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Sample records for les colloides radioactifs

  1. Colloidal Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at Princeton University in colloidal phenomena stressing the physical and dynamical side of colloid science. The course outline, reading list, and requirements are presented. (BT)

  2. Hexadecapolar Colloids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-02-11

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and forbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms’ displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. We describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Becausemore » of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and report the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously.« less

  3. Colloidal polypyrrole

    DOEpatents

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized aromatic heterocyclic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a vinyl pyridine-containing polymer and dopant anions and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are disclosed.

  4. Hexadecapolar colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-02-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of `colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously.

  5. Hexadecapolar colloids

    PubMed Central

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-01-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously. PMID:26864184

  6. Hexadecapolar colloids.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2016-01-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of 'colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously. PMID:26864184

  7. Topological colloids.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Liu, Qingkun; He, Sailing; Kamien, Randall D; Kusner, Robert B; Lubensky, Tom C; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2013-01-10

    Smoke, fog, jelly, paints, milk and shaving cream are common everyday examples of colloids, a type of soft matter consisting of tiny particles dispersed in chemically distinct host media. Being abundant in nature, colloids also find increasingly important applications in science and technology, ranging from direct probing of kinetics in crystals and glasses to fabrication of third-generation quantum-dot solar cells. Because naturally occurring colloids have a shape that is typically determined by minimization of interfacial tension (for example, during phase separation) or faceted crystal growth, their surfaces tend to have minimum-area spherical or topologically equivalent shapes such as prisms and irregular grains (all continuously deformable--homeomorphic--to spheres). Although toroidal DNA condensates and vesicles with different numbers of handles can exist and soft matter defects can be shaped as rings and knots, the role of particle topology in colloidal systems remains unexplored. Here we fabricate and study colloidal particles with different numbers of handles and genus g ranging from 1 to 5. When introduced into a nematic liquid crystal--a fluid made of rod-like molecules that spontaneously align along the so-called 'director'--these particles induce three-dimensional director fields and topological defects dictated by colloidal topology. Whereas electric fields, photothermal melting and laser tweezing cause transformations between configurations of particle-induced structures, three-dimensional nonlinear optical imaging reveals that topological charge is conserved and that the total charge of particle-induced defects always obeys predictions of the Gauss-Bonnet and Poincaré-Hopf index theorems. This allows us to establish and experimentally test the procedure for assignment and summation of topological charges in three-dimensional director fields. Our findings lay the groundwork for new applications of colloids and liquid crystals that range from

  8. Colloidal polyaniline

    DOEpatents

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized amino-substituted aromatic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a random copolymer containing amino-benzene type moieties as side chain constituents, and dopant anions, and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are provided.

  9. Soil colloidal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent understanding that organic and inorganic contaminants are often transported via colloidal particles has increased interest in colloid science. The primary importance of colloids in soil science stems from their surface reactivity and charge characteristics. Characterizations of size, shape,...

  10. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  11. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  12. Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russel, W. B.; Saville, D. A.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1992-03-01

    The book covers the physical side of colloid science from the individual forces acting between submicron particles suspended in a liquid through the resulting equilibrium and dynamic properties. The relevant forces include Brownian motion, electrostatic repulsion, dispersion attraction, both attraction and repulsion due to soluble polymer, and viscous forces due to relative motion between the particles and the liquid. The balance among Brownian motion and the interparticle forces decides the questions of stability and phase behavior. Imposition of external fields produces complex effects, i.e. electrokinetic phenomena (electric field), sedimentation (gravitational field), diffusion (concentration/chemical potential gradient), and non-Newtonian rheology (shear field). The treatment aims to impart a sound, quantitative understanding based on fundamental theory and experiments with well-characterized model systems. This broad grasp of the fundamentals lends insight and helps to develop the intuitive sense needed to isolate essential features of technological problems and design critical experiments. Some exposure to fluid mechanics, statistical mechanics, and electricity and magnetism is assumed, but each subject is reintroduced in a self-contained manner.

  13. Colloidal Silver Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be dangerous to your health. What the Science Says About the Safety and Side Effects of ... homemade and commercial colloidal silver products. What the Science Says About the Effectiveness of Colloidal Silver Scientific ...

  14. What Is a Colloid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the properties of colloids, listing those commonly encountered (such as whipped cream, mayonnaise, and fog). Also presents several experiments using colloids and discusses "Silly Putty," a colloid with viscoelastic properties whose counterintuitive properties result from its mixture of polymers. (DH)

  15. Electrohydrodynamically patterned colloidal crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, Ryan C. (Inventor); Poon, Hak F. (Inventor); Xiao, Yi (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for assembling patterned crystalline arrays of colloidal particles using ultraviolet illumination of an optically-sensitive semiconducting anode while using the anode to apply an electronic field to the colloidal particles. The ultraviolet illumination increases current density, and consequently, the flow of the colloidal particles. As a result, colloidal particles can be caused to migrate from non-illuminated areas of the anode to illuminated areas of the anode. Selective illumination of the anode can also be used to permanently affix colloidal crystals to illuminated areas of the anode while not affixing them to non-illuminated areas of the anode.

  16. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” - often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  17. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    PubMed Central

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level. PMID:26927706

  18. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. Viswanathan; P. Reimus

    2003-09-05

    Colloid retardation is influenced by the attachment and detachment of colloids from immobile surfaces. This analysis demonstrates the development of parameters necessary to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids and, hence, retardation in both fractured tuff and porous alluvium. Field and experimental data specific to fractured tuff are used for the analysis of colloid retardation in fractured tuff. Experimental data specific to colloid transport in alluvial material from Yucca Mountain as well as bacteriophage field studies in alluvial material, which are thought to be good analogs for colloid transport, are used to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids in the alluvial material. There are no alternative scientific approaches or technical methods for calculating these retardation factors.

  19. Microfluidic colloid filtration.

    PubMed

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J C; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today's water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a "cake layer" - often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level. PMID:26927706

  20. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation

  1. Ring around the colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Marcello, Jr.; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Beller, Daniel A.; Čopar, Simon; Shi, Zheng; Kamien, Randall D.; Yang, Shu; Baumgart, Tobias; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    In this work, we show that Janus washers, genus-one colloids with hybrid anchoring conditions, form topologically required defects in nematic liquid crystals. Experiments under crossed polarizers reveal the defect structure to be a rigid disclination loop confined within the colloid, with an accompanying defect in the liquid crystal. When confined to a homeotropic cell, the resulting colloid-defect ring pair tilts relative to the far field director, in contrast to the behavior of toroidal colloids with purely homeotropic anchoring. We show that this tilting behavior can be reversibly suppressed by the introduction of a spherical colloid into the center of the toroid, creating a new kind of multi-shape colloidal assemblage.

  2. Analysis of colloid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1985-12-31

    The population balance methodology is described and applied to the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. The transient model includes particle growth, capture, convective transport, and dispersion. We also follow the dynamic accumulation of captured colloids on the solids. The multidimensional parabolic partial differential equation was solved by a recently enhanced method of characteristics technique. This computational technique minimized numerical dispersion and is computationally very fast. The FORTRAN 77 code ran on a VAX-780 in less than a minute and also runs on an IBM-AT using the Professional FORTRAN compiler. The code was extensively tested against various simplified cases and against analytical models. The packed column experiments by Saltelli et al. were re-analyzed incorporating the experimentally reported size distribution of the colloid feed material. Colloid capture was modeled using a linear size dependent filtration function. The effects of a colloid size dependent filtration factor and various initial colloid size distributions on colloid migration and capture were investigated. Also, we followed the changing colloid size distribution as a function of position in the column. Some simple arguments are made to assess the likelihood of colloid migration at a potential NTS Yucca Mountain waste disposal site. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  4. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  5. Driving magnetic colloidal polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempster, Joshua; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    Magnetic colloids are of growing interest for applications such as drug delivery and in vitro tissue growth. Recent experiments have synthesized 1D chains of magnetic colloids into permanent colloidal polymers. We study magnetic colloidal polymers theoretically and computationally under the influence of time-varying external fields and find a rich set of controllable, dynamic conformations. By iterating through a sequence of conformations, these polymers can perform mechanical functions. We discuss possible roles for these polymers beyond those considered for single colloids. This work was supported as part of the Center for Bio-Inspired Energy Science, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award # DE-SC0000989.

  6. Lock and key colloids.

    PubMed

    Sacanna, S; Irvine, W T M; Chaikin, P M; Pine, D J

    2010-03-25

    New functional materials can in principle be created using colloids that self-assemble into a desired structure by means of a programmable recognition and binding scheme. This idea has been explored by attaching 'programmed' DNA strands to nanometre- and micrometre- sized particles and then using DNA hybridization to direct the placement of the particles in the final assembly. Here we demonstrate an alternative recognition mechanism for directing the assembly of composite structures, based on particles with complementary shapes. Our system, which uses Fischer's lock-and-key principle, employs colloidal spheres as keys and monodisperse colloidal particles with a spherical cavity as locks that bind spontaneously and reversibly via the depletion interaction. The lock-and-key binding is specific because it is controlled by how closely the size of a spherical colloidal key particle matches the radius of the spherical cavity of the lock particle. The strength of the binding can be further tuned by adjusting the solution composition or temperature. The composite assemblies have the unique feature of having flexible bonds, allowing us to produce flexible dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric colloidal molecules as well as more complex colloidal polymers. We expect that this lock-and-key recognition mechanism will find wider use as a means of programming and directing colloidal self-assembly. PMID:20336142

  7. NOCHAR Polymers: An Aqueous and Organic Liquid Solidification Process for Cadarache LOR (Liquides Organiques Radioactifs) - 13195

    SciTech Connect

    Vaudey, Claire-Emilie; Renou, Sebastien; Porco, Julien; Kelley, Dennis; Cochaud, Chantal

    2013-07-01

    To handle the Very Low Level Waste (VLLW) and the Low Level Waste (LLW) in France, two options can be considered: the incineration at CENTRACO facility and the disposal facility on ANDRA sites. The waste acceptance in these radwaste routes is dependent upon the adequacy between the waste characteristics (physical chemistry and radiological) and the radwaste route specifications. If the waste characteristics are incompatible with the radwaste route specifications (presence of significant quantities of chlorine, fluorine, organic component etc or/and high activity limits), it is necessary to find an alternative solution that consists of a waste pre-treatment process. In the context of the problematic Cadarache LOR (Liquides Organiques Radioactifs) waste streams, two radioactive scintillation cocktails have to be treated. The first one is composed of organic liquids at 13.1 % (diphenyloxazol, mesitylene, TBP, xylene) and water at 86.9 %. The second one is composed of TBP at 8.6 % and water at 91.4 %. They contain chlorine, fluorine and sulphate and have got alpha/beta/gamma spectra with mass activities equal to some kBq.g{sup -1}. Therefore, tritium is present and creates the second problematic waste stream. As a consequence, in order for disposal acceptance at the ANDRA site, it is necessary to pre-treat the waste. The NOCHAR polymers as an aqueous and organic liquid solidification process seem to be an adequate solution. Indeed, these polymers constitute an important variety of products applied to the treatment of radioactive aqueous and organic liquids (solvent, oil, solvent/oil mixing etc) and sludge through a mechanical and chemical solidification process. For Cadarache LOR, N910 and N960 respectively dedicated to the organic and aqueous liquids solidification are considered. With the N910, the organic waste solidification occurs in two steps. As the organic liquid travels moves through the polymer strands, the strands swell and immobilise the liquid. Then as the

  8. Colloidal pen lithography.

    PubMed

    Xue, Mianqi; Cai, Xiaojing; Chen, Ghenfu

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal pen lithography, a low-cost, high-throughput scanning probe contact printing method, has been developed, which is based on self-assembled colloidal arrays embedded in a soft elastomeric stamp. Patterned protein arrays are demonstrated using this method, with a feature size ranging from 100 nm to several micrometers. A brief study into the specificity reorganization of protein gives evidence for the feasibility of this method for writing protein chips. PMID:25288364

  9. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  10. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  11. Les jeux de hasard chez les enfants et les adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rina; Pinzon, Jorge L

    2012-01-01

    RÉSUMÉ Même si, au Canada, les mineurs n’ont pas le droit de jouer à des jeux de hasard légalisés, les adolescents participent souvent à des jeux de hasard soit légalisés (produits de loterie, casino, terminaux de jeux vidéo), soit autonomes (jeux de cartes, paris sportifs, dés) à la maison et en milieu scolaire. Chez les adultes, le taux de prévalence de dépendance aux jeux de hasard au cours de la vie se situe entre 1 % et 2 %. D’après les données existantes, la prévalence chez les adolescents serait de deux à quatre fois plus élevée. On ne sait pas grand-chose des facteurs de risque d’apparition et de perpétuation d’une dépendance pathologique aux jeux de hasard. Le présent document de principes vise à informer les pédiatres, les médecins de famille et les autres professionnels de la santé des connaissances émergentes sur les jeux de hasard pendant l’enfance et l’adolescence et du risque de conséquences graves qui s’y rattachent. On y exhorte également les gouvernements fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux à inclure cette question dans leur programme et à tenir compte des facteurs sociopolitiques associés aux jeux de hasard.

  12. COLLOIDS. Colloidal matter: Packing, geometry, and entropy.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2015-08-28

    Colloidal particles with well-controlled shapes and interactions are an ideal experimental system for exploring how matter organizes itself. Like atoms and molecules, these particles form bulk phases such as liquids and crystals. But they are more than just crude analogs of atoms; they are a form of matter in their own right, with complex and interesting collective behavior not seen at the atomic scale. Their behavior is affected by geometrical or topological constraints, such as curved surfaces or the shapes of the particles. Because the interactions between the particles are often short-ranged, we can understand the effects of these constraints using geometrical concepts such as packing. The geometrical viewpoint gives us a window into how entropy affects not only the structure of matter, but also the dynamics of how it forms. PMID:26315444

  13. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole–dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single

  14. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Teitelboim, Ayelet; Meir, Noga; Kazes, Miri; Oron, Dan

    2016-05-17

    Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole-dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single photon

  15. Colloid migration in fractured media

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.R. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1989-09-15

    Field studies at the Nevada Test Site by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have demonstrated that radionuclides are being transported by colloidal material suspended in groundwater. This observation is counter to most predictions from contaminant transport models because the models assume adsorbed species are immobile. The purpose of this research is to quantify the transport processes for colloidal materials and develop the mechanistic understanding necessary to predict radionuclide transport in fractured media. There were three areas of investigation during this year that have addressed these issues: chemical control of colloid deposition on clean mineral surfaces, colloid accumulation on fracture surfaces, and the influence of deposited colloids on colloid and tracer migration. 7 refs.

  16. Magnetofluidic Tweezing of Nonmagnetic Colloids.

    PubMed

    Timonen, Jaakko V I; Demirörs, Ahmet F; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2016-05-01

    Magnetofluidic tweezing based on negative magnetophoresis and microfabricated core-shell magnetic microtips allows controlled on-demand assembly of colloids and microparticles into various static and dynamic structures such as colloidal crystals (as shown for 3.2 μm silica particles). PMID:26990182

  17. Colloidal aggregation in polymer blends.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, M; Ridouane, H; Hachem, E-K; Derouiche, A; Rahmoune, M

    2005-06-22

    We consider here a low-density assembly of colloidal particles immersed in a critical polymer mixture of two chemically incompatible polymers. We assume that, close to the critical point of the free mixture, the colloids prefer to be surrounded by one polymer (critical adsorption). As result, one is assisted to a reversible colloidal aggregation in the nonpreferred phase, due the existence of a long-range attractive Casimir force between particles. This aggregation is a phase transition driving the colloidal system from dilute to dense phases, as the usual gas-liquid transition. We are interested in a quantitative investigation of the phase diagram of the immersed colloids. We suppose that the positions of particles are disordered, and the disorder is quenched and follows a Gaussian distribution. To apprehend the problem, use is made of the standard phi(4) theory, where the field phi represents the composition fluctuation (order parameter), combined with the standard cumulant method. First, we derive the expression of the effective free energy of colloids and show that this is of Flory-Huggins type. Second, we find that the interaction parameter u between colloids is simply a linear combination of the isotherm compressibility and specific heat of the free mixture. Third, with the help of the derived effective free energy, we determine the complete shape of the phase diagram (binodal and spinodal) in the (Psi,u) plane, with Psi as the volume fraction of immersed colloids. The continuous "gas-liquid" transition occurs at some critical point K of coordinates (Psi(c) = 0.5,u(c) = 2). Finally, we emphasize that the present work is a natural extension of that, relative to simple liquid mixtures incorporating colloids. PMID:16035822

  18. Colloids in Acute Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cartotto, Robert; Greenhalgh, David

    2016-10-01

    Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury. Albumin, in contrast, is less expensive and safer and has demonstrated ability to reduce resuscitation requirements and possibly limit edema-related morbidity. PMID:27600123

  19. Two-dimensional dipolar nematic colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Skarabot, M; Ravnik, M; Zumer, S; Tkalec, U; Poberaj, I; Babic, D; Osterman, N; Musevic, I

    2007-11-01

    We study the interactions and directed assembly of dipolar nematic colloidal particles in planar nematic cells using laser tweezers. The binding energies for two stable configurations of a colloidal pair with homeotropic surface alignment are determined. It is shown that the orientation of the dipolar colloidal particle can efficiently be controlled and changed by locally quenching the nematic liquid crystal from the laser-induced isotropic phase. The interaction of a single colloidal particle with a single colloidal chain is determined and the interactions between pairs of colloidal chains are studied. We demonstrate that dipolar colloidal chains self-assemble into the two-dimensional (2D) dipolar nematic colloidal crystals. An odd-even effect is observed with increasing number of colloidal chains forming the 2D colloidal crystal. PMID:18233658

  20. Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  1. Method of making colloid labeled with radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1991-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  2. Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, R.W.; Hines, J.J.

    1990-11-13

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints. No Drawings

  3. Emergent behavior in active colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöttl, Andreas; Stark, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Active colloids are microscopic particles, which self-propel through viscous fluids by converting energy extracted from their environment into directed motion. We first explain how artificial microswimmers move forward by generating near-surface flow fields via self-phoresis or the self-induced Marangoni effect. We then discuss generic features of the dynamics of single active colloids in bulk and in confinement, as well as in the presence of gravity, field gradients, and fluid flow. In the third section, we review the emergent collective behavior of active colloidal suspensions, focusing on their structural and dynamic properties. After summarizing experimental observations, we give an overview of the progress in modeling collectively moving active colloids. While active Brownian particles are heavily used to study collective dynamics on large scales, more advanced methods are necessary to explore the importance of hydrodynamic and phoretic particle interactions. Finally, the relevant physical approaches to quantify the emergent collective behavior are presented.

  4. Mechanical Failure in Colloidal Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodger, Thomas Edward

    When colloidal particles in a dispersion are made attractive, they aggregate into fractal clusters which grow to form a space-spanning network, or gel, even at low volume fractions. These gels are crucial to the rheological behavior of many personal care, food products and dispersion-based paints. The mechanical stability of these products relies on the stability of the colloidal gel network which acts as a scaffold to provide these products with desired mechanical properties and to prevent gravitational sedimentation of the dispersed components. Understanding the mechanical stability of such colloidal gels is thus of crucial importance to predict and control the properties of many soft solids. Once a colloidal gel forms, the heterogeneous structure bonded through weak physical interactions, is immediately subject to body forces, such as gravity, surface forces, such as adhesion to a container walls and shear forces; the interplay of these forces acting on the gel determines its stability. Even in the absence of external stresses, colloidal gels undergo internal rearrangements within the network that may cause the network structure to evolve gradually, in processes known as aging or coarsening or fail catastrophically, in a mechanical instability known as syneresis. Studying gel stability in the laboratory requires model colloidal system which may be tuned to eliminate these body or endogenous forces systematically. Using existing chemistry, I developed several systems to study delayed yielding by eliminating gravitational stresses through density matching and cyclic heating to induce attraction; and to study syneresis by eliminating adhesion to the container walls, altering the contact forces between colloids, and again, inducing gelation through heating. These results elucidate the varied yet concomitant mechanisms by which colloidal gels may locally or globally yield, but then reform due to the nature of the physical, or non-covalent, interactions which form

  5. Colloidal Suspended Iron in Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiller, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Iron is transported in most rivers predominantly in two physical-chemical forms: a) organic complexes of Fe(III) and b) crystalline or poorly-ordered suspended phases frequently dominated by iron oxides. These two forms have different properties with respect to transport, bioavailability, and sorption. For the suspended phase iron, the fraction in the colloidal size range may be especially important given the interactions of ferric oxide surfaces with dissolved metal ions and organic compounds. We report the concentrations of colloidal (20 - 450 nm) suspended particulate iron in a wide variety of rivers. Goals of this effort are to ascertain the ubiquity of this material and also to examine other fluvial variables as indicators of its sources and nature. This, in turn, should lead to an understanding of how landscape/climate change could affect fluvial colloidal suspended iron. Possible sources of suspended colloidal iron include ferric oxides precipitated from the oxidation of ferrous iron derived from reducing environments, alumino-silicates derived from physical weathering, products of chemical weathering, and flushing of soils. We observe most commonly that increasing concentrations of colloidal suspended iron follow indicators of reducing sources (e.g., higher dissolved Mn and Ce anomaly close to 1), suggesting that this material is dominated by freshly precipitated iron oxides. Only in glacial watersheds do we find colloidal suspended iron instead correlating with colloidal suspended Si, and hence, likely to be associated with alumino-silicates. We also observe that colloidal suspended iron correlates well with the UV absorbance associated with this size range (20 - 450 nm).

  6. Re-shaping colloidal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the geometry and yield of anisotropic colloidal particles remains a challenge for hierarchical self-assembly. I will discuss a synthetic strategy for fabricating colloidal clusters by creating order in randomly aggregated polymer spheres using surface tension and geometrical constraints. The technique can be extended to a variety of charge-stabilized polymer spheres and offers control over the cluster size distribution. VENI grant from The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  7. Aggregation of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-28

    Patchy colloids are attractive as programmable building blocks for metamaterials. Inverse patchy colloids, in which a charged surface is decorated with patches of the opposite charge, are additionally noteworthy as models for heterogeneously charged biological materials such as proteins. We study the phases and aggregation behavior of a single charged patch in an oppositely charged colloid with a single-site model. This single-patch inverse patchy colloid model shows a large number of phases when varying patch size. For large patch sizes we find ferroelectric crystals, while small patch sizes produce cross-linked gels. Intermediate values produce monodisperse clusters and unusual worm structures that preserve finite ratios of area to volume. The polarization observed at large patch sizes is robust under extreme disorder in patch size and shape. We examine phase-temperature dependence and coexistence curves and find that large patch sizes produce polarized liquids, in contrast to mean-field predictions. Finally, we introduce small numbers of unpatched charged colloids. These can either suppress or encourage aggregation depending on their concentration and the size of the patches on the patched colloids. These effects can be exploited to control aggregation and to measure effective patch size. PMID:27253725

  8. Dielectrophoresis force of colloidal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hao; Ou-Yang, Daniel

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is the motion of a polarizable colloidal particle in a non­uniform electric field. The magnitude of the DEP force is known to be proportional to the gradient of E2. The DEP force also depends on the relative polarizability of the particle to that of the surrounding medium. Due to its ease of use, DEP has been proposed for a variety of applications to manipulate colloidal particles in a microfluidic setting. However, accurate measurements of the DEP force on colloidal nanoparticles are lacking. A new method is proposed to measure accurately the DEP potential force of colloidal nanoparticles by using confocal fluorescence imaging to determine the density distributions of dilute colloidal nanoparticle in a DEP potential force field. The DEP potential field can be calculated from the particle density distributions since the spatial distribution of the particle number density follows the Boltzmann distribution of the DEP potential energy. The validity of the measured DEP force is tested by examining the force as a function of the E field strength and particle size. The classic Maxwell­Wagner­O'Konski is found to be inadequate to fully describe the frequency dependence of the DEP force. NSF 0928299, Emulsion Polymer Institute, Department of Physics of Lehigh University.

  9. PREFACE: Colloidal and molecular electro-optics Colloidal and molecular electro-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palberg, Thomas; Löwen, Hartmut

    2010-12-01

    exciting trends and earn the interest of a good fraction of contemporary soft matter scientists. Note1 http://www.elopto2010.fb08.uni-mainz.de Note2 http://www.sfb-tr6.de References [1] Weinberger P 2008 John Kerr and his effects found in 1877 and 1878 Phil. Mag. Lett. 88 897-907 [2] Benoit H 1948 Calcul de l'écart quadratique moyen entre les extrémités de diverses chaînes moléculaires de type usuel J. Polym. Sci. 3 376-87 [3] Benoit H 1949 Sur un dispositif de mesure de l'effet Kerr par impulsions electriques isoles Comptes Rendus 228 1716-8 [4] Benoit H 1951 Contribution a l'etude de l'effet Kerr presente par les solutions diluees de macromolecules rigide Ann. Phys. 6 561-609 Colloidal and molecular electro-optics contents Electric dichroism transients of aqueous solutions of DNA J A Bertolotto, G M Corral, E M Farias de La Torre and G B Roston The role of effective charges in the electrophoresis of highly charged colloids Apratim Chatterji and Jürgen Horbach Nonlinear response of the electric birefringence of polyelectrolyte solutions J L Déjardin and J M Martinez Kerr constant of multi-subunit particles and semiflexible, wormlike chains J García de la Torre, F G Díaz Baños and H E Pérez Sánchez Self-assembling electroactive hydrogels for flexible display technology Scott L Jones, Kok Hou Wong, Pall Thordarson and François Ladouceur Electrooptical effects in colloid systems subjected to short pulses of strong electric field S A Klemeshev, M P Petrov, A A Trusov and A V Voitylov The effect of ionic strength on electrical properties of polyelectrolyte multilayers on colloidal particles V Milkova and Ts Radeva Charge transport and current in non-polar liquids Kristiaan Neyts, Filip Beunis, Filip Strubbe, Matthias Marescaux, Bart Verboven, Masoumeh Karvar and Alwin Verschueren Ionic concentration- and pH-dependent electrophoretic mobility as studied by single colloid electrophoresis I Semenov, P Papadopoulos, G Stober and F Kremer Effect of magnesium ions and

  10. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A.; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  11. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-a; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:26279317

  12. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:26279317

  13. Gel transitions in colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergenholtz, J.; Fuchs, M.

    1999-12-01

    The idealized mode-coupling theory (MCT) is applied to colloidal systems interacting via short-range attractive interactions of Yukawa form. At low temperatures, MCT predicts a slowing down of the local dynamics and ergodicity-breaking transitions. The non-ergodicity transitions share many features with the colloidal gel transition, and are proposed to be the source of gelation in colloidal systems. Previous calculations of the phase diagram are complemented with additional data for shorter ranges of the attractive interaction, showing that the path of the non-ergodicity transition line is then unimpeded by the gas-liquid critical curve at low temperatures. Particular attention is given to the critical non-ergodicity parameters; this is motivated by recent experimental measurements. An asymptotic model is developed, valid for dilute systems of spheres interacting via strong short-range attractions, and is shown to capture all aspects of the low-temperature MCT non-ergodicity transitions.

  14. Polymeric stabilization of colloidal asphaltenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashmi, Sara; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2010-03-01

    Asphaltenes, the heaviest component of crude oil, cause many problems in petroleum extraction and recovery. Operationally defined as insoluble in long chain alkanes but soluble in toluene, asphaltenes have been described by bulk thermodynamic models such as the Flory-Huggins theory. However, bulk models work well only for asphaltenes in good solvents. Characterization of asphaltenes in poor solvents remains elusive: molecular scale asphaltenes readily aggregate to the colloidal scale and become highly unstable in solution. We investigate the ability of polymers to stabilize colloidal asphaltene suspensions in heptane. In the absence of added polymer, sedimentation measurements reveal dynamics reminiscent of collapsing gels. Adding polymers to colloidal asphaltene suspensions can delay the characteristic sedimentation time by orders of magnitude. Light scattering results suggest that the mechanism of stabilization may be related to a decrease in both particle size and polydispersity as a function of added polymer.

  15. Entropy favours open colloidal lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaoming; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Burgeoning experimental and simulation activity seeks to understand the existence of self-assembled colloidal structures that are not close-packed. Here we describe an analytical theory based on lattice dynamics and supported by experiments that reveals the fundamental role entropy can play in stabilizing open lattices. The entropy we consider is associated with the rotational and vibrational modes unique to colloids interacting through extended attractive patches. The theory makes predictions of the implied temperature, pressure and patch-size dependence of the phase diagram of open and close-packed structures. More generally, it provides guidance for the conditions at which targeted patchy colloidal assemblies in two and three dimensions are stable, thus overcoming the difficulty in exploring by experiment or simulation the full range of conceivable parameters.

  16. Doped colloidal artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libál, A.; Olson Reichhardt, C. J.; Reichhardt, C.

    2015-10-01

    We examine square and kagome artificial spin ice for colloids confined in arrays of double-well traps. Unlike magnetic artificial spin ices, colloidal and vortex artificial spin ice realizations allow creation of doping sites through double occupation of individual traps. We find that doping square and kagome ice geometries produces opposite effects. For square ice, doping creates local excitations in the ground state configuration that produce a local melting effect as the temperature is raised. In contrast, the kagome ice ground state can absorb the doping charge without generating non-ground-state excitations, while at elevated temperatures the hopping of individual colloids is suppressed near the doping sites. These results indicate that in the square ice, doping adds degeneracy to the ordered ground state and creates local weak spots, while in the kagome ice, which has a highly degenerate ground state, doping locally decreases the degeneracy and creates local hard regions.

  17. Colloidal particle assembly using piezoelectric inkjet printing of polystyrene colloidal ink formulations.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Younghwan

    2014-10-01

    We report the feasibility of piezoelectric inkjet printing of colloidal dispersion inks for geometrical patterning to arrange colloids in desired locations. Polystyrene colloid (dia. = 3 μm) inks dispersed with thermally curable binder in organic solvents are explored for fundamental study on colloidal patterning. The inkjet printability of colloidal inks is systematically investigated with different ink formulations and inkjet process variables. In addition, in order to maintain the structural stability of colloidal patterns fabricated on the substrate from externally applied forces such as mechanical, chemical and thermal stimuli, thermally curable binder was formulated into the colloidal ink formulations. PMID:25942838

  18. Colloid cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grasu, Beatrice L; Alberico, Anthony M

    2011-01-01

    Colloid cysts are a rare clinical finding with a unique clinical presentation: non-specific paroxysmal headaches. The current recommended treatment is microsurgery, which poses the greatest risk to the patient but allows complete removal of the cyst to prevent recurrence. A 41-year old man presented with a colloid cyst located in the foramen of Monro causing obstructive hydrocephalus. He had paroxysmal headaches and memory and personality changes. Transcortical transventricle microsurgery was performed to remove the entire cyst. A temporary shunt was placed to prevent post-operative hydrocephalus. Normal neurological function returned upon cyst removal. PMID:22034805

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Supramolecular Colloids.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Neus; De Feijter, Isja; Voets, Ilja K

    2016-01-01

    Control over colloidal assembly is of utmost importance for the development of functional colloidal materials with tailored structural and mechanical properties for applications in photonics, drug delivery and coating technology. Here we present a new family of colloidal building blocks, coined supramolecular colloids, whose self-assembly is controlled through surface-functionalization with a benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derived supramolecular moiety. Such BTAs interact via directional, strong, yet reversible hydrogen-bonds with other identical BTAs. Herein, a protocol is presented that describes how to couple these BTAs to colloids and how to quantify the number of coupling sites, which determines the multivalency of the supramolecular colloids. Light scattering measurements show that the refractive index of the colloids is almost matched with that of the solvent, which strongly reduces the van der Waals forces between the colloids. Before photo-activation, the colloids remain well dispersed, as the BTAs are equipped with a photo-labile group that blocks the formation of hydrogen-bonds. Controlled deprotection with UV-light activates the short-range hydrogen-bonds between the BTAs, which triggers the colloidal self-assembly. The evolution from the dispersed state to the clustered state is monitored by confocal microscopy. These results are further quantified by image analysis with simple routines using ImageJ and Matlab. This merger of supramolecular chemistry and colloidal science offers a direct route towards light- and thermo-responsive colloidal assembly encoded in the surface-grafted monolayer. PMID:27168201

  20. Colloids and Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerson, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the work funded under this grant were to develop a microphotographic technique and use it to monitor the nucleation and growth of crystals of hard colloidal spheres. Special attention is given to the possible need for microgravity studies in future experiments. A number of persons have been involved in this work. A masters student, Keith Davis, began the project and developed a sheet illumination apparatus and an image processing system for detection and analysis. His work on a segmentation program for image processing was sufficient for his master's research and has been published. A post doctoral student Bernie Olivier and a graduate student Yueming He, who originally suggested the sheet illumination, were funded by another source but along with Keith made photographic series of several samples (that had been made by Keith Davis). Data extraction has been done by Keith, Bernie, Yueming and two undergraduates employed on the grant. Results are published in Langmuir. These results describe the sheet lighting technique as one which illuminates not only the Bragg scattering crystal, but all the crystals. Thus, accurate crystal counts can be made for nucleation rate measurements. The strange crystal length scale reduction, observed in small angle light scattering (SALS) studies, following the initial nucleation and growth period, has been observed directly. The Bragg scattering (and dark) crystal size decreases in the crossover region. This could be an effect due to gravitational forces or due to over- compression of the crystal during growth. Direct observations indicate a complex morphology for the resulting hard sphere crystals. The crystal edges are fairly sharp but the crystals have a large degree of internal structure. This structure is a result of (unstable) growth and not aggregation. As yet unpublished work compares growth exponents data with data obtained by SALS. The nucleation rate density is determined over a broad volume fraction range

  1. Colloid characterization and quantification in groundwater samples

    SciTech Connect

    K. Stephen Kung

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the work conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory for studying the groundwater colloids for the Yucca Mountain Project in conjunction with the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. Colloidal particle size distributions and total particle concentration in groundwater samples are quantified and characterized. Colloid materials from cavity waters collected near underground nuclear explosion sites by HRMP field sampling personnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were quantified. Selected colloid samples were further characterized by electron microscope to evaluate the colloid shapes, elemental compositions, and mineral phases. The authors have evaluated the colloid size and concentration in the natural groundwater sample that was collected from the ER-20-5 well and stored in a 50-gallon (about 200-liter) barrel for several months. This groundwater sample was studied because HRMP personnel have identified trace levels of radionuclides in the water sample. Colloid results show that even though the water sample had filtered through a series of Millipore filters, high-colloid concentrations were identified in all unfiltered and filtered samples. They had studied the samples that were diluted with distilled water and found that diluted samples contained more colloids than the undiluted ones. These results imply that colloids are probably not stable during the storage conditions. Furthermore, results demonstrate that undesired colloids have been introduced into the samples during the storage, filtration, and dilution processes. They have evaluated possible sources of colloid contamination associated with sample collection, filtrating, storage, and analyses of natural groundwaters. The effects of container types and sample storage time on colloid size distribution and total concentration were studied to evaluate colloid stability by using J13 groundwater. The data suggests that groundwater samples

  2. Physics of Colloids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, Dave; Weeks, Eric; Gasser, Urs; Dinsmore, Tony; Mawley, Suliana; Segre, Phil; Cipelletti, Lucia

    2000-01-01

    This talk will present recent results from ground-based research to support the "Physics of Colloids in Space" project which is scheduled to fly in the ISS approximately one year from now. In addition, results supporting future planned flights will be discussed.

  3. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, C. Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-09-01

    Drying suspensions often leave behind complex patterns of particulates, as might be seen in the coffee stains on a table. Here, we consider the dynamics of periodic band or uniform solid film formation on a vertical plate suspended partially in a drying colloidal solution. Direct observations allow us to visualize the dynamics of band and film deposition, where both are made of multiple layers of close packed particles. We further see that there is a transition between banding and filming when the colloidal concentration is varied. A minimal theory of the liquid meniscus motion along the plate reveals the dynamics of the banding and its transition to the filming as a function of the ratio of deposition and evaporation rates. We also provide a complementary multiphase model of colloids dissolved in the liquid, which couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving meniscus to the fluid and particulate flows and the transition from a dilute suspension to a porous plug. This allows us to determine the concentration dependence of the bandwidth and the deposition rate. Together, our findings allow for the control of drying-induced patterning as a function of the colloidal concentration and evaporation rate.

  4. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs.

  5. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  6. Sonochemical synthesis of iron colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.; Fang, M.; Hyeon, T.

    1996-11-27

    We present here a new method for the preparation of stable ferromagnetic colloids of iron using high-intensity ultrasound to sonochemically decompose volatile organometallic compounds. These colloids have narrow size distributions centered at a few nanometers and are found to be superparamagnetic. In conclusion, a simple synthetic method has been discovered to produce nanosized iron colloid using high-intensity ultrasound. Nanometer iron particles dispersed in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) matrix or stabilized by adsorption of oleic acid have been synthesized by sonochemical decomposition of Fe(CO){sub 5}. Transmission electron micrographs show that the iron particles have a relatively narrow range in size from 3 to 8 nm for polyvinylpyrrolidone, while oleic acid gives an even more uniform distribution at 8 nm. magnetic measurements revealed that these nanometer iron particles are superparamagnetic with a saturation magnetization of 101 emu/g (Fe) at 290 K. This work is easily extended to colloids of other metals and to alloys of two or more metals, simply by using multiple volatile precursors. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Towards Structural Complexity with Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Colloids rather easily assemble into simple crystal structures like the face-centered cubic lattice or the body-centered cubic lattice. More complex phases are harder to achieve, but have recently been reported using a number of approaches. Yet, assembling complex structures often results from trial-and-error and is not well understood. In this presentation, we show how novel crystals, quasicrystals, and liquid crystals can be achieved with colloidal building blocks by varying the interactions and the shapes of the building blocks. Using computer simulations, we demonstrate the formation of unusually ordered phases both with isotropic pair potentials, as well as with facetted shapes like polyhedra. We describe new tools we have developed to perform complex structural analysis on simulated systems and show how they may be used to analyze real space images from colloid experiments. We also compare the assembled structures with densest packings of the building blocks and show that good packings can often be distinct from what is observed to assemble from the disordered state. This suggests that dense packings may not be illustrative of what is achievable in colloid experiments.

  8. Effective Forces Between Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tehver, Riina; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1999-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions have proven to be excellent model systems for the study of condensed matter and its phase behavior. Many of the properties of colloidal suspensions can be investigated with a systematic variation of the characteristics of the systems and, in addition, the energy, length and time scales associated with them allow for experimental probing of otherwise inaccessible regimes. The latter property also makes colloidal systems vulnerable to external influences such as gravity. Experiments performed in micro-ravity by Chaikin and Russell have been invaluable in extracting the true behavior of the systems without an external field. Weitz and Pusey intend to use mixtures of colloidal particles with additives such as polymers to induce aggregation and form weak, tenuous, highly disordered fractal structures that would be stable in the absence of gravitational forces. When dispersed in a polarizable medium, colloidal particles can ionize, emitting counterions into the solution. The standard interaction potential in these charged colloidal suspensions was first obtained by Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek. The DLVO potential is obtained in the mean-field linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approximation and thus has limited applicability. For more precise calculations, we have used ab initio density functional theory. In our model, colloidal particles are charged hard spheres, the counterions are described by a continuum density field and the solvent is treated as a homogeneous medium with a specified dielectric constant. We calculate the effective forces between charged colloidal particles by integrating over the solvent and counterion degrees of freedom, taking into account the direct interactions between the particles as well as particle-counterion, counterion-counterion Coulomb, counterion entropic and correlation contributions. We obtain the effective interaction potential between charged colloidal particles in different configurations. We evaluate two

  9. Diffusion dans les liquides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dianoux, A. J.

    2003-09-01

    Après une brève introduction qui rappelle les concepts détaillés dans le cours de M. Bée, nous présentons un aperçu de trois de nos travaux sur l'étude de la diffusion. Tout d'abord la dynamique de l'eau, dans son état normal ou surfondu, révèle la complexité apportée par le réseau de liaisons hydrogène. Ensuite l'effet du confinement sur la dynamique de l'eau sera étudié dans le cas de la membrane Nafion. Enfin la diffusion dans les phases nématique et smectique A d'un cristal liquide permet d'obtenir la valeur du potentiel qui maintient les couches dans la phase smectique.

  10. Glass/Jamming Transition in Colloidal Aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segre, Philip N.; Prasad, Vikram; Weitz, David A.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have studied colloidal aggregation in a model colloid plus polymer system with short-range attractive interactions. By varying the colloid concentration and the strength of the attraction, we explored regions where the equilibrium phase is expected to consist of colloidal crystallites in coexistance with colloidal gas (i.e. monomers). This occurs for moderate values of the potential depth, U approximately equal to 2-5 kT. Crystallization was not always observed. Rather, over an extended sub-region two new metastable phases appear, one fluid-like and one solid-like. These were examined in detail with light scattering and microscopy techniques. Both phases consist of a near uniform distribution of small irregular shaped clusters of colloidal particles. The dynamical and structural characteristics of the ergodic-nonergodic transition between the two phases share much in common with the colloidal hard sphere glass transition.

  11. Distorted colloidal arrays as designed template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ye; Zhou, Ziwei; Möhwald, Helmuth; Ai, Bin; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Ye, Shunsheng; Zhang, Gang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel type of colloidal template with broken symmetry was generated using commercial, inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE). With proper but simple treatment, the traditional symmetric non-close-packed colloidal template evolves into an elliptical profile with high uniformity. This unique feature can add flexibility to colloidal lithography and/or other lithography techniques using colloidal particles as building blocks to fabricate nano-/micro-structures with broken symmetry. Beyond that the novel colloidal template we developed possesses on-site tunability, i.e. the transformability from a symmetric into an asymmetric template. Sandwich-type particles with eccentric features were fabricated utilizing this tunable template. This distinguishing feature will provide the possibility to fabricate structures with unique asymmetric features using one set of colloidal template, providing flexibility and broad tunability to enable nano-/micro-structure fabrication with colloidal templates.

  12. Colloid particle size-dependent dispersivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C. V.; Katzourakis, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that dispersion coefficients evaluated by fitting advection-dispersion transport models to nonreactive tracer breakthrough curves do not adequately describe colloid transport under the same flow field conditions. Here an extensive laboratory study was undertaken to assess whether the dispersivity, which traditionally has been considered to be a property of the porous medium, is dependent on colloid particle size and interstitial velocity. A total of 49 colloid transport experiments were performed in columns packed with glass beads under chemically unfavorable colloid attachment conditions. Nine different colloid diameters, and various flow velocities were examined. The breakthrough curves were successfully simulated with a mathematical model describing colloid transport in homogeneous, water saturated porous media. The results demonstrated that the dispersivity is positively correlated with colloid particle size, and increases with increasing velocity.

  13. Colloidal aspects of texture perception.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Ton; van Aken, George A; de Jongh, Harmen H J; Hamer, Rob J

    2009-08-30

    Recently, considerable attention has been given to the understanding of texture attributes that cannot directly be related to physical properties of food, such as creamy, crumbly and watery. The perception of these attributes is strongly related to the way the food is processed during food intake, mastication, swallowing of it and during the cleaning of the mouth after swallowing. Moreover, their perception is modulated by the interaction with other basic attributes, such as taste and aroma attributes (e.g. sourness and vanilla). To be able to link the composition and structure of food products to more complicated texture attributes, their initial physical/colloid chemical properties and the oral processing of these products must be well understood. Understanding of the processes in the mouth at colloidal length scales turned out to be essential to grasp the interplay between perception, oral physiology and food properties. In view of the huge differences in physical chemical properties between food products, it is practical to make a distinction between solid, semi-solid, and liquid food products. The latter ones are often liquid dispersions of emulsion droplets or particles in general. For liquid food products for instance flow behaviour and colloidal stability of dispersed particles play a main role in determining their textural properties. For most solid products stiffness and fracture behaviour in relation to water content are essential while for semi-solids a much larger range of mechanical properties will play a role. Examples of colloidal aspects of texture perception will be discussed for these three categories of products based on selected sensory attributes and/or relevant colloidal processes. For solid products some main factors determining crispness will be discussed. For crispiness of dry cellular solid products these are water content and the architecture of the product at mesoscopic length scales (20-1000 microm). In addition the distribution of

  14. Statistical Physics of Colloidal Dispersions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canessa, E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis is concerned with the equilibrium statistical mechanics of colloidal dispersions which represent useful model systems for the study of condensed matter physics; namely, charge stabilized colloidal dispersions and polymer stabilized colloidal dispersions. A one-component macroparticle approach is adopted in order to treat the macroscopic and microscopic properties of these systems in a simple and comprehensive manner. The thesis opens with the description of the nature of the colloidal state before reviewing some basic definitions and theory in Chapter II. In Chapter III a variational theory of phase equilibria based on the Gibbs-Bogolyobov inequality is applied to sterically stabilized colloidal dispersions. Hard spheres are chosen as the reference system for the disordered phases while an Einstein model is used for the ordered phases. The new choice of pair potential, taken for mathematical convenience, is a superposition of two Yukawa functions. By matching a double Yukawa potential to the van der Waals attractive potential at different temperatures and introducing a purely temperature dependent coefficient to the repulsive part, a rich variety of observed phase separation phenomena is qualitatively described. The behaviour of the potential is found to be consistent with a small decrease of the polymer layer thickness with increasing temperature. Using the same concept of a collapse transition the non-monotonic second virial coefficient is also explained and quantified. It is shown that a reduction of the effective macroparticle diameter with increasing temperature can only be partially examined from the point of view of a (binary-) polymer solution theory. This chapter concludes with the description of the observed, reversible, depletion flocculation behaviour. This is accomplished by using the variational formalism and by invoking the double Yukawa potential to allow

  15. What happens when pharmaceuticals meet colloids.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals (PCs) have been widely detected in natural environment due to agricultural application of reclaimed water, sludge and animal wastes. Their potential risks to various ecosystems and even to human health have caused great concern; however, little was known about their environmental behaviors. Colloids (such as clays, metal oxides, and particulate organics) are kind of substances that are active and widespread in the environment. When PCs meet colloids, their interaction may influence the fate, transport, and toxicity of PCs. This review summarizes the progress of studies on the role of colloids in mediating the environmental behaviors of PCs. Synthesized results showed that colloids can adsorb PCs mainly through ion exchange, complexation and non-electrostatic interactions. During this process the structure of colloids and the stability of PCs may be changed. The adsorbed PCs may have higher risks to induce antibiotic resistance; besides, their transport may also be altered considering they have great chance to move with colloids. Solution conditions (such as pH, ionic strength, and cations) could influence these interactions between PCs and colloids, as they can change the forms of PCs and alter the primary forces between PCs and colloids in the solution. It could be concluded that PCs in natural soils could bind with colloids and then co-transport during the processes of irrigation, leaching, and erosion. Therefore, colloid-PC interactions need to be understood for risk assessment of PCs and the best management practices of various ecosystems (such as agricultural and wetland systems). PMID:26427370

  16. Preparatiion of metal colloids in inverse micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcoxon, J.P.

    1990-11-23

    A method is provided for preparing catalytic elemental metal colloidal particles (e.g., gold, palladium, silver, rhodium, nickel, iron, platinum, molybdenum) or colloidal alloy particles (silver/iridium or platinum/gold). A homogenous inverse micelle solution of a metal salt is first formed in a metal-salt solvent comprised of a surfactant (e.g. a nonionic or cationic surfactant) and an organic solvent. The size and number of inverse micelles is controlled by the proportions of the surfactant and the solvent. Then, the metal salt is reduced (by chemical reduction or by a pulsed or continuous wave UV laser) to colloidal particles of elemental metal. After their formation, the colloidal metal particles can be stabilized by reaction with materials that permanently add surface stabilizing groups to the surface of the colloidal metal particles. The sizes of the colloidal elemental metal particles and their size distribution is determined by the size and number of the inverse micelles. A second salt can be added with further reduction to form the colloidal alloy particles. After the colloidal elemental metal particles are formed, the homogeneous solution distributes to two phases, one phase rich in colloidal elemental metal particles and the other phase rich in surfactant. The colloidal elemental metal particles from one phase can be dried to form a powder useful as a catalyst.

  17. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Association

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.

    2012-06-18

    Concluding remarks about this paper are: (1) Gravitational settling, zeta potential, and ultrafiltration data indicate the existence of a colloidal phase of both the alpha and beta emitters in the Chancellor water; (2) The low activity combined with high dispersion homogeneity of the Chancellor water indicate that both alpha and beta emitters are not intrinsic colloids; (3) Radionuclides in the Chancellor water, particularly Pu, coexist as dissolved aqueous and sorbed phases - in other words the radionuclides are partitioned between the aqueous phase and the colloidal phase; (4) The presence of Pu as a dissolved species in the aqueous phase, suggests the possibility of Pu in the (V) oxidation state - this conclusion is supported by the similarity of the k{sub d} value of Pu determined in the current study to that determined for Pu(V) sorbed onto smectite colloids, and the similar electrokinetic behavior of the Chancellor water colloids to smectite colloids; (5) About 50% of the Pu(V) is in the aqueous phase and 50% is sorbed on colloids (mass concentration of colloids in the Chancellor water is 0.12 g/L); (6) The k{sub d} of the Pu and the beta emitters (fission products) between aqueous and colloidal phases in the Chancellor water is {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 3} mL/g using two different activity measurement techniques (LSC and alpha spectroscopy); (7) The gravitational settling and size distributions of the association colloids indicate that the properties (at least the physical ones) of the colloids to which the alpha emitters are associated with seem to be different that the properties of the colloids to which the beta emitters are associated with - the beta emitters are associated with very small particles ({approx}50 - 120 nm), while the alpha emitters are associated with relatively larger particles; and (8) The Chancellor water colloids are extremely stable under the natural pH and ionic strength conditions, indicating high potential for transport in the

  18. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  19. Electrokinetic properties of polymer colloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micale, F. J.; Fuenmayor, D. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The surface of polymer colloids, especially polystyrene latexes, were modified for the purpose of controlling the electrokinetic properties of the resulting colloids. Achievement required a knowledge of electrical double layer charging mechanism, as a function of the electrolyte conditions, at the polymer/water interface. The experimental approach is to control the recipe formulation in the emulsion polymerization process so as to systematically vary the strong acid group concentration on the surface of the polymer particles. The electrophoretic mobility of these model particles will then be measured as a function of surface group concentration and as a function of electrolyte concentration and type. An effort was also made to evaluate the electrophoretic mobility of polystyrene latexes made in space and to compare the results with latexes made on the ground.

  20. Predicting crystals of Janus colloids.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Teun; Preisler, Zdenek; Smallenburg, Frank; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Sciortino, Francesco

    2013-04-28

    We present a numerical study on the phase diagram for a simple model of Janus colloids, including ordered and disordered structures. Using a range of techniques, we generate a set of crystal structures and investigate their relative stability field in the pressure-temperature and temperature-density planes by means of free-energy calculations and thermodynamic integration schemes. We find that despite the Janus colloids' simple architecture, they form stable crystal structures with complicated bond-topologies on an underlying face-centered-cubic or hexagonal-close-packed lattice. In addition, we find a phase consisting of wrinkled bilayer sheets, competing with both the fluid and the crystal phases. We detect a metastable gas-liquid coexistence which displays a micellization-driven re-entrant behavior. PMID:23635155

  1. Phases transitions and interfaces in temperature-sensitive colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Schall, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Colloids are widely used because of their exceptional properties. Beside their own applications in food, petrol, cosmetics and drug industries, photonic, optical filters and chemical sensor, they are also known as powerful model systems to study molecular phase behavior. Here, we examine both aspects of colloids using temperature-sensitive colloidal systems to fully investigate colloidal phase behavior and colloidal assembly.

  2. Superconductivity in colloidal lead nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotavin, Pavlo

    Monodisperse colloidal lead nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 4.4 to 20 nm were prepared by a self-limiting growth method. The nanoparticles are protected from oxidation by an amorphous lead-tin oxide shell of 1.5-2 nm thickness. The magnetic susceptibility of the particles was measured as a function of size, temperature and magnetic field. The Meissner effect was observed indicating the superconducting transition. For the 20 and 16 nm particles, the critical temperature is suppressed to 6.9 K from the bulk value of 7.2 K and is further reduced for smaller particles. Depending on the size of the particles, the critical field is enhanced by 60 to 140 times. The coupling between particles was in situ controlled through the conversion of the oxides present on the surface of the nanoparticles to chalcogenides. This transformation allows for a 109-fold increase in the conductivity. The temperature of the onset of the superconductivity was found to depend upon the degree of coupling of the nanoparticles in the vicinity of the insulator - superconductor transition. The critical current density of the best sample of Pb/PbSe nanocrystals at zero magnetic field was determined to be 4 x 103 A/cm 2. In turn, the critical field of the sample shows 50-fold enhancement compared to bulk Pb. A method to convert the original Pb/PbO nanocrystals into colloidal Pb/PbS (Se, Te) particle was developed. This alleviates the necessity of chemical post processing and provides a truly colloidal superconductor. Paramagnetic Meissner effect of abnormally large amplitude is observed for Pb/PbTe nanocrystal assemblies. The material described in this manuscript is the first nanostructured superconductor prepared by the bottom-up approach starting from colloidal nanoparticles.

  3. Linear viscoelasticity of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichocki, B.; Felderhof, B. U.

    1992-12-01

    We develop a phenomenological theory of the dynamic viscosity of colloidal suspensions, based on an extrapolation of the low-frequency behavior by use of a continued-fraction representation. In lowest approximation the dynamic viscosity depends on a small number of parameters, which may be determined experimentally. For semidilute suspensions the parameters may be found by theoretical calculation. The theory is tested by comparison with an exactly soluble model.

  4. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, J. L.

    1990-05-01

    A method for constructing a solid colloidal optical wavelength filter is discussed. The device was developed to filter optical wavelengths for spectroscopy, protection from intense radiation, monochromatizing, and analyzing optical radiation. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium (such as setting plastic); agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  5. Colloidal assembly by ice templating.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, Guruswamy; Biswas, Bipul; Choudhury, Chandan Kumar

    2016-04-12

    We investigate ice templating of aqueous dispersions of polymer coated colloids and crosslinkers, at particle concentrations far below that required to form percolated monoliths. Freezing the aqueous dispersions forces the particles into close proximity to form clusters, that are held together as the polymer chains coating the particles are crosslinked. We observe that, with an increase in the particle concentration from about 10(6) to 10(8) particles per ml, there is a transition from isolated single particles to increasingly larger clusters. In this concentration range, most of the colloidal clusters formed are linear or sheet like particle aggregates. Remarkably, the cluster size distribution for clusters smaller than about 30 particles, as well as the size distribution of linear clusters, is only weakly dependent on the dispersion concentration in the range that we investigate. We demonstrate that the main features of cluster formation are captured by kinetic simulations that do not consider hydrodynamics or instabilities at the growing ice front due to particle concentration gradients. Thus, clustering of colloidal particles by ice templating dilute dispersions appears to be governed only by particle exclusion by the growing ice crystals that leads to their accumulation at ice crystal boundaries. PMID:26780838

  6. Colloidal thermoresponsive gel forming hybrids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruixue; Tirelli, Nicola; Cellesi, Francesco; Saunders, Brian R

    2010-09-15

    Colloidal hybrids comprise organic and inorganic components and are attracting considerable attention in the literature. Recently, we reported hybrid anisotropic microsheets that formed thermoresponsive gels in polymer solutions [Liu et al., Langmuir, 25, 490, 2009]. Here, we investigate the composition and properties of these hybrid colloids themselves in detail for the first time. Three different cationic PNIPAm (N-isopropylacrylamide) graft copolymers and two inorganic nanoparticle types (laponite and Ludox silica) were used to prepare a range of hybrids. Anisotropic microsheets only formed when laponite particles were added to the copolymer implying directed self-assembly. Aqueous dispersions of the microsheets spontaneously formed gels at room temperature and these gels were thermoresponsive. They represent a new class of gel forming colloid and are termed thermoresponsive gel forming hybrids. The compositions of the hybrids were determined from thermogravimetric analysis and those that gave gel forming behaviour identified. Variable-temperature rheology experiments showed that the elasticity of the gels increased linearly with temperature. The reversibility of the thermally-triggered changes in gel elasticity was investigated. The concentration dependence of the rheology data was well described by elastic percolation scaling theory and the data could be collapsed onto a master curve. The concentration exponent for the elastic modulus was 2.5. The strong attractive interactions that exist between the dispersed gel forming hybrids was demonstrated by the formation of stable thermoresponsive hybrid hydrogels through casting of hybrid dispersions. PMID:20561633

  7. Crystallization of DNA-coated colloids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Yodh, Jeremy S.; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-coated colloids hold great promise for self-assembly of programmed heterogeneous microstructures, provided they not only bind when cooled below their melting temperature, but also rearrange so that aggregated particles can anneal into the structure that minimizes the free energy. Unfortunately, DNA-coated colloids generally collide and stick forming kinetically arrested random aggregates when the thickness of the DNA coating is much smaller than the particles. Here we report DNA-coated colloids that can rearrange and anneal, thus enabling the growth of large colloidal crystals from a wide range of micrometre-sized DNA-coated colloids for the first time. The kinetics of aggregation, crystallization and defect formation are followed in real time. The crystallization rate exhibits the familiar maximum for intermediate temperature quenches observed in metallic alloys, but over a temperature range smaller by two orders of magnitude, owing to the highly temperature-sensitive diffusion between aggregated DNA-coated colloids. PMID:26078020

  8. Crystallization of DNA-coated colloids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Yodh, Jeremy S; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J

    2015-01-01

    DNA-coated colloids hold great promise for self-assembly of programmed heterogeneous microstructures, provided they not only bind when cooled below their melting temperature, but also rearrange so that aggregated particles can anneal into the structure that minimizes the free energy. Unfortunately, DNA-coated colloids generally collide and stick forming kinetically arrested random aggregates when the thickness of the DNA coating is much smaller than the particles. Here we report DNA-coated colloids that can rearrange and anneal, thus enabling the growth of large colloidal crystals from a wide range of micrometre-sized DNA-coated colloids for the first time. The kinetics of aggregation, crystallization and defect formation are followed in real time. The crystallization rate exhibits the familiar maximum for intermediate temperature quenches observed in metallic alloys, but over a temperature range smaller by two orders of magnitude, owing to the highly temperature-sensitive diffusion between aggregated DNA-coated colloids. PMID:26078020

  9. Binodal Colloidal Aggregation Test - 4: Polydispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaikin, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Binodal Colloidal Aggregation Test - 4: Polydispersion (BCAT-4-Poly) will use model hard-spheres to explore seeded colloidal crystal nucleation and the effects of polydispersity, providing insight into how nature brings order out of disorder. Crewmembers photograph samples of polymer and colloidal particles (tiny nanoscale spheres suspended in liquid) that model liquid/gas phase changes. Results will help scientists develop fundamental physics concepts previously cloaked by the effects of gravity.

  10. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test Conducted on Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Monica I.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1999-01-01

    Colloids are tiny (submicron) particles suspended in fluid. Paint, ink, and milk are examples of colloids found in everyday life. The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test (BCAT) is part of an extensive series of experiments planned to investigate the fundamental properties of colloids so that scientists can make colloids more useful for technological applications. Some of the colloids studied in BCAT are made of two different sized particles (binary colloidal alloys) that are very tiny, uniform plastic spheres. Under the proper conditions, these colloids can arrange themselves in a pattern to form crystals. These crystals may form the basis of new classes of light switches, displays, and optical devices. Windows made of liquid crystals are already in the marketplace. These windows change their appearance from transparent to opaque when a weak electric current is applied. In the future, if the colloidal crystals can be made to control the passage of light through them, such products could be made much more cheaply. These experiments require the microgravity environment of space because good quality crystals are difficult to produce on Earth because of sedimentation and convection in the fluid. The BCAT experiment hardware included two separate modules for two different experiments. The "Slow Growth" hardware consisted of a 35-mm camera with a 250- exposure photo film cartridge. The camera was aimed toward the sample module, which contained 10 separate colloid samples. A rack of small lights provided backlighting for the photographs. The BCAT hardware was launched on the shuttle and was operated aboard the Russian space station Mir by American astronauts John Blaha and David Wolf (launched September 1996 and returned January 1997; reflown September 1997 and returned January 1998). To begin the experiment, one of these astronauts would mix the samples to disperse the colloidal particles and break up any crystals that might have already formed. Once the samples were mixed and

  11. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  12. Collective motion in populations of colloidal bots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Denis

    One of the origins of active matter physics was the idea that flocks, herds, swarms and shoals could be quantitatively described as emergent ordered phases in self-driven materials. From a somehow dual perspective, I will show how to engineer active materials our of colloidal flocks. I will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors and how to handle them in microfluidic chips. These populations of colloidal bots display a non-equilibrium transition toward collective motion. A special attention will be paid to the robustness of the resulting colloidal flocks with respect to geometrical frustration and to quenched disorder.

  13. Nonequilibrium forces between dragged ultrasoft colloids.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sunil P; Winkler, Roland G; Gompper, Gerhard

    2011-10-01

    The dynamical deformation of ultrasoft colloids as well as their dynamic frictional forces are numerically investigated, when one colloid is dragged past another at constant velocity. Hydrodynamic interactions are captured by a particle-based mesoscopic simulation method. At vanishing relative velocity, the equilibrium repulsive force-distance curve is obtained. At large drag velocities, in contrast, we find an apparent attractive force for departing colloids along the dragging direction. The deformation, in the close encounter of colloids, and the energy dissipation are examined as a function of the drag velocity and their separation. PMID:22107322

  14. Colloid Coalescence with Focused X Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Kim, J. T.; Je, J. H.; Yi, J. M.; Wang, S.; Lee, W.-K.

    2011-07-01

    We show direct evidence that focused x rays enable us to merge polymer colloidal particles at room temperature. This phenomenon is ascribed to the photochemical scission of colloids with x rays, reducing the molecular weight, glass transition temperature, surface tension, and viscosity of colloids. The observation of the neck bridge growth with time shows that the x-ray-induced colloid coalescence is analogous to viscoelastic coalescence. This finding suggests a feasible protocol of photonic nanofabrication by sintering or welding of polymers, without thermal damage, using x-ray photonics.

  15. Aggregation kinetics in a model colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S

    2005-08-08

    The authors present molecular dynamics simulations of aggregation kinetics in a colloidal suspension modeled as a highly asymmetric binary mixture. Starting from a configuration with largely uncorrelated colloidal particles the system relaxes by coagulation-fragmentation dynamics to a structured state of low-dimensionality clusters with an exponential size distribution. The results show that short range repulsive interactions alone can give rise to so-called cluster phases. For the present model and probably other, more common colloids, the observed clusters appear to be equilibrium phase fluctuations induced by the entropic inter-colloidal attractions.

  16. Colloid Titration--A Rapid Method for the Determination of Charged Colloid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ueno, Keihei; Kina, Ken'yu

    1985-01-01

    "Colloid titration" is a volumetric method for determining charged polyelectrolytes in aqueous solutions. The principle of colloid titration, reagents used in the procedure, methods of endpoint detection, preparation of reagent solutions, general procedure used, results obtained, and pH profile of colloid titration are considered. (JN)

  17. SIGNIFICANCE OF STRAINING IN COLLOID DEPOSITION: EVIDENCE AND IMPLICATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Filtration theory is often used to characterize colloid attachment when deposition is controlled by chemical interactions between colloids and grain surfaces. Over the past decade considerable research suggests that colloid deposition is frequently not consistent with filtration theory predictions u...

  18. Analysis of colloid and tracer breakthrough curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindrod, Peter; Edwards, Mark S.; Higgo, Jenny J. W.; Williams, Geoffrey M.

    1996-02-01

    We consider the dispersion and elution of colloids and dissolved nonsorbing tracers within saturated heterogeneous porous media. Since flow path geometry in natural systems is often ill-characterized macroscopic (mean) flow rates and dispersion tensors are utilized in order to account for the sub-model scale microscopic fluctuations in media structure (and the consequent hydrodynamic profile). Even for tracer migration and dispersal this issue is far from settled. Here we consider how colloid and tracer migration phenomena can be treated consistently. Theoretical calculations for model flow geometries yield two quantitative predictions for the transport of free (not yet captured) colloids with reference to a non-sorbing dissolved tracer within the same medium: the average migration velocity of the free colloids is higher than that of the tracer; and that the ratio of the equivalent hydrodynamic dispersion rates of colloids and tracer is dependent only upon properties of the colloids and the porous medium, it is independent of pathlengths and fluid flux, once length scales are large enough. The first of these is well known, since even in simple flow paths free colloids must stay more centre stream. The second, if validated suggests how solute and colloid dispersion may be dealt with consistently in macroscopic migration models. This is crucial since dispersion is usually ill-characterized and unaddressed by the experimental literature. In this paper we present evidence based upon an existing Drigg field injection test for the validity of these predictions. We show that starting from experimental data the fitted dispersion rates of both colloids and non-sorbing tracers increase with the measured elution rates (obeying slightly different rules for tracers and colloids); and that the ratio of colloid and nonsorbing tracer elution rates, and the ratio of colloid and nonsorbing tracer dispersion rates may be dependent upon properties of the colloids and the medium (not

  19. Structural color from colloidal glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkiriadou, Sofia

    When a material has inhomogeneities at a lengthscale comparable to the wavelength of light, interference can give rise to structural colors: colors that originate from the interaction of the material's microstructure with light and do not require absorbing dyes. In this thesis we study a class of these materials, called photonic glasses, where the inhomogeneities form a dense and random arrangement. Photonic glasses have angle-independent structural colors that look like those of conventional dyes. However, when this work started, there was only a handful of colors accessible with photonic glasses, mostly hues of blue. We use various types of colloidal particles to make photonic glasses, and we study, both theoretically and experimentally, how the optical properties of these glasses relate to their structure and constituent particles. Based on our observations from glasses of conventional particles, we construct a theoretical model that explains the scarcity of yellow, orange, and red photonic glasses. Guided by this model, we develop novel colloidal systems that allow a higher degree of control over structural color. We assemble glasses of soft, core-shell particles with scattering cores and transparent shells, where the resonant wavelength can be tuned independently of the reflectivity. We then encapsulate glasses of these core-shell particles into emulsion droplets of tunable size; in this system, we observe, for the first time, angle-independent structural colors that cover the entire visible spectrum. To enhance color saturation, we begin experimenting with inverse glasses, where the refractive index of the particles is lower than the refractive index of the medium, with promising results. Finally, based on our theoretical model for scattering from colloidal glasses, we begin an exploration of the color gamut that could be achieved with this technique, and we find that photonic glasses are a promising approach to a new type of long-lasting, non-toxic, and

  20. Highly uniform polyhedral colloids formed by colloidal crystal templating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifan; McGinley, James; Crocker, John; Crocker Research Group Team

    2015-03-01

    We seek to create polyhedral solid particles by trapping oil droplets in a colloidal crystal, and polymerizing them in situ, resulting in polyhedral particles containing spherical dimples in an ordered arrangement. Specifically, highly monodisperse, micron-sized droplets of 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (TPM) were first prepared through a poly condensation reaction, following well established methods. The droplets were mixed with an excess of polystyrene(PS) particles (diameter in 2.58 μm), which formed close packed (FCC or HCP) colloidal crystals by natural sedimentation and compression under partial drying to an extent, with TPM oil droplets trapped into their tetrahedral and octahedral interstitial sites and wet PS particles. Depending on the initial particle volume fraction and extent of drying, a high yield of dimpled particles having different shapes including tetrahedra and cubes were obtained after oil initiated polymerization and dissolution of the host PS particles, as seen under SEM. The effects of TPM to PS particles size ratio, drying time, and other factors in relation to the yield of tetrahedral and cubic dimpled particles will be presented. Finally, fractionation techniques were used to obtain suspensions of uniform polyhedral particles of high purity.

  1. Active colloids at fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Malgaretti, P; Popescu, M N; Dietrich, S

    2016-05-01

    If an active Janus particle is trapped at the interface between a liquid and a fluid, its self-propelled motion along the interface is affected by a net torque on the particle due to the viscosity contrast between the two adjacent fluid phases. For a simple model of an active, spherical Janus colloid we analyze the conditions under which translation occurs along the interface and we provide estimates of the corresponding persistence length. We show that under certain conditions the persistence length of such a particle is significantly larger than the corresponding one in the bulk liquid, which is in line with the trends observed in recent experimental studies. PMID:27025167

  2. Colloidal entanglement in highly twisted chiral nematic colloids: twisted loops, Hopf links, and trefoil knots.

    PubMed

    Jampani, V S R; Škarabot, M; Ravnik, M; Čopar, S; Žumer, S; Muševič, I

    2011-09-01

    The topology and geometry of closed defect loops is studied in chiral nematic colloids with variable chirality. The colloidal particles with perpendicular surface anchoring of liquid crystalline molecules are inserted in a twisted nematic cell with the thickness that is only slightly larger than the diameter of the colloidal particle. The total twist of the chiral nematic structure in cells with parallel boundary conditions is set to 0, π, 2π, and 3π, respectively. We use the laser tweezers to discern the number and the topology of the -1/2 defect loops entangling colloidal particles. For a single colloidal particle, we observe that a single defect loop is winding around the particle, with the winding pattern being more complex in cells with higher total twist. We observe that colloidal dimers and colloidal clusters are always entangled by one or several -1/2 defect loops. For colloidal pairs in π-twisted cells, we identify at least 17 different entangled structures, some of them exhibiting linked defect loops-Hopf link. Colloidal entanglement is even richer with a higher number of colloidal particles, where we observe not only linked, but also colloidal clusters knotted into the trefoil knot. The experiments are in good agreement with numerical modeling using Landau-de Gennes theory coupled with geometrical and topological considerations using the method of tetrahedral rotation. PMID:22060386

  3. Colloidal Electrolytes and the Critical Micelle Concentration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, L. G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes methods for determining the Critical Micelle Concentration of Colloidal Electrolytes; methods described are: (1) methods based on Colligative Properties, (2) methods based on the Electrical Conductivity of Colloidal Electrolytic Solutions, (3) Dye Method, (4) Dye Solubilization Method, and (5) Surface Tension Method. (BR)

  4. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the incre...

  5. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Aspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaikin, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Aspheres (BCAT-5-Aspheres) experiment photographs initially randomized colloidal samples (tiny nanoscale spheres suspended in liquid) in microgravity to determine their resulting structure over time. BCAT-5-Aspheres will study the properties of concentrated systems of small particles when they are identical, but not spherical in microgravity..

  6. Shaping Colloids for Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacanna, Stefano; Yi, Gi-Ra; Pine, David

    2013-03-01

    The creation of a new material often starts from the design of its constituent building blocks at a smaller scale. From macromolecules to colloidal architectures, to granular systems, the interactions between basic units of matter can dictate the macroscopic behavior of the resulting engineered material and even regulate its genesis. Information can be imparted to the building units by altering their physical and chemical properties. In particular, the shape of building blocks plays a fundamental role at the colloidal scale, as it can govern the self-organization of particles into hierarchical structures and ultimately into the desired material. Herein we report a simple and general approach to generate an entire zoo of new anisotropic colloids. Our method is based on a controlled deformation of multiphase colloidal particles that can be selectively liquified, polymerized, dissolved and functionalized in bulk. We further demonstrate control over the particle functionalization and coating by realizing patchy and Janus colloids.

  7. Shaping colloids for self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacanna, Stefano; Korpics, Mark; Rodriguez, Kelvin; Colón-Meléndez, Laura; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Pine, David J.; Yi, Gi-Ra

    2013-04-01

    The creation of a new material often starts from the design of its constituent building blocks at a smaller scale. From macromolecules to colloidal architectures, to granular systems, the interactions between basic units of matter can dictate the macroscopic behaviour of the resulting engineered material and even regulate its genesis. Information can be imparted to the building units by altering their physical and chemical properties. In particular, the shape of building blocks has a fundamental role at the colloidal scale, as it can govern the self-organization of particles into hierarchical structures and ultimately into the desired material. Herein we report a simple and general approach to generate an entire zoo of new anisotropic colloids. Our method is based on a controlled deformation of multiphase colloidal particles that can be selectively liquified, polymerized, dissolved and functionalized in bulk. We further demonstrate control over the particle functionalization and coating by realizing patchy and Janus colloids.

  8. Stability of Ionic Colloidal Crystals (ICCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskaly, Garry R.; Garcia, R. Edwin; Carter, W. Craig; Chiang, Yet-Ming

    2003-03-01

    Ionic colloidal crystals (ICCs) are here defined as ordered multicomponent colloids formed by attractive electrostatic interactions. Compared to previous approaches to colloidal crystallization, the ICC approach holds the potential for self-assembly of a wide range of structures not easily accessible by other methods. In this work, the colloid-chemical conditions under which ICCs are stable have been theoretically analyzed. A model is presented in which two dimensionless parameters are found to fully characterize an ICC system. We calculate the Madelung constant for ICCs of several classical ionic crystal structures as a function of these two parameters, and discuss the parallels between the ICC Madelung constants and the classical ionic case. Experimentally accessible regions of surface charge, particle sizes, salt concentration, and temperature where ionic colloidal crystallization should be possible are identified.

  9. Les aspects psychosociaux de l’obésité chez les enfants et les adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, Peter; LeBlanc, Claire MA

    2012-01-01

    RÉSUMÉ En plus de donner des conseils aux familles au sujet de l’activité physique régulière et d’une saine alimentation, les cliniciens doivent déterminer les facteurs psychosociaux qui contribuent à l’obésité des enfants ou des adolescents et les aider à y faire face. Les personnes touchées peuvent souffrir de dépression, de mauvaise estime de soi, d’intimidation et de préjugés liés au poids, qui sont tous des expériences qui peuvent compliquer l’obtention des résultats de santé souhaités. Les cliniciens devraient tenter de déterminer les facteurs stressants sous-jacents et s’assurer de la mise en œuvre de conseils pertinents.

  10. Synthesis of substantially monodispersed colloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klabunde, Kenneth J. (Inventor); Stoeva, Savka (Inventor); Sorensen, Christopher (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of forming ligated nanoparticles of the formula Y(Z).sub.x where Y is a nanoparticle selected from the group consisting of elemental metals having atomic numbers ranging from 21-34, 39-52, 57-83 and 89-102, all inclusive, the halides, oxides and sulfides of such metals, and the alkali metal and alkaline earth metal halides, and Z represents ligand moieties such as the alkyl thiols. In the method, a first colloidal dispersion is formed made up of nanoparticles solvated in a molar excess of a first solvent (preferably a ketone such as acetone), a second solvent different than the first solvent (preferably an organic aryl solvent such as toluene) and a quantity of ligand moieties; the first solvent is then removed under vacuum and the ligand moieties ligate to the nanoparticles to give a second colloidal dispersion of the ligated nanoparticles solvated in the second solvent. If substantially monodispersed nanoparticles are desired, the second dispersion is subjected to a digestive ripening process. Upon drying, the ligated nanoparticles may form a three-dimensional superlattice structure.

  11. Cocklebur-shaped colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Lestage, David J; Urban, Marek W

    2005-11-01

    Unique cocklebur-shaped colloidal dispersions were prepared using a combination of a nanoextruder applied to the aqueous solution containing methyl methacrylate (MMA) and n-butyl acrylate (n-BA) with azo-bis-isobutyronitrile (AIBN) or potassium persulfate (KPS) initiators and stabilized by a mixture of sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (SDOSS) and 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DCPC) phospholipid. Upon extrusion and heating to 75 degrees C, methyl methacrylate/n-butyl acrylate (MMA/nBA) colloidal particles containing tubules pointing outward were obtained as a result of DCPC phospholipids present at the particle surfaces. The same cocklebur-shaped particles were obtained when classical polymerization was used without a nanoextruder under similar compositional and thermal conditions, giving a particle size of 159 nm. However, when Ca(2+) ions are present during polymerization, cocklebur morphologies are disrupted. Because DCPC tubules undergo a transition at 38 degrees C, such cocklebur morphologies may offer numerous opportunities for devices with stimuli-responsive characteristics. PMID:16262269

  12. Kinetically guided colloidal structure formation

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Fabian M.; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2016-01-01

    The self-organization of colloidal particles is a promising approach to create novel structures and materials, with applications spanning from smart materials to optoelectronics to quantum computation. However, designing and producing mesoscale-sized structures remains a major challenge because at length scales of 10–100 μm equilibration times already become prohibitively long. Here, we extend the principle of rapid diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) to a multicomponent system of spherical colloidal particles to enable the rational design and production of finite-sized anisotropic structures on the mesoscale. In stark contrast to equilibrium self-assembly techniques, kinetic traps are not avoided but exploited to control and guide mesoscopic structure formation. To this end the affinities, size, and stoichiometry of up to five different types of DNA-coated microspheres are adjusted to kinetically control a higher-order hierarchical aggregation process in time. We show that the aggregation process can be fully rationalized by considering an extended analytical DLCA model, allowing us to produce mesoscopic structures of up to 26 µm in diameter. This scale-free approach can easily be extended to any multicomponent system that allows for multiple orthogonal interactions, thus yielding a high potential of facilitating novel materials with tailored plasmonic excitation bands, scattering, biochemical, or mechanical behavior. PMID:27444018

  13. Nonlinear rheology of colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Brader, J M

    2010-09-15

    Colloidal dispersions are commonly encountered in everyday life and represent an important class of complex fluid. Of particular significance for many commercial products and industrial processes is the ability to control and manipulate the macroscopic flow response of a dispersion by tuning the microscopic interactions between the constituents. An important step towards attaining this goal is the development of robust theoretical methods for predicting from first-principles the rheology and nonequilibrium microstructure of well defined model systems subject to external flow. In this review we give an overview of some promising theoretical approaches and the phenomena they seek to describe, focusing, for simplicity, on systems for which the colloidal particles interact via strongly repulsive, spherically symmetric interactions. In presenting the various theories, we will consider first low volume fraction systems, for which a number of exact results may be derived, before moving on to consider the intermediate and high volume fraction states which present both the most interesting physics and the most demanding technical challenges. In the high volume fraction regime particular emphasis will be given to the rheology of dynamically arrested states. PMID:21386516

  14. Colloid-Associated Radionuclide Concentration Limits: ANL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Mertz

    2000-12-21

    The purpose and scope of this report is to describe the analysis of available colloidal data from waste form corrosion tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to extract characteristics of these colloids that can be used in modeling their contribution to the source term for sparingly soluble radioelements (e.g., Pu). Specifically, the focus is on developing a useful description of the following waste form colloid characteristics: (1) composition, (2) size distribution, and (3) quantification of the rate of waste form colloid generation. The composition and size distribution information are intended to support analysis of the potential transport of the sparingly soluble radionuclides associated with the waste form colloids. The rate of colloid generation is intended to support analysis of the waste form colloid-associated radionuclide concentrations. In addressing the above characteristics, available data are interpreted to address mechanisms controlling colloid formation and stability. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000). Because the end objective is to support the source term modeling we have organized the conclusions into two categories: (1) data analysis conclusions and (2) recommendations for colloid source term modeling. The second category is included to facilitate use of the conclusions from the data analysis in the abstraction of a colloid source term model. The data analyses and conclusions that are presented in this report are based on small-scale laboratory tests conducted on a limited number of waste glass compositions and spent fuel types.

  15. Plutonium and Cesium Colloid Mediated Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhalfa, H.; Dittrich, T.; Reimus, P. W.; Ware, D.; Erdmann, B.; Wasserman, N. L.; Abdel-Fattah, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Plutonium and cesium have been released to the environment at many different locations worldwide and are present in spent fuel at significant levels. Accurate understanding of the mechanisms that control their fate and transport in the environment is important for the management of contaminated sites, for forensic applications, and for the development of robust repositories for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. Plutonium, which can be present in the environment in multiple oxidations states and various chemical forms including amorphous oxy(hydr)oxide phases, adsorbs/adheres very strongly to geological materials and is usually immobile in all its chemical forms. However, when associated with natural colloids, it has the potential to migrate significant distances from its point of release. Like plutonium, cesium is not very mobile and tends to remain adhered to geological materials near its release point, although its transport can be enhanced by natural colloids. However, the reactivity of plutonium and cesium are very different, so their colloid-mediated transport might be significantly different in subsurface environments. In this study, we performed controlled experiments in two identically-prepared columns; one dedicated to Pu and natural colloid transport experiments, and the other to Cs and colloid experiments. Multiple flow-through experiments were conducted in each column, with the effluent solutions being collected and re-injected into the same column two times to examine the persistence and scaling behavior of the natural colloids, Pu and Cs. The data show that that a significant fraction of colloids were retained in the first elution through each column, but the eluted colloids collected from the first run transported almost conservatively in subsequent runs. Plutonium transport tracked natural colloids in the first run but deviated from the transport of natural colloids in the second and third runs. Cesium transport tracked natural

  16. Colloid Transport in Saturated Porous Media: Elimination of Attachment Efficiency in a New Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    Landkamer, Lee L.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2013-05-11

    A new colloid transport model is introduced that is conceptually simple but captures the essential features of complicated attachment and detachment behavior of colloids when conditions of secondary minimum attachment exist. This model eliminates the empirical concept of collision efficiency; the attachment rate is computed directly from colloid filtration theory. Also, a new paradigm for colloid detachment based on colloid population heterogeneity is introduced. Assuming the dispersion coefficient can be estimated from tracer behavior, this model has only two fitting parameters: (1) the fraction of colloids that attach irreversibly and (2) the rate at which reversibly attached colloids leave the surface. These two parameters were correlated to physical parameters that control colloid transport such as the depth of the secondary minimum and pore water velocity. Given this correlation, the model serves as a heuristic tool for exploring the influence of physical parameters such as surface potential and fluid velocity on colloid transport. This model can be extended to heterogeneous systems characterized by both primary and secondary minimum deposition by simply increasing the fraction of colloids that attach irreversibly.

  17. Polymer-Induced Depletion Interaction and Its Effect on Colloidal Sedimentation in Colloid-Polymer Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Penger

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the polymer-induced depletion attraction and its effect on colloidal sedimentation in colloid-polymer mixtures. We first report a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of the depletion effect in a mixture of hard-sphere-like colloid and non-adsorbing polymer. Then we present results of our recent sedimentation measurements in the same colloid-polymer mixture. A key parameter in controlling the sedimentation of heavy colloidal particles is the interparticle potential U(tau), which is the work required to bring two colloidal particles from infinity to a distance tau under a give solvent condition. This potential is known to affect the average settling velocity of the particles and experimentally one needs to have a way to continuously vary U(tau) in order to test the theory. The interaction potential U(tau) can be altered by adding polymer molecules into the colloidal suspension. In a mixture of colloid and non-adsorbing polymer, the potential U(tau) can develop an attractive well because of the depletion effect, in that the polymer chains are expelled from the region between two colloidal particles when their surface separation becomes smaller than the size of the polymer chains. The exclusion of polymer molecules from the space between the colloidal particles leads to an unbalanced osmotic pressure difference pushing the colloidal particles together, which results in an effective attraction between the two colloidal particles. The polymer-induced depletion attraction controls the phase stability of many colloid-polymer mixtures, which are directly of interest to industry.

  18. Structural evolution of Colloidal Gels under Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao; Jamali, Safa

    Colloidal suspensions are ubiquitous in different industrial applications ranging from cosmetic and food industries to soft robotics and aerospace. Owing to the fact that mechanical properties of colloidal gels are controlled by its microstructure and network topology, we trace the particles in the networks formed under different attraction potentials and try to find a universal behavior in yielding of colloidal gels. Many authors have implemented different simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and Brownian dynamics (BD) to capture better picture during phase separation and yielding mechanism in colloidal system with short-ranged attractive force. However, BD neglects multi-body hydrodynamic interactions (HI) which are believed to be responsible for the second yielding of colloidal gels. We envision using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) with modified depletion potential and hydrodynamic interactions, as a coarse-grain model, can provide a robust simulation package to address the gel formation process and yielding in short ranged-attractive colloidal systems. The behavior of colloidal gels with different attraction potentials under flow is examined and structural fingerprints of yielding in these systems will be discussed.

  19. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  20. Interactions between radioactively labeled colloids and natural particles: Evidence for colloidal pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Liang-Saw; Santschi, Peter H.; Tang, Degui

    1997-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that colloidal forms of trace metals can be reactive intermediaries in the scavenging processes leading to the removal of their particulate forms. A series of radiotracer experiments using natural colloidal organic matter from Galveston Bay, USA were carried out in order to test this hypothesis. Suspended particle uptake of originally colloidally bound trace metals occurred in a matter of hours to days in estuarine waters. After ten days, the majority (>50%) of the colloidal trace metals had been transferred into the particulate phase (≥0.45 μm), except for 65Zn. Two distinctively different temporal regions of removal of colloidal trace metals were identified: a faster reaction during the first four hours, followed by a slower reaction after approximately one day. In a separate river water-seawater mixing experiment, the solid/solution partitioning of the radiotracers was investigated in the absence of suspended matter. About 30% of most of the elements, except Ag and Fe (˜60%), were associated with a newly formed particulate phase after eight days. There were two major trends: (1) the particulate fraction of 59Fe and 110Ag increased while the colloidal fraction decreased, suggesting a colloidal pumping mechanism. (2) The particulate fraction of 54Mn, 133Ba, 65Zn, 109Cd, 113Sn, and 60CO increased while the LMW (≤ 1 kDa) fraction decreased, suggesting a direct uptake into the particulate fraction with less involvement of a transitory colloidal phase. The values of the particle-water ( Kd) and colloid-water partitioning ( Kc) coefficients for most trace metals were similar to those observed in Galveston Bay waters, suggesting complementary results to field studies. The results from these experiments suggested two different pathways for colloidal tracer uptake by particles: (1) colloidal pumping of a major component (e.g., biopolymer) of the colloidal pool and (2) coagulation of trace components (e.g., phytochelatins) with varying

  1. Assembly of open clusters of colloidal dumbbells via droplet evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham Van, Hai; Fortini, Andrea; Schmidt, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the behavior of a mixture of asymmetric colloidal dumbbells and emulsion droplets by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The evaporation of the droplets and the competition between droplet-colloid attraction and colloid-colloid interactions lead to the formation of clusters built up of colloid aggregates with both closed and open structures. We find that stable packings and hence complex colloidal structures can be obtained by changing the relative size of the colloidal spheres and/or their interfacial tension with the droplets.

  2. Colloidal QDs-polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, H.; Suárez, I.; Rodríguez-Cantó, P.; Abargues, R.; García-Calzada, R.; Chyrvony, V.; Albert, S.; Martínez-Pastor, J.

    2012-04-01

    Nanometer-size colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, or Quantum Dots (NQD), are very prospective active centers because their light emission is highly efficient and temperature-independent. Nanocomposites based on the incorporation of QDs inside a polymer matrix are very promising materials for application in future photonic devices because they combine the properties of QDs with the technological feasibility of polymers. In the present work some basic applications of these new materials have been studied. Firstly, the fabrication of planar and linear waveguides based on the incorporation of CdS, CdSe and CdTe in PMMA and SU-8 are demonstrated. As a result, photoluminescence (PL) of the QDs are coupled to a waveguide mode, being it able to obtain multicolor waveguiding. Secondly, nanocomposite films have been evaluated as photon energy down-shifting converters to improve the efficiency of solar cells.

  3. Colloidal Synthesis of Gold Semishells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Denis; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a novel and scalable colloid chemistry strategy to fabricate gold semishells based on the selective growth of gold on Janus silica particles (500 nm in diameter) partly functionalized with amino groups. The modulation of the geometry of the Janus silica particles allows us to tune the final morphology of the gold semishells. This method also provides a route to fabricating hollow gold semishells through etching of the silica cores with hydrofluoric acid. The optical properties were characterized by visible near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy and compared with simulations performed using the boundary element method (BEM). These revealed that the main optical features are located beyond the NIR region because of the large core size. PMID:24551496

  4. Colloids at NAPL-Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Thomas; Metz, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids in subsurface are relevant in the scope of contaminated sites as well as for enhanced oil recovery. In both cases colloids and engineered nanoparticles are applied to increase the efficiency of NAPL removal. Particle tracking experiments using fluoresecent latex beads and opaque particles have been run in micromodels mimicking the pore structure of subsurface media. The results show that the interface between NAPL and water is highly dynamic, especially in its early stage. There is a distinct circular flow pattern at the interface, effectively increasing the interfacial area. Concentration gradients measured with Raman Microspectrometry at low Peclet numbers suggest that the mass transfer of dissolved contaminants from the NAPL into the water is highly affected by the interface dynamics. On the other hand the interfaces themselves are less accessible, which has implications for the remediation of contaminated sites.

  5. Three-dimensional ultrasonic colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2016-05-01

    Colloidal assembly represents a powerful method for the fabrication of functional materials. In this article, we describe how acoustic radiation forces can guide the assembly of colloidal particles into structures that serve as microscopic elements in novel acoustic metadevices or act as phononic crystals. Using a simple three-dimensional orthogonal system, we show that a diversity of colloidal structures with orthorhombic symmetry can be assembled with megahertz-frequency (MHz) standing pressure waves. These structures allow rapid tuning of acoustic properties and provide a new platform for dynamic metamaterial applications. xml:lang="fr"

  6. Transport in charged colloids driven by thermoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Würger, Alois

    2008-09-01

    We study the thermal diffusion coefficient D{T} of a charged colloid in a temperature gradient, and find that it is to a large extent determined by the thermoelectric response of the electrolyte solution. The thermally induced salinity gradient leads in general to a strong increase with temperature. The difference of the heat of transport of coions and counterions gives rise to a thermoelectric field that drives the colloid to the cold or to the warm, depending on the sign of its charge. Our results provide an explanation for recent experimental findings on thermophoresis in colloidal suspensions. PMID:18851262

  7. A colloidal quantum dot spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jie; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2015-07-01

    Spectroscopy is carried out in almost every field of science, whenever light interacts with matter. Although sophisticated instruments with impressive performance characteristics are available, much effort continues to be invested in the development of miniaturized, cheap and easy-to-use systems. Current microspectrometer designs mostly use interference filters and interferometric optics that limit their photon efficiency, resolution and spectral range. Here we show that many of these limitations can be overcome by replacing interferometric optics with a two-dimensional absorptive filter array composed of colloidal quantum dots. Instead of measuring different bands of a spectrum individually after introducing temporal or spatial separations with gratings or interference-based narrowband filters, a colloidal quantum dot spectrometer measures a light spectrum based on the wavelength multiplexing principle: multiple spectral bands are encoded and detected simultaneously with one filter and one detector, respectively, with the array format allowing the process to be efficiently repeated many times using different filters with different encoding so that sufficient information is obtained to enable computational reconstruction of the target spectrum. We illustrate the performance of such a quantum dot microspectrometer, made from 195 different types of quantum dots with absorption features that cover a spectral range of 300 nanometres, by measuring shifts in spectral peak positions as small as one nanometre. Given this performance, demonstrable avenues for further improvement, the ease with which quantum dots can be processed and integrated, and their numerous finely tuneable bandgaps that cover a broad spectral range, we expect that quantum dot microspectrometers will be useful in applications where minimizing size, weight, cost and complexity of the spectrometer are critical.

  8. Polarity inversion of ζ-potential in concentrated colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla-Granados, Héctor M; Jiménez-Ángeles, Felipe; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2011-10-27

    A concentrated colloidal dispersion is studied by applying an integral equations theory to the colloidal primitive model fluid. Important effects, attributed to large size and charge and to the finite concentration of colloidal particles, are found. We observe a polarity inversion of ζ-potential for concentrated colloidal dispersions, while it is not present for a single colloidal particle at infinite dilution. An excellent qualitative agreement between our theoretical predictions and our computer simulations is observed. PMID:21928833

  9. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides through the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B.; Zachara, John M.; McCarthy, John F.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2006-05-31

    This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of the role of colloids in facilitating the transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. We focus on three major thrusts: (1) thermodynamic stability and mobility of colloids formed by reactions of sediments with highly alkaline tank waste solutions, (2) colloid-contaminant interactions, and (3) in-situ colloid mobilization and colloid facilitated contaminant transport occurring in both contaminated and uncontaminated Hanford sediments.

  10. Polydispersity effects in colloid-polymer mixtures.

    PubMed

    Liddle, S M; Narayanan, T; Poon, W C K

    2011-05-18

    We study phase separation and transient gelation experimentally in a mixture consisting of polydisperse colloids (polydispersity: ≈ 6%) and non-adsorbing polymers, where the ratio of the average size of the polymer to that of the colloid is ≈ 0.062. Unlike what has been reported previously for mixtures with somewhat lower colloid polydispersity (≈ 5%), the addition of polymers does not expand the fluid-solid coexistence region. Instead, we find a region of fluid-solid coexistence which has an approximately constant width but an unexpected re-entrant shape. We detect the presence of a metastable gas-liquid binodal, which gives rise to two-stepped crystallization kinetics that can be rationalized as the effect of fractionation. Finally, we find that the separation into multiple coexisting solid phases at high colloid volume fractions predicted by equilibrium statistical mechanics is kinetically suppressed before the system reaches dynamical arrest. PMID:21525554

  11. Ultrasonically assisted deposition of colloidal crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wollmann, Sabine; Patel, Raj B.; Wixforth, Achim; Krenner, Hubert J.

    2014-07-21

    Colloidal particles are a versatile physical system which have found uses across a range of applications such as the simulation of crystal kinetics, etch masks for fabrication, and the formation of photonic band-gap structures. Utilization of colloidal particles often requires a means to produce highly ordered, periodic structures. One approach is the use of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to direct the self-assembly of colloidal particles. Previous demonstrations using standing SAWs were shown to be limited in terms of crystal size and dimensionality. Here, we report a technique to improve the spatial alignment of colloidal particles using traveling SAWs. Through control of the radio frequency power, which drives the SAW, we demonstrate enhanced quality and dimensionality of the crystal growth. We show that this technique can be applied to a range of particle sizes in the μm-regime and may hold potential for particles in the sub-μm-regime.

  12. Colloidal suspension simulates linear dynamic pressure profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Cann, R. J.

    1966-01-01

    Missile nose fairings immersed in colloidal suspension prepared with various specific gravities simulate pressure profiles very similar to those encountered during reentry. Stress and deflection conditions similar to those expected during atmospheric reentry are thus attained in the laboratory.

  13. Mesoscopic modelling of colloids in chiral nematics.

    PubMed

    Ravnik, Miha; Alexander, Gareth P; Yeomans, Julia M; Zumer, Slobodan

    2010-01-01

    We present numerical modelling of colloidal particles in chiral nematics with cubic symmetry (blue phases) within the framework of the Landau-de Gennes free energy. The interaction potential of a single, nano-sized colloidal particle with a -1/2 disclination line is calculated as a generic trapping mechanism for particles within the cholesteric blue phases. The interaction potential is shown to be highly anisotropic and have threefold rotational symmetry. We discuss the equilibration of the colloidal texture with respect to particle positions and the unit cell size of the blue phase. We also describe how preservation of the liquid crystal volume and the number of particles allows blue phase colloidal structures with different unit cell sizes and configurations to be compared numerically. PMID:20158028

  14. Self-similarity in active colloid motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constant, Colin; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    The self-similarity of displacements among randomly evolving systems has been used to describe the foraging patterns of animals and predict the growth of financial systems. At micron scales, the motion of colloidal particles can be analyzed by sampling their spatial displacement in time. For self-similar systems in equilibrium, the mean squared displacement increases linearly in time. However, external forces can take the system out of equilibrium, creating active colloidal systems, and making this evolution more complex. A moment scaling spectrum of the distribution of particle displacements quantifies the degree of self-similarity in the colloid motion. We will demonstrate that, by varying the temporal and spatial characteristics of the external forces, one can control the degree of self-similarity in active colloid motion.

  15. A Course in Colloid and Surface Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scamehorn, John F.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a course for chemical engineers, chemists, and petroleum engineers that focuses on colloid and surface science. Major topic areas in the course include capillarity, surface thermodynamics, adsorption contact angle, micelle formation, solubilization in micelles, emulsions, foams, and applications. (JN)

  16. Dynamical Threshold of Diluteness of Soft Colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Ren; Do, Changwoo; Egami, T; Falus, Peter; Li, Xin; Liu, Dazhi; Porcar, L.; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis E; Smith, Gregory Scott; Wu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of soft colloids in solutions is characterized by internal collective motion as well as center-of-mass diffusion. Using neutron scattering we demonstrate that the competition between the relaxation processes associated with these two degrees of freedom results in strong dependence of dynamics and structure on colloid concentration, c, well below the overlap concentration c*. Triggered by the increasing inter-particle collisions, substantial structural dehydration and slowing-down of internal dynamics occurs before geometrically defined colloidal overlap develops. This observation is surprising since it is generally believed that the internal dynamics and conformation of soft colloidal particles essentially remain invariant below c*. The competition between these two relaxation processes gives rise to a new dynamically-defined dilute threshold concentration well below c*.

  17. Colloidal gold: a pluripotent receptor probe.

    PubMed

    Handley, D A; Chien, S

    1983-10-01

    Colloidal gold is an electron-dense, lyophobic colloid that readily forms a stable electrostatic interaction with a variety of macromolecules. Monodispersed colloids ranging from 3-150 nm in diameter can be produced to provide the researcher with flexibility in selecting the optimally sized probe. Gold labeling of antibodies and lectins has been extensively used to study surface antigens and cell components. Recently, the use of gold labeling has been extended to study receptor-ligand binding, enzyme-substrate reactions, and transcellular pathways. Published applications include gold labeling of metabolites (low-density lipoproteins), enzymes (DNAase and RNAase, RNA polymerase, thrombin, collagenase, elastase), hormones (insulin, epidermal growth factor, glucagon), circulating plasma proteins (asialoglycoprotein, alpha 2-macroglobulin, factor VIII-von Willebrand factor), and endotoxins (tetanus toxin, cholera toxin). This broad spectrum of applications emphasizes the versatility and usefulness of colloidal gold as a probe in areas of cell biology related to receptors, endocytosis, transport, and functions of proteins. PMID:6356133

  18. Sulfonated nanoporous colloidal films and membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joanna Jane

    The objective of this thesis is to describe the preparation and investigation of a new class of proton-conducting membrane materials, namely, nanoporous colloidal membranes whose proton conductivity results from the nanopore surface modification with organic molecules carrying acid functionalities. Both the proton transport and ion transport were studied in nanoporous silica colloidal crystals that were surface modified with sulfonic groups. First, the transport of ions was studied through sulfonated silica colloidal films that were supported on platinum electrodes using cyclic voltammetry. The surface of self-assembled nanoporous silica colloidal crystalline films was sulfonated using 1,3-propanesultone. We found that the flux of anions through the sulfonated colloidal films is reduced, while the flux of cations is increased, compared to the unmodified colloidal films. Second, the proton transport in free-standing assemblies of surface-sulfonated silica nanospheres, either randomly packed or self-assembled into a close-packed arrangement, were studied. It was demonstrated that colloidal assemblies prepared using surface-sulfonated silica nanospheres posses proton conductivity that depends on the ordering of the material, temperature and relative humidity. Based on the comparison between the close-packed and disordered assemblies made of the same spheres, we conclude that the increase in structural organization of the self-assembled colloidal materials leads to increased proton conductivity and better water retention. Next free-standing colloidal membranes with a relatively large area and no mechanical defects were prepared by sintering silica colloidal films. The sintered membranes were then surface rehydroxylated, which restores the surface silanol groups, and then can be chemically modified. Finally, sintered self-assembled nanoporous silica colloidal crystals were modified with poly(sulfopropyl-methacrylate) (pSPM) and poly(stryrenesulfonic acid) (pSSA) brushes

  19. Inventions Utilizing Microfluidics and Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, David W.; Gong, Tieying; Oakey, John; Terray, Alexander V.; Wu, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Several related inventions pertain to families of devices that utilize microfluidics and/or colloidal particles to obtain useful physical effects. The families of devices can be summarized as follows: (1) Microfluidic pumps and/or valves wherein colloidal-size particles driven by electrical, magnetic, or optical fields serve as the principal moving parts that propel and/or direct the affected flows. (2) Devices that are similar to the aforementioned pumps and/or valves except that they are used to manipulate light instead of fluids. The colloidal particles in these devices are substantially constrained to move in a plane and are driven to spatially order them into arrays that function, variously, as waveguides, filters, or switches for optical signals. (3) Devices wherein the ultra-laminar nature of microfluidic flows is exploited to effect separation, sorting, or filtering of colloidal particles or biological cells in suspension. (4) Devices wherein a combination of confinement and applied electrical and/or optical fields forces the colloidal particles to become arranged into three-dimensional crystal lattices. Control of the colloidal crystalline structures could be exploited to control diffraction of light. (5) Microfluidic devices, incorporating fluid waveguides, wherein switching of flows among different paths would be accompanied by switching of optical signals.

  20. Linked topological colloids in a nematic host

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Angel; Hermosillo, Leonardo; Tasinkevych, Mykola; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2015-01-01

    Geometric shape and topology of constituent particles can alter many colloidal properties such as Brownian motion, self-assembly, and phase behavior. Thus far, only single-component building blocks of colloids with connected surfaces have been studied, although topological colloids, with constituent particles shaped as freestanding knots and handlebodies of different genus, have been recently introduced. Here we develop a topological class of colloids shaped as multicomponent links. Using two-photon photopolymerization, we fabricate colloidal microparticle analogs of the classic examples of links studied in the field of topology, the Hopf and Solomon links, which we disperse in nematic fluids that possess orientational ordering of anisotropic rod-like molecules. The surfaces of these particles are treated to impose tangential or perpendicular boundary conditions for the alignment of liquid crystal molecules, so that they generate a host of topologically nontrivial field and defect structures in the dispersing nematic medium, resulting in an elastic coupling between the linked constituents. The interplay between the topologies of surfaces of linked colloids and the molecular alignment field of the nematic host reveals that linking of particle rings with perpendicular boundary conditions is commonly accompanied by linking of closed singular defect loops, laying the foundations for fabricating complex composite materials with interlinking-based structural organization. PMID:25825765

  1. Self-replication with magnetic dipolar colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Zhang, Rui; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal self-replication represents an exciting research frontier in soft matter physics. Currently, all reported self-replication schemes involve coating colloidal particles with stimuli-responsive molecules to allow switchable interactions. In this paper, we introduce a scheme using ferromagnetic dipolar colloids and preprogrammed external magnetic fields to create an autonomous self-replication system. Interparticle dipole-dipole forces and periodically varying weak-strong magnetic fields cooperate to drive colloid monomers from the solute onto templates, bind them into replicas, and dissolve template complexes. We present three general design principles for autonomous linear replicators, derived from a focused study of a minimalist sphere-dimer magnetic system in which single binding sites allow formation of dimeric templates. We show via statistical models and computer simulations that our system exhibits nonlinear growth of templates and produces nearly exponential growth (low error rate) upon adding an optimized competing electrostatic potential. We devise experimental strategies for constructing the required magnetic colloids based on documented laboratory techniques. We also present qualitative ideas about building more complex self-replicating structures utilizing magnetic colloids. PMID:26565238

  2. Colloids generation from metallic uranium fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, C.; Fortner, J.; Goldberg, M.; Shelton-Davis, C.

    2000-07-20

    The possibility of colloid generation from spent fuel in an unsaturated environment has significant implications for storage of these fuels in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. Because colloids can act as a transport medium for sparingly soluble radionuclides, it might be possible for colloid-associated radionuclides to migrate large distances underground and present a human health concern. This study examines the nature of colloidal materials produced during corrosion of metallic uranium fuel in simulated groundwater at elevated temperature in an unsaturated environment. Colloidal analyses of the leachates from these corrosion tests were performed using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Results from both techniques indicate a bimodal distribution of small discrete particles and aggregates of the small particles. The average diameters of the small, discrete colloids are {approximately}3--12 nm, and the large aggregates have average diameters of {approximately}100--200 nm. X-ray diffraction of the solids from these tests indicates a mineral composition of uranium oxide or uranium oxy-hydroxide.

  3. Sterically stabilized colloids with tunable repulsions.

    PubMed

    van Gruijthuijsen, Kitty; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Heinen, Marco; Nägele, Gerhard; Stradner, Anna

    2013-09-10

    When studying tunable electrostatic repulsions in aqueous suspensions of charged colloids, irreversible colloid aggregation or gelation may occur at high salt concentrations. For many commonly used synthetic colloids, such as polystyrene and silica particles, the reason for coagulation is the presence of unbalanced, strongly attractive, and short-ranged van der Waals (VDW) forces. Here, we present an aqueous polystyrene model colloid that is sterically stabilized against VDW attractions. We show that the synthesis procedure, based on a neutral initiator couple and a nonionic surfactant, introduces surface charges that can be further increased by the addition of charged comonomer methacrylic acid. Thus, the interactions between the polystyrene spheres can be conveniently tuned from hard-sphere-like to charge-stabilized with long-ranged electrostatic repulsions described by a Yukawa-type pair potential. The particle size, grafting density, core-shell structure, and surface charge are characterized by light and neutron scattering. Using X-ray and neutron scattering in combination with an accurate analytic integral equation scheme for the colloidal static structure factor, we deduce effective particle charges for colloid volume fractions ≥0.1 and salt concentrations in the range of 1.5 to 50 mM. PMID:23937718

  4. Self-replication with magnetic dipolar colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempster, Joshua M.; Zhang, Rui; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal self-replication represents an exciting research frontier in soft matter physics. Currently, all reported self-replication schemes involve coating colloidal particles with stimuli-responsive molecules to allow switchable interactions. In this paper, we introduce a scheme using ferromagnetic dipolar colloids and preprogrammed external magnetic fields to create an autonomous self-replication system. Interparticle dipole-dipole forces and periodically varying weak-strong magnetic fields cooperate to drive colloid monomers from the solute onto templates, bind them into replicas, and dissolve template complexes. We present three general design principles for autonomous linear replicators, derived from a focused study of a minimalist sphere-dimer magnetic system in which single binding sites allow formation of dimeric templates. We show via statistical models and computer simulations that our system exhibits nonlinear growth of templates and produces nearly exponential growth (low error rate) upon adding an optimized competing electrostatic potential. We devise experimental strategies for constructing the required magnetic colloids based on documented laboratory techniques. We also present qualitative ideas about building more complex self-replicating structures utilizing magnetic colloids.

  5. Linked topological colloids in a nematic host.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Angel; Hermosillo, Leonardo; Tasinkevych, Mykola; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2015-04-14

    Geometric shape and topology of constituent particles can alter many colloidal properties such as Brownian motion, self-assembly, and phase behavior. Thus far, only single-component building blocks of colloids with connected surfaces have been studied, although topological colloids, with constituent particles shaped as freestanding knots and handlebodies of different genus, have been recently introduced. Here we develop a topological class of colloids shaped as multicomponent links. Using two-photon photopolymerization, we fabricate colloidal microparticle analogs of the classic examples of links studied in the field of topology, the Hopf and Solomon links, which we disperse in nematic fluids that possess orientational ordering of anisotropic rod-like molecules. The surfaces of these particles are treated to impose tangential or perpendicular boundary conditions for the alignment of liquid crystal molecules, so that they generate a host of topologically nontrivial field and defect structures in the dispersing nematic medium, resulting in an elastic coupling between the linked constituents. The interplay between the topologies of surfaces of linked colloids and the molecular alignment field of the nematic host reveals that linking of particle rings with perpendicular boundary conditions is commonly accompanied by linking of closed singular defect loops, laying the foundations for fabricating complex composite materials with interlinking-based structural organization. PMID:25825765

  6. Autonomous colloidal crystallization in a galvanic microreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punckt, Christian; Jan, Linda; Jiang, Peng; Frewen, Thomas A.; Saville, Dudley A.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2012-10-01

    We report on a technique that utilizes an array of galvanic microreactors to guide the assembly of two-dimensional colloidal crystals with spatial and orientational order. Our system is comprised of an array of copper and gold electrodes in a coplanar arrangement, immersed in a dilute hydrochloric acid solution in which colloidal micro-spheres of polystyrene and silica are suspended. Under optimized conditions, two-dimensional colloidal crystals form at the anodic copper with patterns and crystal orientation governed by the electrode geometry. After the aggregation process, the colloidal particles are cemented to the substrate by co-deposition of reaction products. As we vary the electrode geometry, the dissolution rate of the copper electrodes is altered. This way, we control the colloidal motion as well as the degree of reaction product formation. We show that particle motion is governed by a combination of electrokinetic effects acting directly on the colloidal particles and bulk electrolyte flow generated at the copper-gold interface.

  7. Colloidal diffusion over a periodic energy landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiao-Guang; Lai, Pik-Yin; Tong, Penger

    2014-03-01

    A two-layer colloidal system is developed for the study of colloidal diffusion over a two-dimensional periodic energy landscape. The energy landscape is made from the bottom layer of colloidal spheres forming a honey-comb crystalline pattern above a glass substrate. The corrugated surface of the bottom colloidal crystal provides a gravitational potential field for the diffusing particles in the top layer. The obtained population probability histogram P(x , y) of the diffusing particles is used to fully characterize the energy landscape U(x , y) via the Boltzmann distribution. The dynamical properties of the diffusing particle, such as its escape time tR and diffusion coefficient D are simultaneously measured from the particle's trajectories. The long-time diffusion coefficients D is found to be in good agreement with the theory for all colloidal samples studied. The experiment demonstrates the applications of this newly constructed colloidal energy landscape. *Work supported in part by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong SAR.

  8. Tunable Time-Dependent Colloidal Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Andrew M.; Rogers, W. Benjamin; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    Self-assembly of colloidal particles can be driven by changes in temperature, density, or the concentration of solutes, and it is even possible to program the thermal response and equilibrium phase transitions of such systems. It is still difficult, however, to tune how the self-assembly process varies in time. We demonstrate control over the time-dependence of colloidal interactions, using DNA-functionalized colloidal particles with binding energies that are set by the concentration of a free linker strand in solution. We control the rate at which this free strand is consumed using a catalytic DNA reaction, whose rate is governed by the concentration of a catalyst strand. Varying the concentration of the linker, its competitor, and the catalyst at a fixed temperature, we can tune the rate and degree of the formation of colloidal aggregates and their following disassembly. Close to the colloidal melting point, the timescales of these out-of-equilibrium assembly and disassembly processes are determined by the rate of the catalytic reaction. Far below the colloidal melting point, however, the effects from varying our linker and competitor concentrations dominate.

  9. Interactions between radioactively labeled colloids and natural particles: Evidence for colloidal pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, L.S.; Santschi, P.H.; Tang, D.

    1997-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that colloidal forms of trace metals can be reactive intermediaries in the scavenging processes leading to the removal of their particulate forms. A series of radiotracer experiments using natural colloidal organic matter from Galveston Bay, USA were carried out in order to test this hypothesis. Suspended particle uptake of originally colloidally bound trace metals occurred in a matter of hours to days in estuarine waters. After ten days, the majority ( >50%) of the colloidal trace metals had been transferred into the particulate phase ({ge} 0.45{mu}m), except for {sup 65}Zn. Two distinctively different temporal regions of removal of colloidal trace metals were identified: a faster reaction during the first four hours, followed by a slower reaction after approximately one day. In a separate river water-seawater mixing experiment, the solid/solution partitioning of the radiotracers was investigated in the absence of suspended matter. About 30% of most of the elements, except Ag and Fe ({approximately}60%), were associated with a newly formed particulate phase after eight days. There were two major trends: (1) the particulate fraction of {sup 59}Fe and {sup 110}Ag increased while the colloidal fraction decreased, suggesting a colloidal pumping mechanism. (2) The particulate fraction of {sup 54}Mn, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 65}Zn, {sup 109}Cd, {sup 113}Sn, and {sup 60}Co increased while the LMW({le}1 kDa) fraction decreased, suggesting a direct uptake into the particulate fraction with less involvement of a transitory colloidal phase. The results from these experiments suggested two different pathways for colloidal tracer uptake by particles: (1) colloidal pumping of a major component (e.g., biopolymer) of the colloidal pool and (2) coagulation of trace components (e.g., phytochelatins) with varying affinities for different trace metals. 39 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Magnetic nanostructures by colloidal lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Frank Qing

    Structural, magnetic and in some cases magneto-transport properties of (1) symmetric and asymmetric ferromagnetic nanorings and (2) single layer, multilayer, and exchange biased ferromagnetic nanodots prepared by colloidal lithography are presented. A fast, reliable and cost effective method has been developed to fabricate large number (˜ 109) of magnetic nanorings over macroscopic areas (˜ cm2) with large areal densities (up to 45 rings/mum 2). Cobalt nanorings with diameters ranging from 100 nm to 500 nm have been fabricated by sputtering Co onto nanosphere-coated substrates followed by ion beam etching. X-ray diffraction verifies that the Co nanorings still have hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the cross-section of the symmetric nanoring is tapered and uniform along the circumference, and the cross-section of the asymmetric nanoring changes progressively along the circumference. Two magnetic reversal processes have been found in magnetic nanorings---the vortex formation process and the onion rotation process. The co-existence of these two processes is the manifestation of the competition between the exchange energy and the magnetostatic energy in the nanorings. Micromagnetics simulations have been carried out to reveal the details of the magnetic reversals. The experimental and the computed hysteresis loops agree both qualitatively and quantitatively. For the 100 nm symmetric Co nanorings, the vortex formation process has a probability of about 40%, while the onion rotation process has 60% chances. To increase the probability of vortex formation process, a desirable process for application, asymmetric nanorings have been fabricated by ion beam etching at oblique angles. Unlike the symmetric nanorings, the probability of the vortex formation process in asymmetric nanorings can be controlled by the direction of the external field. For the 100 nm asymmetric nanorings, the fraction of the vortex formation process

  11. Les violences conjugales à Dakar

    PubMed Central

    Soumah, Mohamed Maniboliot; Issa, Abdoul Wahab; Ndiaye, Mor; Ndoye, El Hadj Oumar; Sow, Mamadou Lamine

    2015-01-01

    L'objectif était d’évaluer les aspects épidémiologiques des violences conjugales, identifier les facteurs de risques et les différents types de violences conjugales, évaluer les conséquences des violences conjugales sur la santé des victimes, afin d'améliorer la prise en charge des victimes et la prévention du phénomène. Il s'est agit d'une étude transversale effectuée de décembre 2012 à janvier 2013 à Dakar. Les données ont été recueillies, après consentement, sur fiche d'enquête anonyme soumise à toute personne volontaire vivant en couple et résidant à Dakar. L'analyse statistique a été effectuée avec le logiciel SPSS 13.0. Le nombre de personnes victimes de violences conjugales était de 60 soit 37,30% dont 31 femmes (51,70%) et 29 hommes (48,30%). Le sex-ratio était de 0,93. Parmi les victimes, 53 étaient scolarisées soit 88,30%. Le régime matrimonial était de type monogame dans 39 cas (65%) et polygame dans 21 cas (35%). La vie en couple durait depuis moins de 11 ans dans 60% des cas et durait de 11 ans à 20 ans au plus dans 26,6% des cas. L’étude des types de violences montrait la fréquence des agressions physiques. Les armes utilisées étaient surtout les armes naturelles. Les principaux facteurs de risque de violence conjugale sont les facteurs sociodémographiques, culturels et économiques comme le jeune âge, l'inégalité du genre, les jeunes couples, la précarité, le niveau d'instruction élevé. La prise en charge des victimes et la prévention du phénomène restent insuffisantes dans nos pays. PMID:26918077

  12. Statistical thermodynamics of charge-stabilized colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Valderrama, A.

    2008-06-01

    This thesis is a theoretical study of equilibrium statistical thermodynamic properties of colloidal systems in which electrostatic interactions play a dominant role, namely, charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. Such systems are fluids consisting of a mixture of a large number of mesoscopic particles and microscopic ions which interact via the Coulomb force, suspended in a molecular fluid. Quantum statistical mechanics is essential to fully understand the properties and stability of such systems. A less fundamental but for many purposes, sufficient description, is provided by classical statistical mechanics. In such approximation the system is considered as composed of a great number of charged classical particles with additional hard-core repulsions. The kinetic energy or momentum integrals become independent Gaussians, and hence their contribution to the free energy can be trivially evaluated. The contribution of the potential energy to the free energy on the other hand, depends upon the configuration of all the particles and becomes highly non-trivial due to the long-range character of the Coulomb force and the extremely different length scales involved in the problem. Using the microscopic model described above, we focus on the calculation of equilibrium thermodynamic properties (response functions), correlations (structure factors), and mechanical properties (forces and stresses), which can be measured in experiments and computed by Monte Carlo simulations. This thesis is divided into three parts. In part I, comprising chapters 2 and 3, we focus on finite-thickness effects in colloidal platelets and rigid planar membranes. In chapter 2 we study electrolyte-mediated interactions between two of such colloidal objects. Several aspects of these interactions are considered including the nature (attractive or repulsive) of the force between the objects, the osmotic properties for different types of surfaces and image charge effects. In part II, which includes

  13. Colloidal Gelation-2 and Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition-2 Investigations Conducted on STS-95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Monica T.

    2000-01-01

    The Colloidal Gelation-2 (CGEL 2) and Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition-2 (CDOT 2) investigations flew on Space Shuttle Discovery mission STS-95 (also known as the John Glenn Mission). These investigations were part of a series of colloid experiments designed to help scientists answer fundamental science questions and reduce the trial and error involved in developing new and better materials. Industries dealing with semiconductors, electro-optics, ceramics, and composites are just a few that may benefit from this knowledge. The goal of the CGEL 2 investigation was to study the fundamental properties of colloids to help scientists better understand their nature and make them more useful for technology. Colloids consist of very small (submicron) particles suspended in a fluid. They play a critical role in the technology of this country, finding uses in materials ranging from paints and coatings to drugs, cosmetics, food, and drink. Although these products are routinely produced and used, there are still many aspects of their behavior about which scientists know little. Understanding their structures may allow scientists to manipulate the physical properties of colloids (a process called "colloidal engineering") to produce new materials and products. Colloid research may even improve the processing of known products to enhance their desirable properties.

  14. Colloidal Bandpass and Bandgap Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellen, Benjamin; Tahir, Mukarram; Ouyang, Yuyu; Nori, Franco

    2013-03-01

    Thermally or deterministically-driven transport of objects through asymmetric potential energy landscapes (ratchet-based motion) is of considerable interest as models for biological transport and as methods for controlling the flow of information, material, and energy. Here, we provide a general framework for implementing a colloidal bandpass filter, in which particles of a specific size range can be selectively transported through a periodic lattice, whereas larger or smaller particles are dynamically trapped in closed-orbits. Our approach is based on quasi-static (adiabatic) transition in a tunable potential energy landscape composed of a multi-frequency magnetic field input signal with the static field of a spatially-periodic magnetization. By tuning the phase shifts between the input signal and the relative forcing coefficients, large-sized particles may experience no local energy barriers, medium-sized particles experience only one local energy barrier, and small-sized particles experience two local energy barriers. The odd symmetry present in this system can be used to nudge the medium-sized particles along an open pathway, whereas the large or small beads remain trapped in a closed-orbit, leading to a bandpass filter, and vice versa for a bandgap filter. NSF CMMI - 0800173, Youth 100 Scholars Fund

  15. Colloids in the River Inn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Baumann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    In the light of an increasing number of technical applications using nanoparticles and reports of adverse effects of engineered nanoparticles, research on the occurrence and stability of particles in all compartments has to be intensified. Colloids in river water represent the geologic setting, environmental conditions, and the anthropogenic use in its catchment. The river not only acts as a sink for nanoparticles but also as the source term due to exchange in the hyporheic zone and in bank filtration setups. The concentration, size distribution and elemental composition of particles in the River Inn were studied from the source in the Swiss Alps to the river mouth at Passau. Samples were collected after each tributary from a sub-catchment and filtered on-site. The elemental composition was determined after acid digestion with ICP/MS. SEM/EDX analyses provided morphological and elemental information for single particles. A complementary chemical analysis of the river water was performed to assess the geochemical stability of indvidual particles. Particles in the upper, rural parts mainly reveal changes in the geological setting of the tributary catchments. Not unexpectedly, particles originating from crystalline rocks, were more stable than particles originating from calcareous rocks. Anthropogenic and industrial influences increase in the lower parts. This went together with a change of the size distribution, an increase of the number of organic particles, and a decrease of the microfauna. Interestingly, specific leisure activities in a sub-catchment, like extensive downhill skiing, manifest itself in the particle composition.

  16. Seismic stress mobilization of natural colloids in a porous rock

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Peter M; Abdel-fattah, Amr I

    2008-01-01

    Stress oscillations at 26 Hz enhanced the release of natural micro-particles (colloids) in a porous rock sample. Micron-scale effects were induced by meter-scale wavelengths. The results are attributed to altering the release rate coefficient for colloids trapped in pores. The rate change did not depend on colloid size and thus is not due to altering colloid-pore-wall interactions. Enhanced colloid detachment from pore walls and flushing from dead-end pores are likely mechanisms. This phenomenon could impact a broad range of physical sciences involving colloid dynamics and porous transport.

  17. Modeling colloid transport for performance assessment.

    PubMed

    Contardi, J S; Turner, D R; Ahn, T M

    2001-02-01

    The natural system is expected to contribute to isolation at the proposed high-level nuclear waste (HLW) geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, NV (YM). In developing performance assessment (PA) computer models to simulate long-term behavior at YM, colloidal transport of radionuclides has been proposed as a critical factor because of the possible reduced interaction with the geologic media. Site-specific information on the chemistry and natural colloid concentration of saturated zone groundwaters in the vicinity of YM is combined with a surface complexation sorption model to evaluate the impact of natural colloids on calculated retardation factors (RF) for several radioelements of concern in PA. Inclusion of colloids into the conceptual model can reduce the calculated effective retardation significantly. Strongly sorbed radionuclides such as americium and thorium are most affected by pseudocolloid formation and transport, with a potential reduction in RF of several orders of magnitude. Radioelements that are less strongly sorbed under YM conditions, such as uranium and neptunium, are not affected significantly by colloid transport, and transport of plutonium in the valence state is only moderately enhanced. Model results showed no increase in the peak mean annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) within a compliance period of 10,000 years, although this is strongly dependent on container life in the base case scenario. At longer times, simulated container failures increase and the TEDE from the colloidal models increased by a factor of 60 from the base case. By using mechanistic models and sensitivity analyses to determine what parameters and transport processes affect the TEDE, colloidal transport in future versions of the TPA code can be represented more accurately. PMID:11288586

  18. Colloids with continuously tunable surface charge.

    PubMed

    van Ravensteijn, Bas G P; Kegel, Willem K

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present a robust way to tune the surface potential of polystyrene colloids without changing the pH, ionic strength, etc. The colloids are composed of a cross-linked polystyrene core and a cross-linked vinylbenzyl chloride layer. Besides the chlorine groups, the particle surface contains sulfate/sulfonate groups (arising from the polymerization initiators) that provide a negative surface potential. Performing a Menschutkin reaction on the surface chlorine groups with tertiary amines allows us to introduce quaternary, positively charged amines. The overall charge on the particles is then determined by the ratio between the sulfate/sulfonate moieties and the quaternary amines. Using this process, we were able to invert the charge in a continuous manner without losing colloidal stability upon passing the isoelectric point. The straightforward reaction mechanism together with the fact that the reaction could be quenched rapidly resulted in a colloidal system in which the ζ potential can be tuned between -80 and 45 mV. As proof of principle, the positively charged particles were used in heterocoagulation experiments with nanometer- and micrometer-sized negatively charged silica particles to create geometrically well-defined colloidal (nano) clusters. PMID:25127340

  19. Diffusing colloidal probes of cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Gregg A; Fairbrother, D Howard; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-05-25

    Measurements and analyses are reported to quantify dynamic and equilibrium interactions between colloidal particles and live cell surfaces using dark field video microscopy. Two-dimensional trajectories of micron-sized polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated silica colloids relative to adherent epithelial breast cancer cell perimeters are determined allowing measurement of position dependent diffusivities and interaction potentials. PEG was chosen as the material system of interest to assess non-specific interactions with cell surfaces and establishes a basis for investigation of specific interactions in future studies. Analysis of measured potential energies on cell surfaces reveals the spatial dependence in cell topography. With the measured cell topography and models for particle-cell surface hydrodynamic interactions, excellent agreement is obtained between theoretical and measured colloidal transport on cell surfaces. Quantitative analyses of association lifetimes showed that PEG coatings act to stabilize colloids above the cell surface through net repulsive, steric interactions. Our results demonstrate a self-consistent analysis of diffusing colloidal probe interactions due to conservative and non-conservative forces to characterize biophysical cell surface properties. PMID:27117575

  20. Interparticle interactions and polarization effects in colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The physics of simple colloidal systems is usually dominated by three independent length scales: the particle size, the average interparticle distance, and the range of the interparticle potential. The dispersed particles typically have characteristic dimensions in the range 5 to 100 nm, often with spherical or cylindrical symmetry. Dispersion densities vary over volume fractions ranging from 0.5 to 10/sup -4/, with the corresponding mean interparticle distances ranging from about 1 to 10 diameters (in spherical systems). The interaction potential may be very short ranged (hard sphere), very long ranged (Coulomb or dipolar), or anywhere in between (screened Coulomb), and the correlations exhibited in the dispersion may be gas-like, liquid-like or crystalline, depending on the range of the potential relative to the interparticle distance. This rich phase behavior is responsible for the remarkable importance of colloidal studies in many areas of condensed matter physics and biophysics, but it poses often intractable problems in developing the statistical mechanical descriptions necessary for an understanding of scattering data from colloids. This paper will review the considerable recent progress in this field, in the context of SANS experiments on colloids in which the potentials are dominated by either screened Coulomb or magnetic dipolar interactions; in the case of magnetic colloids (ferrofluids), the use of polarization analysis will also be discussed. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Colloidal spirals in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Pandey, Manoj B; Liu, Qingkun; Tasinkevych, Mykola; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2015-12-01

    One of the central experimental efforts in nematic colloids research aims to explore how the interplay between the geometry of particles along with the accompanying nematic director deformations and defects around them can provide a means of guiding particle self-assembly and controlling the structure of particle-induced defects. In this work, we design, fabricate, and disperse low-symmetry colloidal particles with shapes of spirals, double spirals, and triple spirals in a nematic fluid. These spiral-shaped particles, which are controlled by varying their surface functionalization to provide tangential or perpendicular boundary conditions of the nematic molecular alignment, are found inducing director distortions and defect configurations with non-chiral or chiral symmetry. Colloidal particles also exhibit both stable and metastable multiple orientational states in the nematic host, with a large number of director configurations featuring both singular and solitonic nonsingular topological defects accompanying them, which can result in unusual forms of colloidal self-assembly. Our findings directly demonstrate how the symmetry of particle-generated director configurations can be further lowered, or not, as compared to the low point group symmetry of solid micro-inclusions, depending on the nature of induced defects while satisfying topological constraints. We show that achiral colloidal particles can cause chiral symmetry breaking of elastic distortions, which is driven by complex three-dimensional winding of induced topological line defects and solitons. PMID:26358649

  2. Method for electrohydrodynamically assembling patterned colloidal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trau, Mathias (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method apparatus is provided for electrophoretically depositing particles onto an electrode, and electrohydrodynamically assembling the particles into crystalline structures. Specifically, the present method and apparatus creates a current flowing through a solution to cause identically charged electrophoretically deposited colloidal particles to attract each other over very large distances (<5 particle diameters) on the surface of electrodes to form two-dimensional colloidal crystals. The attractive force can be created with both DC and AC fields and can modulated by adjusting either the field strength or frequency of the current. Modulating this lateral attraction between the particles causes the reversible formation of two-dimensional fluid and crystalline colloidal states on the electrode surface. Further manipulation allows for the formation of two or three-dimensional colloidal crystals, as well as more complex designed structures. Once the required structures are formed, these three-dimension colloidal crystals can be permanently frozen or glued by controlled coagulation induced by to the applied field to form a stable crystalline structure.

  3. Apparatus for electrohydrodynamically assembling patterned colloidal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trau, Mathias (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method apparatus is provided for electrophoretically depositing particles onto an electrode, and electrohydrodynamically assembling the particles into crystalline structures. Specifically, the present method and apparatus creates a current flowing through a solution to cause identically charged electrophoretically deposited colloidal particles to attract each other over very large distances (<5 particle diameters) on the surface of electrodes to form two-dimensional colloidal crystals. The attractive force can be created with both DC and AC fields and can modulated by adjusting either the field strength or frequency of the current. Modulating this lateral attraction between the particles causes the reversible formation of two-dimensional fluid and crystalline colloidal states on the electrode surface. Further manipulation allows for the formation of two or three-dimensional colloidal crystals, as well as more complex designed structures. Once the required structures are formed, these three-dimension colloidal crystals can be permanently frozen or glued by controlled coagulation induced by to the applied field to form a stable crystalline structure.

  4. Une vie active saine pour les enfants et les adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    De mauvais modes de vie, comme une alimentation malsaine et l’inactivité physique, sont d'importants facteurs contributifs à une augmentation de la morbidité et de la mortalité secondaires à des maladies chroniques à l’âge adulte. Depuis dix ans, on remarque une augmentation du mode de vie sédentaire et de l’obésité chez les enfants et les adolescents, tant en Amérique du Nord qu’ailleurs dans le monde. Les médecins doivent être conscients de l’importance du problème, fournir des conseils de prévention aux familles et promouvoir une vie active saine dans leur pratique.

  5. ["Les Impatients": expression through art].

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, Céline; Palardy, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    The organization called "Les Impatients" was founded in 1992. Using a unique model, Les Impatients welcomes those with mental health issues who would like to express themselves through art. Les Impatients offers free creative workshops and encourages exchanges with the community through the sharing of its participants' creations. The name Les Impatients reinforces the idea that the organization does not consider those attending its workshops as patients, but rather creators who are eager to heal, develop their craft and find their place in society. The participants contribute to the collective objective of breaking down the stigma that surrounds mental illness.Les Impatients collaborates with various mental health organizations in Quebec, such as the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal (IUSMM) affiliated to the Université de Montréal, Douglas Mental Health University Institute (DMHUI), the Centre de santé et services sociaux Drummond (CSSS Drummond) and the Centre de santé et services sociaux Pierre-Boucher (CSSS Pierre-Boucher). Les Impatients offers more than 48 workshops in eight different locations to around 450 participants each week.Dissemination activities, remarkable events, original projects: Les Impatients stands out through its realizations. Examples are exhibitions, collections of love letters, comic books, CD, concerts, and reading nights. The organization's originality resides in the exploration of the links between the work of the participants and that of professional artists. An illustration of this interest is the annual Parle-moi d'amour auction-exhibition, which has been one of Les Impatients' major events since 1999.As part of its mission, Les Impatients conserves the works of art created by the participants during the workshops. Its collection includes more than 15,000 works of art from Les Impatients as well as pieces donated by collectors of unconventional art, commonly known as "art brut" or "outsider art". The

  6. Influence of heteroaggregation processes between intrinsic colloids and carrier colloids on cerium(III) mobility through fractured carbonate rocks.

    PubMed

    Tran, Emily; Klein Ben-David, Ofra; Teutch, Nadya; Weisbrod, Noam

    2016-09-01

    Colloid facilitated transport of radionuclides has been implicated as a major transport vector for leaked nuclear waste in the subsurface. Sorption of radionuclides onto mobile carrier colloids such as bentonite and humic acid often accelerates their transport through saturated rock fractures. Here, we employ column studies to investigate the impact of intrinsic, bentonite and humic acid colloids on the transport and recovery of Ce(III) through a fractured chalk core. Ce(III) recovery where either bentonite or humic colloids were added was 7.7-26.9% Ce for all experiments. Greater Ce(III) recovery was observed when both types of carrier colloids were present (25.4-37.4%). When only bentonite colloids were present, Ce(III) appeared to be fractionated between chemical sorption to the bentonite colloid surfaces and heteroaggregation of bentonite colloids with intrinsic carbonate colloids, precipitated naturally in solution. However, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and colloid stability experiments reveal that in suspensions of humic acid colloids, colloid-facilitated Ce(III) migration results only from the latter attachment mechanism rather than from chemical sorption. This observed heteroaggregation of different colloid types may be an important factor to consider when predicting potential mobility of leaked radionuclides from geological repositories for spent fuel located in carbonate rocks. PMID:27183207

  7. Technetium-99m antimony colloid for bone-marrow imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Martindale, A.A.; Papadimitriou, J.M.; Turner, J.H.

    1980-11-01

    Technetium-99m antimony colloid was prepared in our laboratory for bone-marrow imaging. Optimal production of colloid particles of size range 1 to 13 nm was achieved by the use of polyvinylpyrrolidone of mol. wt. 44,000. Electron microscopy was used to size the particles. Studies in rabbits showed exclusive concentration in the subendothelial dendritic phagocytes of the bone marrow. Pseudopods from these cells were found to traverse interendothelial junctions and concentrate colloid from the sinusoids. Imaging studies of bone marrow in rabbits showed the superiority of the Tc-99m antimony colloid over the much larger colloidal particle of Tc-99m sulfur colloid. Tissue distribution studies in the rat confirmed that bone-marrow uptake of Tc-99m antimony colloid was greater than that of Tc-99m sulfur colloid, although blood clearance was much slower.

  8. COLLOIDAL CONSIDERATIONS IN GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AND CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT PREDICTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The association of contaminants with suspended colloidal material in groundwater is a possible transport mechanism and a complicating factor for accurate estimations of the aqueous geochemistry of subsurface systems. esearch to date indicates colloidal facilitated transport of co...

  9. Nematic colloidal tilings as photonic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravnik, M.; Dontabhaktuni, J.; Cancula, M.; Zumer, S.

    2014-02-01

    Colloidal platelets are explored as elementary building blocks for the shape-controlled assembly of crystalline and quasicrystalline tilings. Using three-dimensional (3D) numerical modelling based on the minimization of Landau-de Gennes free energy for modelling of colloids combined with Finite Difference Time Domain calculations for optics, we demonstrate the self-assembly and optical (transmission) properties of triangular, square and pentagonal sub-micrometer sized platelets in a thin layer of nematic liquid crystal. Interactions between platelets are explored, providing an insight into the assembly process. Two-dimensional tilings of various-shaped colloidal platelets are demonstrated, and their use as diffraction layers is explored by using FDTD simulations. Designing symmetry-breaking surface anchoring profiles on pentagonal platelets opens also a possibility to achieve interactions that could lead to tilings with non-crystalline symmetry.

  10. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly.

  11. Colloids in food: ingredients, structure, and stability.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews progress in the field of food colloids with particular emphasis on advances in novel functional ingredients and nanoscale structuring. Specific aspects of ingredient development described here are the stabilization of bubbles and foams by the protein hydrophobin, the emulsifying characteristics of Maillard-type protein-polysaccharide conjugates, the structural and functional properties of protein fibrils, and the Pickering stabilization of dispersed droplets by food-grade nanoparticles and microparticles. Building on advances in the nanoscience of biological materials, the application of structural design principles to the fabrication of edible colloids is leading to progress in the fabrication of functional dispersed systems-multilayer interfaces, multiple emulsions, and gel-like emulsions. The associated physicochemical insight is contributing to our mechanistic understanding of oral processing and textural perception of food systems and to the development of colloid-based strategies to control delivery of nutrients during food digestion within the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25422877

  12. Dynamic Assembly of Magnetic Colloidal Vortices.

    PubMed

    Mohorič, Tomaž; Kokot, Gašper; Osterman, Natan; Snezhko, Alexey; Vilfan, Andrej; Babič, Dušan; Dobnikar, Jure

    2016-05-24

    Magnetic colloids in external time-dependent fields are subject to complex induced many-body interactions governing their self-assembly into a variety of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium structures such as chains, networks, suspended membranes, and colloidal foams. Here, we report experiments, simulations, and theory probing the dynamic assembly of superparamagnetic colloids in precessing external magnetic fields. Within a range of field frequencies, we observe dynamic large-scale structures such as ordered phases composed of precessing chains, ribbons, and rotating fluidic vortices. We show that the structure formation is inherently coupled to the buildup of torque, which originates from internal relaxation of induced dipoles and from transient correlations among the particles as a result of short-lived chain formation. We discuss in detail the physical properties of the vortex phase and demonstrate its potential in particle-coating applications. PMID:27128501

  13. Collective behavior of thermally active colloids.

    PubMed

    Golestanian, Ramin

    2012-01-20

    Colloids with patchy metal coating under laser irradiation could act as local heat sources and generate temperature gradients that could induce self-propulsion and interactions between them. The collective behavior of a dilute solution of such thermally active particles is studied using a stochastic formulation. It is found that when the Soret coefficient is positive, the system could be described in a stationary state by the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation and could adopt density profiles with significant depletion in the middle region when confined. For colloids with a negative Soret coefficient, the system can be described as a dissipative equivalent of a gravitational system. It is shown that in this case the thermally active colloidal solution could undergo an instability at a critical laser intensity, which has similarities to a supernova explosion. PMID:22400792

  14. Collective Behavior of Thermally Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestanian, Ramin

    2012-01-01

    Colloids with patchy metal coating under laser irradiation could act as local heat sources and generate temperature gradients that could induce self-propulsion and interactions between them. The collective behavior of a dilute solution of such thermally active particles is studied using a stochastic formulation. It is found that when the Soret coefficient is positive, the system could be described in a stationary state by the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation and could adopt density profiles with significant depletion in the middle region when confined. For colloids with a negative Soret coefficient, the system can be described as a dissipative equivalent of a gravitational system. It is shown that in this case the thermally active colloidal solution could undergo an instability at a critical laser intensity, which has similarities to a supernova explosion.

  15. Boundaries Matter for Confined Colloidal Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Gary L.; Edmond, Kazem V.; Weeks, Eric R.

    2012-02-01

    We confine dense colloidal suspensions within emulsion droplets to examine how confinement and properties of the confining medium affect the colloidal glass transition. Samples are imaged via fast confocal microscopy. By observing a wide range of droplet sizes and varying the viscosity of the external continuous phase, we separate finite size and boundary effects on particle motions within the droplet. Suspensions are composed of binary PMMA spheres in organic solvents while the external phases are simple mixtures of water and glycerol. In analogy with molecular super-cooled liquids and thin-film polymers, we find that confinement effects in colloidal systems are not merely functions of the finite size of the system, but are strongly dependent on the viscosity of the confining medium and interactions between particles and the interface of the two phases.

  16. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly. PMID:27426418

  17. Industrial application of surface and colloid science

    SciTech Connect

    Borgarello, E.

    1995-12-01

    Interfacial phenomena are playing a key role in several industrial processes such as oil production and refining, synthesis of chemicals and catalytic reactions. Eniricerche has gained a quite wide experience in applied colloid science in the last fifteen years working together with the Operating Companies of the ENI group. The main areas of interest have been oil production and transportation, fuel formulation, lubrication, bitumen, detergency, reactions in microemulsions, gels for cosmetics, blood substitutes, and photocatalytic degradation of pollutants in colloidal dispersions. The understanding of the interfacial phenomena occurring at the solid-liquid or at the liquid-liquid interface has been a major contribution to the solution of industrial problems. After a short description of Eniricerche activities in applied colloid science, two examples will be described: the hydroformulation of olefines in a microemulsion and the transportation of heavy oil in an oil-in-water emulsion.

  18. Targeted delivery of colloids by swimming bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Koumakis, N.; Lepore, A.; Maggi, C.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of exploiting motile microorganisms as tiny propellers represents a fascinating strategy for the transport of colloidal cargoes. However, delivery on target sites usually requires external control fields to steer propellers and trigger cargo release. The need for a constant feedback mechanism prevents the design of compact devices where biopropellers could perform their tasks autonomously. Here we show that properly designed three-dimensional (3D) microstructures can define accumulation areas where bacteria spontaneously and efficiently store colloidal beads. The process is stochastic in nature and results from the rectifying action of an asymmetric energy landscape over the fluctuating forces arising from collisions with swimming bacteria. As a result, the concentration of colloids over target areas can be strongly increased or depleted according to the topography of the underlying structures. Besides the significance to technological applications, our experiments pose some important questions regarding the structure of stationary probability distributions in non-equilibrium systems. PMID:24100868

  19. Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition (CDOT-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is an image of a colloidal crystal from the CDOT-2 investigation flown on STS-95. There are so many colloidal particles in this sample that it behaves like a glass. In the laboratory on Earth, the sample remained in an amorphous state, showing no sign of crystal growth. In microgravity the sample crystallized in 3 days, as did the other glassy colloidal samples examined in the CDOT-2 experiment. During the investigation, crystallization occurred in samples that had a volume fraction (number of particles per total volume) larger than the formerly reported glass transition of 0.58. This has great implications for theories of the structural glass transition. These crystals were strong enough to survive space shuttle re-entry and landing.

  20. Premelting at Defects Within Bulk Colloidal Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsayed, A. M.; Islam, M. F.; Zhang, J.; Collings, P. J.; Yodh, A. G.

    2005-08-01

    Premelting is the localized loss of crystalline order at surfaces and defects at temperatures below the bulk melting transition. It can be thought of as the nucleation of the melting process. Premelting has been observed at the surfaces of crystals but not within. We report observations of premelting at grain boundaries and dislocations within bulk colloidal crystals using real-time video microscopy. The crystals are equilibrium close-packed, three-dimensional colloidal structures made from thermally responsive microgel spheres. Particle tracking reveals increased disorder in crystalline regions bordering defects, the amount of which depends on the type of defect, distance from the defect, and particle volume fraction. Our observations suggest that interfacial free energy is the crucial parameter for premelting in colloidal and atomic-scale crystals.

  1. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly. PMID:27426418

  2. Convection of a stratified colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepanov, I. N.; Smorodin, B. L.

    2013-11-15

    The convection of a colloidal suspension, which is a binary mixture of a carrier medium with an admixture of nanoparticles having a large positive thermal diffusion parameter, has been studied for the case of the heating of a horizontal cell from below and periodic conditions at the vertical boundaries corresponding to the experimental situation of ring channels. Bifurcation diagrams have been constructed for vibrational and monotonic regimes of the convection of the colloidal mixture. The time dependences of the maximum stream function and the stream function at a fixed point of the cell, as well as the spatial distributions of the concentration field of the colloid admixture, have been obtained. It has been shown that a stable regime of traveling waves exists in a certain region of the parameters of the problem (Boltzmann and Rayleigh numbers characterizing the gravitational stratification and intensity of the thermal effect, respectively)

  3. Phosphate binding by natural iron-rich colloids in streams.

    PubMed

    Baken, Stijn; Moens, Claudia; van der Grift, Bas; Smolders, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Phosphorus (P) in natural waters may be bound to iron (Fe) bearing colloids. However, the natural variation in composition and P binding strength of these colloids remain unclear. We related the composition of "coarse colloids" (colloids in the 0.1-1.2 μm size range) in 47 Belgian streams to the chemical properties of the streamwater. On average, 29% of the P in filtered (<1.2 μm) samples of these streams is present in coarse colloids. The concentration of Fe-rich colloids in streams decreases with increasing water hardness and pH. The P bearing colloids in these streams mostly consist of Fe hydroxyphosphates and of Fe oxyhydroxides with surface adsorbed P, which is underpinned by geochemical speciation calculations. In waters with molar P:Fe ratios above 0.5, only a minor part of the P is bound to coarse colloids. In such waters, the colloids have molar P:Fe ratios between 0.2 and 1 and are, therefore, nearly saturated with P. Conversely, in streams with molar P:Fe ratios below 0.1, most of the P is bound to Fe-rich colloids. Equilibration of synthetic and natural Fe and P bearing colloids with a zero sink reveals that colloids with low molar P:Fe ratios contain mostly nonlabile P, whereas P-saturated colloids contain mostly labile P which can be released within 7 days. Equilibration at a fixed free orthophosphate activity shows that the Fe-rich colloids may bind only limited P through surface adsorption, in the range of 0.02-0.04 mol P (mol Fe)(-1). The P:Fe ratios measured in naturally occurring Fe and P bearing colloids is clearly higher (between 0.05 and 1). These colloids are therefore likely formed by coprecipitation of P during oxidation of Fe(II), which leads to the formation of Fe hydroxyphosphate minerals. PMID:27110889

  4. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Compete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisken, Barbara J.; Bailey, Arthur E.; Weitz, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Compete (BCAT-5-Compete) investigation will photograph andomized colloidal samples onboard the International Space Station (ISS) to determine their resulting structure over time. The use of EarthKAM software and hardware will allow the scientists to capture the kinetics (evolution) of their samples, as well as the final equilibrium state of each sample. BCAT-5-Compete will utilize samples 6 - 8 in the BCAT-5 hardware to study the competition between phase separation and crystallization, which is important in the manufacture of plastics and other materials.

  5. Self-assembly of colloidal surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegel, Willem

    2012-02-01

    We developed colloidal dumbbells with a rough and a smooth part, based on a method reported in Ref. [1]. Specific attraction between the smooth parts occurs upon addition of non-adsorbing polymers of appropriate size. We present the first results in terms of the assemblies that emerge in these systems. [4pt] [1] D.J. Kraft, W.S. Vlug, C.M. van Kats, A. van Blaaderen, A. Imhof and W.K. Kegel, Self-assembly of colloids with liquid protrusions, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 1182, (2009)

  6. Colloidal-gold electrosensor measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Wegner, S.; Harpold, M.A.; McCaffrey, T.M.; Morris, S.E.; Wojciechowski, M.; Zhao, J.; Henkens, R.W.; Naser, N.; O`Daly, J.P.

    1995-11-21

    The present invention provides a new device for use in measuring lead levels in biological and environmental samples. Using square wave coulometry and colloidal gold particles impregnated on carbon electrodes, the present invention provides a rapid, reliable, portable and inexpensive means of detecting low lead levels. The colloidal gold modified electrodes have microelectrode array characteristics and produce significantly higher stripping detection signals for lead than are produced at bulk gold electrode surfaces. The method is effective in determining levels of lead down to at least 5 {micro}g/dL in blood samples as small as 10 {micro}L. 9 figs.

  7. Controlling colloidal interaction through asymetric functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Charles E.

    The use of colloids and nanoparticles is becoming more and more prevalent across all scientific disciplines. The ability to control how these particles interact may yield new structures with unique and useful properties. This thesis contributes a new method of creating dual functionality on colloids, "particle lithography". These modified colloids may be used to bottom-up assemble asymmetric colloidal aggregate structures. Particle lithography allows for the site specific functionalization of a colloid at a single site. The technique is not limited to any specific material and is scalable. The ability to control the patch's size is demonstrated. Characterization of the patch confirms the ability to control the patch size through varying the size of the colloid, the hydrodynamic radius of the coating particles or molecules, and the salt concentration at which the coating is applied. The effects of other experimental conditions on the particle lithography process, such as sonication, are examined. The particle lithography process is extended to functionalize a colloid at two sites. The sites are ninety degrees relative to the center of the colloid. This functionalization is used to form self-assembled trimers. Through this process, the ability to use other particles as masking agents in the particle lithography process is demonstrated. Also demonstrated is the ability to assemble particles composed of differing materials. Modeling aided in understanding how a lithographed and complementary particle might interact. Phase diagrams were constructed to show the critical coagulation concentration of salt needed for a lithographed particle to bind to its complement. This salt concentration is a function of patch size and potential, and particle size and potential. An effective patch size is defined and found to vary little as a function of system parameters. Defining a critical coagulation concentration suggests the ability to store lithographed precursor particles. This

  8. Dynamics of Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Experiments with colloidal solutions of plastic microspheres suspended in a liquid serve as models of how molecules interact and form crystals. For the Dynamics of Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition (CDOT) experiment, Paul Chaikin of Princeton University has identified effects that are attributable to Earth's gravity and demonstrated that experiments are needed in the microgravity of orbit. Space experiments have produced unexpected dendritic (snowflake-like) structures. To date, the largest hard sphere crystal grown is a 3 mm single crystal grown at the cool end of a ground sample. At least two more additional flight experiments are plarned aboard the International Space Station. This image is from a video downlink.

  9. Collective sliding states for colloidal molecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    We study the driving of colloidal molecular crystals over periodic substrates such as those created with optical traps. The n-merization that occurs in the colloidal molecular crystal states produces a remarkably rich variety of distinct dynamical behaviors, including polarization effects within the pinned phase and the formation of both ordered and disordered sliding phases. Using computer simulations, we map the dynamic phase diagrams as a function of substrate strength for dimers and trimers on a triangular substrate, and correlate features on the phase diagram with transport signatures.

  10. Colloidal-gold electrosensor measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Wegner, Steven; Harpold, Michael A.; McCaffrey, Terence M.; Morris, Susan E.; Wojciechowski, Marek; Zhao, Junguo; Henkens, Robert W.; Naser, Najih; O'Daly, John P.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a new device for use in measuring lead levels in biological and environmental samples. Using square wave coulometry and colloidal gold particles impregnated on carbon electrodes, the present invention provides a rapid, reliable, portable and inexpensive means of detecting low lead levels. The colloidal gold modified electrodes have microelectrode array characteristics and produce significantly higher stripping detection signals for lead than are produced at bulk gold electrode surfaces. The method is effective in determining levels of lead down to at least 5 .mu.g/dL in blood samples as small as 10 .mu.L.

  11. Dynamic Light Scattering From Colloidal Gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krall, A. H.; Weitz, David A.

    1996-01-01

    We present a brief, preliminary account of the interpretation of dynamic light scattering from fractal colloidal gels. For small scattering angles, and for high initial colloid particle volume fractions, the correlation functions exhibit arrested decay, reflecting the non-ergodic nature of these systems and allowing us to directly determine the elastic modulus of the gels. For smaller initial volume fractions, the correlation functions decay completely. In all cases, the initial decay is not exponential, but is instead described by a stretched exponential. We summarize the principles of a model that accounts for these data and discuss the scaling behavior of the measured parameters.

  12. Wetting reversal in colloid-polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Blokhuis, Edgar M; Kuipers, Joris

    2010-05-01

    The wetting of a phase-separated colloid-polymer mixture in contact with a hard wall is analyzed using free volume theory in a Nakanishi-Fisher-type approach. We present results for the wetting phase diagram for several model approximations. Our analysis is compared with a previous analysis by Aarts [J. Chem. Phys. 120, 1973 (2004)]. We find that there is a crossover from wetting to drying at a threshold value for the colloid-polymer size ratio and that the transitions are close to the critical point and of second order in nature. PMID:20866234

  13. Fabrication of anisotropic multifunctional colloidal carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerri, Huda A.

    The field of colloidal assembly has grown tremendously in recent years, although the direct or template-assisted methods used to fabricate complex colloidal constructions from monodisperse micro- and nanoparticles have been generally demonstrated on model materials. In this work, novel core particle syntheses, particle functionalizations and bottom-up assembly techniques are presented to create functional colloidal devices. Using particle lithography, high-information colloidal vectors have been developed and modified with imaging and targeting agents. Localized nanoscale patches have been reliably positioned on microparticles to serve as foundations for further chemical or physical modifications. Site-specific placement of RGD targeting ligands has been achieved in these lithographed patches. Preferential uptake of these targeted vectors by RGD-specific 3T3 fibroblasts was verified using confocal laser scanning microscopy. A transition was made from the functionalization of model imaging core particles to the lithography of colloidal cartridges, in an effort to construct colloidal syringes with specialized, programmable release profiles. A variety of functional, pH-sensitive fluorescent cores were engineered to respond to solution conditions. When triggered, the diverse composite core microparticles and reservoir microcapsules released embedded fluorescent moieties such as dye molecules, and fluorophore-conjugated nanoparticles. The microcapsules, created using layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte deposition on sacrificial templates, were selectively modified with a robust coating. The pH-responsive anisotropic reservoir microcapsules were extremely stable in solution, and exhibited a "Lazarus" functionality of rehydrating to their original state following desiccation. A snapshot of focused-release of core constituents through the lone opening in colloidal monotremes has been obtained by anisotropically-functionalizing degradable cores with barrier shells. Additionally

  14. Synthesis of Ionic Colloidal Crystals (ICCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskaly, Garry R.; Garcia, R. Edwin; Carter, W. Craig; Chiang, Yet-Ming

    2003-03-01

    Binary ionic colloidal crystals (ICCs) have been produced by ordered heterocoagulation of colloidal mixtures of silica (negative surface charge) and polystyrene functionalized with amidine (positive surface charge) suspended in isopropanol. Experimental conditions predicted by the theoretical model discussed in a separate talk have been implemented to obtain heterocoagulation of these particles in the rocksalt structure. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental demonstration of the ICC concept. The importance of various experimental parameters on ICC formation is discussed. Particle dynamics simulations are carried out to provide insight into the kinetics of ICCs. Potential applications are discussed.

  15. Bidisperse colloids: nanoparticles and microemulsions in coexistence.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Rico F; Eastoe, Julian; Dowding, Peter J; Grillo, Isabelle; Rogers, Sarah E

    2010-04-15

    Mixed 'hard-soft' colloidal systems have been generated in which the 'hard' components (80 nm diameter silica nanoparticles) coexist with a population of 'soft' microemulsion droplets, both structures stabilised by the anionic surfactant sodium bis(ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) with toluene as solvent. The addition of water to swell the inverse micelles to form microemulsion droplets appears to increase attractive interactions between the silica particles (determined by DLS), possibly due to adsorption of some water at the silica-toluene interface; however, long-term stability of the dispersions is maintained. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to examine the structures present in these new colloidal systems. PMID:20144832

  16. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Phase Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Matthew; Weitz, David A.; Lu, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Phase Separation (BCAT-5-PhaseSep) experiment will photograph initially randomized colloidal samples onboard the ISS to determine their resulting structure over time. This allows the scientists to capture the kinetics (evolution) of their samples, as well as the final equilibrium state of each sample. BCAT-5-PhaseSep studies collapse (phase separation rates that impact product shelf-life); in microgravity the physics of collapse is not masked by being reduced to a simple top and bottom phase as it is on Earth.

  17. Partial rejuvenation of a colloidal glass.

    PubMed

    Ozon, F; Narita, T; Knaebel, A; Debrégeas, G; Hébraud, P; Munch, J-P

    2003-09-01

    We study the effect of shear on the aging dynamics of a colloidal suspension of synthetic clay particles. We find that a shear of amplitude gamma reduces the relaxation time measured just after the cessation of shear by a factor exp(-gamma/gamma(c)), with gamma(c) approximately 5%, and is independent of the duration and the frequency of the shear. This simple law for the rejuvenation effect shows that the energy involved in colloidal rearrangements is proportional to the shear amplitude gamma rather than gamma(2), leading to an Eyring-like description of the dynamics of our system. PMID:14524814

  18. Fabrication of High Sensitive Immunochromato Kit Using Au Colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Koji

    Au colloid have characteristics of surface plasmon resonance with absorption at 500 nm~600 nm wavelength. Surface on the citric acid Au colloid can be conjugated with protein eg. antibody. Various particle size of Au colloid makes it high sensitive immunochromato as diagnostics. High sensitive immunochromato will be useful for application of cancer marker eg. prostate specific antigen and influenza early diagnosis.

  19. Colloid mobilization and transport during capillary fringe fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead-filled column. We studied four specific conditions: (1) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase, (2) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially wet porous medium, (3) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially dry porous medium, and (4) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase with the presence of a static air bubble. Confocal images confirmed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively charged and hydrophilic positively charged colloids did. Our results demonstrate that capillary fringe fluctuations are an effective means for colloid mobilization. PMID:24897130

  20. Ultrasound Propagation in Colloidal Dispersions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Nigel E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis describes apparatus and techniques for making ultrasonic measurements in fluids and applications of them to measurements of ultrasonic parameters in colloidal dispersions. A brief description of the properties and uses of ultrasound propagation in dispersions is followed by an extensive review of theories which relate the particulate properties of the dispersions to the measurable ultrasonic parameters, velocity (c) and attenuation (alpha ). Measurement principles are outlined related to the design of near-field measurement methods and the development of three techniques is described. These are shown to give results which are both highly self-consistent and in excellent agreement with a far-field method. Measurements of alpha and c for model dispersions of glass spheres in Newtonian liquids are shown to be in good agreement with the relevant theory when particle polydispersity is taken into account. For structured fluids as the continuous phase, the alpha and c data for suspensions of spheres are used to obtain the continuous phase viscosity ( eta). The alpha data agree approximately with the macroscopic viscosity, but the velocity data requires the introduction of a shear elastic term and the revision of theory in order to obtain agreement. Attenuation as a function of barite concentration in Newtonian liquids was investigated and the ultrasonic particle radius was found to be systematically larger than expected. This is attributed to particle rugosity. Measurements of alpha and c using non-gelling aqueous kaolinite suspensions are shown to agree well with theory when the eccentricity and the interactions of particles are taken into account. For gelling aqueous bentonite suspensions, alpha and c were found to be time-dependent over a period of several days following initial dispersion. The observed increases in both alpha and c are interpreted in terms of a growth in gel fraction and shear

  1. Colloids in the River Inn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In the light of an increasing number of technical applications using nanoparticles and reports of adverse effects of engineered nanoparticles, research on the occurrence and stability of particles in all compartments has to be intensified. Colloids in river water represent the geologic setting, environmental conditions, and the anthropogenic use in its catchment. The river not only acts as a sink for nanoparticles but also as the source term due to exchange in the hyporheic zone and in bank filtration setups. The concentration, size distribution and elemental composition of particles in the River Inn were studied from the source in the Swiss Alps to the river mouth at Passau from 2008 to 2014. Samples were collected after each tributary from a sub-catchment and filtered on site using a new filtration device for gentle filtration. The elemental composition was determined after acid digestion with ICP/MS. SEM/EDX analysis provided morphological and elemental information for single particles. A complementary chemical analysis of the river water was performed to assess the geochemical stability of individual particles. As presented at EGU 2014, particles in the upper, rural parts mainly reveal changes in the geological setting of the tributary catchments. Not unexpectedly, particles originating from crystalline rocks, were more stable than particles originating from calcareous rocks. Anthropogenic and industrial influences increase in the lower parts. This went together with a change of the size distribution, an increase of the number of organic particles, and a decrease of the microfauna. Interestingly, specific leisure activities in a sub-catchment, like extensive downhill skiing, manifest itself in the particle composition. This general setting was validated in last year's sampling campaigns. An interesting change in on site parameters and hydrochemical composition was seen during all sampling campaigns at an inflow from the valley Kaunertal, Austria. Therefore

  2. Les plaies du tendon patellaire

    PubMed Central

    Mechchat, Atif; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Mardy, Abdelhak; Elayoubi, Abdelghni; Shimi, Mohammed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Les plaies du tendon patellaire sont peu fréquentes et sont peu rapportés dans la littérature, contrairement aux ruptures sous cutanées. Les sections du tendon patellaire nécessitent une réparation immédiate afin de rétablir l'appareil extenseur et de permettre une récupération fonctionnelle précoce. A travers ce travail rétrospectif sur 13 cas, nous analysons les aspects épidémiologiques, thérapeutiques et pronostiques de ce type de pathologie en comparant différents scores. L’âge moyen est de 25 ans avec une prédominance masculine. Les étiologies sont dominées par les accidents de la voie publique (68%) et les agressions par agent tranchant (26%) et contendant (6 %). Tous nos patients ont bénéficié d'un parage chirurgical avec suture tendineuse direct protégée par un laçage au fils d'aciers en légère flexion. La rééducation est débutée après sédation des phénomènes inflammatoires. Au dernier recul les résultats sont excellents et bon à 92%. Nous n'avons pas noté de différence de force musculaire et d'amplitude articulaire entre le genou sain et le genou lésé. Les lésions ouvertes du tendon patellaire est relativement rare. La prise en charge chirurgicale rapide donne des résultats assez satisfaisants. La réparation est généralement renforcée par un semi-tendineux, synthétique ou métallique en forme de cadre de renfort pour faciliter la réadaptation et réduire le risque de récidive après la fin de l'immobilisation. PMID:25170379

  3. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  4. Collective dynamics of rotating colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkiriadou, Sofia; Soni, Vishal; van Zuiden, Benny; Bartolo, Denis; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Irvine, William T. M.

    We study magnetic colloidal particles in suspension under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. When in aggregates, these particles show rich dynamics that are governed by magnetic and hydrodynamic interactions. By tuning these interactions, we probe the phase diagram of this system and study the emergent collective dynamics. Finally, we begin to investigate whether we can control this phase diagram with geometry.

  5. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Chmiel, Alan J.; Eustace, John; LaBarbera, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Increment 43 - 44 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  6. Colloidal crystal grain boundary formation and motion

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Tara D.; Yang, Yuguang; Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to assemble nano- and micro- sized colloidal components into highly ordered configurations is often cited as the basis for developing advanced materials. However, the dynamics of stochastic grain boundary formation and motion have not been quantified, which limits the ability to control and anneal polycrystallinity in colloidal based materials. Here we use optical microscopy, Brownian Dynamic simulations, and a new dynamic analysis to study grain boundary motion in quasi-2D colloidal bicrystals formed within inhomogeneous AC electric fields. We introduce “low-dimensional” models using reaction coordinates for condensation and global order that capture first passage times between critical configurations at each applied voltage. The resulting models reveal that equal sized domains at a maximum misorientation angle show relaxation dominated by friction limited grain boundary diffusion; and in contrast, asymmetrically sized domains with less misorientation display much faster grain boundary migration due to significant thermodynamic driving forces. By quantifying such dynamics vs. compression (voltage), kinetic bottlenecks associated with slow grain boundary relaxation are understood, which can be used to guide the temporal assembly of defect-free single domain colloidal crystals. PMID:25139760

  7. Self assembly of anisotropic colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florea, Daniel; Wyss, Hans

    2012-02-01

    Colloidal particles have been successfully used as ''model atoms'', as their behavior can be more directly studied than that of atoms or molecules by direct imaging in a confocal microscope. Most studies have focussed on spherical particles with isotropic interactions. However, a range of interesting materials such as many supramolecular polymers or biopolymers exhibit highly directional interactions. To capture their behavior in colloidal model systems, particles with anisotropic interactions are clearly required. Here we use a colloidal system of nonspherical colloids, where highly directional interactions can be induced via depletion. By biaxially stretching spherical PMMA particles we create oblate spheroidal particles. We induce attractive interactions between these particles by adding a non-adsorbing polymer to the background liquid. The resulting depletion interaction is stronger along the minor axis of the oblate spheroids. We study the phase behavior of these materials as a function of the ellipsoid aspect ratio, the strength of the depletion interactions, and the particle concentration. The resulting morphologies are qualitatively different from those observed with spherical particles. This can be exploited for creating new materials with tailored structures.

  8. Practical colloidal processing of multication ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nelson S.; Monson, Todd C.; Diantonio, Christopher; Wu, Yiquan

    2015-09-07

    The use of colloidal processing principles in the formation of ceramic materials is well appreciated for developing homogeneous material properties in sintered products, enabling novel forming techniques for porous ceramics or 3D printing, and controlling microstructure to enable optimized material properties. The solution processing of electronic ceramic materials often involves multiple cationic elements or dopants to affect microstructure and properties. Material stability must be considered through the steps of colloidal processing to optimize desired component properties. This review provides strategies for preventing material degradation in particle synthesis, milling processes, and dispersion, with case studies of consolidation using spark plasma sintering of these systems. The prevention of multication corrosion in colloidal dispersions can be achieved by utilizing conditions similar to the synthesis environment or by the development of surface passivation layers. The choice of dispersing surfactants can be related to these surface states, which are of special importance for nanoparticle systems. A survey of dispersant chemistries related to some common synthesis conditions is provided for perovskite systems as an example. Furthermore, these principles can be applied to many colloidal systems related to electronic and optical applications.

  9. Practical colloidal processing of multication ceramics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bell, Nelson S.; Monson, Todd C.; Diantonio, Christopher; Wu, Yiquan

    2015-09-07

    The use of colloidal processing principles in the formation of ceramic materials is well appreciated for developing homogeneous material properties in sintered products, enabling novel forming techniques for porous ceramics or 3D printing, and controlling microstructure to enable optimized material properties. The solution processing of electronic ceramic materials often involves multiple cationic elements or dopants to affect microstructure and properties. Material stability must be considered through the steps of colloidal processing to optimize desired component properties. This review provides strategies for preventing material degradation in particle synthesis, milling processes, and dispersion, with case studies of consolidation using spark plasma sinteringmore » of these systems. The prevention of multication corrosion in colloidal dispersions can be achieved by utilizing conditions similar to the synthesis environment or by the development of surface passivation layers. The choice of dispersing surfactants can be related to these surface states, which are of special importance for nanoparticle systems. A survey of dispersant chemistries related to some common synthesis conditions is provided for perovskite systems as an example. Furthermore, these principles can be applied to many colloidal systems related to electronic and optical applications.« less

  10. Photoelectrochromism in Tungsten Trioxide Colloidal Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenthamarakshan, C. R.; Tacconi, N. R. de; Xu, Lucy; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2004-01-01

    Photophysical and photochemical properties of semiconductor metal oxide colloids are studied in the context of photoelectrochemical conversion and storage of solar energy. The experiment teaches the instrumental principles of UV-visible spectrophotometry, spectral acquisition and background subtraction strategies and diode array spectrometers.

  11. Cobalt-doped cadmium selenide colloidal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Du, Ai Jun; Sun, Qiao; Aljada, Muhsen; Cheng, Li Na; Riley, Mark J; Zhu, Zhong Hua; Cheng, Zhen Xiang; Wang, Xiao Lin; Hall, Jeremy; Krausz, Elmars; Qiao, Shi Zhang; Smith, Sean C; Lu, Gao Qing Max

    2011-11-21

    Co(2+)-doped CdSe colloidal nanowires with tunable size and dopant concentration have been prepared by a solution-liquid-solid (SLS) approach for the first time. These doped nanowires exhibit anomalous photoluminescence temperature dependence in comparison with undoped nanowires. PMID:21975534

  12. Solid colloids with surface-mobile linkers.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Stef A J; Helms, Gesa; Dogterom, Marileen

    2015-06-17

    In this report we review the possibilities of using colloids with surface mobile linkers for the study of colloidal self-assembly processes. A promising route to create systems with mobile linkers is the use of lipid (bi-)layers. These lipid layers can be either used in the form of vesicles or as coatings for hard colloids and emulsion droplets. Inside the lipid bilayers molecules can be inserted via membrane anchors. Due to the fluidity of the lipid bilayer, the anchored molecules remain mobile. The use of different lipid mixtures even allows creating Janus-like particles that exhibit directional bonding if linkers are used which have a preference for a certain lipid phase. In nature mobile linkers can be found e.g. as receptors in cells. Therefore, towards the end of the review, we also briefly address the possibility of using colloids with surface mobile linkers as model systems to mimic cell-cell interactions and cell adhesion processes. PMID:25993272

  13. Prospects of Colloidal Copper Chalcogenide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    van der Stam, Ward; Berends, Anne C; de Mello Donega, Celso

    2016-03-01

    Over the past few years, colloidal copper chalcogenide nanocrystals (NCs) have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional Cd and Pb chalcogenide NCs. Owing to their wide size, shape, and composition tunability, Cu chalcogenide NCs hold great promise for several applications, such as photovoltaics, lighting and displays, and biomedical imaging. They also offer characteristics that are unparalleled by Cd and Pb chalcogenide NCs, such as plasmonic properties. Moreover, colloidal Cu chalcogenide NCs have low toxicity, potentially lower costs, and excellent colloidal stability. This makes them attractive materials for the large-scale deployment of inexpensive, sustainable, and environmentally benign solution-processed devices. Nevertheless, the synthesis of colloidal Cu chalcogenide NCs, especially that of ternary and quaternary compositions, has yet to reach the same level of mastery as that available for the prototypical Cd chalcogenide based NCs. This review provides a concise overview of this rapidly advancing field, sketching the state of the art and highlighting the key challenges. We discuss recent developments in the synthesis of size-, shape-, and composition-controlled NCs of Cu chalcogenides, with emphasis in strategies to circumvent the limitations arising from the need to precisely balance the reactivities of multiple precursors in synthesizing ternary and quaternary compositions. In this respect, we show that topotactic cation-exchange reactions are a promising alternative route to complex multinary Cu chalcogenide NCs and hetero-NCs, which are not attainable by conventional routes. The properties and potential applications of Cu chalcogenide NCs and hetero-NCs are also addressed. PMID:26684665

  14. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  15. Colloid Formation at Waste Plume Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Saiz, Eduardo; Larsen, Joern T.; Zheng, Zuoping; Couture, Rex A.

    2004-05-22

    Highly saline and caustic tank waste solutions containing radionuclides and toxic metals have leaked into sediments at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities such as the Hanford Site (Washington State). Colloid transport is frequently invoked to explain migration of radionuclides and metals in the subsurface. To understand colloid formation during interactions between highly reactive fluids and sediments and its impact on contaminant transport, we simulated tank waste solution (TWS) leakage processes in laboratory columns at ambient and elevated (70 C) temperatures. We found that maximum formation of mobile colloids occurred at the plume fronts (hundreds to thousands times higher than within the plume bodies or during later leaching). Concentrations of suspended solids were as high as 3 mass%, and their particle-sizes ranged from tens of nm to a few {micro}m. Colloid chemical composition and mineralogy depended on temperature. During infiltration of the leaked high Na{sup +} waste solution, rapid and completed Na{sup +} replacement of exchangeable Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} from the sediment caused accumulation of these divalent cations at the moving plume front. Precipitation of supersaturated Ca{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+}-bearing minerals caused dramatic pH reduction at the plume front. In turn, the reduced pH caused precipitation of other minerals. This understanding can help predict the behavior of contaminant trace elements carried by the tank waste solutions, and could not have been obtained through conventional batch studies.

  16. Motile Fluids: Granular, Colloidal and Living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2014-03-01

    My talk will present our recent results from theory, simulation and experiment on flocking, swarming and instabilities in diverse realizations of active systems. The findings I will report include: flocking at a distance in vibrated granular monolayers; the active hydrodynamics of self-propelled solids; clusters, asters and oscillations in colloidal chemotaxis. Supported by a J C Bose Fellowship.

  17. The colloidal chemistry of ceramic clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    The colloidal chemistry and mineralogy of two argil minerals were studied. Deposits of kaolin and of ceramic clays in the United States and England are discussed for the probable mechanism of formation. The structural modifications of the bed, original material associated with the clays and the proper use of flocculants are discussed.

  18. Grafting of oligosaccharides onto synthetic polymer colloids.

    PubMed

    Mange, Siyabonga; Dever, Cédric; De Bruyn, Hank; Gaborieau, Marianne; Castignolles, Patrice; Gilbert, Robert G

    2007-06-01

    A new method to form colloidally stable oligosaccharide-grafted synthetic polymer particles has been developed. The oligosaccharides, of weight-average degree of polymerization approximately 38, were obtained by enzymatic debranching of amylopectin. Through the use of a cerium(IV)-based redox initiation process, oligosaccharide chains are grafted onto a synthetic polymer colloid comprising electrostatically stabilized poly(methyl methacrylate) or polystyrene latex particles swollen with methyl methacrylate monomer. Ce(IV) creates a radical species on these oligosaccharides, which then propagates, initially with aqueous-phase monomer, then with the methyl methacrylate monomer inside the particles. Ultracentrifugation, NMR, and total starch analyses together prove that the grafting process has occurred, with at least 7.7 wt % starch grafted and a grafting efficiency of 33%. The surfactant used in latex preparation was removed by dialysis, resulting in particles colloidally stabilized with only linear starch as a steric stabilizer. The debranched starch that comprises these oligosaccharides is found to be a remarkably effective colloidal stabilizer, albeit at low electrolyte concentration, stabilizing particles with very sparse surface coverage. PMID:17497920

  19. Bonded boojum-colloids in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Zahra; Silvestre, Nuno M; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2013-08-20

    We investigate bonded boojum-colloids in nematic liquid crystals, configurations where two colloids with planar degenerate anchoring are double-bonded through line defects connecting their surfaces. This bonded structure promotes the formation of linear chains aligned with the nematic director. We show that the bonded configuration is the global minimum in systems that favor twist deformations. In addition, we investigate the influence of confinement on the stability of bonded boojum-colloids. Although the unbonded colloid configuration, where the colloids bundle at oblique angles, is favored by confinement, the bonded configuration is again the global minimum for liquid crystals with sufficiently small twist elastic constants. PMID:23859624

  20. Colloidal nickel boride catalyst for hydrogenation of olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Y.; Fujishige, S.

    1981-04-01

    Colloidal nickel boride was prepared from nickel(II) chloride by reduction with sodium borohydride in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone in ethanol. Hydrogenation of various olefins was examined over the colloidal catalyst at 30/sup 0/C and atmospheric pressure. The colloidal nickel boride was much more effective than the precipitated nickel boride prepared in the absence of polyvinylpyrrolidone as a hydrogenation catalyst, especially for isopropenyl compounds. Additional amines and sodium acetate were slightly inhibitive to the colloidal catalyst, while, being strongly promotive to the precipitated catalyst. The colloidal nickel boride was superior to the charcoal-supported metals of the platinum group in catalytic activity for ..cap alpha..-methylstyrene.

  1. Validating LES for Jet Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Engineers charged with making jet aircraft quieter have long dreamed of being able to see exactly how turbulent eddies produce sound and this dream is now coming true with the advent of large eddy simulation (LES). Two obvious challenges remain: validating the LES codes at the resolution required to see the fluid-acoustic coupling, and the interpretation of the massive datasets that are produced. This paper addresses the former, the use of advanced experimental techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV) and Raman and Rayleigh scattering, to validate the computer codes and procedures used to create LES solutions. This paper argues that the issue of accuracy of the experimental measurements be addressed by cross-facility and cross-disciplinary examination of modern datasets along with increased reporting of internal quality checks in PIV analysis. Further, it argues that the appropriate validation metrics for aeroacoustic applications are increasingly complicated statistics that have been shown in aeroacoustic theory to be critical to flow-generated sound, such as two-point space-time velocity correlations. A brief review of data sources available is presented along with examples illustrating cross-facility and internal quality checks required of the data before it should be accepted for validation of LES.

  2. Validating LES for Jet Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    Engineers charged with making jet aircraft quieter have long dreamed of being able to see exactly how turbulent eddies produce sound and this dream is now coming true with the advent of large eddy simulation (LES). Two obvious challenges remain: validating the LES codes at the resolution required to see the fluid-acoustic coupling, and the interpretation of the massive datasets that result in having dreams come true. This paper primarily addresses the former, the use of advanced experimental techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV) and Raman and Rayleigh scattering, to validate the computer codes and procedures used to create LES solutions. It also addresses the latter problem in discussing what are relevant measures critical for aeroacoustics that should be used in validating LES codes. These new diagnostic techniques deliver measurements and flow statistics of increasing sophistication and capability, but what of their accuracy? And what are the measures to be used in validation? This paper argues that the issue of accuracy be addressed by cross-facility and cross-disciplinary examination of modern datasets along with increased reporting of internal quality checks in PIV analysis. Further, it is argued that the appropriate validation metrics for aeroacoustic applications are increasingly complicated statistics that have been shown in aeroacoustic theory to be critical to flow-generated sound.

  3. Assembly of Colloidal Materials Using Bioadhesive Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Daniel A.; Hiddessen, Amy L.; Tohver, Valeria; Crocker, John C.; Weitz, David A.

    2002-01-01

    We have pursued the use of biological crosslinking molecules of several types to make colloidal materials at relatively low volume fraction of colloidal particles. The objective is to make binary alloys of colloidal particles, made of two different colloidal particles coated with complementary biological lock-and-key binding molecules, which assemble due to the biological specificity. The long-term goal is to use low affinity lock-and-key biological interactions, so that the can anneal to form crystalline states. We have used a variety of different surface chemistries in order to make colloidal materials. Our first system involved using selectin-carbohydrate (sialyl-Lewis) interactions; this chemistry is derived from immune system. This chemical interaction is of relatively low affinity, with timescales for dissociation of several seconds. Furthermore, the adhesion mediated by these molecules can be reversed by the chelation of calcium atoms; thus assembled structures can be disassembled reversibly. Our second system employed avidin-biotin chemistry. This well-studied system is of high affinity, and is generally irreversible on a laboratory time-scale. Thus, we would expect selectin-carbohydrate interactions at high molecular density and avidin-biotin interactions to give kinetically-trapped structures; however, at low densities, we would expect significant differences in the structure and dynamics of the two materials, owing to their very different release rates. We have also begun to use a third chemistry - DNA hybridization. By attaching single stranded DNA oligonucleotide chains to beads, we can drive the assembly of colloidal materials by hybridization of complementary DNA chains. It is well known that DNA adenosine-thymine (A-T) and guanine-cytosine (G-C) bases hybridize pairwise with a Gibbs free energy change of 1.7 kcal/mol per base; thus, the energy of the assembly can be modulated by altering the number of complementary bases in the DNA chains. Using

  4. Assembly of Colloidal Materials Using Bioadhesive Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel A.; Hiddessen, Amy L.; Tohver, Valeria; Crocker, John C.; Weitz, David A.

    2002-11-01

    We have pursued the use of biological crosslinking molecules of several types to make colloidal materials at relatively low volume fraction of colloidal particles. The objective is to make binary alloys of colloidal particles, made of two different colloidal particles coated with complementary biological lock-and-key binding molecules, which assemble due to the biological specificity. The long-term goal is to use low affinity lock-and-key biological interactions, so that the can anneal to form crystalline states. We have used a variety of different surface chemistries in order to make colloidal materials. Our first system involved using selectin-carbohydrate (sialyl-Lewis) interactions; this chemistry is derived from immune system. This chemical interaction is of relatively low affinity, with timescales for dissociation of several seconds. Furthermore, the adhesion mediated by these molecules can be reversed by the chelation of calcium atoms; thus assembled structures can be disassembled reversibly. Our second system employed avidin-biotin chemistry. This well-studied system is of high affinity, and is generally irreversible on a laboratory time-scale. Thus, we would expect selectin-carbohydrate interactions at high molecular density and avidin-biotin interactions to give kinetically-trapped structures; however, at low densities, we would expect significant differences in the structure and dynamics of the two materials, owing to their very different release rates. We have also begun to use a third chemistry - DNA hybridization. By attaching single stranded DNA oligonucleotide chains to beads, we can drive the assembly of colloidal materials by hybridization of complementary DNA chains. It is well known that DNA adenosine-thymine (A-T) and guanine-cytosine (G-C) bases hybridize pairwise with a Gibbs free energy change of 1.7 kcal/mol per base; thus, the energy of the assembly can be modulated by altering the number of complementary bases in the DNA chains. Using

  5. Colloid suspension stability and transport through unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, M.A.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1997-04-01

    Contaminant transport is traditionally modeled in a two-phase system: a mobile aqueous phase and an immobile solid phase. Over the last 15 years, there has been an increasing awareness of a third, mobile solid phase. This mobile solid phase, or mobile colloids, are organic or inorganic submicron-sized particles that move with groundwater flow. When colloids are present, the net effect on radionuclide transport is that radionuclides can move faster through the system. It is not known whether mobile colloids exist in the subsurface environment of the Hanford Site. Furthermore, it is not known if mobile colloids would likely exist in a plume emanating from a Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal site. No attempt was made in this study to ascertain whether colloids would form. Instead, experiments and calculations were conducted to evaluate the likelihood that colloids, if formed, would remain in suspension and move through saturated and unsaturated sediments. The objectives of this study were to evaluate three aspects of colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides as they specifically relate to the LLW Performance Assessment. These objectives were: (1) determine if the chemical conditions likely to exist in the near and far field of the proposed disposal site are prone to induce flocculation (settling of colloids from suspension) or dispersion of naturally occurring Hanford colloids, (2) identify the important mechanisms likely involved in the removal of colloids from a Hanford sediment, and (3) determine if colloids can move through unsaturated porous media.

  6. Analysis of colloids released from bentonite and crushed rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahtinen, M.; Hölttä, P.; Riekkola, M.-L.; Yohannes, G.

    Inorganic colloids are present in natural groundwater but colloids can also be produced from degraded Engineered Barrier System (EBS) materials. The potential relevance of colloids for radionuclide transport is highly dependent on the release and stability of colloids in different chemical environments and their interaction with radionuclides. In this work, release and stability of inorganic colloids were determined from bentonite and crushed rock which will be used in the tunnel back-fill. In the batch dispersion experiments, MX-80 bentonite powder or crushed rock samples of mica gneiss, unaltered and two altered tonalites were added to Milli-Q water, saline OLSO, and low salinity Allard reference water with adjusted pH values 7-9. After 4 months, pH, particle size distribution, zeta potential, morphology, elemental composition, and colloid concentration were analyzed. The release and stability of colloids depended significantly on groundwater salinity, pH, and the degree of alteration of the rock. In saline OLSO, zeta potential values near zero, wide particle size range, and low colloid concentrations indicated particle aggregation and instable colloidal dispersion. In low salinity Allard and Milli-Q water, high or moderate negative zeta potential values, smaller particle sizes, and higher colloid concentrations than in OLSO indicated the existence of stable colloids.

  7. Colloid Bound Transport of Contaminats In The Unsaturated Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, T.; Christ, A.

    Colloids can play a major role in the relocation of contaminants in the unsaturated zone. The amount of colloid driven transport is defined by soil chemistry, soil water chemistry and water flow velocity as well as colloid composition and formation. In a current research project we investigate the filtration and mobilization of colloids in unsaturated column studies. We use different soil types, chosen by a wide range of mean grain size and heterogeneity. Particle tracers are polystyrene solids with a de- fined negative surface charge and defined size from 50 nm to 10 µm. In addition, we use natural colloids extracted from a wide range of contaminated and uncontaminated land. Experimental conditions are exactly controlled throughout all the time. We alter mainly flow velocity ionic strength in order to study the filtration behaviour of the soils. In addition, Pyrene and Lead are are used as model contaminants. First results show the colloids are not retarded in many coarse structured soil types. Preferential colloid flow shows a major impact in breakthrough behaviour. Colloid bound lead is relocated significant through the unsaturated zone, whereas non colloid bound lead species are strongly retarded. In the presentation we will show results of contami- nant processes and present new results on the filtration behaviour of colloids in the unsaturated zone depending on flow velocity, soil type and colloid size.

  8. Scattering from correlations in colloidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions typically exhibit spatial correlations over distances of order 10-10/sup 4/ A, corresponding either to the size of individual particles (e.g., polymer chains, surfactant micelles) or to the range of interaction between particles (e.g., charged polymer lattices at low ionic strength). Apart from having fundamental intrinsic interest, such systems are also extremely useful as model systems with which to study, for example, non-Newtonian hydrodynamics, since temporal correlations are generally much longer lived (10/sup -8/-10/sup -3/ sec) than those found in simple atomic or small molecular systems (10/sup -13/-10/sup -10/ sec). Colloids have long been the subject of macroscopic phenomenological research (on rheological properties, for example), but it is only recently that microscopic light, x-ray and neutron scattering techniques have been applied to their study, in large part because of theoretical difficulties in understanding the scattering from dense liquid-like systems of interacting particles. For spherical colloids, such theoretical problems have now been largely overcome, and for anisotropic colloids experimental techniques are being developed which circumvent the intractable theoretical areas. This paper will first review some static light and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) results on colloidal suspensions, both at equilibrium and in steady-state non-equilibrium situations, and will then discuss some dynamic measurements on polymer solutions and melts made using the neutron spin-echo (NSE) technique. Emphasis is placed on experiments which have a possible counterpart in synchrotron radiation studies. In particular, NSE extends the results of photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) to larger momentum transfers and shorter time-scales than are available with visible light, and the extension of PCS to short wavelength on a synchrotron source would be of similar fundamental interest.

  9. Colloid Mobilization and Transport during Capillary Fringe Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead filled column. Confocal images showed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively-charged and hydrophilic positively-charged colloids did.

  10. [Preliminary study of colloid osmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Xiang, L; Luo, J

    1996-12-01

    The ideal colloid osmotic pressure is beneficial to decrease the fluid accumulated in the pulmonary and other tissue during cardiopulmonary bypass. Schupbach reported the proper colloidosmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass was 2.1 kPa (16 mmHg). Colloid osmotic pressures of blood and priming fluid during cardiopulmonary bypass were measured in 28 patients with heart disease by using colloid osmotic pressure detection apparatus. The value of colloid osmotic pressure suitable for the designed standard was apparently different among the Gelofusine group and other groups. P value was 0.005. Priming fluid for cardiopulmonary bypass needs to satisfy the quality and the quantity of colloid osmotic pressure. Using Albumin isn't economical. Whole blood and plazma are not suitable for increasing colloid osmotic pressure. Hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine is best choice in priming to get designed standard of colloid osmotic pressure. The ratio of hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine in priming fluid should beyond 1/2. PMID:9590779

  11. Tracking liquid in drying colloidal fluids with polarized light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kun; Park, Jung Soo; Kim, Joon Heon; Weon, Byung Mook

    2014-11-01

    When colloidal fluids dry, tracking liquid surfaces around colloids is difficult with conventional imaging techniques. Here we show that polarized light microscopy (PM) is very useful in tracking liquid surfaces during drying processes of colloidal fluids. In particular, the PM mode is not a new or difficult way but is able to visualize liquid films above colloids in real time. We demonstrate that when liquid films above colloidal particles are broken, the PM patterns appear clearly: this feature is useful to identify the moment of liquid film rupture above colloids in drying colloidal fluids. This result is helpful to improve relevant processes such as inkjet printing, painting, and nanoparticle patterning (K.C. and J.S.P. equally contributed). This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST.

  12. Modeling of Hydrodynamic Chromatography for Colloid Migration in Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shihhai; Jen, C.-P

    2001-02-15

    The role of colloids in the migration of radionuclides in the geosphere has been emphasized in the performance assessment of high-level radioactive waste disposal. The literature indicates that the colloid velocity may not be equal to the velocity of groundwater owing to hydrodynamic chromatography. A theoretical model for hydrodynamic chromatography of colloid migration in the fracture is proposed in the present work. In this model, the colloids are treated as nonreactive and the external forces acting on colloidal particles are considered including the inertial force, the van der Waals attractive force, and the electrical double-layer repulsive force, as well as the gravitational force. A fully developed concentration profile for colloids is obtained to elucidate migration behavior for colloids in the fracture. The effects of parameters governing these forces and the aperture of the fracture are determined using a theoretical model.

  13. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01

    The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface

  14. Quantitative uptake of colloidal particles by cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Feliu, Neus; Hühn, Jonas; Zyuzin, Mikhail V; Ashraf, Sumaira; Valdeperez, Daniel; Masood, Atif; Said, Alaa Hassan; Escudero, Alberto; Pelaz, Beatriz; Gonzalez, Elena; Duarte, Miguel A Correa; Roy, Sathi; Chakraborty, Indranath; Lim, Mei L; Sjöqvist, Sebastian; Jungebluth, Philipp; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2016-10-15

    The use of nanotechnologies involving nano- and microparticles has increased tremendously in the recent past. There are various beneficial characteristics that make particles attractive for a wide range of technologies. However, colloidal particles on the other hand can potentially be harmful for humans and environment. Today, complete understanding of the interaction of colloidal particles with biological systems still remains a challenge. Indeed, their uptake, effects, and final cell cycle including their life span fate and degradation in biological systems are not fully understood. This is mainly due to the complexity of multiple parameters which need to be taken in consideration to perform the nanosafety research. Therefore, we will provide an overview of the common denominators and ideas to achieve universal metrics to assess their safety. The review discusses aspects including how biological media could change the physicochemical properties of colloids, how colloids are endocytosed by cells, how to distinguish between internalized versus membrane-attached colloids, possible correlation of cellular uptake of colloids with their physicochemical properties, and how the colloidal stability of colloids may vary upon cell internalization. In conclusion three main statements are given. First, in typically exposure scenarios only part of the colloids associated with cells are internalized while a significant part remain outside cells attached to their membrane. For quantitative uptake studies false positive counts in the form of only adherent but not internalized colloids have to be avoided. pH sensitive fluorophores attached to the colloids, which can discriminate between acidic endosomal/lysosomal and neutral extracellular environment around colloids offer a possible solution. Second, the metrics selected for uptake studies is of utmost importance. Counting the internalized colloids by number or by volume may lead to significantly different results. Third, colloids

  15. EDITORIAL: Colloidal dispersions in external fields Colloidal dispersions in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Colloidal dispersions have long been proven as pivotal model systems for equilibrium phase transition such as crystallization, melting and liquid-gas phase transition. The last decades have revealed that this is also true for nonequilibrium phenomena. In fact, the fascinating possibility to track the individual trajectories of colloidal particles has greatly advanced our understanding of collective behaviour in classical many-body systems and has helped to reveal the underlying physical principles of glass transition, crystal nucleation, and interfacial dynamics (to name just a few typical nonequilibrium effects). External fields can be used to bring colloids out of equilibrium in a controlled way. Different kinds of external fields can be applied to colloidal dispersions, namely shear flow, electric, magnetic and laser-optical fields, and confinement. Typical research areas can be sketched with the by now traditional complexity diagram (figure 1). The complexity of the colloidal system itself as embodied in statistical degrees of freedom is shown on the x-axis while the complexity of the problem posed, namely bulk, an inhomogeneity in equilibrium, steady state nonequilibrium and full time-dependent nonequilibrium are shown on the y-axis. The different external fields which can be imposed are indicated by the different hatched areas. figure1 Figure 1. Diagram of complexity for colloidal dispersions in external fields: while the x-axis shows the complexity of the system, the y-axis shows the complexity of the problem. Regions which can be accessed by different kinds of external fields are indicated. The arrows indicate recent research directions. Active particles are also indicated with a special complexity of internal degrees of freedom [1]. This collection of papers reflects the scientific programme of the International Conference on Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields III (CODEF III) which took place in Bonn-Bad Godesberg from 20-23 March 2012. This was the

  16. Hierarchical microstructures formed by bidisperse colloidal suspensions within colloid-in-liquid crystal gels.

    PubMed

    Diestra-Cruz, Heberth; Bukusoglu, Emre; Abbott, Nicholas L; Acevedo, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    Past studies have reported that colloids of a single size dispersed in the isotropic phase of a mesogenic solvent can form colloid-rich networks (and gels) upon thermal quenching of the system across the isotropic-nematic phase boundary of the mesogens. Herein we report the observation and characterization of complex hierarchical microstructures that form when bidisperse colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles (NPs; iron oxide with diameters of 188 ± 20 nm or poly(methyl methacrylate) with diameters of 150 ± 15 nm) and microparticles (MPs; polystyrene with diameters of 2.77 ± 0.20 μm) are dispersed in the isotropic phase of 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) and thermally quenched. Specifically, we document microstructuring that results from three sequential phase separation processes that occur at distinct temperatures during stepwise cooling of the ternary mixture from its miscibility region. The first phase transition demixes the system into coexisting MP-rich and NP-rich phases; the second promotes formation of a particle network within the MP-rich phase; and the third, which coincides with the isotropic-to-nematic phase transition of 5CB, produces a second colloidal network within the NP-rich phase. We quantified the dynamics of each demixing process by using optical microscopy and Fourier transform image analysis to establish that the phase transitions occur through (i) surface-directed spinodal decomposition, (ii) spinodal decomposition, and (iii) nucleation and growth, respectively. Significantly, the observed series of phase transitions leads to a hierarchical organization of cellular microstructures not observed in colloid-in-liquid crystal gels formed from monodisperse colloids. The results of this study suggest new routes to the synthesis of colloidal materials with hierarchical microstructures that combine large surface areas and organized porosity with potential applications in catalysis, separations, chemical sensing, or tissue engineering. PMID

  17. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) Science Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Luna, Unique J.; Chaiken, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew; Secanna, Stefano; Weitz, David; Lu, Peter; Yodh, Arjun; Yunker, Peter; Lohr, Matthew; Gratale, Matthew; Lynch, Matthew; Kodger, Thomas; Piazza, Roberto; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Cipelletti, Luca; Schall, Peter; Veen, Sandra; Wegdam, Gerhard; Lee, Chand-Soo; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J.; Cohen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Colloids Experiment is being conducted on the International Space Station (ISS) using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). Work to date will be discussed and future plans and opportunities will be highlighted. The LMM is a microscope facility designed to allow scientists to process, manipulate, and characterize colloidal samples in micro-gravity where the absence of gravitational settling and particle jamming enables scientists to study such things as:a.The role that disordered and ordered-packing of spheres play in the phase diagram and equation of state of hard sphere systems,b.crystal nucleation and growth, growth instabilities, and the glass transition, c.gelation and phase separation of colloid polymer mixtures,d.crystallization of colloidal binary alloys,e.competition between crystallization and phase separation,f.effects of anisotropy and specific interactions on packing, aggregation, frustration and crystallization,g.effects of specific reversible and irreversible interactions mediated in the first case by hybridization of complementary DNA strands attached to separate colloidal particles,h.Lock and key interactions between colloids with dimples and spheres which match the size and shape of the dimples,i.finding the phase diagrams of isotropic and interacting particles,j.new techniques for complex self-assembly including scenarios for self-replication, k.critical Casimir forces,l.biology (real and model systems) in microgravity,m.etc. By adding additional microscopy capabilities to the existing LMM, NASA will increase the tools available for scientists that fly experiments on the ISS enabling scientists to observe directly what is happening at the particle level. Presently, theories are needed to bridge the gap between what is being observed (at a macroscopic level when photographing samples) with what is happening at a particle (or microscopic) level. What is happening at a microscopic level will be directly

  18. Approaches to separations using silica colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignacio-de Leon, Patricia Anne Argana

    This thesis describes the synthesis and properties of free-standing nanoporous silica colloidal membranes where the molecular transport is controlled on the basis of size, charge, and chiral selectivity. To achieve this, free-standing membranes were prepared from colloidal solutions of silica nanospheres and the nanopore size and surface functionality were varied. First, Au-coated membranes were prepared and the transport of neutral and charged small molecules through Au-coated silica colloidal membranes modified with poly(methacrylic acid) was studied. Polymer length was controlled by polymerization time to produce pH- and ion-responsive brushes inside the nanopores. By monitoring the flux of a diffusing species, it was demonstrated that the polyelectrolyte brush undergoes swelling and collapse when the pH is increased and decreased, respectively. We also observed an expansion and contraction in the absence and presence of counterions, respectively. We also studied the transport of enantiomers of a chiral dye molecule through silica colloidal membranes with attached chiral moieties. We used small molecules and polymers of amino acid derivatives and chiral calixarenes capable of chiral recognition as a result of stereochemically dependent noncovalent interactions with the diffusing molecule. We found that the selectivity remains approximately the same for membranes modified with small molecules and with polymers. This suggests that enantiopermselectivity depends primarily on the strength of noncovalent interactions rather than the availability of recognition sites. Next, the transport of various generations of dendrimers through silica colloidal membranes was studied in a proof-of-concept experiment to demonstrate the size-selectivity of our materials. Smaller dendrimers were found to diffuse faster and selectivity is improved by using smaller nanopores. Finally, the transport of proteins through silica colloidal membranes was studied as a function of nanopore size

  19. Application of ESEM to environmental colloids. [Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttall, H.E.; Kale, R. . Dept. of Chemical/Nuclear Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    Environmental colloids are toxic or radioactive particles suspended in ground or surface water. These hazardous particles can facilitate and accelerate the transport of toxicants and enhance the threat to humans by exposure to pathogenic substances. The chemical and physical properties of hazardous colloids have not been well characterized nor are there standard colloid remediation technologies to prevent their deleterious effects. Colloid characterization requires measurement of their size distribution, zeta potential, chemical composition, adsorption capacity and morphology. The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) by ElectroScan, Inc., analyzes particle sizes, composition, and morphology. It is also used in this study to identify the attachment of colloids onto packing or rock surfaces in the development of a colloid remediation process. The ESEM has confirmed the composition of groundwater colloids in these studies to be generally the same material as the surrounding rock. The morphology studies have generally shown that colloids are simply small pieces of the rock surface that have exfoliated into the surrounding water. However, in general, the source and chemical composition of groundwater colloids is site dependent. The authors have found that an ESEM works best as a valuable analysis tool within a suite of colloid characterization instruments.

  20. Colloidal mode of transport in the Potomac River watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, I.L.; Foster, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    Similarly to the particulate phase the colloidal phase may play an important role in the organic contaminant transport downstream the river. The colloidal phase consisting of microparticles and micromolecules which are small enough to be mobile and large enough to attract pollutants can absorb nonpolar organic compounds similarly as do soil and sediment particles. To test the hypothesis three river water samples have been analyzed for PAH content in the dissolved, the colloidal, and the particulate phase. The first sample was collected at the Blue Ridge province of Potomac River watershed, at Point of Rocks, the second one in the Pidmont province, at Riverbend Park, and the third sample at Coastal Plane, at Dyke Marsh (Belle Heven marina). In the laboratory environment each water sample was prefiltered to separate the particulate phase form the dissolved and colloidal phase. One part of the prefiltered water sample was ultrafiltered to separate colloids while the second part of the water was Goulden extracted. The separated colloidal phase was liquid-liquid extracted (LLE) while filters containing the suspended solids were Soxhlet extracted. The extracts of the particulate phase, the colloidal phase, and the dissolved plus colloidal phase were analyzed for selected PAHs via GC/MS. It is planned that concentrations of selected PAHs in three phases will be used for calculations of the partition coefficients, the colloid/dissolved partition coefficient and the particle/dissolved partition coefficient. Both partition coefficients will be compared to define the significance of organic contaminant transport by aquatic colloids.

  1. Colloid Mobilization in Two Atlantic Coastal Plain Aquifers: Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Joseph N.; Gschwend, Philip M.

    1990-02-01

    The geochemical mechanisms leading to the mobilization of colloids in groundwater were investigated in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey and in rural central Delaware by sampling pairs of wells screened in oxic and anoxic groundwaters in the same geologic formations. Samples were carefully taken at very low flow rates (˜100 mL min-1) to avoid suspending immobilized particles. The colloidal matter was characterized by light-scattering photometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X ray analysis, microelectrophoresis, and Fe, Al, Si, and organic carbon analyses. The colloids, composed primarily of clays, were observed at high concentrations (up to 60 mg colloids/L) in the anoxic groundwaters, while the oxic groundwaters exhibited ≤1 mg colloids/L. Colloidal organic carbon was present in all groundwaters; but under anoxic conditions, one-third to one-half of the total organic carbon was associated with the inorganic colloids. The field evidence indicates that anoxic conditions cause the mobilization of soil colloids by dissolving the ferric oxyhydroxide coatings cementing the clay particles to the aquifer solids. The depletion of oxidized iron on the surfaces of immobile particles and the addition of organic carbon coatings on the soil particles and colloids apparently stabilizes the colloidal suspension in the anoxic groundwaters.

  2. Methods for colloid transport visualization in pore networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Naoyuki; Kraft, Erika L.; Selker, John S.

    2006-12-01

    Prediction of colloid transport in the subsurface is relevant to researchers in a variety of fields such as contaminant transport, wastewater treatment, and bioremediation. Investigations have traditionally relied on column studies whereby mechanistic inferences must be drawn on the basis of colloid behavior at the outlet. Over the past decade, development of noninvasive visualization techniques based on visible light, magnetic resonance, and X rays have provided insight into a number of colloid transport mechanisms by enabling direct observation of individual colloids at the pore scale and colloid concentrations at longer length scales. As research focus shifts from transport of ideal colloids in ideal media such as glass beads to natural colloids in natural porous media, these noninvasive techniques will become increasingly useful for studying the collection of mechanisms at work in heterogeneous pore systems. It is useful at this juncture to review recent progress in colloid transport visualization as a starting point for further development of visualization tools to support investigation of colloids in natural systems. We briefly discuss characteristics of visualization systems currently used to study colloid transport in porous media and review representative microscale and mesoscale visualization studies conducted over the past decade, with additional attention given to two optical visualization systems being developed by the authors.

  3. Cotransport of bismerthiazol and montmorillonite colloids in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chongyang; Wang, Hong; Lazouskaya, Volha; Du, Yichun; Lu, Weilan; Wu, Junxue; Zhang, Hongyan; Huang, Yuanfang

    2015-06-01

    While bismerthiazol [N,N‧-methylene-bis-(2-amino-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole)] is one of the most widely used bactericides, the transport of bismerthiazol in subsurface environments is unclear to date. Moreover, natural colloids are ubiquitous in the subsurface environments. The cotransport of bismerthiazol and natural colloids has not been investigated. This study conducted laboratory column experiments to examine the transport of bismerthiazol in saturated sand porous media both in the absence and presence of montmorillonite colloids. Results show that a fraction of bismerthiazol was retained in sand and the retention was higher at pH 7 than at pH 4 and 10. The retention did not change with ionic strength. The retention was attributed to the complex of bismerthiazol with metals/metal oxides on sand surfaces through ligand exchange. The transport of bismerthiazol was enhanced with montmorillonite colloids copresent in the solutions and, concurrently, the transport of montmorillonite colloids was facilitated by the bismerthiazol. The transport of montmorillonite colloids was enhanced likely because the bismerthiazol and the colloids competed for the attachment/adsorption sites on collector surfaces and the presence of bismerthiazol changed the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies between colloids and collectors. The transport of bismerthiazol was inhibited if montmorillonite colloids were pre-deposited in sand because bismerthiazol could adsorb onto the colloid surfaces. The adsorbed bismerthiazol could be co-remobilized with the colloids from primary minima by decreasing ionic strength. Whereas colloid-facilitated transport of pesticides has been emphasized, our study implies that transport of colloids could also be facilitated by the presence of pesticides.

  4. Shape recognition of microbial cells by colloidal cell imprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Paunov, Vesselin N.

    2013-08-01

    We have engineered a class of colloids which can recognize the shape and size of targeted microbial cells and selectively bind to their surfaces. These imprinted colloid particles, which we called ``colloid antibodies'', were fabricated by partial fragmentation of silica shells obtained by templating the targeted microbial cells. We successfully demonstrated the shape and size recognition between such colloidal imprints and matching microbial cells. High percentage of binding events of colloidal imprints with the size matching target particles was achieved. We demonstrated selective binding of colloidal imprints to target microbial cells in a binary mixture of cells of different shapes and sizes, which also resulted in high binding selectivity. We explored the role of the electrostatic interactions between the target cells and their colloid imprints by pre-coating both of them with polyelectrolytes. Selective binding occurred predominantly in the case of opposite surface charges of the colloid cell imprint and the targeted cells. The mechanism of the recognition is based on the amplification of the surface adhesion in the case of shape and size match due to the increased contact area between the target cell and the colloidal imprint. We also tested the selective binding for colloid imprints of particles of fixed shape and varying sizes. The concept of cell recognition by colloid imprints could be used for development of colloid antibodies for shape-selective binding of microbes. Such colloid antibodies could be additionally functionalized with surface groups to enhance their binding efficiency to cells of specific shape and deliver a drug payload directly to their surface or allow them to be manipulated using external fields. They could benefit the pharmaceutical industry in developing selective antimicrobial therapies and formulations.

  5. Colloidal pseudocapacitor: Nanoscale aggregation of Mn colloids from MnCl2 under alkaline condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kunfeng; Xue, Dongfeng; Komarneni, Sridhar

    2015-04-01

    Novel colloidal pseudocapacitors are designed using commercially available MnCl2 salts as starting materials and KOH as electrolyte, where the colloids synthesis and subsequently integrating into practical electrode structures occur at the same spatial and temporal scale. Highly electroactive Mn7O13·5H2O colloids are formed in-situ by electric field assisted chemical coprecipitation in KOH solution. The highly efficient Faradaic redox reactions involving Mn3+ ↔ Mn4+ and Mn2+ ↔ Mn3+ are confirmed in electroactive Mn7O13·5H2O pseudocapacitors, which can deliver high specific capacitance of 2518 F/g based on active Mn cations at current density of 5 A/g. The present results show that instead of one-electron Faradaic reaction, Mn cations in our designed system can lead to two-electron Faradaic reactions. The colloidal pseudocapacitor system involving Mn-based colloids is a novel route to engineer electrochemical performances of inorganic pseudocapacitors.

  6. SUSY Les Houches Accord 2

    SciTech Connect

    Allanach, B.; Balazs, C.; Belanger, G.; Bernhardt, M.; Boudjema, F.; Choudhury, D.; Desch, K.; Ellwanger, U.; Gambino, P.; Godbole, R.; Goto, T.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Monash U. /Annecy, LAPTH /Bonn U. /Harish-Chandra Res. Inst. /Orsay, LPT /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /KEK, Tsukuba /Barcelona U.

    2007-11-08

    The Supersymmetry Les Houches Accord (SLHA) [1] provides a universal set of conventions for conveying spectral and decay information for supersymmetry analysis problems in high energy physics. Here, we propose extensions of the conventions of the first SLHA to include various generalizations: the minimal supersymmetric standard model with violation of CP, R-parity, and flavor, as well as the simplest next-to-minimal model.

  7. SUSY Les Houches Accord 2

    SciTech Connect

    Allanach, B.; Balazs, C.; Belanger, G.; Bernhardt, M.; Boudjema, F.; Choudhury, D.; Desch, K.; Ellwanger, U.; Gambino, P.; Godbole, R.; Goto, T.; Guasch, J.; Guchait, M.; Hahn, T.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hugonie, C.; Hurth, T.; Kraml, S.; Kreiss, S.; Lykken, J.; Moortgat, F.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Monash U. /Annecy, LAPTH /Bonn U. /Harish-Chandra Res. Inst. /Orsay, LPT /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /KEK, Tsukuba /Barcelona U. /Tata Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Montpellier U. /CERN /SLAC /Edinburgh U. /Fermilab /Zurich, ETH /Southampton U.

    2007-11-08

    The Supersymmetry Les Houches Accord (SLHA) provides a universal set of conventions for conveying spectral and decay information for supersymmetry analysis problems in high energy physics. Here, we propose extensions of the conventions of the first SLHA to include various generalizations: the minimal supersymmetric standard model with violation of CP, R-parity, and flavor, as well as the simplest next-to-minimal model.

  8. Magnetic Colloids By Pulsed Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. K.; Singh, M. K.; Agarwal, A.; Gopal, R.

    2011-06-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by nano second pules laser ablation of a cobalt slice immersed in liquid (distilled water) medium. The focused output of 1064 nm wavelength of pulsed Nd: YAG laser operating at 40 mJ/pulse is used for ablation. The liquid enviorment allows formation of colloids with nanoparticles in uniform particle diameter. Synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) is used for the study of structural property of synthesized nanoparticles. The magnetic properties of cobalt nanoparticles are also investigated. The coercivity of is found to be 73 Oe. The optical properties have been determined by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and band gap found to be 2.16 and 3.60 eV.

  9. Collective motion in populations of colloidal robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Denis; Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Dauchot, Olivier; Desreumaux, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    Could the behavior of bacteria swarms, fish schools, and bird flocks be understood within a unified framework? Can one ignore the very details of the interaction mechanisms at the individual level to elucidate how strikingly similar collective motion emerges at the group level in this broad range of motile systems? These seemingly provocative questions have triggered significant advance in the physics and the biology, communities over the last decade. In the physics language these systems, made of motile individuals, can all be though as different realizations of ``active matter.'' In this talk, I will show how to gain more insight into this vivid field using self-propelled colloids as a proxy for motile organism. I will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors. Then, I will demonstrate that these archetypal populations display spontaneous transitions to swarming motion, and to global directed motion with very few density and orientation fluctuations.

  10. Knot theory realizations in nematic colloids.

    PubMed

    Čopar, Simon; Tkalec, Uroš; Muševič, Igor; Žumer, Slobodan

    2015-02-10

    Nematic braids are reconfigurable knots and links formed by the disclination loops that entangle colloidal particles dispersed in a nematic liquid crystal. We focus on entangled nematic disclinations in thin twisted nematic layers stabilized by 2D arrays of colloidal particles that can be controlled with laser tweezers. We take the experimentally assembled structures and demonstrate the correspondence of the knot invariants, constructed graphs, and surfaces associated with the disclination loop to the physically observable features specific to the geometry at hand. The nematic nature of the medium adds additional topological parameters to the conventional results of knot theory, which couple with the knot topology and introduce order into the phase diagram of possible structures. The crystalline order allows the simplified construction of the Jones polynomial and medial graphs, and the steps in the construction algorithm are mirrored in the physics of liquid crystals. PMID:25624467