calibrator of the metallicity dependences of the variable star luminosities.

  20. Phylogeographic Patterns in Africa and High Resolution Delineation of Genetic Clades in the Lion (Panthera leo)

    PubMed Central

    Bertola, L. D.; Jongbloed, H.; van der Gaag, K. J.; de Knijff, P.; Yamaguchi, N.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Bauer, H.; Henschel, P.; White, P. A.; Driscoll, C. A.; Tende, T.; Ottosson, U.; Saidu, Y.; Vrieling, K.; de Iongh, H. H.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative phylogeography of African savannah mammals shows a congruent pattern in which populations in West/Central Africa are distinct from populations in East/Southern Africa. However, for the lion, all African populations are currently classified as a single subspecies (Panthera leo leo), while the only remaining population in Asia is considered to be distinct (Panthera leo persica). This distinction is disputed both by morphological and genetic data. In this study we introduce the lion as a model for African phylogeography. Analyses of mtDNA sequences reveal six supported clades and a strongly supported ancestral dichotomy with northern populations (West Africa, Central Africa, North Africa/Asia) on one branch, and southern populations (North East Africa, East/Southern Africa and South West Africa) on the other. We review taxonomies and phylogenies of other large savannah mammals, illustrating that similar clades are found in other species. The described phylogeographic pattern is considered in relation to large scale environmental changes in Africa over the past 300,000 years, attributable to climate. Refugial areas, predicted by climate envelope models, further confirm the observed pattern. We support the revision of current lion taxonomy, as recognition of a northern and a southern subspecies is more parsimonious with the evolutionary history of the lion. PMID:27488946

  1. Effect of LEO cycling on 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen battery cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced 125 Ah individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen cell was designed. The primary function of the advanced cell is to store and deliver energy for long-term, low earth-orbit (LEO) spacecraft missions. The new features of this design are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte, (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick, (3) use of serrated-edge separators to facilitate gaseous oxygen and hydrogen flow within the cell, while still maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management, and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack (state-of-the-art) to accommodate nickel electrode expansion. Six 125-Ah flight cells based on this design were fabricated by Eagle-Picher. Three of the cells contain all of the advanced features (test cells) and three are the same as the test cells except they don't have catalyst on the wall wick (control cells). All six cells are in the process of being evaluated in a LEO cycle life test. The cells have accumulated about 4700 LEO cycles (60 percent DOD 10 C). There have been no cell failures; the catalyzed wall wick cells, however, are performing better.

  2. Effect of LEO cycling on 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen battery cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced 125 Ah individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen cell was designed. The primary function of the advanced cell, is to store and deliver energy for long term, low earth-orbit (LEO) spacecraft missions. The new features of this design are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte, (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick, (3) use of serrated edge separators to facilitate gaseous oxygen and hydrogen flow within the cell, while still maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management, and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack (state-of-the-art) to accommodate nickel electrode expansion. Six 125 Ah flight cells based on this design were fabricated by Eagle-Picher. Three of the cells contain all of the advanced features (test cells) and three are the same as the test cells except they don't have catalyst on the wall wick (control cells). All six cells are in the process of being evaluated in a LEO cycle life test. The cells have accumulated about 4700 LEO cycles (60 percent DOD 10 C). There have been no cell failures, the catalyzed wall wick cells however, are performing better.

  3. The Star Formation History of the Leo I Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Marsteller, B.; Cole, A.; Bullock, J.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on results of new deep imaging obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advance Camera for Surveys (ACS) that show the Leo I dwarf Spheroidal (dSph) galaxy has a much larger population of ancient (>10 Gyr old) stars than previously determined with shallower WFPC2 imaging (Gallart et al. 1999, Dolphin 2003), as well as the previously identified component of intermediate-aged stars. Our new imaging is much deeper, which allows us to unambiguously identify the main sequence turnoffs of the ancient population and constrain the star formation rate at the epoch of the formation of the "first stars” in this galaxy. We will determine the galaxy's star formation rate as a function of time from the observed density of stars in the color-magnitude diagram by comparing with Padova stellar evolutionary models (Girardi et al. 2000). We compare and contrast the star formation histories of the Leo I dSph, which is currently devoid of any gas, with that of the gas-rich Leo A dIrr galaxy. The two are very different in that the dSph formed most of its stars early and the dIrr formed most of its stars later, however both have been actively forming stars over most of the age of the universe.

  4. Phylogeographic Patterns in Africa and High Resolution Delineation of Genetic Clades in the Lion (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    Bertola, L D; Jongbloed, H; van der Gaag, K J; de Knijff, P; Yamaguchi, N; Hooghiemstra, H; Bauer, H; Henschel, P; White, P A; Driscoll, C A; Tende, T; Ottosson, U; Saidu, Y; Vrieling, K; de Iongh, H H

    2016-01-01

    Comparative phylogeography of African savannah mammals shows a congruent pattern in which populations in West/Central Africa are distinct from populations in East/Southern Africa. However, for the lion, all African populations are currently classified as a single subspecies (Panthera leo leo), while the only remaining population in Asia is considered to be distinct (Panthera leo persica). This distinction is disputed both by morphological and genetic data. In this study we introduce the lion as a model for African phylogeography. Analyses of mtDNA sequences reveal six supported clades and a strongly supported ancestral dichotomy with northern populations (West Africa, Central Africa, North Africa/Asia) on one branch, and southern populations (North East Africa, East/Southern Africa and South West Africa) on the other. We review taxonomies and phylogenies of other large savannah mammals, illustrating that similar clades are found in other species. The described phylogeographic pattern is considered in relation to large scale environmental changes in Africa over the past 300,000 years, attributable to climate. Refugial areas, predicted by climate envelope models, further confirm the observed pattern. We support the revision of current lion taxonomy, as recognition of a northern and a southern subspecies is more parsimonious with the evolutionary history of the lion. PMID:27488946

  5. Optimal planning of LEO active debris removal based on hybrid optimal control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiao-qian; Chen, Li-hu

    2015-06-01

    The mission planning of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) active debris removal problem is studied in this paper. Specifically, the Servicing Spacecraft (SSc) and several debris exist on near-circular near-coplanar LEOs. The SSc should repeatedly rendezvous with the debris, and de-orbit them until all debris are removed. Considering the long-duration effect of J2 perturbation, a linear dynamics model is used for each rendezvous. The purpose of this paper is to find the optimal service sequence and rendezvous path with minimum total rendezvous cost (Δv) for the whole mission, and some complex constraints (communication time window constraint, terminal state constraint, and time distribution constraint) should be satisfied meanwhile. Considering this mission as a hybrid optimal control problem, a mathematical model is proposed, as well as the solution method. The proposed approach is demonstrated by a typical active debris removal problem. Numerical experiments show that (1) the model and solution method proposed in this paper can effectively address the planning problem of LEO debris removal; (2) the communication time window constraint and the J2 perturbation have considerable influences on the optimization results; and (3) under the same configuration, some suboptimal sequences are equivalent to the optimal one since their difference in Δv cost is very small.

  6. Controlling the Growth of Future LEO Debris Populations with Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Johnson, N. L.; Hill, N. M.

    2008-01-01

    Active debris removal (ADR) was suggested as a potential means to remediate the low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment as early as the 1980s. The reasons ADR has not become practical are due to its technical difficulties and the high cost associated with the approach. However, as the LEO debris populations continue to increase, ADR may be the only option to preserve the near-Earth environment for future generations. An initial study was completed in 2007 to demonstrate that a simple ADR target selection criterion could be developed to reduce the future debris population growth. The present paper summarizes a comprehensive study based on more realistic simulation scenarios, including fragments generated from the 2007 Fengyun-1C event, mitigation measures, and other target selection options. The simulations were based on the NASA long-term orbital debris projection model, LEGEND. A scenario, where at the end of mission lifetimes, spacecraft and upper stages were moved to 25-year decay orbits, was adopted as the baseline environment for comparison. Different annual removal rates and different ADR target selection criteria were tested, and the resulting 200-year future environment projections were compared with the baseline scenario. Results of this parametric study indicate that (1) an effective removal strategy can be developed based on the mass and collision probability of each object as the selection criterion, and (2) the LEO environment can be stabilized in the next 200 years with an ADR removal rate of five objects per year.

  7. The low-mass classic Algol-type binary UU Leo revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-Gui

    2013-12-01

    New multi-color photometry of the eclipsing binary UU Leo, acquired from 2010 to 2013, was carried out by using the 60-cm and 85-cm telescopes at the Xinglong station, which is administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. With the updated Wilson-Devinney code, the photometric solution was derived from BVR light curves. The results imply that UU Leo is a semi-detached Algol-type binary, with a mass ratio of q = 0.100(±0.002). The change in orbital period was reanalyzed based on all available eclipsing times. The O - C curve could be described by an upward parabola superimposed on a quasi-sinusoidal curve. The period and semi-amplitudes are Pmod = 54.5(±1.1) yr and A = 0.0273d(±0.0015d), which may be attributed to the light-time effect via the presence of an invisible third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt = +4.64(±0.14) × 10-7d yr-1, which may be interpreted by the conserved mass being transferred from the secondary to the primary. With mass being transferred, the low-mass Algol-type binary UU Leo may evolve into a binary system with a main sequence star and a helium white dwarf.

  8. Going LO (laparoscopic oviductal) for ET and AI in Felids – Challenges, Strategies and Successes

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, WF

    2012-01-01

    Contents Embryo transfer (ET) and artificial insemination (AI) are potentially invaluable techniques for the propagation and management of genetically valuable domestic cat and endangered nondomestic cat populations. Many of the challenges that impair the effective application of ET and AI in felids may be overcome by using laparoscopic oviductal (LO) approaches. LO-ET and LO-AI are minimally-invasive procedures, requiring only two small skin incisions for insertion of a laparoscope and grasping forceps into the abdominal cavity to permit visualization and catheterization of the oviduct for embryo or semen deposition. With concurrent improvements in embryo culture systems and ovarian synchronization protocols, LO-ET has proven effective over the past decade for propagation of laboratory cats, cat models of hereditary disease and nondomestic cats. To date, viable offspring have been produced following LO-ET of non-frozen and frozen-thawed IVF-derived embryos in eight cat hereditary disease models and two nondomestic cat species, the ocelot and sand cat. LO-AI with low sperm numbers (~2–8 million motile) has shown similar efficacy to LO-ET, resulting in high pregnancy percentages (50–70%) following insemination of gonadotropin-treated domestic cats. Multiple kittens also have been produced in two hereditary disease models following LO-AI with frozen semen, and both ocelot and Pallas’ cat kittens have been born after LO-AI with freshly-collected semen. The application of LO-ET and LO-AI to felids has resulted in substantial improvement in the efficiency of assisted reproduction for genetic management of these invaluable domestic cat and wild cat populations. PMID:23279483

  9. Design application and development of spacecraft in LEO utilizing LDEF results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, George B., Jr.; Sudduth, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    In general, the results from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) have provided much useful information on material sensitivity in the low-Earth orbit (LEO) environment. This is particularly true for selected materials such as thermal control coatings, composites, polymers, fasteners and solar cells. However, LDEF material sensitivity data for other materials like glasses, glass coatings, lubricants, adhesives and seal materials were limited. Some of this important LDEF material sensitivity data has not yet been addressed in detail at the LDEF meetings. The type of material information needed in the design and development of a new spacecraft in LEO depends to a large extent on program phase. In early program phases it is only necessary to have material sensitivity data to determine what materials may or may not work. Later program phases require details on the material strength, optical properties, and/or other long term survivability requirements for materials in LEO. Unfortunately, documentation of exposure results for many materials sensitivity experiments that flew on LDEF has not yet been summarized in a convenient form for use by multiple users. Documentation of this data in a form convenient for scientists, engineers as well as technicians remains a significant area of concern for the aerospace industry. Many of the material experiments that flew on LDEF were only designed to measure material sensitivity for one year in an LEO environment. However, some materials expected to survive one year simply did not survive the 5.8 years that LDEF eventually remained in orbit. Therefore the survivability of several materials in an LEO environment was determined by default. Most of the LDEF materials experiments were not designed to establish long term material survivability data. This long term material survivability data is particularly useful in later program phases of spacecraft development. The lack of more controlled materials experiments to determine long

  10. Design application and development of spacecraft in LEO utilizing LDEF results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, George B., Jr.; Sudduth, Richard D.

    1993-12-01

    In general, the results from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) have provided much useful information on material sensitivity in the low-Earth orbit (LEO) environment. This is particularly true for selected materials such as thermal control coatings, composites, polymers, fasteners and solar cells. However, LDEF material sensitivity data for other materials like glasses, glass coatings, lubricants, adhesives and seal materials were limited. Some of this important LDEF material sensitivity data has not yet been addressed in detail at the LDEF meetings. The type of material information needed in the design and development of a new spacecraft in LEO depends to a large extent on program phase. In early program phases it is only necessary to have material sensitivity data to determine what materials may or may not work. Later program phases require details on the material strength, optical properties, and/or other long term survivability requirements for materials in LEO. Unfortunately, documentation of exposure results for many materials sensitivity experiments that flew on LDEF has not yet been summarized in a convenient form for use by multiple users. Documentation of this data in a form convenient for scientists, engineers as well as technicians remains a significant area of concern for the aerospace industry. Many of the material experiments that flew on LDEF were only designed to measure material sensitivity for one year in an LEO environment. However, some materials expected to survive one year simply did not survive the 5.8 years that LDEF eventually remained in orbit. Therefore the survivability of several materials in an LEO environment was determined by default. Most of the LDEF materials experiments were not designed to establish long term material survivability data. This long term material survivability data is particularly useful in later program phases of spacecraft development. The lack of more controlled materials experiments to determine long

  11. Hydrology Simulations on Basalt Soil for the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, C. M.; Schaap, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) project at Biosphere2 utilizes a non-traditional soil, specifically basalt rock that has been ground to a loamy sand texture. This engineered material is likely to have hydraulic transport properties that differ from natural loamy sands. In this study the transport properties were characterized by combining laboratory column studies and numerical modeling. Saturated hydraulic conductivity and a portion of the soil moisture release curve were studied using 7.1 cm and 91.5 cm Plexiglass columns filled with the LEO material and subjected to flux and matric potential boundary conditions. The experimental data were subsequently analyzed in Hydrus-1D using both forward and inverse modeling. This study found that the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) values range between 4.05 and 16.57 cm/hr, which is substantially higher than typical values for loamy sand. The range in values is indicative of the variation expected within the LEO hillslopes, primarily resulting from bulk density variations. Additionally, we found substantial and irreversible effects of fine-particle mobility on Ks: high saturated flow rates lead to particle rearrangement and permanently elevated Ks values, which persist at lower saturated flow rates. The transport of fines may lead to an evolution of transport properties during the initial irrigation phase of LEO. Hydrus-1D modeling indicates that the observed time-series of matric potentials and cumulative outflow from a 91.5 cm column can be closely reproduced by the model. Modeling results also indicate that the effective parameters of the LEO material are substantially different from those estimated in previous studies using pedotransfer models. While the Ks value resembles that of a sand, the α and n parameters resemble the expected values for a much finer material. Further modeling, such as in Hydrus-3D, is desirable, as well as a study of different soil water fluxes to quantify the relation among

  12. A SCUBA-2 survey of FeLoBAL QSOs. Are FeLoBALs in a `transition phase' between ULIRGs and QSOs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violino, Giulio; Coppin, Kristen E. K.; Stevens, Jason A.; Farrah, Duncan; Geach, James E.; Alexander, Dave M.; Hickox, Ryan; Smith, Daniel J. B.; Wardlow, Julie L.

    2016-04-01

    It is thought that a class of broad absorption line (BAL) QSOs, characterized by Fe absorption features in their UV spectra (called `FeLoBALs'), could mark a transition stage between the end of an obscured starburst event and a youthful QSO beginning to shed its dust cocoon, where Fe has been injected into the interstellar medium by the starburst. To test this hypothesis, we have undertaken deep Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) 850 μm observations of a sample of 17 FeLoBAL QSOs with 0.89 ≤ z ≤ 2.78 and -23.31 ≤ MB ≤ -28.50 to directly detect an excess in the thermal emission of the dust which would probe enhanced star formation activity. We find that FeLoBALs are not luminous sources in the sub-mm, none of them are individually detected at 850 μm, nor as a population through stacking (Fs = 1.14 ± 0.58 mJy). Statistical and survival analyses reveal that FeLoBALs have sub-mm properties consistent with BAL and non-BAL QSOs with matched redshifts and magnitudes. An Spectral Energy Distribution fitting analysis shows that the far-infrared emission is dominated by active galactic nuclei activity, and a starburst component is required only in 6/17 sources of our sample; moreover the integrated total luminosity of 16/17 sources is L ≥ 1012 L⊙, high enough to classify FeLoBALs as infrared luminous. In conclusion, we do not find any evidence in support of FeLoBAL QSOs being a transition population between an ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) and an unobscured QSO; in particular, FeLoBALs are not characterized by a cold starburst which would support this hypothesis.

  13. Resonant tunnelling diode oscillator as an alternative LO for SIS receiver applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blundell, R.; Papa, D. C.; Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    The resonant tunnelling diode (RTD) oscillator has been demonstrated for the first time as a local oscillator (LO) in a heterodyne receiver. Noise measurements made on a sensitive 200 GHz superconductor-insulator-superconductor receiver using both a multiplied Gunn diode and an RTD oscillator as the LO revealed no difference in receiver noise as a function of oscillator type.

  14. Complexity on Small Scales. II. Metallicities and Ages in the Leo II Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; Grebel, Eva K.; Kleyna, Jan T.; Wilkinson, Mark I.; Harbeck, Daniel R.; Gilmore, Gerard F.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Evans, N. Wyn

    2007-01-01

    We present metallicities and ages for 52 red giants in the remote Galactic dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy Leo II. These stars cover the entire surface area of Leo II and are radial velocity members. We obtained medium-resolution multifiber spectroscopy with FLAMES as part of a Large Program with the Very Large Telescope at the European Southern Observatory, Chile. The metallicities were determined based on the well-established near-infrared Ca II triplet technique. This allowed us to achieve a mean random error of 0.16 dex on the metallicities, while other systematic effects, such as unknown variations in the dSph's [Ca/Fe] ratio, may introduce a further source of uncertainty of the order of 0.1 dex. The resulting metallicity distribution is asymmetric and peaks at [Fe/H]=-1.74 dex on the Carretta & Gratton scale. The full range in metallicities extends from -2.4 to -1.08 dex. As in other dSph galaxies, no extremely metal-poor red giants were found. We compare Leo II's observed metallicity distribution with model predictions for several other Galactic dSphs from the literature. Leo II clearly exhibits a lack of more metal-poor stars, analogous to the classical G dwarf problem, which may indicate a comparable ``K giant problem.'' Moreover, its evolution appears to have been affected by galactic winds. We use our inferred metallicities as an input parameter for isochrone fits to Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry of our target stars and derive approximate ages. The resulting age-metallicity distribution covers the full age range from 2 to about 15 Gyr on our adopted isochrone scale. During the first ~7 Gyr relative to the oldest stars, the metallicity of Leo II appears to have remained almost constant, centering on the mean metallicity of this galaxy. The almost constant metallicity at higher ages and a slight drop by about 0.3 dex thereafter may be indicative of rejuvenation by low-metallicity gas. Overall, the age-metallicity relation appears to support the

  15. Effect of KOH concentration on LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells-update 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    An update of validation test results confirming the breakthrough in low earth orbit (LEO) cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte is presented. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel (IPV nickel-hydrogen cells has been previously reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte was about 40 000 LEO cycles compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. This test was conducted at Hughes Aircraft Company under a NASA Lewis contract. The purpose was to investigate the effect of KOH concentration on cycle life. The cycle regime was a stressful accelerated LEO, which consisted of a 27.5 min charge followed by a 17.5 min discharge (2x normal rate). The depth of discharge (DOD) was 80 percent. The cell temperature was maintained at 23 C. The boiler plate test results are in the process of being validated using flight hardware and real time LEO test at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC), Crane, Indiana under a NASA Lewis Contract. Six 48 Ah Hughes recirculation design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight battery cells are being evaluated. Three of the cells contain 26 percent KOH (test cells), and three contain 31 percent KOH (control cells). They are undergoing real time LEO cycle life testing. The cycle regime is a 90-min LEO orbit consisting of a 54-min charge followed by a 36-min discharge. The depth-of-discharge is 80 percent. The cell temperature is maintained at 10 C. The three 31 percent KOH cells failed (cycles 3729, 4165, and 11355). One of the 26 percent KOH cells failed at cycle 15314. The other two 26 percent KOH cells were cycled for over 16600 cycles during the continuing test.

  16. A ROACH Based Data Acquisition System for the Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartez, Louis P.; Jenet, F.; Cohen, S.; Creighton, T. D.; Ford, A.; Garcia, A.; Hicks, B.; Hinojosa, J.; Kassim, N. E.; Longoria, C.; Lunsford, G.; Mata, A.; Miller, R. B.; Price, R. H.; Quintero, L.; Ray, P. S.; Reser, J.; Rivera, J.; Stovall, K.; Taylor, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a distributed array of dipole antennas that are sensitive to radio frequencies from 5 to 88 MHz. The primary science goals will be the detection and study of low-frequency radio transients. LoFASM consists of antennas and front end electronics that were originally developed for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) by the U.S. Naval Research Lab, the University of New Mexico, Virginia Tech, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. LoFASM, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, will initially consist of 4 stations, each consisting of 12 dual-polarization dipole antenna stands. The signals received by LoFASM are digitized and processed using Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware (ROACH) boards. This poster will describe the LoFASM project with an emphasis on the ROACH data processing pipe-line.

  17. A novel signal processing approach for LEO space debris based on a fence-type space surveillance radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; Hu, Weidong; Ghogho, Mounir; Xin, Qin; Du, Xiaoyong; Guo, Weiwei

    2012-12-01

    The increase in space debris can seriously threaten regular activities in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. Therefore, it is necessary to develop robust, efficient and reliable techniques to understand the potential motions of the LEO debris. In this paper, we propose a novel signal processing approach to detect and estimate the motions of LEO space debris that is based on a fence-type space surveillance radar system. Because of the sparse distribution of the orbiting debris through the fence in our observations, we formulate the signal detection and the motion parameter estimation as a sparse signal reconstruction problem with respect to an over-complete dictionary. Moreover, we propose a new scheme to reduce the size of the original over-complete dictionary without the loss of the important information. This new scheme is based on a careful analysis of the relations between the acceleration and the directions of arrival for the corresponding LEO space debris. Our simulation results show that the proposed approach can achieve extremely good performance in terms of the accuracy for detection and estimation. Furthermore, our simulation results demonstrate the robustness of the approach in scenarios with a low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and the super-resolution properties. We hope our signal processing approach can stimulate further work on monitoring LEO space debris.

  18. Contrast Invariant Interest Point Detection by Zero-Norm LoG Filter.

    PubMed

    Zhenwei Miao; Xudong Jiang; Kim-Hui Yap

    2016-01-01

    The Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) filter is widely used in interest point detection. However, low-contrast image structures, though stable and significant, are often submerged by the high-contrast ones in the response image of the LoG filter, and hence are difficult to be detected. To solve this problem, we derive a generalized LoG filter, and propose a zero-norm LoG filter. The response of the zero-norm LoG filter is proportional to the weighted number of bright/dark pixels in a local region, which makes this filter be invariant to the image contrast. Based on the zero-norm LoG filter, we develop an interest point detector to extract local structures from images. Compared with the contrast dependent detectors, such as the popular scale invariant feature transform detector, the proposed detector is robust to illumination changes and abrupt variations of images. Experiments on benchmark databases demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed zero-norm LoG detector in terms of the repeatability and matching score of the detected points as well as the image recognition rate under different conditions. PMID:26302514

  19. TriLoNet: Piecing Together Small Networks to Reconstruct Reticulate Evolutionary Histories.

    PubMed

    Oldman, James; Wu, Taoyang; van Iersel, Leo; Moulton, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Phylogenetic networks are a generalization of evolutionary trees that can be used to represent reticulate processes such as hybridization and recombination. Here, we introduce a new approach called TriLoNet (Trinet Level- one Network algorithm) to construct such networks directly from sequence alignments which works by piecing together smaller phylogenetic networks. More specifically, using a bottom up approach similar to Neighbor-Joining, TriLoNet constructs level-1 networks (networks that are somewhat more general than trees) from smaller level-1 networks on three taxa. In simulations, we show that TriLoNet compares well with Lev1athan, a method for reconstructing level-1 networks from three-leaved trees. In particular, in simulations we find that Lev1athan tends to generate networks that overestimate the number of reticulate events as compared with those generated by TriLoNet. We also illustrate TriLoNet's applicability using simulated and real sequence data involving recombination, demonstrating that it has the potential to reconstruct informative reticulate evolutionary histories. TriLoNet has been implemented in JAVA and is freely available at https://www.uea.ac.uk/computing/TriLoNet. PMID:27189565

  20. LoCoH: Non-parameteric kernel methods for constructing home ranges and utilization distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Getz, Wayne M.; Fortmann-Roe, Scott; Cross, Paul C.; Lyons, Andrew J.; Ryan, Sadie J.; Wilmers, Christopher C.

    2007-01-01

    Parametric kernel methods currently dominate the literature regarding the construction of animal home ranges (HRs) and utilization distributions (UDs). These methods frequently fail to capture the kinds of hard boundaries common to many natural systems. Recently a local convex hull (LoCoH) nonparametric kernel method, which generalizes the minimum convex polygon (MCP) method, was shown to be more appropriate than parametric kernel methods for constructing HRs and UDs, because of its ability to identify hard boundaries (e.g., rivers, cliff edges) and convergence to the true distribution as sample size increases. Here we extend the LoCoH in two ways: ‘‘fixed sphere-of-influence,’’ or r -LoCoH (kernels constructed from all points within a fixed radius r of each reference point), and an ‘‘adaptive sphere-of-influence,’’ or a -LoCoH (kernels constructed from all points within a radius a such that the distances of all points within the radius to the reference point sum to a value less than or equal to a ), and compare them to the original ‘‘fixed-number-of-points,’’ or k -LoCoH (all kernels constructed from k -1 nearest neighbors of root points). We also compare these nonparametric LoCoH to parametric kernel methods using manufactured data and data collected from GPS collars on African buffalo in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Our results demonstrate that LoCoH methods are superior to parametric kernel methods in estimating areas used by animals, excluding unused areas (holes) and, generally, in constructing UDs and HRs arising from the movement of animals influenced by hard boundaries and irregular structures (e.g., rocky outcrops). We also demonstrate that a -LoCoH is generally superior to k - and r -LoCoH (with software for all three methods available at http://locoh.cnr.berkeley.edu).

  1. LoCoH: Nonparameteric Kernel Methods for Constructing Home Ranges and Utilization Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Wayne M.; Fortmann-Roe, Scott; Wilmers, Christopher C.

    2007-01-01

    Parametric kernel methods currently dominate the literature regarding the construction of animal home ranges (HRs) and utilization distributions (UDs). These methods frequently fail to capture the kinds of hard boundaries common to many natural systems. Recently a local convex hull (LoCoH) nonparametric kernel method, which generalizes the minimum convex polygon (MCP) method, was shown to be more appropriate than parametric kernel methods for constructing HRs and UDs, because of its ability to identify hard boundaries (e.g., rivers, cliff edges) and convergence to the true distribution as sample size increases. Here we extend the LoCoH in two ways: “fixed sphere-of-influence,” or r-LoCoH (kernels constructed from all points within a fixed radius r of each reference point), and an “adaptive sphere-of-influence,” or a-LoCoH (kernels constructed from all points within a radius a such that the distances of all points within the radius to the reference point sum to a value less than or equal to a), and compare them to the original “fixed-number-of-points,” or k-LoCoH (all kernels constructed from k-1 nearest neighbors of root points). We also compare these nonparametric LoCoH to parametric kernel methods using manufactured data and data collected from GPS collars on African buffalo in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Our results demonstrate that LoCoH methods are superior to parametric kernel methods in estimating areas used by animals, excluding unused areas (holes) and, generally, in constructing UDs and HRs arising from the movement of animals influenced by hard boundaries and irregular structures (e.g., rocky outcrops). We also demonstrate that a-LoCoH is generally superior to k- and r-LoCoH (with software for all three methods available at http://locoh.cnr.berkeley.edu). PMID:17299587

  2. Higgs boson gluon-fusion production beyond threshold in N3LO QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Gehrmann, Thomas; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2015-03-18

    In this study, we compute the gluon fusion Higgs boson cross-section at N3LO through the second term in the threshold expansion. This calculation constitutes a major milestone towards the full N3LO cross section. Our result has the best formal accuracy in the threshold expansion currently available, and includes contributions from collinear regions besides subleading corrections from soft and hard regions, as well as certain logarithmically enhanced contributions for general kinematics. We use our results to perform a critical appraisal of the validity of the threshold approximation at N3LO in perturbative QCD.

  3. HERRO: A Science-Oriented Strategy for Crewed Missions Beyond LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an exploration strategy for human missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and the Moon that combines the best features of human and robotic spaceflight. This "Human Exploration using Real-time Robotic Operations" (HERRO) strategy refrains from placing humans on the surfaces of the Moon and Mars in the near-term. Rather, it focuses on sending piloted spacecraft and crews into orbit around exploration targets of interest, such as Mars, and conducting astronaut exploration of the surfaces using telerobots and remotely controlled systems. By eliminating the significant communications delay with Earth due to the speed of light limit, teleoperation provides scientists real-time control of rovers and other sophisticated instruments, in effect giving them a "virtual presence" on planetary surfaces, and thus expanding the scientific return at these destinations. It also eliminates development of the numerous man-rated landers, ascent vehicles and surface systems that are required to land humans on planetary surfaces. The propulsive requirements to travel from LEO to many destinations with shallow gravity-wells in the inner solar system are quite similar. Thus, a single spacecraft design could perform a variety of missions, including orbit-based surface exploration of the Moon, Mars and Venus, and rendezvous with Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs), as well as Phobos and Deimos. Although HERRO bypasses many of the initial steps that have been historically associated with human space exploration, it opens the door to many new destinations that are candidates for future resource utilization and settlement. HERRO is a first step that takes humans to exciting destinations beyond LEO, while expanding the ability to conduct science within the inner solar system.

  4. Large-scale structure and galaxy motions in the Leo/Cancer constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Nasonova, O. G.; Karachentseva, V. E.

    2015-01-01

    In the region of the sky limited by the coordinates RA = 7ḥ0-12ḥ0, Dec = 0°...+20° and extending from the Virgo Cluster to the South Pole of the Local Supercluster, we consider the data on the galaxies with radial velocities V LG ≲ 2000 km/s. For 290 among them, we determine individual distances and peculiar velocities. In this region, known as the local velocity anomaly zone, there are 23 groups and 20 pairs of galaxies for which the estimates of virial/orbital masses are obtained. A nearby group around NGC3379 = Leo I and NGC3627 as well as the Local Group show the motion from the Local Void in the direction of Leo cloud with a characteristic velocity of about 400 km/s. Another rich group of galaxies around NGC3607 reveals peculiar velocity of about -420 km/s in the frame of reference related with the cosmic background radiation. A peculiar scattered association of dwarf galaxies Gemini Flock at a distance of 8 Mpc has the radial velocity dispersion of only 20 km/s and the size of approximately 0.7 Mpc. The virial mass estimate for it is 300 times greater than the total stellar mass. The ratio of the sum of virial masses of groups and pairs in the Leo/Can region to the sum of stellar masses of the galaxies contained in them equals 26, which is equivalent to the local average density Ω m (local) = 0.074, which is 3-4 times smaller than the global average density of matter.

  5. Leo Kanner's Mention of 1938 in His Report on Autism Refers to His First Patient.

    PubMed

    Olmsted, Dan; Blaxill, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Leo Kanner begins his landmark 1943 case series on autistic children by stating the condition was first brought to his attention in 1938. Recent letters to JADD have described this reference as "mysterious" and speculated it refers to papers published that year by Despert or Asperger. In fact, as Kanner goes on to state, 1938 is when he examined the first child in his case series. An exchange of letters with Despert and later writing by Kanner also point to the originality of his observations. PMID:26231203

  6. Mass savings domain of plasma propulsion for LEO to GEO transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Choueiri, E.Y.; Kelly, A.J.; Jahn, R.G. )

    1993-01-20

    A parametric model is used to study the mass savings of plasma propulsion over advanced chemical propulsion for lower earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO) transfer. Such savings are characterized by stringent requirements of massive payloads (O(10) metric tons) and high power levels (O(100) kW). Mass savings on the order of the payload mass are possible but at the expense of longer transfer times (8--20 months). Typical of the savings domain is the case of a self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster running quasi-steadily, at an [ital I][sub [ital s

  7. [The situational diagnosis of the medical units of Petróleos Mexicanos].

    PubMed

    García-Romero, H; Cordera-Pastor, A; Vargas-Martínez, J

    1993-01-01

    The Medical Service Management of Petróleos Mexicanos developed a situational diagnosis of 30 medical units in 1992. This evaluation covered 94 per cent of the institutional population. The basis for this evaluation was a formulary with more than 70 per cent closed questions and instructions with explicit explanations about them. The main points that the formulary investigated were: geography, demography, sociocultural and economics aspects, epidemiology, morbidity, mortality, preventive medicine, service availability and others. With this situational diagnosis we have been able to identify the main problems with a possible solution, presented in terms of planning, organization and execution of actions. PMID:8128292

  8. Leos Janácek and "the late style" in music.

    PubMed

    Beckerman, M B

    1990-10-01

    Czech composer Leos Janácek (1854-1928) represents one of the most remarkable cases of creative energy in advancing years. Indeed, he is remembered primarily for the works that he composed in the last decade of his life. In this paper, Janácek's concept of aging is outlined in three areas: the subject matter of his late operas, the composer's own comments during this period, and the shape of his musical structures. The concept of "the late style" is questioned, and the problems of applying models to artistic creativity and productivity are noted. PMID:2276636

  9. Tanker Argus: Re-supply for a LEO Cryogenic Propellant Depot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Germain, B.; Olds, J.; Kokan, T.; Marcus, L.; Miller, J.

    The Argus reusable launch vehicle (RLV) concept is a single-stage-to-orbit conical, winged bodied vehicle powered by two liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen supercharged ejector ramjets. The 3rd generation Argus launch vehicle utilizes advanced vehicle technologies along with a Maglev launch assist track. A tanker version of the Argus RLV is envisioned to provide an economical means of providing liquid fuel and oxidizer to an orbiting low-Earth orbit (LEO) propellant depot. This depot could then provide propellant to various spacecraft, including reusable orbital transfer vehicles used to ferry space solar power satellites to geo-stationary orbit. Two different tanker Argus configurations were analyzed. The first simply places additional propellant tanks inside the payload bay of an existing Argus reusable launch vehicle. The second concept is a modified Argus RLV in which the payload bay is removed and the vehicle propellant tanks are stretched to hold extra propellant. An iterative conceptual design process was used to design both Argus vehicles. This process involves various disciplines including aerodynamics, trajectory analysis, weights &structures, propulsion, operations, safety, and cost/economics. The payload bay version of tanker Argus, which has a gross mass of 256.3MT, is designed to deliver a 9.07MT payload to LEO. This payload includes propellant and the tank structure required to secure this propellant in the payload bay. The modified, pure tanker version of Argus has a gross mass of 218.6MT and is sized to deliver a full 9.07MT of propellant to LEO. The economic analysis performed for this study involved the calculation of many factors including the design/development and recurring costs of each vehicle. These results were used along with other economic assumptions to determine the "per kilogram" cost of delivering propellant to orbit. The results show that for a given flight rate the "per kilogram" cost is cheaper for the pure tanker version of Argus

  10. Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) Life Cycle Evaluation of Nickel-Zinc Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, D.; Ferreira, E.; Nyce, M.; Charkey, A.

    1997-01-01

    The conclusion of the Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) life cycle evaluation of nickel-zinc batteries are: that composite nickel electrode provide excellent performance at a reduced weight and lower cost; calcium / zinc electrode minimizes shape change; unioptimized cell designs yield 60 Wh/kg; nickel-zinc delivers 600 cycles at 80% DOD; long cycle life obtainable at low DOD; high rate capability power density; long-term failure mechanism is stack dry; and anomalous overcharge (1120%) greatly affected cell performance but did not induce failure and was recoverable.