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Sample records for leptonic cp phases

  1. Probing leptonic CP phases in LFV processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajc, Borut; Nemevšek, Miha; Senjanović, Goran

    2010-02-01

    We study a CP and T violating triple (spin) correlation in the muon to electron conversion in nuclei in the context of the seesaw mechanism. After concluding that the results are negative for all three seesaw types, we turn to the left-right symmetric theories as the original source of seesaw. We find that in general this correlation is of order one which offers a hope of observing CP violation in lepton flavor violating processes for a L-R scale below around 10-30 TeV. We discuss the conditions that could render to (unlikely) conspiracies as to suppress the CP violating effects.

  2. The leptonic Dirac CP-violating phase from sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, I.; Petcov, S. T.; Titov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    In the reference 3-neutrino mixing scheme with three light massive neutrinos, CP-violating effects in neutrino oscillations can be caused by the Dirac CP-violating phase δ present in the unitary neutrino mixing matrix U. Using the fact that U = U†eUv , where Ue and Uv are unitary matrices arising from the diagonalisation, respectively, of the charged lepton and neutrino mass matrices, we consider in a systematic way forms of Ue and Uv allowing us to express δ as a function of the neutrino mixing angles present in U and the angles contained in Uv. After obtaining sum rules for cos δ, we consider several forms of Uv dictated by, or associated with, symmetries, such as tri-bimaximal, bimaximal, etc., for which the angles in Uv are fixed. For each of these forms and forms of Ue allowing to reproduce the measured values of the neutrino mixing angles, we construct the likelihood function for cos δ, using the prospective uncertainties in the determination of the mixing angles. Our results show that the measurement of δ along with improvement of the precision on the neutrino mixing angles can provide unique information about the possible existence of a new fundamental symmetry in the lepton sector.

  3. Predicting leptonic CP phase by considering deviations in charged lepton and neutrino sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sruthilaya, M.; Soumya, C.; Deepthi, K. N.; Mohanta, R.

    2015-08-01

    Recently, the reactor mixing angle {θ }13 has been measured precisely by Daya Bay, RENO, and T2K experiments with a moderately large value. However, the standard form of neutrino mixing patterns such as bimaximal, tri-bimaximal, golden ratio of types A and B, hexagonal, etc., which are based on certain flavor symmetries, predict vanishing {θ }13. Using the fact that the neutrino mixing matrix can be represented as {V}{PMNS}={U}l\\dagger {U}ν {P}ν , where Ul and {U}ν result from the diagonalization of the charged lepton and neutrino mass matrices and {P}ν is a diagonal matrix containing Majorana phases, we explore the possibility of accounting for the large reactor mixing angle by considering deviations both in the charged lepton and neutrino sector. In the charged lepton sector we consider the deviation as an additional rotation in the (12) and (13) planes, whereas in the neutrino sector we consider deviations to various neutrino mixing patterns through (13) and (23) rotations. We find that with the inclusion of these deviations it is possible to accommodate the observed large reactor mixing angle {θ }13, and one can also obtain limits on the charge-conjugation parity-violating Dirac phase{δ }{CP} and Jarlskog invariant JCP for most of the cases. We then explore whether our findings can be tested in the currently running NuMI Off-axis ve Appearance experiment with three years of data taking in neutrino mode followed by three years with the anti-neutrino mode.

  4. Leptonic CP phases near the μ-τ symmetric limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Agudelo, Diana C.; Pérez-Lorenzana, Abdel

    2016-09-01

    The neutrino masses and mixings indicated by current neutrino oscillation experiments suggest that the neutrino mass matrix possesses an approximate μ-τ exchange symmetry. In this study, we explore the neutrino parameter space and show that if a small μ-τ symmetry breaking is considered, the Majorana CP phases must be unequal and non-zero independently of the neutrino mass scale. Moreover, a small μ-τ symmetry breaking favors quasi-degenerate masses. We also show that Majorana phases are strongly correlated with the Dirac CP violating phase. Within this framework, we obtain robust predictions for the values of the Majorana phases when the experimental indications for the Dirac CP phase are used.

  5. Prospects of measuring the leptonic CP phase with atmospheric neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Abhijit

    2009-10-01

    We have studied the prospects of measuring the CP violating phase with atmospheric neutrinos at a large magnetized iron calorimeter detector considering the muons (directly measurable) of the neutrino events generated by a Monte Carlo event generator Nuance. The effect of {theta}{sub 13} and {delta}{sub CP} appears dominantly neither in atmospheric neutrino oscillation nor in solar neutrino oscillation, but appears as subleading in both cases. These are observable in the range of E{approx}1 GeV for atmospheric neutrino, where solar and atmospheric oscillation couple. In this regime, the quasielastic events dominate and the energy resolution is very good, but the angular resolution is very poor. Unlike beam experiments this poor angular resolution acts against its measurements. However, we find that one can be able to distinguish {delta}{sub CP}{approx_equal}0 deg. and 180 deg. at 90% confidence level. We find no significant sensitivity for {delta}{sub CP}{approx_equal}90 deg. or 270 deg.

  6. Neutrino mixings and leptonic CP violation from CKM matrix and Majorana phases

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Parida, M. K.; Mohapatra, R. N.; Rajasekaran, G.

    2007-02-01

    The high scale mixing unification hypothesis recently proposed by three of us (R. N. M., M. K. P. and G. R.) states that if at the seesaw scale the quark and lepton mixing matrices are equal, then for quasidegenerate neutrinos radiative corrections can lead to large solar and atmospheric mixings and small reactor angle at the weak scale in agreement with data. Evidence for quasidegenerate neutrinos could, within this framework, be interpreted as being consistent with quark-lepton unification at high scale. In the current work, we extend this model to show that the hypothesis works quite successfully in the presence of CP-violating phases (which were set to zero in the first paper). In the case where the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix is identical to the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix at the seesaw scale, with a Dirac phase but no Majorana phase, the low energy Dirac phase is predicted to be ({approx_equal}0.3 deg.) and leptonic CP-violation parameter J{sub CP}{approx_equal}(4-8)x10{sup -5} and {theta}{sub 13}=3.5 deg. If on the other hand, the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix is assumed to also have non-negligible Majorana phase(s) initially, the resulting theory damps radiative magnification phenomenon for a large range of parameters but nevertheless has enough parameter space to give the two necessary large neutrino mixing angles. In this case, one has {theta}{sub 13}=3.5 deg. -10 deg. and vertical bar J{sub CP} vertical bar as large as 0.02-0.04 which are accessible to long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.

  7. Neutrino mixings and leptonic CP violation from CKM matrix and Majorana phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Parida, M. K.; Mohapatra, R. N.; Rajasekaran, G.

    2007-02-01

    The high scale mixing unification hypothesis recently proposed by three of us (R. N. M., M. K. P. and G. R.) states that if at the seesaw scale the quark and lepton mixing matrices are equal, then for quasidegenerate neutrinos radiative corrections can lead to large solar and atmospheric mixings and small reactor angle at the weak scale in agreement with data. Evidence for quasidegenerate neutrinos could, within this framework, be interpreted as being consistent with quark-lepton unification at high scale. In the current work, we extend this model to show that the hypothesis works quite successfully in the presence of CP-violating phases (which were set to zero in the first paper). In the case where the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix is identical to the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix at the seesaw scale, with a Dirac phase but no Majorana phase, the low energy Dirac phase is predicted to be (≃0.3°) and leptonic CP-violation parameter JCP≃(4-8)×10-5 and θ13=3.5°. If on the other hand, the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix is assumed to also have non-negligible Majorana phase(s) initially, the resulting theory damps radiative magnification phenomenon for a large range of parameters but nevertheless has enough parameter space to give the two necessary large neutrino mixing angles. In this case, one has θ13=3.5° 10° and |JCP| as large as 0.02 0.04 which are accessible to long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.

  8. Theory prospective on leptonic CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petcov, S. T.

    2016-07-01

    The phenomenology of 3-neutrino mixing, the current status of our knowledge about the 3-neutrino mixing parameters, including the absolute neutrino mass scale, and of the Dirac and Majorana CP violation in the lepton sector are reviewed. The problems of CP violation in neutrino oscillations and of determining the nature - Dirac or Majorana - of massive neutrinos are discussed. The seesaw mechanism of neutrino mass generation and the related leptogenesis scenario of generation of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe are considered. The results showing that the CP violation necessary for the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe in leptogenesis can be due exclusively to the Dirac and/or Majorana CP-violating phase(s) in the neutrino mixing matrix U are briefly reviewed. The discrete symmetry approach to understanding the observed pattern of neutrino mixing and the related predictions for the leptonic Dirac CP violation are also reviewed.

  9. Super-PINGU for measurement of the leptonic CP-phase with atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaque, Soebur; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2015-05-01

    We explore a possibility to measure the CP-violating phase δ using multimegaton scale ice or water Cherenkov detectors with low, (0.2-1) GeV, energy threshold assuming that the neutrino mass hierarchy is identified. We elaborate the relevant theoretical and phenomenological aspects of this possibility. The distributions of the ν μ (track) and ν e (cascade) events in the neutrino energy and zenith angle ( E ν - θ z ) plane have been computed for different values of δ. We study properties and distinguishability of the distributions before and after smearing over the neutrino energy and zenith angle. The CP-violation effects are not washed out by smearing, and furthermore, the sensitivity to δ increases with decrease of the energy threshold. The ν e events contribute to the CP-sensitivity as much as the ν μ events. While sensitivity of PINGU to δ is low, we find that future possible upgrade, Super-PINGU, with few megaton effective volume at (0 .5-1) GeV and e.g. after 4 years of exposure will be able to disentangle values of δ = π/2 , π, 3 π/2 from δ = 0 with "distinguishability" (˜ significance in σ's) S {/σ tot} = (3 - 8), (6 - 14), (3 - 8) correspondingly. Here the intervals of S σot are due to various uncertainties of detection of the low energy events, especially the flavor identification, systematics, etc. Super-PINGU can be used simultaneously for the proton decay searches.

  10. Hints for Leptonic CP Violation or New Physics?

    PubMed

    Forero, David V; Huber, Patrick

    2016-07-15

    One of the major open questions in the neutrino sector is the issue of leptonic CP violation. Current global oscillation data show a mild preference for a large, potentially maximal value for the Dirac CP phase in the neutrino mixing matrix. In this Letter, we point out that new physics in the form of neutral-current-like nonstandard interactions with real couplings would likely yield a similar conclusion even if CP in the neutrino sector were conserved. Therefore, the claim for a discovery of leptonic CP violation will require a robust ability to test new physics scenarios. PMID:27472108

  11. Unveiling neutrino mixing and leptonic CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Olga; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    We review the present understanding of neutrino masses and mixings, discussing what are the unknowns in the three family oscillation scenario. Despite the anticipated success coming from the planned long baseline neutrino experiments in unraveling the leptonic mixing sector, there are two important unknowns which may remain obscure: the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and the CP-phase {delta}. The measurement of these two parameters has led us to consider the combination of superbeams and neutrino factories as the key to unveil the neutrino oscillation picture.

  12. Unveiling Neutrino Mixing and Leptonic CP Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena, Olga

    We review the present understanding of neutrino masses and mixings, discussing what are the unknowns in the three-family oscillation scenario. Despite the anticipated success coming from the planned long baseline neutrino experiments in unraveling the leptonic mixing sector, there are two important unknowns which may remain obscure: the mixing angle θ13 and the CP-phase δ. The measurement of these two parameters has led us to consider the combination of superbeams and neutrino factories as the key to unveil the neutrino oscillation picture.

  13. Generalised geometrical CP violation in a T ' lepton flavour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, Ivan; Meroni, Aurora; Petcov, S. T.; Spinrath, Martin

    2014-02-01

    We analyse the interplay of generalised CP transformations and the non-Abelian discrete group T ' and use the semi-direct product G f = T ' ⋊ H CP, as family symmetry acting in the lepton sector. The family symmetry is shown to be spontaneously broken in a geometrical manner. In the resulting flavour model, naturally small Majorana neutrino masses for the light active neutrinos are obtained through the type I see-saw mechanism. The known masses of the charged leptons, lepton mixing angles and the two neutrino mass squared differences are reproduced by the model with a good accuracy. The model allows for two neutrino mass spectra with normal ordering (NO) and one with inverted ordering (IO). For each of the three spectra the absolute scale of neutrino masses is predicted with relatively small uncertainty. The value of the Dirac CP violation (CPV) phase δ in the lepton mixing matrix is predicted to be δ = π/2 or 3 π/2. Thus, the CP violating effects in neutrino oscillations are predicted to be maximal (given the values of the neutrino mixing angles) and experimentally observable. We present also predictions for the sum of the neutrino masses, for the Majorana CPV phases and for the effective Majorana mass in neutrinoless double beta decay. The predictions of the model can be tested in a variety of ongoing and future planned neutrino experiments.

  14. INTENSE NEUTRINO BEAMS AND LEPTONIC CP VIOLATION.

    SciTech Connect

    MARCIANO, W.; PARSA, Z.

    2006-06-13

    Effects of the Leptonic CP violating phase, {delta}, on 3 generation neutrino oscillation rates and asymmetries are discussed. A figure of merit argument is used to show that our ability to measure the phase 6 is rather insensitive to the value of {theta}{sub 13} (for sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} {approx}> 0.01) as well as the detector distance (for very long oscillation baselines). Using a study of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations for BNL-Homestake (2540 km) we show that a conventional horn focused wide band neutrino beam generated by an intense 1-2 MW proton source combined with a very large water Cherenkov detector (250-500 kton) should be able to determine {delta} to about {+-}15{sup o} in 5 x 10{sup 7} sec. of running. In addition, such an effort would also measure the other oscillation parameters ({theta}{sub ij}, {Delta}m{sub ij}{sup 2}) with high precision. Similar findings apply to a Fermilab-Homestake (1280 km) baseline. We also briefly discuss features of Superbeams, Neutrino Factories and Beta-Beams.

  15. Partial Quark-Lepton Universality and Neutrino CP Violation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, D.; Whisnant, K.

    2015-01-01

    We smore » tudy a model with partial quark-lepton universality that can naturally arise in grand unified theories. We find that constraints on the model can be reduced to a single condition on the Dirac CP phase δ in the neutrino sector. Using our current knowledge of the CKM and PMNS mixing matrices, we predict - 32 . 4 ° ≤ δ ≤ 32 . 0 ° at 2 σ .« less

  16. On spontaneous CP violation in the lepton sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimus, W.; Neufeld, H.

    1990-03-01

    After a general discussion of CP transformations in the lepton sector we apply a class of non-standard CP sysmmetries to the Zee model. We show that the resulting cases are all equivalent and give rise to a Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud lepton number and to neutral flavour conservation. The mass, the magnetic moment and the electric dipole moment of the corresponding Dirac neutrino are calculated.

  17. The investigation of CP violation through the decay of polarized tau leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Y.S.

    1996-03-01

    Under the assumption that CP violation is caused by exchange of a new boson, the author proposes to measure the magnitudes and CP-violating phases of the coupling constants of this boson to five different vertices in tau decay. This can be accomplished by studying the decays of polarized tau leptons produced at an e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} collider whose beams are polarized. He points out that CP violation in the tau decay tests most directly the assumption in the standard theory that the imaginary numbers in the mass matrix is the sole cause of CP violation.

  18. The investigation of CP violation through the decay of polarized tau leptons II

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Y.S.

    1996-05-01

    Under the assumption that CP violation is caused by exchange of anew boson, the authors propose to measure the magnitudes and CP-violating phases of the coupling constants of this boson to five different vertices in tau decay. This can be accomplished by studying the decay of polarized tau leptons produced at an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider whose beams are polarized. These five coupling constants could be used to construct a future theory of CP violation. If CP is violated in any channel of tau decay, it will imply that there exists a new charged boson other than the W boson responsible for CP violation. It will also imply that CP violation is much more prevalent than the standard theory predicts and this may enable one to understand the preponderance of matter over antimatter in the present universe.

  19. Reassessing the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blennow, Mattias; Coloma, Pilar; Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique

    2015-03-01

    We address the validity of the usual procedure to determine the sensitivity of neutrino oscillation experiments to CP violation. An explicit calibration of the test statistic is performed through Monte Carlo simulations for several experimental setups. We find that significant deviations from a χ 2 distribution with one degree of freedom occur for experimental setups with low sensitivity to δ. In particular, when the allowed region to which δ is constrained at a given confidence level is comparable to the whole allowed range, the cyclic nature of the variable manifests and the premises of Wilk's theorem are violated. This leads to values of the test statistic significantly lower than a χ 2 distribution at that confidence level. On the other hand, for facilities which can place better constraints on δ the cyclic nature of the variable is hidden and, as the potential of the facility improves, the values of the test statistics first become slightly higher than and then approach asymptotically a χ 2 distribution. The role of sign degeneracies is also discussed.

  20. Generalised CP and trimaximal TM1 lepton mixing in S4 family symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cai-Chang; Ding, Gui-Jun

    2014-04-01

    We construct two flavor models based on S4 family symmetry and generalised CP symmetry. In both models, the S4 family symmetry is broken down to the Z2SU subgroup in the neutrino sector, as a consequence, the trimaximal TM1 lepton mixing is produced. Depending on the free parameters in the flavon potential, the Dirac CP is predicted to be either conserved or maximally broken, and the Majorana CP phases are trivial. The two models differ in the neutrino sector. The flavon fields are involved in the Dirac mass terms at leading order in the first model, and the neutrino mass matrix contains three real parameters such that the absolute neutrino masses are fixed. Nevertheless, the flavon fields enter into the Majorana mass terms at leading order in the second model. The leading order lepton mixing is of the tri-bimaximal form which is broken down to TM1 by the next to leading order contributions.

  1. Leptonic CP Violation measurement at the neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguet Castell, J.; Mena, O.

    2003-05-01

    In this talk, based on the work [J. Burguet Castell, et al., Nucl. Phys. B 608 (2001) 301], we refine our previous analysis [A. Cervera, et al., Nucl. Phys. B 579 (2000) 17] of the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation and θ13 at a neutrino factory in the LMA-MSW scenario, by exploring the full range of these two parameters. We have discovered that there exist, at fixed neutrino energy, Eν, and baseline, L, degenerate solutions. Although the spectral analysis helps in disentangling fake from true solutions, a leftover product of this degeneracy remains for a realistic detector, which we analyse. Furthermore, we take into account the expected uncertainties on the solar and atmospheric oscillation parameters and in the average Earth matter density along the neutrino path. An intermediate baseline of O(3000) km is still the best option to tackle CP violation, although a combination of two baselines turns out to be very important in resolving degeneracies.

  2. Can the four-zero-texture mass matrix model reproduce the observed quark and lepton mixing angles and CP-violating phases?

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Koichi; Nishiura, Hiroyuki

    2006-08-01

    We reconsider a universal mass matrix model which has a seesaw-invariant structure with four-zero texture common to all quarks and leptons. The Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark and Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (MNS) lepton mixing matrices of the model are analyzed analytically. We show that the model can be consistent with all the experimental data of neutrino oscillation and quark mixings by tuning free parameters of the model. It is also shown that the model predicts a relatively large value for the (1, 3) element of the MNS lepton mixing matrix (U{sub MNS}){sub 13}{sup 2}{approx_equal}(0.041-9.6)x10{sup -2}. Using the seesaw mechanism, we also discuss the conditions for the components of the Dirac and the right-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrices which lead to the neutrino mass matrix consistent with the experimental data.

  3. Insensitivity of Leptogenesis with Flavor Effects to Low Energy Leptonic CP Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Sacha; Palorini, Federica; Garayoa, Julia; Rius, Nuria

    2007-10-19

    If the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is produced by leptogenesis, CP violation is required in the lepton sector. In the seesaw extension of the standard model with three hierarchical right-handed neutrinos, we show that the baryon asymmetry is insensitive to the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nagakawa-Sakata phases: thermal leptogenesis can work for any value of the observable phases. This result was well known when there were no flavor effects in leptogenesis; we show that it remains true when flavor effects are included.

  4. Insensitivity of Leptogenesis with Flavor Effects to Low Energy Leptonic CP Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Sacha; Garayoa, Julia; Palorini, Federica; Rius, Nuria

    2007-10-01

    If the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is produced by leptogenesis, CP violation is required in the lepton sector. In the seesaw extension of the standard model with three hierarchical right-handed neutrinos, we show that the baryon asymmetry is insensitive to the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nagakawa-Sakata phases: thermal leptogenesis can work for any value of the observable phases. This result was well known when there were no flavor effects in leptogenesis; we show that it remains true when flavor effects are included.

  5. Lepton mixing from the interplay of the alternating group A 5 and CP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Iura, Andrea; Hagedorn, Claudia; Meloni, Davide

    2015-08-01

    Assuming three generations of Majorana neutrinos, we study the different mixing patterns that arise from the non-trivial breaking of the flavor group A 5 and CP to the residual symmetries Z 3, Z 5 or Z 2 × Z 2 in the charged lepton and to Z 2 × CP in the neutrino sector. All patterns contain only one free parameter θ and thus mixing angles as well as the Dirac and the two Majorana phases are strongly correlated. We perform an analytical and a numerical study of all possible mixing patterns. It turns out that only four patterns can describe the experimentally measured values of the mixing angles for a particular choice of θ well. All of them predict trivial Majorana phases, while the Dirac phase δ is maximal for two patterns and trivial for the two remaining ones. If δ is maximal, also the atmospheric mixing angle is fixed to be maximal.

  6. A realistic pattern of lepton mixing and masses from and CP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Hagedorn, Claudia; Ziegler, Robert

    2014-02-01

    We present a supersymmetric model with the flavour symmetry and a CP symmetry which are broken to a subgroup of the flavour symmetry in the charged lepton sector and to CP () in the neutrino one at leading order. This model implements an approach capable of predicting lepton mixing angles and Dirac as well as Majorana phases in terms of one free parameter. This parameter, directly related to the size of the reactor mixing angle , can be naturally of the correct order in our model. Atmospheric mixing is maximal, while . All three phases are predicted: the Dirac phase is maximal, whereas the two Majorana phases are trivial. The neutrino mass matrix contains only three real parameters at leading order and neutrino masses effectively only depend on two of them. As a consequence, they have to be normally ordered and the absolute neutrino mass scale and the sum of the neutrino masses are predicted. The vacuum of the flavons can be correctly aligned. We study subleading corrections to the leading order results and show that they are small.

  7. Leptonic Dirac CP violation predictions from residual discrete symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, I.; Petcov, S. T.; Stuart, Alexander J.; Titov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Assuming that the observed pattern of 3-neutrino mixing is related to the existence of a (lepton) flavour symmetry, corresponding to a non-Abelian discrete symmetry group Gf, and that Gf is broken to specific residual symmetries Ge and Gν of the charged lepton and neutrino mass terms, we derive sum rules for the cosine of the Dirac phase δ of the neutrino mixing matrix U. The residual symmetries considered are: i) Ge =Z2 and Gν =Zn, n > 2 or Zn ×Zm, n , m ≥ 2; ii) Ge =Zn, n > 2 or Zn ×Zm, n , m ≥ 2 and Gν =Z2; iii) Ge =Z2 and Gν =Z2; iv) Ge is fully broken and Gν =Zn, n > 2 or Zn ×Zm, n , m ≥ 2; and v) Ge =Zn, n > 2 or Zn ×Zm, n , m ≥ 2 and Gν is fully broken. For given Ge and Gν, the sum rules for cos ⁡ δ thus derived are exact, within the approach employed, and are valid, in particular, for any Gf containing Ge and Gν as subgroups. We identify the cases when the value of cos ⁡ δ cannot be determined, or cannot be uniquely determined, without making additional assumptions on unconstrained parameters. In a large class of cases considered the value of cos ⁡ δ can be unambiguously predicted once the flavour symmetry Gf is fixed. We present predictions for cos ⁡ δ in these cases for the flavour symmetry groups Gf =S4, A4, T‧ and A5, requiring that the measured values of the 3-neutrino mixing parameters sin2 ⁡θ12, sin2 ⁡θ13 and sin2 ⁡θ23, taking into account their respective 3σ uncertainties, are successfully reproduced.

  8. Broken R parity contributions to flavor changing rates and CP asymmetries in fermion pair production at leptonic colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemtob, M.; Moreau, G.

    1999-06-01

    the Z-boson pole, AJJ'=(BJJ'-BJ'J)/(BJJ'+BJ'J), vary inside the range (10-1-10-3)sin ψ, where ψ is the CP-odd phase. At energies higher than the Z-boson pole, CP-odd asymmetries for leptons, d-quark and u-quark pair production lie approximately at (10-2-10-3)sin ψ, irrespective of whether one deals with light or heavy flavors.

  9. Quark-lepton complementarity predictions for θ 23 pmns and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gazal; Chauhan, B. C.

    2016-07-01

    In the light of recent experimental results on θ 13 pmns , we re-investigate the complementarity between the quark and lepton mixing matrices and obtain predictions for most unsettled neutrino mixing parameters like θ 23 pmns and CP violating phase invariants J, S 1 and S 2. This paper is motivated by our previous work where in a QLC model we predicted the value for θ 13 pmns = (9 - 2 + 1 ) °, which was found to be in strong agreement with the experimental results. In the QLC model the non-trivial correlation between CKM and PMNS mixing matrices is given by a correlation matrix ( V c ). We do numerical simulation and estimate the texture of the V c and in our findings we get a small deviation from the Tri-Bi-Maximal (TBM) texture and a large from the Bi-Maximal one, which is consistent with the work already reported in literature. In the further investigation we obtain quite constrained limits for sin2 θ 23 pmns = 0. 4235 - 0.0043 + 0.0032 that is narrower to the existing ones. We also obtain the constrained limits for the three CP violating phase invariants J , S 1 and S 2:as J < 0 .0315, S 1 < 0 .12 and S 2 < 0 .08, respectively.

  10. A very intense neutrino super beam experiment for leptonic CP violation discovery based on the European spallation source linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baussan, E.; Blennow, M.; Bogomilov, M.; Bouquerel, E.; Caretta, O.; Cederkäll, J.; Christiansen, P.; Coloma, P.; Cupial, P.; Danared, H.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Dracos, M.; Ekelöf, T.; Eshraqi, M.; Fernandez Martinez, E.; Gaudiot, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Lindroos, M.; Loveridge, P.; Matev, R.; McGinnis, D.; Mezzetto, M.; Miyamoto, R.; Mosca, L.; Ohlsson, T.; Öhman, H.; Osswald, F.; Peggs, S.; Poussot, P.; Ruber, R.; Tang, J. Y.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Wurtz, J.

    2014-08-01

    Very intense neutrino beams and large neutrino detectors will be needed in order to enable the discovery of CP violation in the leptonic sector. We propose to use the proton linac of the European Spallation Source currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, to deliver, in parallel with the spallation neutron production, a very intense, cost effective and high performance neutrino beam. The baseline program for the European Spallation Source linac is that it will be fully operational at 5 MW average power by 2022, producing 2 GeV 2.86 ms long proton pulses at a rate of 14 Hz. Our proposal is to upgrade the linac to 10 MW average power and 28 Hz, producing 14 pulses/s for neutron production and 14 pulses/s for neutrino production. Furthermore, because of the high current required in the pulsed neutrino horn, the length of the pulses used for neutrino production needs to be compressed to a few μs with the aid of an accumulator ring. A long baseline experiment using this Super Beam and a megaton underground Water Cherenkov detector located in existing mines 300-600 km from Lund will make it possible to discover leptonic CP violation at 5 σ significance level in up to 50% of the leptonic Dirac CP-violating phase range. This experiment could also determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a significance level of more than 3 σ if this issue will not already have been settled by other experiments by then. The mass hierarchy performance could be increased by combining the neutrino beam results with those obtained from atmospheric neutrinos detected by the same large volume detector. This detector will also be used to measure the proton lifetime, detect cosmological neutrinos and neutrinos from supernova explosions. Results on the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy are presented.

  11. Leptonic CP violation studies at MiniBooNE in the (3+2) sterile neutrino oscillation hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiorgi, G.; Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Conrad, J. M.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Whisnant, K.; Sorel, M.; Barger, V.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the extent to which leptonic CP-violation in (3+2) sterile neutrino models leads to different oscillation probabilities for {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} oscillations at MiniBooNE. We are using a combined analysis of short-baseline (SBL) oscillation results, including the LSND and null SBL results, to which we impose additional constraints from atmospheric oscillation data. We obtain the favored regions in MiniBooNE oscillation probability space for both (3+2) CP-conserving and (3+2) CP-violating models. We further investigate the allowed CP-violation phase values and the MiniBooNE reach for such a CP violation measurement. The analysis shows that the oscillation probabilities in MiniBooNE neutrino and antineutrino running modes can differ significantly, with the latter possibly being as much as 3 times larger than the first. In addition, we also show that all possible values of the single CP-violation phase measurable at short baselines in (3+2) models are allowed within 99% CL by existing data.

  12. CP violation, single lepton polarization asymmetry, and polarized CP asymmetry in B{yields}K{sup *}l{sup +}l{sup -} decay in the four-generation standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Bashiry, V.; Shirkhanghah, N.; Zeynali, K.

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we present a study of CP asymmetry, single lepton polarization asymmetry and polarized CP asymmetry in B{yields}K*l{sup +}l{sup -} decay within the four-generation standard model. Taking |V{sub t{sup '}}{sub s}*V{sub t{sup '}}{sub b}|=0.01, 0.02, 0.03 with phase {l_brace}60 deg. -120 deg.{r_brace}, which is consistent with the b{yields}sl{sup +}l{sup -} rate and the Bs mixing parameter {delta}m{sub Bs}, we find that CP asymmetry, single lepton polarization asymmetry and polarized CP asymmetry are sensitive to the existence of the fourth generation. This can serve as an indirect method to search for new physics effects, in particular, to search for the fourth-generation quarks(t{sup '},b{sup '}) via their indirect manifestations in loop diagrams.

  13. Revisiting the sensitivity studies for leptonic CP-violation and mass hierarchy with T2K, NOνA and LBNE experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepthi, K. N.; C, Soumya; Mohanta, R.

    2015-02-01

    Precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters and the determination of mass hierarchy are the primary goals of present and upcoming neutrino experiments. In this work, we study the sensitivity of T2K, NOνA and LBNE experiments to discover leptonic charge parity (CP)-violation and the determination of neutrino mass hierarchy. We obtain the correlation between the CP-violating phase {{δ }CP} and the mixing angles {{θ }13}, {{θ }23}, and the sensitivity to determine the octant of atmospheric mixing angle {{θ }23}. The entire analysis is performed for a total of ten years (5ν + 5 \\bar{ν }) of the running of T2K, NOνA and LBNE experiments. Furthermore, we also consider the impact of cross section uncertainties on the CP-violation sensitivity of the LBNE experiment.

  14. Predicting lepton flavor mixing from Δ(48) and generalized CP symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Gui-Jun; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2015-02-01

    We propose to understand the mixing angles and CP-violating phases from the Δ(48) family symmetry combined with the generalized CP symmetry. A model-independent analysis is performed by scanning all the possible symmetry breaking chains. We find a new mixing pattern with only one free parameter, excellent agreement with the observed mixing angles can be achieved and all the CP-violating phases are predicted to take nontrivial values. This mixing pattern is testable in the near future neutrino oscillation and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Finally, a flavor model is constructed to realize this mixing pattern. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275188, 11179007, 11135009)

  15. Direct CP, Lepton Flavor, and Isospin Asymmetries in the Decays B→K(*)l+l-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Cahn, R. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Nash, J. A.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Li, X.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Koeneke, K.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Esteve, L.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Gabareen, A. M.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-03-01

    We measure branching fractions and integrated rate asymmetries for the rare decays B→K(*)l+l-, where l+l- is either e+e- or μ+μ-, using a sample of 384×106 B Bmacr events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider. We find no evidence for direct CP or lepton-flavor asymmetries. However, for dilepton masses below the J/ψ resonance, we find evidence for unexpectedly large isospin asymmetries in both B→Kl+l- and B→K*l+l- which differ, respectively, by 3.2σ and 2.7σ, including systematic uncertainties, from the standard model expectations.

  16. Direct CP, Lepton Flavor and Isospin Asymmetries in the Decays B->K(*)l+l-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-03-03

    We measure rate asymmetries for the rare decays B {yields} K{sup (*)}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, where {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} is either e{sup +}e{sup -} or {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, using a sample of 384 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We find no evidence for direct CP or lepton-flavor asymmetries. For dilepton masses below the J/{psi} resonance, we find evidence for unexpectedly large isospin asymmetries in both B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} which differ respectively by 3.2{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, including systematic uncertainties, from the Standard Model expectations.

  17. Direct CP, lepton flavor, and isospin asymmetries in the decays B-->K(*)l+l-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-03-01

    We measure branching fractions and integrated rate asymmetries for the rare decays B-->K(*)l+l-, where l+l- is either e+e- or micro+micro-, using a sample of 384x10(6) BB events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider. We find no evidence for direct CP or lepton-flavor asymmetries. However, for dilepton masses below the J/psi resonance, we find evidence for unexpectedly large isospin asymmetries in both B-->Kl+l- and B-->K*l+l- which differ, respectively, by 3.2sigma and 2.7sigma, including systematic uncertainties, from the standard model expectations. PMID:19392508

  18. Prediction for CP violation via electric dipole moment of τ lepton in γγ → τ + τ - process at CLIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atağ, S.; Gürkanlı, E.

    2016-06-01

    Pair production of tau leptons in two photon collision γγ → τ + τ - is studied at CLIC to test CP violating QED couplings of tau leptons. CP violating effects are investigated using tau pair spin correlations which are observed through the hadronic decay of each τ into πν. Competitive bounds with previous works on the electric dipole moment from CP odd terms have been obtained.

  19. CP-conserving unparticle phase effects on the unpolarized and polarized direct CP asymmetry in b{yields}dl{sup +}l{sup -} transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bashiry, V.

    2008-05-01

    We examine the unparticle CP-conserving phase effects on the direct CP asymmetry for both polarized and unpolarized leptons in the inclusive b{yields}dl{sup +}l{sup -} transition, where the flavor-changing neutral currents are forbidden at tree level but are induced by one-loop penguin diagrams. The averaged polarized and unpolarized CP asymmetries depict strong dependency on the unparticle parameters. In particular, a sizable discrepancy corresponding to the standard model is achieved when the scale dimension value is 1CP asymmetry depending on the definite value of the scaling dimension d{sub U}. Especially, when d{sub U}{approx}1.1 the CP asymmetries vanish.

  20. Majorana phases, CP violation, sterile neutrinos and neutrinoless double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Babič, Andrej; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2013-12-30

    CP violation plays a crucial role in the generation of the baryon asymmetry in the Universe. Within this context we investigate the possibility of CP violation in the lepton sector caused by Majorana neutrino mixing. Focus is put on the model including 1 sterile neutrino. Both cases of normal and inverted neutrino mass spectrum are considered. We address the question whether the Majorana phases can be measured in the neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments with sensitivity to the effective Majorana neutrino mass of the order of 10{sup −2} eV.

  1. Lepton mixing predictions from infinite group series D 9 n, 3 n (1) with generalized CP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cai-Chang; Yao, Chang-Yuan; Ding, Gui-Jun

    2016-05-01

    We have performed a comprehensive analysis of the type D group D 9 n, 3 n (1) as flavor symmetry and the generalized CP symmetry. All possible residual symmetries and their consequences for the prediction of the mixing parameters are studied. We find that only one type of mixing pattern is able to accommodate the measured values of the mixing angles in both "direct" and "variant of semidirect" approaches, and four types of mixing patterns are phenomenologically viable in the "semidirect" approach. The admissible values of the mixing angles as well as CP violating phases are studied in detail for each case. It is remarkable that the first two smallest D 9 n, 3 n (1) groups with n = 1 , 2 can fit the experimental data very well. The phenomenological predictions for neutrinoless double beta decay are discussed.

  2. Relating lepton mixing angles with lepton mass hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the possibility of relating lepton mixing angles with lepton mass hierarchies in a model-independent way. Guided by the existence of such relations in the quark sector, we first consider all the mixing angles, both in charged lepton and neutrino sectors to be related to the respective mass ratios. This allows us to calculate the leptonic mixing angles observed in neutrino oscillations as functions of the lightest neutrino mass. We show that for both normal and inverted hierarchical neutrino masses, this scenario does not give rise to correct leptonic mixing angles. We then show that correct leptonic mixing angles can be generated with normal hierarchical neutrino masses if the relation between mixing angle and mass ratio is restricted to 1-2 and 1-3 mixing in both charged lepton and neutrino sectors leaving the 2-3 mixing angles as free parameters. We then restrict the lightest neutrino mass as well as the difference between 2-3 mixing angles in charged lepton and neutrino sectors from the requirement of producing correct leptonic mixing angles. We constrain the lightest neutrino mass to be around 0.002 eV and leptonic Dirac CP phase δCP such that sin2δ CP ˜ (0.35-0.50). We also construct the leptonic mass matrices in terms of 2-3 mixing angles and lightest neutrino mass and briefly comment on the possibility of realizing texture zeros in the neutrino mass matrix.

  3. Leptons, Quarks, and Their Antiparticles: A Phase-Space View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żenczykowski, Piotr

    2010-09-01

    Recently, a correspondence has been shown to exist between the structure of a single Standard Model generation of elementary particles and the properties of the Clifford algebra of nonrelativistic phase space. Here, this correspondence is spelled out in terms of phase-space variables. Thus, a phase-space interpretation of the connections between leptons, quarks and their antiparticles is proposed, in particular providing a timeless alternative to the standard Stückelberg-Feynman interpretation. The issue of the additivity of canonical momenta is raised and argued to be intimately related to the unobservability of free quarks and the emergence of mesons and baryons.

  4. Resolving Standard and Nonstandard CP Violation Phases in Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gago, A. M.; Minakata, H.; Uchinami, S.; Nunokawa, H.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.

    2010-03-30

    Neutrino oscillations can exhibit extra CP violation effects, beyond those expected from the standard Kobayashi-Maskawa phase delta, if non-standard neutrino interactions are at play. We show that it is possible to disentangle the two CP violating effects by measuring muon neutrino appearance using a near-far two detector setting in a neutrino factory experiment.

  5. Remark on Majorana CP phases in neutrino mixing and leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitabayashi, Teruyuki; Koizumi, Naoto

    2014-05-01

    We estimate Majorana CP phases for a simple flavor neutrino mixing matrix which has been reported by Qu and Ma. Sizes of Majorana CP phases are evaluated in the study of the neutrinoless double beta decay and a particular leptogenesis scenario. We find the dependence of the physically relevant Majorana CP phase on the mass of lightest right-handed neutrino in the minimal seesaw model and the effective Majorana neutrino mass which is related with the half-life of the neutrinoless double beta decay.

  6. A 4 × U(1)PQ model for the lepton flavor structure and the strong CP problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takaaki; Shimizu, Yusuke; Yamada, Toshifumi

    2016-06-01

    We present a model with A 4 × U(1)PQ lepton flavor symmetry which explains the origin of the lepton flavor structure and also solves the strong CP problem. Standard model gauge singlet fields, so-called "flavons", charged under the A 4 × U(1)PQ symmetry are introduced and are coupled with the lepton and the Higgs sectors. The flavon vacuum expectation values (VEVs) trigger spontaneous breaking of the A 4 × U(1)PQ symmetry. The breaking pattern of the A 4 accounts for the tri-bimaximal neutrino mixing and the deviation from it due to the non-zero θ 13 angle, and the breaking of the U(1)PQ gives rise to a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson, axion, whose VEV cancels the QCD θ term. We investigate the breaking of the A 4 × U(1)PQ symmetry through an analysis on the scalar potential and further discuss the properties of the axion in the model, including its decay constant, mass and coupling with photons. It is shown that the axion decay constant is related with the right-handed neutrino mass through the flavon VEVs. Experimental constraints on the axion and their implications are also studied.

  7. Measuring the 13 Neutrino Mixing Angle and the CP Phase with Neutrino Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, P.D.; Kachelriess, M.

    2005-06-03

    The observed excess of high-energy cosmic rays from the Galactic plane in the energy range around 10{sup 18} eV may be explained by neutron primaries generated in the photodissociation of heavy nuclei. In this scenario, lower-energy neutrons decay before reaching the Earth and produce a detectable flux in a 1 km{sup 3} neutrino telescope. The initial flavor composition of the neutrino flux, {phi}({nu}{sub e}):{phi}({nu}{sub {mu}}):{phi}({nu}{sub {tau}})=1:0:0, permits a combined {nu}{sub {mu}}/{nu}{sub {tau}} appearance and {nu}{sub e} disappearance experiment. The observable flux ratio {phi}({nu}{sub {mu}})/{phi}({nu}{sub e}+{nu}{sub {tau}}) at Earth depends on the 13 mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and the leptonic CP phase {delta}{sub CP}, thus opening a new way to measure these two quantities.

  8. Phase direct CP violations and general mixing matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Ling-Lie

    2007-08-01

    I formulate expressions for amplitudes suitable for quantifying both modulus and phase direct CP violations. They result in Möbius transformation (MT) relations, which provide encouraging information for the search of direct CP violations in general. I apply the formulation to calculate the measurements of phase direct CP violations and strong amplitudes in B∓ →K∓π±π∓ by the Belle Collaboration. For the formulation, I show a versatile construction procedure for N × N Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrices, Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) matrices, and general unitary matrices. It clarifies the 3 × 3 cases and is useful for the beyond.

  9. SO(10) SUSY GUT for fermion masses: Lepton flavor and CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Dermisek, R.; Harada, M.; Raby, S.

    2006-08-01

    We discuss the results of a global {chi}{sup 2} analysis of a simple SO(10) supersymmetric grand unified theory (SUSY GUT) with D{sub 3} family symmetry and low energy R parity. The model describes fermion mass matrices with 14 parameters and gives excellent fits to 20 observable masses and mixing angles in both quark and lepton sectors, giving six predictions. Bi-large neutrino mixing is obtained with hierarchical quark and lepton Yukawa matrices, thus avoiding the possibility of large lepton flavor violation. The model naturally predicts small 1-3 neutrino mixing, with sin{theta}{sub 13}{approx_equal}0.05-0.06. In this paper we evaluate the predictions for the lepton flavor violating processes, {mu}{yields}e{gamma}, {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} and {tau}{yields}e{gamma} and also the electric dipole moment of the electron (d{sub e}), the muon, and the tau, assuming universal squark and slepton masses (m{sub 16}) and a universal soft SUSY breaking A parameter (A{sub 0}) at the GUT scale. We find Br({mu}{yields}e{gamma}) is naturally below present bounds, but may be observable by MEG. Similarly, d{sub e} is below present bounds, but it is within the range of future experiments. We also give predictions for the light Higgs mass (using FeynHiggs). We find an upper bound given by m{sub h}{<=}127 GeV, with an estimated {+-}3 GeV theoretical uncertainty. Finally we present predictions for SUSY particle masses in the favored region of parameter space.

  10. Neutrino experiments: Hierarchy, CP, CPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manmohan; Randhawa, Monika; Singh, Mandip

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of our recent investigations regarding the prospects of ongoing neutrino experiments as well as future experiments in determining few of the most important unknowns in the field of neutrino physics, specifically the neutrino mass ordering and leptonic CP-violation phase. The effect of matter oscillations on the neutrino oscillation probabilities has been exploited in resolving the degeneracy between the neutrino mass ordering and the CP violation phase in the leptonic sector. Further, we estimate the extent of extrinsic CP and CPT violation in the experiments with superbeams as well as neutrino factories.

  11. SPheno 3.1: extensions including flavour, CP-phases and models beyond the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porod, W.; Staub, F.

    2012-11-01

    We describe recent extensions of the program SPhenoincluding flavour aspects, CP-phases, R-parity violation and low energy observables. In case of flavour mixing all masses of supersymmetric particles are calculated including the complete flavour structure and all possible CP-phases at the 1-loop level. We give details on implemented seesaw models, low energy observables and the corresponding extension of the SUSY Les Houches Accord. Moreover, we comment on the possibilities to include MSSM extensions in SPheno. Catalogue identifier: ADRV_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADRV_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 154062 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1336037 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran95. Computer: PC running under Linux, should run in every Unix environment. Operating system: Linux, Unix. Classification: 11.6. Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADRV_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 153(2003)275 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The first issue is the determination of the masses and couplings of supersymmetric particles in various supersymmetric models, the R-parity conserved MSSM with generation mixing and including CP-violating phases, various seesaw extensions of the MSSM and the MSSM with bilinear R-parity breaking. Low energy data on Standard Model fermion masses, gauge couplings and electroweak gauge boson masses serve as constraints. Radiative corrections from supersymmetric particles to these inputs must be calculated. Theoretical constraints on the soft SUSY breaking parameters from a high scale theory are imposed and the parameters at the electroweak scale are obtained from the

  12. CP-odd phase correlations and electric dipole moments

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam; Santoso, Yudi

    2005-10-01

    We revisit the constraints imposed by electric dipole moments (EDMs) of nucleons and heavy atoms on new CP-violating sources within supersymmetric theories. We point out that certain two-loop renormalization group corrections induce significant mixing between the basis-invariant CP-odd phases. In the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model, the CP-odd invariant related to the soft trilinear A-phase at the grand unified theory (GUT) scale, {theta}{sub A}, induces nontrivial and distinct CP-odd phases for the three gaugino masses at the weak scale. The latter give one-loop contributions to EDMs enhanced by tan{beta}, and can provide the dominant contribution to the electron EDM induced by {theta}{sub A}. We perform a detailed analysis of the EDM constraints within the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model, exhibiting the reach, in terms of sparticle spectra, which may be obtained assuming generic phases, as well as the limits on the CP-odd phases for some specific parameter points where detailed phenomenological studies are available. We also illustrate how this reach will expand with results from the next generation of experiments which are currently in development.

  13. Quark CP-phase and Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Chuichiro; Matsuda, Masahisa; Matsunaga, Mamoru; Matsuoka, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism, we study quark flavor mixings in the SU (6) × SU (2)R model. The characteristic structure of the CKM matrix is attributed to the hierarchical effective Yukawa couplings due to the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism and also to the state-mixings beyond the MSSM. We elucidate the detailed form of the CKM matrix elements and find interesting relations between the CP violating phase and three mixing angles. Taking the existing data of three mixing angles, we estimate the quark CP-phase at δ = (75 ± 3) °. This result is in accord with observations.

  14. Measurement of the CP-violating phase γ at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopman, R. F.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The CKM phase γ is the angle of the unitarity triangle which is least well known. To reach the highest sensitivity to its value, all currently available measurements using hadronic tree decays by LHCb are combined, resulting in γ=(73 ^{+9}_{-10})°. The combination includes results from measurements of time-integrated CP violation in B^{±}→ Dh^{±} and B0→ DK^{*0} decays, with h a pion or kaon, and from a time-dependent measurement of CP violation using Bs0→ Ds^{±}K^{∓} decays.

  15. CP-Violating Phases From D Branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Lisa L.

    2001-04-01

    Theories with softly broken supersymmetry (SUSY) are the best motivated candidates for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), as they can provide a resolution to the hierarchy problem and explain the origin of the electroweak scale. In these theories, a central issue to be addressed is the origin and dynamical mechanism of spontaneous supersymmetry breaking. In supersymmetric extensions of the SM such as the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the effects of the unknown dynamics of supersymmetry breaking are encoded by adding terms to the Lagrangian which break supersymmetry explicitly, at the expense of introducing a considerable number of parameters into the theory. For example, the most general set of soft supersymmetry breaking parameters in the MSSM (defined to be the minimal supersymmetric extension of the SM with the standard Higgs sector and conserved R-parity) includes 105 masses, mixing angles, and phases. From the phenomenological viewpoint this large number of parameters can be cumbersome but not otherwise problematic, as it is for experiments to measure and for the underlying theory (for example, superstring theory) to predict the values of these parameters. Phenomenological analyses aid in this process both for experimentalists and theorists by serving as a helpful guide to the allowed regions of parameter space, and are crucial from the experimental side since almost none of the Lagrangian parameters are directly measured...

  16. Leptonic g -2 moments, C P phases, and the Higgs boson mass constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboubrahim, Amin; Ibrahim, Tarek; Nath, Pran

    2016-07-01

    Higgs boson mass measurement at ˜125 GeV points to a high scale for supersymmetry (SUSY) specifically the scalar masses. If all the scalars are heavy, the supersymmetric contribution to the leptonic g -2 moments will be significantly reduced. On the other hand, the Brookhaven experiment indicates a ˜3 σ deviation from the standard model prediction. Here we analyze the leptonic g -2 moments in an extended minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with inclusion of a vectorlike leptonic generation which brings in new sources of C P violation. In this work we consider the contributions to the leptonic g -2 moments arising from the exchange of charginos and neutralinos, sleptons and mirror sleptons, and from the exchange of W and Z bosons and of leptons and mirror leptons. We focus specifically on the g -2 moments for the muon and the electron where sensitive measurements exist. Here it is shown that one can get consistency with the current data on g -2 under the Higgs boson mass constraint. Dependence of the moments on C P phases from the extended sector are analyzed and it is shown that they are sensitively dependent on the phases from the new sector. It is shown that the corrections to the leptonic moments arising from the extended MSSM sector will be nonvanishing even if the SUSY scale extends into the PeV region.

  17. Flavor symmetry L{sub e}-L{sub {mu}}-L{sub {tau}}, atmospheric neutrino mixing, and CP violation in the lepton sector

    SciTech Connect

    Petcov, S.T.; Rodejohann, W.

    2005-04-01

    The Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata neutrino mixing matrix is given, in general, by the product of two unitary matrices associated with the diagonalization of the charged lepton and neutrino mass matrices. Assuming that the active flavor neutrinos possess a Majorana mass matrix which is diagonalized by a bimaximal mixing matrix, we give the allowed forms of the charged lepton mixing matrix and the corresponding implied forms of the charged lepton mass matrix. We then assume that the origin of bimaximal mixing is a weakly broken flavor symmetry corresponding to the conservation of the nonstandard lepton charge L{sup '}=L{sub e}-L{sub {mu}}-L{sub {tau}}. The latter does not predict, in general, the atmospheric neutrino mixing to be maximal. We study the impact of this fact on the allowed forms of the charged lepton mixing matrix and on the neutrino mixing observables, analyzing the case of CP violation in detail. When compared with the case of exact bimaximal mixing, the deviations from zero U{sub e3} and from maximal atmospheric neutrino mixing are typically more sizable if one assumes just L{sup '} conservation. In fact, |U{sub e3}|{sup 2} can be as small as 0.007 and atmospheric neutrino mixing can take any value inside its currently allowed range. We discuss under which conditions the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle is larger or smaller than {pi}/4. We present also a simple seesaw realization of the implied light neutrino Majorana mass matrix and consider leptogenesis in this scenario.

  18. CP Symmetry, Lee-Yang zeros and Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Aguado, M.; Asorey, M.

    2011-05-23

    We analyze the analytic properties of {theta}-vacuum in QCD and its connection with spontaneous symmetry breaking of CP symmetry. A loss of analyticity in the {theta}-vacuum energy density can only be due to the accumulation of Lee-Yang zeros at some real values of {theta}. In the case of first order transitions these singularities are always associated to and cusp singularities and never to or cusps, which in the case {theta} = 0 are incompatible with the Vafa-Witten diamagnetic inequality This fact provides a key missing link in the Vafa-Witten proof of parity symmetry conservation in vector-like gauge theories like QCD. The argument is very similar to that used in the derivation of Bank-Casher formula for chiral symmetry breaking. However, the and behavior does not exclude the existence of a first phase transition at {theta} = {pi}, where a and cusp singularity is not forbidden by any inequality; in this case the topological charge condensate is proportional to the density of Lee-Yang zeros at {theta} = {pi}. Moreover, Lee-Yang zeros could give rise to a second order phase transition at {theta} = 0, which might be very relevant for the interpretation of the anomalous behavior of the topological susceptibility in the CP{sup 1} sigma model.

  19. Generation mixing and CP-violation, standard and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Harari, H.

    1987-05-01

    We discuss several issues related to the observed generation pattern of quarks and leptons. Among the main topics: Masses, angles and phases and possible relations among them, a possible fourth generation of quarks and leptons, new bounds on neutrino masses, comments on the recently observed mixing in the B - anti B system, CP-violation, and recent proposals for a b-quark ''factory''.

  20. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; Prosper, Harrison B.; Sato, Nobuo

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $\\Theta$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling through the $\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  1. Probing nonunitary mixing and CP violation at a neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan; Blennow, Mattias; Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Lopez-Pavon, Jacobo

    2009-08-01

    A low-energy nonunitary leptonic mixing matrix is a generic feature of many extensions of the standard model. In such a case, the task of future precision neutrino oscillation experiments is more ambitious than measuring the three mixing angles and the leptonic (Dirac) CP phase, i.e., the accessible parameters of a unitary leptonic mixing matrix. A nonunitary mixing matrix has 13 parameters that affect neutrino oscillations, out of which four are CP violating. In the scheme of minimal unitarity violation we analyze the potential of a neutrino factory for determining or constraining the parameters of the nonunitary leptonic mixing matrix, thereby testing the origin of CP violation in the lepton sector.

  2. Uncertainties on the CP phase α due to Penguin diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksan, R.; Buccella, F.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Oliver, L.; Pène, O.; Raynal, J.-C.

    1995-02-01

    A major problem in the determination of the the CP angle α, that should be measured through modes of the type B d, overlineBd → ππ, … , is the uncertainty coming from Penguin diagrams. We consider the different ground state modes ππ, πϱ, ϱϱ, and, assuming the FSI phases to be negligible, we investigate the amount of uncertainty coming from Penguins that can be parametrized by a dilution factor D and an angle shift Δα. The parameter D is either 1 or very close to 1 in all these modes, and it can be measured independently, up to a sign ambiguity, by the t dependence. Assuming factorization, we show that Δα is much smaller for the modes ϱπ and ϱϱ than for ππ, and we plot their allowed region as a function of α itself. Moreover, we show that most of the modes contribute to the asymmetry with the same sign, and define for their sum an effective Deff and an effective Δαeff, an average of Δα for the different modes. It turns out that Deff is of the order of 0.9, Δαeff is between 5% and 10% and, relative to ππ, the statistical gain for the sum is of about a factor 10. Finally, we compute the ratios {Kπ}/{ππ}, … that test the strength of the Penguins and depend on the CP angles, as emphasized by Silva and Wolfenstein and by Deandrea et al.

  3. CP-violating phases in neutral meson oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eijk, Daan; LHCb Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    LHCb is one of the four large experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland and is dedicated to heavy flavour physics. LHCb searches for New Physics (NP) by performing precision measurements of CP-violating parameters. One of the key measurements of LHCb is the extraction of the CP-violating weak phase ϕs. The Standard Model (SM) prediction for this parameter is small: ϕsSM=2arg({VV}/{ts*VVcs*})=-0.0364±0.0016 [J. Charles, et al., CKMfitter Group, European Physical Journal C 41 (2005) 1-131, updated results and plots available at: http://ckmfitter.in2p3.fr. arXiv:hep-ph/0406184.]. Possible deviations from this SM prediction may be attributed to NP. The parameter ϕs is measured by performing a time-dependent angular analysis of Bs0→J/ψϕ decays and independently by a time-dependent analysis of Bs0→J/ψππ decays. A simultaneous fit to both decays yields ϕs=-0.002±0.083 (stat.)±0.027 (syst.). The fitted values of ϕs and the lifetime difference ΔΓs exhibit a phase ambiguity, which is resolved by performing fits in bins of the K+K- invariant mass and looking at the difference in fitted strong phases of P-wave and S-wave contributions. Finally, as a first step towards controlling penguin contributions to b→c(c¯s) transitions such as Bs0→J/ψϕ decays, a branching ratio measurement of Bs0→J/ψK decays is presented. In addition to the ϕs measurement, two other analyses are presented here. Firstly, preliminary results of the LHCb asls measurement are presented. The second analysis is the measurement of triple product asymmetries in Bs0→ϕϕ decays. The branching ratio measurement of Bs0→J/ψK decays is extracted from a dataset with an integrated luminosity of 0.37 fb. The results from all other aforementioned analyses are extracted from the full 2011 LHCb data set which has an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb.

  4. B{sub s} mixing phase and lepton flavor violation in supersymmetric SU(5)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jae-hyeon

    2008-11-23

    The connection between B{sub s} mixing phase and lepton flavor violation is studied in SU(5) GUT. The O(1) phase, preferring a non-vanishing squark mixing, generically implies {tau}{yields}(e+{mu}){gamma} and {mu}{yields}e{gamma}. In addition to the facts already well-known, stresses are put on the role of gaugino to scalar mass ratio at the GUT scale and the possible modifications due to Planck-suppressed non-renormalizable operators.

  5. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; Prosper, Harrison B.; Sato, Nobuo

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in themore » $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $$\\Theta$$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling through the $$\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  6. First measurement of the CP-violating phase in Bs(0) → ϕϕ decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Mcnab, A; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-06-14

    A first flavor-tagged measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating asymmetry in B(s)(0) → ϕϕ decays is presented. In this decay channel, the CP-violating weak phase arises due to CP violation in the interference between B(s)(0)-B(s)(0) mixing and the b → sss gluonic penguin decay amplitude. Using a sample of pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb(-1) and collected at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the LHCb detector, 880 B(s)(0) → ϕϕ signal decays are obtained. The CP-violating phase is measured to be in the interval [-2.46,-0.76] rad at a 68% confidence level. The p value of the standard model prediction is 16%. PMID:25165914

  7. Intracerebral administration of CpG oligonucleotide for patients with recurrent glioblastoma: a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Alexandre; Metellus, Philippe; Ursu, Renata; Zohar, Sarah; Lafitte, Francois; Barrié, Maryline; Meng, Yuxia; Richard, Margaretha; Parizot, Christophe; Laigle-Donadey, Florence; Gorochov, Guy; Psimaras, Dimitri; Sanson, Marc; Tibi, Annick; Chinot, Olivier; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2010-04-01

    Immunostimulating oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG-ODN) have shown promising efficacy in cancer models when injected locally. In a phase I clinical trial, intratumoral infusions of CpG-ODN in glioblastoma (GBM) patients were well tolerated at doses up to 20 mg. This phase II trial was designed to study the efficacy of a local treatment by CpG-ODN in patients with recurrent GBMs. Patients with recurrent GBM occurring at least 3 months after radiotherapy, and previously treated with 1 or 2 regimens of chemotherapy received 20 mg of CpG-ODN (CpG-28) by convection-enhanced delivery. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients without tumor progression 6 months after inclusion. Secondary endpoints were tolerance, survival, and radiological response. Thirty-four patients were enrolled in two centers between November 2004 and March 2006. Thirty-one patients received CpG-ODN treatment. The progression-free survival (PFS) at 6 months was 19%. One partial response and 3 minor responses were observed. The median overall survival was 28 weeks. Eight patients (24%) were alive 1 year after inclusion and 5 patients (15%) were alive after 2 years. Treatment was usually well tolerated. As reported previously, the most common toxicities were lymphopenia, mild fever, seizures, and transient neurological worsening. Despite a few cases showing a radiological response, CpG-28 showed modest activity on the 6-month PFS in this patient population. The molecular or clinical characteristics of a subgroup of patients that could potentially benefit from such an approach remain to be defined. PMID:20308317

  8. CP Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigi, I. I.; Sanda, A. I.

    2009-04-01

    Foreword; Part I. Basics of CP Violation: 1. Prologue; 2. Prelude: C, P and T in classical dynamics; 3. C, P and T in non-relativistic quantum mechanics; 4. C, P and T in relativistic quantum theories; 5. The arrival of strange particles; 6. Quantum mechanics of neutral particles; Part II. Theory and Experiments: 7. The quest for CP violation in K decays - a marathon; 8. The KM implementation of CP violation; 9. The theory of KL → ππ decays; 10. Paradigmatic discoveries in B physics; 11. Let the drama unfold - B CP phenomenology; 12. Rare K and B decays - almost perfect laboratories; 13. CPT violation - could it be in K and B decays?; 14. CP violation in charm decays - the dark horse; 15. The strong CP problem; Part III. Looking Beyond the Standard Model: 16. Quest for CP violation in the neutrino sector; 17. Possible corrections to the KM ansatz: right-handed currents and non-minimal Higgs dynamics; 18. CP violation without nonperturbative dynamics - top quarks and charged leptons; 19. SUSY - providing shelter for Higgs dynamics; 20. Minimal flavour violation and extra dimensions; 21. Baryogenesis in the universe; Part IV. Summary: 11. Summary and Perspectives; References; Index.

  9. Lifetime difference and CP-violating phase in the Bs0 system.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, B; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-03-23

    From an analysis of the decay Bs0-->J/psi phi, we obtain the width difference between the light and heavy mass eigenstates DeltaGamma identical with (GammaL-GammaH)=0.17+/-0.09(stat)+/-0.02(syst) ps-1 and the CP-violating phase phis=-0.79+/-0.56(stat)(-0.01)(+0.14)(syst). Under the hypothesis of no CP violation (phis identical with 0), we obtain 1/Gamma=tau(Bs0)=1.52+/-0.08(stat)(-0.03)(+0.01)(syst) ps and DeltaGamma=0.12(-0.10)(+0.08)(stat)+/-0.02(syst) ps-1. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of about 1.1 fb-1 accumulated with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This is the first direct measurement of the CP-violating mixing phase in the Bs0 system. PMID:17501111

  10. Universal Mass Matrix and Leptonic θ13 Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, Hiroyuki; Fukuyama, Takeshi

    We propose a universal mixing hypothesis between quark and lepton sectors at high energy scale (probably GUT scale) where quark-lepton universality holds. Namely in the charged lepton diagonal base, all the other mass matrices for up and down quarks and neutrinos are diagonalized by the same unitary matrix except for the phase elements. Thanks to this hypothesis, the observed values of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark mixing matrix and the mixing angles θ12 and θ23 in the Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (MNS) lepton mixing matrix can predict the unknown magnitudes of the mixing angle θ13 and of the CP violating Dirac phase δ in the MNS matrix. Their allowed regions are rather narrow, 0.036 < sin θ13 < 0.048 and 6° < δ < 12°.

  11. Measuring Dirac CP-violating phase with intermediate energy beta beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhti, P.; Farzan, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Taking the established nonzero value of , we study the possibility of extracting the Dirac CP-violating phase by a beta beam facility with a boost factor . We compare the performance of different setups with different baselines, boost factors, and detector technologies. We find that an antineutrino beam from He decay with a baseline of km has a very promising CP-discovery potential using a 500 kton water Cherenkov detector. Fortunately this baseline corresponds to the distance between FermiLAB to Sanford underground research facility in South Dakota.

  12. Determination of the CP properties of the Higgs boson from data on tau-lepton-decay products in the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {sup {yields}} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{nu}-bar

    SciTech Connect

    Likhoded, A. A.

    2008-03-15

    The process e{sup +}e{sup -} {sup {yields}} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}v{nu}-bar, which is highly sensitive to anomalous H{tau}{tau} interaction, is investigated within a model involving a new pseudoscalar Higgs boson. It is shown that the problem of separating the contributions of the scalar and pseudoscalar states of the Higgs boson can be solved via taking into account the polarizations of final-state particles. The inclusion of cascade tau-lepton decays makes it possible to determine reliably the CP state of the Higgs boson and to pinpoint the magnitude and sign of respective coupling constants.

  13. Missing energy and the measurement of the CP-violating phase in neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Mariani, Camillo; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-11-30

    In the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments aiming to determine the charge-parity-violating phase δCP in the appearance channel, fine-grained time-projection chambers are expected to play an important role. In this study, we analyze an influence of realistic detector capabilities on the δCP sensitivity for a setup similar to that of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. We find that the effect of the missing energy carried out by undetected particles is sizable. Although the reconstructed neutrino energy can be corrected for the missing energy, the accuracy of such procedure has to exceed 20%, to avoid a sizable bias in the extracted δCP value.

  14. Missing energy and the measurement of the CP-violating phase in neutrino oscillations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Mariani, Camillo; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-11-30

    In the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments aiming to determine the charge-parity-violating phase δCP in the appearance channel, fine-grained time-projection chambers are expected to play an important role. In this study, we analyze an influence of realistic detector capabilities on the δCP sensitivity for a setup similar to that of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. We find that the effect of the missing energy carried out by undetected particles is sizable. Although the reconstructed neutrino energy can be corrected for the missing energy, the accuracy of such procedure has to exceed 20%, to avoid a sizable bias inmore » the extracted δCP value.« less

  15. Exploring the CP-violating NMSSM: EDM constraints and phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. F.; Mühlleitner, M.; Nevzorov, R.; Walz, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (NMSSM) features extra new sources for CP violation. In contrast to the MSSM CP violation can already occur at tree level in the Higgs sector. We investigate the range of possible allowed CP-violating phases by taking into account the constraints arising from the measurements of the Electric Dipole Moments (EDMs) and the latest LHC Higgs data. Our analysis shows that large CP-violating phases, that are NMSSM-specific, are not in conflict with the EDMs. They are dominantly constrained by the Higgs data in this case. We use our results to investigate the prospects of measuring CP violation through the combined measurement of Higgs rates, on the one hand, and in observables based on CP-violating Higgs couplings to tau leptons on the other hand.

  16. Prospects for reconstruction of leptonic unitarity quadrangle and neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surender; Bhardwaj, Shankita

    2016-06-01

    After the observation of non-zero θ13 the goal has shifted to observe CP violation in the leptonic sector. Neutrino oscillation experiments can, directly, probe the Dirac CP phases. Alternatively, one can measure CP violation in the leptonic sector using Leptonic Unitarity Quadrangle (LUQ). The existence of Standard Model (SM) gauge singlets - sterile neutrinos - will provide additional sources of CP violation. We investigate the connection between neutrino survival probability and rephasing invariants of the 4 × 4 neutrino mixing matrix. In general, LUQ contain eight geometrical parameters out of which five are independent. We obtain CP asymmetry (Pνf→νf‧ -Pνbarf→νbarf‧) in terms of these independent parameters of the LUQ and search for the possibilities of extracting information on these independent geometrical parameters in short baseline (SBL) and long baseline (LBL) experiments, thus, looking for constructing LUQ and possible measurement of CP violation. We find that it is not possible to construct LUQ using data from LBL experiments because CP asymmetry is sensitive to only three of the five independent parameters of LUQ. However, for SBL experiments, CP asymmetry is found to be sensitive to all five independent parameters making it possible to construct LUQ and measure CP violation.

  17. Phase 1 trial of a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide for patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Alexandre; Laigle-Donadey, Florence; Zohar, Sarah; Capelle, Laurent; Behin, Anthony; Tibi, Annick; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Sanson, Marc; Lacomblez, Lucette; Taillibert, Sophie; Puybasset, Louis; Van Effenterre, Remy; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2006-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG ODNs) display a strong immunostimulating activity and drive the immune response toward the Th1 (T helper type 1) phenotype. These ODNs have shown promising efficacy in preclinical studies when injected locally in several cancer models. We conducted a phase 1 trial to define the safety profile of CpG-28, a phosphorothioate CpG ODN, administered intratumorally by convection-enhanced delivery in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Cohorts of three to six patients were treated with escalating doses of CpG-28 (0.5-20 mg), and patients were observed for at least four months. Twenty-four patients entered the trial. All patients had previously been treated with radiotherapy, and most patients had received one or several types of chemotherapy. Median age was 58 years (range, 25-73) and median KPS was 80% (range, 60%-100%). Adverse effects possibly or probably related to the studied drug were moderate and consisted mainly in worsening of neurological conditions (four patients), fever above 38 degrees C that disappeared within a few days (five patients), and reversible grade 3 lymphopenia (seven patients). Only one patient experienced a dose-limiting toxicity. Preliminary evidence of activity was suggested by a minor response observed in two patients and an overall median survival of 7.2 months. In conclusion, CpG-28 was well tolerated at doses up to 20 mg per injection in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Main side effects were limited to transient worsening of neurological condition and fever. PMID:16443949

  18. Immunotherapy with CpG-ODN in neoplastic meningitis: A phase I trial.

    PubMed

    Ursu, Renata; Taillibert, Sophie; Banissi, Claire; Vicaut, Eric; Bailon, Olivier; Le Rhun, Emilie; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Psimaras, Dimitri; Tibi, Annick; Sacko, Adama; Marantidou, Athina; Belin, Catherine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2015-09-01

    TLR-9 agonists are immunostimulating agents that have antitumor effects in animal models. A phase I trial was conducted to define the safety profile of subcutaneous injections, combined with intrathecally administration of CpG-28, a TRL 9 agonist, in patients with neoplastic meningitis (NM). Cohorts of 3-6 patients with NM were treated for 5 weeks with escalating doses of CpG-28. The primary endpoint was tolerance. Secondary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Twenty-nine patients were treated with CpG-28. The primary cancers were malignant glioma, lung carcinoma, breast cancer, melanoma or melanocytoma, ependymoma, and colorectal cancer. The median age was 56 years and median Karnovsky Performance status (KPS) was 70%. The treatment was well tolerated. Adverse effects that were possibly or probably related to the studied drug were grade 2 lymphopenia, anemia and neutropenia, local erythema at injection sites, fever and seizure. There were five serious adverse events: two confusions, two infections of ventricular devices and one grade 4 thrombopenia and neutropenia. The median PFS was 7 weeks and median OS was 15 weeks. Interestingly, the median survival was slightly (but not significantly) higher in the eight patients who were concomitantly treated with bevacizumab (19 weeks vs 15 weeks; P = 0.11). CpG-28 was well tolerated at doses up to 0.3 mg/kg subcutaneously and 18 mg intrathecally. Additional trials are warranted. PMID:26094710

  19. Theoretical analysis of direct CP violation and differential decay width in in phase space around the resonances and

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Song, Ren; Su, Yu-Mo; Lü, Gang; Zheng, Bo

    2015-09-01

    We perform a theoretical study on direct CP violation in in phase space around the intermediate states and . The possible interference between the amplitudes corresponding to the two resonances is taken into account, and the relative strong phase of the two amplitudes is treated as a free parameter. Our analysis shows that by a properly chosen strong phase, both the CP violation strength and the differential decay width accommodate the experimental results.

  20. Lepton mass and mixing in a neutrino mass model based on S4 flavor symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vien, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    We study a neutrino mass model based on S4 flavor symmetry which accommodates lepton mass, mixing with nonzero θ13 and CP violation phase. The spontaneous symmetry breaking in the model is imposed to obtain the realistic neutrino mass and mixing pattern at the tree-level with renormalizable interactions. Indeed, the neutrinos get small masses from one SU(2)L doublet and two SU(2)L singlets in which one being in 2̲ and the two others in 3̲ under S4 with both the breakings S4 → S3 and S4 → Z3 are taken place in charged lepton sector and S4 →𝒦 in neutrino sector. The model also gives a remarkable prediction of Dirac CP violation δCP = π 2 or ‑π 2 in both the normal and inverted spectrum which is still missing in the neutrino mixing matrix. The relation between lepton mixing angles is also represented.

  1. Immunotherapy with CpG-ODN in neoplastic meningitis: A phase I trial

    PubMed Central

    Ursu, Renata; Taillibert, Sophie; Banissi, Claire; Vicaut, Eric; Bailon, Olivier; Le Rhun, Emilie; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Psimaras, Dimitri; Tibi, Annick; Sacko, Adama; Marantidou, Athina; Belin, Catherine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2015-01-01

    TLR-9 agonists are immunostimulating agents that have antitumor effects in animal models. A phase I trial was conducted to define the safety profile of subcutaneous injections, combined with intrathecally administration of CpG-28, a TRL 9 agonist, in patients with neoplastic meningitis (NM). Cohorts of 3–6 patients with NM were treated for 5 weeks with escalating doses of CpG-28. The primary endpoint was tolerance. Secondary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Twenty-nine patients were treated with CpG-28. The primary cancers were malignant glioma, lung carcinoma, breast cancer, melanoma or melanocytoma, ependymoma, and colorectal cancer. The median age was 56 years and median Karnovsky Performance status (KPS) was 70%. The treatment was well tolerated. Adverse effects that were possibly or probably related to the studied drug were grade 2 lymphopenia, anemia and neutropenia, local erythema at injection sites, fever and seizure. There were five serious adverse events: two confusions, two infections of ventricular devices and one grade 4 thrombopenia and neutropenia. The median PFS was 7 weeks and median OS was 15 weeks. Interestingly, the median survival was slightly (but not significantly) higher in the eight patients who were concomitantly treated with bevacizumab (19 weeks vs 15 weeks; P = 0.11). CpG-28 was well tolerated at doses up to 0.3 mg/kg subcutaneously and 18 mg intrathecally. Additional trials are warranted. PMID:26094710

  2. Comparison of analytical protein separation characteristics for three amine-based capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liuwei; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fiber stationary phases are finding utility in the realms of protein analytics as well as downstream processing. We have recently described the modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) C-CP fibers to affect amine-rich phases for the weak anion-exchange (WAX) separation of proteins. Polyethylenimine (PEI) is covalently coupled to the PET surface, with subsequent cross-linking imparted by treatment with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BUDGE). These modifications yield vastly improved dynamic binding capacities over the unmodified fibers. We have also previously employed native (unmodified) nylon 6 C-CP fibers as weak anion/cation-exchange (mixed-mode) and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) phases for protein separations. Polyamide, nylon 6, consists of amide groups along the polymer backbone, with primary amines and carboxylic acid end groups. The analytical separation characteristics of these three amine-based C-CP fiber phases are compared here. Each of the C-CP fiber columns in this study was shown to be able to separate a bovine serum albumin/hemoglobin/lysozyme mixture at high mobile phase linear velocity (∼70 mm s(-1)) but with different elution characteristics. These differences reflect the types of protein-surface interactions that are occurring, based on the active group composition of the fiber surfaces. This study provides important fundamental understanding for the development of surface-modified C-CP fiber columns for protein separation. PMID:26345444

  3. Penguin Contributions to CP Phases in B(d,s) Decays to Charmonium.

    PubMed

    Frings, Philipp; Nierste, Ulrich; Wiebusch, Martin

    2015-08-01

    The precision of the CP phases 2β and 2β(s) determined from the mixing-induced CP asymmetries in B(d)→J/ψK(S) and B(s)→J/ψϕ, respectively, is limited by the unknown long-distance contribution of a penguin diagram involving up quarks. The penguin contribution is expected to be comparable in size to the precision of the LHCb and Belle II experiments and, therefore, limits the sensitivity of the measured quantities to new physics. We analyze the infrared QCD structure of this contribution and find that all soft and collinear divergences either cancel between different diagrams or factorize into matrix elements of local four-quark operators up to terms suppressed by Λ(QCD)/m(ψ), where m(ψ) denotes the J/ψ mass. Our results, which are based on an operator product expansion, allow us to calculate the penguin-to-tree ratio P/T in terms of the matrix elements of these operators and to constrain the penguin contribution to the phase 2β as |Δϕ(d)|≤0.68°. The penguin contribution to 2β(s) is bounded as |Δϕ(s)(0)|≤0.97°, |Δϕ(s)(∥)|≤1.22°, and |Δϕ(s)(⊥)|≤0.99° for the case of longitudinal, parallel, and perpendicular ϕ and J/ψ polarizations, respectively. Further, we place bounds on |Δϕ(d)| for B(d)→ψ(2S)K(S) and the polarization amplitudes in B(d)→J/ψK(*). In our approach, it is further possible to constrain P/T for decays in which P/T is Cabibbo unsuppressed, and we derive upper limits on the penguin contribution to the mixing-induced CP asymmetries in B(d)→J/ψπ(0), B(d)→J/ψρ(0), B(s)→J/ψK(S), and B(s)→J/ψK(*). For all studied decay modes, we also constrain the sizes of the direct CP asymmetries. PMID:26296109

  4. Spontaneous CP violation in A4 flavor symmetry and leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y. H.; Kang, Sin Kyu; Kim, C. S.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a simple renormalizable model for the spontaneous CP violation based on SU(2)L×U(1)Y×A4 symmetry in a radiative seesaw mechanism, which can be guaranteed by an extra Z2 symmetry. In our model CP is spontaneously broken at high energies, after the breaking of flavor symmetry, by a complex vacuum expectation value of the A4 triplet and gauge-singlet scalar field. We show that the spontaneously generated CP phase could become a natural source of leptogenesis, and also investigate CP violation at low energies in the lepton sector and show how the CP phases in the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata formalism could arise through a spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism. As a numerical study, interestingly, we show that the normal mass hierarchy favors relatively large values of θ13, large deviations from maximality of θ23<π/4, and the Dirac-CP phase 0°≤δCP≤50° and 300°≤δCP≤360°. For the inverted hierarchy case, the experimentally measured values of θ13 favors θ23>π/4 and discrete values of δCP around 100°, 135°, 255°, and 300°. Finally, with a successful leptogenesis our numerical results give more predictive values on the Dirac CP phase: for the normal mass hierarchy 1°≲δCP≲10° and for inverted one δCP˜100°, 135°, 300°.

  5. Constructing the leptonic unitarity triangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Gulsheen; Gupta, Manmohan

    2008-03-01

    Following the analogy of the “db” triangle in the quark-mixing case, we have explored the construction of the “ν2.ν3” leptonic unitarity triangle using the Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix obtained by Bjorken et al. through generalization of the tribimaximal scenario. In particular, for the Ue3 range 0.05 0.15, the existence of the leptonic unitarity triangle indicates a fairly good possibility of having nonzero CP violation.

  6. Constructing the leptonic unitarity triangle

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, Gulsheen; Gupta, Manmohan

    2008-03-01

    Following the analogy of the ''db'' triangle in the quark-mixing case, we have explored the construction of the ''{nu}{sub 2}.{nu}{sub 3}'' leptonic unitarity triangle using the Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix obtained by Bjorken et al. through generalization of the tribimaximal scenario. In particular, for the U{sub e3} range 0.05-0.15, the existence of the leptonic unitarity triangle indicates a fairly good possibility of having nonzero CP violation.

  7. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ϕs in Bbars0→J/ψπ+π- decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-09-01

    The mixing-induced CP-violating phase ϕs in Bs0 and Bbars0 decays is measured using the J/ψπ+π- final state in data, taken from 3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, collected with the LHCb detector in 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass pp collisions at the LHC. A time-dependent flavour-tagged amplitude analysis, allowing for direct CP violation, yields a value for the phase ϕs=70±68±8 mrad. This result is consistent with the Standard Model expectation and previous measurements.

  8. Dynamical CP source for Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa and Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrices and leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y. H.; Baek, Seungwon

    2013-08-01

    We propose a model for the spontaneous CP violation based on SU(2)L×U(1)Y×A4×CP×Z2 symmetry for quarks and leptons in a seesaw framework. We investigate a link between the CP phase in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix and CP phase in the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) matrix by using the present data of quark sector. In our model CP is spontaneously broken at high energies, after breaking of flavor symmetry, by a complex vacuum expectation value of A4 triplet and gauge singlet scalar field. And, certain effective dimension-5 operators are considered in the Lagrangian as an equal footing, in which the quarks lead to the CKM matrix of the quark mixing. However, the lepton Lagrangian still keep renormalizability, which gives rise to a nondegenerate Dirac neutrino Yukawa matrix, a unique CP-phase, and the nonzero value of θ13≃9° as well as two large mixing angles θ12, θ23. We show that the generated CP phase “ξ” from the spontaneous CP violation could become a natural source of leptogenesis as well as CP violations in the CKM and PMNS. Interestingly enough, we show that, for around ξ≃110°(140°), we obtain the measured CKM CP phase δCPq≃70° for normal (inverted) hierarchy. For the measured value of θ13 we favor the PMNS CP phase around 30°, 200°, and |θ23-45°|→0 for normal mass hierarchy and around 60°, 110°, 230°, |θ23-45°|→5° for inverted one. As a numerical study in the lepton sector, we show low-energy phenomenologies and leptogenesis for the normal and inverted case, respectively, and a interplay between them.

  9. Probing the CP violation signal at DUNE in the presence of non-standard neutrino interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masud, Mehedi; Chatterjee, Animesh; Mehta, Poonam

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the impact of non-standard neutrino matter interactions (NSIs) in propagation on the determination of the CP phase in the context of long baseline accelerator experiments such as the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). DUNE will mainly address the issue of CP violation in the leptonic sector. Here we study the role of NSI and its impact on observing the CP violation signal at DUNE. We consider two scenarios of oscillation with three active neutrinos in the absence and presence of NSI. We elucidate the importance of ruling out subdominant new physics effects introduced by NSI in inferring the CP violation signal at DUNE by considering NSI terms collectively as well as by exploiting the non-trivial interplay of moduli and phases of the NSI terms. We demonstrate the existence of NSI-SI degeneracies which need to be eliminated in reliable manner in order to make conclusive statements about the CP phase.

  10. Flavor mixing democracy and minimal CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Jean-Marc; Xing, Zhi-zhong

    2012-06-01

    We point out that there is a unique parametrization of quark flavor mixing in which every angle is close to the Cabibbo angle θC≃13° with the CP-violating phase ϕq around 1°, implying that they might all be related to the strong hierarchy among quark masses. Applying the same parametrization to lepton flavor mixing, we find that all three mixing angles are comparably large (around π/4) and the Dirac CP-violating phase ϕl is also minimal as compared with its values in the other eight possible parametrizations. In this spirit, we propose a simple neutrino mixing ansatz which is equivalent to the tri-bimaximal flavor mixing pattern in the ϕl→0 limit and predicts sin θ13=1/√{2}sin(ϕl/2) for reactor antineutrino oscillations. Hence the Jarlskog invariant of leptonic CP violation Jl=(sin ϕl)/12 can reach a few percent if θ13 lies in the range 7°⩽θ13⩽10°.

  11. Radiative corrections to the solar lepton mixing sum rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jue; Zhou, Shun

    2016-08-01

    The simple correlation among three lepton flavor mixing angles ( θ 12, θ 13, θ 23) and the leptonic Dirac CP-violating phase δ is conventionally called a sum rule of lepton flavor mixing, which may be derived from a class of neutrino mass models with flavor symmetries. In this paper, we consider the solar lepton mixing sum rule θ 12 ≈ θ 12 ν + θ 13 cos δ, where θ 12 ν stems from a constant mixing pattern in the neutrino sector and takes the value of θ 12 ν = 45 ° for the bi-maximal mixing (BM), {θ}_{12}^{ν } = { tan}^{-1}(1/√{2}) ≈ 35.3° for the tri-bimaximal mixing (TBM) or {θ}_{12}^{ν } = { tan}^{-1}(1/√{5+1}) ≈ 31.7° for the golden-ratio mixing (GR), and investigate the renormalization-group (RG) running effects on lepton flavor mixing parameters when this sum rule is assumed at a superhigh-energy scale. For illustration, we work within the framework of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), and implement the Bayesian approach to explore the posterior distribution of δ at the low-energy scale, which becomes quite broad when the RG running effects are significant. Moreover, we also discuss the compatibility of the above three mixing scenarios with current neutrino oscillation data, and observe that radiative corrections can increase such a compatibility for the BM scenario, resulting in a weaker preference for the TBM and GR ones.

  12. Connecting leptonic unitarity triangle to neutrino oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong-Jian; Xu, Xun-Jie

    2014-04-01

    The leptonic unitarity triangle (LUT) provides a geometric description of CP violations in the lepton-neutrino sector and is directly measurable in principle. In this paper, we reveal that the angles in the LUT have definite physical meaning, and demonstrate the exact connection of the LUT to neutrino oscillations. For the first time, we prove that these leptonic angles act as phase shifts in neutrino oscillations, by shifting Δm2L/2E to Δm2L/2E +α, where (L,E,α) denote the baseline length, neutrino energy and corresponding angle of the LUT. Each LUT has three independent parameters and contains only partial information of the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) matrix. We demonstrate that the partial information in each LUT can describe the corresponding neutrino oscillation. Hence, for the first time, we uncover that any given kind of neutrino oscillations contains at most three (rather than four) independent degrees of freedom from the PMNS matrix, and this may provide a cleaner way for fitting the corresponding oscillation data.

  13. Quark lepton complementarity and renormalization group effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Michael A.; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2006-12-01

    We consider a scenario for the quark-lepton complementarity relations between mixing angles in which the bimaximal mixing follows from the neutrino mass matrix. According to this scenario in the lowest order the angle {theta}{sub 12} is {approx}1{sigma} (1.5 degree sign -2 degree sign ) above the best fit point coinciding practically with the tribimaximal mixing prediction. Realization of this scenario in the context of the seesaw type-I mechanism with leptonic Dirac mass matrices approximately equal to the quark mass matrices is studied. We calculate the renormalization group corrections to {theta}{sub 12} as well as to {theta}{sub 13} in the standard model (SM) and minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). We find that in a large part of the parameter space corrections {delta}{theta}{sub 12} are small or negligible. In the MSSM version of the scenario, the correction {delta}{theta}{sub 12} is in general positive. Small negative corrections appear in the case of an inverted mass hierarchy and opposite CP parities of {nu}{sub 1} and {nu}{sub 2} when leading contributions to {theta}{sub 12} running are strongly suppressed. The corrections are negative in the SM version in a large part of the parameter space for values of the relative CP phase of {nu}{sub 1} and {nu}{sub 2}: {phi}>{pi}/2.

  14. New simple A{sub 4} neutrino model for nonzero {theta}{sub 13} and large {delta}{sub CP}

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimori, Hajime

    2013-05-23

    In a new simple application of the non-Abelian discrete symmetry A{sub 4} to charged-lepton and neutrino mass matrices, we show that for the current experimental central value of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.1, leptonic CP violation is necessarily large, i.e. Double-Vertical-Line tan{delta}{sub CP} Double-Vertical-Line > 1.3. We also consider T{sub 7} model with one parameter to be complex, thus allowing for one Dirac CP phase {delta}{sub CP} and two Majorana CP phases {alpha}{sub 1,2}. We find a slight modification to this correlation as a function of {delta}{sub CP}. For a given set of input values of {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 21}, {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}, {theta}{sub 12}, and {theta}{sub 13}, we obtain sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} and m{sub ee} (the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay) as functions of tan {delta}{sub CP}. We find that the structure of this model always yields small Double-Vertical-Line tan {delta}{sub CP} Double-Vertical-Line .

  15. Direct CP violation of B{yields}l{nu} in unparticle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Chaoshang; Wu Xiaohong

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the effects of unparticles in decays B{yields}l{nu}. It is found that the direct CP violation in the decays, which is zero in the standard model, can show up due to the CP conserving phase intrinsic in unparticle physics. For l={tau}, the direct CP asymmetry can reach 30% for the scalar unparticle contribution, and 100% for the longitudinal vector unparticle contribution under the constraints of Br(B{yields}{tau}{nu}) and {nu}e elastic scattering. If both unparticle-lepton coupling universality and unparticle-quark coupling universality are assumed the constraint from Br({pi}{yields}{mu}{nu}) leads that the direct CP violation in B{yields}l{nu} can only reach at most 8% and 1% for scalar and vector unparticle contributions, respectively, if d{sub U}<2. If the direct CP violation is observed in the future it would give strong evidence for the existence of unparticle stuff.

  16. Phase 2 Study of an HIV-1 Canarypox Vaccine (vCP1452) Alone and in Combination With rgp120

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Nina D.; Graham, Barney S.; Keefer, Michael C.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Self, Steve G.; Weinhold, Kent J.; Montefiori, David C.; Ferrari, Guido; Horton, Helen; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Gurunathan, Sanjay; Baglyos, Lynn; Frey, Sharon E.; Mulligan, Mark J.; Harro, Clayton D.; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Blattner, William A.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Corey, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    Background A goal of T-cell HIV vaccines is to define the correlation between a vaccine-induced immune response and protection from HIV infection. We conducted a phase 2 trial to determine if a canarypox vaccine candidate (vCP1452) administered with rgp120 subunit protein would “qualify” for a trial to define a correlate of efficacy. Methods A total of 330 healthy volunteers were enrolled into 4 groups: 120 received vCP1452 alone (0, 1, 3, and 6 months), 120 received vCP1452 with 2 different regimens of rgp120 coadministration, and 90 received placebo. HIV-specific antibody responses were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) and neutralizing activity. T-cell responses were measured by chromium release and interferon-γ (IFNγ) enzyme-linked immunospot (ELI-Spot) assay. Results Significant neutralizing antibody responses to the HIV MN strain were detected in all vaccine groups, with net responses ranging from 57% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 40% to 71%) to 94% (95% CI: 85% to 99%). Net cumulative HIV-specific CD8+ IFNγ ELISpot assay responses were 13% (95% CI: 21% to 26%) for recipients of vCP1452 alone and 16% (95% CI: 2% to 29%) for recipients of vCP1452 plus rgp120. Conclusions Overall, the HIV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response was not sufficient to qualify the regimen for a subsequent trial designed to detect an immune correlate of protection requiring a minimum CD8+ CTL frequency of 30%. PMID:17106277

  17. Dirac leptonic angle matrix versus Majorana leptonic angle matrix and their renormalization group running behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shu

    2012-01-01

    Enlightened by the idea of the 3×3 Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle matrix proposed recently by Harrison , we introduce the Dirac angle matrix Φ and the Majorana angle matrix Ψ in the lepton sector for Dirac and Majorana neutrinos, respectively. We show that in the presence of CP violation, the angle matrix Φ or Ψ is entirely equivalent to the complex Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix V itself, but has the advantage of being real, phase rephasing invariant, directly associated to the leptonic unitarity triangles and do not depend on any particular parametrization of V. In this paper, we further analyzed how the angle matrices evolve with the energy scale. The one-loop renormalization group equations of Φ, Ψ and some other rephasing invariant parameters are derived and a numerical analysis is performed to compare between the case of Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. Different neutrino mass spectra are taken into account in our calculation. We find that apparently different from the case of Dirac neutrinos, for Majorana neutrinos the renormalization group equation evolutions of Φ, Ψ and J strongly depend on the Majorana-type CP-violating parameters and are more sensitive to the sign of Δm312. They may receive significant radiative corrections in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with large tan⁡β if three neutrino masses are nearly degenerate.

  18. CP violation in K decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1989-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental progress on the manifestation of CP violation in K decays, and toward understanding whether CP violation originates in a phase, or phases, in the weak mixing matrix of quarks is reviewed. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Correlating lepton mixing angles and mixing maxtrix with Wolfenstein parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyi; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2012-11-01

    Inspired by a new relation θ13PMNS=θC/2 observed from the relatively large θ13PMNS, we find that the combination of this relation with the quark-lepton complementarity and the self-complementarity results in correlations of the lepton mixing angles with the quark mixing angles. We find that the three mixing angles in the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) matrix are all related to the Wolfenstein parameter λ in the quark mixing, so they are also correlated. Consequently, the PMNS matrix can be parameterized by λ, A, and a Dirac CP-violating phase δ. Such parametrizations for the PMNS matrix have the same explicitly hierarchical structure as the Wolfenstein parametrization for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix in the quark mixing, and the bimaximal mixing pattern is deduced at the leading order. We also discuss implications of these phenomenological relations in parametrizations.

  20. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ϕs in Bs(0)→Ds(+)Ds(-) decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellán Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elena, E; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R F; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2014-11-21

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating weak mixing phase ϕs using the decay Bs(0)→Ds(+)Ds(-) in a data sample corresponding to 3.0 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected with the LHCb detector in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. An analysis of the time evolution of the system, which does not use the constraint |λ|=1 to allow for the presence of CP violation in decay, yields ϕs=0.02±0.17(stat)±0.02(syst)  rad, |λ|=0.91(-0.15)(+0.18)(stat)±0.02(syst). This result is consistent with the standard model expectation. PMID:25479486

  1. The role of flavon cross couplings in leptonic flavour mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoli, Silvia; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2016-06-01

    In models with discrete flavour symmetries, flavons are critical to realise specific flavour structures. Leptonic flavour mixing originates from the misalignment of flavon vacuum expectation values which respect different residual symmetries in the charged lepton and neutrino sectors. Flavon cross couplings are usually forbidden, in order to protect these symmetries. Contrary to this approach, we show that cross couplings can play a key role and give raise to necessary corrections to flavour-mixing patterns, including a non-zero value for the reactor angle and CP violation. For definiteness, we present two models based on A 4. In the first model, all flavons are assumed to be real or pseudo-real, with 7 real degrees of freedom in the flavon sector in total. A sizable reactor angle associated with nearly maximal CP violation is achieved, and, as both originate from the same cross coupling, a sum rule results with a precise prediction for the value of the Dirac CP-violating phase. In the second model, the flavons are taken to be complex scalars, which can be connected with supersymmetric models and multi-Higgs models. The complexity properties of flavons provide new sources for generating the reactor angle. Models in this new approach introduce very few degrees of freedom beyond the Standard Model and can be more economical than those in the framework of extra dimension or supersymmetry.

  2. Self-sustained asymmetry of lepton-number emission: a new phenomenon during the supernova shock-accretion phase in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Tamborra, Irene; Raffelt, Georg G.; Hanke, Florian; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Müller, Bernhard; Marek, Andreas

    2014-09-10

    During the stalled-shock phase of our three-dimensional, hydrodynamical core-collapse simulations with energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, the lepton-number flux (ν {sub e} minus ν-bar {sub e}) emerges predominantly in one hemisphere. This novel, spherical-symmetry breaking neutrino-hydrodynamical instability is termed LESA for 'Lepton-number Emission Self-sustained Asymmetry'. While the individual ν {sub e} and ν-bar {sub e} fluxes show a pronounced dipole pattern, the heavy-flavor neutrino fluxes and the overall luminosity are almost spherically symmetric. Initially, LESA seems to develop stochastically from convective fluctuations. It exists for hundreds of milliseconds or more and persists during violent shock sloshing associated with the standing accretion shock instability. The ν {sub e} minus ν-bar {sub e} flux asymmetry originates predominantly below the neutrinosphere in a region of pronounced proto-neutron star (PNS) convection, which is stronger in the hemisphere of enhanced lepton-number flux. On this side of the PNS, the mass accretion rate of lepton-rich matter is larger, amplifying the lepton-emission asymmetry, because the spherical stellar infall deflects on a dipolar deformation of the stalled shock. The increased shock radius in the hemisphere of less mass accretion and minimal lepton-number flux ( ν-bar {sub e} flux maximum) is sustained by stronger convection on this side, which is boosted by stronger neutrino heating due to 〈ϵ{sub ν-bar{sub e}}〉>〈ϵ{sub ν{sub e}}〉. Asymmetric heating thus supports the global deformation despite extremely nonstationary convective overturn behind the shock. While these different elements of the LESA phenomenon form a consistent picture, a full understanding remains elusive at present. There may be important implications for neutrino-flavor oscillations, the neutron-to-proton ratio in the neutrino-heated supernova ejecta, and neutron-star kicks, which remain to be explored.

  3. Occam's razor in lepton mass matrices: The sign of the universe's baryon asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneta, Yuya; Shimizu, Yusuke; Tanimoto, Morimitsu; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the neutrino mass matrix based on the Occam's-razor approach in the framework of the seesaw mechanism. We impose four zeros in the Dirac neutrino mass matrix, which give the minimum number of parameters needed for the observed neutrino masses and lepton mixing angles, while the charged lepton mass matrix and the right-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrix are taken as real diagonal ones. The low-energy neutrino mass matrix has only seven physical parameters. We show successful predictions for the mixing angle θ_{13} and the CP-violating phase δ_CP with the normal mass hierarchy of neutrinos by using the experimental data on the neutrino mass-squared differences, the mixing angles θ_{12} and θ_{23}. The most favored region of sinθ_{13} is around 0.13-0.15, which is completely consistent with the observed value. The CP-violating phase δ_CP is favored to be close to ± π/2. We also discuss the Majorana phases as well as the effective neutrino mass for the neutrinoless double-beta decay m_{ee}, which is around 7-8 meV. It is extremely remarkable that we can perform a "complete experiment" to determine the low-energy neutrino mass matrix, since we have only seven physical parameters in the neutrino mass matrix. In particular, two CP-violating phases in the neutrino mass matrix are directly given by two CP-violating phases at high energy. Thus, assuming leptogenesis, we can determine the sign of the cosmic baryon in the universe from the low-energy experiments for the neutrino mass matrix.

  4. Statistical understanding of quark and lepton masses in Gaussian landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Salem, Michael P.; Watari, Taizan

    2007-11-01

    The fundamental theory of nature may allow a large landscape of vacua. Even if the theory contains a unified gauge symmetry, the 22 flavor parameters of the standard model, including neutrino masses, may be largely determined by the statistics of this landscape, and not by any symmetry. Then the measured values of the flavor parameters do not lead to any fundamental symmetries, but are statistical accidents; their precise values do not provide any insights into the fundamental theory, rather the overall pattern of flavor reflects the underlying landscape. We investigate whether random selection from the statistics of a simple landscape can explain the broad patterns of quark, charged lepton, and neutrino masses and mixings. We propose Gaussian landscapes as simplified models of landscapes where Yukawa couplings result from overlap integrals of zero-mode wave functions in higher-dimensional supersymmetric gauge theories. In terms of just five free parameters, such landscapes can account for all gross features of flavor, including the hierarchy of quark and charged-lepton masses; small quark mixing angles in the basis with quarks arranged according to mass, with 13 mixing less than 12 and 23 mixing; very light Majorana neutrino masses, with the solar to atmospheric neutrino mass ratio consistent with data; distributions for leptonic mixings sin2{theta}{sub 12} and sin2{theta}{sub 23} that are peaked at large values, while the distribution for sin2{theta}{sub 13} is peaked at low values; and order unity CP-violating phases in both the quark and lepton sectors. While the statistical distributions for flavor parameters are broad, the distributions are robust to changes in the geometry of the extra dimensions. Constraining the distributions by loose cuts about observed values leads to narrower distributions for neutrino measurements of {theta}{sub 13}, CP violation, and neutrinoless double beta decay.

  5. Asymmetries in rare radiative leptonic and semileptonic decays of B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Balakireva, I. A. Nikitin, N. V. Tlisov, D. A.

    2010-10-15

    The time-dependent and time-independent CP asymmetries A({sub CP})/{sup B}{sub q}{sup 0{yields}f} ({tau}) and A({sub CP})/{sup B}{sub q}{sup 0{yields}f}) (s-circumflex) for rare semileptonic and radiative leptonic decays of B mesons are calculated by the method of helicity amplitudes. The sensitivity of CP asymmetries to various extensions of the Standard Model that have an operator basis that is identical to the operator basis of the Standard Model is investigated. It is shown that, by combining information about the form of the charge lepton asymmetry A{sub FB} at small values of the square of the invariant dilepton mass and information about the average value of the time-dependent CP asymmetry, one can in principle determine the relative phases of the Wilson coefficients C7{sub {gamma}}, C-{sub 9}V, and C10A in the effective Hamiltonian for b {sup {yields} {l_brace}}d, s{r_brace}l{sup +}l{sup -} transitions.

  6. Cubic and Quartic Higgs Couplings of Higgs Potentials and CP Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, You; Yan, Qi-Shu; Zhao, Xiao-Ran

    2016-06-01

    We derive cubic and quartic couplings of the Higgs singlet extension of the SM and the two Higgs doublet model. We also examine the number of CP violated couplings in a model with n Higgs doublet model and a model with ns Higgs singlets and nd Higgs doublets. We conclude that in order to reconstruct the Higgs potential with multi Higgs fields at the LHC and future colliders, to detect the cubic/quartic couplings is necessary. Supported by the Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11175251 and 11575005

  7. Precision Measurements of Lifetime and $\\bf CP$ Violation Phase in the $\\bf B^{0}_{s}$ Meson with the DØ Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez Ortega, Jorge

    2012-10-01

    The Standard Model of Partice Physics (SM) is probably the most successful theory, regarding to his predictions. The SM prediction for $CP$ violation is not enough to explain the overwhelming asymmetry among the matter and anti-matter abundance. Measuring some process where $CP$ violation is different to the one predicted by the SM would be a clear signal for Physics Beyond the Standard Model. The SM prediction for the $CP$ violation phase, $\\phi_{s}$, in the $B^{0}_{s}$ meson is practically equal to zero for the current experiments. This means that measuring a deviation from zero in $\\phi_{s}$ could be an indication for Physics Beyond the SM. On the other hand, the approximation based on the ``heavy quark symmetry'' let approximated calculations of the fundamental quantities of those hadrons containing a heavy quark, $c,b,t$. These calculations are expressed as expansions on inverse powers of the heavy quark mass in such hadron. This formalism is called `` Heavy Quark Effective Theory'' (HQET), and has been successful predicting some properties of the heavy hadrons. The HQET prediction for the lifetime ratio the $B^{0}_{d}$ and $B^{0}_{s}$ is practically equal to one. So, measuring with good precision the $B^{0}_{s}$ lifetime is also a way to test an approximation based on the SM. In this thesis it is detailed presented the method to measure the $\\phi_{s}$ and the lifetime ratio of the $B^{0}_{d}$ and $B^{0}_{s}$, among other quantities, with the DØ located in the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, in the United States.

  8. Hume-Rothery phase-inspired metal-rich molecules: cluster expansion of [Ni(ZnMe)₆(ZnCp*)₂] by face capping with Ni⁰(η⁶-toluene) and Ni(I)(η⁵-Cp*).

    PubMed

    Molon, Mariusz; Gemel, Christian; Jerabek, Paul; Trombach, Lukas; Frenking, Gernot; Fischer, Roland A

    2014-10-01

    The novel all-hydrocarbon ligand-stabilized binuclear clusters of metal-core composition Ni2Zn7E, [(η(5)-Cp*)Ni2(ZnMe)6(ZnCp*)(ECp*)] (1-Zn, E = Zn; 1-Ga, E = Ga) and [(η(6)-toluene)Ni2(ZnCp*)2(ZnMe)6] (2; Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl), were obtained via Ga/Zn and Al/Zn exchange reactions using the starting compounds [Ni2(ECp*)3(η(2)-C2H4)2] (E = Al/Ga) and an excess of ZnMe2 (Me = CH3). Compounds 1-Zn and 1-Ga are very closely related and differ only by one Zn or Ga atom in the group 12/13 metal shell (Zn/Ga) around the two Ni centers. Accordingly, 1-Zn is EPR-active and 1-Ga is EPR-silent. The compounds were derived as a crystalline product mixture. All new compounds were characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, mass spectrometric analysis using liquid-injection field desorption ionization, and elemental analysis, and their molecular structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. In addition, the electronic structure has been investigated by DFT and QTAIM calculations, which suggest that there is a Ni1-Ni2 binding interaction. Similar to Zn-rich intermetallic phases of the Hume-Rothery type, the transition metals (here Ni) are distributed in a matrix of Zn atoms to yield highly Zn-coordinated environments. The organic residues, ancillary ligands (Me, Cp*, and toluene), can be viewed as the "protecting" shell of the 10-metal-atom core structures. The soft and flexible binding properties of Cp* and transferability of Me substituents between groups 12 and 13 are essential for the success of this precedence-less type of cluster formation reaction. PMID:25244516

  9. Measurement of strong phases, D-overline D mixing, and CP violation using quantum correlation at charm threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    We review the measurements of the D decay strong-phase parameters based on quantum-correlated D 0 overline D 0 pairs produced in the e + e - → Ψ(3770) → D 0 overline D 0 process, and we discuss their role in the measurements of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle γ and D-overline D mixing. In addition, we present estimates of the size of quantum-correlated datasets necessary to support the γ and charm mixing measurements conducted at the LHCb and Belle II experiments. Finally, we review the methods for measuring the D-overline D mixing and CP violation parameters at a high-luminosity charm factory, giving sensitivity estimates.

  10. Spontaneous C P violation in lepton-sector: A common origin for θ13, the Dirac C P phase, and leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Biswajit; Sil, Arunansu

    2016-01-01

    A possible interplay between the two terms of the general type-II seesaw formula is exercised which leads to the generation of nonzero θ13. The specific flavor structure of the model, guided by the A4×Z4×Z3 symmetry and accompanied with the Standard Model singlet flavons, yields the conventional seesaw contribution to produce the tribimaximal lepton mixing which is further corrected by the presence of the S U (2 )L triplet contribution to accommodate θ13. We consider the C P symmetry to be spontaneously broken by the complex vacuum expectation value (vev) of a singlet field S . While the magnitude of its complex vev is responsible for generating θ13, its phase part induces the low energy C P violating phase (δ ) and the C P violation required for leptogenesis. Hence the triplet contribution, although subdominant, plays a crucial role in providing a common source for nonzero θ13, δ and C P -violation required for leptogenesis. We find that the recent hint for δ close to 3 π /2 is somewhat favored in this setup though it excludes the exact equality with 3 π /2 . We also discuss the generation of lepton asymmetry in this scenario.

  11. SUSY CP problem and spontaneous CP violation in SUSY GUT

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiduki, M.; Kim, S.-G.; Maekawa, N.; Sakurai, K.

    2008-11-23

    We study spontaneous CP violation in association with so-called SUSY flavor problem, SUSY CP problem, and stability of electroweak (EW) scale on the context of supersymmetric grand unified theory (SUSY GUT). In view of naturalness we retain stop masses on EW scale. Then in order to suppress non-decoupling SUSY contribution to up quark EDM we examine a certain type of flavor structure where up-type quark sector is real whereas down-type quark and charged lepton sectors are complex. We exhibit, as an example, an explicit model based on E{sub 6} SUSY GUT with SU(2) flavor symmetry that realizes these situations.

  12. Leptogenesis and residual CP symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Ding, Gui-Jun; King, Stephen F.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss flavour dependent leptogenesis in the framework of lepton flavour models based on discrete flavour and CP symmetries applied to the type-I seesaw model. Working in the flavour basis, we analyse the case of two general residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, which corresponds to all possible semi-direct models based on a preserved Z 2 in the neutrino sector, together with a CP symmetry, which constrains the PMNS matrix up to a single free parameter which may be fixed by the reactor angle. We systematically study and classify this case for all possible residual CP symmetries, and show that the R-matrix is tightly constrained up to a single free parameter, with only certain forms being consistent with successful leptogenesis, leading to possible connections between leptogenesis and PMNS parameters. The formalism is completely general in the sense that the two residual CP symmetries could result from any high energy discrete flavour theory which respects any CP symmetry. As a simple example, we apply the formalism to a high energy S 4 flavour symmetry with a generalized CP symmetry, broken to two residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, recovering familiar results for PMNS predictions, together with new results for flavour dependent leptogenesis.

  13. Exotic Leptons. Higgs, Flavor and Collider Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela

    2014-01-15

    We study extensions of the standard model by one generation of vector-like leptons with non-standard hypercharges, which allow for a sizable modification of the h → γγ decay rate for new lepton masses in the 300 GeV-1 TeV range. We also analyze vacuum stability implications for different hypercharges. Effects in h → Zγ are typically much smaller than in h → γγ, but distinct among the considered hypercharge assignments. Non-standard hypercharges constrain or entirely forbid possible mixing operators with standard model leptons. As a consequence, the leading contributions to the experimentally strongly constrained electric dipole moments of standard model fermions are only generated at the two loop level by the new CP violating sources of the considered setups. Furthermore, we derive the bounds from dipole moments, electro-weak precision observables and lepton flavor violating processes, and discuss their implications. Finally, we examine the production and decay channels of the vector-like leptons at the LHC, and find that signatures with multiple light leptons or taus are already probing interesting regions of parameter space.

  14. Exotic Leptons. Higgs, Flavor and Collider Phenomenology

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela

    2014-01-15

    We study extensions of the standard model by one generation of vector-like leptons with non-standard hypercharges, which allow for a sizable modification of the h → γγ decay rate for new lepton masses in the 300 GeV-1 TeV range. We also analyze vacuum stability implications for different hypercharges. Effects in h → Zγ are typically much smaller than in h → γγ, but distinct among the considered hypercharge assignments. Non-standard hypercharges constrain or entirely forbid possible mixing operators with standard model leptons. As a consequence, the leading contributions to the experimentally strongly constrained electric dipole moments of standard model fermionsmore » are only generated at the two loop level by the new CP violating sources of the considered setups. Furthermore, we derive the bounds from dipole moments, electro-weak precision observables and lepton flavor violating processes, and discuss their implications. Finally, we examine the production and decay channels of the vector-like leptons at the LHC, and find that signatures with multiple light leptons or taus are already probing interesting regions of parameter space.« less

  15. Randall-Sundrum corrections to the width difference and CP-violating phase in B{sub s}{sup 0}-meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Goertz, Florian; Pfoh, Torsten

    2011-11-01

    We study the impact of the Randall-Sundrum setup on the width difference {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s} and the CP-violating phase {phi}{sub s} in the B{sub s}{sup 0}-B{sub s}{sup 0} system. Our calculations are performed in the general framework of an effective theory, based on operator product expansion. The results can thus be used for many new-physics models. We find that the correction to the magnitude of the decay amplitude {Gamma}{sub 12}{sup s} is below 4% for a realistic choice of input parameters. The main modification in the {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s}/{beta}{sub s}-plane is caused by a new CP-violating phase in the mixing amplitude, which allows for a better agreement with the experimental results of the CDF and D0 Collaborations from B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{phi} decays. The best-fit value of the CP asymmetry S{sub {psi}{phi}} can be reproduced, while simultaneously the theoretical prediction for the semileptonic CP asymmetry A{sub SL}{sup s} can enter the 1{sigma} range.

  16. Precision measurements of θ12 for testing models of discrete leptonic flavour symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballett, P.; King, S. F.; Luhn, C.; Pascoli, S.; Schmidt, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Models of leptonic flavour with discrete symmetries can provide an attractive explanation of the pattern of elements found in the leptonic mixing matrix. The next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments will allow the mixing parameters to be tested to a new level of precision, crucially measuring the CP violating phase δ for the first time. In this contribution, we present results of a systematic survey of the predictions of a class of models based on residual discrete symmetries and the prospects for excluding such models at medium- and long-term oscillation experiments. We place particular emphasis on the complementary role that a future circa 50 km reactor experiment, e.g. JUNO, can play in constraining these models.

  17. Radiative Leptonic B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Edward Tann

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a search for B+ meson decays into γℓ+v, where ℓ = e,μ. We use a sample of 232 million B$\\bar{B}$ meson pairs recorded at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We measure a partial branching fraction Δβ in a restricted region of phase space that reduces the effect of theoretical uncertainties, requiring the lepton energy to be in the range 1.875 and 2.850 GeV, the photon energy to be in the range 0.45 and 2.35 GeV, and the cosine of the angle between the lepton and photon momenta to be less than -0.36, with all quantities computed in the Υ(4S) center-of-mass frame. We find Δβ(B+ → γℓ+v) = (-0.31.5+1.3(statistical) -0.6+0.6(systematic) ± 0.1(theoretical)) x 10-6, under the assumption of lepton universality. Interpreted as a 90% confidence-level Bayesian upper limit, the result corresponds to 1.7 x 10-6 for a prior at in amplitude, and 2.3 x 10-6 for a prior at in branching fraction.

  18. CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1989-12-01

    Predictions for CP violation in the three generation Standard Model are reviewed based on what is known about the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. Application to the K and B meson systems are emphasized. 43 refs., 13 figs.

  19. Measurement of CP violation in the phase space of B± → K+ K- π± and B± → π+ π- π± decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-01-10

    The charmless decays B± → K+ K- π± and B± → π+ π- π± are reconstructed in a data set of pp collisions with an integrated luminosity of 1.0  fb(-1) and center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by LHCb in 2011. The inclusive charge asymmetries of these modes are measured to be A(CP)(B± → K+ K- π±) = -0.141±0.040  (stat)±0.018 (syst)±0.007(J/ψ K±) and A(CP)(B± → π+ π- π±) = 0.117±0.021 (stat)±0.009 (syst)±0.007(J/ψ K±), where the third uncertainty is due to the CP asymmetry of the B± → J/ψK± reference mode. In addition to the inclusive CP asymmetries, larger asymmetries are observed in localized regions of phase space. PMID:24483886

  20. Sum rules for leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinrath, Martin

    2016-06-01

    There is a wide class of models which give a dynamical description of the origin of flavor in terms of spontaneous symmetry breaking of an underlying symmetry. Many of these models exhibit sum rules which relate on the one hand mixing angles and the Dirac CP phase with each other and/or on the other hand neutrino masses and Majorana phases with each other. We will briefly sketch how this happens and discuss briefly the impact of renormalization group corrections to the mass sum rules.

  1. MFV and the SUSY CP Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, David M.

    2010-02-10

    The principle of Minimal Flavour Violation (MFV) provides a natural solution to the SUSY flavour problem, but does not solve the SUSY CP problem as it allows for the presence of new CP-violating phases. If the MFV principle is generalized by the assumption of CP conservation in the limit of flavour blindness, the SUSY CP problem can be solved, predicting at the same time interesting CP violating phenomenology.

  2. Measurement of CP violation in the phase space of B±→K± π+ π- and B±→K± K+ K- decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Holtrop, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-01

    The charmless decays B±→K± π+ π- and B±→K± K+ K- are reconstructed using data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0  fb(-1), collected by LHCb in 2011. The inclusive charge asymmetries of these modes are measured as ACP(B±→K± π+ π-)=0.032±0.008 (stat)±0.004 (syst)±0.007(J/ψK±) and ACP(B±→K± K+ K-)=-0.043±0.009 (stat)±0.003 (syst)±0.007(J/ψK±), where the third uncertainty is due to the CP asymmetry of the B±→J/ψK± reference mode. The significance of ACP(B±→K± K+ K-) exceeds three standard deviations and is the first evidence of an inclusive CP asymmetry in charmless three-body B decays. In addition to the inclusive CP asymmetries, larger asymmetries are observed in localized regions of phase space. PMID:25166651

  3. Composite quarks and leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Preskill, J.

    1982-01-01

    Calculability of quark and lepton masses and mixing angles is stressed as the primary motivation for constructing models in which quarks and leptons are composite particles. A general strategy for constructing such models is outlined, in which quarks and leptons are kept light compared to their inverse sizes by approximate chiral symmetries. The origin of multiple families is discussed, and an unrealistic model is exhibited which has several generations and a complicated pattern of masses and generation-mixing angles. The new physics responsible for binding quarks and leptons tends to induce various rare processes at rates which are potentially too large.

  4. Particle physics: CP violation in hyperon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Michael J.

    2000-10-31

    The primary research activities under this grant were in E871 (HyperCP) at Fermilab, a search for CP violation in hyperon decays which completed data taking in January, 2000. HyperCP is an experiment designed to perform a sensitive search for direct CP violation in the decays of cascade ({Xi}) and {Lambda} hyperons by looking for an asymmetry between particle and antiparticle decay parameters. The experiment is expected to achieve a sensitivity {approx}10{sup -4} in the decay parameters. Standard model predictions for this CP-violating asymmetry range from 0.3 to 5 x 10{sup -4}. A difference between the decay parameters for particle and antiparticle is direct evidence that CP symmetry is violated. A non-zero asymmetry would be the first evidence for CP violation outside of the K{sup o} system. Recent results from KTeV indicate a direct CP violation in K{sup o} decays, which suggests that CP violation will appear in other decays. In addition, we will look at a number of rare hyperon decays involving muons. These probe important new physics topics such as Majorana neutrinos and lepton number violating processes. The latter are of great current interest because new evidence for neutrino oscillations indicate lepton flavor violation does occur. Our data will lead to an improvement in the limits on branching ratios for these processes typically by three to four orders-of-magnitude. The muon detector construction and data resulting from it have been the responsibility of the Michigan group. We are now leading the analysis of the rare muon-related decay modes, and were responsible for the muon system and beam monitor upgrades for the 1999 run.

  5. CP VIOLATION HIGHLIGHTS: CIRCA 2005

    SciTech Connect

    SONI A.

    2005-02-27

    Recent highlights in CP violation phenomena, are reviewed. B-factory results imply that, CP-violation phase in the CKM matrix is the dominant contributor to the observed CP violation in K and B-physics. Deviations from the predictions of the CKM-paradigm due to beyond the Standard Model CP-odd phase are likely to be a small perturbation. Therefore, large data sample of clean B's will be needed. Precise determination of the unitarity triangle, along with time dependent CP in penguin dominated hadronic and radiative modes are discussed. Null tests in B, K and top-physics and separate determination of the K-unitarity triangle are also emphasized.

  6. The lytic phase of epstein-barr virus requires a viral genome with 5-methylcytosine residues in CpG sites.

    PubMed

    Kalla, Markus; Göbel, Christine; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus which has been studied intensively for its role in certain human tumors. It also serves as a model of herpesviral latency because it establishes an immediate, latent infection in human B cells. When EBV infects quiescent, primary B cells it induces their continuous proliferation to yield growth-transformed B-cell lines in vitro. The lytic or productive phase of EBV's life cycle is induced by the expression of the viral BZLF1 gene in latently infected cells. The BZLF1 protein is a transactivator, which selectively binds to two classes of distinct DNA sequence motifs. One class is similar to the motifs that are bound by members of the AP-1 transcription factor family to which BZLF1 belongs. The second class, which contains CpG motifs, is predominant in viral promoters of early lytic genes and is BZLF1's preferred or exclusive target sequence when methylated. The BZLF1 gene is transiently expressed in newly infected B cells but fails to induce EBV's lytic cycle, potentially because the virion DNA is unmethylated. Here we report that the lack of 5-methylcytosine residues in CpG sites of virion DNA prevents the expression of essential lytic genes indispensable for viral DNA amplification during productive infection. This finding indicates that BZLF1 transactivates these promoters in a methylation-dependent fashion and explains how progeny virus synthesis is abrogated in newly infected B cells. Our data also reveal that viral lytic DNA synthesis precludes CpG methylation of virion DNA during EBV's lytic, productive cycle, which can be overcome by the ectopic expression of a prokaryotic cytosine methyltransferase to yield CpG-methylated virion DNA. Upon infection of B cells, randomly CpG-methylated virion DNA induces high expression of essential lytic genes in contrast to virion DNA free of 5-methylcytosine residues. Our data suggest that unmethylated virion DNA is part of EBV's strategy to prevent the viral lytic phase in

  7. Building the full Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix from six independent Majorana-type phases

    SciTech Connect

    Branco, Gustavo C.; Rebelo, M. N.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of three light Majorana neutrinos, we show how to reconstruct, through the use of 3x3 unitarity, the full PMNS matrix from six independent Majorana-type phases. In particular, we express the strength of Dirac-type CP violation in terms of these Majorana-type phases by writing the area of the unitarity triangles in terms of these phases. We also study how these six Majorana phases appear in CP-odd weak-basis invariants as well as in leptonic asymmetries relevant for flavored leptogenesis.

  8. Building the full Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix from six independent Majorana-type phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, Gustavo C.; Rebelo, M. N.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of three light Majorana neutrinos, we show how to reconstruct, through the use of 3×3 unitarity, the full PMNS matrix from six independent Majorana-type phases. In particular, we express the strength of Dirac-type CP violation in terms of these Majorana-type phases by writing the area of the unitarity triangles in terms of these phases. We also study how these six Majorana phases appear in CP-odd weak-basis invariants as well as in leptonic asymmetries relevant for flavored leptogenesis.

  9. Models of neutrino mass, mixing and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.

    2015-12-01

    In this topical review we argue that neutrino mass and mixing data motivates extending the Standard Model (SM) to include a non-Abelian discrete flavour symmetry in order to accurately predict the large leptonic mixing angles and {C}{P} violation. We begin with an overview of the SM puzzles, followed by a description of some classic lepton mixing patterns. Lepton mixing may be regarded as a deviation from tri-bimaximal mixing, with charged lepton corrections leading to solar mixing sum rules, or tri-maximal lepton mixing leading to atmospheric mixing rules. We survey neutrino mass models, using a roadmap based on the open questions in neutrino physics. We then focus on the seesaw mechanism with right-handed neutrinos, where sequential dominance (SD) can account for large lepton mixing angles and {C}{P} violation, with precise predictions emerging from constrained SD (CSD). We define the flavour problem and discuss progress towards a theory of favour using GUTs and discrete family symmetry. We classify models as direct, semidirect or indirect, according to the relation between the Klein symmetry of the mass matrices and the discrete family symmetry, in all cases focussing on spontaneous {C}{P} violation. Finally we give two examples of realistic and highly predictive indirect models with CSD, namely an A to Z of flavour with Pati-Salam and a fairly complete A 4 × SU(5) SUSY GUT of flavour, where both models have interesting implications for leptogenesis.

  10. The Cabibbo angle as a universal seed for quark and lepton mixings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Morisi, S.; Singh, N. N.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2015-09-01

    A model-independent ansatz to describe lepton and quark mixing in a unified way is suggested based upon the Cabibbo angle. In our framework neutrinos mix in a "Bi-Large" fashion, while the charged leptons mix as the "down-type" quarks do. In addition to the standard Wolfenstein parameters (λ, A) two other free parameters (ψ, δ) are needed to specify the physical lepton mixing matrix. Through this simple assumption one makes specific predictions for the atmospheric angle as well as leptonic CP violation in good agreement with current observations.

  11. Tevatron results on the discovery of sigma^(*)_b, b_s oscillations and the measurement of delta m_s, the lifetime difference delta gamma_s and the cp-violating phase phi

    SciTech Connect

    Heijboer, Aart; /Pennsylvania U.

    2007-10-01

    The author discusses results from the Tevatron experiments on mixing and CP-violation in B{sub s} mesons, including the observation of B{sub s} oscillations and the first precision measurement of the mixing frequency, as well as a measurement of the lifetime difference {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} and the first measurement of the CP-violating phase {delta}{sub s}. The author also briefly reports on the observation of four new bottom baryons at CDF.

  12. Lasofoxifene: CP 336156, CP-336156.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    Lasofoxifene [CP 336156] is a potent, nonsteroidal, tissue-selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM). It has the bone-sparing and cardioprotective effects of estrogen, but lacks estrogen's uterine cancer risk. Lasofoxifene is under development with Ligand Pharmaceuticals and Pfizer (formerly Parke-Davis) for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis and breast cancer. In June 2000, Parke-Davis' parent company, Warner-Lambert, merged with Pfizer. The resulting company retained the Pfizer name and Parke-Davis was integrated into Pfizer Global Research and Development. The discovery of lasofoxifene resulted from a research collaboration between Pfizer and Ligand Pharmaceuticals. There was a contract dispute between the two companies relating to their research agreement. Under a settlement of litigation, Ligand is entitled to milestone and royalty payments. If Pfizer is successful in developing the drug through to regulatory approval in the US, Ligand could receive royalty revenues from lasofoxifene as early as 2003-2004. The royalties will be equal to 6% of net sales and will be in addition to milestone payments for continuing development of the drug. However, on 6 March 2002, Ligand Pharmaceutical announced an agreement with Royalty Pharma in which the latter purchased the rights to a share of these future payments. Under the agreement, Ligand received US dollars 6 million from Royalty Pharma in exchange for a 0.25% stake in net sales of three SERM products (lasofoxifene, bazedoxifene and bazedoxifene/Premarin) for a period of 10 years. Royalty Pharma retains the option to purchase, at escalating prices, additional rights (subject to timing restrictions) to extend this stake up to 1.0%, for a total of US dollars 56 million. In April 2002, Royalty Pharma exercised its first option to purchase an additional 0.125% of potential future sales of the three SERMS in exchange for US dollars 3 million. Subsequently, in December 2002, Royalty Pharma exercised an

  13. Measurement of the CP violating phase βs in B0s J/ΨΦ decays

    SciTech Connect

    Oakes, Louise Beth

    2010-01-01

    The CP violating phase β j/ΨΦs is measured in decays of B0s → J/ΨΦ. This measurement uses 5.2 fb-1 of data collected in √s = 1.96 TeV p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF Run-II detector. CP violation in the Bs0-$\\bar{B}$s0 system is predicted to be very small in the Standard Model. However, several theories beyond the Standard Model allow enhancements to this quantity by heavier, New Physics particles entering second order weak mixing box diagrams. Previous measurements have hinted at a deviation from the Standard Model expectation value for βsJ/ΨΦ with a significance of approximately 2σ. The measurement described in this thesis uses the highest statistics sample available to date in the Bs0 → J/ΨΦ decay channel, where J/Ψ → μ+μ- and Φ → K+K-. Furthermore, it contains several improvements over previous analyses, such as enhanced signal selection, fully calibrated particle ID and flavour tagging, and the inclusion of an additional decay component in the likelihood function. The added decay component considers S-wave states of KK pairs in the Bs0 → J/Ψ K+K- channel. The results are presented as 2-dimensional frequentist confidence regions for βsJ/ΨΦ and ΔΓ (the width difference between the Bs0 mass eigenstates), and as a confidence interval for βsJ/ΨΦ of [0.02,0.52] U [1.08, 1.55] at the 68% confidence level. The measurement of the CP violating phase obtained in this thesis is complemented by the world's most precise measurement of the lifetime τs = 1.53 ± 0.025 (stat.) ± 0.012 (syst.) ps and decay width difference ΔΓ = 0.075 ± 0.035 (stat.) ± 0.01 (syst.) ps-1 of the B

  14. Technology evaluation: CpG-7909, Coley.

    PubMed

    Paul, Stéphane

    2003-10-01

    Coley Pharmaceutical (formerly CpG ImmunoPharmaceuticals) is developing CpG-7909 (ProMune) for use in the potential treatment of cancer and as a vaccine adjuvant. By April 2000, CpG-7909 had entered phase I/II trials for cancer and in March 2002, Coley initiated a phase I trial in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in combination with rituximab (Rituxan). By October 2002, CpG-7909 was in phase II trials as a vaccine adjuvant. Cpg-7909 is currently also undergoing phase II trials for melanoma. PMID:14601526

  15. CP violation in bilinear R-parity violation and its consequences for the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chériguène, Asma; Porod, Werner; Liebler, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Supersymmetric models with bilinear R-parity violation (BRpV) provide a framework for neutrino masses and mixing angles to explain neutrino oscillation data. We consider CP violation within the new physical phases in BRpV and discuss their effect on the generation of neutrino masses and the decays of the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), being a light neutralino with mass ˜100 GeV, at next-to-leading order. The decays affect the lepton and via sphaleron transitions the baryon asymmetry in the early universe. For a rather light LSP, asymmetries generated before the electroweak phase transition via e.g. the Affleck-Dine mechanism are reduced up to 2 orders of magnitude, but are still present. On the other hand, the decays of a light LSP themselves can account for the generation of a lepton and baryon asymmetry, the latter in accordance with the observation in our universe, since the smallness of the BRpV parameters allows for an out-of-equilibrium decay and sufficiently large CP violation is possible consistent with experimental bounds from the nonobservation of electric dipole moments.

  16. Flavor Physics & CP Violation 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    "Flavor Physics & CP violation 2015" (FPCP 2015) was held in Nagoya, Japan, at Nagoya University, from May 25 to May 29 2015. This is the 13th meeting of the series of annual conferences started in Philadelphia, PA, USA in 2002. The aim of the conference is to review developments in flavor physics and CP violation, in both theory and experiment, exploiting the potential to study new physics at the LHC and future facilities. The topics include CP violation, rare decays, CKM elements with heavy quark decays, flavor phenomena in charged leptons and neutrinos, and also interplay between flavor and LHC high Pt physics. The FPCP2015 conference had more than 140 participants, including researchers from abroad and many young researchers (postdocs and students). The conference consisted of plenary talks and poster presentations. The plenary talks include 2 overview talks, 48 review talks, and 2 talks for outlook in theories and experiments, given by world leading researchers. There was also a special lecture by Prof. Makoto Kobayashi, one of the Nobel laureates in 2008. The poster session had 41 contributions. Many young researchers presented their works. These proceedings contain written documents for these plenary and poster presentations. The full scientific program and presentation materials can be found at http://fpcp2015.hepl.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp/. We would like to thank the International Advisory Committee for their invaluable assistance in coordinating the scientific program and in helping to identifying many speakers. Thanks are also due to the Local Organizing Committee for tireless efforts for smooth running of the conference and very enjoyable social activities. We also thank the financial supports provided by Japanese Scociety for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) unfer the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) "Probing New Physics with Tau-Lepton" (No. 26220706), by Nagoya University under the Program for Promoting the Enhancement of Research Universities, and

  17. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ϕ(s) in the decay B(s)(0) → J/ψϕ.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Bonal, F; Domingo Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-03-01

    We present a measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating asymmetry in B(s)(0) → J/ψϕ decays, using data collected with the LHCb detector at the LHC. The decay time distribution of B(s)(0) → J/ψϕ is characterized by the decay widths Γ(H) and Γ(L) of the heavy and light mass eigenstates, respectively, of the B(s)(0) - B(s)(0) system and by a CP-violating phase ϕ(s). In a sample of about 8500 B(s)(0) → J/ψϕ events isolated from 0.37  fb(-1) of pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 7  TeV, we measure ϕ(s) = 0.15 ± 0.18(stat) ± 0.06(syst)  rad. We also find an average B(s)(0) decay width Γ(s) ≡ (Γ(L) + Γ(H))/2 = 0.657 ± 0.009(stat) ± 0.008(syst)  ps(-1) and a decay width difference ΔΓ(s) ≡ Γ(L) - Γ(H) = 0.123 ± 0.029(stat) ± 0.011(syst)  ps(-1). Our measurement is insensitive to the transformation (ϕ(s),ΔΓ(s)) ↦ (π - ϕ(s), -ΔΓ(s)). PMID:22463401

  18. Dynamical CP violation in the early universe and leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Balaji, K.R.S.; Biswas, Tirthabir; Brandenberger, Robert H.; London, David

    2005-09-01

    In a recent publication, we suggested a mechanism for obtaining dynamical CP violation in the early universe based on the out-of-equilibrium evolution of complex scalar fields. In this paper, we suggest several ways of transferring the CP asymmetry from the scalar sector to the leptonic sector. In particular, we point out how a 'transient Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (Pontecorvo) matrix' can generate an asymmetry between fermions and antifermions directly.

  19. Measurement of the CP-Violating Phase beta_s in B0s -> J/Psi Phi Decays with the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; et al.

    2012-04-01

    We present a measurement of the \\CP-violating parameter \\betas using approximately 6500 $\\BsJpsiPhi$ decays reconstructed with the CDF\\,II detector in a sample of $p\\bar p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab. We find the \\CP-violating phase to be within the range $\\betas \\in [0.02, 0.52] \\cup [1.08, 1.55]$ at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential $S$-wave contribution to the $\\Bs\\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval $1.009 < m(K^+K^-)<1.028 \\gevcc$. Assuming the standard model prediction for the \\CP-violating phase \\betas, we find the \\Bs decay width difference to be $\\deltaG = 0.075 \\pm 0.035\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.006\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\ps$. We also present the most precise measurements of the \\Bs mean lifetime $\\tau(\\Bs) = 1.529 \\pm 0.025\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.012\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ ps, the polarization fractions $|A_0(0)|^2 = 0.524 \\pm 0.013\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ and $|A_{\\parallel}(0)|^2 = 0.231 \\pm 0.014\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$, as well as the strong phase $\\delta_{\\perp}= 2.95 \\pm 0.64\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.07\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\textrm{rad}$. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.

  20. A role for compromise: synaptic inhibition and electrical coupling interact to control phasing in the leech heartbeat CpG.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Adam L; Roffman, Rebecca C; Norris, Brian J; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2010-01-01

    How can flexible phasing be generated by a central pattern generator (CPG)? To address this question, we have extended an existing model of the leech heartbeat CPG's timing network to construct a model of the CPG core and explore how appropriate phasing is set up by parameter variation. Within the CPG, the phasing among premotor interneurons switches regularly between two well defined states - synchronous and peristaltic. To reproduce experimentally observed phasing, we varied the strength of inhibitory synaptic and excitatory electrical input from the timing network to follower premotor interneurons. Neither inhibitory nor electrical input alone was sufficient to produce proper phasing on both sides, but instead a balance was required. Our model suggests that the different phasing of the two sides arises because the inhibitory synapses and electrical coupling oppose one another on one side (peristaltic) and reinforce one another on the other (synchronous). Our search of parameter space defined by the strength of inhibitory synaptic and excitatory electrical input strength led to a CPG model that well approximates the experimentally observed phase relations. The strength values derived from this analysis constitute model predictions that we tested by measurements made in the living system. Further, variation of the intrinsic properties of follower interneurons showed that they too systematically influence phasing. We conclude that a combination of inhibitory synaptic and excitatory electrical input interacting with neuronal intrinsic properties can flexibly generate a variety of phase relations so that almost any phasing is possible. PMID:20700387

  1. Direct and semi-direct approaches to lepton mixing with a massless neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.; Ludl, Patrick Otto

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the possibility of enforcing a massless Majorana neutrino in the direct and semi-direct approaches to lepton mixing, in which the PMNS matrix is partly predicted by subgroups of a discrete family symmetry, extending previous group searches up to order 1535. We find a phenomenologically viable scheme for the semi-direct approach based on Q(648) which contains Δ(27) and the quaternion group as subgroups. This leads to novel predictions for the first column of the PMNS matrix corresponding to a normal neutrino mass hierarchy with m 1 = 0, and sum rules for the mixing angles and phase which are characterised by the solar angle being on the low side θ 12 ˜ 31° and the Dirac (oscillation) CP phase δ being either about ±45° or ±π.

  2. Measurement of the CP-violating phase βsJ/ψΦ in Bs0→J/ψΦ decays with the CDF II detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-04-23

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating parameter βsJ/ψΦ using approximately 6500 B0s→J/ψΦ decays reconstructed with the CDF II detector in a sample of pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb⁻¹ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. We find the CP-violating phase to be within the range βsJ/ψΦϵ [0.02,0.52]∪[1.08,1.55] at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential S-wavemore » contribution to the B0s→J/ψK⁺K⁻ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval 1.009sJ/ψΦ, we find the B0s decay width difference to be ΔΓs=0.075±0.035(stat)±0.006(syst) ps⁻¹. We also present the most precise measurements of the B0s mean lifetime τ(B0s)=1.529±0.025(stat)±0.012(syst) ps, the polarization fractions |A0(0)|²=0.524±0.013(stat)±0.015(syst) and |A II (0)|²=0.231±0.014(stat)±0.015(syst), as well as the strong phase δ⊥=2.95±0.64(stat)±0.07(syst) rad. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.« less

  3. CP violation versus flavour in supersymmetric theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, S.; Branco, G. C.; Khalil, S.

    2003-09-01

    We show that the quark flavour structure and CP violating phenomena are strongly correlated in supersymmetric theories. For a generic pattern of supersymmetry breaking the two broad categories of Yukawa couplings, democratic and hierarchical textures, have entirely different phenomenological implications. With hierarchical Yukawas, the rephasing invariant phase, arg(VusVcbVcb∗Vcs∗), in the CKM mixing matrix has to be of order unity, while the SUSY CP violating phases are severely constrained by electric dipole moments, giving rise to the so-called SUSY CP problem. With democratic Yukawas, all experimental CP results can be accommodated with small values for the CKM and SUSY CP violating phases (i.e., CP can be considered as an approximate symmetry at the high energy scale). We also show that within this scenario, an entirely real CKM matrix in supersymmetric models is still allowed by the present experimental results.

  4. Low scale seesaw, electron EDM and leptogenesis in a model with spontaneous CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Mahanthappa, K.T.; /Colorado U.

    2006-09-01

    Strong correlations between leptogenesis and low energy CP violating leptonic processes have been shown by us to exist fin the minimal left-right symmetric model with spontaneous CP violation. In this note, they investigate the implications of this model for the electric dipole moment of the electron. With an additional broken U(1){sub H} symmetry, the seesaw scale can be lowered to close to the electroweak scale. This additional symmetry also makes the connection between CP violation in quark sector to that in the lepton sector possible.

  5. CP violation at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Adam; Atlas Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    A measurement of several properties of the Bs meson, including the CP-violating weak phase phis and the mixing-induced width difference ΔΓs, is performed using the decay Bs → J/ψ(μ+μ-)phi(K+K-), from a dataset of 4.9 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected in 2011 by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The measured parameters are consistent with the world average values and theoretical expectations; in particular phis is within 1 σ of the expected value in the Standard Model.

  6. Phenomenology of baryogenesis from lepton-doublet mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbrecht, Björn; Izaguirre, Ignacio

    2015-07-01

    Mixing lepton doublets of the Standard Model can lead to lepton flavour asymmetries in the Early Universe. We present a diagrammatic representation of this recently identified source of CP violation and elaborate in detail on the correlations between the lepton flavours at different temperatures. For a model where two sterile right-handed neutrinos generate the light neutrino masses through the see-saw mechanism, the lower bound on reheat temperatures in accordance with the observed baryon asymmetry turns out to be ≳ 1.2 ×109 GeV. With three right-handed neutrinos, substantially smaller values are viable. This requires however a tuning of the Yukawa couplings, such that there are cancellations between the individual contributions to the masses of the light neutrinos.

  7. Improved Measurement of CP Observables in B- to D0_CP K- Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, Marcella; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, Marco; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, Janice; Cahn, Robert N.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-07-01

    We present a study of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub (CP)}{sup 0}K{sup -} and its charge conjugate, where D{sub (CP)}{sup 0} is reconstructed in both a non-CP flavor eigenstate and in CP (CP-even and CP-odd) eigenstates, based on a sample of 382 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. We measure the direct CP asymmetries A{sub CP{+-}} and the ratios of the branching fractions R{sub CP{+-}}: A{sub CP+} = 0.27 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst), A{sub CP-} = -0.09 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.02(syst), R{sub CP+} = 1.06 {+-} 0.10(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst), R{sub CP-} = 1.03 {+-} 0.10(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst). These results will help to better constrain the gamma phase parameter of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix.

  8. Leptons Masses and Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Terrence; Stephenson, Gerard J., Jr.

    2016-03-01

    We apply our successful modest revision of the quark mass sector of the Standard Model to leptons. We include the effects of the possibility of dark matter fermions, which appear as a number of sterile neutrinos. Email: tjgoldman@post.harvard.edu.

  9. Phenomenology of heavy vectorlike leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwata, Koji; Wise, Mark B.

    2013-09-01

    We study the impact that a heavy generation of vectorlike leptons can have on the value of the electric dipole moment of the electron, and the rates for the flavor violating processes μ→eγ and μ→3e. The smallness of the charged lepton masses suggests that at least some of the Yukawa coupling constants of the vectorlike leptons to the ordinary leptons or amongst themselves are small, but even with such small couplings experiments trying to detect these quantities are sensitive to extra generation lepton masses up to about 100 TeV.

  10. Phase I/II Randomized Trial of Safety and Immunogenicity of LIPO-5 Alone, ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452) Alone, and ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452) Prime/LIPO-5 Boost in Healthy, HIV-1-Uninfected Adult Participants

    PubMed Central

    Peiperl, Laurence; McElrath, M. Juliana; Kalams, Spyros; Goepfert, Paul A.; Keefer, Michael C.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Lally, Michelle A.; Mayer, Kenneth; Blattner, William A.; Harro, Clayton D.; Hammer, Scott M.; Gorse, Geoffrey J.; Hural, John; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Levy, Yves; Gilbert, Peter; deCamp, Allan; Russell, Nina D.; Elizaga, Marnie; Allen, Mary; Corey, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Finding an effective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine remains a major global health priority. In a phase I/II, placebo-controlled trial, healthy, HIV-1-negative adults were randomized to receive one of 5 vaccine regimens: LIPO-5 (combination of 5 lipopeptides) alone (250 μg), ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452) alone, or 3 groups of ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452) followed by ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452) plus LIPO-5 (250, 750, and 2,500 μg). Only 73/174 participants (42%) received all four vaccinations due to a study halt related to myelitis. There were no significant differences in systemic reactions between groups or in local reactogenicity between groups receiving ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452). Significant differences in local reactogenicity occurred between groups receiving LIPO-5 (P ≤ 0.05). Gag and Env antibodies were undetectable by ELISA 2 weeks after the fourth vaccination for all but one recipient. Antibodies to Gag and Env were present in 32% and 24% of recipients of ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452) alone and in 47% and 35% of ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452)+LIPO recipients, respectively. Coadministration of LIPO-5 did not significantly increase the response rate compared to ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452) alone, nor was there a significant relationship between dose and antibody responses among ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452)+LIPO groups. Over 90% of study participants had no positive gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISpot) responses to any peptide pool at any time point. The study was halted due to a case of myelitis possibly related to the LIPO-5 vaccine; this case of myelitis remains an isolated event. In general, there was no appreciable cell-mediated immunity detected in response to the vaccines used in this study, and antibody responses were limited. The clinical trial is registered on ClinicalTrials.gov with registry number NCT00076063. PMID:25253665

  11. Phase I/II randomized trial of safety and immunogenicity of LIPO-5 alone, ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452) alone, and ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452) prime/LIPO-5 boost in healthy, HIV-1-uninfected adult participants.

    PubMed

    Frey, Sharon E; Peiperl, Laurence; McElrath, M Juliana; Kalams, Spyros; Goepfert, Paul A; Keefer, Michael C; Baden, Lindsey R; Lally, Michelle A; Mayer, Kenneth; Blattner, William A; Harro, Clayton D; Hammer, Scott M; Gorse, Geoffrey J; Hural, John; Tomaras, Georgia D; Levy, Yves; Gilbert, Peter; deCamp, Allan; Russell, Nina D; Elizaga, Marnie; Allen, Mary; Corey, Lawrence

    2014-11-01

    Finding an effective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine remains a major global health priority. In a phase I/II, placebo-controlled trial, healthy, HIV-1-negative adults were randomized to receive one of 5 vaccine regimens: LIPO-5 (combination of 5 lipopeptides) alone (250 μg), ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452) alone, or 3 groups of ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452) followed by ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452) plus LIPO-5 (250, 750, and 2,500 μg). Only 73/174 participants (42%) received all four vaccinations due to a study halt related to myelitis. There were no significant differences in systemic reactions between groups or in local reactogenicity between groups receiving ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452). Significant differences in local reactogenicity occurred between groups receiving LIPO-5 (P ≤ 0.05). Gag and Env antibodies were undetectable by ELISA 2 weeks after the fourth vaccination for all but one recipient. Antibodies to Gag and Env were present in 32% and 24% of recipients of ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452) alone and in 47% and 35% of ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452)+LIPO recipients, respectively. Coadministration of LIPO-5 did not significantly increase the response rate compared to ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452) alone, nor was there a significant relationship between dose and antibody responses among ALVAC-HIV (vCP1452)+LIPO groups. Over 90% of study participants had no positive gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISpot) responses to any peptide pool at any time point. The study was halted due to a case of myelitis possibly related to the LIPO-5 vaccine; this case of myelitis remains an isolated event. In general, there was no appreciable cell-mediated immunity detected in response to the vaccines used in this study, and antibody responses were limited. The clinical trial is registered on ClinicalTrials.gov with registry number NCT00076063. PMID:25253665

  12. Measurement of the CP Violating Phase $\\boldsymbol{\\sin(2\\beta_{s})}$ using $\\boldsymbol{B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\phi}$ Decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Pueschel, Elisa

    2010-05-01

    A B0 s meson can oscillate into its anti-particle, the $\\bar{B}$0 s meson, before decaying. CP violation in this system is made possible by the presence of amplitudes from both mixed and unmixed B0 s meson decays. The CP violating phase βs appears in the interference between the decay amplitudes. The quantity sin(2βs) is expected to be small in the standard model. Thus, measuring a large value for sin(2βs) would be an unequivocal sign of new physics participation in the B0 s mixing loop diagram. In this thesis, we present a latest measurement of sin(2βs), using 5.2 fb-1 of data collected at CDF from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center of mass energy of √s=1.96 TeV. A time-dependent angular analysis, with the production flavor of the B0 s meson identified with flavor tagging methods, is used to extract sin(2βs) from ~6500 B0 s→ J/ψφ decays. Other parameters of interest, such as the B0 s lifetime and the decay width difference between the heavy and light B0 s mass eigenstates are determined to high precision. Also, the effect of potential contributions to the final state from B0 s → J/ψf0 and B0 s→ J/ψK+K- decays is considered for the first time. We present 68% and 95% confidence regions in the βs plane. The probability that the observed central value is a fluctuation of the data from the standard model expected value of βs is calculated to be 44%. The observed confidence region shows better agreement with the standard model prediction than previous measurements.

  13. Soft Lepton Flavor Tagging at CDF using Run 2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, Tania

    2003-04-01

    An overview of soft lepton tagging at CDF is presented. Flavour tagging is needed to determine the flavour of a B(B_0/B_S) meson at production. Making such a decision is called flavour tagging the B meson. This is required to make precision measurements of B mixing and CP violation. Soft Lepton tagging is an opposite side tagging which exploits the sign of the lepton in the decays, b arrow X l^- compared to barb arrow X l^+, where l is an electron or muon, to tag the B. The effectiveness of the tagging is characterised by the effective tagging efficiency, ɛ D^2, where ɛ is the tagging efficiency and the dilution D is a measure of the wrong sign tags. In Run 2, CDF expects to improve the effective tagging efficiency, due to an extended lepton coverage with the muon extension systems and the plug calorimeter. Details on the soft lepton tagging studies and results using the latest data sample at CDF are presented.

  14. CP-violating Higgs at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Siba Prasad; Drees, Manuel; Datta, Amitava

    2008-11-23

    We analyze the prospect for observing the intermediate neutral Higgs (h{sub 2}) boson in its decay to two lighter Higgs bosons (h{sub 1}) at the Tevatron in the framework of the CP violating MSSM using the PYTHIA event generator. We consider the lepton+4-jets+Ee{sub T} channel from pp-bar{yields}Wh{sub 2}{yields}Wh{sub 1}h{sub 1}{yields}lv{sub l}bb-barbb-bar, with two or three tagged b jets. We found that it is very hard to observe this signature in the LEP-allowed region of parameter space, due to the small signal efficiency.

  15. CP-Violating Sources for Electroweak Baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Christopher

    2008-11-23

    In this talk I derive the CP-violating sources for the squark number density in the MSSM generated by interactions with the spacetime-varying Higgs vev during a first-order electroweak phase transition.

  16. Effects of neutral Z' boson in Bs→φℓ+ℓ- decay with polarized φ and the unpolarized and polarized CP violation asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Aslam, M. Jamil; Paracha, M. Ali

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the new neutral Z' boson in Bs→φℓ+ℓ-, when φ is longitudinal or transverse polarized, are studied. In addition, the implications of the Z' boson on the unpolarized and polarized CP violation asymmetries, with reference to leptons, are also presented. It is observed that the branching ratio with polarized φ is quite sensitive to the Z' contributions which are coming through the modification of the Wilson coefficients C9eff and C10. Moreover, the off-diagonal elements of the chiral Z' couplings contain a new weak phase φsb that provides a new source of CP violation. Keeping in view that in the flavor-changing neutral-current transitions, the CP-violation asymmetries are highly suppressed in the Standard Model, we have studied the unpolarized and polarized CP-violation asymmetries in Bs→φℓ+ℓ- decays. Our results indicate that these CP-violation asymmetries are remarkably significant and can give us hints of any new physics coming through the Z' boson. It is hoped that accurate measurements of these asymmetries will not only help us to establish NP but also give us a chance to determine the precise values of the coupling parameters of the Z' boson.

  17. Baryogenesis via leptogenesis from quark-lepton symmetry and a compact heavy NR spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.; Falcone, D.; Oliver, L.

    2011-05-01

    By demanding a compact spectrum for the right-handed neutrinos and an approximate quark-lepton symmetry inspired from SO(10) gauge unification (assuming a Dirac neutrino mass matrix close to the up quark mass matrix), we construct a fine-tuning scenario for baryogenesis via leptogenesis. We find two solutions with a normal hierarchy, with the lightest neutrino mass m1 different from zero, providing an absolute scale for the spectrum. In the approximations of the model, there are three independent CP phases: δL (that we take of the order of the quark Kobayashi-Maskawa phase) and the two light neutrino Majorana phases α and β. A main conclusion is that, although this general scheme is rather flexible, in some regions of parameter space we find that the necessary baryogenesis with its sign is given in terms of the δL phase alone. The light Majorana phases can also be computed, and they turn out to be close to π/2 or very small. Moreover, SO(10) breaks down to the Pati-Salam group SU(4)×SU(2)×SU(2) at the expected natural intermediate scale of about 1010-1011GeV. A prediction is made for the effective mass in (ββ)0ν decay, the νe mass, and the sum of all light neutrino masses.

  18. Hard-thermal-loop corrections in leptogenesis I: CP-asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Kießig, Clemens P.; Plümacher, Michael E-mail: pluemi@mpp.mpg.de

    2012-07-01

    We investigate hard-thermal-loop (HTL) corrections to the CP-asymmetries in neutrino and, at high temperature, Higgs boson decays in leptogenesis. We pay special attention to the two leptonic quasiparticles that arise at non-zero temperature and find that there are four contributions to the CP-asymmetries, which correspond to the four combinations of the two leptonic quasiparticles in the loop and in the final states. In two additional cases, we approximate the full HTL-lepton propagator with a zero-temperature propagator that employs the thermal lepton mass m{sub l}(T), or the asymptotic thermal lepton mass (2){sup 1/2} m{sub l}(T). We find that the CP-asymmetries in the one-mode approaches differ by up to one order of magnitude from the full two-mode treatment in the interesting temperature regime T ∼ M{sub 1}. The asymmetry in Higgs boson decays turns out to be two orders of magnitude larger than the asymmetry in neutrino decays in the zero-temperature treatment. The effect of HTL corrections on the final lepton asymmetry are investigated in paper II of this series.

  19. Capillary-Channeled Polymer (C-CP) Fibers as a Stationary Phase for Sample Clean-Up of Protein Solutions for Matrix-Assisted Laser/Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manard, Benjamin T.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2012-08-01

    Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers are employed in a micropipette tip format to affect a stationary phase for the solid phase extraction (SPE) of proteins from buffer solutions prior to MALDI-MS analysis. Proteins readily adsorb to the polypropylene (PP) C-CP fibers while buffer species are easily washed off the tips using DI-H2O. Elution of the solutes is achieved with an aliquot of 50:50 ACN:H2O, which is compatible with the subsequent spotting on the MALDI target with the matrix solution. Lysozyme and cytochrome c are used as test species, with a primary buffer composition of 100 mM Tris-HCl. In this case, direct MALDI-MS produces no discernible protein signals. SPE on the C-CP fibers yields high fidelity mass spectra for 1 μL sample volumes. Limits of detection for cytochrome c in 100 mM Tris-HCl are on the order of 40 nM. Extraction of cytochrome c from buffer concentrations of up to 1 M Tris-HCl, provides signal recoveries that are suppressed by only ~50 % versus neat protein solutions. Finally, extraction of 3.1 μM cytochrome c from a synthetic urine matrix exhibits excellent recovery.

  20. Electric dipole moments of charged leptons with sterile fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abada, Asmaa; Toma, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    We address the impact of sterile fermions on charged lepton electric dipole moments. Any experimental signal of these observables calls for scenarios of physics beyond the Standard Model providing new sources of CP violation. In this work, we consider a minimal extension of the Standard Model via the addition of sterile fermions which mix with active neutrinos and we derive the corresponding analytical expressions for the electric dipole moments of charged leptons at two-loop order. Our study reveals that, in order to have a non-vanishing contribution in this framework, the minimal extension necessitates the addition of at least 2 sterile fermion states to the Standard Model field content. Our conclusion is that sterile neutrinos can give significant contributions to the charged lepton electric dipole moments, some of them lying within present and future experimental sensitivity if the masses of the non-degenerate sterile states are both above the electroweak scale. The Majorana nature of neutrinos is also important in order to allow for significative contributions to the charged lepton electric dipole moments. In our analysis we impose all available experimental and observational constraints on sterile neutrinos and we further discuss the prospect of probing this scenario at low and high energy experiments.

  1. Five-body leptonic decays of muon and tau leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Tlalpa, A.; Castro, G. López; Roig, P.

    2016-04-01

    We study the five-body decays {μ}-to {e}-{e}+{e}-{ν}_{μ }{overline{ν}}_e and {τ}-to {ℓ}-{ℓ}^' +}{ℓ}^' -}{ν}_{τ }{overline{ν}}_{ℓ } for ℓ, ℓ ' = e, μ within the Standard Model (SM) and in a general effective field theory description of the weak interactions at low energies. We compute the branching ratios and compare our results with two previous — mutually discrepan — SM calculations. By assuming a general structure for the weak currents we derive the expressions for the energy and angular distributions of the three charged leptons when the decaying lepton is polarized, which will be useful in precise tests of the weak charged current at Belle II. In these decays, leptonic T-odd correlations in triple products of spin and momenta — which may signal time reversal violation in the leptonic sector — are suppressed by the tiny neutrino masses. Therefore, a measurement of such T-violating observables would be associated to neutrinoless lepton flavor violating (LFV) decays, where this effect is not extremely suppressed. We also study the backgrounds that the SM five-lepton lepton decays constitute to searches of LFV L - → ℓ - ℓ '+ ℓ '- decays. Searches at high values of the invariant mass of the ℓ '+ ℓ '- pair look the most convenient way to overcome the background.

  2. Oligonuclear molecular models of intermetallic phases: a case study on [Pd2Zn6Ga2(Cp*)5(CH3)3].

    PubMed

    Bollermann, Timo; Molon, Mariusz; Gemel, Christian; Freitag, Kerstin; Seidel, Rüdiger W; von Hopffgarten, Moritz; Jerabek, Paul; Frenking, Gernot; Fischer, Roland A

    2012-04-16

    The synthesis, characterization, and theoretical investigation by means of quantum-chemical calculations of an oligonuclear metal-rich compound are presented. The reaction of homoleptic dinuclear palladium compound [Pd(2)(μ-GaCp*)(3)(GaCp*)(2)] with ZnMe(2) resulted in the formation of unprecedented ternary Pd/Ga/Zn compound [Pd(2)Zn(6)Ga(2)(Cp*)(5)(CH(3))(3)] (1), which was analyzed by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, MS, elemental analysis, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 consisted of two C(s)-symmetric molecular isomers, as revealed by NMR spectroscopy, at which distinct site-preferences related to the Ga and Zn positions were observed by quantum-chemical calculations. Structural characterization of compound 1 showed significantly different coordination environments for both palladium centers. Whilst one Pd atom sat in the central of a bi-capped trigonal prism, thereby resulting in a formal 18-valence electron fragment, {Pd(ZnMe)(2)(ZnCp*)(4)(GaMe)}, the other Pd atom occupied one capping unit, thereby resulting in a highly unsaturated 12-valence electron fragment, {Pd(GaCp*)}. The bonding situation, as determined by atoms-in-molecules analysis (AIM), NBO partial charges, and molecular orbital (MO) analysis, pointed out that significant Pd-Pd interactions had a large stake in the stabilization of this unusual molecule. The characterization and quantum-chemical calculations of compound 1 revealed distinct similarities to related M/Zn/Ga Hume-Rothery intermetallic solid-state compounds, such as Ga/Zn-exchange reactions, the site-preferences of the Zn/Ga positions, and direct M-M bonding, which contributes to the overall stability of the metal-rich compound. PMID:22416016

  3. Strong CP, Flavor, and Twisted Split Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Perez, Gilad; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Shirman, Yuri

    2004-11-10

    We present a natural solution to the strong CP problem in the context of split fermions. By assuming CP is spontaneously broken in the bulk, a weak CKM phase is created in the standard model due to a twisting in flavor space of the bulk fermion wavefunctions. But the strong CP phase remains zero, being essentially protected by parity in the bulk and CP on the branes. As always in models of spontaneous CP breaking, radiative corrections to theta bar from the standard model are tiny, but even higher dimension operators are not that dangerous. The twisting phenomenon was recently shown to be generic, and not to interfere with the way that split fermions naturally weaves small numbers into the standard model. It follows that out approach to strong CP is compatible with flavor, and we sketch a comprehensive model. We also look at deconstructed version of this setup which provides a viable 4D model of spontaneous CP breaking which is not in the Nelson-Barr class.

  4. Summary of Lepton Photon 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2012-03-14

    In this lecture, I summarize developments presented at the Lepton Photon 2011 conference and give my perspective on the current situation in high-energy physics. I am grateful to the organizers of Lepton Photon 2011 for providing us a very pleasant and simulating week in Mumbai. This year's Lepton Photon conference has covered the full range of subjects that fall within the scope of high-energy physics, including connections to cosmology, nuclear physics, and atomic physics. The experiments that were discussed detect particles ranging in energy from radio frequencies to EeV.

  5. CP violation experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, Yee B.

    1990-07-01

    The E731 experiment at Fermilab has searched for direct'' CP violation in K{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{pi}, which is parametrized by {var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}. For the first time, in 20% of the data set, all four modes of the K{sub L,S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} ({pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) were collected simultaneously, providing a great check on the systematic uncertainty. The result is Re({var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}) = {minus}0.0004 {plus minus} 0.0014 (stat) {plus minus} 0.0006(syst), which provides no evidence for direct'' CP violation. The CPT symmetry has also been tested by measuring the phase difference {Delta}{phi} = {phi}{sub 00} {minus} {phi}{sub {plus minus}} between the two CP violating parameters {eta}{sub 00} and {eta}{sub {plus minus}}. We fine {Delta}{phi} = {minus}0.3{degrees} {plus minus} 2.4{degree}(stat) {plus minus} 1.2{degree}(syst). Using this together with the world average {phi}{sub {plus minus}}, we fine that the phase of the K{sup 0}-{bar K}{sup 0} mixing parameter {var epsilon} is 44.5{degree} {plus minus} 1.5{degree}. Both of these results agree well with the predictions of CPT symmetry. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Birth of Lepton Flavor Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto

    The history of the lepton flavor mixing could be traced back to the early 60s, when Maki, Nakagawa and Sakata (MNS) discussed the neutrino mixing. Their work emerged in the course of the developments of the composite model of elementary particles which was initiated by Sakata. In Sakata's model, the weak interaction of the hadrons can be described by two types of transitions among the fundamental triplet baryons. This pattern of the weak interaction of the hadrons is similar to that of leptons provided that the neutrino consists of a single species. From this similarity, Maki, Nakagawa, Ohnuki and Sakata proposed the so-called Nagoya model, in which the fundamental triplet baryons are regarded as composite states of the leptons and a hypothetical object called B-matter. Although the Nagoya model did not make a remarkable success, when existence of two kinds of neutrinos was discovered in 1962, Maki, Nakagawa and Sakata precisely formulated lepton flavor mixing to associate leptons with the fundamental baryons in the framework of the Nagoya model. To recognize their contributions, the flavor mixing matrix of the lepton sector is called the MNS matrix. See also: M. Kobayashi, "Neutrino mass and mixing -- The beginning and future", Nucl. Phys. B (Proc. Suppl.) Vol. 235-236, (2013), pp. 4-7.

  7. Measurement of the Tau Lepton Lifetime at Opal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janissen, Anna Cornelia

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes a new measurement of the tau (tau) lepton lifetime using two statistically independent techniques each associated with one of the two principle decay topologies of the tau to one and three charged particles, respectively. The measurement was performed with data collected in 1990 and 1991 at the OPAL detector at the LEP e^+e ^- colliding beam accelerator at CERN. The LEP collider operates at a significantly higher energy than previous e^+e^- colliders. This presents a new experimental opportunity to investigate the physics associated with the tau<=pton in general and the tau lifetime in particular. The tau lepton is one of three similar electron -like particles: e, mu, and tau. These leptons exhibit a hierarchy of masses with: m_{e} < m_ {mu} < m_{tau}. While the electron is stable, the mu and the tau are unstable and decay via the weak interaction charged current. It is a fundamental feature of the standard model of fundamental particles and their interactions that this weak charged current has exactly the same strength for each of the three leptons; a phenomenon called lepton universality. The tau lifetime, tau_tau, can be related to the mu lifetime, tau_ mu, and the average leptonic branching ratio, BR(tau to lnu| nu), by:tau_ tau = tau_mu {G_mu G_{e}over G_tau G_ l} ({m_muover m_tau})^5 {rm BR}(tautolnu|nu)R where R is a calculable factor to account for phase space and radiative corrections, and G _l is the Fermi effective coupling strength of the weak charged current to the lepton l. Lepton universality implies that G _mu = G_{e} = G_tau. The experimentally measured tau lifetime, together with the measurements of the other quantities in the above relation, can be interpreted as a direct test of lepton universality. The tau lifetime measured with each of the two independent techniques is: eqalign{tau_1 &rm= 296.4+/-7.1(stat.)+/- 3.8(sys.) fscr tau_3 &rm= 286.3+/-7.4(stat.)+/-5.2(sys.) fs.}The systematic uncertainties for each of the

  8. Gravitating lepton bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Burinskii, A.

    2015-08-15

    The Kerr–Newman (KN) black hole (BH) solution exhibits the external gravitational and electromagnetic field corresponding to that of the Dirac electron. For the large spin/mass ratio, a ≫ m, the BH loses horizons and acquires a naked singular ring creating two-sheeted topology. This space is regularized by the Higgs mechanism of symmetry breaking, leading to an extended particle that has a regular spinning core compatible with the external KN solution. We show that this core has much in common with the known MIT and SLAC bag models, but has the important advantage of being in accordance with the external gravitational and electromagnetic fields of the KN solution. A peculiar two-sheeted structure of Kerr’s gravity provides a framework for the implementation of the Higgs mechanism of symmetry breaking in configuration space in accordance with the concept of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model. Similar to other bag models, the KN bag is flexible and pliant to deformations. For parameters of a spinning electron, the bag takes the shape of a thin rotating disk of the Compton radius, with a ring–string structure and a quark-like singular pole formed at the sharp edge of this disk, indicating that the considered lepton bag forms a single bag–string–quark system.

  9. Gravitating lepton bag model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burinskii, A.

    2015-08-01

    The Kerr-Newman (KN) black hole (BH) solution exhibits the external gravitational and electromagnetic field corresponding to that of the Dirac electron. For the large spin/mass ratio, a ≫ m, the BH loses horizons and acquires a naked singular ring creating two-sheeted topology. This space is regularized by the Higgs mechanism of symmetry breaking, leading to an extended particle that has a regular spinning core compatible with the external KN solution. We show that this core has much in common with the known MIT and SLAC bag models, but has the important advantage of being in accordance with the external gravitational and electromagnetic fields of the KN solution. A peculiar two-sheeted structure of Kerr's gravity provides a framework for the implementation of the Higgs mechanism of symmetry breaking in configuration space in accordance with the concept of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model. Similar to other bag models, the KN bag is flexible and pliant to deformations. For parameters of a spinning electron, the bag takes the shape of a thin rotating disk of the Compton radius, with a ring-string structure and a quark-like singular pole formed at the sharp edge of this disk, indicating that the considered lepton bag forms a single bag-string-quark system.

  10. Asymmetric dark matter and CP violating scatterings in a UV complete model

    SciTech Connect

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F.; Millar, Alexander J.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2015-10-21

    We explore possible asymmetric dark matter models using CP violating scatterings to generate an asymmetry. In particular, we introduce a new model, based on DM fields coupling to the SM Higgs and lepton doublets, a neutrino portal, and explore its UV completions. We study the CP violation and asymmetry formation of this model, to demonstrate that it is capable of producing the correct abundance of dark matter and the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry. Crucial to achieving this is the introduction of interactions which violate CP with a T{sup 2} dependence.

  11. Hints for Leptonic C P Violation or New Physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forero, David V.; Huber, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    One of the major open questions in the neutrino sector is the issue of leptonic C P violation. Current global oscillation data show a mild preference for a large, potentially maximal value for the Dirac C P phase in the neutrino mixing matrix. In this Letter, we point out that new physics in the form of neutral-current-like nonstandard interactions with real couplings would likely yield a similar conclusion even if C P in the neutrino sector were conserved. Therefore, the claim for a discovery of leptonic C P violation will require a robust ability to test new physics scenarios.

  12. CP Violation in B Meson Decays: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lanceri, Livio; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2005-08-30

    CP violation is intimately connected with the puzzle of matter-antimatter asymmetry and baryogenesis. In the Standard Model of particle physics, the observed CP violation phenomena are accounted for by the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism involving a phase in the quark mixing matrix. This paper is devoted to a review of the experimental status of CP violation in the decays of B mesons.

  13. Status of heavy-lepton searches

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1981-06-01

    Searches for heavy leptons using e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation, lepton-hadron collisions, photon-hadron collisions, hadron-hadron collisions, and studies of macroscopic matter are reviewed. The present experimental status and future possibilities are summarized.

  14. Status of Heavy-lepton Searches

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Perl, M. L.

    1981-06-01

    Searches for heavy leptons using e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation, lepton-hadron collisions, photon-hadron collisions, hadron-hadron collisions, and studies of macroscopic matter are reviewed. The present experimental status and future possibilities are summarized.

  15. Hadronic atoms and leptonic conservations

    SciTech Connect

    Kunselman, R.

    1989-01-01

    The major 1989 efforts have been mainly on two experiments at TRIUMF. One was a search for events where the leptonic flavor number conservation law would be violated. The second was an attempt to produce muonic hydrogen and muonic deuterium into a vacuum, and if there are found a adequate number of muons in the 2s state to measure precision energies. The minor efforts have been on the LAMPF experiment on lepton conservations which has consumed effort only in fabricating equipment, and on the completion of analyses from the experiments with hadronic atoms at LAMPF (pionic atoms) and BNL (kaonic and sigmonic atoms).

  16. Constraining CP-violating Higgs sectors at the LHC using gluon fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Harris, Philip; Jankowiak, Martin; Spannowsky, Michael

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the constraints that the LHC can set on a 126 GeV Higgs boson that is an admixture of CP eigenstates. Traditional analyses rely on Higgs couplings to massive vector bosons, which are suppressed for CP-odd couplings, so that these analyses have limited sensitivity. Instead we focus on Higgs production in gluon fusion, which occurs at the same order in αS for both CP-even and -odd Higgs couplings to top quarks. We study the Higgs plus two jet final state followed by Higgs decay into a pair of tau leptons. We show that using the 8 TeV data set it is possible to rule out the pure CP-odd hypothesis in this channel alone at nearly 95% C.L, assuming that the Higgs is CP-even. We also provide projected limits for the 14 TeV LHC run.

  17. Measurement of the CP-violating phase βsJ/ψΦ in Bs0→J/ψΦ decays with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.

    2012-04-23

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating parameter βsJ/ψΦ using approximately 6500 B0s→J/ψΦ decays reconstructed with the CDF II detector in a sample of pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb⁻¹ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. We find the CP-violating phase to be within the range βsJ/ψΦϵ [0.02,0.52]∪[1.08,1.55] at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential S-wave contribution to the B0s→J/ψK⁺K⁻ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval 1.009CP-violating phase βsJ/ψΦ, we find the B0s decay width difference to be ΔΓs=0.075±0.035(stat)±0.006(syst) ps⁻¹. We also present the most precise measurements of the B0s mean lifetime τ(B0s)=1.529±0.025(stat)±0.012(syst) ps, the polarization fractions |A0(0)|²=0.524±0.013(stat)±0.015(syst) and |A II (0)|²=0.231±0.014(stat)±0.015(syst), as well as the strong phase δ=2.95±0.64(stat)±0.07(syst) rad. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.

  18. Lepton and quark mixing patterns from finite flavor symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chang-Yuan; Ding, Gui-Jun

    2015-11-01

    We perform a systematical and analytical study of lepton mixing which can be derived from the subgroups of S U (3 ) under the assumption that neutrinos are Dirac particles. We find that type D groups can predict lepton mixing patterns compatible with the experimental data at the 3 σ level. The lepton mixing matrix turns out to be of the trimaximal form, and the Dirac C P violating phase is trivial. Moreover, we extend the flavor symmetry to the quark sector. The Cabibbo mixing between the first two generations of quarks can be generated by type D groups. Since all the finite subgroups of U (3 ) that are not the subgroups of S U (3 ) have not been classified, an exhaustive scan over all finite discrete groups up to order 2000 is performed with the help of the computer algebra system gap. We find that only 90 (10) groups for Dirac (Majorana) neutrinos can generate the lepton mixing angles in the experimentally preferred ranges. The lepton mixing matrix is still the trimaximal pattern and the Dirac C P phase remains trivial. The smallest groups that lead to viable mixing angles are [162, 10], [162, 12], and [162, 14]. For quark flavor mixing, the correct order of magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements cannot be generated. Only the Cabibbo mixing is allowed even if we impose very loose constraints 0.1 ≤|Vu s|≤0.3 and |Vu b|≤|Vc b|<|Vu s|. The group Δ (6 ×72) can predict a Cabibbo angle θq=π /14 in good agreement with the best fit value. The observed Cabibbo mixing angle can easily be accommodated if the first two left-handed quark fields are assigned to a doublet. The groups that can give rise to both phenomenologically viable lepton mixing angles and acceptable Cabibbo angles are discussed, and the groups Δ (6 ×92), [648, 259], [648, 260], [648, 266], and Δ (6 ×142) are especially promising in the case of the triplet assignment for both quark and lepton sectors. The three groups [496, 19], [496, 21], and [496, 23] are interesting

  19. Lepton Flavour Violation and electron EDM in SUSY with a non-abelian flavour symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Calibbi, Lorenzo

    2008-11-23

    We present the lepton sector phenomenology of a supersymmetric flavour model based on a SU(3) horizontal symmetry. This model successfully reproduces the observed fermion masses and mixings, without introducing unacceptably large SUSY sources of flavour and CP violation. We show that the model, which is at present weakly constrained, predicts the electron EDM and {mu}{yields}e,y to be within the final sensitivity of the currently running experiments, at least for SUSY masses within the reach of the LHC.

  20. Search for anomalous couplings in the decay of polarized Z bosons to tau lepton pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Torrence, E.C.

    1997-06-01

    Using a sample of 4,500 polarized Z decays to {tau} lepton pairs accumulated with the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) in 1993-95, a search has been made for anomalous couplings in the neutral current reaction e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}}. A measurement of the CP violating Weak Electric Dipole Moment (WEDM) and the CP conserving Weak Magnetic Dipole Moment (WMDM) of the {tau} lepton has been performed by considering the transverse spin polarization of {tau} leptons produced at the Z pole. Using a maximum likelihood technique, the observed {tau} decay spectra in the e, {mu}, {pi}, and {rho} decay channels are used to infer the net transverse polarization of the underlying tau leptons, and a fit for the anomalous dipole moments is performed. No evidence for these dipole movements is observed, and limits are placed on both the real and imaginary parts of the WEDM and WMDM.

  1. Lepton forward-backward asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, R. ); DELPHI Collaboration,

    1992-02-01

    Results of Forward-Backward Asymmetries with Leptons measured at [ital Z][sup 0] energies are presented. Details of the analysis by the DELPHI Collaboration are given together with the most recent values of the peak Asymmetries for electrons, muons, and taus obtained by ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL Collaborations at LEP.

  2. Review of tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, D.P.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of the {tau} decay modes are reviewed and compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. While the agreement is generally good, the status of the 1-prong puzzle'' remains controversial and a discrepancy between the measured leptonic branching fractions and the {tau} lifetime persists. Prospects for precision measurements at a Tau-Charm Factory are also reviewed. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Vectorlike leptons at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nilanjana; Martin, Stephen P.

    2015-12-01

    We study the prospects for excluding or discovering vectorlike leptons using multilepton events at the LHC. We consider models in which the vectorlike leptons decay to tau leptons. If the vectorlike leptons are weak isosinglets, then discovery in multilepton states is found to be extremely challenging. For the case that the vectorlike leptons are weak isodoublet, we argue that there may be an opportunity for exclusion for masses up to about 275 GeV by direct searches with existing LHC data at √{s }=8 TeV . We also discuss prospects for exclusion or discovery at the LHC with future √{s }=13 TeV data.

  4. Measurement of the CP-violating phase phi sJ/psi phi using the flavor-tagged decay Bs(0) -> J/psi phi in 8 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, {phi}{sub s}{sup J/{psi}{phi}} and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s}, from the flavor-tagged decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb{sup -1} accumulated with the D0 detector using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s} = 0.163{sub -0.064}{sup +0.065} ps{sup -1} and {phi}{sub s}{sup J}/{psi}{phi} = -0.55{sub -0.36}{sup +0.38}. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  5. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ΦsJ/ψΦ using the flavor-tagged decay Bs0→J/ ψΦ in 8 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ΦsJ/ψΦ, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ΔΓs, from the flavor-tagged decay B0s→J/ψΦ. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb⁻¹ accumulated with the D0 detector using pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ΔΓs=0.163+0.065₋0.064 ps⁻¹ and ΦsJ/ψΦ=₋0.55+0.38₋0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  6. Spontaneous CP-violation in extended technicolor models

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    The spontaneous CP-violation in models with dynamically broken weak interaction symmetries, i.e., extended technicolor models is examined. Attention is focussed on situations in which the global, flavor symmetry of the strong, color-technicolor, interactions is a product of chiral, horizontal U(2), or, when weak degrees of freedom are included, U(4) factors. In this context, we demonstrate the Eichten, Lane, Preskill CP-violation mechanism and show that the nemesis of this mechanism, strong CP-violation, can be easily avoided by imposing a discrete symmetry on the chiral perturbation. When strong CP-invariance is preserved by this means, we find that spontaneously generated CP-violating phases are suppressed by a ratio of extended technicolor mass scales. In addition, we consider, and attempt to analyze the direct contribution to strong CP-violation from colored technifermions.

  7. Quark and lepton mass matrices described by charged lepton masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Yoshio; Nishiura, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Recently, we proposed a unified mass matrix model for quarks and leptons, in which, mass ratios and mixings of the quarks and neutrinos are described by using only the observed charged lepton mass values as family-number-dependent parameters and only six family-number-independent free parameters. In spite of quite few parameters, the model gives remarkable agreement with observed data (i.e. Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) mixing, Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) mixing and mass ratios). Taking this phenomenological success seriously, we give a formulation of the so-called Yukawaon model in detail from a theoretical aspect, especially for the construction of superpotentials and R charge assignments of fields. The model is considerably modified from the previous one, while the phenomenological success is kept unchanged.

  8. CP Violation Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark .R.J.; /Lancaster U.

    2010-07-09

    The two colliding beam experiments at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, CDF and D0, continue to publish world-leading measurements of CP Violation parameters in the B meson sector. I will present several recent results from both experiments, including measurements of direct CP violating parameters in decays of B{sup +}{sub u}, B{sup 0}{sub d} and B{sup 0}{sub s} mesons; a new D0 measurement of a{sup s}{sub sl} using time-dependent analysis of B{sub s} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}D{sup -}{sub s}X decays; and the latest Tevatron combination of the CP violating phase {beta}{sub s}, measured in the 'golden mode' B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}.

  9. CP-safe gravity mediation and muon g - 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Sho; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.; Yokozaki, Norimi

    2015-07-01

    We propose a CP-safe minimal supersymmetric (SUSY) standard model in gravity mediation, where the phases of the Higgs B parameter, scalar trilinear couplings, and gaugino mass parameters are all aligned. Since all dangerous CP-violating phases are suppressed, we are now safe to consider low-energy SUSY scenarios under the assumption that the SUSY flavor-changing neutral current problem is solved. As an application, we consider a gravity mediation model explaining the observed muon g-2 anomaly. The CP-safe property originates in two simple assumptions: SUSY breaking in the Kähler potential and the shift symmetry of a SUSY-breaking field Z. As a result of the shift symmetry, the imaginary part of Z behaves as a QCD (quantum chromodynamics) axion, leading to an intriguing possibility: the strong CP problem in QCD and the SUSY CP problem are solved simultaneously.

  10. Atomic CP-violating polarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Ravaine, Boris; Derevianko, Andrei; Kozlov, M.G.

    2005-07-15

    Searches for CP-violating effects in atoms and molecules provide important constrains on competing extensions to the standard model of elementary particles. In particular, CP violation in an atom leads to the CP-odd (T,P-odd) polarizability {beta}{sup CP}: a magnetic moment {mu}{sup CP} is induced by an electric field E{sub 0} applied to an atom, {mu}{sup CP}={beta}{sup CP}E{sub 0}. We estimate the CP-violating polarizability for rare-gas (diamagnetic) atoms He through Rn. We relate {beta}{sup CP} to the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron and to the scalar constant of the CP-odd electron-nucleus interaction. The analysis is carried out using the third-order perturbation theory and the Dirac-Hartree-Fock formalism. We find that, as a function of nuclear charge Z, {beta}{sup CP} scales steeply as Z{sup 5}R(Z), where slowly varying R(Z) is a relativistic enhancement factor. Finally, we evaluate the feasibility of setting a limit on electron EDM by measuring CP-violating magnetization of liquid Xe. We find that such an experiment could provide competitive bounds on electron EDM only if the present level of experimental sensitivity to ultraweak magnetic fields [Kominis et al., Nature 422, 596 (2003)] is improved by several orders of magnitude.

  11. An accessible heavy neutral lepton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chao-Hsi

    1982-09-01

    In the SUL(2) ⊗ SUR(2) ⊗ UB-L(1) model, an accessible heavy neutral lepton may exist owing to the mixing of generations. Based on a rough estimate, it is pointed out that the most hopeful experiments to observe this lepton are ν-production in an emulsion (because the track of a particle with lifetime 10-11-10-13 s could be seen) and e-production. The author thanks Professor J.D. Bjorken, Professor He Zuo-Xiu, Professor R.E. Mashark, Professor S.J. Chang, Professor Zhu Cong-Yuan and Professor M. Dine for helpful discussions and comments. He would like to thank the referee for valuable comments.

  12. Polarized lepton-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, E.

    1994-02-01

    Deep inelastic polarized lepton-nucleon scattering is reviewed in three lectures. The first lecture covers the polarized deep inelastic scattering formalism and foundational theoretical work. The second lecture describes the nucleon spin structure function experiments that have been performed up through 1993. The third lecture discusses implication of the results and future experiments aimed at high-precision measurements of the nucleon spin structure functions.

  13. Combining Flavour and CP Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio

    2013-07-01

    I shortly review the impact of the most recent neutrino oscillation data on our attempts to construct a realistic model for neutrino masses and mixing angles. Models based on anarchy and its variants remain an open possibility, reinforced by the latest experimental findings. Many models based on discrete symmetries no longer work in their simplest realizations. I illustrate several proposals that can rescue discrete symmetries. In particular I discuss the possibility of combining discrete flavour symmetries and CP, and I describe a recently proposed symmetry breaking pattern that allows to predict all mixing parameters, angles and phases, in terms of a single real unknown. I analyze several explicit examples of this construction, providing new realistic mixing patterns.

  14. Enhanced thj signal at the LHC with h → γγ decay and CP-violating top-Higgs coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jason

    2015-05-01

    We study the observability of non-standard top Yukawa couplings in the pp → t (→ ℓνℓ b) h (→ γγ) j channel at 14 TeV high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The small diphoton branching ratio is enhanced when the CP-violating phase, ξ, of the top-Higgs interaction is non-zero. When the modulus of the top-Higgs interaction assumes the SM value, yt = ytSM, we find that the signal significance reaches 2.7σ (7.7 σ) when ξ = 0.25 π (0.5 π). Furthermore, the different couplings modify the polarisation of the top quark, and can subsequently be distinguished via asymmetries in spin correlations with the final state leptons. The diphoton decay mode is found to be significantly more promising than the previously considered pp → t (→ ℓνℓ b) h (→ bbbar) j channel.

  15. New Ambiguity in Probing CP Violation in Neutrino Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Miranda, O G; Tórtola, M; Valle, J W F

    2016-08-01

    If neutrinos get mass via the seesaw mechanism the mixing matrix describing neutrino oscillations can be effectively nonunitary. We show that in this case the neutrino appearance probabilities involve a new CP phase ϕ associated with nonunitarity. This leads to an ambiguity in extracting the "standard" three-neutrino phase δ_{CP}, which can survive even after neutrino and antineutrino channels are combined. Its existence should be taken into account in the planning of any oscillation experiment aiming at a robust measurement of δ_{CP}. PMID:27541461

  16. The ESS Based Neutrino Super Beam for CP Violation Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dracos, Marcos

    After measuring the last neutrino mixing angle θ13 and finding it relatively large, the observation of CP violation in the leptonic sector is now reachable with the condition to have significantly more intense neutrino beams than the existing ones. For this θ13 value, it came out that going to the second oscillation maximum instead of the first one, provides more sensitivity to CP violation. The European Spallation Source facility in Lund, designed to accelerate protons to 2.0 GeV at a repetition rate of 14 Hz for neutron production, could also be used to produce a copious number of neutrinos. Doubling the frequency of its proton linac opens the possibility to operate the facility simultaneously for neutron and neutrino production. An accumulator ring would be needed to shorten the pulses from 2.86 ms for neutrons to few μs in order to reduce to acceptable levels the electric current sent to the magnetic horn focusing charged mesons to acceptable levels for the neutrino production. This accumulator could also be used by the neutron facility to increase its performance. Coupled with a megaton Water Cherenkov far detector placed at the optimal distance, this facility could efficiently exploite the second oscillation maximum to cover a large fraction of the CP violation parameter δCP at 5 σ confidence level.

  17. WIMP abundance and lepton (flavour) asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Stuke, Maik; Schwarz, Dominik J.; Starkman, Glenn E-mail: dschwarz@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2012-03-01

    We investigate how large lepton asymmetries affect the evolution of the early universe at times before big bang nucleosynthesis and in particular how they influence the relic density of WIMP dark matter. In comparison to the standard calculation of the relic WIMP abundance we find a decrease, depending on the lepton flavour asymmetry. We find an effect of up to 20 per cent for lepton flavour asymmetries l{sub f} = O(0.1)

  18. Radiative Penguin and Leptonic Rare Decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Paoloni, E

    2004-07-06

    Recent BABAR results on rare B decays involving flavour-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. New measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma}, B {yields} K*{sub 2}(1430){gamma}, and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported, as well as a new measurement of the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching fraction. Also reported are updated limits on B {yields} {mu}{nu} and recent measurements of B {yields} K(*){ell}{ell} and b {yields} s{ell}{ell}. The data sample comprises 123 {center_dot} 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring.

  19. Liposomal SLA co-incorporated with PO CpG ODNs or PS CpG ODNs induce the same protection against the murine model of leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Shargh, Vahid Heravi; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Khamesipour, Ali; Jaafari, Iman; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Abbasi, Azam; Badiee, Ali

    2012-06-01

    First generation Leishmania vaccines consisting of whole killed parasites with or without adjuvants have reached phase 3 trial and failed to show enough efficacy mainly due to the lack of an appropriate adjuvant. In this study, the nuclease-resistant phosphorothioate CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (PS CpG) or nuclease-sensitive phosphodiester CpG ODNs (PO CpG) were used as adjuvants to enhance immunogenicity and rate of protection against leishmaniasis. Due to the susceptibility of PO CpG to nuclease degradation, an efficient liposomal delivery system was developed to protect them from degradation. 1, 2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) as a cationic lipid was used because of its unique adjuvanticity and electrostatic interaction with negatively charged CpG ODNs. To evaluate the role of liposomal formulation in protection rate and enhanced immune response, BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously with liposomal soluble Leishmania antigens (SLA) co-incorporated with PO CpG (Lip-SLA-PO CpG), Lip-SLA-PS CpG, SLA+PO CpG, SLA+PS CpG, SLA or buffer. As criteria for protection, footpad swelling at the site of challenge, parasite loads, the levels of IFN-γ and IL-4, and the IgG subtypes were evaluated. The groups of mice receiving Lip-SLA-PO CpG or Lip-SLA-PS CpG showed a high protection rate compared with the control groups. In addition, there was no significant difference in immune response generation between mice immunized with PS CpG and the group receiving PO CpG when incorporated into the liposomes. The results suggested that liposomal form of PO CpG might be used instead of PS CpG in future vaccine formulations as an efficient adjuvant. PMID:22465747

  20. Search for CP violation in the decay Z → τ+τ-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Engelhardt, A.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Johnson, S. D.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Salomone, S.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Hassard, J. F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Payne, D. G.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Wright, A. G.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Abt, I.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, C.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Kim, H.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Conway, J. S.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Gonzáles, S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Wildish, T.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Data collected by ALEPH in the years 1990, 1991 and 1992 have been used to update a previous search for CP violation in the decay of the Z into τ+τ-. The measurement of the weak dipole form factor of the τ lepton has been performed by studying correlations between the τ leptons. No signal of CP violation was found. The weak dipole form factor is found to be d˜τ = (+0.15 ± 0.58 stat ± 0.38 sys)10 -17e · cm, obtained with 19628 identified τ+τ- events. This gives an upper limit on the weak dipole form factor of d˜τ < 1.5 · 10 -17 e · cm at the 95% confidence level.

  1. Quark and lepton masses and mixing in the landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Donoghue, John F.; Dutta, Koushik; Ross, Andreas

    2006-06-01

    Even if quark and lepton masses are not uniquely predicted by the fundamental theory, as may be the case in the string theory landscape, nevertheless their pattern may reveal features of the underlying theory. We use statistical techniques to show that the observed masses appear to be representative of a scale-invariant distribution, {rho}(m){approx}1/m. If we extend this distribution to include all the Yukawa couplings, we show that the resulting Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements typically show a hierarchical pattern similar to observations. The Jarlskog invariant measuring the amount of CP violation is also well reproduced in magnitude. We also apply this framework to neutrinos using the seesaw mechanism. The neutrino results are ambiguous, with the observed pattern being statistically allowed even though the framework does not provide a natural explanation for the observed two large mixing angles. Our framework highly favors a normal hierarchy of neutrino masses. We also are able to make statistical predictions in the neutrino sector when we specialize to situations consistent with the known mass differences and two large mixing angles. Within our framework, we show that with 95% confidence the presently unmeasured Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing angle sin{theta}{sub 13} is larger than 0.04 and typically of order 0.1. The leptonic Jarlskog invariant is found to be typically of order 10{sup -2} and the magnitude of the effective Majorana mass m{sub ee} is typically of order 0.001 eV.

  2. CP violation in h → ττ and LFV h → μτ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayreter, Alper; He, Xiao-Gang; Valencia, German

    2016-09-01

    The CMS Collaboration has reported a possible lepton flavor violating (LFV) signal h → μτ. Whereas this does not happen in the standard model (SM), we point out that new physics responsible for this type of decay would, in general, also produce charge-parity (CP) violation in h → ττ. We estimate the size of this effect in a model independent manner and find that a large asymmetry, of order 25%, is allowed by current constraints.

  3. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as immunotherapy in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jahrsdörfer, Bernd; Weiner, George J.

    2008-01-01

    Preclinical and early clinical trials indicate synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing unmethylated CG dinucleotides (CpG ODN) have potent immunostimulatory effects and can enhance the anti-cancer activity of a variety of cancer treatments. Synergy between CpG ODN and monoclonal antibodies has been noted in various preclinical models. Early clinical trials indicate CpG ODN and monoclonal antibodies can be administered safely together. Preclinical models indicate CpG ODN can enhance the anti-tumor activity of both chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Thus, one possible approach to the use of CpG ODN was to use it in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy with the goal of enhancing presentation of tumor antigen from dying cancer cells. Promising results in a randomized phase II trial in patients with non-small cell lung cancer led to initiation of two large randomized phase III trials comparing CpG ODN plus chemotherapy to chemotherapy alone. Unfortunately, interim analysis of these trials indicated CpG ODN was unlikely to enhance efficacy of chemotherapy, and they were stopped. CpG ODN also holds promise as a component of cancer vaccines including those composed of protein antigen, peptides, whole tumor cells, and antigen-pulsed dendritic cells. Finally, CpG ODN has been combined with a variety of cytokines to enhance NK activation, promote development of an active anti-tumor immune response or induce apoptosis of malignant cells that express the TLR9 receptor. Overall, both preclinical and early clinical trials suggest CpG ODN may be a valuable component of a variety of approaches to cancer therapy. However, clinical development of this recently discovered, novel class of immunostimulatory agents is just beginning, and we still have much to learn about the optimal approach to their use, and their potential. PMID:19255607

  4. CP violation in heavy MSSM Higgs scenarios

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carena, M.; Ellis, J.; Lee, J. S.; Pilaftsis, A.; Wagner, C. E. M.

    2016-02-18

    We introduce and explore new heavy Higgs scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with explicit CP violation, which have important phenomenological implications that may be testable at the LHC. For soft supersymmetry-breaking scales MS above a few TeV and a charged Higgs boson mass MH+ above a few hundred GeV, new physics effects including those from explicit CP violation decouple from the light Higgs boson sector. However, such effects can significantly alter the phenomenology of the heavy Higgs bosons while still being consistent with constraints from low-energy observables, for instance electric dipole moments. To consider scenarios with amore » charged Higgs boson much heavier than the Standard Model (SM) particles but much lighter than the supersymmetric particles, we revisit previous calculations of the MSSM Higgs sector. We compute the Higgs boson masses in the presence of CP violating phases, implementing improved matching and renormalization-group (RG) effects, as well as two-loop RG effects from the effective two-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) scale MH± to the scale MS. Here, we illustrate the possibility of non-decoupling CP-violating effects in the heavy Higgs sector using new benchmark scenarios named.« less

  5. Phase I study of tremelimumab (CP-675 206) plus PF-3512676 (CPG 7909) in patients with melanoma or advanced solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Millward, M; Underhill, C; Lobb, S; McBurnie, J; Meech, S J; Gomez-Navarro, J; Marshall, M A; Huang, B; Mather, C B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tremelimumab, a fully human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 monoclonal antibody, and PF-3512676, a Toll-like receptor-9 agonist, are targeted immune modulators that elicit durable single-agent antitumour activity in advanced cancer. Methods: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of these agents combined during this phase I study, patients received intravenous tremelimumab (6.0, 10.0, or 15.0 mg kg−1) every 12 weeks plus subcutaneous PF-3512676 (0.05, 0.10, or 0.15 mg kg−1) weekly. Primary end points were safety and tolerability; secondary end points included pharmacokinetics and antitumour activity. Results: Twenty-one patients with stage IV melanoma (n=17) or advanced solid tumours (n=4) were enrolled. Injection-site reactions (n=21; 100%), influenza-like illness (n=18; 86%), and diarrhoea (n=13; 62%) were the most common treatment-related adverse events (TAEs). Grade ⩾3 TAEs were reported (n=7; 33%). Dose-limiting toxicities (prespecified 6-week observation) occurred in one of the six patients in the 10 mg kg−1 tremelimumab plus 0.05 mg kg−1 PF-3512676 cohort (grade 3 hypothalamopituitary disorder) and two of the six patients in the 15 mg kg−1 tremelimumab plus 0.05 mg kg−1 PF-3512676 cohort (grade 3 diarrhoea). Consequently, 15 mg kg−1 tremelimumab plus 0.05 mg kg−1 PF-3512676 exceeded the MTD. Two melanoma patients achieved durable (⩾170 days) partial response. No human antihuman antibody responses to tremelimumab were observed. Conclusion: Weekly PF-3512676 (⩽0.15 mg kg−1) plus tremelimumab (⩽10 mg kg−1 every 12 weeks) was tolerable. PMID:23652314

  6. Quartet states of the lepton sector

    SciTech Connect

    Kosmachev, O. S.

    2013-09-15

    A holistic study of the lepton sector is fulfilled in the framework of rigorous restrictions by five input suppositions. All leptons are divided into three classes on the structure of their equations. They are singlets, doublets and quartets. The quartet states are the most interesting among them from the point of view of their properties and possible physical interpretations.

  7. Physics with tau leptons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, C.P.; /Oxford U.

    2007-04-01

    The {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions produced by the Tevatron result in many processes with tau leptons in the final state. The CDF Collaboration has studied these final states in Z and t{bar t} production, and has used tau leptons to search for evidence of Higgs, sparticle, and Z{prime} production.

  8. Spontaneous CP violation in E{sub 6} supersymmetric grand unified theory with SU(2) flavor and anomalous U(1) symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiduki, M.; Maekawa, N.; Kim, S.-G.; Sakurai, K.

    2009-12-01

    We construct a model of spontaneous CP violation in E{sub 6} supersymmetric grand unified theory. In the model, we employ an SU(2){sub F} flavor symmetry and an anomalous U(1){sub A} symmetry. The SU(2){sub F} flavor symmetry is introduced to provide the origin of hierarchical structures of Yukawa coupling and to ensure the universality of sfermion soft masses. The anomalous U(1){sub A} symmetry is introduced to realize the doublet-triplet mass splitting, to provide the origin of hierarchical structures of Yukawa couplings, and to solve the {mu} problem. In the model, CP is spontaneously broken by the SU(2){sub F} breaking in order to provide a Kobayashi-Maskawa phase and to evade the supersymmetric CP problem. However, a naive construction of the model generally leads to an unwanted outcome, arg[{mu}b*]=O(1), when CP violating effects in the flavor sector are taken into account. We cure this difficulty by imposing a discrete symmetry and find that this prescription can play additional roles. It ensures that the realistic up-quark mass and Cabibbo angle are simultaneously realized without cancellation between O(1) coefficients. Also, severe constraints from the chromo-electric dipole moment of the quark can be satisfied without destabilizing the weak scale. The discrete symmetry reduces the number of free parameters, but the model is capable of reproducing quark and lepton mass spectra, mixing angles, and a Jarlskog invariant. We obtain characteristic predictions V{sub ub}{approx}O({lambda}{sup 4}) ({lambda}=0.22) and |V{sub cb}Y{sub b}|=|Y{sub c}| at the grand unified theory scale.

  9. Measuring CP violation in h→τ+τ- at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnik, Roni; Martin, Adam; Okui, Takemichi; Primulando, Reinard; Yu, Felix

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the LHC and Higgs factory prospects for measuring the CP phase in the Higgs-τ-τ coupling. Currently this phase can be anywhere between 0° (CP even) and 90° (CP odd). A new, ideal observable is identified from an analytic calculation for the τ±→ρ±ν→π±π0ν channel. It is demonstrated to have promising sensitivity at the LHC and superior sensitivity at the ILC compared to previous proposals. Our observable requires the reconstruction of the internal substructure of decaying taus but does not rely on measuring the impact parameter of tau decays. It is the first proposal for such a measurement at the LHC. For the 14 TeV LHC, we estimate that about 1ab-1 data can discriminate CP even versus CP odd at the 5σ level. With 3ab-1, the CP phase should be measurable to an accuracy of ˜11°. At an e+e- Higgs factory, we project that a 250 GeV run with 1ab-1 luminosity can measure the phase to ˜4.4° accuracy.

  10. The MOMENT to search for CP violation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Blennow, Mattias; Coloma, Pilar; Fernández-Martinez, Enrique

    2016-03-30

    In this letter, we analyze for the first time the physics reach in terms of sensitivity to leptonic CP violation of the proposed MuOn-decay MEdium baseline NeuTrino beam (MOMENT) experiment, a novel neutrino oscillation facility that would operate with neutrinos from muon decay. Apart from obtaining a sufficiently intense flux, the bottlenecks to the physics reach of this experiment will be achieving a high enough suppression of the atmospheric background and, particularly, attaining a sufficient level of charge identification. We thus present our results as a function of these two factors. We consider a very massive Gd-doped Water Cherenkov detector.more » We also find that MOMENT will be competitive with other currently planned future oscillation experiments if a charge identification of at least 80 % can be achieved at the same time that the atmospheric background can be suppressed by at least a factor of ten. We also find a large synergy of MOMENT with the current generation of neutrino oscillation experiments, T2K and NOvA, which significantly enhances its final sensitivity.« less

  11. The MOMENT to search for CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Coloma, Pilar; Fernández-Martinez, Enrique

    2015-11-09

    In this letter, we analyze for the first time the physics reach in terms of sensitivity to leptonic CP violation of the proposed MuOn-decay MEdium baseline NeuTrino beam (MOMENT) experiment, a novel neutrino oscillation facility that would operate with neutrinos from muon decay. Apart from obtaining a sufficiently intense flux, the bottlenecks to the physics reach of this experiment will be achieving a high enough suppression of the atmospheric background and, particularly, attaining a sufficient level of charge identification. We thus present our results as a function of these two factors. We consider a very massive Gd-doped Water Cherenkov detector. We also find that MOMENT will be competitive with other currently planned future oscillation experiments if a charge identification of at least 80 % can be achieved at the same time that the atmospheric background can be suppressed by at least a factor of ten. We also find a large synergy of MOMENT with the current generation of neutrino oscillation experiments, T2K and NOvA, which significantly enhances its final sensitivity.

  12. The MOMENT to search for CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blennow, Mattias; Coloma, Pilar; Fernández-Martínez, Enrique

    2016-03-01

    In this letter, we analyze for the first time the physics reach in terms of sensitivity to leptonic CP violation of the proposed MuOn-decay MEdium baseline NeuTrino beam (MOMENT) experiment, a novel neutrino oscillation facility that would operate with neutrinos from muon decay. Apart from obtaining a sufficiently intense flux, the bottlenecks to the physics reach of this experiment will be achieving a high enough suppression of the atmospheric background and, particularly, attaining a sufficient level of charge identification. We thus present our results as a function of these two factors. As for the detector, we consider a very massive Gd-doped Water Cherenkov detector. We find that MOMENT will be competitive with other currently planned future oscillation experiments if a charge identification of at least 80 % can be achieved at the same time that the atmospheric background can be suppressed by at least a factor of ten. We also find a large synergy of MOMENT with the current generation of neutrino oscillation experiments, T2K and NOvA, which significantly enhances its final sensitivity.

  13. Quark flavor mixing, CP violation, and all that

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1988-04-01

    We review the present state of knowledge of the mixing of quark flavors under weak interactions and the associated explanation of CP violation inherent in the single nontrivial phase present in the three-generation mixing matrix. In this context we present the phenomenological basis for the increasing possibility that large CP violation asymmetries can be experimentally observed in the B meson system. 39 refs., 11 figs.,

  14. Lepton masses in a minimal model with triplet Higgs bosons and S{sub 3} flavor symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, Manimala; Choubey, Sandhya

    2008-12-01

    Viable neutrino and charged lepton masses and mixings are obtained by imposing a S{sub 3}xZ{sub 4}xZ{sub 3} flavor symmetry in a model with a few additional Higgs. We use two SU(2){sub L} triplet Higgs which are arranged as a doublet of S{sub 3}, and standard model singlet Higgs which are also put as doublets of S{sub 3}. We break the S{sub 3} symmetry in this minimal model by giving vacuum expectation values (VEV) to the additional Higgs fields. Dictated by the minimum condition for the scalar potential, we obtain certain VEV alignments which allow us to maintain {mu}-{tau} symmetry in the neutrino sector, while breaking it maximally for the charged leptons. This helps us to simultaneously explain the hierarchical charged lepton masses, and the neutrino masses and mixings. In particular, we obtain maximal {theta}{sub 23} and zero {theta}{sub 13}. We allow for a mild breaking of the {mu}-{tau} symmetry for the neutrinos and study the phenomenology. We give predictions for {theta}{sub 13} and the CP violating Jarlskog invariant J{sub CP}, as a function of the {mu}-{tau} symmetry breaking parameter. We also discuss possible collider signatures and phenomenology associated with lepton flavor violating processes.

  15. Quark-lepton mass relation in a realistic A4 extension of the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. F.; Morisi, S.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2013-07-01

    We propose a realistic A4 extension of the Standard Model involving a particular quark-lepton mass relation, namely that the ratio of the third family mass to the geometric mean of the first and second family masses are equal for down-type quarks and charged leptons. This relation, which is approximately renormalization group invariant, is usually regarded as arising from the Georgi-Jarlskog relations, but in the present model there is no unification group or supersymmetry. In the neutrino sector we propose a simple modification of the so-called Zee-Wolfenstein mass matrix pattern which allows an acceptable reactor angle along with a deviation of the atmospheric and solar angles from their bi-maximal values. Quark masses, mixing angles and CP violation are well described by a numerical fit.

  16. Solving the supersymmetric CP problem with flavor breaking F terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Cruz, J. Lorenzo; Ferrandis, Javier

    2005-08-01

    Supersymmetric flavor models for the radiative generation of fermion masses offer an alternative way to solve the SUSY-CP problem. We assume that the supersymmetric theory is flavor and CP conserving. CP violating phases are associated to the vacuum expectation values of flavor violating SUSY-breaking fields. As a consequence, phases appear at tree level only in the soft supersymmetry-breaking matrices. Using a U(2) flavor model as an example we show that it is possible to generate radiatively the first and second generation of quark masses and mixings as well as the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) CP phase. The one-loop supersymmetric contributions to electric dipole moments are automatically zero since all the relevant parameters in the Lagrangian are flavor conserving and as a consequence real. The size of the flavor and CP mixing in the SUSY-breaking sector is mostly determined by the fermion mass ratios and CKM elements. We calculate the contributions to ɛ, ɛ' and to the CP asymmetries in the B decays to ψKs, ϕKs, η'Ks and Xsγ. We analyze a case study with maximal predictivity in the fermion sector. For this worst case scenario the measurements of ΔmK, ΔmB and ɛ constrain the model requiring extremely heavy squark spectra.

  17. Quark and lepton flavor triality

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Ernest

    2010-08-01

    Motivated by the success of A{sub 4} in explaining neutrino tribimaximal mixing, and its approximate residual Z{sub 3} symmetry in the quark and charged-lepton sectors, the notion of flavor triality is proposed. Under this hypothesis, certain processes such as {tau}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}e{sup -} and {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup +}{mu}{sup -} are favored, but {tau}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup -} and {mu}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup -} are disfavored. Similarly, B{sup 0}{yields}{tau}{sup +}e{sup -} is favored, but B{sup 0}{yields}{tau}{sup -}e{sup +} is disfavored.

  18. Maximal CP violation in flavor neutrino masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitabayashi, Teruyuki; Yasuè, Masaki

    2016-03-01

    Since flavor neutrino masses Mμμ,ττ,μτ can be expressed in terms of Mee,eμ,eτ, mutual dependence among Mμμ,ττ,μτ is derived by imposing some constraints on Mee,eμ,eτ. For appropriately imposed constraints on Mee,eμ,eτ giving rise to both maximal CP violation and the maximal atmospheric neutrino mixing, we show various specific textures of neutrino mass matrices including the texture with Mττ = Mμμ∗ derived as the simplest solution to the constraint of Mττ ‑ Mμμ = imaginary, which is required by the constraint of Meμcos θ23 ‑ Meτsin θ23 = real for cos 2θ23 = 0. It is found that Majorana CP violation depends on the phase of Mee.

  19. Monte Carlo study of CP asymmetry measurement of a Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Karshon, U.

    1989-07-01

    It is shown that, for D/sup 0//bar D//sup 0/ mixing of order /approximately/ 1%, it may be possible to observe in a Tau-Charm Factory a CP violation effect in the D/sup 0//bar D//sup 0/ system via a CP asymmetry. The method used is to tag one D by its semi-leptonic decay and to look for decays of the other D into CP eigenstates. It is estimated that within 1 year of running at the designed luminosity of L = 10/sup 33/ cm/sup /minus/2/sec/sup /minus/1/, /approximately/ 6600 such events can be collected. 8 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The Tau Lepton and the Search for New Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.

    1998-11-18

    This Fifth International WEIN Symposium is devoted to physics beyond the standard model. This talk is about tau lepton physics, but I begin with the question: do we know how to find new physics in the world of elementary particles? This question is interwoven with the various tau physics topics. These topics are: searching for unexpected tau decay modes; searching for additional tau decay mechanisms; radiative tau decays; tau decay modes of the W, B, and D; decay of the Z{sup 0} to tau pairs; searching for CP violation in tau decay; the tau neutrino, dreams and odd ideas in tau physics; and tau research facilities in the next decades.

  1. Leptophilic dark matter from the lepton asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Timothy; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2010-03-12

    We present a model of weak scale dark matter (DM) where the thermal DM density is set by the lepton asymmetry due to the presence of higher dimension lepton violating operators. In these models there is generically a separation between the annihilation cross section responsible for the relic abundance (through lepton violating operators) and the annihilation cross section that is relevant for the indirect detection of DM (through lepton preserving operators). This implies a perceived boost in the annihilation cross section in the Galaxy today relative to that derived for canonical thermal freeze-out, giving a natural explanation for the observed cosmic ray electron and positron excesses, without resorting to a Sommerfeld enhancement. These models motivate continued searches for DM with apparently nonthermal annihilation cross sections. The DM may also play a role in radiatively generating Majorana neutrino masses. PMID:20366412

  2. Quarkonia production with leptons and hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    V. Papadimitriou

    2004-06-09

    We discuss current issues and present the latest measurements on quarkonia production from experiments monitoring hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. These measurements include cross section and polarization results for charmonium and bottomonium states.

  3. The. tau. -lepton and its associated neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A. )

    1990-10-10

    This paper discusses the {tau}-lepton and the prospects for future improvements. It is shown how a better understanding of the {tau} properties could be used for testing fundamental aspects of the electroweak and strong interactions.

  4. Lepton Flavor Violation in B Decays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glashow, Sheldon L.; Guadagnoli, Diego; Lane, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    The LHCb Collaboration's measurement of RK=B (B+→K+μ+μ-)/B (B+→K+e+e-) lies 2.6 σ below the Standard Model prediction. Several groups suggest this deficit to result from new lepton nonuniversal interactions of muons. But nonuniversal leptonic interactions imply lepton flavor violation in B decays at rates much larger than are expected in the Standard Model. A simple model shows that these rates could lie just below current limits. An interesting consequence of our model, that B (Bs→μ+μ-)exp/B (Bs→μ+μ-)SM≅RK≅0.75 , is compatible with recent measurements of these rates. We stress the importance of searches for lepton flavor violations, especially for B →K μ e , K μ τ , and Bs→μ e , μ τ .

  5. Preclinical pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and toxicity studies required for regulatory approval of a phase I clinical trial with 111In-CP04 in medullary thyroid carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Theodosia; Konijnenberg, Mark W.; KolencPeitl, Petra; Garnuszek, Piotr; Nock, Berthold A.; Kaloudi, Aikaterini; Kroselj, Marko; Zaletel, Katja; Maecke, Helmut; Mansi, Rosalba; Erba, Paola; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Mikolajczak, Renata; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction From a series of radiolabelled cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin analogues, 111In-CP04 (111In-DOTA-(DGlu)6-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2) was selected for further translation as a diagnostic radiopharmaceutical towards a first-in-man study in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). A freeze-dried kit formulation for multicentre application has been developed. We herein report on biosafety, in vivo stability, biodistribution and dosimetry aspects of 111In-CP04 in animal models, essential for the regulatory approval of the clinical trial. Materials and methods Acute and extended single dose toxicity of CP04 was tested in rodents, while the in vivo stability of 111In-CP04 was assessed by HPLC analysis of mouse blood samples. The biodistribution of 111In-CP04 prepared from a freeze-dried kit was studied in SCID mice bearing double A431-CCK2R(±) xenografts at 1, 4 and 24 h pi. Further 4-h animal groups were either additionally treated with the plasma expander gelofusine or injected with 111In-CP04 prepared by wet-labelling. Pharmacokinetics in healthy mice included the 30 min, 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h time points pi. Dosimetric calculations were based on extrapolation of mice data to humans adopting two scaling models. Results CP04 was well-tolerated by both mice and rats, with an LD50 > 178.5 μg/kg body weight for mice and a NOAEL (no-observed-adverse-effect-level) of 89 μg/kg body weight for rats. After labelling, 111In-CP04 remained >70% intact in peripheral mouse blood at 5 min pi. The uptake of 111In-CP04 prepared from the freeze-dried kit and by wet-labelling were comparable in the A431-CCK2R(+)-xenografts (9.24 ± 1.35%ID/g and 8.49 ± 0.39%ID/g, respectively; P > 0.05). Gelofusine-treated mice exhibited significantly reduced kidneys values (1.69 ± 0.15%ID/g vs. 5.55 ± 0.94%ID/g in controls, P < 0.001). Dosimetry data revealed very comparable effective tumour doses for the two scaling models applied, of 0.045 and 0.044 m

  6. CP violation at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, J.

    2001-04-16

    A major goal of experimental particle physics over the next decade is to measure the sides and angles of the Unitarity triangle redundantly, and as precisely as possible. Overconstraining the triangle will test the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa model of quark mixing. The CDF collaboration, due to begin a second run in March 2001 with major upgrades to both the accelerator and the detector, will study the angle {beta} using B{sup 0} decays, the angle {gamma} using B{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} decays, and a side of the triangle through the observation of B{sub s}{sup 0}--{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mixing. Projected sensitivities are driven mostly by previous measurements using data from the first run. One highlight of the Run I B physics program is a measurement of the CP violating parameter sin 2{beta} = 0.79{sub {minus}0.44}{sup +0.41}, based on a tagged sample of 400 B{sup 0} decays in the mode B{sub 0}/{bar B}{sup 0} {r_arrow} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0}. The technology of flavor tagging, used here as well as in numerous B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} mixing analyses in run I, is crucial and will be augmented in Run II with better particle identification capabilities. Exclusive all-hadronic final states will enter the data sample in Run II through a new displaced track trigger.

  7. Quark model and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    After a short review of the activities of Shoichi Sakata and his group, how the six-quark model explains CP violation is described. Experimental verification of the model at the B-factories is also briefly discussed.

  8. A search for the electric dipole moment of the /τ-lepton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reßing, D.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Frankl, C.; Graf, J.; Schmidtler, M.; Schramm, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Rohde, A.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; Van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Bračko, M.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Medin, G.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Barsuk, S.; Belyaev, I.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Eiges, V.; Gershtein, L.; Gershtein, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Igonkina, O.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Y.

    2000-07-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e+e- storage ring DORIS II, we have searched for the real and imaginary part of the electric dipole formfactor dτ of the /τ lepton in the production of /τ pairs at q2=100GeV2. This is the first direct measurement of this /CP violating formfactor. We applied the method of optimised observables which takes into account all available information on the observed /τ decay products. No evidence for /CP violation was found, and we derive the following results: Re(dτ)=(1.6+/-1.9).10-16ecm and Im(dτ)=(-0.2+/-0.8).10-16ecm, where statistical and systematic errors have been combined.

  9. Origin of constrained maximal CP violation in flavor symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong-Jian; Rodejohann, Werner; Xu, Xun-Jie

    2015-12-01

    Current data from neutrino oscillation experiments are in good agreement with δ = -π/2 and θ23 =π/4 under the standard parametrization of the mixing matrix. We define the notion of "constrained maximal CP violation" (CMCPV) for predicting these features and study their origin in flavor symmetry. We derive the parametrization-independent solution of CMCPV and give a set of equivalent definitions for it. We further present a theorem on how the CMCPV can be realized. This theorem takes the advantage of residual symmetries in neutrino and charged lepton mass matrices, and states that, up to a few minor exceptions, (| δ | ,θ23) = (π/2 ,π/4) is generated when those symmetries are real. The often considered μ- τ reflection symmetry, as well as specific discrete subgroups of O(3), is a special case of our theorem.

  10. CP Violation in B Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Natalie A.

    2001-04-01

    Our world manifestly violates CP, the symmetry between matter and antimatter; there is no observational evidence for any significant amount of antimatter in the Universe. Andrei Sakharov was the first to point out that, in the context of Big Bang theory, a matter-dominated universe requires CP violation at the quantum level. Indeed, CP violation was subsequently observed as a tiny effect in K-meson decays, and it can be naturally accommodated in the Standard Model of fundamental particles with 3 generations of quarks. However, to produce the observed baryon asymmetry, baryogenesis calculations require more CP violation than the Standard Model affords. This is an intriguing puzzle whose solution will require input from both particle physics and cosmology, and it has inspired particle physicists to study CP violation with greater precision in a new generation of experiments. We are now entering this exciting new era in CP violation studies. Several new or upgraded experiments plan a program of detailed measurements of CP violating effects in B mesons. The predicted asymmetries are large, observable in a variety of decay channels, and the theoretical uncertainties are small for the best modes. Some interesting experimental results have recently been announced, and more precise measurements will soon follow. Future experiments are already planned to make even more definitive measurements. In this talk I will review the theoretical predictions and the connection to cosmology, survey the experimental scene, and describe how the study of CP violation in B mesons will allow us to make stringent tests of the Standard Model.

  11. Lepton flavor violation without supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Cirigliano, V.; Kurylov, A.; Ramsey-Musolf, M.J.; Vogel, P.

    2004-10-01

    We study the lepton flavor-violating (LFV) processes {mu}{yields}e{gamma}, {mu}{yields}3e, and {mu}{yields}e conversion in nuclei in the left-right symmetric model without supersymmetry and perform the first complete computation of the LFV branching ratios B({mu}{yields}f) to leading nontrivial order in the ratio of left- and right-handed symmetry-breaking scales. To this order, B({mu}{yields}e{gamma}) and B({mu}{yields}e) are governed by the same combination of LFV violating couplings, and their ratio is naturally of order unity. We also find B({mu}{yields}3e)/B({mu}{yields}e){approx}100 under slightly stronger assumptions. Existing limits on the branching ratios already substantially constrain mass splittings and/or mixings in the heavy neutrino sector. When combined with future collider studies and precision electroweak measurements, improved limits on LFV processes will test the viability of low-scale, nonsupersymmetric LFV scenarios.

  12. CP violation in fourth generation quark decays

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Hou Weishu

    2009-10-01

    We show that, if a fourth generation is discovered at the Tevatron or LHC, one could study CP violation (CPV) in b{sup '}{yields}s decays. Asymmetries could reach 30% for b{sup '}{yields}sZ for m{sub b{sup '}} < or approx. 350 GeV, while it could be greater than 50% for b{sup '}{yields}s{gamma} and extend to higher m{sub b{sup '}}. Branching ratios are 10{sup -3}-10{sup -5}, and CPV measurement requires tagging. Once measured, however, the CPV phase can be extracted with little theoretical uncertainty.

  13. Search for CP Violation in the Decay tau- \\to pi- K^0_S (>= 0 pi0) nu_tau

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-02-16

    We report a search for CP violation in the decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}({>=} 0{pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}} using a dataset of 437 million {tau} lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 476 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The CP-violating decay-rate asymmetry is determined to be (-0.45 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.11)%, approximately three standard deviations from the Standard Model prediction of (0.33 {+-} 0.01)%.

  14. Observation of Z decays to four leptons with the CMS detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Gonzalez, J. Suarez; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Junior, M. Correa Martins; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santoro, A.; Jorge, L. Soares; Sznajder, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Moreno, B. Gomez; Oliveros, A. F. Osorio; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Kamel, A. Ellithi; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. 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Lobelle; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Röcker, S.; Scheurer, A.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Bansal, M.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J. 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S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. 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M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Taroni, S.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. 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C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Dünser, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; del Arbol, P. Martinez Ruiz; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Rikova, M. Ivova; Mejias, B. Millan; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, Z. K.; Lu, Y. J.; Mekterovic, D.; Singh, A. P.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. 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M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; RadburnSmith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Bryer, A. Guneratne; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Stoye, M.; Tapper, A.; Acosta, M. Vazquez; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; John, J. St.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Sierra, R. Vasquez; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Tucker, J.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Dinardo, M. E.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Traczyk, P.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Azzolini, V.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Lopez, E. Luiggi; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kilminster, B.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dragoiu, C.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Ceballos, G. Gomez; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Krajczar, K.; Li, W.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Nash, D.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Safdi, B.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Brownson, E.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Vargas, J. E. Ramirez; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Marono, M. Vidal; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Roh, Y.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Johnston, C.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Don, C. Kottachchi Kankanamge; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Belknap, D.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Palmonari, F.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2012-12-01

    The first observation of the Z boson decaying to four leptons in proton-proton collisions is presented. The analyzed data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.02 fb-1 at sqrt{s}=7 TeV collected by the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. A pronounced resonance peak, with a statistical significance of 9.7 σ, is observed in the distribution of the invariant mass of four leptons (electrons and/or muons) with mass and width consistent with expectations for Z boson decays. The branching fraction and cross section reported here are defined by phase space restrictions on the leptons, namely, 80 < m 4ℓ < 100 GeV, where m 4ℓ is the invariant mass of the four leptons, and m ℓℓ > 4 GeV for all pairs of leptons, where m ℓℓ is the two-lepton invariant mass. The measured branching fraction is {B}( {Zto 4ell } )=( {4.2_{-0.8}^{+0.9}( {stat.} )± 0.2( {syst.} )} )× {10^{-6 }} and agrees with the standard model prediction of 4.45 × 10-6. The measured cross section times branching fraction is σ ( {ppto Z} ){B}( {Zto 4ell } )=112_{-20}^{+23}( {stat.} )_{-5}^{+7}( {syst.} )_{-2}^{+3}( {lumi.} ) fb, also consistent with the standard model prediction of 120 fb. The four-lepton mass peak arising from Z → 4 ℓ decays provides a calibration channel for the Higgs boson search in the H → ZZ → 4 ℓ decay mode.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Lepton Universality and Lepton Flavour Violation tests at the B-factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusiani, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    We review the experimental status of the lepton universality tests and lepton flavour violation searches after the completion of the data-taking and most of the data analysis of the B-factories BABAR and Belle. The universality of the Standard Model charged weak couplings has been confirmed and moderately improved in precision by the B-factories results. Lepton Flavour violation in the τ lepton decays has been searched in several decay modes and no evidence has been found. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the Lepton Flavour violating branching ratios in the 10-7-10-8 range, greatly extending the previous limits set mainly by CLEO in the 10-6 range.

  16. New results of the spectral observations of CP stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polosukhina, N. S.; Shavrina, A. V.; Drake, N. A.; Kudryavtsev, D. O.; Smirnova, M. A.

    2010-04-01

    The lithium problem in Ap-CP stars has been, for a long time, a subject of debate. Individual characteristics of CP stars, such as high abundance of the rare-earth elements presence of magnetic fields, complicate structure of the surface distribution of chemical elements, rapid oscillations of some CP-stars, make the detection of the lithium lines and the determination of the lithium abundance, a difficult task. During the International Meeting in Slovakia in 1996, the lithium problem in Ap-CP stars was discussed. The results of the Li study carried out in CrAO Polosukhina (1973-1976), the works of Hack & Faraggiana (1963), Wallerstein & Hack (1964), Faraggiana et al. (1992-1996) formed the basis of the International project ‘Lithium in the cool CP-stars with magnetic fields’. The main goal of the project was, using systematical observations of Ap-CP stars with phase rotation in the spectral regions of the resonance doublet Li I 6708 Å and subordinate 6104 Å lithium lines with different telescopes, to create a database, which will permit to explain the physical origin of anomalous Li abundance in the atmospheres of these stars.

  17. Towards new frontiers in CP violation in B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Robert

    2014-11-01

    CP-violating effects in decays of B mesons offer a wide spectrum of probes for testing the phase structure of the quark-flavour sector of the Standard Model. After a brief discussion of the picture emerging from the current LHC data, the focus will be put on two specific topics: hadronic uncertainties from penguin topologies on measurements of the B0q-bar B0q mixing phases (q in {d,s}), and the U-spin-related decays B0s → K+K- and B0d → π+π-. Valuable new insights are expected from future studies of CP violation in B decays. For the detection of possible new sources of CP violation, it will be crucial to match the experimental and theoretical precisions and to have a careful look at the underlying assumptions.

  18. CP asymmetry in heavy Majorana neutrino decays at finite temperature: the nearly degenerate case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondini, S.; Brambilla, N.; Escobedo, M. A.; Vairo, A.

    2016-03-01

    In a model where Majorana neutrinos heavier than the electroweak scale couple to Standard Model Higgs bosons and leptons, we compute systematically thermal corrections to the direct and indirect CP asymmetries in the Majorana neutrino decays. These are key ingredients entering the equations that describe the thermodynamic evolution of the induced lepton-number asymmetry eventually leading to the baryon asymmetry in the universe. We compute the thermal corrections in an effective field theory framework that assumes the temperature smaller than the masses of the Majorana neutrinos and larger than the electroweak scale, and we provide the leading corrections in an expansion of the temperature over the mass. In this work, we consider the case of two Majorana neutrinos with nearly degenerate masses.

  19. Lepton flavor violation with light vector bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeck, Julian

    2016-07-01

    New sub-GeV vector bosons with couplings to muons but not electrons have been discussed in order to explain the muon's magnetic moment, the gap of high-energy neutrinos in IceCube or the proton radius puzzle. If such a light Z‧ not only violates lepton universality but also lepton flavor, as expected for example from the recent hint for h → μτ at CMS, the two-body decay mode τ → μZ‧ opens up and for MZ‧ < 2mμ gives better constraints than τ → 3 μ already with 20-year-old ARGUS limits. We discuss the general prospects and motivation of light vector bosons with lepton-flavor-violating couplings.

  20. Electroweak Gauge Models and Lepton Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsuji, N.; Ito, I.; Tsai, S. Y.; Kimura, T.; Furuya, K.

    1982-04-01

    We discuss, in the framework of the spontaneously broken electroweak gauge theory, the connection between the two non-standard lepton conservation laws, i.e., the Konopinski-Mahmoud (KM) scheme and the multiplicative scheme. For this purpose, we take SU(3) as a gauge group and start with KM triplets ({μ}^+,{ν},e^-)_L and (e^+,{ν}^c,{μ}^-)_L. We then point out that the idea of mass generation through the Higgs mechanism naturally gives rise to {μ}-e mixing which, supplemented by the requirement of a {μ}-e symmetry, results in a model of leptons which obeys the multiplicative scheme. This model also provides a mechanism for giving an asymmetrical masses to the electron and muon which otherwise behave symmetrically. An extension of the model to include the heavy lepton and quark sectors is suggested.

  1. Theoretical Status of Charged Lepton Flavor Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Kaladi

    2013-04-01

    The emphasis of this talk will be physics potential for new discoveries in the charged lepton flavor sector. Popular theoretical models where new signals arise naturally will be surveyed, and expectations for rare decays such as μ->e ,->3e and τ->μγ, as well as for μ-e conversion in nuclei and muonium-antimuonium oscillation will be outlined. A connection between the observed neutrino flavor oscillations and charged lepton flavor violation will be drawn. Expectations for flavor conserving processes such as muon g-2 and lepton electric dipole moments will be presented. Models based on supersymmetry, left-right symmetry and unified symmetry, as well as models generating small neutrino masses naturally will be analyzed.

  2. Lepton flavor violating decays of vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Helo, Juan C.; Kovalenko, Sergey

    2010-02-01

    We estimate the rates of lepton flavor violating decays of the vector mesons {rho}, {omega}, and {phi}{yields}e{mu}. The theoretical tools are based on an effective Lagrangian approach without referring to any specific realization of the physics beyond the standard model responsible for lepton flavor violation (Le{sub f}). The effective lepton-vector meson couplings are extracted from the existing experimental bounds on the nuclear {mu}{sup -}-e{sup -} conversion. In particular, we derive an upper limit for the Le{sub f} branching ratio Br({phi}{yields}e{mu}){<=}1.3x10{sup -21} which is much more stringent than the recent experimental result Br({phi}{yields}e{mu})<2x10{sup -6} presented by the SND Collaboration. Very tiny limits on Le{sub f} decays of vector mesons derived in this paper make direct experimental observation of these processes unrealistic.

  3. Probing lepton asymmetry with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: oyamayo@post.kek.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry ξ{sub ν}=μ{sub ν}/T{sub ν} in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on ξ{sub ν} in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

  4. Determinations of P, and CP, for heavy mesons and tests for their violations without polarization experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.A.

    1984-10-01

    Powerful results are tabulated which can be used at modern colliders to make fundamental symmetry tests by analysis of sequential decays of X ..-->.. V/sub 1/V/sub 2/. By generalization of the phi phi parity test which has recently been used to determine the parity of the eta/sub c/, the P ( or CP) quantum number can always be determined for X of any spin J which decays P (or respectively CP) invariantly into VV or V anti V where each vector meson decays into two spin-0 bosons, or is ..omega... P can also always be determined from a mode like K*/sup +/ anti K*/sup 0/. A neutral spin-0 technipion and an elementary Higgs particle, for instance, can be distinguished by such CP invariant decay modes and by phi rho/sup 0/, phi J, J UPSILON, or if sufficiently massive by phi Z/sup 0/ or JZ/sup 0/ where J/psi and Z/sup 0/ go into a lepton-antilepton pair. Generalization to the gZ/sup 0/ and gg decay channels, g = gluon jet, which would be relevant to new resonance physics, for example, at the CERN collider is discussed. There are also very simple tests for possible violations of P, of the combination of C plus isospin, of both P and CP, and of both C and CP. 9 references.

  5. The impact of sterile neutrinos on CP measurements at long baselines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gandhi, Raj; Kayser, Boris; Masud, Mehedi; Prakash, Suprabh

    2015-09-01

    With the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) as an example, we show that the presence of even one sterile neutrino of mass ~1 eV can significantly impact the measurements of CP violation in long baseline experiments. Using a probability level analysis and neutrino-antineutrino asymmetry calculations, we discuss the large magnitude of these effects, and show how they translate into significant event rate deviations at DUNE. These results demonstrate that measurements which, when interpreted in the context of the standard three family paradigm, indicate CP conservation at long baselines, may, in fact hide large CP violation if there is a sterilemore » state. Similarly, any data indicating the violation of CP cannot be properly interpreted within the standard paradigm unless the presence of sterile states of mass O(1 eV) can be conclusively ruled out. Our work underscores the need for a parallel and linked short baseline oscillation program and a highly capable near detector for DUNE, but in order that its highly anticipated results on CP violation in the lepton sector may be correctly interpreted.« less

  6. The impact of sterile neutrinos on CP measurements at long baselines

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Raj; Kayser, Boris; Masud, Mehedi; Prakash, Suprabh

    2015-09-01

    With the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) as an example, we show that the presence of even one sterile neutrino of mass ~1 eV can significantly impact the measurements of CP violation in long baseline experiments. Using a probability level analysis and neutrino-antineutrino asymmetry calculations, we discuss the large magnitude of these effects, and show how they translate into significant event rate deviations at DUNE. These results demonstrate that measurements which, when interpreted in the context of the standard three family paradigm, indicate CP conservation at long baselines, may, in fact hide large CP violation if there is a sterile state. Similarly, any data indicating the violation of CP cannot be properly interpreted within the standard paradigm unless the presence of sterile states of mass O(1 eV) can be conclusively ruled out. Our work underscores the need for a parallel and linked short baseline oscillation program and a highly capable near detector for DUNE, but in order that its highly anticipated results on CP violation in the lepton sector may be correctly interpreted.

  7. CP violation results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Austin; /Tufts U.

    2012-01-01

    We present world-leading results on CP-violating asymmetries and branching fractions of several decay modes of B{sup 0}, B{sub s}{sup 0}, and {Lambda}{sub b} hadrons into charmless two-body, and of B{sup {+-}} into charm, final states collected by the CDF detector. We also report a new measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in D*{sup {+-}}-tagged D{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} (h = K or {pi}) decays, where any enhancement from the Standard Model prediction would be unambiguous evidence for New Physics.

  8. Measurement of the Branching Fraction And Search for Direct CP-Violation in the B+- --> J/Psi Pi+- Decay Mode at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Fobozzi, Francesco; /Naples U.

    2006-08-22

    The phenomenon of CP-violation in weak interactions, discovered in 1964 in decays of neutral kaons, receives a simple and elegant explanation in the Standard Model with three generations of quarks. Indeed, in this model the common source of CP-asymmetry phenomena is represented by a simple complex phase in the unitary matrix (the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix) describing the charged weak couplings of the quarks. This simple scheme has never received an accurate validation, because the phenomenological parameters determined from measurements of CP-violation in kaons decays are related to the fundamental parameters of the theory in a complex way, sensitive to large theoretical uncertainties. On the contrary, decays of neutral B mesons like B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K{sub S}{sup 0} represent a unique laboratory to test the predictions of the theory because they are expected to show significant CP-violation effects, the magnitude of which is cleanly related to the Standard Model parameters. Thus experimental facilities have been built with the purpose of performing extensive studies of B decays. The BABAR experiment is operating at one of these facilities, at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is collecting data at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider (E{sub e{sup -}} = 9.0 GeV; E{sub e{sup +}} = 3.1 GeV), a high-luminosity accelerator machine (L = 3 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). The center-of-mass energy (10.58 GeV) of the e{sup +}e{sup -} system at PEP-II allows resonant production of the {Upsilon}(4S), a b{bar b} bound state, which decays almost exclusively in a B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} or a B{sup +}B{sup -} pair. A high-acceptance detector, projected and built by a wide international collaboration, detects and characterizes the decay products of the B mesons. From the analysis of the data collected during the first two years of operation, the BABAR collaboration has established CP-violation in decays of neutral B mesons at the 4.1{sigma

  9. Limits on tau lepton flavor violating decays in three charged leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Cervelli, Alberto

    2010-04-29

    A search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating decay of the {tau} lepton into three charged leptons has been performed using an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1.8-3.3) x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  10. Di-leptons at the Bevalac

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, H.S.

    1988-03-01

    Recent results on the production of di-leptons measured by the Di-Lepton-Spectrometer (DLS) collaboration are discussed. Results are reported from observations made on p /plus/ Be collisions with proton beams from 1.0 to 4.9 GeV and on Ca collisions with calcium beams of 1.0 to 2.0 GeV/A. The shape of the distributions are similar to that at higher energies. The low mass cross section appears to be explained by ..pi..-..pi.. annihilation, but detailed calculations are needed to substantiate that hypothesis. (LEN)