Science.gov

Sample records for leone age-dependent haplotype

  1. Is extinction age dependent?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doran, N.A.; Arnold, A.J.; Parker, W.C.; Huffer, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    Age-dependent extinction is an observation with important biological implications. Van Valen's Red Queen hypothesis triggered three decades of research testing its primary implication: that age is independent of extinction. In contrast to this, later studies with species-level data have indicated the possible presence of age dependence. Since the formulation of the Red Queen hypothesis, more powerful tests of survivorship models have been developed. This is the first report of the application of the Cox Proportional Hazards model to paleontological data. Planktonic foraminiferal morphospecies allow the taxonomic and precise stratigraphic resolution necessary for the Cox model. As a whole, planktonic foraminiferal morphospecies clearly show age-dependent extinction. In particular, the effect is attributable to the presence of shorter-ranged species (range < 4 myr) following extinction events. These shorter-ranged species also possess tests with unique morphological architecture. The morphological differences are probably epiphenomena of underlying developmental and heterochronic processes of shorter-ranged species that survived various extinction events. Extinction survivors carry developmental and morphological characteristics into postextinction recovery times, and this sets them apart from species populations established independently of extinction events. Copyright ?? 2006, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  2. Haplotyping algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, E.; Lange, K.; O`Connell, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Haplotyping is the logical process of inferring gene flow in a pedigree based on phenotyping results at a small number of genetic loci. This paper formalizes the haplotyping problem and suggests four algorithms for haplotype reconstruction. These algorithms range from exhaustive enumeration of all haplotype vectors to combinatorial optimization by simulated annealing. Application of the algorithms to published genetic analyses shows that manual haplotyping is often erroneous. Haplotyping is employed in screening pedigrees for phenotyping errors and in positional cloning of disease genes from conserved haplotypes in population isolates. 26 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Country Profiles, Sierra Leone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, Thomas E., Jr.

    A profile of Sierra Leone is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition, migration,…

  4. Detecting local haplotype sharing and haplotype association

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel haplotype association method is presented, and its power is demonstrated. Relying on a statistical model for linkage disequilibrium (LD), the method first infers ancestral haplotypes and their loadings at each marker for each individual. The loadings are then used to quantify local haplotype...

  5. Fighting Ebola in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Clavagnier, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Sophie and Pierre have enrolled in the operational team of a humanitarian organisation for two months, in order to help contain the Ebola epidemic. They landed in Freetown, the capital of Sierra Leone, only yesterday. PMID:26146002

  6. Detecting local haplotype sharing and haplotype association.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hanli; Guan, Yongtao

    2014-07-01

    A novel haplotype association method is presented, and its power is demonstrated. Relying on a statistical model for linkage disequilibrium (LD), the method first infers ancestral haplotypes and their loadings at each marker for each individual. The loadings are then used to quantify local haplotype sharing between individuals at each marker. A statistical model was developed to link the local haplotype sharing and phenotypes to test for association. We devised a novel method to fit the LD model, reducing the complexity from putatively quadratic to linear (in the number of ancestral haplotypes). Therefore, the LD model can be fitted to all study samples simultaneously, and, consequently, our method is applicable to big data sets. Compared to existing haplotype association methods, our method integrated out phase uncertainty, avoided arbitrariness in specifying haplotypes, and had the same number of tests as the single-SNP analysis. We applied our method to data from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium and discovered eight novel associations between seven gene regions and five disease phenotypes. Among these, GRIK4, which encodes a protein that belongs to the glutamate-gated ionic channel family, is strongly associated with both coronary artery disease and rheumatoid arthritis. A software package implementing methods described in this article is freely available at http://www.haplotype.org. PMID:24812308

  7. Mitochondrial DNA genetic diversity among four ethnic groups in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Bruce A; Wilson, Jamie Lee; Kirbah, Salwa; Sidney, Sheree S; Rosenberger, Joshua; Bassie, Larry; Alie, Joe A D; McLean, David C; Garvey, W Timothy; Ely, Bert

    2005-09-01

    Although there are numerous ethnic groups in Sierra Leone, the Mende and Temne together account for approximately 60% of the total population. To see if genetic differences could be observed among ethnic groups in Sierra Leone, the nucleotide sequence of the hypervariable 1 (HV1) region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was determined from samples of the two major ethnic groups, the Mende (n=59) and Temne (n=121), and of two minor ethnic groups, the Loko (n=29) and Limba (n=67). Among these 276 HV1 sequences, 164 individual haplotypes were observed. An analysis of molecular variance indicated that the distribution of these haplotypes within the Limba sample was significantly different from that of the other ethnic groups. No significant genetic variation was seen between the Mende, Temne, and Loko. These results indicate that distinguishing genetic differences can be observed among ethnic groups residing in historically close proximity to one another. Furthermore, we observed some mitochondrial DNA haplotypes that are common among the Sierra Leone ethnic groups but that have not been observed in other published studies of West African ethnic groups. Therefore, we may have evidence for mtDNA lineages that are unique to this region of West Africa. PMID:15761855

  8. SEECAL: Program to calculate age-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes the computer program SEECAL, which calculates specific effective energies (SEE) to specified target regions for ages newborn, 1 y, 5 y, 10 y, 15 y, a 70-kg adult male, and a 58-kg adult female. The dosimetric methodology is that of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and is generally consistent with the schema of the Medical Internal Radiation Dose committee of the US Society of Nuclear Medicine. Computation of SEEs is necessary in the computation of equivalent dose rate in a target region, for occupational or public exposure to radionuclides taken into the body. Program SEECAL replaces the program SEE that was previously used by the Dosimetry Research Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The program SEE was used in the dosimetric calculations for occupational exposures for ICRP Publication 30 and is limited to adults. SEECAL was used to generate age-dependent SEEs for ICRP Publication 56, Part 1. SEECAL is also incorporated into DCAL, a radiation dose and risk calculational system being developed for the Environmental Protection Agency. Electronic copies of the program and data files and this report are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  9. Age-dependent decay in the landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Winitzki, Sergei

    2008-03-15

    The picture of the 'multiverse' arising in diverse cosmological scenarios involves transitions between metastable vacuum states. It was pointed out by Krauss and Dent that the transition rates decrease at very late times, leading to a dependence of the transition probability between vacua on the age of each vacuum region. I investigate the implications of this non-Markovian, age-dependent decay on the global structure of the spacetime in landscape scenarios. I show that the fractal dimension of the eternally inflating domain is precisely equal to 3, instead of being slightly below 3, which is the case in scenarios with purely Markovian, age-independent decay. I develop a complete description of a non-Markovian landscape in terms of a nonlocal master equation. Using this description I demonstrate by an explicit calculation that, under some technical assumptions about the landscape, the probabilistic predictions of our position in the landscape are essentially unchanged, regardless of the measure used to extract these predictions. I briefly discuss the physical plausibility of realizing non-Markovian vacuum decay in cosmology in view of the possible decoherence of the metastable quantum state.

  10. Human serum metabolic profiles are age dependent.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhonghao; Zhai, Guangju; Singmann, Paula; He, Ying; Xu, Tao; Prehn, Cornelia; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Lattka, Eva; Gieger, Christian; Soranzo, Nicole; Heinrich, Joachim; Standl, Marie; Thiering, Elisabeth; Mittelstraß, Kirstin; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Peters, Annette; Suhre, Karsten; Li, Yixue; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; Wang-Sattler, Rui

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the complexity of aging is of utmost importance. This can now be addressed by the novel and powerful approach of metabolomics. However, to date, only a few metabolic studies based on large samples are available. Here, we provide novel and specific information on age-related metabolite concentration changes in human homeostasis. We report results from two population-based studies: the KORA F4 study from Germany as a discovery cohort, with 1038 female and 1124 male participants (32-81 years), and the TwinsUK study as replication, with 724 female participants. Targeted metabolomics of fasting serum samples quantified 131 metabolites by FIA-MS/MS. Among these, 71/34 metabolites were significantly associated with age in women/men (BMI adjusted). We further identified a set of 13 independent metabolites in women (with P values ranging from 4.6 × 10(-04) to 7.8 × 10(-42) , α(corr) = 0.004). Eleven of these 13 metabolites were replicated in the TwinsUK study, including seven metabolite concentrations that increased with age (C0, C10:1, C12:1, C18:1, SM C16:1, SM C18:1, and PC aa C28:1), while histidine decreased. These results indicate that metabolic profiles are age dependent and might reflect different aging processes, such as incomplete mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. The use of metabolomics will increase our understanding of aging networks and may lead to discoveries that help enhance healthy aging. PMID:22834969

  11. Susu Language Manual: Sierra Leone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Freetown (Sierra Leone).

    A teacher's guide for Susu is designed for Peace Corps volunteer language instruction and geared to the daily language needs of volunteers in Sierra Leone. It contains a section on Susu phonology and 28 lessons on these topics: situation-specific greetings, basic greetings, introducing a friend, the market, travel and getting directions, visiting…

  12. English Teaching Profile: Sierra Leone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English Language and Literature Div.

    The role and status of English in Sierra Leone are examined, with attention directed to: (1) English within the education system, (2) teachers of English, (3) materials support; (4) educational administration for English teaching, (5) development and planning, (6) British support for the teaching of English, and (7) commercial opportunities.…

  13. Sierra Leone Temne Language Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC.

    A language guide to Temne is designed for Peace Corps volunteers serving in Sierra Leone. It contains introductory sections about the Temnes and Temne phonology and orthography, teacher notes on the use of the manual, and 12 lessons. Each lesson consists of a dialogue or narrative, notes on classroom presentation, vocabulary and useful phrases,…

  14. English Teaching Profile: Sierra Leone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English Language and Literature Div.

    This review of the status of English language instruction in Sierra Leone provides an overview of the role of English in the society in general and outlines the status of English use and instruction in the educational system at all levels (preprimary, elementary, secondary, higher, vocational, adult, and teacher education). Topics covered are: the…

  15. My Great Migration from Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Educational Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the author's personal narrative as an immigrant from Sierra Leone who has undergone so many challenges in life and ended up turning all these obstacles into opportunities. In this article, the author describes his life growing up in Sierra Leone, his first experience of the horrors of war, his life as a student, and his dream…

  16. Paederus dermatitis in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Syed Nurul Rasool; Raza, Naeem; Rahman, Simeen Ber

    2006-01-01

    Paederus dermatitis, a type of irritant contact dermatitis attributed to a Staphylinid beetle, is prevalent in most parts of the world. We studied 50 cases of Paederus dermatitis at the United Nations Hospital at Koidu Sierra Leone (West Africa), over a period of 6 months from Oct 2003 to Mar 2004. The objectives of the study were to determine clinical patterns of dermatitis and its response to topical steroids, with and without antibiotics. Patients with a definite history of contact with the insect were included in the study. Amongst these, 14 of the more severe cases were treated with oral prednisolone or intralesional triamcinolone acetonide. The remainder of the 36 patients were divided in two equal groups A and B. Patients in Group A were treated with topical diflucortolone valerate 0.001 percent and oral cetirizine hydrochloride; patients in group B were given oral ciprofloxacin in addition. In 50 patients studied, 43 (86%) were males and 7 (14%) were females. The neck was the most common site involved followed by face. Healing time ranged from 14 to 28 days and lesions in all the patients healed with residual dyschromia. Healing time was shorter in Group B patients in comparison with those in Group A. Paederus dermatitis in Sierra Leone is a relatively severe form of this dermatitis. The better response to a combination of topical steroids and oral antibiotics may indicate concurrent bacterial infection. PMID:17459295

  17. Quantifying Age-dependent Extinction from Species Phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Helen K; Lambert, Amaury; Stadler, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Several ecological factors that could play into species extinction are expected to correlate with species age, i.e., time elapsed since the species arose by speciation. To date, however, statistical tools to incorporate species age into likelihood-based phylogenetic inference have been lacking. We present here a computational framework to quantify age-dependent extinction through maximum likelihood parameter estimation based on phylogenetic trees, assuming species lifetimes are gamma distributed. Testing on simulated trees shows that neglecting age dependence can lead to biased estimates of key macroevolutionary parameters. We then apply this method to two real data sets, namely a complete phylogeny of birds (class Aves) and a clade of self-compatible and -incompatible nightshades (Solanaceae), gaining initial insights into the extent to which age-dependent extinction may help explain macroevolutionary patterns. Our methods have been added to the R package TreePar. PMID:26405218

  18. AGE-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN ACTIVITY OF MALLARD PLASMA CHOLINESTERASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasma acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity was measured repeatedly in 27 mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings between 7 and 85 days of age to determine age-dependent changes in enzyme activity. Plasma AChE, BChe, and total cholinesterase (ChE) a...

  19. Leon Knopoff (1926-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Paul; Jackson, David; Gilbert, Freeman

    2011-06-01

    Leon Knopoff died at his home in Sherman Oaks, Calif., on 20 January 2011 at the age of 85. A man of wide-ranging talents, he had the rare distinction of being simultaneously a professor of physics, a professor of geophysics, and a research musicologist at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). As an undergraduate he studied electrical engineering and obtained his Ph.D. in physics and mathematics at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in 1949. He was recruited to the Institute of Geophysics (now the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics) at UCLA in 1950 by Louis Slichter, where he became a professor of geophysics in 1957 and of geophysics and physics in 1961. He became a research musicologist in the UCLA Institute of Ethnomusicology soon after it was formed in 1960. Other appointments included faculty positions at Miami University in Ohio (1948-1950) and Caltech (1962-1963) and visiting appointments at Cambridge, Karlsruhe, Harvard, Santiago, Trieste, and Venice.

  20. Age-dependent protection quantities for external photon irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chou, D P; Wang, J N; Chen, I J

    2001-01-01

    The age-dependent conversion coefficients of the protection quantities, the equivalent dose and the effective dose defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), are obtained. A Monte Carlo computer code and the age-dependent hermaphrodite mathematical phantoms of six age groups: newborn, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old and adult are used for the evaluation. Twenty-three photon source energies from 10 keV to 10 MeV and six kinds of irradiation geometries: AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT, and ISO are chosen in the calculation. The evaluated conversion coefficients for the adult are compared with those in ICRP Publication 74 with good agreement. The conversion coefficients of the equivalent dose and the effective dose increase while the age of the phantom decreases, but with some exceptions for the AP irradiation geometry under certain conditions. PMID:11605795

  1. A SIRS epidemic model with infection-age dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Peng, Jigen

    2007-07-01

    Based on J. Mena-Lorca and H.W. Hethcote's epidemic model, a SIRS epidemic model with infection-age-dependent infectivity and general nonlinear contact rate is formulated. Under general conditions, the unique existence of its global positive solutions is obtained. Moreover, under more general assumptions than the existing, the existence and asymptotical stability of its equilibria are discussed. In the end, the condition on the stability of endemic equilibrium is verified by a special model.

  2. Age-dependent diet choice in an avian top predator.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Christian; Whittingham, Mark J; Newton, Ian

    2006-03-01

    Age-dependent breeding performance is arguably one of the best-documented phenomena in ornithology. The existence of age-related trends has major implications for life-history theory, but the proximate reasons for these patterns remain poorly understood. It has been proposed that poor breeding performance of young individuals might reflect lack of foraging skills. We investigated this possibility in a medium-sized, powerful raptor-the northern goshawk Accipiter gentilis. Male goshawks are responsible for providing their females and their offspring with food. We hypothesized that young males may generally show poor breeding performance or even delay breeding, because they lack the experience to hunt efficiently-especially, their principal avian prey, the feral pigeon Columba livia. Our study exploited a rare 'natural experiment', the expansion phase of an urban population, where intraspecific interference was negligible and many young males bred successfully. This enabled us to examine the improvement of foraging skills in a larger sample of young individuals, and in more controlled conditions than usually possible. Using data from individually identified male breeders, we show that, consistent with our hypothesis, the proportion of pigeons in the diet increased significantly with male age, for at least the first three years of life. Other studies have shown a parallel increase in productivity, and a positive effect of a pigeon-rich diet on brood size and nestling condition, stressing the potential fitness relevance of this prey species for goshawks. Our results suggest a causal link between patterns of age-dependence in foraging ecology and reproductive performance. Furthermore, our study is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration that prey choice of breeders, which might reflect individual hunting skills, is age-dependent in a raptor. PMID:16537129

  3. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tuǧrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age τ as τ-α. Depending on the exponent α , the scaling of tree depth with tree size n displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition (α =1 ) tree depth grows as (logn) 2. This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus providing a theoretical support for age-dependent speciation and associating it to the occurrence of a critical point.

  4. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model.

    PubMed

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tuğrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age τ as τ(-α). Depending on the exponent α, the scaling of tree depth with tree size n displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition (α=1) tree depth grows as (logn)(2). This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus providing a theoretical support for age-dependent speciation and associating it to the occurrence of a critical point. PMID:25768548

  5. Particularizing Universal Education in Postcolonial Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pai, Grace

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a vertical case study of the history of universalizing education in postcolonial Sierra Leone from the early 1950s to 1990 to highlight how there has never been a universal conception of universal education. In order to unite a nation behind a universal ideal of schooling, education needed to be adapted to different…

  6. Leon Foucault: His Life, Times and Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aczel, Amir D.

    2004-01-01

    Leon Foucault's dramatic demonstration of the rotation of the Earth using a freely-rotating pendulum in 1850 shocked the world of science. Scientists were stunned that such a simple proof of our planet's rotation had to wait so long to be developed. Foucault's public demonstration, which was repeated at many locations around the world, put an end…

  7. Age-dependent protection quantities for external neutron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chou, D P; Wang, J N; Chen, I J; Chang, B J

    2003-01-01

    Based on the recommendations issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), equivalent doses and effective doses for different ages are obtained for external neutron sources. The calculations at 28 neutron energies from 1 x 10(-9) MeV to 20 MeV are carried out for six irradiation geometries: AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO. An age-dependent anthropomorphic mathematical phantom series of six age groups: newborn, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old and adult is used with the Monte Carlo computer code MCNP for the dose evaluations. The results for adults are compared with those in ICRP Publication 74 and are in good agreement. At low energies the effective doses increase as the phantom age increases, but at high energics they decrease with increasing age for the AP, PA, ROT and ISO irradiation geometries. In the whole energy region the effective doses decrease as the phantom age increases for the RLAT and LLAT irradiation geometries. The age-dependent equivalent doses behave similarly to the effective doses, with some exceptions caused by the influence of the organ position. PMID:12862238

  8. Age-dependent social learning in a lizard

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Daniel W. A.; Byrne, Richard W.; Whiting, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence of social learning, whereby the actions of an animal facilitate the acquisition of new information by another, is taxonomically biased towards mammals, especially primates, and birds. However, social learning need not be limited to group-living animals because species with less interaction can still benefit from learning about potential predators, food sources, rivals and mates. We trained male skinks (Eulamprus quoyii), a mostly solitary lizard from eastern Australia, in a two-step foraging task. Lizards belonging to ‘young’ and ‘old’ age classes were presented with a novel instrumental task (displacing a lid) and an association task (reward under blue lid). We did not find evidence for age-dependent learning of the instrumental task; however, young males in the presence of a demonstrator learnt the association task faster than young males without a demonstrator, whereas old males in both treatments had similar success rates. We present the first evidence of age-dependent social learning in a lizard and suggest that the use of social information for learning may be more widespread than previously believed. PMID:25009244

  9. Role of Mitochondrial Complex IV in Age-Dependent Obesity.

    PubMed

    Soro-Arnaiz, Ines; Li, Qilong Oscar Yang; Torres-Capelli, Mar; Meléndez-Rodríguez, Florinda; Veiga, Sónia; Veys, Koen; Sebastian, David; Elorza, Ainara; Tello, Daniel; Hernansanz-Agustín, Pablo; Cogliati, Sara; Moreno-Navarrete, Jose Maria; Balsa, Eduardo; Fuertes, Esther; Romanos, Eduardo; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Enriquez, Jose Antonio; Fernandez-Real, Jose Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; De Bock, Katrien; Aragonés, Julián

    2016-09-13

    Aging is associated with progressive white adipose tissue (WAT) enlargement initiated early in life, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain unknown. Here we show that mitochondrial complex IV (CIV) activity and assembly are already repressed in white adipocytes of middle-aged mice and involve a HIF1A-dependent decline of essential CIV components such as COX5B. At the molecular level, HIF1A binds to the Cox5b proximal promoter and represses its expression. Silencing of Cox5b decreased fatty acid oxidation and promoted intracellular lipid accumulation. Moreover, local in vivo Cox5b silencing in WAT of young mice increased the size of adipocytes, whereas restoration of COX5B expression in aging mice counteracted adipocyte enlargement. An age-dependent reduction in COX5B gene expression was also found in human visceral adipose tissue. Collectively, our findings establish a pivotal role for CIV dysfunction in progressive white adipocyte enlargement during aging, which can be restored to alleviate age-dependent WAT expansion. PMID:27626667

  10. Haplotyping Problem, A Clustering Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Eslahchi, Changiz; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Pezeshk, Hamid; Kargar, Mehdi; Poormohammadi, Hadi

    2007-09-06

    Construction of two haplotypes from a set of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) fragments is called haplotype reconstruction problem. One of the most popular computational model for this problem is Minimum Error Correction (MEC). Since MEC is an NP-hard problem, here we propose a novel heuristic algorithm based on clustering analysis in data mining for haplotype reconstruction problem. Based on hamming distance and similarity between two fragments, our iterative algorithm produces two clusters of fragments; then, in each iteration, the algorithm assigns a fragment to one of the clusters. Our results suggest that the algorithm has less reconstruction error rate in comparison with other algorithms.

  11. Peripheral Surgical Wounding and Age-Dependent Neuroinflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Culley, Deborah J.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality. However, its neuropathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Neuroinflammation and accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) have been reported to contribute to cognitive dysfunction in humans and cognitive impairment in animals. Our recent studies have established a pre-clinical model in mice, and have found that the peripheral surgical wounding without the influence of general anesthesia induces an age-dependent Aβ accumulation and cognitive impairment in mice. We therefore set out to assess the effects of peripheral surgical wounding, in the absence of general anesthesia, on neuroinflammation in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in 9 and 18 month-old mice. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Iba1 positive cells (the marker of microglia activation), CD33, and cognitive function in mice were determined. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and Iba1 positive cells in the hippocampus of both 9 and 18 month-old mice, and age potentiated these effects. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of CD33 in the hippocampus of 18, but not 9, month-old mice. Finally, anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen ameliorated the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment in 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgical wounding could induce an age-dependent neuroinflammation and elevation of CD33 levels in the hippocampus of mice, which could lead to cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pending further studies, anti-inflammatory therapies may reduce the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients. PMID:24796537

  12. Age-dependent forest carbon sink: Estimation via inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tao; Shi, Peijun; Jia, Gensuo; Dai, Yongjiu; Zhao, Xiang; Shangguan, Wei; Du, Ling; Wu, Hao; Luo, Yiqi

    2015-12-01

    Forests have been recognized to sequester a substantial amount of carbon (C) from the atmosphere. However, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the magnitude and time course of the C sink. Revealing the intrinsic relationship between forest age and C sink is crucial for reducing uncertainties in prediction of forest C sink potential. In this study, we developed a stepwise data assimilation approach to combine a process-based Terrestrial ECOsystem Regional model, observations from multiple sources, and stochastic sampling to inversely estimate carbon cycle parameters including carbon sink at different forest ages for evergreen needle-leaved forests in China. The new approach is effective to estimate age-dependent parameter of maximal light-use efficiency (R2 = 0.99) and, accordingly, can quantify a relationship between forest age and the vegetation and soil C sinks. The estimated ecosystem C sink increases rapidly with age, peaks at 0.451 kg C m-2 yr-1 at age 22 years (ranging from 0.421 to 0.465 kg C m-2 yr-1), and gradually decreases thereafter. The dynamic patterns of C sinks in vegetation and soil are significantly different. C sink in vegetation first increases rapidly with age and then decreases. C sink in soil, however, increases continuously with age; it acts as a C source when the age is less than 20 years, after which it acts as a sink. For the evergreen needle-leaved forest, the highest C sink efficiency (i.e., C sink per unit net primary productivity) is approximately 60%, with age between 11 and 43 years. Overall, the inverse estimation of carbon cycle parameters can make reasonable estimates of age-dependent C sequestration in forests.

  13. Calorie Restriction Suppresses Age-Dependent Hippocampal Transcriptional Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Marissa J.; Dolgalev, Igor; Alldred, Melissa J.; Heguy, Adriana; Ginsberg, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) enhances longevity and mitigates aging phenotypes in numerous species. Physiological responses to CR are cell-type specific and variable throughout the lifespan. However, the mosaic of molecular changes responsible for CR benefits remains unclear, particularly in brain regions susceptible to deterioration during aging. We examined the influence of long-term CR on the CA1 hippocampal region, a key learning and memory brain area that is vulnerable to age-related pathologies, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Through mRNA sequencing and NanoString nCounter analysis, we demonstrate that one year of CR feeding suppresses age-dependent signatures of 882 genes functionally associated with synaptic transmission-related pathways, including calcium signaling, long-term potentiation (LTP), and Creb signaling in wild-type mice. By comparing the influence of CR on hippocampal CA1 region transcriptional profiles at younger-adult (5 months, 2.5 months of feeding) and older-adult (15 months, 12.5 months of feeding) timepoints, we identify conserved upregulation of proteome quality control and calcium buffering genes, including heat shock 70 kDa protein 1b (Hspa1b) and heat shock 70 kDa protein 5 (Hspa5), protein disulfide isomerase family A member 4 (Pdia4) and protein disulfide isomerase family A member 6 (Pdia6), and calreticulin (Calr). Expression levels of putative neuroprotective factors, klotho (Kl) and transthyretin (Ttr), are also elevated by CR in adulthood, although the global CR-specific expression profiles at younger and older timepoints are highly divergent. At a previously unachieved resolution, our results demonstrate conserved activation of neuroprotective gene signatures and broad CR-suppression of age-dependent hippocampal CA1 region expression changes, indicating that CR functionally maintains a more youthful transcriptional state within the hippocampal CA1 sector. PMID:26221964

  14. Obituary: Leon Van Speybroeck, 1935-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, Paul; Tananbaum, Harvey Dale

    2003-12-01

    Leon Van Speybroeck, a master designer of X-ray telescope mirrors and the telescope scientist for the Chandra X-ray Observatory, died in Newton, Massachusetts, on 25 December 2002, shortly after learning that he had metastatic melanoma. Leon was born on 27 August 1935 in Wichita, Kansas. His father, Paul, was Assistant Treasurer and head of the accounting department at Beech Aircraft, and his mother, Anna Florence (Utley), was a homemaker. Both parents died in 1996. Leon's younger sister, Saundra, is a nurse and his younger brother, John, is a surgeon. Leon received a BS in 1957 and a PhD in 1965, both in physics, from MIT. His PhD thesis, ``Elastic Electron-Deuteron Scattering at High Momentum Transfer," was carried out under the supervision of Henry Kendall and Jerome Friedman. Leon spent two more years at MIT as a research associate. In 1967, he was hired by American Science and Engineering (AS&E) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and joined the X-ray astronomy group led by Riccardo Giacconi, who received the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physics for contributions to astrophysics that led to the discovery of cosmic X-ray sources. Leon soon became involved in the design and construction of high-resolution, grazing-incidence X-ray telescopes, starting with the Apollo Telescope Mount flown on NASA's Skylab from 1973 to 1974. A series of high-resolution X-ray images of the solar corona led to dramatic changes in ideas about the solar corona, with new emphasis on magnetic dynamo processes. When the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Harvard College Observatory morphed into the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in 1973, Leon, with Giacconi and other senior X-ray astronomers from AS&E, joined the CfA and formed the high-energy astrophysics division. Leon guided the design and development of the X-ray mirrors on NASA's Einstein Observatory, which was flown from 1978 to 1981 as the first cosmic X-ray observatory with an imaging telescope. Along the way, he

  15. War and deforestation in Sierra Leone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Robin; Miguel, Edward; Stanton, Charlotte

    2015-09-01

    The impact of armed conflict on the environment is of major public policy importance. We use a geographically disaggregated dataset of civil war violence together with satellite imagery of land cover to test whether war facilitated or prevented forest loss in Sierra Leone. The conflict data set allows us to establish where rebel groups were stationed and where battles and attacks occurred. The satellite data enables to us to monitor the change in forest cover (total, primary, and secondary) in all of Sierra Leone’s 151 chiefdoms, between 1990 (prior to the war) and 2000 (just prior to its end). The results suggest that conflict in Sierra Leone acted as a brake on local deforestation: conflict-ridden areas experienced significantly less forest loss relative to their more conflict-free counterparts.

  16. Leon X-1, the First Chandra Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Aldcroft, Tom; Cameron, Robert A.; Gandhi, Poshak; Foellmi, Cedric; Elsner, Ronald F.; Patel, Sandeep K.; ODell, Stephen L.

    2004-01-01

    Here we present an analysis of the first photons detected with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and an identification of the brightest source in the field which we named Leon X-1 to honor the momentous contributions of the Chandra Telescope Scientist, Leon Van Speybroeck. The observation took place immediately following the opening of the last door protecting the X-ray telescope. We discuss the unusual operational conditions as the first extra-terrestrial X-ray photons reflected from the telescope onto the ACIS camera. One bright source was a p parent to the team at the control center and the small collection of photons that appeared on the monitor were sufficient to indicate that the telescope had survived the launch and was approximately in focus, even prior to any checks and subsequent adjustments.

  17. 6. SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT AT CALVERT STREET, SHOWING LEON HERMANT ALLEGORICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT AT CALVERT STREET, SHOWING LEON HERMANT ALLEGORICAL RELIEF OF TRANSPORTATION BY AUTOMOBILE - Calvert Street Bridge, Spanning Rock Creek & Potomac Parkway, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. Obituary: Leon Van Speybroeck, 1935-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, Paul; Tananbaum, Harvey Dale

    2003-12-01

    Leon Van Speybroeck, a master designer of X-ray telescope mirrors and the telescope scientist for the Chandra X-ray Observatory, died in Newton, Massachusetts, on 25 December 2002, shortly after learning that he had metastatic melanoma. Leon was born on 27 August 1935 in Wichita, Kansas. His father, Paul, was Assistant Treasurer and head of the accounting department at Beech Aircraft, and his mother, Anna Florence (Utley), was a homemaker. Both parents died in 1996. Leon's younger sister, Saundra, is a nurse and his younger brother, John, is a surgeon. Leon received a BS in 1957 and a PhD in 1965, both in physics, from MIT. His PhD thesis, ``Elastic Electron-Deuteron Scattering at High Momentum Transfer," was carried out under the supervision of Henry Kendall and Jerome Friedman. Leon spent two more years at MIT as a research associate. In 1967, he was hired by American Science and Engineering (AS&E) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and joined the X-ray astronomy group led by Riccardo Giacconi, who received the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physics for contributions to astrophysics that led to the discovery of cosmic X-ray sources. Leon soon became involved in the design and construction of high-resolution, grazing-incidence X-ray telescopes, starting with the Apollo Telescope Mount flown on NASA's Skylab from 1973 to 1974. A series of high-resolution X-ray images of the solar corona led to dramatic changes in ideas about the solar corona, with new emphasis on magnetic dynamo processes. When the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Harvard College Observatory morphed into the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in 1973, Leon, with Giacconi and other senior X-ray astronomers from AS&E, joined the CfA and formed the high-energy astrophysics division. Leon guided the design and development of the X-ray mirrors on NASA's Einstein Observatory, which was flown from 1978 to 1981 as the first cosmic X-ray observatory with an imaging telescope. Along the way, he

  19. Age dependence of natural uranium and thorium concentrations in bone.

    PubMed

    Larivière, Dominic; Packer, Ana Paula; Marro, Leonora; Li, Chunsheng; Chen, Jing; Cornett, R Jack

    2007-02-01

    The age dependence of the natural concentration of uranium and thorium in the skeleton was investigated using human vertebrae bone collected from two Canadian locations (Winnipeg, Manitoba, and Regina, Saskatchewan). The concentration of both radioelements in digested ashed bone samples was determined using sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The geometric means for uranium level in bones showed a significant statistical difference between the two locations studied. Similarly for thorium, a statistical difference was observed, although this difference was considered marginal. The thorium concentration differed only marginally with respect to age group, indicating that its behavior in the body could be age-independent. Conversely, the uranium level in bones was found to change for the age groups tested, an indication of age-specific deposition. The age profile for uranium was comparable to the calcium turn-over rate, indicating that uranium deposition is probably, in part, dictated by this metabolic process, showing the role of present uptake into the uranium concentration in bones for populations exposed to significant uranium intake. PMID:17220713

  20. Demographic drivers of age-dependent sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Martin, A M; Festa-Bianchet, M; Coltman, D W; Pelletier, F

    2016-07-01

    Sexual selection has a critical role in evolution, and it is fundamental to identify what ecological factors drive its variation. Disentangling the ecological correlates of sexual selection over the long term, however, is challenging and has rarely been done in nature. We sought to assess how demographic changes influenced the intensity, direction and form of sexual selection and whether selective pressures varied with age. We tested whether breeder sex ratio, number of competitors and age structure influenced selection differentials on horn length of wild bighorn rams (Ovis canadensis) of different age classes on Ram Mountain, Alberta. We used 21 years of data including a detailed pedigree, demographic parameters and repeated morphological measurements. Sexual selection on horn length of males of all ages was directional and positive. Selection intensity increased with the number of competitors, reflecting male-male encounter rate during the rut, but was independent of breeder sex ratio or age structure. This result can also be linked to changes in population size because the number of competitors was highly correlated to total number of sheep. This demographic effect likely arises from age-dependent mating tactics. Males aged 2-4 years are weakly competitive and experienced stronger sexual selection as they accounted for a greater proportion of all males. Selection experienced by mature males appeared independent of demography. Our study provides a rare description of the demographic determinants of sexual selection in nature. PMID:27090379

  1. A comprehensive approach to age-dependent dosimetric modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.W.; Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    In the absence of age-specific biokinetic models, current retention models of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) frequently are used as a point of departure for evaluation of exposures to the general population. These models were designed and intended for estimation of long-term integrated doses to the adult worker. Their format and empirical basis preclude incorporation of much valuable physiological information and physiologically reasonable assumptions that could be used in characterizing the age-specific behavior of radioelements in humans. In this paper we discuss a comprehensive approach to age-dependent dosimetric modeling in which consideration is given not only to changes with age in masses and relative geometries of body organs and tissues but also to best available physiological and radiobiological information relating to the age-specific biobehavior of radionuclides. This approach is useful in obtaining more accurate estimates of long-term dose commitments as a function of age at intake, but it may be particularly valuable in establishing more accurate estimates of dose rate as a function of age. Age-specific dose rates are needed for a proper analysis of the potential effects on estimates or risk of elevated dose rates per unit intake in certain stages of life, elevated response per unit dose received during some stages of life, and age-specific non-radiogenic competing risks.

  2. Implementing an Ebola Vaccine Study - Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Schrag, Stephanie J; Carter, Rosalind J; Carr, Wendy; Legardy-Williams, Jennifer; Gibson, Laura; Lisk, Durodami R; Jalloh, Mohamed I; Bash-Taqi, Donald A; Kargbo, Samuel A Sheku; Idriss, Ayesha; Deen, Gibrilla F; Russell, James B W; McDonald, Wendi; Albert, Alison P; Basket, Michelle; Callis, Amy; Carter, Victoria M; Ogunsanya, Kelli R Clifton; Gee, Julianne; Pinner, Robert; Mahon, Barbara E; Goldstein, Susan T; Seward, Jane F; Samai, Mohamed; Schuchat, Anne

    2016-01-01

    In October 2014, the College of Medicine and Allied Health Sciences of the University of Sierra Leone, the Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation, and CDC joined the global effort to accelerate assessment and availability of candidate Ebola vaccines and began planning for the Sierra Leone Trial to Introduce a Vaccine against Ebola (STRIVE). STRIVE was an individually randomized controlled phase II/III trial to evaluate efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of the recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus Ebola vaccine (rVSV-ZEBOV). The study population was health care and frontline workers in select chiefdoms of the five most affected districts in Sierra Leone. Participants were randomized to receive a single intramuscular dose of rVSV-ZEBOV at enrollment or to receive a single intramuscular dose 18-24 weeks after enrollment. All participants were followed up monthly until 6 months after vaccination. Two substudies separately assessed detailed reactogenicity over 1 month and immunogenicity over 12 months. During the 5 months before the trial, STRIVE and partners built a research platform in Sierra Leone comprising participant follow-up sites, cold chain, reliable power supply, and vaccination clinics and hired and trained at least 350 national staff. Wide-ranging community outreach, informational sessions, and messaging were conducted before and during the trial to ensure full communication to the population of the study area regarding procedures and current knowledge about the trial vaccine. During April 9-August 15, 2015, STRIVE enrolled 8,673 participants, of whom 453 and 539 were also enrolled in the safety and immunogenicity substudies, respectively. As of April 28, 2016, no Ebola cases and no vaccine-related serious adverse events, which by regulatory definition include death, life-threatening illness, hospitalization or prolongation of hospitalization, or permanent disability, were reported in the study population. Although STRIVE will not produce an

  3. Age dependency of cerebral oxygenation assessed with near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colier, Willy N.; van Haaren, Nicole J.; van de Ven, Marjo J.; Folgering, Hans T.; Oeseburg, Berend

    1997-04-01

    Near-IR spectroscopy (NIRS) is an optical technique that provides information on cerebral tissue oxygenation and hemodynamics on a continuous, direct, and noninvasive basis. It is used to determine cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity during normoxic hyper- and hypocapnia in a group of 28 healthy volunteers aged 20 to 83 years. The main focus is on to the age dependency of the measured variables. The influence of changes in minute ventilation during normocapnia on the cerebral oxygenation was also studied. The mean CBV in age was, for 20 to 30 years, 2.14 +/- 0.51 ml/100 g of brain tissue; for 45 to 50 years, 1.92 +/- 0.40 ml/100 g; and for 70 to 83 years, 1.47 +/- 0.55 ml/100 g. The CBV showed a significant decease with advancing age. No influence was found for a change in minute ventilation on cerebral oxygenation. During hypercapnia cerebral blood flow (CBF) significantly increased in al age groups, with a factor of 1.31 +/- 0.17 kPa-1, 1.64 +/- 1.39 kPa-1, and 2.4 +/- 1.7 kPa-1, respectively, for the three age groups. The difference in change among the age groups was not statistically significant. The trend seen was an increased change in CBF with advancing age. During hypocapnia, the CBF significantly decreased in all age groups, with a factor of 0.89 +/- 0.08 kPa-1, 0.89 +/- 0.04 kPa-1, and 0.85 +/- 0.11 kPa-1, respectively. There was no significant difference among the age groups.

  4. Age-Dependent Male Mating Investment in Drosophila pseudoobscura

    PubMed Central

    Dhole, Sumit; Pfennig, Karin S.

    2014-01-01

    Male mating investment can strongly influence fitness gained from a mating. Yet, male mating investment often changes with age. Life history theory predicts that mating investment should increase with age, and males should become less discriminatory about their mate as they age. Understanding age-dependent changes in male behavior and their effects on fitness is important for understanding how selection acts in age-structured populations. Although the independent effects of male or female age have been studied in many species, how these interact to influence male mating investment and fitness is less well understood. We mated Drosophila pseudoobscura males of five different age classes (4-, 8-, 11-, 15-, 19-day old) to either young (4-day) or old (11-day) females, and measured copulation duration and early post-mating fecundity. Along with their independent effects, we found a strong interaction between the effects of male and female ages on male mating investment and fitness from individual matings. Male mating investment increased with male age, but this increase was more prominent in matings with young females. Male D. pseudoobscura made smaller investments when mating with old females. The level of such discrimination based on female age, however, also changed with male age. Intermediate aged males were most discriminatory, while the youngest and the oldest males did not discriminate between females of different ages. We also found that larger male mating investments resulted in higher fitness payoffs. Our results show that male and female ages interact to form a complex pattern of age-specific male mating investment and fitness. PMID:24586373

  5. Indigenous Knowledge and Library Work in Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kargbo, John Abdul

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous knowledge is vital information that is sadly diminishing at an alarming rate in Sierra Leone. There is, therefore, an urgent need to collect it before much of it is completely lost. This article explores the concept of indigenous knowledge and indigenous knowledge systems with a particular focus on Sierra Leone. Definitions and…

  6. Age-dependent morphological and compositional variations on Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Extended smooth plains cover the interior of a number of craters on Ceres. Smooth plains appear on different topographic levels associated with pits and flow-like features that overrun crater rims. The material forming these plains also ponds in depressions and smaller craters and cover the pre-existing surface creating distinct geological boundaries. Ikapati crater shows smooth plains on different topographic levels associated with pits and flow-like features that overrun crater rims. The material forming these plains, ponds in depressions and smaller craters and cover the pre-existing surface creating a distinct geological boundary. The interior of Occator also exhibits extended plains of ponded material, multiple flows originating from the center overwhelming the mass wasting deposits from the rim, dome-like features, vents cracks and fissures. Furthermore, crater densities on Occator's floor are lower than those on the ejecta blanket indicating a post-impact formation age of the flows. The flows to the northeast appear to originate from the central region and move slightly uphill. This indicates either a feeding zone that pushes the flows forward by supplying low-viscosity material or a depression of the crater center, possibly after discharging a subsurface reservoir. The plains and flows as well as some areas surrounding the craters appear spectrally blue. Both plains and flow material are characterized in camera and spectrometer visible spectra by a slightly negative slope with a gradual drop off up to 10% in reflectance from 0.5μm to 1μm. Although the spectral variations in the visible are subtle, they are clearly expressed in the color ratio composite. The crater densities of 20 locations across the surface of Ceres with different spectral behavior were analyzed in order to investigate the age dependence of spectral surface features. The results indicate that bluish material is mainly associated with the youngest impact craters on Ceres (< 0.5 Ga) while

  7. Age Dependent Absolute Plate and Plume Motion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, D. E.; Koppers, A. A. P.

    2015-12-01

    construct rapidly and represent a time period close to the inception age of the seamount, thus by proxy also the hotspot location. Here we present a new age dependent plate motion model that tests the 'fixed' and 'moving' hotspot hypotheses.

  8. Treatment of neuropathic pain in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Lacoux, Phillipe; Ford, Nathan

    2002-07-01

    During Sierra Leone's violent decade-long war, the warring parties used amputation, especially of arms, as a means of terror. In a camp for amputees in the capital city Freetown, Médecins Sans Frontières established a clinic and a treatment programme for neuropathic pain. Insecurity and cultural and language barriers have complicated this work, but medical and humanitarian benefits have been demonstrated. Pain services are virtually non-existent in less-developed countries. There have recently been no major treatment advances for neuropathic or phantom pain; however, the general body of knowledge about amputation pain can be increased by observations from these difficult settings. PMID:12849488

  9. Detecting structure of haplotypes and local ancestry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a two-layer hidden Markov model to detect the structure of haplotypes for unrelated individuals. This allows us to model two scales of linkage disequilibrium (one within a group of haplotypes and one between groups), thereby taking advantage of rich haplotype information to infer local an...

  10. Undiagnosed Acute Viral Febrile Illnesses, Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Cynthia A.; Khan, Sheik H.; Goba, Augustine; Fair, Joseph N.

    2014-01-01

    Sierra Leone in West Africa is in a Lassa fever–hyperendemic region that also includes Guinea and Liberia. Each year, suspected Lassa fever cases result in submission of ≈500–700 samples to the Kenema Government Hospital Lassa Diagnostic Laboratory in eastern Sierra Leone. Generally only 30%–40% of samples tested are positive for Lassa virus (LASV) antigen and/or LASV-specific IgM; thus, 60%–70% of these patients have acute diseases of unknown origin. To investigate what other arthropod-borne and hemorrhagic fever viral diseases might cause serious illness in this region and mimic Lassa fever, we tested patient serum samples that were negative for malaria parasites and LASV. Using IgM-capture ELISAs, we evaluated samples for antibodies to arthropod-borne and other hemorrhagic fever viruses. Approximately 25% of LASV-negative patients had IgM to dengue, West Nile, yellow fever, Rift Valley fever, chikungunya, Ebola, and Marburg viruses but not to Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. PMID:24959946

  11. HaplotypeCN: copy number haplotype inference with Hidden Markov Model and localized haplotype clustering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Jen; Chen, Yu-Tin; Hsu, Shu-Ni; Peng, Chien-Hua; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Hsieh, Wen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) has been reported to be associated with disease and various cancers. Hence, identifying the accurate position and the type of CNV is currently a critical issue. There are many tools targeting on detecting CNV regions, constructing haplotype phases on CNV regions, or estimating the numerical copy numbers. However, none of them can do all of the three tasks at the same time. This paper presents a method based on Hidden Markov Model to detect parent specific copy number change on both chromosomes with signals from SNP arrays. A haplotype tree is constructed with dynamic branch merging to model the transition of the copy number status of the two alleles assessed at each SNP locus. The emission models are constructed for the genotypes formed with the two haplotypes. The proposed method can provide the segmentation points of the CNV regions as well as the haplotype phasing for the allelic status on each chromosome. The estimated copy numbers are provided as fractional numbers, which can accommodate the somatic mutation in cancer specimens that usually consist of heterogeneous cell populations. The algorithm is evaluated on simulated data and the previously published regions of CNV of the 270 HapMap individuals. The results were compared with five popular methods: PennCNV, genoCN, COKGEN, QuantiSNP and cnvHap. The application on oral cancer samples demonstrates how the proposed method can facilitate clinical association studies. The proposed algorithm exhibits comparable sensitivity of the CNV regions to the best algorithm in our genome-wide study and demonstrates the highest detection rate in SNP dense regions. In addition, we provide better haplotype phasing accuracy than similar approaches. The clinical association carried out with our fractional estimate of copy numbers in the cancer samples provides better detection power than that with integer copy number states. PMID:24849202

  12. TUMOR HAPLOTYPE ASSEMBLY ALGORITHMS FOR CANCER GENOMICS

    PubMed Central

    AGUIAR, DEREK; WONG, WENDY S.W.; ISTRAIL, SORIN

    2014-01-01

    The growing availability of inexpensive high-throughput sequence data is enabling researchers to sequence tumor populations within a single individual at high coverage. But, cancer genome sequence evolution and mutational phenomena like driver mutations and gene fusions are difficult to investigate without first reconstructing tumor haplotype sequences. Haplotype assembly of single individual tumor populations is an exceedingly difficult task complicated by tumor haplotype heterogeneity, tumor or normal cell sequence contamination, polyploidy, and complex patterns of variation. While computational and experimental haplotype phasing of diploid genomes has seen much progress in recent years, haplotype assembly in cancer genomes remains uncharted territory. In this work, we describe HapCompass-Tumor a computational modeling and algorithmic framework for haplotype assembly of copy number variable cancer genomes containing haplotypes at different frequencies and complex variation. We extend our polyploid haplotype assembly model and present novel algorithms for (1) complex variations, including copy number changes, as varying numbers of disjoint paths in an associated graph, (2) variable haplotype frequencies and contamination, and (3) computation of tumor haplotypes using simple cycles of the compass graph which constrain the space of haplotype assembly solutions. The model and algorithm are implemented in the software package HapCompass-Tumor which is available for download from http://www.brown.edu/Research/Istrail_Lab/. PMID:24297529

  13. Projected Treatment Capacity Needs in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard A; MacDonald, Emily; de Blasio, Birgitte Freiesleben; Nygård, Karin; Vold, Line; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2015-01-01

    Background: The ongoing outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease in West Africa requires immediate and sustained input from the international community in order to curb transmission. The CDC has produced a model that indicates that to end the outbreak by pushing the reproductive number below one, 25% of the patients must be placed in an Ebola Treatment Unit (ETC) and 45% must be isolated in community settings in which risk of disease transmission is reduced and safe burials are provided. In order to provide firmer targets for the international response in Sierra Leone, we estimated the national and international personnel and treatment capacity that may be required to reach these percentages. Methods: We developed a compartmental SEIR model that was fitted to WHO data and local data allowing the reproductive number to change every 8 weeks to forecast the progression of the EVD epidemic in Sierra Leone. We used the previously estimated 2.5x correction factor estimated by the CDC to correct for underreporting. Number of personnel required to provide treatment for the predicted number of cases was estimated using UNMEER and UN OCHA requests for resources required to meet the CDC target of 70% isolation. Results: As of today (2014-12-04), we estimate that there are 810 (95% CI=646 to 973) EVD active cases in treatment, with an additional 3751 (95% CI=2778 to 4723) EVD cases unreported and untreated. To reach the CDC targets today, we need 1140 (95% CI=894 to 1387) cases in ETCs and 2052 (95% CI=1608 to 2496) at home or in a community setting with a reduced risk for disease transmission. In 28 days (2015-01-01), we will need 1309 (95% CI=804 to 1814) EVD cases in ETCs and 2356 (95% CI=1447 to 3266) EVD cases at reduced risk of transmission. If the current transmission rate is not reduced, up to 3183 personnel in total will be required in 56 days (2015-01-29) to operate ETCs according to our model. Conclusions: The current outbreak will require massive input from the

  14. Haplotype studies in Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.R.; Bull, P.C.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.; Walshe, J.M. )

    1994-01-01

    In 51 families with Wilson disease, the authors have studied DNA haplotypes of dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms (CA repeats) in the 13q14.3 region, to examine these markers for association with the Wilson disease gene (WND). In addition to a marker (D13S133) described elsewhere, the authors have developed three new highly polymorphic markers (D13S314, D13S315, and D13S316) close to the WND locus. The authors have examined the distribution of marker alleles at the loci studied and have found that D13S314, D13S133, and D13S316 each show nonrandom distribution on chromosomes carrying the WND mutation. The authors have studied haplotypes of these three markers and have found that there are highly significant differences between WND and normal haplotypes in northern European families. These findings have important implications for mutation detection and molecular diagnosis in families with Wilson disease. 25 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Initiatives for Sustainable Community Development in Sierra Leone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamara, John M.; Kargbo, Stephen B.

    1999-01-01

    In Sierra Leone, two church-sponsored programs are focused on sustainable development. The Wesleyan Development Education and Awareness Programme trains people to initiate community projects. Women's Loan Scheme encourages development of small-scale enterprises. (SK)

  16. Fatal parathion poisoning in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Etzel, R. A.; Forthal, D. N.; Hill, R. H.; Demby, A.

    1987-01-01

    In May and June 1986, 49 persons in Sierra Leone were acutely poisoned by the organothiophosphate insecticide, parathion. Fourteen people died. Illness occurred in three episodes at two different locations that were 44 km apart. A study of 21 cases and 22 household controls was undertaken to explore which factors were associated with the development of the symptoms. Cases were more likely than controls to have eaten bread in the 4 hours before becoming ill (odds ratio, 12.7; 95% confidence interval, 2.4-83.8). Scrapings of residue from the floor of the truck that had brought the wheat flour from the mill to the general store where the baker purchased it were positive for parathion, suggesting that the flour had been contaminated during transport. Pesticide poisoning is a common problem in the developing world, and public health measures such as restricting the use of parathion may help to prevent fatal poisonings. PMID:3501344

  17. Towards an Analytical Age-Dependent Model of Contrast Sensitivity Functions for an Ageing Society

    PubMed Central

    Joulan, Karine; Brémond, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The Contrast Sensitivity Function (CSF) describes how the visibility of a grating depends on the stimulus spatial frequency. Many published CSF data have demonstrated that contrast sensitivity declines with age. However, an age-dependent analytical model of the CSF is not available to date. In this paper, we propose such an analytical CSF model based on visual mechanisms, taking into account the age factor. To this end, we have extended an existing model from Barten (1999), taking into account the dependencies of this model's optical and physiological parameters on age. Age-dependent models of the cones and ganglion cells densities, the optical and neural MTF, and optical and neural noise are proposed, based on published data. The proposed age-dependent CSF is finally tested against available experimental data, with fair results. Such an age-dependent model may be beneficial when designing real-time age-dependent image coding and display applications. PMID:26078994

  18. Intrinsic Age-Dependent Changes and Cell-Cell Contacts Regulate Nephron Progenitor Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, S Steven; Dexheimer, Phillip J; Salomonis, Nathan; Aronow, Bruce J; Hong, Christian I; Zhang, Tongli; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-10-12

    During fetal development, nephrons of the metanephric kidney form from a mesenchymal progenitor population that differentiates en masse before or shortly after birth. We explored intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms controlling progenitor lifespan in a transplantation assay that allowed us to compare engraftment of old and young progenitors into the same young niche. The progenitors displayed an age-dependent decrease in proliferation and concomitant increase in niche exit rates. Single-cell transcriptome profiling revealed progressive age-dependent changes, with heterogeneity increasing in older populations. Age-dependent elevation in mTor and reduction in Fgf20 could contribute to increased exit rates. Importantly, 30% of old progenitors remained in the niche for up to 1 week post engraftment, a net gain of 50% to their lifespan, but only if surrounded by young neighbors. We provide evidence in support of a model in which intrinsic age-dependent changes affect inter-progenitor interactions that drive cessation of nephrogenesis. PMID:26460946

  19. Post-Ebola Syndrome, Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Sesay, Foday R.; Massaquoi, Thomas A.; Idriss, Baimba R.; Sahr, Foday; Semple, Malcolm G.

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of persons have survived Ebola virus disease. Almost all survivors describe symptoms that persist or develop after hospital discharge. A cross-sectional survey of the symptoms of all survivors from the Ebola treatment unit (ETU) at 34th Regimental Military Hospital, Freetown, Sierra Leone (MH34), was conducted after discharge at their initial follow-up appointment within 3 weeks after their second negative PCR result. From its opening on December 1, 2014, through March 31, 2015, the MH34 ETU treated 84 persons (8–70 years of age) with PCR-confirmed Ebola virus disease, of whom 44 survived. Survivors reported musculoskeletal pain (70%), headache (48%), and ocular problems (14%). Those who reported headache had had lower admission cycle threshold Ebola PCR than did those who did not (p<0.03). This complete survivor cohort from 1 ETU enables analysis of the proportion of symptoms of post-Ebola syndrome. The Ebola epidemic is waning, but the effects of the disease will remain. PMID:26983037

  20. Post-Ebola Syndrome, Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Scott, Janet T; Sesay, Foday R; Massaquoi, Thomas A; Idriss, Baimba R; Sahr, Foday; Semple, Malcolm G

    2016-04-01

    Thousands of persons have survived Ebola virus disease. Almost all survivors describe symptoms that persist or develop after hospital discharge. A cross-sectional survey of the symptoms of all survivors from the Ebola treatment unit (ETU) at 34th Regimental Military Hospital, Freetown, Sierra Leone (MH34), was conducted after discharge at their initial follow-up appointment within 3 weeks after their second negative PCR result. From its opening on December 1, 2014, through March 31, 2015, the MH34 ETU treated 84 persons (8-70 years of age) with PCR-confirmed Ebola virus disease, of whom 44 survived. Survivors reported musculoskeletal pain (70%), headache (48%), and ocular problems (14%). Those who reported headache had had lower admission cycle threshold Ebola PCR than did those who did not (p<0.03). This complete survivor cohort from 1 ETU enables analysis of the proportion of symptoms of post-Ebola syndrome. The Ebola epidemic is waning, but the effects of the disease will remain. PMID:26983037

  1. Filling in missing genotypes using haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unknown genotypes can be made known (imputed) from observed genotypes at the same or nearby loci of relatives using pedigree haplotyping, or from matching allele patterns (regardless of pedigree) using population haplotyping. Fortran program findhap.f90 was designed to combine population and pedigre...

  2. Ebola Surveillance - Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Lucy A; Schafer, Ilana J; Nolen, Leisha D; Gorina, Yelena; Redd, John T; Lo, Terrence; Ervin, Elizabeth; Henao, Olga; Dahl, Benjamin A; Morgan, Oliver; Hersey, Sara; Knust, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Developing a surveillance system during a public health emergency is always challenging but is especially so in countries with limited public health infrastructure. Surveillance for Ebola virus disease (Ebola) in the West African countries heavily affected by Ebola (Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone) faced numerous impediments, including insufficient numbers of trained staff, community reticence to report cases and contacts, limited information technology resources, limited telephone and Internet service, and overwhelming numbers of infected persons. Through the work of CDC and numerous partners, including the countries' ministries of health, the World Health Organization, and other government and nongovernment organizations, functional Ebola surveillance was established and maintained in these countries. CDC staff were heavily involved in implementing case-based surveillance systems, sustaining case surveillance and contact tracing, and interpreting surveillance data. In addition to helping the ministries of health and other partners understand and manage the epidemic, CDC's activities strengthened epidemiologic and data management capacity to improve routine surveillance in the countries affected, even after the Ebola epidemic ended, and enhanced local capacity to respond quickly to future public health emergencies. However, the many obstacles overcome during development of these Ebola surveillance systems highlight the need to have strong public health, surveillance, and information technology infrastructure in place before a public health emergency occurs. Intense, long-term focus on strengthening public health surveillance systems in developing countries, as described in the Global Health Security Agenda, is needed.The activities summarized in this report would not have been possible without collaboration with many U.S and international partners (http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/2014-west-africa/partners.html). PMID:27389614

  3. Modelling Anopheles gambiae s.s. Population Dynamics with Temperature- and Age-Dependent Survival.

    PubMed

    Christiansen-Jucht, Céline; Erguler, Kamil; Shek, Chee Yan; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Parham, Paul E

    2015-06-01

    Climate change and global warming are emerging as important threats to human health, particularly through the potential increase in vector- and water-borne diseases. Environmental variables are known to affect substantially the population dynamics and abundance of the poikilothermic vectors of disease, but the exact extent of this sensitivity is not well established. Focusing on malaria and its main vector in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, we present a set of novel mathematical models of climate-driven mosquito population dynamics motivated by experimental data suggesting that in An. gambiae, mortality is temperature and age dependent. We compared the performance of these models to that of a "standard" model ignoring age dependence. We used a longitudinal dataset of vector abundance over 36 months in sub-Saharan Africa for comparison between models that incorporate age dependence and one that does not, and observe that age-dependent models consistently fitted the data better than the reference model. This highlights that including age dependence in the vector component of mosquito-borne disease models may be important to predict more reliably disease transmission dynamics. Further data and studies are needed to enable improved fitting, leading to more accurate and informative model predictions for the An. gambiae malaria vector as well as for other disease vectors. PMID:26030468

  4. Modelling Anopheles gambiae s.s. Population Dynamics with Temperature- and Age-Dependent Survival

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen-Jucht, Céline; Erguler, Kamil; Shek, Chee Yan; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Parham, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and global warming are emerging as important threats to human health, particularly through the potential increase in vector- and water-borne diseases. Environmental variables are known to affect substantially the population dynamics and abundance of the poikilothermic vectors of disease, but the exact extent of this sensitivity is not well established. Focusing on malaria and its main vector in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, we present a set of novel mathematical models of climate-driven mosquito population dynamics motivated by experimental data suggesting that in An. gambiae, mortality is temperature and age dependent. We compared the performance of these models to that of a “standard” model ignoring age dependence. We used a longitudinal dataset of vector abundance over 36 months in sub-Saharan Africa for comparison between models that incorporate age dependence and one that does not, and observe that age-dependent models consistently fitted the data better than the reference model. This highlights that including age dependence in the vector component of mosquito-borne disease models may be important to predict more reliably disease transmission dynamics. Further data and studies are needed to enable improved fitting, leading to more accurate and informative model predictions for the An. gambiae malaria vector as well as for other disease vectors. PMID:26030468

  5. Haplotypes and mutations in Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.R.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    Wilson disease is a disorder of copper transport, resulting in neurological and hepatic damage due to copper toxicity. We have recently identified >20 mutations in the copper-transporting ATPase defective in this disease. Given the difficulties of searching for mutations in a gene spanning >80 kb of genomic DNA, haplotype data are important as a guide to mutation detection. Here we examine the haplotypes associated with specific mutations. We have extended previous studies of DNA haplotypes of dinucleotide-repeat polymorphisms (CA repeats) in the Wilson disease region to include an additional marker, in 58 families. These haplotypes, combining three markers (D13S314, D12S316, and D13S301), are usually specific for each different mutation, even though highly polymorphic CA repeat markers have been used. Haplotypes, as well as their accompanying mutations, differ between populations. In the patients whom we have studied, the haplotype data indicate that as many as 20 mutations may still be unidentified. The use of the haplotypes that we have identified provides an important guide for the identification of known mutations and can facilitate future mutation searches. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Sickle cell disorder, beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes and alpha-thalassemia in neonates and adults from Guadeloupe.

    PubMed

    Kéclard, L; Romana, M; Lavocat, E; Saint-Martin, C; Berchel, C; Mérault, G

    1997-05-01

    We have studied haplotype of beta(S) chromosome and alpha-globin gene status in 534 patients (255 adults and 279 children of whom 159 neonates) from Guadeloupe with various sickle cell-related conditions, namely SS (n = 298), SC (n = 170), S-beta-thal (n = 56), and other rare forms (n = 10). Haplotype data on beta(S) chromosomes confirm our previous observation that Benin type is the most prevalent (75%) beta(S) chromosome in Guadeloupe, in disagreement with the historical records. Comparison of the frequency of distribution of various beta(S) haplotypes between neonates and adults on the one hand and between SS and SC cases on the other shows that the current beta(S) haplotype distribution in this island is not distorted by haplotype-related differential survival. We also show that the frequency of alpha-thalassemia (-3.7 kb) in Guadeloupe is one of the highest recorded in this region involved in Atlantic slave trade and also failed to reveal any age-dependent increase in frequency. We conclude that the African component of Guadeloupe is distinct from that of Brazil and Cuba but is close to that of Jamaica. PMID:9136913

  7. Alternative haplotype construction methods for genomic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jónás, Dávid; Ducrocq, Vincent; Fouilloux, Marie-Noëlle; Croiseau, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    Genomic evaluation methods today use single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) as genomic markers to trace quantitative trait loci (QTL). Today most genomic prediction procedures use biallelic SNP markers. However, SNP can be combined into short, multiallelic haplotypes that can improve genomic prediction due to higher linkage disequilibrium between the haplotypes and the linked QTL. The aim of this study was to develop a method to identify the haplotypes, which can be expected to be superior in genomic evaluation, as compared with either SNP or other haplotypes of the same size. We first identified the SNP (termed as QTL-SNP) from the bovine 50K SNP chip that had the largest effect on the analyzed trait. It was assumed that these SNP were not the causative mutations and they merely indicated the approximate location of the QTL. Haplotypes of 3, 4, or 5 SNP were selected from short genomic windows surrounding these markers to capture the effect of the QTL. Two methods described in this paper aim at selecting the most optimal haplotype for genomic evaluation. They assumed that if an allele has a high frequency, its allele effect can be accurately predicted. These methods were tested in a classical validation study using a dairy cattle population of 2,235 bulls with genotypes from the bovine 50K SNP chip and daughter yield deviations (DYD) on 5 dairy cattle production traits. Combining the SNP into haplotypes was beneficial with all tested haplotypes, leading to an average increase of 2% in terms of correlations between DYD and genomic breeding value estimates compared with the analysis when the same SNP were used individually. Compared with haplotypes built by merging the QTL-SNP with its flanking SNP, the haplotypes selected with the proposed criteria carried less under- and over-represented alleles: the proportion of alleles with frequencies <1 or >40% decreased, on average, by 17.4 and 43.4%, respectively. The correlations between DYD and genomic breeding value

  8. Age-dependence of lipid parameters in the general population and vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Richter, V; Rassoul, F; Hentschel, B; Kothe, K; Krobara, M; Unger, R; Purschwitz, K; Rotzsch, W; Thiery, J; Muradian, K

    2004-06-01

    Age-dependent changes of lipid metabolism may arise both as a result of mechanisms of biological ageing and factors influencing age-dependent changes. To study possible influences of nutrition and life-style of vegetarians on age-dependence of lipid parameters, subjects of general population were compared with vegetarians. In the frame of population-based lipid screening projects in the city of Leipzig/Germany (Lipid Study Leipzig, LSL) 10 550 subjects (3,816 men and 6,734 women, age 18-99 years) of general population were compared with 417 vegetarians (vegans, lacto-vegetarians, lacto-ovo-vegetarians, 148 men and 269 women, age 18-93 years). Most of the vegetarians included in the study were members of the German Society of Vegetarians. The study program included capillary blood cholesterol measurements and the determination of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, the measurement of other cardiovascular risk factors and the evaluation of dietary and life-style factors. Evaluation of cardiovascular risk profile within LSL was connected with individual consultation. The mean total cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol level and the total: HDL-cholesterol ratio showed the expected age-dependence, with maximum values within the decade 60-70 years. Vegetarians showed lower total and non-HDL-cholesterol levels in comparison with the general population. Furthermore, the age-dependent increase of these parameters is less pronounced under the conditions of vegetarian nutrition and life-style. Especially in young adulthood a significant difference is observed. Thus, the results of the present study reveal the role of nutritional and life-style factors that determine the lipid profile on a population basis and suggest that the known age-dependent rise of the level of atherogenic plasma lipoproteins is partly preventable. PMID:15224241

  9. Finding Uncertainties that Cause the Age Dependence of Dose Limits to Be Immature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation permissible exposure limits (PEL) are intended to set acceptable levels of cancer risks, and avoid any clinical significant non-cancer effects. The 1989 recommendation of the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) recommended a strong age dependence of dose limits that departed drastically from the then mature 1970 dose limits recommendations from the National Academy of Science, which were independent of age. In 2000, the NCRP recommended revised limits that showed a similar trend of risk with age to the 1989 report. In this model, the cancer risk per Sv varies by more than 2-fold for ages between 30- and 50-yr. Therefore for galactic cosmic rays exposure, astronaut age has a larger influence on risk then radiation shielding mass or material composition, vehicle propulsion method, or position in the solar cycle. For considering the control of mission costs and resources, the possibility of using astronaut age as a trade variable in mission design could be considered. However, the uncertainties in describing the age dependence on risk have not been fully explored. We discuss biological factors that influence the age dependence of radiation risks, including susceptibility, expression and latency, and radiation quality. These factors depend not only on the individual s age, but also their genetic sensitivity and interaction with other environmental factors. Epidemiological data is limited in describing the age dependence on risk. The 2005, BEIR VII report recommends an age dependence for cancer risk attributable solely to the life-table disagreeing strongly with the NCRP model. However, BEIR VII also noted the limited power of human data for concomitantly describing both age and age after exposure dependences of cancer risks. Many experimental studies have shown that high LET radiation (e.g., high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei and neutrons) display reduced latency compared to low LET radiation, suggesting distinct biological

  10. Measuring the impact of Ebola control measures in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Kucharski, Adam J.; Camacho, Anton; Flasche, Stefan; Glover, Rebecca E.; Edmunds, W. John; Funk, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Between September 2014 and February 2015, the number of Ebola virus disease (EVD) cases reported in Sierra Leone declined in many districts. During this period, a major international response was put in place, with thousands of treatment beds introduced alongside other infection control measures. However, assessing the impact of the response is challenging, as several factors could have influenced the decline in infections, including behavior changes and other community interventions. We developed a mathematical model of EVD transmission, and measured how transmission changed over time in the 12 districts of Sierra Leone with sustained transmission between June 2014 and February 2015. We used the model to estimate how many cases were averted as a result of the introduction of additional treatment beds in each area. Examining epidemic dynamics at the district level, we estimated that 56,600 (95% credible interval: 48,300–84,500) Ebola cases (both reported and unreported) were averted in Sierra Leone up to February 2, 2015 as a direct result of additional treatment beds being introduced. We also found that if beds had been introduced 1 month earlier, a further 12,500 cases could have been averted. Our results suggest the unprecedented local and international response led to a substantial decline in EVD transmission during 2014–2015. In particular, the introduction of beds had a direct impact on reducing EVD cases in Sierra Leone, although the effect varied considerably between districts. PMID:26460023

  11. Power in Practice: Trade Union Education in Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stirling, John

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the development of a trade union education program in Sierra Leone in the geo-historical context of British colonialism. It places the argument in relation to the contradictory trends of trade unionism more generally and alongside their antagonistic cooperation with capitalism. It discusses the limits and…

  12. Home Alone: Children as Caretakers in Leon, Nicaragua

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlblom, Kjerstin; Herrara, Andres Rodriguez; Pena, Rodolfo; Dahlgren, Lars

    2009-01-01

    This article seeks to explore and understand the life situations of sibling caretakers in poor areas in Leon, Nicaragua. The every day lives for caretakers were studied through observations and interviews with children, informants and parents. The children themselves were satisfied and proud to be trusted as caretakers and felt useful in…

  13. Phylogenetic Analysis of West Nile Virus, Nuevo Leon State, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Blitvich, Bradley J.; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso; Contreras-Cordero, Juan F.; Loroño-Pino, María A.; Marlenee, Nicole L.; Díaz, Francisco J.; González-Rojas, José I.; Obregón-Martínez, Nelson; Chiu-García, Jorge A.; Black, William C.

    2004-01-01

    West Nile virus RNA was detected in brain tissue from a horse that died in June 2003 in Nuevo Leon State, Mexico. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the premembrane and envelope genes showed that the virus was most closely related to West Nile virus isolates collected in Texas in 2002. PMID:15324558

  14. Life in Sierra Leone, West Africa. A Teaching Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corby, Richard A.

    This unit is designed for students in grades 6-12. The unit provides an introduction to Sierra Leone and the continent of Africa through basic concepts and a conceptual framework for learning. The unit is divided into 17 activities. Activities include: (1) "Stereotypes and Myths about African and Africans"; (2) "The Manding Name Game"; (3) "Common…

  15. Leon Cooper's Perspective on Teaching Science: An Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor; Klassen, Stephen; McMillan, Barbara; Metz, Don

    2010-01-01

    The authors of this paper portray the perspective of Professor Leon Cooper, a theoretical physicist, Nobel laureate, active researcher, and physics textbook author, on teaching science and on the nature of science (NOS). The views presented emerged from an interview prepared by the authors and responded to in writing by Professor Cooper. Based on…

  16. School Libraries in Sierra Leone's Educational System: Quo Vadis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kargbo, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the role of school libraries in Sierra Leone's (Africa) educational system and the problems affecting their development. Discusses the need for materials to support teaching activities; sociological factors; teachers' and students' information needs; current trends and changes; rural areas with no school libraries; and lack of standards,…

  17. School-Based Peace Building in Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherton, Diane; Weston, Jane; Zbar, Vic

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the development of a peace education project, including the Peace Education Kit, in schools in Sierra Leone. The program, initiated by the World Bank, has involved working partnerships between local and international agencies and provides a case study of how schools can work with the community to contribute to a national…

  18. A New Agenda for Adult Education in Sierra Leone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skelt, Joanna

    2003-01-01

    After years of conflict, Sierra Leone has critical educational development needs including trauma healing and conflict resolution, rebuilding of the educational infrastructure, and citizenship and capacity building. Citizenship education in this context must be redefined as developing individual agency and encouraging active participation. (SK)

  19. Library Education and the Practitioner: The Sierra Leone Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kargbo, John Abdul

    1999-01-01

    Examines the past and current educational trends of librarianship in Sierra Leone. Discuses courses offered in the current library school; economic and political issues affecting higher education; the need for full-time faculty; general versus specialized practitioner needs; attitudes of faculty toward working librarians; and professional…

  20. Why High School Must Go: An Interview with Leon Botstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Leon Botstein, longtime president of Bard College, as well as music director and conductor of the American and Jerusalem symphony orchestras. Botstein talks about his book entitled "Jefferson's Children: Education and the Promise of American Culture" and his views about teens and high schools in America.…

  1. Reemergence of chikungunya virus in Bo, Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Ansumana, Rashid; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Leski, Tomasz A; Covington, Andrea L; Bangura, Umaru; Hodges, Mary H; Lin, Baochuan; Bockarie, Alfred S; Lamin, Joseph M; Bockarie, Moses J; Stenger, David A

    2013-07-01

    We diagnosed 400 possible IgM-positive cases of chikungunya virus in Bo, Sierra Leone, during July 2012-January 2013 by using lateral flow immunoassays. Cases detected likely represent only a small fraction of total cases. Further laboratory testing is required to confirm this outbreak and characterize the virus. PMID:23764023

  2. Reemergence of Chikungunya Virus in Bo, Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Ansumana, Rashid; Leski, Tomasz A.; Covington, Andrea L.; Bangura, Umaru; Hodges, Mary H.; Lin, Baochuan; Bockarie, Alfred S.; Lamin, Joseph M.; Bockarie, Moses J.; Stenger, David A.

    2013-01-01

    We diagnosed 400 possible IgM-positive cases of chikungunya virus in Bo, Sierra Leone, during July 2012–January 2013 by using lateral flow immunoassays. Cases detected likely represent only a small fraction of total cases. Further laboratory testing is required to confirm this outbreak and characterize the virus. PMID:23764023

  3. Land Lab Experiences in Sierra Leone and Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Burton E.; Tucker, Sonny W.

    1978-01-01

    The agricultural education curriculum at Njala University College, University of Sierra Leone, is stressing practical farm experience programs on school land for students preparing to teach agriculture. In Illinois also the "land laboratories" concept appears to be effective in providing practical agricultural training. (MF)

  4. The Science Curriculum and the Secondary Student in Sierra Leone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyerr, Ebun S.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the new primary and secondary-level science curriculum in Sierra Leone as well as new teacher roles and instructional approaches. Indicates that curricular changes in this country should address needs related to job opportunities, the environment, and citizenship. Results of 1972-80 secondary-level biology, chemistry, and physics…

  5. Lassa Fever in Post-Conflict Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Hartnett, Jessica N.; Levy, Danielle C.; Yenni, Rachael E.; Moses, Lina M.; Fullah, Mohammed; Momoh, Mambo; Fonnie, Mbalu; Fonnie, Richard; Kanneh, Lansana; Koroma, Veronica J.; Kargbo, Kandeh; Ottomassathien, Darin; Muncy, Ivana J.; Jones, Abigail B.; Illick, Megan M.; Kulakosky, Peter C.; Haislip, Allyson M.; Bishop, Christopher M.; Elliot, Deborah H.; Brown, Bethany L.; Zhu, Hu; Hastie, Kathryn M.; Andersen, Kristian G.; Gire, Stephen K.; Tabrizi, Shervin; Tariyal, Ridhi; Stremlau, Mathew; Matschiner, Alex; Sampey, Darryl B.; Spence, Jennifer S.; Cross, Robert W.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Folarin, Onikepe A.; Happi, Christian T.; Pitts, Kelly R.; Geske, F. Jon; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Robinson, James E.; Wilson, Russell B.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Henderson, Lee A.; Khan, S. Humarr; Bausch, Daniel G.; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lassa fever (LF), an often-fatal hemorrhagic disease caused by Lassa virus (LASV), is a major public health threat in West Africa. When the violent civil conflict in Sierra Leone (1991 to 2002) ended, an international consortium assisted in restoration of the LF program at Kenema Government Hospital (KGH) in an area with the world's highest incidence of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Clinical and laboratory records of patients presenting to the KGH Lassa Ward in the post-conflict period were organized electronically. Recombinant antigen-based LF immunoassays were used to assess LASV antigenemia and LASV-specific antibodies in patients who met criteria for suspected LF. KGH has been reestablished as a center for LF treatment and research, with over 500 suspected cases now presenting yearly. Higher case fatality rates (CFRs) in LF patients were observed compared to studies conducted prior to the civil conflict. Different criteria for defining LF stages and differences in sensitivity of assays likely account for these differences. The highest incidence of LF in Sierra Leone was observed during the dry season. LF cases were observed in ten of Sierra Leone's thirteen districts, with numerous cases from outside the traditional endemic zone. Deaths in patients presenting with LASV antigenemia were skewed towards individuals less than 29 years of age. Women self-reporting as pregnant were significantly overrepresented among LASV antigenemic patients. The CFR of ribavirin-treated patients presenting early in acute infection was lower than in untreated subjects. Conclusions/Significance Lassa fever remains a major public health threat in Sierra Leone. Outreach activities should expand because LF may be more widespread in Sierra Leone than previously recognized. Enhanced case finding to ensure rapid diagnosis and treatment is imperative to reduce mortality. Even with ribavirin treatment, there was a high rate of fatalities underscoring the need to

  6. Probabilistic Multilocus Haplotype Reconstruction in Outcrossing Tetraploids.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chaozhi; Voorrips, Roeland E; Jansen, Johannes; Hackett, Christine A; Ho, Julie; Bink, Marco C A M

    2016-05-01

    For both plant (e.g., potato) and animal (e.g., salmon) species, unveiling the genetic architecture of complex traits is key to the genetic improvement of polyploids in agriculture. F1 progenies of a biparental cross are often used for quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in outcrossing polyploids, where haplotype reconstruction by identifying the parental origins of marker alleles is necessary. In this paper, we build a novel and integrated statistical framework for multilocus haplotype reconstruction in a full-sib tetraploid family from biallelic marker dosage data collected from single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays or next-generation sequencing technology given a genetic linkage map. Compared to diploids, in tetraploids, additional complexity needs to be addressed, including double reduction and possible preferential pairing of chromosomes. We divide haplotype reconstruction into two stages: parental linkage phasing for reconstructing the most probable parental haplotypes and ancestral inference for probabilistically reconstructing the offspring haplotypes conditional on the reconstructed parental haplotypes. The simulation studies and the application to real data from potato show that the parental linkage phasing is robust to, and that the subsequent ancestral inference is accurate for, complex chromosome pairing behaviors during meiosis, various marker segregation types, erroneous genetic maps except for long-range disturbances of marker ordering, various amounts of offspring dosage errors (up to ∼20%), and various fractions of missing data in parents and offspring dosages. PMID:26920758

  7. Age-dependent seizures of absence epilepsy and sleep spindles dynamics in WAG/Rij rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Sitnikova, Evgenia Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Khramova, Marina V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2015-03-01

    In the given paper, a relation between time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles and the age-dependent epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is discussed. Analysis of sleep spindles based on the continuous wavelet transform is performed for rats of different ages. It is shown that the epileptic activity affects the time-frequency intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindles.

  8. Age-dependent changes in the neural substrates of empathy in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Greimel, Ellen; Piefke, Martina; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Remschmidt, Helmut; Fink, Gereon R; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin

    2014-08-01

    In typical development, empathic abilities continue to refine during adolescence and early adulthood. Children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) show deficits in empathy, whereas adults with ASD may have developed compensatory strategies. We aimed at comparing developmental trajectories in the neural mechanisms underlying empathy in individuals with ASD and typically developing control (TDC) subjects. Using an explicit empathizing paradigm and functional magnetic resonance imaging, 27 participants with ASD and 27 TDC aged 12-31 years were investigated. Participants were asked to empathize with emotional faces and to either infer the face's emotional state (other-task) or to judge their own emotional response (self-task). Differential age-dependent changes were evident during the self-task in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right medial prefrontal cortex, right inferior parietal cortex, right anterior insula and occipital cortex. Age-dependent decreases in neural activation in TDC were paralleled by either increasing or unchanged age-dependent activation in ASD. These data suggest ASD-associated deviations in the developmental trajectories of self-related processing during empathizing. In TDC, age-dependent modulations of brain areas may reflect the 'fine-tuning' of cortical networks by reduction of task-unspecific brain activity. Increased age-related activation in individuals with ASD may indicate the development of compensatory mechanisms. PMID:23784073

  9. AGE DEPENDENT MODEL OF PCB IN A LAKE MICHIGAN FOOD CHAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    An age-dependent food chain model that considers species bioenergetics and toxicant exposure through water and food was developed. It was successfully applied to PCB contamination in the Lake Michigan lake trout food chain represented by phytoplankton, Mysis, alewife, and lake tr...

  10. AGE-DEPENDENT DIFFERENCES IN THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF RATS TO DELTAMETHRIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Separate groups of weanling and adult rats were exposed to both behaviorally-active and lethal doses of deltamethrin to examine age-dependent toxicity of a pyrethroid over a wide dose range. he acoustic startle response (ASR) was selected for comparison at low doses since it is a...

  11. Molecular Correlates of Age-Dependent Seizures in an Inherited Neonatal-Infantile Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Yunxiang; Deprez, Liesbet; Maljevic, Snezana; Pitsch, Julika; Claes, Lieve; Hristova, Dimitrina; Jordanova, Albena; Ala-Mello, Sirpa; Bellan-Koch, Astrid; Blazevic, Dragica; Schubert, Simone; Thomas, Evan A.; Petrou, Steven; Becker, Albert J.; De Jonghe, Peter; Lerche, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Many idiopathic epilepsy syndromes have a characteristic age dependence, the underlying molecular mechanisms of which are largely unknown. Here we propose a mechanism that can explain that epileptic spells in benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures occur almost exclusively during the first days to months of life. Benign familial…

  12. Age-dependent modulation of the somatosensory network upon eye closure.

    PubMed

    Brodoehl, Stefan; Klingner, Carsten; Witte, Otto W

    2016-02-01

    Eye closure even in complete darkness can improve somatosensory perception by switching the brain to a uni-sensory processing mode. This causes an increased information flow between the thalamus and the somatosensory cortex while decreasing modulation by the visual cortex. Previous work suggests that these modulations are age-dependent and that the benefit in somatosensory performance due to eye closing diminishes with age. The cause of this age-dependency and to what extent somatosensory processing is involved remains unclear. Therefore, we intended to characterize the underlying age-dependent modifications in the interaction and connectivity of different sensory networks caused by eye closure. We performed functional MR-imaging with tactile stimulation of the right hand under the conditions of opened and closed eyes in healthy young and elderly participants. Conditional Granger causality analysis was performed to assess the somatosensory and visual networks, including the thalamus. Independent of age, eye closure improved the information transfer from the thalamus to and within the somatosensory cortex. However, beyond that, we found an age-dependent recruitment strategy. Whereas young participants were characterized by an optimized information flow within the relays of the somatosensory network, elderly participants revealed a stronger modulatory influence of the visual network upon the somatosensory cortex. Our results demonstrate that the modulation of the somatosensory and visual networks by eye closure diminishes with age and that the dominance of the visual system is more pronounced in the aging brain. PMID:26546882

  13. Paradise Lost: Age-Dependent Mortality of American Communes, 1609-1965

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitts, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Theorists agree that the risk of folding changes as organizations age, but there is little consensus as to the general form or generative processes of age-dependent mortality. This article investigates four such processes (maturation, senescence, legitimation and obsolescence), which have been taken as competing accounts. Using two analytical…

  14. Ontogenetic changes in genetic variances of age-dependent plasticity along a latitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Nilsson-Örtman, V; Rogell, B; Stoks, R; Johansson, F

    2015-10-01

    The expression of phenotypic plasticity may differ among life stages of the same organism. Age-dependent plasticity can be important for adaptation to heterogeneous environments, but this has only recently been recognized. Whether age-dependent plasticity is a common outcome of local adaptation and whether populations harbor genetic variation in this respect remains largely unknown. To answer these questions, we estimated levels of additive genetic variation in age-dependent plasticity in six species of damselflies sampled from 18 populations along a latitudinal gradient spanning 3600 km. We reared full sib larvae at three temperatures and estimated genetic variances in the height and slope of thermal reaction norms of body size at three points in time during ontogeny using random regression. Our data show that most populations harbor genetic variation in growth rate (reaction norm height) in all ontogenetic stages, but only some populations and ontogenetic stages were found to harbor genetic variation in thermal plasticity (reaction norm slope). Genetic variances in reaction norm height differed among species, while genetic variances in reaction norm slope differed among populations. The slope of the ontogenetic trend in genetic variances of both reaction norm height and slope increased with latitude. We propose that differences in genetic variances reflect temporal and spatial variation in the strength and direction of natural selection on growth trajectories and age-dependent plasticity. Selection on age-dependent plasticity may depend on the interaction between temperature seasonality and time constraints associated with variation in life history traits such as generation length. PMID:25649500

  15. Age-dependent cognitive impairment in a Drosophila Fragile X model and its pharmacological rescue

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Catherine H.; Schoenfeld, Brian P.; Liebelt, David A.; Ferreiro, David; Ferrick, Neal J.; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Rudominer, Rebecca L.; Terlizzi, Allison M.; Koenigsberg, Eric; Wang, Yan; Sumida, Ai; Nguyen, Hanh T.; Bell, Aaron J.; McDonald, Thomas V.

    2010-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome afflicts 1 in 2,500 individuals and is the leading heritable cause of mental retardation worldwide. The overriding clinical manifestation of this disease is mild to severe cognitive impairment. Age-dependent cognitive decline has been identified in Fragile X patients, although it has not been fully characterized nor examined in animal models. A Drosophila model of this disease has been shown to display phenotypes bearing similarity to Fragile X symptoms. Most notably, we previously identified naive courtship and memory deficits in young adults with this model that appear to be due to enhanced metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) signaling. Herein we have examined age-related cognitive decline in the Drosophila Fragile X model and found an age-dependent loss of learning during training. We demonstrate that treatment with mGluR antagonists or lithium can prevent this age-dependent cognitive impairment. We also show that treatment with mGluR antagonists or lithium during development alone displays differential efficacy in its ability to rescue naive courtship, learning during training and memory in aged flies. Furthermore, we show that continuous treatment during aging effectively rescues all of these phenotypes. These results indicate that the Drosophila model recapitulates the age-dependent cognitive decline observed in humans. This places Fragile X in a category with several other diseases that result in age-dependent cognitive decline. This demonstrates a role for the Drosophila Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (dFMR1) in neuronal physiology with regard to cognition during the aging process. Our results indicate that misregulation of mGluR activity may be causative of this age onset decline and strengthens the possibility that mGluR antagonists and lithium may be potential pharmacologic compounds for counteracting several Fragile X symptoms. PMID:20039205

  16. Influence of nootropic drugs on the age-dependent potassium-coupling of transmitter release.

    PubMed

    Wustmann, C; Blaschke, M; Rudolph, E; Fischer, H D; Schmidt, J

    1990-01-01

    The potassium-induced dopamine release from rat striatum slices shows an age-dependent decline comparable to observations after hypoxia. Pretreatment of aged animals with antihypoxically active nootropic drugs for three weeks results in an improvement of the impaired transmitter release. Simultaneously the slope of the stimulus-release relation is increased and an age-related 50% decrease of the high affinity Ca(++)-ATPase activity (brain P2 fraction) is partially compensated. Like the antihypoxic effect, the effectiveness of nootropic drugs regarding age-dependent changes of neuronal functions probably will consist, above all, in vascular influences of the microcirculation, repair of phospholipids damaged by free radical triggered peroxidation and improvement of stimulus-release coupling. PMID:2149265

  17. Age dependence of metals in hair in a selected US population

    SciTech Connect

    Paschal, D.C.; DiPietro, E.S.; Phillips, D.L.; Gunter, E.W. )

    1989-02-01

    Concentrations of 28 metals were determined in hair samples from 199 children (age {le} years) and 322 adults (age 13-73) years. Levels of calcium, barium, magnesium, zinc, and strontium all show a similar age-dependent increase up to about 12-14 years; levels of aluminum show a decrease with age. Relationships of elemental concentrations with age were examined by using correlation, linear regression, t tests, and discriminant analysis. Statistically significant differences in mean concentration values between children and adults were shown for these metals. Discriminant analysis gave about 95% accuracy in classifying a test data set into the categories of children and adults. A hypothesis suggested by the data is that there is an age-dependent excretion in hair of alkali metals during skeletal growth and development. The observed decrease in aluminum is largely unexplained at this time.

  18. Response to the Ebola crisis in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Davies, Beauty Chiedza; Bowley, Douglas; Roper, Katrina

    2015-02-27

    The Ebola outbreak in 2014 marked the first time that an epidemic of this viral haemorrhagic fever had occurred in West Africa. From its origin in Guinea, the outbreak rapidly increased to become a humanitarian crisis affecting all aspects of life in the three countries worst affected: Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. Improving understanding of Ebola virus disease among the general population and instigating the behavioural changes required to help break the epidemic were central to the public health response. This article explores some of the misconceptions about Ebola as it spread into Sierra Leonean communities, and the social mobilisation response of the government of Sierra Leone. It is a reflective account of conversations with Sierra Leonean nationals during a military deployment at the International Security Advisory Team headquarters medical treatment facility in Freetown. PMID:25711592

  19. Sequence Variability and Geographic Distribution of Lassa Virus, Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Stockelman, Michael G.; Moses, Lina M.; Park, Matthew; Stenger, David A.; Ansumana, Rashid; Bausch, Daniel G.; Lin, Baochuan

    2015-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic to parts of West Africa and causes highly fatal hemorrhagic fever. The multimammate rat (Mastomys natalensis) is the only known reservoir of LASV. Most human infections result from zoonotic transmission. The very diverse LASV genome has 4 major lineages associated with different geographic locations. We used reverse transcription PCR and resequencing microarrays to detect LASV in 41 of 214 samples from rodents captured at 8 locations in Sierra Leone. Phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of nucleoprotein (NP), glycoprotein precursor (GPC), and polymerase (L) genes showed 5 separate clades within lineage IV of LASV in this country. The sequence diversity was higher than previously observed; mean diversity was 7.01% for nucleoprotein gene at the nucleotide level. These results may have major implications for designing diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents for LASV infections in Sierra Leone. PMID:25811712

  20. Home birth and hospital birth trends in Bo, Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Abdirahman, Hafsa A; Ansumana, Rashid; Bockarie, Alfred S; Bangura, Umaru; Jimmy, David Henry; Malanoski, Anthony P; Sundufu, Abu James; Stenger, David A

    2012-06-01

    As of April 2010, all maternity care at government healthcare facilities in Sierra Leone is provided at no cost to patients. In late 2010, we conducted a community health census of 18 sections of the city of Bo (selected via randomized cluster sampling from 68 total sections). Among the 3421 women with a history of pregnancy who participated in the study, older women most often reported having a history of both home and hospital deliveries, while younger women showed a preference for hospital births. The proportion of lastborn children delivered at a healthcare facility increased from 71.8% of offspring 10-14 years old to 81.1% of those one to nine years old and 87.3% of infants born after April 2010. These findings suggest that the new maternal healthcare initiative has accelerated an existing trend toward a preference for healthcare facility births, at least in some urban parts of Sierra Leone. PMID:22375565

  1. Optimal Control of Markov Processes with Age-Dependent Transition Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Mrinal K. Saha, Subhamay

    2012-10-15

    We study optimal control of Markov processes with age-dependent transition rates. The control policy is chosen continuously over time based on the state of the process and its age. We study infinite horizon discounted cost and infinite horizon average cost problems. Our approach is via the construction of an equivalent semi-Markov decision process. We characterise the value function and optimal controls for both discounted and average cost cases.

  2. Age dependence of the concentrations of harmful substances in Baltic herring (Clupea harengus)

    SciTech Connect

    Perttila, M.; Tervo, V.; Parmanne, R.

    1982-01-01

    The age dependence of Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd, Hg, CH/sub 3/-Hg, DDT, DDD, DDE, HCH, HCB and the PCBs have been studied in Baltic herring of 1 to 6 years of age. Lead, cadmium, mercury and the organochlorine concentrations increase significantly with age. In the case of the DDTs and the PCBs, the variations can be attributed almost totally to the combined effect of age and variations in the lipid percentage.

  3. Methodology for stormwater runoff investigation, urban Leon County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with Leon County is currently (1981) developing a lumped-parameter, rainfall-runoff model for the urban area of the county. Flood information from 16 sites is being collected and will be analyzed to define hydrologic relations useful for estimating magnitude and frequency of discharges in urban areas. This report summarizes methods of collection, processing, and analysis of rainfall-runoff data from the drainage basins that will be used in the model.

  4. Health complications of female genital mutilation in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Bjälkander, Owolabi; Bangura, Laurel; Leigh, Bailah; Berggren, Vanja; Bergström, Staffan; Almroth, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Sierra Leone has one of the highest rates of female genital mutilation (FGM) in the world, and yet little is known about the health consequences of the practice. Purpose To explore whether and what kind of FGM-related health complications girls and women in Sierra Leone experience, and to elucidate their health care-seeking behaviors. Patients and methods A feasibility study was conducted to test and refine questionnaires and methods used for this study. Thereafter, a cross-section of girls and women (n = 258) attending antenatal care and Well Women Clinics in Bo Town, Bo District, in the southern region and in Makeni Town, Bombali District, in the northern region of Sierra Leone were randomly selected. Participants answered interview-administrated pretested structured questionnaires with open- ended-questions, administrated by trained female personnel. Results All respondents had undergone FGM, most between 10 and 14 years of age. Complications were reported by 218 respondents (84.5%), the most common ones being excessive bleeding, delay in or incomplete healing, and tenderness. Fever was significantly more often reported by girls who had undergone FGM before 10 years of age compared with those who had undergone the procedure later. Out of those who reported complications, 187 (85.8%) sought treatment, with 89 of them visiting a traditional healer, 75 a Sowei (traditional circumciser), and 16 a health professional. Conclusion The high prevalence rate of FGM and the proportion of medical complications show that FGM is a matter for public health concern in Sierra Leone. Girls who undergo FGM before 10 years of age seem to be more vulnerable to serious complications than those who are older at the time of FGM. It is important that health care personnel are aware of, and look for possible complications from FGM, and encourage girls and women to seek medical care for their problems. PMID:22870046

  5. Age-Dependent Pancreatic Gene Regulation Reveals Mechanisms Governing Human β Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Arda, H Efsun; Li, Lingyu; Tsai, Jennifer; Torre, Eduardo A; Rosli, Yenny; Peiris, Heshan; Spitale, Robert C; Dai, Chunhua; Gu, Xueying; Qu, Kun; Wang, Pei; Wang, Jing; Grompe, Markus; Scharfmann, Raphael; Snyder, Michael S; Bottino, Rita; Powers, Alvin C; Chang, Howard Y; Kim, Seung K

    2016-05-10

    Intensive efforts are focused on identifying regulators of human pancreatic islet cell growth and maturation to accelerate development of therapies for diabetes. After birth, islet cell growth and function are dynamically regulated; however, establishing these age-dependent changes in humans has been challenging. Here, we describe a multimodal strategy for isolating pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells from children and adults to identify age-dependent gene expression and chromatin changes on a genomic scale. These profiles revealed distinct proliferative and functional states of islet α cells or β cells and histone modifications underlying age-dependent gene expression changes. Expression of SIX2 and SIX3, transcription factors without prior known functions in the pancreas and linked to fasting hyperglycemia risk, increased with age specifically in human islet β cells. SIX2 and SIX3 were sufficient to enhance insulin content or secretion in immature β cells. Our work provides a unique resource to study human-specific regulators of islet cell maturation and function. PMID:27133132

  6. Age-dependent tissue-specific exposure of cell phone users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christ, Andreas; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Christopoulou, Maria; Kühn, Sven; Kuster, Niels

    2010-04-01

    The peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) assessed with the standardized specific anthropometric mannequin head phantom has been shown to yield a conservative exposure estimate for both adults and children using mobile phones. There are, however, questions remaining concerning the impact of age-dependent dielectric tissue properties and age-dependent proportions of the skull, face and ear on the global and local absorption, in particular in the brain tissues. In this study, we compare the absorption in various parts of the cortex for different magnetic resonance imaging-based head phantoms of adults and children exposed to different models of mobile phones. The results show that the locally induced fields in children can be significantly higher (>3 dB) in subregions of the brain (cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus) and the eye due to the closer proximity of the phone to these tissues. The increase is even larger for bone marrow (>10 dB) as a result of its significantly high conductivity. Tissues such as the pineal gland show no increase since their distances to the phone are not a function of age. This study, however, confirms previous findings saying that there are no age-dependent changes of the peak spatial SAR when averaged over the entire head.

  7. RTEMS SMP and MTAPI for Efficient Multi-Core Space Applications on LEON3/LEON4 Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederman, Daniel; Hellstrom, Daniel; Sherrill, Joel; Bloom, Gedare; Patte, Mathieu; Zulianello, Marco

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the final result of an European Space Agency (ESA) activity aimed at improving the software support for LEON processors used in SMP configurations. One of the benefits of using a multicore system in a SMP configuration is that in many instances it is possible to better utilize the available processing resources by load balancing between cores. This however comes with the cost of having to synchronize operations between cores, leading to increased complexity. While in an AMP system one can use multiple instances of operating systems that are only uni-processor capable, a SMP system requires the operating system to be written to support multicore systems. In this activity we have improved and extended the SMP support of the RTEMS real-time operating system and ensured that it fully supports the multicore capable LEON processors. The targeted hardware in the activity has been the GR712RC, a dual-core core LEON3FT processor, and the functional prototype of ESA's Next Generation Multiprocessor (NGMP), a quad core LEON4 processor. The final version of the NGMP is now available as a product under the name GR740. An implementation of the Multicore Task Management API (MTAPI) has been developed as part of this activity to aid in the parallelization of applications for RTEMS SMP. It allows for simplified development of parallel applications using the task-based programming model. An existing space application, the Gaia Video Processing Unit, has been ported to RTEMS SMP using the MTAPI implementation to demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of multicore processors for space payload software. The activity is funded by ESA under contract 4000108560/13/NL/JK. Gedare Bloom is supported in part by NSF CNS-0934725.

  8. An Arabidopsis haplotype map takes root

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laying the foundation for an A. thaliana haplotype map, Clark et al.1 conducted a thorough array resequencing of 20 diverse A. thaliana genomes at single-base resolution. This provided a powerful catalog of genetic diversity, with more than 1 million SNPs and hypervariable regions (50-bp to >10-kb d...

  9. Applications of haplotypes in dairy farm management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haplotypes from genomic tests are now available for almost 100,000 dairy cows and heifers in the U.S.. Genomic EBV values are accelerating the rate of genetic improvement in dairy cattle, but genomic information also is useful for making improved decisions on the farm. Mate selection strategies have...

  10. Dissecting risk haplotypes in sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Soldner, Frank; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how genetic risk variants contribute to complex diseases is crucial for predicting disease susceptibility and developing patient-tailored therapies. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Young et al. (2015) dissect the function of common non-coding risk haplotypes in the SORL1 locus in the pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer's disease using patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25842969

  11. Evaluating the Feasibility of Fitting Haplotype Effects as Random: Variance Component Estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fitting haplotypes as random effects in association studies may prevent overestimation of haplotypic effects with low frequencies. The objective was to determine whether haplotypic variance could be accurately estimated. Using simulation, haplotypic effects were deterministically assigned to eithe...

  12. Age-Dependent Neuroimmune Modulation of IGF-1R in the Traumatic Mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Age-dependent neuroimmune modulation following traumatic stress is accompanied by discordant upregulation of Fyn signaling in the frontal cortex, but the mechanistic details of the potential cellular behavior regarding IGF-1R/Fyn have not been established. Methods Trans-synaptic IGF-1R signaling during the traumatic stress was comparably examined in wild type, Fyn (−/−) and MOR (−/−) mice. Techniques included primary neuron culture, in vitro kinase activity, immunoprecipitation, Western Blot, sucrose discontinuous centrifugation. Besides that, [3 H] incorporation was used to assay lymphocyte proliferation and NK cell activity. Results We demonstrate robust upregulation of synaptic Fyn activity following traumatic stress, with higher amplitude in 2-month mice than that in 1-year counterpart. We also established that the increased Fyn signaling is accompanied by its molecular connection with IGF-1R within the synaptic zone. Detained analysis using Fyn (−/−) and MOR (−/−) mice reveal that IGF-1R/Fyn signaling is governed to a large extent by mu opioid receptor (MOR), and with age-dependent manner; these signaling cascades played a central role in the modulation of lymphocyte proliferation and NK cell activity. Conclusions Our data argued for a pivotal role of synaptic IGF-1R/Fyn signaling controlled by MOR downstream signaling cascades were crucial for the age-dependent neuroimmune modulation following traumatic stress. The result here might present a new quality of synaptic cellular communication governing the stress like events and have significant potential for the development of therapeutic approaches designed to minimize the heightened vulnerability during aging. PMID:22640633

  13. The role of heat shock protein 70 in mediating age-dependent mortality in sepsis.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Kevin W; Fox, Amy C; Clark, Andrew T; Chang, Nai-Yuan Nicholas; Dominguez, Jessica A; Farris, Alton B; Buchman, Timothy G; Hunt, Clayton R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2011-03-15

    Sepsis is primarily a disease of the aged, with increased incidence and mortality occurring in aged hosts. Heat shock protein (HSP) 70 plays an important role in both healthy aging and the stress response to injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of HSP70 in mediating mortality and the host inflammatory response in aged septic hosts. Sepsis was induced in both young (6- to 12-wk-old) and aged (16- to 17-mo-old) HSP70(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice to determine whether HSP70 modulated outcome in an age-dependent fashion. Young HSP70(-/-) and WT mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture, Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia, or Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia had no differences in mortality, suggesting HSP70 does not mediate survival in young septic hosts. In contrast, mortality was higher in aged HSP70(-/-) mice than aged WT mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (p = 0.01), suggesting HSP70 mediates mortality in sepsis in an age-dependent fashion. Compared with WT mice, aged septic HSP70(-/-) mice had increased gut epithelial apoptosis and pulmonary inflammation. In addition, HSP70(-/-) mice had increased systemic levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1β compared with WT mice. These data demonstrate that HSP70 is a key determinant of mortality in aged, but not young hosts in sepsis. HSP70 may play a protective role in an age-dependent response to sepsis by preventing excessive gut apoptosis and both pulmonary and systemic inflammation. PMID:21296977

  14. The role of HSP70 in mediating age-dependent mortality in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Kevin W.; Fox, Amy C.; Clark, Andrew T.; Chang, Nai-Yuan Nicholas; Dominguez, Jessica A.; Farris, Alton B.; Buchman, Timothy G.; Hunt, Clayton R.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is primarily a disease of the aged, with increased incidence and mortality occurring in aged hosts. Heat shock protein (HSP) 70 plays an important role in both healthy aging and the stress response to injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of HSP70 in mediating mortality and the host inflammatory response in aged septic hosts. Sepsis was induced in both young (6–12week old) and aged (16–17 month old) HSP70−/− and wild type (WT) mice to determine if HSP70 modulated outcome in an age-dependent fashion. Young HSP70−/− and WT mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia or Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia had no differences in mortality, suggesting HSP70 does not mediate survival in young septic hosts. In contrast, mortality was higher in aged HSP70−/− mice than aged WT mice subjected to CLP (p=0.01), suggesting HSP70 mediates mortality in sepsis in an age-dependent fashion. Compared to WT mice, aged septic HSP70−/− mice had increased gut epithelial apoptosis and pulmonary inflammation. In addition, HSP70−/−mice had increased systemic levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-1β compared to WT mice. These data demonstrate that HSP70 is a key determinant of mortality in aged but not young hosts in sepsis. HSP70 may play a protective role in an age-dependent response to sepsis by preventing excessive gut apoptosis and both pulmonary and systemic inflammation. PMID:21296977

  15. Mutant Alpha-Synuclein Causes Age-Dependent Neuropathology in Monkey Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weili; Wang, Guohao; Wang, Chuan-En; Guo, Xiangyu; Yin, Peng; Gao, Jinquan; Tu, Zhuchi; Wang, Zhengbo; Wu, Jing; Hu, Xintian; Li, Shihua

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease that often occurs in those over age 60. Although rodents and small animals have been used widely to model PD and investigate its pathology, their short life span makes it difficult to assess the aging-related pathology that is likely to occur in PD patient brains. Here, we used brain tissues from rhesus monkeys at 2–3, 7–8, and >15 years of age to examine the expression of Parkin, PINK1, and α-synuclein, which are known to cause PD via loss- or gain-of-function mechanisms. We found that α-synuclein is increased in the older monkey brains, whereas Parkin and PINK1 are decreased or remain unchanged. Because of the gain of toxicity of α-synuclein, we performed stereotaxic injection of lentiviral vectors expressing mutant α-synuclein (A53T) into the substantia nigra of monkeys and found that aging also increases the accumulation of A53T in neurites and its associated neuropathology. A53T also causes more extensive reactive astrocytes and axonal degeneration in monkey brain than in mouse brain. Using monkey brain tissues, we found that A53T interacts with neurofascin, an adhesion molecule involved in axon subcellular targeting and neurite outgrowth. Aged monkey brain tissues show an increased interaction of neurofascin with A53T. Overexpression of A53T causes neuritic toxicity in cultured neuronal cells, which can be attenuated by transfected neurofascin. These findings from nonhuman primate brains reveal age-dependent pathological and molecular changes that could contribute to the age-dependent neuropathology in PD. PMID:26019347

  16. Age-dependent loss of the C-terminal amino acid from alpha crystallin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmons, T.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Antiserum made against the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin was used to monitor the purification of a tryptic peptide containing the C-terminus of the molecule from fetal versus adult bovine lenses. Mass spectral analysis of the peptide preparations obtained from these lenses demonstrated the presence of a peptide (T20) containing an intact C-terminus from fetal lenses and the presence of an additional peptide (T20') from older lenses that contained a cleaved C-terminal serine. These results demonstrate an age-dependent processing of alpha-A crystallin in the bovine lens, resulting in removal of the C-terminal amino acid residue.

  17. Assessment of Anemia Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors among Pregnant Women in Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    M'Cormack, Fredanna A. D.; Drolet, Judy C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Iron deficiency anemia prevalence of pregnant Sierra Leone women currently is reported to be 59.7%. Anemia is considered to be a direct cause of 3-7% of maternal deaths and an indirect cause of 20-40% of maternal deaths. This study explores knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of urban pregnant Sierra Leone women regarding anemia.…

  18. Non-Governmental Organizations in Africa: The Leonenet Street Children Project in Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide snapshots of observations, interventions, and processes in the day to day working of a child charity in Sierra Leone. There were 114 local and 49 overseas funded Non Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in Sierra Leone in 2002. The Leonenet Street Children Project was founded in 1996 by the membership of the…

  19. Curriculum Diversification Re-examined--A Case Study of Sierra Leone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Cream A. H.

    This paper deals with a case study of secondary curriculum diversification as a vocationalization strategy in Sierra Leone. It explores diversification issues from four crucial standpoints that are distinct but highly interrelated. First, diversification is dealt with as a policy that was adopted and actively pursued by Sierra Leone for over a…

  20. Haplotype reconstruction and estimation of haplotype frequencies from nuclear families with only one parent available.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiangdong; Zhang, Qin; Flury, Christine; Simianer, Henner

    2006-01-01

    Recent literature has suggested that haplotype inference through close relatives, especially from nuclear families can be an alternative strategy in determining the linkage phase. In this paper, haplotype reconstruction and estimation of haplotype frequencies via expectation maximization (EM) algorithm including nuclear families with only one parent available is proposed. Parent and his (her) child are treated as parent-child pair with one shared haplotype. This reduces the number of potential haplotype pairs for both parent and child separately, resulting in a higher accuracy of the estimation. In a series of simulations, the comparisons of PHASE, GENEHUNTER, EM-based approach for complete nuclear families and our approach are carried out. In all situations, EM-based approach for trio data is comparable but slightly worse error rate than PHASE, our approach is slightly better and much faster than PHASE for incomplete trios, the performance of GENEHUNTER is very bad in simple nuclear family settings and dramatically decreased with the number of markers being increased. On the other hand, the comparison result of different sampling designs demonstrates that sampling trios is the most efficient design to estimate haplotype frequencies in populations under same genotyping cost. PMID:16954697

  1. Experimental febrile seizures induce age-dependent structural plasticity and improve memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, K; Ichikawa, J; Matsuki, N; Ikegaya, Y; Koyama, R

    2016-03-24

    Population-based studies have demonstrated that children with a history of febrile seizure (FS) perform better than age-matched controls at hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. Here, we report that FSs induce two distinct structural reorganizations in the hippocampus and bidirectionally modify future learning abilities in an age-dependent manner. Compared with age-matched controls, adult mice that had experienced experimental FSs induced by hyperthermia (HT) on postnatal day 14 (P14-HT) performed better in a cognitive task that requires dentate granule cells (DGCs). The enhanced memory performance correlated with an FS-induced persistent increase in the density of large mossy fiber terminals (LMTs) of the DGCs. The memory enhancement was not observed in mice that had experienced HT-induced seizures at P11 which exhibited abnormally located DGCs in addition to the increased LMT density. The ectopic DGCs of the P11-HT mice were abolished by the diuretic bumetanide, and this pharmacological treatment unveiled the masked memory enhancement. Thus, this work provides a novel basis for age-dependent structural plasticity in which FSs influence future brain function. PMID:26794590

  2. Mechanism of age-dependent susceptibility and novel treatment strategy in glutaric acidemia type I

    PubMed Central

    Zinnanti, William J.; Lazovic, Jelena; Housman, Cathy; LaNoue, Kathryn; O’Callaghan, James P.; Simpson, Ian; Woontner, Michael; Goodman, Stephen I.; Connor, James R.; Jacobs, Russell E.; Cheng, Keith C.

    2007-01-01

    Glutaric acidemia type I (GA-I) is an inherited disorder of lysine and tryptophan metabolism presenting with striatal lesions anatomically and symptomatically similar to Huntington disease. Affected children commonly suffer acute brain injury in the context of a catabolic state associated with nonspecific illness. The mechanisms underlying injury and age-dependent susceptibility have been unknown, and lack of a diagnostic marker heralding brain injury has impeded intervention efforts. Using a mouse model of GA-I, we show that pathologic events began in the neuronal compartment while enhanced lysine accumulation in the immature brain allowed increased glutaric acid production resulting in age-dependent injury. Glutamate and GABA depletion correlated with brain glutaric acid accumulation and could be monitored in vivo by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy as a diagnostic marker. Blocking brain lysine uptake reduced glutaric acid levels and brain injury. These findings provide what we believe are new monitoring and treatment strategies that may translate for use in human GA-I. PMID:17932566

  3. Age dependence of myosin heavy chain transitions induced by creatine depletion in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity resulting from creatine depletion is an age-dependent process. At weaning (age 28 days), rat pups were placed on either standard rat chow (normal diet juvenile group) or the same chow supplemented with 1% wt/wt of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (creatine depletion juvenile (CDJ) group). Two groups of adult rats (age approximately 8 wk) were placed on the same diet regimens (normal diet adult and creatine depletion adult (CDA) groups). After 40 days (CDJ and normal diet juvenile groups) and 60 days (CDA and normal diet adult groups), animals were killed and several skeletal muscles were removed for analysis of creatine content or MHC ditribution. In the CDJ group, creatine depletion (78%) was accompanied by significant shifts toward expression of slower MHC isoforms in two slow and three fast skeletal muscles. In contrast, creatine depletion in adult animals did not result in similar shifts toward slow MHC isoform expression in either muscle type. The results of this study indicate that there is a differential effect of creatine depletion on MHC tranitions that appears to be age dependent. These results strongly suggest that investigators contemplating experimental designs involving the use of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid should consider the age of the animals to be used.

  4. Mechanism of age-dependent susceptibility and novel treatment strategy in glutaric acidemia type I.

    PubMed

    Zinnanti, William J; Lazovic, Jelena; Housman, Cathy; LaNoue, Kathryn; O'Callaghan, James P; Simpson, Ian; Woontner, Michael; Goodman, Stephen I; Connor, James R; Jacobs, Russell E; Cheng, Keith C

    2007-11-01

    Glutaric acidemia type I (GA-I) is an inherited disorder of lysine and tryptophan metabolism presenting with striatal lesions anatomically and symptomatically similar to Huntington disease. Affected children commonly suffer acute brain injury in the context of a catabolic state associated with nonspecific illness. The mechanisms underlying injury and age-dependent susceptibility have been unknown, and lack of a diagnostic marker heralding brain injury has impeded intervention efforts. Using a mouse model of GA-I, we show that pathologic events began in the neuronal compartment while enhanced lysine accumulation in the immature brain allowed increased glutaric acid production resulting in age-dependent injury. Glutamate and GABA depletion correlated with brain glutaric acid accumulation and could be monitored in vivo by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy as a diagnostic marker. Blocking brain lysine uptake reduced glutaric acid levels and brain injury. These findings provide what we believe are new monitoring and treatment strategies that may translate for use in human GA-I. PMID:17932566

  5. Age dependence of the chemical composition of stars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipper, T.

    An overview of recent investigations of the age dependence of the chemical composition of stars in globular clusters is presented. Attention is given to two contradictory hypotheses on the issue of cluster age and metallicity. According to Carney (1980), there is a metallicity-age dependence. According to Gratton (1985), all globular clusters are the same age - approximately 16 x 10 exp 9 years old. The metallicity of the most metal-abundant clusters is discussed. The Fe/H metallicity of the object 47 Tuc is determined to range from -1.1 to -0.4. The chemical homogeneity of clusters is examined. Spectral investigations of NGC 6752 stars from the main sequence up to the upper part of the giants' branch did not show Fe/H dispersion. The study by Cohen (1980) of the relative distribution of heavy elements in clusters of different metallicity show that in spite of the significant difference in Fe/H (up to 2.0 dex) the relative abundances are quite similar.

  6. REDOX RESPONSIVE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1 is involved in age-dependent and systemic stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Mitsuhiro; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    REDOX RESPONSIVE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1 (RRTF1) regulates redox homeostasis under stress, however the mechanism is mainly unknown. In a recent publication, we analyzed rrtf1 knockout (ko) and RRTF1 overexpressor lines of Arabidopsis thaliana and showed that RRTF1 plays a crucial role in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Ko line produces less and overexpressor lines constitutively high levels of ROS under stress, and the amount of ROS increases with increase in stress and the RRTF1 level in the plant. The transcription factor also activates systemic ROS signaling under stress.1 In this report, we show that RRTF1 exerts different roles in young and old leaves. While RRTF1 enhances defense responses to high light (HL) stress in young leaves, it induces senescence and chlorosis in older leaves. These findings suggest that RRTF1 and/or RRTF1-mediated ROS signaling induce stress responses in an age-dependent manner, and the age-dependent alteration in the RRTF1 function might be important for plants' acclimation to the stress environment. PMID:26479402

  7. Nerve growth factor signaling following unilateral pelvic ganglionectomy in the rat ventral prostate is age dependent.

    PubMed

    Podlasek, Carol A; Ghosh, Rudrani; Onur Cakir, Omer; Bond, Christopher; McKenna, Kevin E; McVary, Kevin T

    2013-11-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a serious health concern and is an underlying cause of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in many men. In affected men, LUTS/BPH is believed to result from benign proliferation of the prostate resulting in bladder outlet obstruction. Postnatal growth of the prostate is controlled via growth factor and endocrine mechanisms. However, little attention had been given to the function of the autonomic nervous system in prostate growth and differentiation. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a prostatic mitogen that has a trophic role in autonomic sensory end organ interaction. In this study, we examine how the autonomic nervous system influences prostate growth as a function of age by quantifying NGF in the rat ventral prostate (VP) after pelvic ganglionectomy. Unilateral pelvic ganglionectomy was performed on postnatal days 30 (P30), 60 and 120 Sprague-Dawley rats in comparison to sham controls (n=39). Semiquantitative RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis for NGF were performed on denervated, intact (contralateral side) and sham control VP 7 days after surgery. Ngf RNA expression was significantly increased in the denervated and intact hyperplastic VP. Western blotting showed age-dependent increases in NGF protein at P60 in the contralateral intact VP. NGF was localized in the nerves, basal cells and columnar epithelium of the prostatic ducts. Denervation causes age-dependent increases in NGF in the VP, which is a potential mechanism by which the autonomic nervous system may regulate prostate growth and lead to BPH/LUTS. PMID:23872662

  8. Probiotic Mixture KF Attenuates Age-Dependent Memory Deficit and Lipidemia in Fischer 344 Rats.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Ahn, Young-Tae; Sim, Jae-Hun; Woo, Jae-Yeon; Huh, Chul-Sung; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the memory-enhancing effect of lactic acid bacteria, we selected the probiotic mixture KF, which consisted of Lactobacillus plantarum KY1032 and Lactobacillus curvatus HY7601 (1 × 10(11) CFU/g of each strain), and investigated its antilipidemic and memoryenhancing effects in aged Fischer 344 rats. KF (1 × 10(10) CFU/rat/day), which was administered orally once a day (6 days per week) for 8 weeks, significantly inhibited age-dependent increases of blood triglyceride and reductions of HDL cholesterol (p < 0.05). KF restored agereduced spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze task to 94.4% of that seen in young rats (p < 0.05). KF treatment slightly, but not significantly, shortened the escape latency daily for 4 days. Oral administration of KF restored age-suppressed doublecortin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in aged rats. Orally administered KF suppressed the expression of p16, p53, and cyclooxygenase-2, the phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR, and the activation of NF-κB in the hippocampus of the brain. These findings suggest that KF may ameliorate age-dependent memory deficit and lipidemia by inhibiting NF-κB activation. PMID:25975611

  9. REMEDIATION OF LEON WATER FLOOD, BUTLER COUNTY, KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Korphage; Kelly Kindscher; Bruce G. Langhus

    2001-11-26

    The Leon Water Flood site has undergone one season of soil amendments and growth of specialized plants meant to colonize and accelerate the remediation of the salt-impacted site. The researchers characterized the impacted soil as to chemistry, added soil amendments, and planted several species of seedlings, and seeded the scarred areas. After the first growing season, the surface soil was again characterized and groundcover was also characterized. While plant growth was quite meager across the area, soil chemistry did improve over most of the two scars.

  10. Fighting Ebola in Sierra Leone: a view from the frontline.

    PubMed

    Owens, Stephen; Leyland, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The largest and most complex Ebola epidemic in history is believed to have started with the infection of a 2-year-old boy in South-eastern Guinea in late 2013. Within a year, thousands of children and their families had contracted the virus, many had died and many more were orphaned. We reflect on our experiences of volunteering at the Kerry Town Ebola Treatment Centre in Sierra Leone between January and February 2015, where we were deployed to care for just a few of these children as part of the Save The Children team. PMID:26507816

  11. Haplotypes of angiotensinogen in essential hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Jeunemaitre, X; Inoue, I; Williams, C; Charru, A; Tichet, J; Powers, M; Sharma, A M; Gimenez-Roqueplo, A P; Hata, A; Corvol, P; Lalouel, J M

    1997-01-01

    The M235T polymorphism of the angiotensinogen gene (AGT) has been associated with essential and pregnancy-induced hypertension. Generation of haplotypes can help to resolve whether the T235 allele itself predisposes to the development of hypertension or acts as a marker of an unknown causal molecular variant. We identified 10 diallelic polymorphisms at the AGT locus and genotyped both a series of 477 probands of hypertensive families and 364 controls, all French Caucasians, as well as a series of 92 hypertensives and 122 controls from Japan. Despite a large ethnic difference in gene frequency, a significant association of T235 with hypertension was observed both in Cancasians (.46 vs. .38, P = .004) and in Japanese (.91 vs. .76, P = .002). In both groups, the G-->A substitution located at position -6 upstream of the initial transcription site occurred at the same frequency and in complete linkage disequilibrium with the T235 allele. No other polymorphism was found to be consistently associated with hypertension. Five informative haplotypes subdividing the T235 allele were generated. Whereas two of them were associated with hypertension in Caucasians, none of these two haplotypes (H3 and H4) reached statistical significance in Japanese. The analysis of the AGT-GT repeat revealed marked linkage disequilibriums between each of the diallelic polymorphisms and some (GT)n alleles, with similar patterns in the two populations. The strong disequilibrium between M235 and (GT)16 explained the increased frequency of that particular allele in French controls compared with hypertensives (.42 vs. .36, P < .01). The haplotype combining the M235T and G-6A polymorphisms appears as the ancestral allele of the human AGT gene and as the one associated with hypertension. PMID:9199566

  12. The Wilson disease gene: Haplotypes and mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.R.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.; Walshe, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease (WND) is an autosomal recessive defect of copper transport. The gene involved in WND, located on chromosome 13, has recently been shown to be a putative copper transporting P-type ATPase, designated ATP7B. The gene is highly similar to ATP7A, located on the X chromosome, which is defective in Menkes disease, another disorder of copper transport. We have available for study WND families from Canada (34 families), the United Kingdom (32 families), Japan (4 families), Iceland (3 families) and Hong Kong (2 families). We have utilized four highly polymorphic CA repeat markers (D13S296, D13S301, D13S314 and D13S316) surrounding the ATP7B locus to construct haplotypes in these families. Analysis indicates that there are many unique WND haplotypes not present on normal chromosomes and that there may be a large number of different WND mutations. We have screened the WND patients for mutations in the ATP7B gene. Fifty six patients, representing all of the identified haplotypes, have been screened using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP), followed by selective sequencing. To date, 19 mutations and 12 polymorphisms have been identified. All of the changes are nucleotide substitutions or small insertions/deletions and there is no evidence for larger deletions as seen in the similar gene on the X chromosome, ATP7A. Haplotypes of close markers and the ability to detect some of the mutations present in the gene allow for more reliable molecular diagnosis of presymptomatic sibs of WND patients. A reassessment of individuals previously diagnosed in the presymptomatic phase is now required, as we have have identified some heterozygotes who are biochemically indistinguishable from affected homozygotes. The identification of specific mutations will soon allow direct diagnosis of WND patients with a high level of certainty.

  13. Age-dependent accumulation of (137)Cs by pike Esox lucius in the Yenisei River.

    PubMed

    Zotina, T A; Trofimova, E A; Dementyev, D V; Bolsunovsky, A Ya

    2016-05-01

    Age-dependent accumulation of (137)Cs in the muscles and bodies of the pike Esox lucius (aged two to seven years) inhabiting a section of the Yenisei River polluted with artificial radionuclides has been studied. The content of (137)Cs in muscles varied from 0.5 to 7.0 Bq/kg of fresh weight. The maximum content of the radionuclide has been found in juveniles. The content of (137)Cs in pike muscles and body decreased considerably with age. The high content of (137)Cs in the muscles of juveniles is probably a consequence of their higher intensity of feeding as compared to older individuals, which is due to the intense growth of juveniles. PMID:27411826

  14. Age-dependent T cell tolerance and autoimmunity to myelin basic protein.

    PubMed

    Huseby, E S; Sather, B; Huseby, P G; Goverman, J

    2001-04-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis, is induced by activating a subset of myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific T cells that have escaped tolerance induction. Here, we define the tolerance mechanisms that eliminate the majority of MBP-specific T cells from the periphery. We show that MBP-specific T cells undergo central tolerance mediated by bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells presenting exogenously derived MBP epitopes. The efficiency of tolerance is age dependent, reflecting the developmentally regulated expression of MBP. Dependence of tolerance on the amount of MBP expressed in vivo results in an age window of susceptibility to EAE in mice that peaks during puberty. These results suggest that factors regulating expression of self-antigens in vivo can influence susceptibility to autoimmunity. PMID:11336692

  15. An age-dependent model to analyse the evolutionary stability of bacterial quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Mund, A; Kuttler, C; Pérez-Velázquez, J; Hense, B A

    2016-09-21

    Bacterial communication is enabled through the collective release and sensing of signalling molecules in a process called quorum sensing. Cooperative processes can easily be destabilized by the appearance of cheaters, who contribute little or nothing at all to the production of common goods. This especially applies for planktonic cultures. In this study, we analyse the dynamics of bacterial quorum sensing and its evolutionary stability under two levels of cooperation, namely signal and enzyme production. The model accounts for mutation rates and switches between planktonic and biofilm state of growth. We present a mathematical approach to model these dynamics using age-dependent colony models. We explore the conditions under which cooperation is stable and find that spatial structuring can lead to long-term scenarios such as coexistence or bistability, depending on the non-linear combination of different parameters like death rates and production costs. PMID:26796220

  16. Age-dependent changes in T cell homeostasis and SIV load in sooty mangabeys.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, L A; Lewin, S R; Zhang, L; Gettie, A; Luckay, A; Martin, L N; Skulsky, E; Ho, D D; Cheng-Mayer, C; Marx, P A

    2000-08-01

    Sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) showed age-dependent changes in T cell regeneration. Younger animals had a high percentage of CD4+ CD45RA + T cells and a high concentration of T cell receptor excisional circles (TRECs) in peripheral blood, which indicated active thymopoiesis. In contrast, older animals had an increased T cell turnover, which suggested that most T cell production occurred in the periphery. In addition, the number of peripheral CD4+ T cells naturally decreased with age. Non-pathogenic SIVsm infection did not significantly change the T cell proliferation rate or the TREC concentration, though it did cause a moderate loss of peripheral CD4 + T cells. The viral load correlated negatively with age, which could be accounted for by the reduced availability of CD4 + target cells in older mangabeys. Thus, the number of susceptible target cells may be a limiting factor in natural SIV infection. PMID:11085578

  17. Age-Dependent Susceptibility of Chromosome Cohesion to Premature Separase Activation in Mouse Oocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Teresa; Schultz, Richard M.; Lampson, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hypothesis to explain the maternal age-dependent increase in formation of aneuploid eggs is deterioration of chromosome cohesion. Although several lines of evidence are consistent with this hypothesis, whether cohesion is actually reduced in naturally aged oocytes has not been directly tested by any experimental perturbation. To directly target cohesion, we increased the activity of separase, the protease that cleaves the meiotic cohesin REC8, in oocytes. We show that cohesion is more susceptible to premature separase activation in old oocytes than in young oocytes, demonstrating that cohesion is significantly reduced. Furthermore, cohesion is protected by two independent mechanisms that inhibit separase, securin and an inhibitory phosphorylation of separase by CDK1; both mechanisms must be disrupted to prematurely activate separase. With the continual loss of cohesins from chromosomes that occurs throughout the natural reproductive lifespan, tight regulation of separase in oocytes may be particularly important to maintain cohesion and prevent aneuploidy. PMID:21865557

  18. Age-dependent changes in cat masseter nerve: an electrophysiological and morphological study.

    PubMed

    Chase, M H; Engelhardt, J K; Adinolfi, A M; Chirwa, S S

    1992-07-24

    The present study was undertaken to determine the manner in which aging affects the function and structure of the masseter nerve in old cats. Electrophysiological data demonstrated a significant decrease in the conduction velocity of the action potential in old cats compared with that observed in adult cats. Light microscopic analyses revealed an age-dependent decrease in axon diameter. Electron microscopic observations of the masseter nerve in the aged cats revealed a disruption of the myelin sheaths and a pronounced increase in collagen fibers in the endoneurium and perineurium. These morphological changes are discussed and then related to the decrease in conduction velocity which was observed in the electrophysiological portion of this study. PMID:1521161

  19. Water quality associated public health risk in Bo, Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Jimmy, David H; Sundufu, Abu J; Malanoski, Anthony P; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Ansumana, Rashid; Leski, Tomasz A; Bangura, Umaru; Bockarie, Alfred S; Tejan, Edries; Lin, Baochuan; Stenger, David A

    2013-01-01

    Human health depends on reliable access to safe drinking water, but in many developing countries only a limited number of wells and boreholes are available. Many of these water resources are contaminated with biological or chemical pollutants. The goal of this study was to examine water access and quality in urban Bo, Sierra Leone. A health census and community mapping project in one neighborhood in Bo identified the 36 water sources used by the community. A water sample was taken from each water source and tested for a variety of microbiological and physicochemical substances. Only 38.9% of the water sources met World Health Organization (WHO) microbial safety requirements based on fecal coliform levels. Physiochemical analysis indicated that the majority (91.7%) of the water sources met the requirements set by the WHO. In combination, 25% of these water resources met safe drinking water criteria. No variables associated with wells were statistically significant predictors of contamination. This study indicated that fecal contamination is the greatest health risk associated with drinking water. There is a need to raise hygiene awareness and implement inexpensive methods to reduce fecal contamination and improve drinking water safety in Bo, Sierra Leone. PMID:22350346

  20. Age-dependent speciation can explain the shape of empirical phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Oskar; Hartmann, Klaas; Steel, Mike; Stadler, Tanja

    2015-05-01

    Tens of thousands of phylogenetic trees, describing the evolutionary relationships between hundreds of thousands of taxa, are readily obtainable from various databases. From such trees, inferences can be made about the underlying macroevolutionary processes, yet remarkably these processes are still poorly understood. Simple and widely used evolutionary null models are problematic: Empirical trees show very different imbalance between the sizes of the daughter clades of ancestral taxa compared to what models predict. Obtaining a simple evolutionary model that is both biologically plausible and produces the imbalance seen in empirical trees is a challenging problem, to which none of the existing models provide a satisfying answer. Here we propose a simple, biologically plausible macroevolutionary model in which the rate of speciation decreases with species age, whereas extinction rates can vary quite generally. We show that this model provides a remarkable fit to the thousands of trees stored in the online database TreeBase. The biological motivation for the identified age-dependent speciation process may be that recently evolved taxa often colonize new regions or niches and may initially experience little competition. These new taxa are thus more likely to give rise to further new taxa than a taxon that has remained largely unchanged and is, therefore, well adapted to its niche. We show that age-dependent speciation may also be the result of different within-species populations following the same laws of lineage splitting to produce new species. As the fit of our model to the tree database shows, this simple biological motivation provides an explanation for a long standing problem in macroevolution. PMID:25575504

  1. Estrogen Effects on Vascular Inflammation are Age-Dependent: Role of Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Akash; Chen, Yiu-Fai; Szalai, Alexander J.; Oparil, Suzanne; Hage, Fadi G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective 17β-Estradiol (E2) offers cardiovascular protection in young female animals and postmenopausal women. In contrast, randomized trials of menopausal hormones carried out in older women have shown harm or no cardiovascular benefit. We hypothesize that E2 effects on vascular inflammation are age-dependent. Approach and Results Young (10-wk) and aged (52-wk) female C57BL/6 mice were used as source for primary cultures of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). E2 pre-treatment of cells derived from young mice attenuated C-reactive protein (CRP)-induced expression of inflammatory mediators. In contrast, E2 pre-treatment of cells from aged mice did not alter (BMMs) or paradoxically exaggerated (VSMCs) inflammatory mediator response to CRP. Using E2 receptor (ER)-knockout mice, we demonstrated that E2 regulates inflammatory response to CRP in BMMs via ERα and in VSMCs via ERβ. BMMs derived from aged (vs. young) mice expressed significantly less ERα mRNA and protein. A selective ligand of the novel ER GPR30 reproduced the E2 effects in BMMs and VSMCs. Unlike in young mice, E2 did not reduce neointima formation in ligated carotid arteries of aged CRP transgenic mice. Conclusions E2 attenuates inflammatory response to CRP in BMMs and VSMCs derived from young but not aged mice and reduces neointima formation in injured carotid arteries of young but not aged CRP transgenic mice. ERα expression in BMMs is greatly diminished with aging. These data suggest that vasoprotective effects of E2 are age-dependent and may explain the vasotoxic effects of E2 seen in clinical trials of postmenopausal women. PMID:24876352

  2. Pharmacological and genetic reversal of age dependent cognitive deficits due to decreased presenilin function

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Sean M. J.; Choi, Catherine H.; Schoenfeld, Brian P.; Bell, Aaron J.; Liebelt, David A.; Ferreiro, David; Choi, Richard J.; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Terlizzi, Allison M.; Ferrick, Neal J.; Koenigsberg, Eric; Rudominer, Rebecca L.; Sumida, Ai; Chiorean, Stephanie; Siwicki, Kathleen K.; Nguyen, Hanh T.; Fortini, Mark E.; McDonald, Thomas V.; Jongens, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of cognitive loss and neurodegeneration in the developed world. Although its genetic and environmental causes are not generally known, familial forms of the disease (FAD) are due to mutations in a single copy of the Presenilin (PS) and Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) genes. The dominant inheritance pattern of FAD indicates that it may be due to gain or change of function mutations. Studies of FAD-linked forms of presenilin in model organisms, however, indicate that they are loss of function, leading to the possibility that a reduction in PS activity might contribute to FAD and that proper psn levels are important for maintaining normal cognition throughout life. To explore this issue further, we have tested the effect of reducing psn activity during aging in Drosophila melanogaster males. We have found that flies in which the dosage of psn function is reduced by 50% display age-onset impairments in learning and memory. Treatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonists or lithium during the aging process prevented the onset of these deficits, and treatment of aged flies reversed the age-dependent deficits. Genetic reduction of DmGluRA, the inositol trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R) or IPPase also prevented these age-onset cognitive deficits. These findings suggest that reduced psn activity may contribute to the age onset cognitive loss observed with FAD. They also indicate that enhanced mGluR signaling and calcium release regulated by InsP3R as underlying causes of the age-dependent cognitive phenotypes observed when psn activity is reduced. PMID:20631179

  3. Cadmium affects the episodic luteinizing hormone secretion in male rats: possible age-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Márquez, N; Piquero, S; Esquifino, A I

    1999-01-11

    Cadmium affects luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion through unknown mechanisms. The present study was undertaken to assess whether chronic exposure to low concentrations of cadmium may affect the episodic secretion of LH and if these effects are age-dependent. Male rats were given cadmium at a dose of 50 ppm in the drinking water, from day 30 to 60 or from day 60 to 90 of life. Age-matched rats with access to cadmium-free water were used as controls. At the end of the treatment, blood samples were collected every 7 min for 3 h, from 10:30 to 13.30 in conscious, freely moving rats. In control animals, mean serum LH levels and pulse duration increased with age (P < or = 0.001), and pulse frequency and the relative amplitude of LH pulses decreased (P < or = 0.001). Cadmium administration, from day 30 to 60 of life, decreased the pulse frequency and mean half-life of the hormone (P < or = 0.05, P < or = 0.01, respectively). However, no changes in any other parameters studied were observed as compared to the control group. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90, mean serum LH levels and the duration of LH pulses decreased (P < or = 0.05), whereas the pulse frequency increased (P < or = 0.05). The absolute and relative amplitude of the LH peaks and the mean half-life of the hormone were not changed after cadmium administration from day 60 to 90. These results indicate that low doses of cadmium change the pulsatile secretion of LH in male rats and that the effect of cadmium on episodic LH release was age-dependent. PMID:10048746

  4. Age-Dependent Effects of Haptoglobin Deletion in Neurobehavioral and Anatomical Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Glushakov, Alexander V.; Arias, Rodrigo A.; Tolosano, Emanuela; Doré, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhages are common features of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their presence is associated with chronic disabilities. Recent clinical and experimental evidence suggests that haptoglobin (Hp), an endogenous hemoglobin-binding protein most abundant in blood plasma, is involved in the intrinsic molecular defensive mechanism, though its role in TBI is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Hp deletion on the anatomical and behavioral outcomes in the controlled cortical impact model using wildtype (WT) C57BL/6 mice and genetically modified mice lacking the Hp gene (Hp−∕−) in two age cohorts [2–4 mo-old (young adult) and 7–8 mo-old (older adult)]. The data obtained suggest age-dependent significant effects on behavioral and anatomical TBI outcomes and recovery from injury. Moreover, in the adult cohort, neurological deficits in Hp−∕− mice at 24 h were significantly improved compared to WT, whereas there were no significant differences in brain pathology between these genotypes. In contrast, in the older adult cohort, Hp−∕− mice had significantly larger lesion volumes compared to WT, but neurological deficits were not significantly different. Immunohistochemistry for ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) revealed significant differences in microglial and astrocytic reactivity between Hp−∕− and WT in selected brain regions of the adult but not the older adult-aged cohort. In conclusion, the data obtained in the study provide clarification on the age-dependent aspects of the intrinsic defensive mechanisms involving Hp that might be involved in complex pathways differentially affecting acute brain trauma outcomes. PMID:27486583

  5. Is the metabolism of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 age-dependent in dairy cows?

    PubMed

    Wilkens, Mirja R; Cohrs, Imke; Lifschitz, Adrian L; Fraser, David R; Olszewski, Katharina; Schröder, Bernd; Breves, Gerhard

    2013-07-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that prepartum administered 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OHD3) is a promising candidate to assist the maintenance of peripartal calcium homeostasis in dairy cows. Since the incidence of peripartal hypocalcemia and the reported beneficial effects of the treatment are both associated with the lactation number, we investigated pharmacokinetic aspects of 25-OHD3 related to the age of dairy cows. The daily oral administration of 3mg 25-OHD3 in rapeseed oil as well as a treatment with 4 and 6mg included in the feed during the last eight to ten days of gestation resulted in linear dosage- and age-dependent increases in plasma 25-OHD3. After parturition the administration was stopped and blood samples were taken to calculate the plasma half-life. Irrespective of the supplemented dosage, cows starting the 2nd lactation showed a significantly longer plasma half-life of 25-OHD3 than cows starting the 3rd or higher lactation. Age-dependent differences in the increase of plasma 25-OHD3 could already be found before parturition when calcium homeostasis was not yet significantly challenged. Additionally, no correlations between plasma half-life of 25-OHD3 and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, PTH or the bone resorption marker CrossLaps were observed after parturition. Thus we conclude that the influence of the lactation number on the pharmacokinetics of 25-OHD3 is related directly to the age of the cows. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Vitamin D Workshop'. PMID:23220546

  6. The probiotic mixture IRT5 ameliorates age-dependent colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Woo, Jae-Yeon; Ahn, Young-Tae; Shim, Jae-Hun; Huh, Chul-Sung; Im, Sin-Heog; Han, Myung Joo; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of probiotics, we orally administered IRT5 (1×10(9)CFU/rat) for 8 weeks to aged (16 months-old) Fischer 344 rats, and measured parameters of colitis. The expression levels of the inflammatory markers' inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-1β were higher in the colons of normal aged rats (18 months-old) than in the colons of normal young rats (6 months-old). Treatment with IRT5 suppressed the age-associated increased expression of iNOS, COX2, TNF-α, and IL-1β, and activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases. In a similar manner, the expression of tight junction proteins in the colon of normal aged rats was suppressed more potently than in normal young rats, and treatment of aged rats with IRT5 decreased the age-dependent suppression of tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1. Treatment with IRT5 suppressed age-associated increases in expressions of senescence markers p16 and p53 in the colon of aged rats, but increased age-suppressed expression of SIRT1. However, treatment with IRT5 inhibited age-associated increased myeloperoxidase activity in the colon. In addition, treatment with IRT5 lowered the levels of LPS in intestinal fluid and blood of aged rats, as well as the reduced concentrations of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde, and C-reactive protein in the blood. These findings suggest that IRT5 treatment may suppress age-dependent colitis by inhibiting gut microbiota LPS production. PMID:25907245

  7. Assigning linkage haplotypes from parent and progeny genotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Nejati-Javaremi, A.; Smith, C.

    1996-04-01

    Given the genotypes of parents and progeny, their haplotypes over several or many linked loci can be easily assigned by listing the allele type at each locus along the haplotype known to be from each parent. Only a small number (5-10) of progeny per family is usually needed to assign the parental and progeny haplotypes. Any gaps left in the haplotypes may be filled in from the assigned haplotypes of relatives. The process is facilitated by having multiple alleles at the loci and by using more linked loci in the haplotype and with more progeny from the mating. Crossover haplotypes in the progeny can be identified by their being unique or uncommon, and the crossover point can often be detected if the locus linkage map order is known. The haplotyping method applies to outbreeding populations in plants, animals, and man, as well as to traditional experimental crosses of inbred lines. The method also applies to half-sib families, whether the genotype of the mates are known or unknown. The haplotyping procedure is already used in linkage analysis but does not seem to have been published. It should be useful in teaching and in genetic applications of haplotypes. 15 refs., 5 tabs.

  8. An improved preprocessing algorithm for haplotype inference by pure parsimony.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mun-Ho; Kang, Seung-Ho; Lim, Hyeong-Seok

    2014-08-01

    The identification of haplotypes, which encode SNPs in a single chromosome, makes it possible to perform a haplotype-based association test with disease. Given a set of genotypes from a population, the process of recovering the haplotypes, which explain the genotypes, is called haplotype inference (HI). We propose an improved preprocessing method for solving the haplotype inference by pure parsimony (HIPP), which excludes a large amount of redundant haplotypes by detecting some groups of haplotypes that are dispensable for optimal solutions. The method uses only inclusion relations between groups of haplotypes but dramatically reduces the number of candidate haplotypes; therefore, it causes the computational time and memory reduction of real HIPP solvers. The proposed method can be easily coupled with a wide range of optimization methods which consider a set of candidate haplotypes explicitly. For the simulated and well-known benchmark datasets, the experimental results show that our method coupled with a classical exact HIPP solver run much faster than the state-of-the-art solver and can solve a large number of instances that were so far unaffordable in a reasonable time. PMID:25152045

  9. Age-Dependent Changes of Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 Availability in the Postnatal Murine Retina.

    PubMed

    Henning, Yoshiyuki; Szafranski, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (TH) triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone thyroxine (T4) are crucial for retinal development and function, and increasing evidence points at TH dysregulation as a cause for retinal degenerative diseases. Thus, precise regulation of retinal TH supply is required for proper retinal function, but knowledge on these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Several transmembrane transporters have been described as key regulators of TH availability in target tissues of which the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a high affinity transporter for T4 and T3, plays an essential role in the central nervous system. Moreover, in the embryonic chicken retina, MCT8 is highly expressed, but the postnatal availability of MCT8 in the mammalian retina was not reported to date. In the present study, spatiotemporal retinal MCT8 availability was examined in mice of different age. For this purpose, we quantified expression levels of Mct8 via Real-Time Reverse-Transcriptase PCR in mouse eyecups (C57BL/6) of juvenile and adult age groups. Additionally, age-dependent MCT8 protein levels were quantified via Western blotting and localized via immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. While no difference in Mct8 expression levels could be detected between age groups, MCT8 protein levels in juvenile animals were about two times higher than in adult animals based on Western blot analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that MCT8 immunoreactivity in the eyecup was restricted to the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In juvenile mice, MCT8 was broadly observed along the apical membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium, tightly surrounding photoreceptor outer segments. Distinct immunopositive staining was also detected in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. However, in adult specimens, immunoreactivity visibly declined in all layers, which was in line with Western blot analyses. Since MCT8 was abundantly present in juvenile and about twofold lower in

  10. Age-dependent chloride channel expression in skeletal muscle fibres of normal and HSALR myotonic mice

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Yu, Carl; Quiñonez, Marbella; Vergara, Julio L

    2013-01-01

    We combine electrophysiological and optical techniques to investigate the role that the expression of chloride channels (ClC-1) plays on the age-dependent electrical properties of mammalian muscle fibres. To this end, we comparatively evaluate the magnitude and voltage dependence of chloride currents (ICl), as well as the resting resistance, in fibres isolated from control and human skeletal actin (HSA)LR mice (a model of myotonic dystrophy) of various ages. In control mice, the maximal peak chloride current ([peak-ICl]max) increases from −583 ± 126 to −956 ± 260 μA cm−2 (mean ± SD) between 3 and 6 weeks old. Instead, in 3-week-old HSALR mice, ICl are significantly smaller (−153 ± 33 μA cm−2) than in control mice, but after a long period of ∼14 weeks they reach statistically comparable values. Thus, the severe ClC-1 channelopathy in young HSALR animals is slowly reversed with aging. Frequency histograms of the maximal chloride conductance (gCl,max) in fibres of young HSALR animals are narrow and centred in low values; alternatively, those from older animals show broad distributions, centred at larger gCl,max values, compatible with mosaic expressions of ClC-1 channels. In fibres of both animal strains, optical data confirm the age-dependent increase in gCl, and additionally suggest that ClC-1 channels are evenly distributed between the sarcolemma and transverse tubular system membranes. Although gCl is significantly depressed in fibres of young HSALR mice, the resting membrane resistance (Rm) at −90 mV is only slightly larger than in control mice due to upregulation of a Rb-sensitive resting conductance (gK,IR). In adult animals, differences in Rm are negligible between fibres of both strains, and the contributions of gCl and gK,IR are less altered in HSALR animals. We surmise that while hyperexcitability in young HSALR mice can be readily explained on the basis of reduced gCl, myotonia in adult HSALR animals may be explained on the basis of a

  11. Age-Dependent Changes of Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 Availability in the Postnatal Murine Retina

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Yoshiyuki; Szafranski, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (TH) triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone thyroxine (T4) are crucial for retinal development and function, and increasing evidence points at TH dysregulation as a cause for retinal degenerative diseases. Thus, precise regulation of retinal TH supply is required for proper retinal function, but knowledge on these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Several transmembrane transporters have been described as key regulators of TH availability in target tissues of which the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a high affinity transporter for T4 and T3, plays an essential role in the central nervous system. Moreover, in the embryonic chicken retina, MCT8 is highly expressed, but the postnatal availability of MCT8 in the mammalian retina was not reported to date. In the present study, spatiotemporal retinal MCT8 availability was examined in mice of different age. For this purpose, we quantified expression levels of Mct8 via Real-Time Reverse-Transcriptase PCR in mouse eyecups (C57BL/6) of juvenile and adult age groups. Additionally, age-dependent MCT8 protein levels were quantified via Western blotting and localized via immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. While no difference in Mct8 expression levels could be detected between age groups, MCT8 protein levels in juvenile animals were about two times higher than in adult animals based on Western blot analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that MCT8 immunoreactivity in the eyecup was restricted to the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In juvenile mice, MCT8 was broadly observed along the apical membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium, tightly surrounding photoreceptor outer segments. Distinct immunopositive staining was also detected in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. However, in adult specimens, immunoreactivity visibly declined in all layers, which was in line with Western blot analyses. Since MCT8 was abundantly present in juvenile and about twofold lower in

  12. When does maternal age-dependent trisomy 21 arise relative to meiosis?

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Jiang Zheng; Byers, B.

    1996-07-01

    Polymorphic DNA markers have recently been used to estimate the fraction of trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) cases that may be attributable to postzygotic nondisjunction - indicative of a loss in the fidelity of the first few cell divisions after fertilization. In these studies, a postzygotic nondisjunction is defined as a case in which two chromosomes of the trisomic set are homozygous for all informative markers (i.e., for those markers that were heterozygous in their parent of origin). These studies estimate that the postzygotic mutation mechanism accounts for 4.5% (11/238) and 3.5% (9/255) of their cases, respectively, but their estimates may actually be conservative, since all noninformative haplotypes (frequency not reported) are arbitrarily attributed to meiosis II-type nondisjunction. Nevertheless, even the conservative estimates would, if confirmed, constitute a new and nonnegligible source of chromosomal segregation errors leading to trisomy. These studies` conclusions are supported by the observation that the 20 reported {open_quotes}postzygotic{close_quotes} cases (5 paternal and 15 maternal) appear to be less dependent on maternal age (mean maternal age 28.4 years) than maternal meiosis I-type failures (mean maternal age 31.2 years). However, given the limited sample size involved, one should be cautious in positing the absence of a maternal age effect. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Haplotype kinship for three populations of the Goettingen minipig

    PubMed Central

    Flury, Christine; Weigend, Steffen; Ding, Xiangdong; Täubert, Helge; Simianer, Henner

    2007-01-01

    To overcome limitations of diversity measures applied to livestock breeds marker based estimations of kinship within and between populations were proposed. This concept was extended from the single locus consideration to chromosomal segments of a given length in Morgan. Algorithms for the derivation of haplotype kinship were suggested and the behaviour of marker based haplotype kinship was investigated theoretically. In the present study the results of the first practical application of this concept are presented. Full sib pairs of three sub-populations of the Goettingen minipig were genotyped for six chromosome segments. After haplotype reconstruction the haplotypes were compared and mean haplotype kinships were estimated within and between populations. Based on haplotype kinships a distance measure is proposed which is approximatively linear with the number of generations since fission. The haplotype kinship distances, the respective standard errors and the pedigree-based expected values are presented and are shown to reflect the true population history better than distances based on single-locus kinships. However the marker estimated haplotype kinship reveals variable among segments. This leads to high standard errors of the respective distances. Possible reasons for this phenomenon are discussed and a pedigree-based approach to correct for identical haplotypes which are not identical by descent is proposed. PMID:17306199

  14. Genomic evolution in domestic cattle: ancestral haplotypes and healthy beef.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Joseph F; Steele, Edward J; Lester, Susan; Kalai, Oscar; Millman, John A; Wolrige, Lindsay; Bayard, Dominic; McLure, Craig; Dawkins, Roger L

    2011-05-01

    We have identified numerous Ancestral Haplotypes encoding a 14-Mb region of Bota C19. Three are frequent in Simmental, Angus and Wagyu and have been conserved since common progenitor populations. Others are more relevant to the differences between these 3 breeds including fat content and distribution in muscle. SREBF1 and Growth Hormone, which have been implicated in the production of healthy beef, are included within these haplotypes. However, we conclude that alleles at these 2 loci are less important than other sequences within the haplotypes. Identification of breeds and hybrids is improved by using haplotypes rather than individual alleles. PMID:21338665

  15. Bayesian Modeling of Haplotype Effects in Multiparent Populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Wang, Wei; Valdar, William

    2014-01-01

    A general Bayesian model, Diploffect, is described for estimating the effects of founder haplotypes at quantitative trait loci (QTL) detected in multiparental genetic populations; such populations include the Collaborative Cross (CC), Heterogeneous Socks (HS), and many others for which local genetic variation is well described by an underlying, usually probabilistically inferred, haplotype mosaic. Our aim is to provide a framework for coherent estimation of haplotype and diplotype (haplotype pair) effects that takes into account the following: uncertainty in haplotype composition for each individual; uncertainty arising from small sample sizes and infrequently observed haplotype combinations; possible effects of dominance (for noninbred subjects); genetic background; and that provides a means to incorporate data that may be incomplete or has a hierarchical structure. Using the results of a probabilistic haplotype reconstruction as prior information, we obtain posterior distributions at the QTL for both haplotype effects and haplotype composition. Two alternative computational approaches are supplied: a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler and a procedure based on importance sampling of integrated nested Laplace approximations. Using simulations of QTL in the incipient CC (pre-CC) and Northport HS populations, we compare the accuracy of Diploffect, approximations to it, and more commonly used approaches based on Haley–Knott regression, describing trade-offs between these methods. We also estimate effects for three QTL previously identified in those populations, obtaining posterior intervals that describe how the phenotype might be affected by diplotype substitutions at the modeled locus. PMID:25236455

  16. First record of Tenuipalpus uvae De Leon, 1962 (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) in Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first record of Tenuipalpus uvae De Leon (Tenuipalpidae) in Brazil. Specimens were collected from Spondias mombin L. (Anacardiaceae) in the states of Amapa (Northern Brazil) and Pernambuco (northeast)....

  17. Notes from The Field: Ebola Virus Disease Cluster - Northern Sierra Leone, January 2016.

    PubMed

    Alpren, Charles; Sloan, Michelle; Boegler, Karen A; Martin, Daniel W; Ervin, Elizabeth; Washburn, Faith; Rickert, Regan; Singh, Tushar; Redd, John T

    2016-01-01

    On January 14, 2016, the Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation was notified that a buccal swab collected on January 12 from a deceased female aged 22 years (patient A) in Tonkolili District had tested positive for Ebola virus by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The most recent case of Ebola virus disease (Ebola) in Sierra Leone had been reported 4 months earlier on September 13, 2015 (1), and the World Health Organization had declared the end of Ebola virus transmission in Sierra Leone on November 7, 2015 (2). The Government of Sierra Leone launched a response to prevent further transmission of Ebola virus by identifying contacts of the decedent and monitoring them for Ebola signs and symptoms, ensuring timely treatment for anyone with Ebola, and conducting an epidemiologic investigation to identify the source of infection. PMID:27388584

  18. Ebola response in Sierra Leone: The impact on children.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Felicity; Awonuga, Waheed; Shah, Tejshri; Youkee, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    The West African Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak is the largest ever seen, with over 28,000 cases and 11,300 deaths since early 2014. The magnitude of the outbreak has tested fragile governmental health systems and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to their limit. Here we discuss the outbreak in the Western Area of Sierra Leone, the shape of the local response and the impact the response had on caring for children suspected of having contracted EVD. Challenges encountered in providing clinical care to children whilst working in the "Red Zone" where risk of EVD is considered to be highest, wearing full personal protective equipment are detailed. Suggestions and recommendations both for further research and for operational improvement in the future are made, with particular reference as to how a response could be more child-focused. PMID:27177732

  19. Age-dependent modulation of vascular niches for haematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kusumbe, Anjali P; Ramasamy, Saravana K; Itkin, Tomer; Mäe, Maarja Andaloussi; Langen, Urs H; Betsholtz, Christer; Lapidot, Tsvee; Adams, Ralf H

    2016-04-21

    Blood vessels define local microenvironments in the skeletal system, play crucial roles in osteogenesis and provide niches for haematopoietic stem cells. The properties of niche-forming vessels and their changes in the ageing organism remain incompletely understood. Here we show that Notch signalling in endothelial cells leads to the expansion of haematopoietic stem cell niches in bone, which involves increases in CD31-positive capillaries and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ)-positive perivascular cells, arteriole formation and elevated levels of cellular stem cell factor. Although endothelial hypoxia-inducible factor signalling promotes some of these changes, it fails to enhance vascular niche function because of a lack of arterialization and expansion of PDGFRβ-positive cells. In ageing mice, niche-forming vessels in the skeletal system are strongly reduced but can be restored by activation of endothelial Notch signalling. These findings indicate that vascular niches for haematopoietic stem cells are part of complex, age-dependent microenvironments involving multiple cell populations and vessel subtypes. PMID:27074508

  20. Age-Dependent Defects of Regulatory B Cells in Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Gene Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Yoshizaki, Ayumi; Simon, Karen L.; Kirby, Martha R.; Anderson, Stacie M.; Candotti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections, thrombocytopenia, eczema, and high incidence of malignancy and autoimmunity. The cellular mechanisms underlying autoimmune complications in WAS have been extensively studied; however, they remain incompletely defined. We investigated the characteristics of IL-10-producing CD19+CD1dhighCD5+ B cells (CD1dhighCD5+ Breg) obtained from Was gene knockout (WKO) mice and found that their numbers were significantly lower in these mice compared to wild type (WT) controls. Moreover, we found a significant age-dependent reduction of the percentage of IL-10-expressing cells in WKO CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells as compared to age-matched WT control mice. CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice did not suppress the in vitro production of inflammatory cytokines from activated CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice displayed a basal activated phenotype which may prevent normal cellular responses, among which is the expression of IL-10. These defects may contribute to the susceptibility to autoimmunity with age in patients with WAS. PMID:26448644

  1. Reproductive and socioeconomic determinants of child survival: confounded, interactive, and age-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Kost, K; Amin, S

    1992-01-01

    Studies of infant and child mortality have evolved to distinguish between two sets of explanatory variables-factors related to reproductive or maternal characteristics and socioeconomic factors, generally described as characteristics of the family or household. Almost all multivariate analyses include variables from each of these two sets, but there has been little consideration of the relationship between them. We examine how these two sets of variables jointly affect mortality. We test first for confounded effects by examining socioeconomic effects while excluding and then including reproductive variables in nested multivariate models. Next, we look for age-dependent effects among the explanatory variables and find that reproductive and socioeconomic factors affect mortality at differing ages of children. Finally, we examine interactive effects of the two sets of variables. We conclude that the higher mortality observed among the low status groups is not a result of greater concentration of poor reproductive patterns in those groups. Instead, higher status groups probably have more resources available for combating the negative effects of the same high-risk reproductive patterns. PMID:1514117

  2. Accommodating volume-constant age-dependent optical (AVOCADO) model of the crystalline GRIN lens

    PubMed Central

    Sheil, Conor J.; Goncharov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to introduce a new age-dependent model of the human lens with two GRIN power distributions (axial and radial) that allow decoupling of its refractive power and axial optical path length. The aspect ratio of the lens core can be held constant under accommodation, as well as the lens volume by varying the asphericity of the lens external surfaces. The spherical aberration calculated by exact raytracing is shown to be in line with experimental data. The proposed model is compared to previous GRIN models from the literature, and it is concluded that the features of the new model will be useful for GRIN reconstruction in future experimental studies; in particular, studies of the accommodation-dependent properties of the ageing human eye. A proposed logarithmic model of the lens core enables decoupling of three fundamental optical characteristics of the lens, namely axial optical path length, optical power and third-order spherical aberration, without changing the external shape of the lens. Conversely, the near-surface GRIN structure conforms to the external shape of the lens, which is necessary for accommodation modelling. PMID:27231637

  3. Accommodating volume-constant age-dependent optical (AVOCADO) model of the crystalline GRIN lens.

    PubMed

    Sheil, Conor J; Goncharov, Alexander V

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to introduce a new age-dependent model of the human lens with two GRIN power distributions (axial and radial) that allow decoupling of its refractive power and axial optical path length. The aspect ratio of the lens core can be held constant under accommodation, as well as the lens volume by varying the asphericity of the lens external surfaces. The spherical aberration calculated by exact raytracing is shown to be in line with experimental data. The proposed model is compared to previous GRIN models from the literature, and it is concluded that the features of the new model will be useful for GRIN reconstruction in future experimental studies; in particular, studies of the accommodation-dependent properties of the ageing human eye. A proposed logarithmic model of the lens core enables decoupling of three fundamental optical characteristics of the lens, namely axial optical path length, optical power and third-order spherical aberration, without changing the external shape of the lens. Conversely, the near-surface GRIN structure conforms to the external shape of the lens, which is necessary for accommodation modelling. PMID:27231637

  4. LINC00507 Is Specifically Expressed in the Primate Cortex and Has Age-Dependent Expression Patterns.

    PubMed

    Mills, James D; Ward, Melanie; Chen, Bei Jun; Iyer, Anand M; Aronica, Eleonora; Janitz, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Over the past decade, there has been an increase in the appreciation of the role of non-coding RNA in the development of organism phenotype. It is possible to divide the non-coding elements of the transcriptome into three categories: short non-coding RNAs, circular RNAs and long non-coding RNAs. Long non-coding RNAs are those transcripts that are greater than 200 nts in length and lack any significant open reading frames that produce proteins greater then 100 amino acids. Long intervening non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are a subclass of long non-coding RNAs. In contrast to protein coding RNAs, lincRNAs are expressed in a more tissue- and species-specific manner. In particular, many lincRNAs are only conserved amongst higher primates. This coupled with the propensity of many lincRNAs to be expressed in the brain, suggests that they are in fact one of the major drivers of organism complexity. We analysed 39 lincRNAs that are expressed in the frontal cortex and identified LINC00507 as being expressed in a cortex-specific manner in non-human primates and humans. The expression patterns of LINC00507 appear to be age-dependent, suggesting it may be involved in brain development of higher primates. Moreover, the analysis of LINC00507 potential to bind ribosomes revealed that this previously identified non-coding transcript may harbour a micropeptide. PMID:27059230

  5. Microscale Mechanism of Age Dependent Wetting Properties of Prickly Pear Cacti (Opuntia).

    PubMed

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Jordan, Jacob S; Linder, Rubin; Woods, Erik T; Sun, Xiaoda; Kemme, Nicholas; Manning, Kenneth C; Cherry, Brian R; Yarger, Jeffery L; Majure, Lucas C

    2016-09-13

    Cacti thrive in xeric environments through specialized water storage and collection tactics such as a shallow, widespread root system that maximizes rainwater absorption and spines adapted for fog droplet collection. However, in many cacti, the epidermis, not the spines, dominates the exterior surface area. Yet, little attention has been dedicated to studying interactions of the cactus epidermis with water drops. Surprisingly, the epidermis of plants in the genus Opuntia, also known as prickly pear cacti, has water-repelling characteristics. In this work, we report that surface properties of cladodes of 25 taxa of Opuntia grown in an arid Sonoran climate switch from water-repelling to superwetting under water impact over the span of a single season. We show that the old cladode surfaces are not superhydrophilic, but have nearly vanishing receding contact angle. We study water drop interactions with, as well as nano/microscale topology and chemistry of, the new and old cladodes of two Opuntia species and use this information to uncover the microscopic mechanism underlying this phenomenon. We demonstrate that composition of extracted wax and its contact angle do not change significantly with time. Instead, we show that the reported age dependent wetting behavior primarily stems from pinning of the receding contact line along multilayer surface microcracks in the epicuticular wax that expose the underlying highly hydrophilic layers. PMID:27537082

  6. Effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields on proteoglycan biosynthesis of articular cartilage is age dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bobacz, K; Graninger, W B; Amoyo, L; Smolen, J S

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of a pulsed electromagnetic field (EMF) on articular cartilage matrix biosynthesis with regard to age and cartilage damage using a matrix depleted cartilage explant model. Methods Cartilage explants were obtained from metacarpophalangeal joints of calves and adult cows. After depletion of the extracellular matrix by trypsin digestion, samples were maintained in serum‐free basal medium with and without the addition of interleukin 1β (IL1β). Half the samples were subjected to an EMF for 24 minutes daily; the other half were left untreated. Undigested and untreated explants served as negative controls. After 7 days, biosynthesis of matrix macromolecules was assessed by [35S]sulphate incorporation and values were normalised to hydroxyproline content. Results The EMF increased matrix macromolecule synthesis in undigested, untreated explants (p<0.009). In matrix depleted samples the EMF had no stimulatory effect on proteoglycan biosynthesis. IL1β significantly decreased the de novo synthesis of matrix macromolecules (p<0.00004) in young and adult samples, but an EMF partly counteracted this inhibitory effect in cartilage samples from young, but not old animals. Conclusion EMF promoted matrix macromolecule biosynthesis in intact tissue explants but had no stimulatory effect on damaged articular cartilage. The supressive effects of IL1β were partially counteracted by EMF exposure, exclusively in cartilage derived from young animals. An EMF has age dependent chondroprotective but not structure modifying properties when cartilage integrity is compromised. PMID:16769781

  7. Age-Dependent Susceptibility to Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Aline; Sommer, Felix; Zhang, Kaiyi; Repnik, Urska; Basic, Marijana; Bleich, André; Kühnel, Mark; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Litvak, Yael; Fulde, Marcus; Rosenshine, Ilan; Hornef, Mathias W

    2016-05-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) represents a major causative agent of infant diarrhea associated with significant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Although studied extensively in vitro, the investigation of the host-pathogen interaction in vivo has been hampered by the lack of a suitable small animal model. Using RT-PCR and global transcriptome analysis, high throughput 16S rDNA sequencing as well as immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we characterize the EPEC-host interaction following oral challenge of newborn mice. Spontaneous colonization of the small intestine and colon of neonate mice that lasted until weaning was observed. Intimate attachment to the epithelial plasma membrane and microcolony formation were visualized only in the presence of a functional bundle forming pili (BFP) and type III secretion system (T3SS). Similarly, a T3SS-dependent EPEC-induced innate immune response, mediated via MyD88, TLR5 and TLR9 led to the induction of a distinct set of genes in infected intestinal epithelial cells. Infection-induced alterations of the microbiota composition remained restricted to the postnatal period. Although EPEC colonized the adult intestine in the absence of a competing microbiota, no microcolonies were observed at the small intestinal epithelium. Here, we introduce the first suitable mouse infection model and describe an age-dependent, virulence factor-dependent attachment of EPEC to enterocytes in vivo. PMID:27159323

  8. Age-Dependent Susceptibility to Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Aline; Sommer, Felix; Zhang, Kaiyi; Repnik, Urska; Basic, Marijana; Bleich, André; Kühnel, Mark; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Litvak, Yael; Fulde, Marcus; Rosenshine, Ilan; Hornef, Mathias W.

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) represents a major causative agent of infant diarrhea associated with significant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Although studied extensively in vitro, the investigation of the host-pathogen interaction in vivo has been hampered by the lack of a suitable small animal model. Using RT-PCR and global transcriptome analysis, high throughput 16S rDNA sequencing as well as immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we characterize the EPEC-host interaction following oral challenge of newborn mice. Spontaneous colonization of the small intestine and colon of neonate mice that lasted until weaning was observed. Intimate attachment to the epithelial plasma membrane and microcolony formation were visualized only in the presence of a functional bundle forming pili (BFP) and type III secretion system (T3SS). Similarly, a T3SS-dependent EPEC-induced innate immune response, mediated via MyD88, TLR5 and TLR9 led to the induction of a distinct set of genes in infected intestinal epithelial cells. Infection-induced alterations of the microbiota composition remained restricted to the postnatal period. Although EPEC colonized the adult intestine in the absence of a competing microbiota, no microcolonies were observed at the small intestinal epithelium. Here, we introduce the first suitable mouse infection model and describe an age-dependent, virulence factor-dependent attachment of EPEC to enterocytes in vivo. PMID:27159323

  9. A comparison of egocentric and allocentric age-dependent spatial learning in the beagle dog.

    PubMed

    Christie, Lori-Ann; Studzinski, Christa M; Araujo, Joseph A; Leung, Cleo S K; Ikeda-Douglas, Candace J; Head, Elizabeth; Cotman, Carl W; Milgram, Norton W

    2005-03-01

    Spatial discriminations can be performed using either egocentric information based on body position or allocentric information based on the position of landmarks in the environment. Beagle dogs ranging from 2 to 16 years of age were tested for their ability to learn a novel egocentric spatial discrimination task that used two identical blocks paired in three possible spatial positions (i.e. left, center and right). Dogs were rewarded for responding to an object furthest to either their left or right side. Therefore, when the center location was used, it was correct on half of the trials and incorrect on the other half. Upon successful acquisition of the task, the reward contingencies were reversed, and the dogs were rewarded for responding to the opposite side. A subset of dogs was also tested on an allocentric spatial discrimination task, landmark discrimination. Egocentric spatial reversal learning and allocentric discrimination learning both showed a significant age-dependent decline, while initial egocentric learning appeared to be age-insensitive. Intra-subject correlation analyses revealed a significant relationship between egocentric reversal learning and allocentric learning. However, the correlation only accounted for a small proportion of the variance, suggesting that although there might be some common mechanism underlying acquisition of the two tasks, additional unique neural substrates were involved depending on whether allocentric or egocentric spatial information processing was required. PMID:15795044

  10. Age-dependent responses to chemosensory cues mediating kin recognition in dogs (Canis familiaris)

    PubMed

    Mekosh-Rosenbaum, V; Carr, W J; Goodwin, J L; Thomas, P L; D'Ver, A; Wysocki, C J

    1994-03-01

    During individually administered 5-min tests conducted in a neutral cage, four age groups (n = 10 males and 10 females per group) of purebred beagles reacted to bedding from their home cage vs. bedding from another litter of the same age. The 20-24-day-old males and females preferred (p < 0.05) home cage bedding over strange cage bedding. Those aged 31-36 days or 66-72 days showed no reliable preference for either type of bedding. Among pups aged 52-56 days, the males preferred (p < 0.05) strange cage bedding, but the females showed no reliable preference. Chemosensory cues are sufficient as mediators of kin recognition in beagles, but their reactions to such cues vary with age-dependent factors, some stemming from changes in the strength of the mother-litter bond. The dogs providing the two types of bedding lived in the same room and on the same diet. Therefore, kin recognition could not have been mediated by different chemosensory cues produced by variations in these environmental factors. PMID:8190767

  11. Cognitive experience and its effect on age-dependent cognitive decline in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Milgram, Norton W

    2003-11-01

    Test-sophisticated beagle dogs show marked age sensitivity in a size discrimination learning task, with old and senior dogs performing significantly more poorly than young dogs. By contrast, age differences in learning were not seen in dogs naive with respect to neuropsychological test experience. These results indicate that old animals benefit less from prior cognitive experience than young animals, which is an example of an age-dependent loss in plasticity. This finding also suggests that behaviorally experienced animals are a more useful model of human cognitive aging than behaviorally naïve animals. We also looked at the effect of a program of behavioral enrichment in aged dogs. One year of enrichment did not lead to significant differences, but after 2 years the behaviorally enriched group performed significantly better than the control group. The effect after 2 years indicates that a prolonged program of cognitive enrichment can serve as an effective intervention in aged dogs. These findings demonstrate that cognitive abilities in aged animals can be modified by providing behavioral experience, indicating that cognitive abilities remain moderately plastic, even in very old animals. PMID:14584821

  12. Age-Dependent Decline of Endogenous Pain Control: Exploring the Effect of Expectation and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Grashorn, Wiebke; Sprenger, Christian; Forkmann, Katarina; Wrobel, Nathalie; Bingel, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Although chronic pain affects all age ranges, it is particularly common in the elderly. One potential explanation for the high prevalence of chronic pain in the older population is impaired functioning of the descending pain inhibitory system which can be studied in humans using conditioned pain modulation (CPM) paradigms. In this study we investigated (i) the influence of age on CPM and (ii) the role of expectations, depression and gender as potential modulating variables of an age-related change in CPM. 64 healthy volunteers of three different age groups (young = 20–40 years, middle-aged = 41–60 years, old = 61–80 years) were studied using a classical CPM paradigm that combined moderate heat pain stimuli to the right forearm as test stimuli (TS) and immersion of the contralateral foot into ice water as the conditioning stimulus (CS). The CPM response showed an age-dependent decline with strong CPM responses in young adults but no significant CPM responses in middle-aged and older adults. These age-related changes in CPM responses could not be explained by expectations of pain relief or depression. Furthermore, changes in CPM responses did not differ between men and women. Our results strongly support the notion of a genuine deterioration of descending pain inhibitory mechanisms with age. PMID:24086595

  13. Age-dependent homeostatic plasticity of GABAergic signaling in developing retinal networks.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Matthias H; Grady, John; van Coppenhagen, James; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2011-08-24

    Developing retinal ganglion cells fire in correlated spontaneous bursts, resulting in propagating waves with robust spatiotemporal features preserved across development and species. Here we investigate the effects of homeostatic adaptation on the circuits controlling retinal waves. Mouse retinal waves were recorded in vitro for up to 35 h with a multielectrode array in presence of the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline, allowing us to obtain a precise, time-resolved characterization of homeostatic effects in this preparation. Experiments were performed at P4-P6, when GABA(A) signaling is depolarizing in ganglion cells, and at P7-P10, when GABA(A) signaling is hyperpolarizing. At all ages, bicuculline initially increased the wave sizes and other activity metrics. At P5-P6, wave sizes decreased toward control levels within a few hours while firing remained strong, but this ability to compensate disappeared entirely from P7 onwards. This demonstrates that homeostatic control of spontaneous retinal activity maintains specific network dynamic properties in an age-dependent manner, and suggests that the underlying mechanism is linked to GABA(A) signaling. PMID:21865458

  14. Consideration of age-dependent radium retention in people on the basis of the beagle model

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, N.J.; Keane, A.T.

    1981-01-01

    This paper examines in humans the proposition emanating from studies in beagles that long-term retention of radium varies in proportion to the calcium addition rate at the time of intake. Because data on the calcium addition rate in younger humans were fragmentary, human calcium-addition rates were scaled from those in beagles, the relative calcium accretion rates in the two species at equivalent stages of skeletal growth providing the scaling factor. The variation of radium retention with age was determined by fitting a modified power function to data on the retention of radium from about 30 to 15,000 days following a series of therapeutic injections of /sup 226/Ra in humans ranging in age from 18 to 63 yr. The fractional retention R at t days following a single injection of /sup 226/Ra was described by R = (1 + t/d)/sup -0/ /sup 44/. The age-dependent time constant d in the retention function was found to be proportional to the calcium addition rate at the time of injection in subjects receiving < 200 ..mu..g /sup 226/Ra.

  15. Steroidogenic Factor 1 in the Ventromedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Regulates Age-Dependent Obesity.

    PubMed

    Kinyua, Ann W; Yang, Dong Joo; Chang, Inik; Kim, Ki Woo

    2016-01-01

    The ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) is important for the regulation of whole body energy homeostasis and lesions in the VMH are reported to result in massive weight gain. The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is a known VMH marker as it is exclusively expressed in the VMH region of the brain. SF-1 plays a critical role not only in the development of VMH but also in its physiological functions. In this study, we generated prenatal VMH-specific SF-1 KO mice and investigated age-dependent energy homeostasis regulation by SF-1. Deletion of SF-1 in the VMH resulted in dysregulated insulin and leptin homeostasis and late onset obesity due to increased food intake under normal chow and high fat diet conditions. In addition, SF-1 ablation was accompanied by a marked reduction in energy expenditure and physical activity and this effect was significantly pronounced in the aged mice. Taken together, our data indicates that SF-1 is a key component in the VMH-mediated regulation of energy homeostasis and implies that SF-1 plays a protective role against metabolic stressors including aging and high fat diet. PMID:27598259

  16. Age-Dependent Demethylation of Sod2 Promoter in the Mouse Femoral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Albert; Leblond, François; Mamarbachi, Maya; Geoffroy, Steve; Thorin, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We studied the age-dependent regulation of the expression of the antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD encoded by Sod2) through promoter methylation. C57Bl/6 mice were either (i) sedentary (SED), (ii) treated with the antioxidant catechin (CAT), or (iii) voluntarily exercised (EX) from weaning (1-month old; mo) to 9 mo. Then, all mice aged sedentarily and were untreated until 12 mo. Sod2 promoter methylation was similar in all groups in 9 mo but decreased (p < 0.05) in 12 mo SED mice only, which was associated with an increased (p < 0.05) transcriptional activity in vitro. At all ages, femoral artery endothelial function was maintained; this was due to an increased (p < 0.05) contribution of eNOS-derived NO in 12 mo SED mice only. CAT and EX prevented these changes in age-related endothelial function. Thus, a ROS-dependent epigenetic positive regulation of Sod2 gene expression likely represents a defense mechanism prolonging eNOS function in aging mouse femoral arteries. PMID:26989455

  17. Age-dependent decline in dental pulp regeneration after pulpectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Iohara, Koichiro; Murakami, Masashi; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Nakashima, Misako

    2014-04-01

    The age-associated decline in the regenerative abilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be due to age-related changes in reduction in number, intrinsic properties of MSCs and extrinsic factors of the extracellular environment (the stem cell niche). The effect of age on the efficacy of MSC transplantation on regeneration, however, has not been clearly demonstrated due to variable methods of isolation of MSCs and variations in stem cell populations. In this study, dental pulp stem cell (DPSC) subsets were isolated from young and aged dog teeth based on their migratory response to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (MDPSCs). In order to study the age-associated changes, their biological properties and stability were compared and the regenerative potential was examined in a pulpectomized tooth model in aged dogs. MDPSCs from aged dogs were efficiently enriched in stem cells, expressing trophic factors with high proliferation, migration and anti-apoptotic effects as in MDPSCs from young dogs. However, pulp regeneration was retarded 120 days after autologous transplantation of aged MDPSCs. We further demonstrated that isolated periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) from aged dogs, representative of migrating stem cells from outside of the tooth compartment to regenerate pulp tissue, had lower proliferation, migration and anti-apoptotic abilities. These results therefore provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the age-dependent decline in pulp regeneration, which are attributed to a decrease in the regenerative potential of resident stem cells. PMID:24468330

  18. Spatial and Age-Dependent Hair Cell Generation in the Postnatal Mammalian Utricle.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhen; Kelly, Michael C; Yu, Dehong; Wu, Hao; Lin, Xi; Chi, Fang-Lu; Chen, Ping

    2016-04-01

    Loss of vestibular hair cells is a common cause of balance disorders. Current treatment options for bilateral vestibular dysfunction are limited. During development, atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1) is sufficient and necessary for the formation of hair cells and provides a promising gene target to induce hair cell generation in the mammals. In this study, we used a transgenic mouse line to test the age and cell type specificity of hair cell induction in the postnatal utricle in mice. We found that forced Atoh1 expression in vivo can induce hair cell formation in the utricle from postnatal days 1 to 21, while the efficacy of hair cell induction is progressively reduced as the animals become older. In the utricle, the induction of hair cells occurs both within the sensory region and in cells in the transitional epithelium next to the sensory region. Within the sensory epithelium, the central region, known as the striola, is most subjective to the induction of hair cell formation. Furthermore, forced Atoh1 expression can promote proliferation in an age-dependent manner that mirrors the progressively reduced efficacy of hair cell induction in the postnatal utricle. These results suggest that targeting both cell proliferation and Atoh1 in the utricle striolar region may be explored to induce hair cell regeneration in mammals. The study also demonstrates the usefulness of the animal model that provides an in vivo Atoh1 induction model for vestibular regeneration studies. PMID:25666161

  19. Large-Scale Age-Dependent Skewed Sex Ratio in a Sexually Dimorphic Avian Scavenger

    PubMed Central

    Lambertucci, Sergio A.; Carrete, Martina; Donázar, José Antonio; Hiraldo, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Age-dependent skewed sex ratios have been observed in bird populations, with adult males generally outnumbering females. This trend is mainly driven by higher female mortality, sometimes associated with anthropogenic factors. Despite the large amount of work on bird sex ratios, research examining the spatial stability of adult sex ratios is extremely scarce. The Andean condor (Vultur gryphus) is the only bird of prey with strong sexual dimorphism favouring males (males are 30% heavier than females). By examining data from most of its South-American range, we show that while the juvenile sex ratio is balanced, or even female-skewed, the sex ratio becomes increasing male-skewed with age, with adult males outnumbering females by >20%, and, in some cases by four times more. This result is consistent across regions and independent of the nature of field data. Reasons for this are unknown but it can be hypothesized that the progressive disappearance of females may be associated with mortality caused by anthropogenic factors. This idea is supported by the asymmetric habitat use by the two sexes, with females scavenging in more humanized areas. Whatever the cause, male-skewed adult sex ratios imply that populations of this endangered scavenger face higher risks of extinction than previously believed. PMID:23029488

  20. Metallothionein modulation in relation to cadmium bioaccumulation and age-dependent sensitivity of Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Toušová, Zuzana; Kuta, Jan; Hynek, David; Adam, Vojtěch; Kizek, René; Bláha, Luděk; Hilscherová, Klára

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to contribute to understanding of the mechanisms behind sensitivity differences between early and late instar larvae of Chironomus riparius and to address the influence of the differences in standard testing approaches on the toxicity evaluation. A 10-day contact sediment toxicity test was carried out to assess sensitivity to cadmium exposure in relation to different age and laboratory culture line origin of test organisms. Chironomid larvae of early (OECD 218 method) and late instar (US-EPA600/R-99/064 method) differed substantially in sensitivity of traditional endpoints (OECD: LOEC 50 and 10 μg Cd/g dry weight (dw); US-EPA: LOEC > 1000 and 100 μg Cd/g dw for survival and growth, respectively). Bioaccumulated cadmium and metallothioneins (MTs) concentrations were analyzed to investigate the role of MTs in reduced sensitivity to cadmium in late instar larvae. Metallothioneins were induced after treatment to greater Cd concentrations, but their levels in relation to cadmium body burdens did not fully explain low sensitivity of late instars to cadmium, which indicates some other effective way of detoxification in late instars. This study brings new information related to the role of MTs in age-dependent toxicant sensitivity and discusses the implications of divergence in data generated by chironomid sediment toxicity tests by standardized methods using different instars. PMID:26957427

  1. Age-dependent neonatal intracerebral hemorrhage in plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Philippe; Omouendze, Priscilla L; Roy, Vincent; Dourmap, Nathalie; Gonzalez, Bruno J; Brasse-Lagnel, Carole; Carmeliet, Peter; Leroux-Nicollet, Isabelle; Marret, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    Intracerebral-intraventricular hemorrhages (ICH/IVH) in very preterm neonates are responsible for high mortality and subsequent disabilities. In humans, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) initiates fibrinolysis and activates endoluminal-endothelial receptors; dysfunction of the t-PA inhibitor (PAI-1) results in recurrent hemorrhages. We used PAI-1 knockout (PAI-1) mice to examine the role of t-PA in age-dependent intracranial hemorrhages as a possible model of preterm ICH/IVH. Intracortical injection of 2 μL of phosphate-buffered saline produced a small traumatic injury and a high rate of hemorrhage in PAI-1 pups at postnatal day 3 (P3) or P5, whereas it had no effect in wild-type neonates. This resulted in white matter and cortical lesions, ventricle enlargement, hyperlocomotion, and altered cortical levels of serotonin and dopamine in the adult PAI mice. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blockers, plasmin- and matrix metalloproteinases inhibitors reduced hemorrhage and tissue lesions. In contrast to P3 to P5, no significant hemorrhages were induced in P10 PAI-1 pups and there were no behavioral or neurochemical alterations in adulthood. These data suggest that microvascular immaturity up to P5 in mice is a determinant factor required for t-PA-dependent vascular rupture. Neonatal PAI-1 mice could be a useful ICH/IVH model for studying the ontogenic window of vascular immaturity and vascular protection against later neurodisabilities. PMID:24709679

  2. Age-dependence of free radical-induced oxidative damage in ischemic-reperfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Nagy, K; Takács, I E; Pankucsi, C

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen free radical-induced oxidative damage is involved in both aging and ischemia-reperfusion. The purpose of this study was to determine the aging-induced oxidative alterations in rat heart as well as the age-dependence of heart injury following ischemia-reperfusion. A comparative study was performed on young and old ischemic-reperfused rat hearts. Protein oxidation and the ascorbyl radical level in heart tissue were determined in order to characterize the oxidative stress. Comparing the control conditions, old hearts have 31% more oxidized proteins as measured by protein carbonyl content, and 18% lower ascorbyl radical level as determined by ESR, than young ones. The extent of increase of protein oxidation and ascorbyl free radical depletion induced by ischemia-reperfusion is less pronounced in the old hearts (7 and 8% respectively), as compared to the young ones (55 and 21% respectively). Pre-treatment with a free radical scavenger, such as centrophenoxine, diminished the ischemia-reperfusion injury in both young and old rat hearts. PMID:15374178

  3. Age-dependent Homeostatic Plasticity of GABAergic Signaling in Developing Retinal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Matthias H.; Grady, John; van Coppenhagen, James; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    Developing retinal ganglion cells fire in correlated spontaneous bursts, resulting in propagating waves with robust spatiotemporal features preserved across development and species. Here we investigate the effects of homeostatic adaptation on the circuits controlling retinal waves. Mouse retinal waves were recorded in vitro for up to 35 h with a multielectrode array in presence of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, allowing us to obtain a precise, time-resolved characterization of homeostatic effects in this preparation. Experiments were performed at P4–P6, when GABAA signaling is depolarizing in ganglion cells, and at P7–P10, when GABAA signaling is hyperpolarizing. At all ages, bicuculline initially increased the wave sizes and other activity metrics. At P5–P6, wave sizes decreased toward control levels within a few hours while firing remained strong, but this ability to compensate disappeared entirely from P7 onwards. This demonstrates that homeostatic control of spontaneous retinal activity maintains specific network dynamic properties in an age-dependent manner, and suggests that the underlying mechanism is linked to GABAA signaling. PMID:21865458

  4. Age-dependent association of serum prolactin with glycaemia and insulin sensitivity in humans.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R; Heni, M; Linder, K; Ketterer, C; Peter, A; Böhm, A; Hatziagelaki, E; Stefan, N; Staiger, H; Häring, H-U; Fritsche, A

    2014-02-01

    The dopamine agonist bromocriptine has been approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in the United States. Bromocriptine inhibits prolactin secretion, and patients with hyperprolactinaemia display impaired insulin sensitivity. We therefore hypothesized that low prolactin levels are associated with lower glycaemia and higher insulin sensitivity in healthy subjects. Prolactin levels were determined from fasting serum in participants without diabetes from the cross-sectional Tübingen family study for type 2 diabetes (m/f = 562/1,121, age = 40 ± 13 years, BMI = 30 ± 9 kg/m(2)). A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was performed, and the area under the glucose curve (AUC(0-120)Glucose) and insulin sensitivity index were calculated. A subgroup (n = 494) underwent hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp tests. Prolactin associated positively with insulin sensitivity (p = 0.001, adjusted for gender, age, and BMI). Age strongly interacted (p < 0.0001) with the effect of prolactin on insulin sensitivity, inverting the positive relationship to a negative one in younger participants. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and AUC(0-120)Glucose correlated negatively with prolactin, and an interaction with age was found as well. Higher prolactin levels are associated with improved insulin sensitivity and lower glucose in individuals without diabetes. This relationship turns to its opposite in younger persons. As prolactin is a proxy for the dopaminergic tone in the central nervous system, these associations may indicate an age-dependent influence of the brain on peripheral insulin sensitivity. PMID:23836327

  5. Consideration of age-dependent radium retention in people on the basis of the beagle model.

    PubMed

    Parks, N J; Keane, A T

    1983-01-01

    This paper examines in humans the proposition emanating from studies in beagles that initial retention of radium varies in proportion to the calcium addition rate at the time of intake. Human calcium addition rates were scaled from those in beagles, the relative calcium accretion rates in the two species at equivalent stages of skeletal growth providing the scaling factor. The variation of radium retention with age was determined by fitting a modified power function to data on the retention of radium from about 30 to 15000 days following a series of therapeutic injections of 226Ra in humans ranging in age from 18 to 63 yr. The fractional retention R at t days following a single injection of 226Ra was described by R = (1 + t/d)-0.44. The age-dependent parameter d in the retention function was found to be proportional to the calcium addition rate at the time of injection in subjects receiving less than 200 micrograms 226Ra. PMID:6862890

  6. αβγ-Synuclein triple knockout mice reveal age-dependent neuronal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Greten-Harrison, Becket; Polydoro, Manuela; Morimoto-Tomita, Megumi; Diao, Ling; Williams, Andrew M.; Nie, Esther H.; Makani, Sachin; Tian, Ning; Castillo, Pablo E.; Buchman, Vladimir L.; Chandra, Sreeganga S.

    2010-01-01

    Synucleins are a vertebrate-specific family of abundant neuronal proteins. They comprise three closely related members, α-, β-, and γ-synuclein. α-Synuclein has been the focus of intense attention since mutations in it were identified as a cause for familial Parkinson's disease. Despite their disease relevance, the normal physiological function of synucleins has remained elusive. To address this, we generated and characterized αβγ-synuclein knockout mice, which lack all members of this protein family. Deletion of synucleins causes alterations in synaptic structure and transmission, age-dependent neuronal dysfunction, as well as diminished survival. Abrogation of synuclein expression decreased excitatory synapse size by ∼30% both in vivo and in vitro, revealing that synucleins are important determinants of presynaptic terminal size. Young synuclein null mice show improved basic transmission, whereas older mice show a pronounced decrement. The late onset phenotypes in synuclein null mice were not due to a loss of synapses or neurons but rather reflect specific changes in synaptic protein composition and axonal structure. Our results demonstrate that synucleins contribute importantly to the long-term operation of the nervous system and that alterations in their physiological function could contribute to the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:20974939

  7. Knowledge of breast cancer in women in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, J H E E; McInerney, P A

    2006-08-01

    Breast cancer has been described as one of the life-threatening diseases affecting women and is a major problem in women's health issues. The unrecorded number of cases of breast lumps and breast cancer observed in women in Sierra Leone prompted the researcher to organize a "Breast Week" during which 1,200 women were educated on breast cancer and the importance of breast health. This research is a follow up of the "Breast Week" which was organized in Freetown, Sierra Leone The specific objective of this study was to assess whether the knowledge and teachings given to the women who participated in this project was fully understood. A sample size of 120 women (10%) who participated in the "Breast Week" was obtained through systematic sampling. A quantitative approach was adopted and a structured interview schedule guided the data collection process. The data were processed through use of SPSS and Microsoft Excel. Texts from open ended questions were categorized and frequency counts were applied to the data. It was found that the majority (96.6%) of the women had some knowledge of breast cancer. They linked breast cancer to the signs and symptoms associated with it and were able to describe the disease as one that kills women if not promptly detected and/or treated appropriately. Findings indicate that the majority of the women are aware of the dangers of the disease and had knowledge of someone who had died of breast cancer (59.2%). An assessment of the effectiveness of knowledge on breast cancer showed that these women could identify breast cancer as a disease that affects women and may cause death if not detected on time. PMID:17131611

  8. Aetiology of uveitis in Sierra Leone, west Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Ronday, M J; Stilma, J S; Barbe, R F; McElroy, W J; Luyendijk, L; Kolk, A H; Bakker, M; Kijlstra, A; Rothova, A

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 1992, non-onchocercal uveitis caused 9% of blindness, 8% of visual impairment, and 11% of uniocular blindness among patients visiting an eye hospital in Sierra Leone, west Africa. The aim of this study was to determine the aetiology of uveitis in this population. METHODS: General and ophthalmic examination complemented by serum and aqueous humour analyses for various infectious agents was performed for 93 uveitis patients and compared with serum (n = 100) and aqueous humour (n = 9) analysis of endemic controls. RESULTS: At the initial examination, 45 patients (48%) proved to be severely visually handicapped. After clinical and laboratory analyses, an aetiological diagnosis was established for 49 patients (52%). Toxoplasma gondii was the most important cause of uveitis (40/93; 43%). Anti-toxoplasma IgM antibodies were detected in serum samples of seven of 93 patients (8%) compared with one of 100 controls (1%, p < 0.05). At least six patients (15%) with ocular toxoplasmosis had acquired the disease postnatally. Antibodies against Treponema pallidum were detected in 18 of 92 patients (20%) and in 21 controls (21%). Other causes of uveitis were varicella zoster virus (one patient), herpes simplex virus (two patients), and HLA-B27 positive acute anterior uveitis with ankylosing spondylitis (one patient), while one patient had presumed HTLV-I uveitis. CONCLUSIONS: In a hospital population in Sierra Leone, west Africa, uveitis was associated with severe visual handicap and infectious diseases. Toxoplasmosis proved to be the most important cause of the uveitis. Although the distribution of congenital versus acquired toxoplasmosis in this population could not be determined, the results indicate an important role of postnatally acquired disease. The results further suggested minor roles for HIV, tuberculosis, toxocariasis, and sarcoidosis as causes of uveitis in this population. PMID:8976721

  9. Age-dependent variation of the gradient index profile in human crystalline lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Alberto; Siedlecki, Damian; Borja, David; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice; Marcos, Susana

    2011-11-01

    An investigation was carried out with the aim of reconstructing the gradient index (GRIN) profile of human crystalline lenses ex-vivo using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging with an optimization technique and to study the dependence of the GRIN profile with age. Cross-sectional images of nine isolated human crystalline lenses with ages ranging from 6 to 72 (post-mortem time 1 to 4 days) were obtained using a custom-made OCT system. Lenses were extracted from whole cadaver globes and placed in a measurement chamber filled with preservation medium (DMEM). Lenses were imaged with the anterior surface up and then flipped over and imaged again, to obtain posterior lens surface profiles both undistorted and distorted by the refraction through the anterior crystalline lens and GRIN. The GRIN distribution of the lens was described with three variables by means of power function, with variables being the nucleus and surface index, and a power coefficient that describes the decay of the refractive index from the nucleus to the surface. An optimization method was used to search for the parameters that produced the best match of the distorted posterior surface. The distorted surface was simulated with accuracy around the resolution of the OCT system (under 15 µm). The reconstructed refractive index values ranged from 1.356 to 1.388 for the surface, and from 1.396 to 1.434 for the nucleus. The power coefficient ranged between 3 and 18. The power coefficient increased significantly with age, at a rate of 0.24 per year. Optical coherence tomography allowed optical, non-invasive measurement of the 2D gradient index profile of the isolated human crystalline lens ex vivo. The age-dependent variation of the changes is consistent with previous data using magnetic resonance imaging, and the progressive formation of a refractive index plateau.

  10. Aging-dependent changes in rat heart mitochondrial glutaredoxins--Implications for redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing-Huang; Qanungo, Suparna; Pai, Harish V; Starke, David W; Steller, Kelly M; Fujioka, Hisashi; Lesnefsky, Edward J; Kerner, Janos; Rosca, Mariana G; Hoppel, Charles L; Mieyal, John J

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and animal studies have documented that hearts of the elderly are more susceptible to ischemia/reperfusion damage compared to young adults. Recently we found that aging-dependent increase in susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to apoptosis was attributable to decrease in cytosolic glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1) and concomitant decrease in NF-κB-mediated expression of anti-apoptotic proteins. Besides primary localization in the cytosol, Grx1 also exists in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS). In contrast, Grx2 is confined to the mitochondrial matrix. Here we report that Grx1 is decreased by 50-60% in the IMS, but Grx2 is increased by 1.4-2.6 fold in the matrix of heart mitochondria from elderly rats. Determination of in situ activities of the Grx isozymes from both subsarcolemmal (SSM) and interfibrillar (IFM) mitochondria revealed that Grx1 was fully active in the IMS. However, Grx2 was mostly in an inactive form in the matrix, consistent with reversible sequestration of the active-site cysteines of two Grx2 molecules in complex with an iron-sulfur cluster. Our quantitative evaluations of the active/inactive ratio for Grx2 suggest that levels of dimeric Grx2 complex with iron-sulfur clusters are increased in SSM and IFM in the hearts of elderly rats. We found that the inactive Grx2 can be fully reactivated by sodium dithionite or exogenous superoxide production mediated by xanthine oxidase. However, treatment with rotenone, which generates intramitochondrial superoxide through inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain Complex I, did not lead to Grx2 activation. These findings suggest that insufficient ROS accumulates in the vicinity of dimeric Grx2 to activate it in situ. PMID:25126518

  11. Age-dependent accumulation of lipofuscin in perivascular and subretinal microglia in experimental mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heping; Chen, Mei; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Lois, Noemi; Forrester, John V

    2008-01-01

    Fundus autofluorescence (AF) imaging by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been widely used by ophthalmologists in the diagnosis/monitoring of various retinal disorders. It is believed that fundus AF is derived from lipofuscin in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells; however, direct clinicopathological correlation has not been possible in humans. We examined fundus AF by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and confocal microscopy in normal C57BL/6 mice of different ages. Increasingly strong AF signals were observed with age in the neuroretina and subretinal/RPE layer by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Unlike fundus AF detected in normal human subjects, mouse fundus AF appeared as discrete foci distributed throughout the retina. Most of the AF signals in the neuroretina were distributed around retinal vessels. Confocal microscopy of retinal and choroid/RPE flat mounts demonstrated that most of the AF signals were derived from Iba-1+ perivascular and subretinal microglia. An age-dependent accumulation of Iba-1+ microglia at the subretinal space was observed. Lipofuscin granules were detected in large numbers in subretinal microglia by electron microscopy. The number of AF+ microglia and the amount of AF granules/cell increased with age. AF granules/lipofuscin were also observed in RPE cells in mice older than 12 months, but the number of AF+ RPE cells was very low (1.48 mm(-2) and 5.02 mm(-2) for 12 and 24 months, respectively) compared to the number of AF+ microglial cells (20.63 mm(-2) and 76.36 mm(-2) for 6 and 24 months, respectively). The fluorescence emission fingerprints of AF granules in subretinal microglia were the same as those in RPE cells. Our observation suggests that perivascular and subretinal microglia are the main cells producing lipofuscin in normal aged mouse retina and are responsible for in vivo fundus AF. Microglia may play an important role in retinal aging and age-related retinal diseases. PMID:17988243

  12. Tissue- and age-dependent expression of the bovine DEFB103 gene and protein.

    PubMed

    Mirabzadeh-Ardakani, Ali; Solie, Jay; Gonzalez-Cano, Patricia; Schmutz, Sheila M; Griebel, Philip J

    2016-02-01

    Beta-defensin 103 (DEFB103) shares little homology with 8 other members of the bovine beta-defensin family and in other species DEFB103 protein has diverse functions, including antimicrobial activity, a chemoattractant for dendritic cells, enhancing epithelial wound repair and regulating hair colour. Expression of the bovine DEFB103 gene was surveyed in 27 tissues and transcript was most abundant in tissues with stratified squamous epithelium. Oral cavity epithelial tissues and nictitating membrane consistently expressed high levels of DEFB103 gene transcript. An age-dependent decrease (P < 0.05) in DEFB103 gene expression was only observed for buccal epithelium when comparing healthy 10- to 14-day-old and 10- to 12-month-old calves. A bovine herpesvirus-1 respiratory infection did, however, significantly (P < 0.05) up-regulate DEFB103 gene expression in the buccal epithelium of 6- to 8-month-old calves. Finally, DEFB103 transcript was low in lymph nodes draining the skin and at the limit of detection in other internal organs such as lung, intestine and kidney. Affinity-purified rabbit antisera to bovine DEFB103 was used to identify cells expressing DEFB103 protein within tissues with stratified squamous epitheliums. DEFB103 protein was most abundant in basal epithelial cells and was present in these cells prior to birth. Beta-defensins have been identified as regulators of dendritic cell (DC) chemokine responses and we observed a close association between DCs and epithelial cells expressing DEFB103 in both the fetus and newborn calf. In conclusion, bovine DEFB103 gene expression is most abundant in stratified squamous epithelium with DEFB103 protein localised to basal epithelial cells. These observations are consistent with proposed roles for DEFB103 in DC recruitment and repair of stratified squamous epithelium. PMID:26299200

  13. Age-dependent expression of the erythropoietin gene in rat liver and kidneys.

    PubMed Central

    Eckardt, K U; Ratcliffe, P J; Tan, C C; Bauer, C; Kurtz, A

    1992-01-01

    Using RNAse protection, we have made quantitative measurements of erythropoietin (EPO) mRNA in liver and kidneys of developing rats (days 1-54), to determine the relative contribution of both organs to the total EPO mRNA, to monitor changes which occur with development, and to compare the hypoxia-induced accumulation of EPO mRNA with the changes in serum EPO concentrations. To determine whether developmental and organ-specific responsiveness is related to the type of hypoxic stimulus, normobaric hypoxia was compared with exposure to carbon monoxide (functional anemia). Under both stimuli EPO mRNA concentration in liver was maximal on day 7 and declined during development. In contrast, EPO mRNA concentration in kidney increased during development from day 1 when it was 30-65% the hepatic concentration to day 54 when it was 12-fold higher than in liver. When organ weight was considered the liver was found to contain the majority of EPO mRNA in the first three to four weeks of life, and although, in stimulated animals, the hepatic proportion declined from 85-91% on day 1, it remained approximately 33% at day 54 and was similar for the two types of stimuli. When normalized for body weight the sum of renal and hepatic EPO mRNA in animals of a particular age was related linearly to serum hormone concentrations. However, the slope of this regression increased progressively with development, suggesting age-dependent alterations in translational efficiency or EPO metabolism. Images PMID:1541670

  14. Age-dependent uncoupling of mitochondria from Ca2+ release units in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ainbinder, Alina; Michelucci, Antonio; Kern, Helmut; Dirksen, Robert T.; Boncompagni, Simona; Protasi, Feliciano

    2015-01-01

    Calcium release units (CRUs) and mitochondria control myoplasmic [Ca2+] levels and ATP production in muscle, respectively. We recently reported that these two organelles are structurally connected by tethers, which promote proximity and proper Ca2+ signaling. Here we show that disposition, ultrastructure, and density of CRUs and mitochondria and their reciprocal association are compromised in muscle from aged mice. Specifically, the density of CRUs and mitochondria is decreased in muscle fibers from aged (>24 months) vs. adult (3-12 months), with an increased percentage of mitochondria being damaged and misplaced from their normal triadic position. A significant reduction in tether (13.8±0.4 vs. 5.5±0.3 tethers/100μm2) and CRU-mitochondrial pair density (37.4±0.8 vs. 27.0±0.7 pairs/100μm2) was also observed in aged mice. In addition, myoplasmic Ca2+ transient (1.68±0.08 vs 1.37±0.03) and mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (9.6±0.050 vs 6.58±0.54) during repetitive high frequency tetanic stimulation were significantly decreased. Finally oxidative stress, assessed from levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), Cu/Zn superoxide-dismutase (SOD1) and Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD2) expression, were significantly increased in aged mice. The reduced association between CRUs and mitochondria with aging may contribute to impaired cross-talk between the two organelles, possibly resulting in reduced efficiency in activity-dependent ATP production and, thus, to age-dependent decline of skeletal muscle performance. PMID:26485763

  15. Is Growth Differentiation Factor 11 a Realistic Therapeutic for Aging-Dependent Muscle Defects?

    PubMed

    Harper, Shavonn C; Brack, Andrew; MacDonnell, Scott; Franti, Michael; Olwin, Bradley B; Bailey, Beth A; Rudnicki, Michael A; Houser, Steven R

    2016-04-01

    This "Controversies in Cardiovascular Research" article evaluates the evidence for and against the hypothesis that the circulating blood level of growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) decreases in old age and that restoring normal GDF11 levels in old animals rejuvenates their skeletal muscle and reverses pathological cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction. Studies supporting the original GDF11 hypothesis in skeletal and cardiac muscle have not been validated by several independent groups. These new studies have either found no effects of restoring normal GDF11 levels on cardiac structure and function or have shown that increasing GDF11 or its closely related family member growth differentiation factor 8 actually impairs skeletal muscle repair in old animals. One possible explanation for what seems to be mutually exclusive findings is that the original reagent used to measure GDF11 levels also detected many other molecules so that age-dependent changes in GDF11 are still not well known. The more important issue is whether increasing blood [GDF11] repairs old skeletal muscle and reverses age-related cardiac pathologies. There are substantial new and existing data showing that GDF8/11 can exacerbate rather than rejuvenate skeletal muscle injury in old animals. There is also new evidence disputing the idea that there is pathological hypertrophy in old C57bl6 mice and that GDF11 therapy can reverse cardiac pathologies. Finally, high [GDF11] causes reductions in body and heart weight in both young and old animals, suggestive of a cachexia effect. Our conclusion is that elevating blood levels of GDF11 in the aged might cause more harm than good. PMID:27034276

  16. Age-Dependent Changes of the Temporal Order--Causes and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gubin, Denis G; Weinert, Dietmar; Bolotnova, Tatyana V

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge on deteriorations in temporal order with advanced age. Changes of the overt rhythms will be described but also their putative causes and possible treatments of the disturbances. In aging animals and humans, all rhythm characteristics change. The most prominent changes are a decrease of circadian amplitude, leading to an extra-circadian dissemination (ECD), and a diminished ability to synchronize with the periodic environment. ECD is a shift from circadian to ultradian and infradian frequencies, accompanied by the loss of day-to-day phase stability. Responsiveness to photic and non-photic cues is decreased. As a consequence, both internal and external temporal order are disturbed not only under steady-state conditions but and even more markedly after changes in the periodic environment or following stressful events. Many of the changes seem to occur within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the central circadian pacemaker, itself. The number of functioning neurons decreases with advancing age as does the coupling between them. Accordingly, the SCN generates a weaker and less stable circadian signal, insufficient to entrain peripheral oscillators properly or to regulate body functions rhythmically. However, age-dependent disturbances in peripheral organs must also be considered. These changes may occur at different ages, thus causing further internal desynchronization. Several possibilities exist with regard to treating circadian disruptions or at least minimizing their consequences for health and fitness and preventing sleep disturbances. Benefits of bright light, melatonin and other chronobiotics, physical activity, social contacts and regular feeding schedules in preserving the temporal order of aged organisms are discussed. PMID:26632427

  17. Age-dependent variation of the Gradient Index profile in human crystalline lenses

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, A.; Siedlecki, D.; Borja, David; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice; Marcos, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To reconstruct the gradient index (GRIN) profile of human crystalline lenses ex-vivo using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging with an optimization technique and to study the dependence of the GRIN profile with age. Methods Cross-sectional images of nine isolated human crystalline lenses with ages ranging from 6 to 72 (post mortem time 1 to 4 days) were obtained using a custom-made OCT system. Lenses were extracted from whole cadaver globes and placed in a measurement chamber filled with preservation medium (DMEM). Lenses were imaged with the anterior surface up and then flipped over and imaged again, to obtain posterior lens surface profiles both undistorted and distorted by the refraction through the anterior crystalline lens and GRIN. The GRIN distribution of the lens was described with three variables by means of power function, with variables being the nucleus and surface index, and a power coefficient that describes the decay of the refractive index from the nucleus to the surface. An optimization method was used to search for the parameters that produced the best match of the distorted posterior surface. Results The distorted surface was simulated with accuracy around the resolution of the OCT system (under 15 µm). The reconstructed refractive index values ranged from 1.356 to 1.388 for the surface, and from 1.396 to 1.434 for the nucleus. The power coefficient ranged between 3 and 18. The power coefficient increased significantly with age, at a rate of 0.24 per year. Conclusion Optical Coherence Tomography allowed optical, non-invasive measurement of the 2-D gradient index profile of the isolated human crystalline lens ex vivo. The age-dependent variation of the changes is consistent with previous data using magnetic resonance imaging, and the progressive formation of a refractive index plateau. PMID:22865954

  18. Leptin is involved in age-dependent changes in response to systemic inflammation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Sandy; Luheshi, Giamal N; Wenz, Tina; Gerstberger, Rüdiger; Roth, Joachim; Rummel, Christoph

    2014-02-01

    Obesity contributes to a state of subclinical peripheral and central inflammation and is often associated with aging. Here we investigated the source and contribution of adipose tissue derived cytokines and the cytokine-like hormone leptin to age-related changes in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced brain-controlled sickness-responses. Old (24 months) and young (2 months) rats were challenged with LPS or saline alone or in combination with a neutralizing leptin antiserum (LAS) or control serum. Changes in the sickness-response were monitored by biotelemetry. Additionally, ex vivo fat-explants from young and old rats were stimulated with LPS or saline and culture medium collected and analyzed by cytokine-specific bioassays/ELISAs. We found enhanced duration/degree of the sickness-symptoms, including delayed but prolonged fever in old rats. This response was accompanied by increased plasma-levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1ra and exaggerated expression of inflammatory markers in brain and liver analyzed by RT-PCR including inhibitor κBα, microsomal prostaglandin synthase and cyclooxygenase 2 (brain). Moreover, for the first time, we were able to show prolonged elevated plasma leptin-levels in LPS-treated old animals. Treatment with LAS in young rats tended to attenuate the early- and in old rats the prolonged febrile response. Fat-explants exhibited unchanged IL-6 but reduced IL-1ra and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release from adipose tissue of aged compared to young animals. In addition, we found increased expression of the endogenous immune regulator microRNA146a in aged animals suggesting a role for these mediators in counteracting brain inflammation. Overall, our results indicate a role of adipose tissue and leptin in “aging-related-inflammation” and age-dependent modifications of febrile-responses. PMID:24513873

  19. G-CSF enhances resolution of Staphylococcus aureus wound infection in an age-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Aleah L; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2013-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that heightened bacterial colonization and delayed wound closure in aged mice could be attenuated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment. Previously, we reported that aged mice had elevated bacterial levels, protracted wound closure, and reduced wound neutrophil accumulation after Staphylococcus aureus wound infection relative to young mice. In aseptic wound models, G-CSF treatment improved wound closure in aged mice to rates observed in young mice. Given these data, our objective was to determine if G-CSF could restore age-associated differences in wound bacterial burden and closure by increasing wound neutrophil recruitment. Young (3- to 4-month) and aged (18- to 20-month) BALB/c mice received three dorsal subcutaneous injections of G-CSF (250 ng/50 μL per injection) or saline control (50 μL per injection) 30 min after wound infection. Mice were killed at days 3 and 7 after wound infection, and bacterial colonization, wound size, wound leukocyte accumulation, and peripheral blood were evaluated. At days 3 and 7 after wound infection, bacterial colonization was significantly reduced in G-CSF-treated aged mice to levels observed in saline-treated young animals. Wound size was reduced in G-CSF-treated aged animals, with no effect on wound size in G-CSF-treated young mice. Local G-CSF treatment significantly enhanced neutrophil wound accumulation in aged mice, whereas there was no G-CSF-induced change in young mice. These data demonstrate that G-CSF enhances bacterial clearance and wound closure in an age-dependent manner. Moreover, G-CSF may be of therapeutic potential in the setting of postoperative wound infection or chronic nonhealing wounds in elderly patients. PMID:23856924

  20. Ankyrin-B metabolic syndrome combines age-dependent adiposity with pancreatic β cell insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Damaris N.; Healy, Jane A.; Hostettler, Janell; Davis, Jonathan; Yang, Jiayu; Wang, Chao; Hohmeier, Hans Ewald; Zhang, Mingjie; Bennett, Vann

    2015-01-01

    Rare functional variants of ankyrin-B have been implicated in human disease, including hereditary cardiac arrhythmia and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Here, we developed murine models to evaluate the metabolic consequences of these alterations in vivo. Specifically, we generated knockin mice that express either the human ankyrin-B variant R1788W, which is present in 0.3% of North Americans of mixed European descent and is associated with T2D, or L1622I, which is present in 7.5% of African Americans. Young AnkbR1788W/R1788W mice displayed primary pancreatic β cell insufficiency that was characterized by reduced insulin secretion in response to muscarinic agonists, combined with increased peripheral glucose uptake and concomitantly increased plasma membrane localization of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in skeletal muscle and adipocytes. In contrast, older AnkbR1788W/R1788W and AnkbL1622I/L1622I mice developed increased adiposity, a phenotype that was reproduced in cultured adipocytes, and insulin resistance. GLUT4 trafficking was altered in animals expressing mutant forms of ankyrin-B, and we propose that increased cell surface expression of GLUT4 in skeletal muscle and fatty tissue of AnkbR1788W/R1788W mice leads to the observed age-dependent adiposity. Together, our data suggest that ankyrin-B deficiency results in a metabolic syndrome that combines primary pancreatic β cell insufficiency with peripheral insulin resistance and is directly relevant to the nearly one million North Americans bearing the R1788W ankyrin-B variant. PMID:26168218

  1. Age-dependence of sensorimotor and cerebral electroencephalographic asymmetry in rats subjected to unilateral cerebrovascular stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The human population mostly affected by stroke is more than 65 years old. This study was designed to meet the recommendation that models of cerebral ischemia in aged animals are more relevant to the clinical setting than young animal models. Until now the majority of the pre-clinical studies examining age effects on stroke outcomes have used rats of old age. Considering the increasing incidence of stroke among younger than old human population, new translational approaches in animal models are needed to match the rejuvenation of stroke. A better knowledge of alterations in stroke outcomes in middle-aged rats has important preventive and management implications providing clues for future investigations on effects of various neuroprotective and neurorestorative drugs against cerebrovascular accidents that may occur before late senescence. Methods We evaluated the impact of transient focal ischemia, induced by intracerebral unilateral infusion of endothelin-1 (Et-1) near the middle cerebral artery of conscious rats, on volume of brain damage and asymmetry in behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) output measures in middle-aged (11–12 month-old) rats. Results We did not find any age-dependent difference in the volume of ischemic brain damage three days after Et-1 infusion. However, age was an important determinant of neurological and EEG outcomes after stroke. Middle-aged ischemic rats had more impaired somatosensory functions of the contralateral part of the body than young ischemic rats and thus, had greater left-right reflex/sensorimotor asymmetry. Interhemispheric EEG asymmetry was more evident in middle-aged than in young ischemic rats, and this could tentatively explain the behavioral asymmetry. Conclusions With a multiparametric approach, we have validated the endothelin model of ischemia in middle-aged rats. The results provide clues for future studies on mechanisms underlying plasticity after brain damage and motivate investigations of

  2. Age-Dependent Kinetics and Metabolism of Dichloroacetate: Possible Relevance to Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shroads, Albert L.; Guo, Xu; Dixit, Vaishali; Liu, Hui-Ping; James, Margaret O.; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2008-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) is an investigational drug for certain metabolic diseases. It is biotransformed principally by the ζ-1 family isoform of glutathione transferase (GSTz1), also known as maleylacetoacetate isomerase (MAAI), which catalyzes the penultimate step in tyrosine catabolism. DCA causes a reversible peripheral neuropathy in several species, including humans. However, recent clinical trials indicate that adults are considerably more susceptible to this adverse effect than children. We evaluated the kinetics and biotransformation of DCA and its effects on tyrosine metabolism in nine patients treated for 6 months with 25 mg/kg/day and in rats treated for 5 days with 50 mg/kg/day. We also measured the activity and expression of hepatic GSTz1/MAAI. Chronic administration of DCA causes a striking age-dependent decrease in its plasma clearance and an increase in its plasma half-life in patients and rats. Urinary excretion of unchanged DCA in rats increases with age, whereas oxalate, an end product of DCA metabolism, shows the opposite trend. Low concentrations of monochloroacetate (MCA), which is known to be neurotoxic, increase as a function of age in the urine of dosed rats. MCA was detectable in plasma only of older animals. Hepatic GSTz1/MAAI-specific activity was inhibited equally by DCA treatment among all age groups, whereas plasma and urinary levels of maleylacetone, a natural substrate for this enzyme, increased with age. We conclude that age is an important variable in the in vivo metabolism and elimination of DCA and that it may account, in part, for the neurotoxicity of this compound in humans and other species. PMID:18096758

  3. Elevated systolic blood pressure in male GH transgenic mice is age dependent.

    PubMed

    Jara, Adam; Benner, Chance M; Sim, Don; Liu, Xingbo; List, Edward O; Householder, Lara A; Berryman, Darlene E; Kopchick, John J

    2014-03-01

    Acromegaly is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. Transgenic mice expressing bovine GH (bGH) gene have previously been used to examine the effects of chronic GH stimulation on cardiovascular function. Results concerning systolic blood pressure (SBP) in bGH mice are conflicting. We hypothesized that these discrepancies may be the result of the various ages of the mice used in previous studies. In the current study, SBP was assessed monthly in male bGH mice from 3-12 months of age. Factors known to alter blood pressure were assessed during this time and included: levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and glucose homeostasis markers, and renal levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Beginning at 6 months of age bGH had increased SBP compared with wild-type controls, which remained elevated through 12 months of age. Despite having increased blood pressure and cardiac BNP mRNA, bGH mice had decreased circulating levels of BNP. Additionally, bGH mice had an age-dependent decline in insulin levels. For example, they were hyperinsulinemic at 3 months, but by 11 months of age were hypoinsulinemic relative to wild-type controls. This decrease in insulin was accompanied by improved glucose tolerance at 11 months. Finally, both angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression were severely depressed in kidneys of 11-month-old bGH mice. These results indicate that elevated SBP in bGH mice is dependent on age, independent of insulin resistance, and related to alterations in both the natriuretic peptide and renin-angiotensin systems. PMID:24424040

  4. Fmr1 deficiency promotes age-dependent alterations in the cortical synaptic proteome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bin; Wang, Tingting; Wan, Huida; Han, Li; Qin, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yaoyang; Wang, Jian; Yu, Chunlei; Berton, Fulvia; Francesconi, Walter; Yates, John R.; Vanderklish, Peter W.; Liao, Lujian

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe intellectual disability and other symptoms including autism. Although caused by the silencing of a single gene, Fmr1 (fragile X mental retardation 1), the complexity of FXS pathogenesis is amplified because the encoded protein, FMRP, regulates the activity-dependent translation of numerous mRNAs. Although the mRNAs that associate with FMRP have been extensively studied, little is known regarding the proteins whose expression levels are altered, directly or indirectly, by loss of FMRP during brain development. Here we systematically measured protein expression in neocortical synaptic fractions from Fmr1 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice at both adolescent and adult stages. Although hundreds of proteins are up-regulated in the absence of FMRP in young mice, this up-regulation is largely diminished in adulthood. Up-regulated proteins included previously unidentified as well as known targets involved in synapse formation and function and brain development and others linked to intellectual disability and autism. Comparison with putative FMRP target mRNAs and autism susceptibility genes revealed substantial overlap, consistent with the idea that the autism endophenotype of FXS is due to a “multiple hit” effect of FMRP loss, particularly within the PSD95 interactome. Through studies of de novo protein synthesis in primary cortical neurons from KO and WT mice, we found that neurons lacking FMRP produce nascent proteins at higher rates, many of which are synaptic proteins and encoded by FMRP target mRNAs. Our results provide a greatly expanded view of protein changes in FXS and identify age-dependent effects of FMRP in shaping the neuronal proteome. PMID:26307763

  5. iXora1: exact haplotype inferencing and trait association

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: We address the task of extracting accurate haplotypes from genotype data of individuals of large F1 populations for mapping studies. While methods for inferring parental haplotype assignments on large F1 populations exist in theory, these approaches do not work in practice at high levels...

  6. Reconstruction of N-acetyltransferase 2 haplotypes using PHASE.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Samimi, Mirabutaleb; Bolt, Hermann M; Selinski, Silvia

    2008-04-01

    The genotyping of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) by PCR/RFLP methods yields in a considerable percentage ambiguous results. To resolve this methodical problem a statistical approach was applied. PHASE v2.1.1, a statistical program for haplotype reconstruction was used to estimate haplotype pairs from NAT2 genotyping data, obtained by the analysis of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms relevant for Caucasians. In 1,011 out of 2,921 (35%) subjects the haplotype pairs were clearcut by the PCR/RFLP data only. For the majority of the data the applied method resulted in a multiplicity (2-4) of possible haplotype pairs. Haplotype reconstruction using PHASE v2.1.1 cleared this ambiguity in all cases but one, where an alternative haplotype pair was considered with a probability of 0.029. The estimation of the NAT2 haplotype is important because the assignment of the NAT2 alleles *12A, *12B, *12C or *13 to the rapid or slow NAT2 genotype has been discussed controversially. A clear assignment is indispensable in surveys of human bladder cancer caused by aromatic amine exposures. In conclusion, PHASE v2.1.1 software allowed an unambiguous haplotype reconstruction in 2,920 of 2,921 cases (>99.9%). PMID:17879084

  7. Bayesian quantitative trait locus mapping using inferred haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Caroline; Mott, Richard

    2010-03-01

    We describe a fast hierarchical Bayesian method for mapping quantitative trait loci by haplotype-based association, applicable when haplotypes are not observed directly but are inferred from multiple marker genotypes. The method avoids the use of a Monte Carlo Markov chain by employing priors for which the likelihood factorizes completely. It is parameterized by a single hyperparameter, the fraction of variance explained by the quantitative trait locus, compared to the frequentist fixed-effects model, which requires a parameter for the phenotypic effect of each combination of haplotypes; nevertheless it still provides estimates of haplotype effects. We use simulation to show that the method matches the power of the frequentist regression model and, when the haplotypes are inferred, exceeds it for small QTL effect sizes. The Bayesian estimates of the haplotype effects are more accurate than the frequentist estimates, for both known and inferred haplotypes, which indicates that this advantage is independent of the effect of uncertainty in haplotype inference and will hold in comparison with frequentist methods in general. We apply the method to data from a panel of recombinant inbred lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, descended from 19 inbred founders. PMID:20048050

  8. Factors affecting the power of haplotype markers in association studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important, unresolved question in genome-wide association studies is whether there are predictable differences in power between single-SNP and haplotype markers. In this study, we use coalescent simulations to compare power for single-SNP and haplotype markers under a number of different models ...

  9. Use of haplotypes to predict selection limits and Mendelian sampling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limits to selection and Mendelian sampling terms can be calculated using haplotypes, which are sums of individual additive effects on a chromosome. Haplotypes were imputed for 43,385 actual markers of 3,765 Jerseys using the Fortran program findhap.f90, which combines population and pedigree haploty...

  10. Restriction digestion method for haplotyping the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A restriction digestion method has been developed for haplotyping the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli Sulc., an economically important pest of solanaceous crops. This method differentiates the four known potato psyllid haplotypes by utilizing restriction enzyme digestion of a portion of the ...

  11. Haplotype map of sickle cell anemia in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Moumni, Imen; Ben Mustapha, Maha; Sassi, Sarra; Zorai, Amine; Ben Mansour, Ikbel; Douzi, Kais; Chouachi, Dorra; Mellouli, Fethi; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Abbes, Salem

    2014-01-01

    β-Globin haplotypes are important to establish the ethnic origin and predict the clinical development of sickle cell disease patients (SCD). To determine the chromosomal background of β (S) Tunisian sickle cell patients, in this first study in Tunisia, we have explored four polymorphic regions of β-globin cluster on chromosome 11. It is the 5' region of β-LCR-HS2 site, the intervening sequence II (IVSII) region of two fetal ((G)γ and (A)γ) genes and the 5' region of β-globin gene. The results reveal a high molecular diversity of a microsatellite configuration describing the sequences haplotypes. The linkage disequilibrium analysis showed various haplotype combinations giving 22 "extended haplotypes". These results confirm the utility of the β-globin haplotypes for population studies and contribute to knowledge of the Tunisian gene pool, as well as establishing the role of genetic markers in physiopathology of SCD. PMID:25197158

  12. Mathematical properties and bounds on haplotyping populations by pure parsimony.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Lin; Chang, Chia-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    Although the haplotype data can be used to analyze the function of DNA, due to the significant efforts required in collecting the haplotype data, usually the genotype data is collected and then the population haplotype inference (PHI) problem is solved to infer haplotype data from genotype data for a population. This paper investigates the PHI problem based on the pure parsimony criterion (HIPP), which seeks the minimum number of distinct haplotypes to infer a given genotype data. We analyze the mathematical structure and properties for the HIPP problem, propose techniques to reduce the given genotype data into an equivalent one of much smaller size, and analyze the relations of genotype data using a compatible graph. Based on the mathematical properties in the compatible graph, we propose a maximal clique heuristic to obtain an upper bound, and a new polynomial-sized integer linear programming formulation to obtain a lower bound for the HIPP problem. PMID:21354185

  13. Chromosomal Haplotypes by Genetic Phasing of Human Families

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Jared C.; Glusman, Gustavo; Hubley, Robert; Montsaroff, Stephen Z.; Holloway, Alisha K.; Mauldin, Denise E.; Srivastava, Deepak; Garg, Vidu; Pollard, Katherine S.; Galas, David J.; Hood, Leroy; Smit, Arian F.A.

    2011-01-01

    Assignment of alleles to haplotypes for nearly all the variants on all chromosomes can be performed by genetic analysis of a nuclear family with three or more children. Whole-genome sequence data enable deterministic phasing of nearly all sequenced alleles by permitting assignment of recombinations to precise chromosomal positions and specific meioses. We demonstrate this process of genetic phasing on two families each with four children. We generate haplotypes for all of the children and their parents; these haplotypes span all genotyped positions, including rare variants. Misassignments of phase between variants (switch errors) are nearly absent. Our algorithm can also produce multimegabase haplotypes for nuclear families with just two children and can handle families with missing individuals. We implement our algorithm in a suite of software scripts (Haploscribe). Haplotypes and family genome sequences will become increasingly important for personalized medicine and for fundamental biology. PMID:21855840

  14. A haplotype map of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Inherited genetic variation has a critical but as yet largely uncharacterized role in human disease. Here we report a public database of common variation in the human genome: more than one million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for which accurate and complete genotypes have been obtained in 269 DNA samples from four populations, including ten 500-kilobase regions in which essentially all information about common DNA variation has been extracted. These data document the generality of recombination hotspots, a block-like structure of linkage disequilibrium and low haplotype diversity, leading to substantial correlations of SNPs with many of their neighbours. We show how the HapMap resource can guide the design and analysis of genetic association studies, shed light on structural variation and recombination, and identify loci that may have been subject to natural selection during human evolution. PMID:16255080

  15. General Framework for Meta-Analysis of Haplotype Association Tests.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Jing Hua; An, Ping; Guo, Xiuqing; Jensen, Richard A; Marten, Jonathan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Meidtner, Karina; Boeing, Heiner; Campbell, Archie; Rice, Kenneth M; Scott, Robert A; Yao, Jie; Schulze, Matthias B; Wareham, Nicholas J; Borecki, Ingrid B; Province, Michael A; Rotter, Jerome I; Hayward, Caroline; Goodarzi, Mark O; Meigs, James B; Dupuis, Josée

    2016-04-01

    For complex traits, most associated single nucleotide variants (SNV) discovered to date have a small effect, and detection of association is only possible with large sample sizes. Because of patient confidentiality concerns, it is often not possible to pool genetic data from multiple cohorts, and meta-analysis has emerged as the method of choice to combine results from multiple studies. Many meta-analysis methods are available for single SNV analyses. As new approaches allow the capture of low frequency and rare genetic variation, it is of interest to jointly consider multiple variants to improve power. However, for the analysis of haplotypes formed by multiple SNVs, meta-analysis remains a challenge, because different haplotypes may be observed across studies. We propose a two-stage meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype analysis results. In the first stage, each cohort estimate haplotype effect sizes in a regression framework, accounting for relatedness among observations if appropriate. For the second stage, we use a multivariate generalized least square meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype effect estimates from multiple cohorts. Haplotype-specific association tests and a global test of independence between haplotypes and traits are obtained within our framework. We demonstrate through simulation studies that we control the type-I error rate, and our approach is more powerful than inverse variance weighted meta-analysis of single SNV analysis when haplotype effects are present. We replicate a published haplotype association between fasting glucose-associated locus (G6PC2) and fasting glucose in seven studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium and we provide more precise haplotype effect estimates. PMID:27027517

  16. Identity of the mtDNA haplotype(s) of Phytophthora infestans in historical specimens from the Irish potato famine.

    PubMed

    May, Kimberley Jane; Ristaino, Jean Beagle

    2004-05-01

    The mtDNA haplotypes of the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans present in dried potato and tomato leaves from herbarium specimens collected during the Irish potato famine and later in the 19th and early 20th century were identified. A 100 bp fragment of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) specific for P. infestans was amplified from 90% of the specimens (n = 186), confirming infection by P. infestans. Primers were designed that distinguish the extant mtDNA haplotypes. 86% percent of the herbarium specimens from historic epidemics were infected with the Ia mtDNA haplotype. Two mid-20th century potato leaves from Ecuador (1967) and Bolivia (1944) were infected with the Ib mtDNA haplotype of the pathogen. Both the Ia and IIb haplotypes were found in specimens collected in Nicaragua in the 1950s. The data suggest that the Ia haplotype of P. infestans was responsible for the historic epidemics during the 19th century in the UK, Europe, and the USA. The Ib mtDNA haplotype of the pathogen was dispersed later in the early 20th century from Bolivia and Ecuador. Multiple haplotypes were present outside Mexico in the 1940s-60s, indicating that pathogen diversity was greater than previously believed. PMID:15229999

  17. Loss of prion protein leads to age-dependent behavioral abnormalities and changes in cytoskeletal protein expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a multifunctional protein, whose exact physiological role remains elusive. Since previous studies indicated a neuroprotective function of PrPC, we investigated whether Prnp knockout mice(Prnp0/0)display age-dependent behavioral abnormalities. Matched sets of Prnp0/0 ...

  18. Age-dependent enhancement of inhibitory synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal neurons via GluR5 kainate receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changqing; Cui, Changhai; Alkon, Daniel L

    2009-08-01

    Changes in hippocampal synaptic networks during aging may contribute to age-dependent compromise of cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Previous studies have demonstrated that GABAergic synaptic transmission exhibits age-dependent changes. To better understand such age-dependent changes of GABAergic synaptic inhibition, we performed whole-cell recordings from pyramidal cells in the CA1 area of acute hippocampal slices on aged (24-26 months old) and young (2-4 months old) Brown-Norway rats. We found that the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSCs) were significantly increased in aged rats, but the frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs were decreased. Furthermore, the regulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission by GluR5 containing kainate receptors was enhanced in aged rats, which was revealed by using LY382884 (a GluR5 kainate receptor antagonist) and ATPA (a GluR5 kainate receptor agonist). Moreover, we demonstrated that vesicular glutamate transporters are involved in the kainate receptor dependent regulation of sIPSCs. Taken together, these results suggest that GABAergic synaptic transmission is potentiated in aged rats, and GluR5 containing kainate receptors regulate the inhibitory synaptic transmission through endogenous glutamate. These alterations of GABAergic input with aging could contribute to age-dependent cognitive decline. PMID:19123252

  19. Age-dependent dichotomous effect of superoxide dismutase Ala16Val polymorphism on oxidized LDL levels

    PubMed Central

    Kanoni, Stavroula; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Louizou, Eirini; Grigoriou, Efi; Chrysohoou, Christina; Pitsavos, Christos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the association between superoxide dismutase (SOD) Ala16Val polymorphism and the levels of oxidized LDL lipoprotein-C (ox-LDL-C) in two age-different Greek cohorts. Four hundred fifteen middle-aged (n = 147 females: 43.2 ± 13 years, n = 268 males: 43.3 ± 14 years) Caucasian Greek subjects consisted the middle aged cohort. One hundred seventy five elderly (n = 88 females: 79.9 ± 4 years; n = 87 males: 80.6 ± 4 years) were selected from the elderly cohort. Genotype data were obtained for all of them. Multiple linear regression analysis, stratified by gender and adjusted for age, smoking habits and body mass index as covariates, showed higher ox-LDL-C levels for the middle aged men with the Val/Val genotype, compared to the other allele (Ala/Ala and Ala/Val) carriers (65.9 ± 25.7 vs. 55.7 ± 20.5 mg/dl; standardized β coefficient = 0.192, P = 0.012). On the contrary, elderly women with the Val/Val genotype occurred with lower ox-LDL-C levels compared to the Ala/Ala or Ala/Val genotype (74.2 ± 22.1 vs. 86.5 ± 26.6 mg/dl; standardized β coefficient = -0.269, P = 0.015). The same trend was also recorded in elderly men, however without reaching statistical significance (standardized β coefficient = -0.187, P = 0.077). Moreover, elderly men and women with the Ala/Ala or Ala/Val genotype presented higher triglycerides levels compared to Val/Val (women: 145.2 ± 68.7 vs. 114.3 ± 34.3 mg/dl, P = 0.027; men: 147.8 ± 72.4 vs. 103.7 ± 38.0 mg/dl, P = 0.002). Additionally, middle aged men with the Val/Val genotype had higher HDL-C levels compared to the Ala allele carriers. The results suggest that SOD Ala16Val polymorphism is an age-dependent modulator of ox-LDL-C levels in middle-aged men and elderly women. PMID:18305395

  20. Human dopamine transporter gene: differential regulation of 18-kb haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Xiong, Nian; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Yanhong; Li, Nuomin; Qing, Hong; Lin, Zhicheng

    2013-01-01

    Aim Since previous functional studies of short haplotypes and polymorphic sites of SLC6A3 have shown variant-dependent and drug-sensitive promoter activity, this study aimed to understand whether a large SLC6A3 regulatory region, containing these small haplotypes and polymorphic sites, can display haplotype-dependent promoter activity in a drug-sensitive and pathway-related manner. Materials & methods By creating and using a single copy number luciferase-reporter vector, we examined regulation of two different SLC6A3 haplotypes (A and B) of the 5′ 18-kb promoter and two known downstream regulatory variable number tandem repeats by 17 drugs in four different cellular models. Results The two regulatory haplotypes displayed up to 3.2-fold difference in promoter activity. The regulations were drug selective (37.5% of the drugs showed effects), and both haplotype and cell type dependent. Pathway analysis revealed at least 13 main signaling hubs targeting SLC6A3, including histone deacetylation, AKT, PKC and CK2 α-chains. Conclusion SLC6A3 may be regulated via either its promoter or the variable number tandem repeats independently by specific signaling pathways and in a haplotype-dependent manner. Furthermore, we have developed the first pathway map for SLC6A3 regulation. These findings provide a framework for understanding complex and variant-dependent regulations of SLC6A3. PMID:24024899

  1. A spatial haplotype copying model with applications to genotype imputation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Yun; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Eskin, Eleazar; Pasaniuc, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    Ever since its introduction, the haplotype copy model has proven to be one of the most successful approaches for modeling genetic variation in human populations, with applications ranging from ancestry inference to genotype phasing and imputation. Motivated by coalescent theory, this approach assumes that any chromosome (haplotype) can be modeled as a mosaic of segments copied from a set of chromosomes sampled from the same population. At the core of the model is the assumption that any chromosome from the sample is equally likely to contribute a priori to the copying process. Motivated by recent works that model genetic variation in a geographic continuum, we propose a new spatial-aware haplotype copy model that jointly models geography and the haplotype copying process. We extend hidden Markov models of haplotype diversity such that at any given location, haplotypes that are closest in the genetic-geographic continuum map are a priori more likely to contribute to the copying process than distant ones. Through simulations starting from the 1000 Genomes data, we show that our model achieves superior accuracy in genotype imputation over the standard spatial-unaware haplotype copy model. In addition, we show the utility of our model in selecting a small personalized reference panel for imputation that leads to both improved accuracy as well as to a lower computational runtime than the standard approach. Finally, we show our proposed model can be used to localize individuals on the genetic-geographical map on the basis of their genotype data. PMID:25526526

  2. Enteric fever in a British soldier from Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Lucy G; Brown, M; Bailey, M S

    2016-06-01

    Enteric fever (typhoid and paratyphoid) remains a threat to British troops overseas and causes significant morbidity and mortality. We report the case of a soldier who developed typhoid despite appropriate vaccination and field hygiene measures, which began 23 days after returning from a deployment in Sierra Leone. The incubation period was longer than average, symptoms started 2 days after stopping doxycycline for malaria chemoprophylaxis and initial blood cultures were negative. The Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi eventually isolated was resistant to amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, co-trimoxazole and nalidixic acid and had reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. He was successfully treated with ceftriaxone followed by azithromycin, but 1 month later he remained fatigued and unable to work. The clinical and laboratory features of enteric fever are non-specific and the diagnosis should be considered in troops returning from an endemic area with a febrile illness. Multiple blood cultures and referral to a specialist unit may be required. PMID:26243802

  3. Leon Cooper's Perspective on Teaching Science: An Interview Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niaz, Mansoor; Klassen, Stephen; McMillan, Barbara; Metz, Don

    2010-01-01

    The authors of this paper portray the perspective of Professor Leon Cooper, a theoretical physicist, Nobel laureate, active researcher, and physics textbook author, on teaching science and on the nature of science (NOS). The views presented emerged from an interview prepared by the authors and responded to in writing by Professor Cooper. Based on the gathered data and the subsequent interpretation of it, the authors identified several educational implications and drew the following conclusions: (a) science should be taught within an historical perspective; (b) textbook authors generally have an empiricist epistemology which makes their presentation of science difficult to understand; (c) an historical perspective inevitably involves comparing, contrasting, and scrutinizing different historical accounts of the same events; (d) varying interpretations of observations do not undermine the objective nature of science; (e) new ideas in physics comprise an imposed vision of the world, and these ideas are then slowly accepted by the scientific community; (f) the current view in any science is almost always a mixture of data, hypotheses, theoretical ideas, and conjectures; (g) since experiments are difficult to perform and understand, scientists rely on their presuppositions to guide the integration of data, theory, and conjectures; (h) inconsistencies in the construction of theories can facilitate new theoretical ideas; and (i) case studies based on various experiments show that scientists use intuition which is guided by facts, conjectures, and speculations.

  4. Leon Van Speybroeck Wins Astrophysics Bruno Rossi Prize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Leon Van Speybroeck of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge Massachusetts was awarded the 2002 Bruno Rossi Prize of the High-Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomy Society. The Rossi Prize is an arnual recognition of significant contributions in high-energy astrophysics in honor of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's late Professor Bruno Rossi, an authority on cosmic ray physics and a pioneer in the field of x-ray astronomy. Van Speybroeck, who led the effort to design and make the x-ray mirrors for NASA's premier Chandra X-Ray Observatory, was recognized for a career of stellar achievements in designing precision x-ray optics. As Telescope Scientist for Chandra, he has worked for more than 20 years with a team that includes scientists and engineers from the Harvard-Smithsonian, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, TRW, Inc., Huhes-Danbury (now B.F. Goodrich Aerospace), Optical Coating Laboratories, Inc., and Eastman-Kodak on all aspects of the x-ray mirror assembly that is the heart of the observatory.

  5. Electrocardiographic parameters in the clinically healthy Zamorano-leones donkey.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Andrés; González, José R; Benedito, José L; Prieto, Felipe R; Ayala, Ignacio

    2009-12-01

    Limited information exists regarding electrocardiographic parameters in clinically healthy donkeys. The study was carried out in 75 healthy adult animals (40 females and 35 males) using the Einthoven standard II and base-apex leads. The P wave showed usually a bifid shape deflection. The QRS complex of the donkeys appeared in several forms: QR and R were the most frequent in limb lead II, and QS and QR in the base-apex lead. Most T waves presented a simple negative configuration in lead II and biphasic shape in the base-apex one. Mean heart rate value was 52 beats per minute. The direction of the QRS vector in lead II had a mean value of 91.4 degrees. We observed a lack of detected arrhythmias. Statistically significant differences were observed between sexes for several parameters. The electrocardiogram of Zamorano-leones donkey differs in several duration, amplitude and morphologic parameters from that of several breeds of horses and donkeys. This fact justifies obtaining values for a specific breed against which to compare values for the same breed. PMID:19433331

  6. Mating patterns of female Leon Springs pupfish Cyprinodon bovinus.

    PubMed

    Leiser, J K; Gagliardi-Seeley, J L; Wisenden, B D; Itzkowitz, M

    2015-09-01

    In a field study of Leon Springs pupfish Cyprinodon bovinus, two questions about female promiscuity were investigated. First, were females selective in the males with whom they spawned or were they unselective, spawning randomly among males? Second, how promiscuous were the females, i.e. with how many males did they spawn? If simply spawning with many males maximized a female's reproductive success, then females might be expected to spawn randomly with as many males as possible. Alternatively, if females were selective but engaged in multiple mating, they would limit their spawning to preferred males. In the only wild population of this endangered fish, breeding males defend closely associated territories in the shallow margins of a single desert pool. No territories were observed elsewhere in the pool. Therefore, all territorial males were present simultaneously and females could survey all of them, depositing any number of eggs with one, a few or many males. Rather than spawning randomly, females surveyed many males first, visited relatively few males and ultimately spawned with a small fraction of those available males. With increasing numbers of spawns, however, females increased the number of different mates with whom they spawned. Thus, females showed a bet-hedging tactic of having a narrow mate preference while also laying eggs in the territories of other males, possibly to reduce egg predation and to avoid inbreeding. PMID:26289774

  7. AAS Publishing News: An Interview with Leon Golub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    In the lead-up to next weeks 2016 Solar Physics Division (SPD) meeting, we wanted to introduce you to Leon Golub, our new Lead Editor for the Sun and the Heliosphere corridor.Leon is a Senior Astrophysicist in the High Energy Division at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. He specializes in studies of solar and stellar magnetic activity, and he has built numerous rocket and satellite instruments to study the Sun and its dynamic behavior.* * * * *Tell me about your field of research and some of your current projects.Ive been working primarily on understanding the dynamics of the solar corona, especially using new types of instrumentation that can provide challenges to our theoretical understanding.Image of the Apollo Telescope Mount on Skylab. [NASA]Why did you choose this field?Shortly after graduating from MIT in experimental high energy physics I found a position with a group that was preparing to launch an X-ray telescope on Skylab as part of the cluster of solar instruments called the Apollo Telescope Mount. I have stayed with that field and related ones ever since.What do you consider to be some of the biggest open questions in solar and heliospheric research today?There are so many major questions that its difficult to just settle on a few. The heliosphere is defined by the extent of the influence of the Sun on the interstellar medium. It is an exciting time in that area of study, because we now have the ability to make impressive new observations that allow us to test our understanding of that outer boundary.Within those limits, the Sun has a major influence on solar system objects via its gravitational pull, its light and heat, and the magnetized plasma and high energy particles that it emits in all directions. We are making major discoveries related to how the Sun has influenced the formation and evolution of the planets, including our own planet.The source of all this influence is, of course, the Sun itself, and we are working to understand

  8. General Framework for Meta‐Analysis of Haplotype Association Tests

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Jing Hua; An, Ping; Guo, Xiuqing; Jensen, Richard A.; Marten, Jonathan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Meidtner, Karina; Boeing, Heiner; Campbell, Archie; Rice, Kenneth M.; Scott, Robert A.; Yao, Jie; Schulze, Matthias B.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Province, Michael A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Hayward, Caroline; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Meigs, James B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT For complex traits, most associated single nucleotide variants (SNV) discovered to date have a small effect, and detection of association is only possible with large sample sizes. Because of patient confidentiality concerns, it is often not possible to pool genetic data from multiple cohorts, and meta‐analysis has emerged as the method of choice to combine results from multiple studies. Many meta‐analysis methods are available for single SNV analyses. As new approaches allow the capture of low frequency and rare genetic variation, it is of interest to jointly consider multiple variants to improve power. However, for the analysis of haplotypes formed by multiple SNVs, meta‐analysis remains a challenge, because different haplotypes may be observed across studies. We propose a two‐stage meta‐analysis approach to combine haplotype analysis results. In the first stage, each cohort estimate haplotype effect sizes in a regression framework, accounting for relatedness among observations if appropriate. For the second stage, we use a multivariate generalized least square meta‐analysis approach to combine haplotype effect estimates from multiple cohorts. Haplotype‐specific association tests and a global test of independence between haplotypes and traits are obtained within our framework. We demonstrate through simulation studies that we control the type‐I error rate, and our approach is more powerful than inverse variance weighted meta‐analysis of single SNV analysis when haplotype effects are present. We replicate a published haplotype association between fasting glucose‐associated locus (G6PC2) and fasting glucose in seven studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium and we provide more precise haplotype effect estimates. PMID:27027517

  9. "Extended" A1, B8, DR3 haplotype shows remarkable linkage disequilibrium but is similar to nonextended haplotypes in terms of diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Ide, Akane; Babu, Sunanda R; Robles, David T; Wang, Tianbao; Erlich, Henry A; Bugawan, Teodorica L; Rewers, Marian; Fain, Pamela R; Eisenbarth, George S

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate potential differential diabetes risk of DR3 haplotypes we have evaluated class I alleles as well as two microsatellites previously associated with differential risk associated with DR3 haplotypes. We found that over one-third of patient DR3 chromosomes consisted of an extended DR3 haplotype, from DQ2 to D6S2223 (DQ2, DR3, D6S273-143, MIC-A5.1, HLA-B8, HLA-Cw7, HLA-A1, and D6S2223-177) with an identical extended haplotype in controls. The extended haplotype was present more frequently (35.1% of autoimmune-associated DR3 haplotypes, 39.4% of control DR3 haplotypes) than other haplotypes (no other haplotype >5% of DR3 haplotypes) and remarkably conserved, but it was not transmitted from parents to affected children more frequently than nonconserved DR3-bearing haplotypes. This suggests that if all alleles are truly identical for the major A1, B8, DR3 haplotype (between A1 and DR3), with different alleles on nonconserved haplotypes without differential diabetes risk, then in this region of the genome DR3-DQ2 may be the primary polymorphisms of common haplotypes contributing to diabetes risk. PMID:15919812

  10. The Effect of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Marker Selection on Patterns of Haplotype Blocks and Haplotype Frequency Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Nothnagel, Michael; Rohde, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    The definition of haplotype blocks of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been proposed so that the haplotypes can be used as markers in association studies and to efficiently describe human genetic variation. The International Haplotype Map (HapMap) project to construct a comprehensive catalog of haplotypic variation in humans is underway. However, a number of factors have already been shown to influence the definition of blocks, including the population studied and the sample SNP density. Here, we examine the effect that marker selection has on the definition of blocks and the pattern of haplotypes by using comparable but complementary SNP sets and a number of block definition methods in various genomic regions and populations that were provided by the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project. We find that the chosen SNP set has a profound effect on the block-covered sequence and block borders, even at high marker densities. Our results question the very concept of discrete haplotype blocks and the possibility of generalizing block findings from the HapMap project. We comparatively apply the block-free tagging-SNP approach and discuss both the haplotype approach and the tagging-SNP approach as means to efficiently catalog genetic variation. PMID:16380910

  11. Molecular Characterization of the First Ebola Virus Isolated in Italy, from a Health Care Worker Repatriated from Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Castilletti, Concetta; Carletti, Fabrizio; Gruber, Cesare E. M.; Bordi, Licia; Lalle, Eleonora; Quartu, Serena; Meschi, Silvia; Lapa, Daniele; Colavita, Francesca; Chiappini, Roberta; Mazzarelli, Antonio; Marsella, Patrizia; Petrosillo, Nicola; Nicastri, Emanuele; Chillemi, Giovanni; Valentini, Alessio; Desideri, Alessandro; Di Caro, Antonino; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of an Ebola virus (EBOV) isolated from a health worker repatriated from Sierra Leone to Italy in November 2014. The sequence, clustering in clade 3 of the Sierra Leone sequences, was analyzed with respect to mutations possibly affecting diagnostic and therapeutic targets as well as virulence. PMID:26089420

  12. Evaluation of the Leon3 soft-core processor within a Xilinx radiation-hardened field-programmable gate array.

    SciTech Connect

    Learn, Mark Walter

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the work done to evaluate the performance of the Leon3 soft-core processor in a radiation environment while instantiated in a radiation-hardened static random-access memory based field-programmable gate array. This evaluation will look at the differences between two soft-core processors: the open-source Leon3 core and the fault-tolerant Leon3 core. Radiation testing of these two cores was conducted at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron facility and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The results of these tests are included within the report along with designs intended to improve the mitigation of the open-source Leon3. The test setup used for evaluating both versions of the Leon3 is also included within this document.

  13. The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM): a higher oxidative stress and age-dependent degenerative diseases model.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoichi; Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Kumagai, Naoko; Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Ishii, Sanae; Furukawa, Ayako; Takei, Shiro; Sakura, Masaaki; Kawamura, Noriko; Hosokawa, Masanori

    2009-04-01

    The SAM strain of mice is actually a group of related inbred strains consisting of a series of SAMP (accelerated senescence-prone) and SAMR (accelerated senescence-resistant) strains. Compared with the SAMR strains, the SAMP strains show a more accelerated senescence process, a shorter lifespan, and an earlier onset and more rapid progress of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to human geriatric disorders. The higher oxidative stress status observed in SAMP mice is partly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and may be a cause of this senescence acceleration and age-dependent alterations in cell structure and function. Based on our recent observations, we discuss a possible mechanism for mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in the excessive production of reactive oxygen species, and a role for the hyperoxidative stress status in neurodegeneration in SAMP mice. These SAM strains can serve as a useful tool to understand the cellular mechanisms of age-dependent degeneration, and to develop clinical interventions. PMID:18688709

  14. Y-chromosome STR haplotypes in males from Greenland.

    PubMed

    Hallenberg, Charlotte; Tomas, Carmen; Simonsen, Bo; Morling, Niels

    2009-09-01

    A total of 272 males from Greenland were typed for 11 Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 with the PowerPlex Y System (Promega). A total of 146 different haplotypes were observed and the haplotype diversity was 0.9887. The number of haplotypes seen once was 108 and the most common haplotype was observed in 12 males. A significant F(ST) value was observed (F(ST)=0.012, P<0.00001) when comparing the population of 15 locations in Greenland assigned to 7 groups. The significance could mainly be attributed to the subpopulation of males from Tasiilaq (East of Greenland). The R(ST) value was not statistically significant (R(ST)=0.016, P=0.15). PMID:19647703

  15. Association of a bovine prion gene haplotype with atypical BSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSEs) are recently recognized prion diseases of cattle. Atypical BSEs are rare; approximately 30 cases have been identified worldwide. We tested prion gene (PRNP) haplotypes for an association with atypical BSE. Methodology/Principal Findin...

  16. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang; Huang, Shujia; Sun, Yuhui; Tong, Xin; Xie, Yinlong; Liu, Binghang; Yang, Hailong; Zheng, Hancheng; Li, Jian; Li, Bo; Wang, Yu; Yang, Fang; Sun, Peng; Liu, Siyang; Gao, Peng; Huang, Haodong; Sun, Jing; Chen, Dan; He, Guangzhu; Huang, Weihua; Huang, Zheng; Li, Yue; Tellier, Laurent C A M; Liu, Xiao; Feng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Bolund, Lars; Krogh, Anders; Kristiansen, Karsten; Drmanac, Radoje; Drmanac, Snezana; Nielsen, Rasmus; Li, Songgang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Li, Yingrui; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should aid in translating genotypes to phenotypes for the development of personalized medicine. PMID:26006006

  17. Mitochondrial haplotype analysis for differentiation of isolates of Phytophthora cinnamomi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While Phytophthora cinnamomi is heterothallic, there are few instances of successful crossing in laboratory experiments and analysis of field populations indicates a clonally reproducing population. In the absence of sexual recombination the ability to monitor mitochondrial haplotypes may provide a...

  18. Tumor-host signaling interaction reveals a systemic, age-dependent splenic immune influence on tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Beheshti, Afshin; Wage, Justin; McDonald, J. Tyson; Lamont, Clare; Peluso, Michael; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The concept of age-dependent host control of cancer development raises the natural question of how these effects manifest across the host tissue/organ types with which a tumor interacts, one important component of which is the aging immune system. To investigate this, changes in the spleen, an immune nexus in the mouse, was examined for its age-dependent interactive influence on the carcinogenesis process. The model is the C57BL/6 male mice (adolescent, young adult, middle-aged, and old or 68, 143, 551 and 736 days old respectively) with and without a syngeneic murine tumor implant. Through global transcriptome analysis, immune-related functions were found to be key regulators in the spleen associated with tumor progression as a function of age with CD2, CD3ε, CCL19, and CCL5 being the key molecules involved. Surprisingly, other than CCL5, all key factors and immune-related functions were not active in spleens from non-tumor bearing old mice. Our findings of age-dependent tumor-spleen signaling interaction suggest the existence of a global role of the aging host in carcinogenesis. Suggested is a new avenue for therapeutic improvement that capitalizes on the pervasive role of host aging in dictating the course of this disease. PMID:26497558

  19. Microsurgeons do better--tactile training might prevent the age-dependent decline of the sensibility of the hand.

    PubMed

    Schmauss, Daniel; Megerle, Kai; Weinzierl, Andrea; Agua, Kariem; Cerny, Michael; Schmauss, Verena; Lohmeyer, Joern A; Machens, Hans-Guenther; Erne, Holger

    2015-12-01

    Recent data demonstrate that the normal sensibility of the hand seems to be age-dependent with the best values in the third decade and a consecutive deterioration afterwards. However, it is not clear if long-term tactile training might prevent this age-dependent decline. We evaluated sensibility of the hand in 125 surgeons aged between 26 and 75 years who perform microsurgical operations, thereby undergoing regular tactile training. We examined sensibility of the radial digital nerve of the index finger (N3) and the ulnar digital nerve of the small finger (N10) using static and moving two-point discrimination (2PD) tests and compared the results to 154 age-matched individuals without specific long-term tactile training. We found significantly lower static and moving 2PD values for the sixth, seventh, and eighth decade of life in the microsurgery group compared to the control group (p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that long-term tactile training might prevent the known age-dependent decline of the sensibility of the hand. PMID:26306813

  20. Haplotype hitchhiking promotes trait coselection in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lunwen; Qian, Wei; Snowdon, Rod J

    2016-07-01

    Local haplotype patterns surrounding densely spaced DNA markers with significant trait associations can reveal information on selective sweeps and genome diversity associated with important crop traits. Relationships between haplotype and phenotype diversity, coupled with analysis of gene content in conserved haplotype blocks, can provide insight into coselection for nonrelated traits. We performed genome-wide analysis of haplotypes associated with the important physiological and agronomic traits leaf chlorophyll and seed glucosinolate content, respectively, in the major oilseed crop species Brassica napus. A locus on chromosome A01 showed opposite effects on leaf chlorophyll content and seed glucosinolate content, attributed to strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between orthologues of the chlorophyll biosynthesis genes EARLY LIGHT-INDUCED PROTEIN and CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE, and the glucosinolate synthesis gene ATP SULFURYLASE 1. Another conserved haplotype block, on chromosome A02, contained a number of chlorophyll-related genes in LD with orthologues of the key glucosinolate biosynthesis genes METHYLTHIOALKYMALATE SYNTHASE-LIKE 1 and 3. Multigene haplogroups were found to have a significantly greater contribution to variation for chlorophyll content than haplotypes for any single gene, suggesting positive effects of additive locus accumulation. Detailed reanalysis of population substructure revealed a clade of ten related accessions exhibiting high leaf chlorophyll and low seed glucosinolate content. These accessions each carried one of the above-mentioned haplotypes from A01 or A02, generally in combination with further chlorophyll-associated haplotypes from chromosomes A05 and/or C05. The phenotypic rather than pleiotropic correlations between leaf chlorophyll content index and seed GSL suggest that LD may have led to inadvertent coselection for these two traits. PMID:26800855

  1. Evolution of haplotypes at the DRD2 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Castiglione, C.M.; Deinard, A.S.; Speed, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    We present here the first evolutionary perspective on haplotypes at DRD2, the locus for the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor. The dopamine D{sub 2} receptor plays a critical role in the functioning of many neural circuits in the human brain. If functionally relevant variation at the DRD2 locus exists, understanding the evolution of haplotypes on the basis of polymorphic sites encompassing the gene should provide a powerful framework for identifying that variation. Three DRD2 polymorphisms (TaqI {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} RFLPs and the (CA){sub n} short tandem repeat polymorphism) encompassing the coding sequences have been studied in 15 populations; these markers are polymorphic in all the populations studied, and they display strong and significant linkage disequilibria with each other. The common haplotypes for the two TaqI RFLPs are separately derived from the ancestral haplotype but predate the spread of modern humans around the world. The knowledge of how the various haplotypes have evolved, the allele frequencies of the haplotypes in human populations, and the physical relationships of the polymorphisms to each other and to the functional parts of the gene should now allow proper design and interpretation of association studies. 48 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Haplotype Reconstruction in Large Pedigrees with Many Untyped Individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Li, Jing

    Haplotypes, as they specify the linkage patterns between dispersed genetic variations, provide important information for understanding the genetics of human traits. However haplotypes are not directly available from current genotyping platforms, and hence there are extensive investigations of computational methods to recover such information. Two major computational challenges arising in current family-based disease studies are large family sizes and many ungenotyped family members. Traditional haplotyping methods can neither handle large families nor families with missing members. In this paper, we propose a method which addresses these issues by integrating multiple novel techniques. The method consists of three major components: pairwise identical-bydescent (IBD) inference, global IBD reconstruction and haplotype restoring. By reconstructing the global IBD of a family from pairwise IBD and then restoring the haplotypes based on the inferred IBD, this method can scale to large pedigrees, and more importantly it can handle families with missing members. Compared with existing methods, this method demonstrates much higher power to recover haplotype information, especially in families with many untyped individuals.

  3. Polymorphic DNA haplotypes at the LDL receptor locus.

    PubMed Central

    Leitersdorf, E; Chakravarti, A; Hobbs, H H

    1989-01-01

    Mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene result in the autosomal dominant disorder familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Many different LDL receptor mutations have been identified and characterized, demonstrating a high degree of allelic heterogeneity at this locus. The ability to identify mutant LDL receptor genes for prenatal diagnosis of homozygous FH or to study the role of the LDL receptor gene in polygenic hypercholesterolemia requires the use of closely linked RFLPs. In the present study we used 10 different RFLPs, including three newly described polymorphisms, to construct 123 independent haplotypes from 20 Caucasian American pedigrees. Our sample contained 31 different haplotypes varying in frequency from 0.8% to 29.3%; the five most common haplotypes account for 67.5% of the sample. The heterozygosity and PIC of each site were determined, and these values disclosed that eight of the RFLPs were substantially polymorphic. Linkage-disequilibrium analysis of the haplotype data revealed strong nonrandom associations among all 10 RFLPs, especially among those sites clustered in the 3' region of the gene. Evolutionary analysis suggests the occurrence of both mutational and recombinational events in the generation of the observed haplotypes. A strategy for haplotype analysis of the LDL receptor gene in individuals of Caucasian American descent is presented. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2563635

  4. iXora: exact haplotype inferencing and trait association

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We address the task of extracting accurate haplotypes from genotype data of individuals of large F1 populations for mapping studies. While methods for inferring parental haplotype assignments on large F1 populations exist in theory, these approaches do not work in practice at high levels of accuracy. Results We have designed iXora (Identifying crossovers and recombining alleles), a robust method for extracting reliable haplotypes of a mapping population, as well as parental haplotypes, that runs in linear time. Each allele in the progeny is assigned not just to a parent, but more precisely to a haplotype inherited from the parent. iXora shows an improvement of at least 15% in accuracy over similar systems in literature. Furthermore, iXora provides an easy-to-use, comprehensive environment for association studies and hypothesis checking in populations of related individuals. Conclusions iXora provides detailed resolution in parental inheritance, along with the capability of handling very large populations, which allows for accurate haplotype extraction and trait association. iXora is available for non-commercial use from http://researcher.ibm.com/project/3430. PMID:23742238

  5. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes

    PubMed Central

    Yunis, Juan J.; Yunis, Edmond J.; Yunis, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family), Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family), Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families), Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family), Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family), Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family) and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family). for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1). Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America. PMID:23885196

  6. [Analysis of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in yakut population].

    PubMed

    Fedorova, S A; Bermisheva, M A; Villems, R; Maksimova, N R; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2003-01-01

    To study the mitochondrial gene pool structure in Yakuts, polymorphism of mtDNA hypervariable segment I (16,024-16,390) was analyzed in 191 people sampled from the indigenous population of the Sakha Republic. In total, 67 haplotypes of 14 haplogroups were detected. Most (91.6%) haplotypes belonged to haplogroups A, B, C, D, F, G, M*, and Y, which are specific for East Eurasian ethnic groups; 8.4% haplotypes represented Caucasian haplogroups H, HV1, J, T, U, and W. A high frequency of mtDNA types belonging to Asian supercluster M was peculiar for Yakuts: mtDNA types belonging to haplogroup C, D, or G and undifferentiated mtDNA types of haplogroup M (M*) accounted for 81% of all haplotypes. The highest diversity was observed for haplogroups C and D, which comprised respectively 22 (44%) and 18 (30%) haplotypes. Yakuts showed the lowest genetic diversity (H = 0.964) among all Turkic ethnic groups. Phylogenetic analysis testified to a common genetic substrate of Yakuts, Mongols, and Central Asian (Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Uigur) populations. Yakuts proved to share 21 (55.5%) mtDNA haplogroups with the Central Asian ethnic groups and Mongols. Comparisons with modern paleo-Asian populations (Chukcha, Itelmen, Koryaks) revealed three (8.9%) haplotypes common for Yakuts and Koryaks. The results of mtDNA analysis disagree with the hypothesis of an appreciable paleo-Asian contribution to the modern Yakut gene pool. PMID:12942638

  7. Association of a Bovine Prion Gene Haplotype with Atypical BSE

    PubMed Central

    Clawson, Michael L.; Richt, Juergen A.; Baron, Thierry; Biacabe, Anne-Gaëlle; Czub, Stefanie; Heaton, Michael P.; Smith, Timothy P. L.; Laegreid, William W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSEs) are recently recognized prion diseases of cattle. Atypical BSEs are rare; approximately 30 cases have been identified worldwide. We tested prion gene (PRNP) haplotypes for an association with atypical BSE. Methodology/Principle Findings Haplotype tagging polymorphisms that characterize PRNP haplotypes from the promoter region through the three prime untranslated region of exon 3 (25.2 kb) were used to determine PRNP haplotypes of six available atypical BSE cases from Canada, France and the United States. One or two copies of a distinct PRNP haplotype were identified in five of the six cases (p = 1.3×10−4, two-tailed Fisher's exact test; CI95% 0.263–0.901, difference between proportions). The haplotype spans a portion of PRNP that includes part of intron 2, the entire coding region of exon 3 and part of the three prime untranslated region of exon 3 (13 kb). Conclusions/Significance This result suggests that a genetic determinant in or near PRNP may influence susceptibility of cattle to atypical BSE. PMID:18350166

  8. Whole-genome haplotyping by dilution, amplification, and sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kaper, Fiona; Swamy, Sajani; Klotzle, Brandy; Munchel, Sarah; Cottrell, Joseph; Bibikova, Marina; Chuang, Han-Yu; Kruglyak, Semyon; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Eberle, Michael A.; Fan, Jian-Bing

    2013-01-01

    Standard whole-genome genotyping technologies are unable to determine haplotypes. Here we describe a method for rapid and cost-effective long-range haplotyping. Genomic DNA is diluted and distributed into multiple aliquots such that each aliquot receives a fraction of a haploid copy. The DNA template in each aliquot is amplified by multiple displacement amplification, converted into barcoded sequencing libraries using Nextera technology, and sequenced in multiplexed pools. To assess the performance of our method, we combined two male genomic DNA samples at equal ratios, resulting in a sample with diploid X chromosomes with known haplotypes. Pools of the multiplexed sequencing libraries were subjected to targeted pull-down of a 1-Mb contiguous region of the X-chromosome Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene. We were able to phase the Duchenne muscular dystrophy region into two contiguous haplotype blocks with a mean length of 494 kb. The haplotypes showed 99% agreement with the consensus base calls made by sequencing the individual DNAs. We subsequently used the strategy to haplotype two human genomes. Standard genomic sequencing to identify all heterozygous SNPs in the sample was combined with dilution-amplification–based sequencing data to resolve the phase of identified heterozygous SNPs. Using this procedure, we were able to phase >95% of the heterozygous SNPs from the diploid sequence data. The N50 for a Yoruba male DNA was 702 kb whereas the N50 for a European female DNA was 358 kb. Therefore, the strategy described here is suitable for haplotyping of a set of targeted regions as well as of the entire genome. PMID:23509297

  9. Whole-genome haplotyping by dilution, amplification, and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kaper, Fiona; Swamy, Sajani; Klotzle, Brandy; Munchel, Sarah; Cottrell, Joseph; Bibikova, Marina; Chuang, Han-Yu; Kruglyak, Semyon; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Eberle, Michael A; Fan, Jian-Bing

    2013-04-01

    Standard whole-genome genotyping technologies are unable to determine haplotypes. Here we describe a method for rapid and cost-effective long-range haplotyping. Genomic DNA is diluted and distributed into multiple aliquots such that each aliquot receives a fraction of a haploid copy. The DNA template in each aliquot is amplified by multiple displacement amplification, converted into barcoded sequencing libraries using Nextera technology, and sequenced in multiplexed pools. To assess the performance of our method, we combined two male genomic DNA samples at equal ratios, resulting in a sample with diploid X chromosomes with known haplotypes. Pools of the multiplexed sequencing libraries were subjected to targeted pull-down of a 1-Mb contiguous region of the X-chromosome Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene. We were able to phase the Duchenne muscular dystrophy region into two contiguous haplotype blocks with a mean length of 494 kb. The haplotypes showed 99% agreement with the consensus base calls made by sequencing the individual DNAs. We subsequently used the strategy to haplotype two human genomes. Standard genomic sequencing to identify all heterozygous SNPs in the sample was combined with dilution-amplification-based sequencing data to resolve the phase of identified heterozygous SNPs. Using this procedure, we were able to phase >95% of the heterozygous SNPs from the diploid sequence data. The N50 for a Yoruba male DNA was 702 kb whereas the N50 for a European female DNA was 358 kb. Therefore, the strategy described here is suitable for haplotyping of a set of targeted regions as well as of the entire genome. PMID:23509297

  10. Croatian national reference Y-STR haplotype database.

    PubMed

    Mršić, Gordan; Gršković, Branka; Vrdoljak, Andro; Popović, Maja; Valpotić, Ivica; Anđelinović, Šimun; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Ehler, Edvard; Urban, Ludvik; Lacković, Gordana; Underhill, Peter; Primorac, Dragan

    2012-07-01

    A reference Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) haplotype database is needed for Y-STR match interpretation as well as for national and regional characterization of populations. The aim of this study was to create a comprehensive Y-STR haplotype database of the Croatian contemporary population and to analyze substructure between the five Croatian regions. We carried out a statistical analysis of the data from previously performed genetic analyses collected during routine forensic work by the Forensic Science Centre "Ivan Vučetić". A total of 1,100 unrelated men from eastern, western, northern, southern and central Croatia were selected for the purpose of this study. Y-STRs were typed using the AmpFISTR Yfiler PCR amplification kit. Analysis of molecular variance calculated with the Y chromosome haplotype reference database online analysis tool included 16 population samples with 20,247 haplotypes. A total of 947 haplotypes were recorded, 848 of which were unique (89.5%). Haplotype diversity was 0.998, with the most frequent haplotype found in 9 of 1,100 men (0.82%). Locus diversity varied from 0.266 for DYS392 to 0.868 for DYS385. Discrimination capacity was 86.1%. Our results suggested high level of similarity among regional subpopulations within Croatia, except for mildly different southern Croatia. Relative resemblance was found with Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia. Whit Atheys' Haplogroup Predictor was used to estimate the frequencies of Y-chromosome haplogroups. I2a, R1a, E1b1b and R1b haplogroups were most frequent in all Croatian regions. These results are important in forensics and contribute to the population genetics and genetic background of the contemporary Croatian population. PMID:22391654