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Sample records for lethal hypersensitivity reactions

  1. Immunomodulatory gene therapy prevents antibody formation and lethal hypersensitivity reactions in murine pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2010-02-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 x 10(10) particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, and IgE antibodies to GAA in Pompe disease mice, when compared with mock-treated mice (P < 0.05). AAV-LSPhGAApA had the same effect on GAA-antibody production whether it was given prior to, following, or simultaneously with the initial GAA injection. Mice given AAV-LSPhGAApA had significantly less decrease in body temperature (P < 0.001) and lower anaphylactic scores (P < 0.01) following the GAA challenge. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) followed the pattern associated with hypersensitivity reactions (P < 0.05). Regulatory T cells (Treg) were demonstrated to play a role in the tolerance induced by gene therapy as depletion of Treg led to an increase in GAA-specific IgG (P < 0.001). Treg depleted mice were challenged with GAA and had significantly stronger allergic reactions than mice given gene therapy without subsequent Treg depletion (temperature: P < 0.01; symptoms: P < 0.05). Ubiquitous GAA expression failed to prevent antibody formation. Thus, immunomodulatory gene therapy could provide adjunctive therapy in lysosomal storage disorders treated by enzyme replacement. PMID:19690517

  2. Immunomodulatory Gene Therapy Prevents Antibody Formation and Lethal Hypersensitivity Reactions in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2009-01-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 × 1010 particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, and IgE antibodies to GAA in Pompe disease mice, when compared with mock-treated mice (P < 0.05). AAV-LSPhGAApA had the same effect on GAA-antibody production whether it was given prior to, following, or simultaneously with the initial GAA injection. Mice given AAV-LSPhGAApA had significantly less decrease in body temperature (P < 0.001) and lower anaphylactic scores (P < 0.01) following the GAA challenge. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) followed the pattern associated with hypersensitivity reactions (P < 0.05). Regulatory T cells (Treg) were demonstrated to play a role in the tolerance induced by gene therapy as depletion of Treg led to an increase in GAA-specific IgG (P < 0.001). Treg depleted mice were challenged with GAA and had significantly stronger allergic reactions than mice given gene therapy without subsequent Treg depletion (temperature: P < 0.01; symptoms: P < 0.05). Ubiquitous GAA expression failed to prevent antibody formation. Thus, immunomodulatory gene therapy could provide adjunctive therapy in lysosomal storage disorders treated by enzyme replacement. PMID:19690517

  3. Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Vatti, Rani R; Ali, Fatima; Teuber, Suzanne; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2014-08-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids (CS) are rare in the general population, but they are not uncommon in high-risk groups such as patients who receive repeated doses of CS. Hypersensitivity reactions to steroids are broadly divided into two categories: immediate reactions, typically occurring within 1 h of drug administration, and non-immediate reactions, which manifest more than an hour after drug administration. The latter group is more common. We reviewed the literature using the search terms "hypersensitivity to steroids, adverse effects of steroids, steroid allergy, allergic contact dermatitis, corticosteroid side effects, and type I hypersensitivity" to identify studies or clinical reports of steroid hypersensitivity. We discuss the prevalence, mechanism, presentation, evaluation, and therapeutic options in corticosteroid hypersensitivity reactions. There is a paucity of literature on corticosteroid allergy, with most reports being case reports. Most reports involve non-systemic application of corticosteroids. Steroid hypersensitivity has been associated with type I IgE-mediated allergy including anaphylaxis. The overall prevalence of type I steroid hypersensitivity is estimated to be 0.3-0.5%. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is the most commonly reported non-immediate hypersensitivity reaction and usually follows topical CS application. Atopic dermatitis and stasis dermatitis of the lower extremities are risk factors for the development of ACD from topical CS. Patients can also develop hypersensitivity reactions to nasal, inhaled, oral, and parenteral CS. A close and detailed evaluation is required for the clinician to confirm the presence of a true hypersensitivity reaction to the suspected drug and choose the safest alternative. Choosing an alternative CS is not only paramount to the patient's safety but also ameliorates the worry of developing an allergic, and potentially fatal, steroid hypersensitivity reaction. This evaluation becomes

  4. Hypersensitivity reaction associated with phenytoin

    PubMed Central

    Indu, T. H.; Basutkar, Roopa Satyanarayan

    2015-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are generally associated with aromatic AEDs. We present a case of hypersensitivity reactions followed by administration of phenytoin with diazepam and ranitidine in a patient with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Antigen-antibody reactions or decreased levels of epoxide hydrolase are well known with phenytoin. Increased level of serum phenytoin causing toxicities due to competitive inhibition with diazepam on co-administration was also reported in the literature. Prevention of the adverse effects with AEDs is a multi-stage process, which requires implementation of preventive measures through careful monitoring and prompts interventions. PMID:26692739

  5. Hypersensitivity reaction associated with phenytoin.

    PubMed

    Indu, T H; Basutkar, Roopa Satyanarayan

    2015-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are generally associated with aromatic AEDs. We present a case of hypersensitivity reactions followed by administration of phenytoin with diazepam and ranitidine in a patient with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Antigen-antibody reactions or decreased levels of epoxide hydrolase are well known with phenytoin. Increased level of serum phenytoin causing toxicities due to competitive inhibition with diazepam on co-administration was also reported in the literature. Prevention of the adverse effects with AEDs is a multi-stage process, which requires implementation of preventive measures through careful monitoring and prompts interventions. PMID:26692739

  6. Immunohistochemical appearance of corticosteroid contact hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S M; Andrew, S M; Maseruka, H; Beck, M H

    1994-11-01

    We have studied, immunohistochemically, hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids and compared them with allergic contact dermatitis from nickel and appropriate controls. We could find no qualitative differences between nickel and corticosteroid contact reactions, providing further evidence that hypersensitivity to corticosteroids is an immunologically mediated reaction. PMID:7532558

  7. Hypersensitivity reaction after administration of rivaroxaban (Xarelto).

    PubMed

    Vernon, Hampton M; Nielsen, Andrew K; O'Bryan, Edward C

    2016-07-01

    Little has been documented regarding hypersensitivity reactions with rivaroxaban or other factor Xa inhibitors. We report the development of a hypersensitivity reaction to rivaroxaban in a 64-year-old African American male patient who presented to the emergency department and was subsequently evaluated in dermatology consultation and follow-up. This case highlights the vigilance required by health care workers in recognizing potential adverse effects of newer anticoagulation therapy and in making medication changes where necessary. PMID:26809930

  8. Hypersensitivity reactions associated with oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Saif, M Wasif

    2006-09-01

    The reported incidence of hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) associated with oxaliplatin in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) is approximately 12%, with 1 - 2% of patients developing grade 3 or 4 in severity. However, the recent rising incidence of HSR to oxaliplatin observed is the result of increasing clinical use. HSR to oxaliplatin may manifest as facial flushing, rash/hives, tachycardia, dyspnoea, erythema, pruritus, fever, tongue swelling, headache, chills, weakness, vomiting, burning sensations, dizziness and oedema. Anaphylactic shock is rare but serious, and must be considered in the event of hypotension. No definitive approaches to prevent and treat HSR associated with oxaliplatin are available; however, few successful strategies have been reported. Such strategies include: slowing the infusion rate, use of steroids and antagonists of type 1 and 2 histamine receptors, and desensitisation. Successful implementation of oxaliplatin desensitisation protocols based on other platinum-containing compounds have been reported, which could enable a small number of patients who experience severe HSR to further receive an effective therapy for CRC. However, reintroductions have only been reported as single case studies or small cohorts. Large-scale validation on desensitisation strategies are still missing. Recently, subcutaneous adrenaline has also been utilised as an alternative approach to manage HSR to oxaliplatin. Knowledge of this rare but real toxicity of oxaliplatin is paramount because the use of this drug continues to increase not only for the treatment of patients with stage II-IV CRC, but also other solid malignancies. In this article, the author discusses the incidence, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, risk factors and current strategies of management of HSR associated with oxaliplatin. PMID:16907658

  9. Immediate-type hypersensitivity drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Shelley F; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Wiese, Michael D; Heddle, Robert J; Brown, Simon G A

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis have been reported for nearly all classes of therapeutic reagents and these reactions can occur within minutes to hours of exposure. These reactions are unpredictable, not directly related to dose or the pharmacological action of the drug and have a relatively high mortality risk. This review will focus on the clinical presentation, immune mechanisms, diagnosis and prevention of the most serious form of immediate onset drug hypersensitivity reaction, anaphylaxis. The incidence of drug-induced anaphylaxis deaths appears to be increasing and our understanding of the multiple and complex reasons for the unpredictable nature of anaphylaxis to drugs is also expanding. This review highlights the importance of enhancing our understanding of the biology of the patient (i.e. immune response, genetics) as well as the pharmacology and chemistry of the drug when investigating, diagnosing and treating drug hypersensitivity. Misdiagnosis of drug hypersensitivity leads to substantial patient risk and cost. Although oral provocation is often considered the gold standard of diagnosis, it can pose a potential risk to the patient. There is an urgent need to improve and standardize diagnostic testing and desensitization protocols as other diagnostic tests currently available for assessment of immediate drug allergy are not highly predictive. PMID:24286446

  10. Clindamycin-induced hypersensitivity reaction.

    PubMed

    Bulloch, Marilyn N; Baccas, Jonathan T; Arnold, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Drug-induced anaphylaxis is an unpredictable adverse reaction. Although it may occur with any medication, antibiotics induce more cases of anaphylaxis than any other medication class with most cases being induced by β-lactam antibiotics. Clindamycin is an antibiotic with good gram-positive and anaerobe coverage which is often used in patients with β-lactam allergies. We report the case of a 46-year-old female who experienced anaphylaxis after a dose of intravenous (IV) clindamycin. Following treatment with methylprednisolone, epinephrine, diphenhydramine, and albuterol, the patient stabilized. The patient's score on the Naranjo's algorithm was 8 (probable); a score of 9 (definite) limited only by absence of drug re-challenge. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a clindamycin-induced anaphylaxis where the patient was not exposed to any other agent that may have triggered the response, the first case in the United States, and only the third documented case in the literature. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for drug-induced anaphylaxis in all medications. PMID:26216470

  11. Hypersensitivity reactions to radiocontrast media: the role of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Szebeni, Janos

    2004-01-01

    Although intravenous use of radiocontrast media (RCM) for a variety of radiographic procedures is generally safe, clinically significant acute hypersensitivity reactions still occur in a significant percentage of patients. The mechanism of these anaphylactoid, or "pseudoallergic," reactions is complex, involving complement activation, direct degranulation of mast cells and basophils, and modulation of enzymes and proteolytic cascades in plasma. In this review, basic information on different RCMs and their reactogenicity is summarized and updated, and the prevalence, pathomechanism, prediction, prevention, treatment, and economic impact of hypersensitivity reactions are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting complement activation as an underlying cause of RCM reactions. PMID:14680617

  12. Ant allergens and hypersensitivity reactions in response to ant stings.

    PubMed

    Potiwat, Rutcharin; Sitcharungsi, Raweerat

    2015-12-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions caused by ant stings are increasingly recognized as an important cause of death by anaphylaxis. Only some species of ants ( e.g. Solenopsis spp., Myrmecia spp., and Pachycondyla spp.) cause allergic reactions. Ant species are identified by evaluating the morphologic structures of worker ants or by molecular techniques. Ant venom contains substances, including acids and alkaloids, that cause toxic reactions, and those from Solenopsis invicta or the imported fire ant have been widely studied. Piperidine alkaloids and low protein contents can cause local reactions (sterile pustules) and systemic reactions (anaphylaxis). Imported fire ant venoms are cross-reactive; for example, the Sol i 1 allergen from S. invicta has cross-reactivity with yellow jacket phospholipase. The Sol i 3 allergen is a member of the antigen 5 family that has amino acid sequence identity with vespid antigen 5. The clinical presentations of ant hypersensitivity are categorized into immediate and delayed reactions: immediate reactions, such as small local reactions, large local reactions, and systemic reactions, occur within 1-4 hours after the ant stings, whereas delayed reactions, such as serum sickness and vasculitis, usually occur more than 4 hours after the stings. Tools for the diagnosis of ant hypersensitivity are skin testing, serum specific IgE, and sting challenge tests. Management of ant hypersensitivity can be divided into immediate (epinephrine, corticosteroids), symptomatic (antihistamines, bronchodilators), supportive (fluid resuscitation, oxygen therapy), and preventive (re-sting avoidance and immunotherapy) treatments. PMID:26708389

  13. An unexpected positive hypersensitive reaction to eugenol.

    PubMed

    Tammannavar, Praveen; Pushpalatha, C; Jain, Shrenik; Sowmya, S V

    2013-01-01

    Eugenol is an active, principal aromatic liquid responsible for several pharmacological activities. It is widely used in dental practice to relieve pain arising from various sources, such as pulpitis and dentinal hypersensitivity. As a primary irritant and sensitiser, it is known to cause contact urticaria as well as chronic urticaria. However, eugenol causes allergic contact dermatitis, possibly because it can react directly with proteins to form conjugate and reactive haptens. It is found that eugenol in various dental preparations-especially in the case of some zinc oxide-contains preparations such as periodontal dressings and root canal cements. This can cause hypersensitivity when it comes in contact with gingiva or teeth. This article presents a case of immediate allergic contact urticaria to eugenol during dental treatment. PMID:24049087

  14. Management of hypersensitivity reactions to anti-D immunoglobulin preparations.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, K; Nasser, S M

    2014-11-01

    RhD immunoglobulin G (anti-D) administered to pregnant Rh(-) women prevents Rh isoimmunization. Its use has significantly reduced the incidence of haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn previously responsible for one death in every 2200 births. In pregnancy, acute drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis can have serious deleterious effects on the mother and foetus/neonate. Women can be erroneously labelled as drug allergic as the investigation of hypersensitivity reactions in pregnancy is complex and drug challenges are usually contraindicated. We present three cases of suspected anti-D hypersensitivity clinically presenting as anaphylaxis and delayed transfusion-related reaction. We also propose a new algorithm for the investigations of such reaction. It relies on detailed history, cautious interpretation of skin tests, foetal Rh genotyping from maternal blood and, in some cases, anti-D challenges. This is not to deprive women of anti-D which might put their future pregnancies at risk. PMID:25066207

  15. Hypersensitivity reaction to cisplatin during chemoradiation therapy for gynecologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Koren, Claude; Yerushalmi, Rinat; Katz, Alan; Malik, Hana; Sulkes, Aaron; Fenig, Eyal

    2002-12-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous cisplatin are rare. The appearance of hypersensitivity reactions in 4 of 25 consecutive patients treated with concomitant pelvic radiation and weekly intravenous cisplatin for gynecologic malignancies is reported. The reactions appeared within hours of cisplatin delivery and included primarily fever, rash, and pruritus. Infection was ruled out by blood cultures and other laboratory studies. Affected patients were treated prophylactically with an antihistamine before subsequent courses of cisplatin, with excellent results. The high rate of hypersensitivity reactions in our series may be attributable to tumor necrosis and cytokine release caused by the pelvic irradiation. Clinicians should be aware of this potential side effect so that early premedication regimens can be instituted to prevent unnecessary toxicity. PMID:12478013

  16. Atypical presentation of fever as hypersensitivity reaction to oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Arushi; Mitsis, Demytra; Kowlgi, Gurukripa N; Holle, Lisa M; Clement, Jessica M

    2016-04-01

    Oxaliplatin, a third-generation, platinum-based agent is widely used, most commonly in the FOLFOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin) regimen, which is the first-line therapy in metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma and adjuvant chemotherapy in stage III colorectal cancer. Platinum-based products are well known for causing hypersensitivity reactions. Fever associated with oxaliplatin-hypersensitivity reactions typically follows a specific pattern. It usually starts during the oxaliplatin infusion or immediately after (within hours instead of days) and happens after several administrations (mean 2-25) with unpredictable clinical presentations. We report a case of oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reaction manifesting as fever but with unusual presentation than the aforementioned features. PMID:25361599

  17. Pragmatism and the evaluation of metal hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating patients with potential metal hypersensitivity reactions is challenging. Clear evidence-based guidelines based on randomized studies are lacking. A pragmatic approach to evaluation of these patients is useful due to this lack of evidence. Patch testing remains the gold standard for evaluating type IV reactions on the skin and is also likely the best test for metal reactions to implanted devices until more hard data is available. PMID:23665837

  18. Monoclonal antibodies: longitudinal prescribing information analysis of hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Kleyman, Konstantin; Weintraub, Debra S

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are known to cause hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs). The reactions pose a significant challenge to investigators, regulators, and health providers. Because HSRs cannot be predicted through the pharmacological basis of a therapy, clinical data are often relied upon to detect the reactions. Unfortunately, clinical studies are often unable to adequately characterize HSRs especially in therapies for orphan diseases. HSRs can go undetected until post-marketing safety surveillance when a large number of patients have been exposed to the therapy. The presented data demonstrates how hypersensitivity reaction warnings have changed over time in the prescribing information (PI), i.e., the drug package insert, through August 1, 2011 for 28 US-marketed mAbs. Tracking all PI revisions for each mAb over time revealed that hypersensitivity warning statements were expanded to include more severe manifestations. Over the course of a mAb therapy's life cycle, the hypersensitivity warning is twice more likely to be upgraded than downgraded in priority. Approximately 85% of hypersensitivity-associated fatality warnings were added in PI revisions as a result of post-marketing experience. Over 60% (20/33) of revisions to hypersensitivity warnings occurred within 3-4 y of product approval. While HSRs are generally recognized and described in the initial PI of mAbs, fatal HSRs are most commonly observed in post-marketing surveillance. Results of this study suggest that initial product labeling information may not describe rare but clinically significant occurrences of severe or fatal HSRs, but subsequent label revisions include rare events observed during post-marketed product use. PMID:22531444

  19. Pharmacogenetic determinants of immediate and delayed reactions of drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Guéant, J L; Guéant-Rodriguez, R M; Gastin, I Aimone; Cornejo-García, J A; Viola, M; Barbaud, A; Mertes, P M; Blanca, M; Romano, A

    2008-01-01

    Drug allergy refers to a hypersensitivity reaction for which either an IgE or T-cell-mediated mechanism is demonstrated. The recognition of the drug by B and T cells is influenced by variants of HLA genes. The genetic factors involved in IgE-mediated mechanisms have been studied mainly in beta-lactam reactions, and they appear to be related to human leukocyte antigen presentation (HLA A2 and DRw52), TNFA -308G>A, class switching to IgE by B cells (variants of IL-13 and of IL-4RA), and expression of IgE receptors on target cells (variant of the FcepsilonRIbeta gene). Delayed T-cell-mediated reactions are also associated with HLA alleles. Studies have reported an association of HLA-B*1502 and HLA-B*5801 in patients with the Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis provoked by carbamazepine, as well as of HLA-B*5701 with abacavir hypersensitivity. HLA-B*5701 seems to be a strong predictor in whites, but not in Hispanics or Africans. Carbamazepine hypersensitivity is also influenced by gene variants of cytochrome P450 enzymes on the generation of reactive metabolites, while CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3 polymorphisms influence the bioactivation of sulfamethoxazole in prohapten. Pharmacogenetic studies on aspirin hypersensitivity have identified distinct types of predictors, such as HLA genotypes, a polymorphism in the promoter of the FcepsilonRIalpha gene, and variants in genes of enzymes from the arachidonic acid pathway. In the future, identification of genetic predictors will benefit from genomewide association studies that also take ethnic differences into account. Ideally, predictors will help to prevent adverse reactions, as suggested by a recent study on the effectiveness of prospective HLA-B*5701 screening to prevent hypersensitivity reactions to abacavir in HIV patients. PMID:18991696

  20. Type IV hypersensitivity reaction to a temporary tattoo

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    A 6-year-old boy developed a skin eruption 10 days after application of a temporary tattoo advertised as a “natural black henna tattoo.” The eruption was a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to the tattoo ink. The textile dye paraphenylenediamine (PPD) is a common industrial allergen and can be found in some temporary tattoo inks. This case describes the reaction and reviews the international literature pertaining to PPD and temporary tattoos. PMID:17256041

  1. The Genetics of Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    Cornejo-García, J A; Jurado-Escobar, R; Doña, I; Perkins, J R; Agúndez, J A; García-Martín, E; Viguera, E; Blanca-López, N; Canto, G; Blanca, M

    2016-01-01

    DHRs are induced by various mechanisms and encompass a heterogeneous set of potentially life-threatening clinical entities. In addition to environmental effects, individual factors play a key role in this intricate puzzle. However, despite commendable efforts in recent years to identify individual predisposing factors, our knowledge of the genetic basis of these reactions remains incomplete. In this manuscript, we summarize current research on the genetics of DHRs, focusing on specific immune-mediated reactions (immediate and nonimmediate) and on pharmacologically mediated reactions (cross-intolerance to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). We also provide some thoughts on potential technological approaches that would help us to decipher the molecular mechanisms underlying DHRs. We believe this manuscript will be of interest not only for allergists and basic researchers in the field, but also for clinicians from various areas of expertise who manage these reactions in their clinical practice. PMID:27375032

  2. Type I hypersensitivity reaction as a complication of lepa.

    PubMed

    Janthli, Deepa Manjunath; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Somashekar, Shruthi; Lohith, B A

    2015-12-01

    Adverse drug reaction is defined as response to a drug which is noxious and unintended, and which occurs at doses normally used in man for the prophylaxis, diagnosis or therapy of disease, or for the modification of physiological functions. Type I hypersensitivity reaction is known as anaphylactic reaction which is due to immediate immunoglobulin E-mediated reaction. It is characterized by symptoms such as fever nausea, back pain, angiodema, rash, flushing, etc. Lepa generally refers to the application of pastes formed by mixing powder of herbs with water, milk, etc., and liquids. Complementary and alternative medicines are frequently used by the general population. Many people consider them to be without side effects. Ayurvedic treatment involves Shodhana (biopurification), Shaman (pacification), Bahya (external therapy), and Abhyantara karma's (internal therapy) for treating different diseases. One such bahya karma or external therapy is lepa. Even though lepa is said as "Aadhya Upakrama," undue hypersensitivity is observed in many patients. A 60-year-old woman had an adverse reaction to lepa after being administered as an external medication. The observations were erythema, eruptions, and itching. Such case of hypersensitivity is discussed in the present study. PMID:26792959

  3. Type I hypersensitivity reaction as a complication of lepa

    PubMed Central

    Janthli, Deepa Manjunath; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Somashekar, Shruthi; Lohith, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reaction is defined as response to a drug which is noxious and unintended, and which occurs at doses normally used in man for the prophylaxis, diagnosis or therapy of disease, or for the modification of physiological functions. Type I hypersensitivity reaction is known as anaphylactic reaction which is due to immediate immunoglobulin E-mediated reaction. It is characterized by symptoms such as fever nausea, back pain, angiodema, rash, flushing, etc. Lepa generally refers to the application of pastes formed by mixing powder of herbs with water, milk, etc., and liquids. Complementary and alternative medicines are frequently used by the general population. Many people consider them to be without side effects. Ayurvedic treatment involves Shodhana (biopurification), Shaman (pacification), Bahya (external therapy), and Abhyantara karma's (internal therapy) for treating different diseases. One such bahya karma or external therapy is lepa. Even though lepa is said as “Aadhya Upakrama,” undue hypersensitivity is observed in many patients. A 60-year-old woman had an adverse reaction to lepa after being administered as an external medication. The observations were erythema, eruptions, and itching. Such case of hypersensitivity is discussed in the present study. PMID:26792959

  4. The effects of thiopentone and propofol on delayed hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Devlin, E G; Clarke, R S; Mirakhur, R K; McNeill, T A

    1995-06-01

    The effects of thiopentone and propofol on delayed hypersensitivity reactions and T lymphocyte proliferation were studied in nine healthy volunteers (five women and four men). Thiopentone 5 mg.kg-1 and propofol 2.5 mg kg-1 were given as a 10 min infusion on two separate occasions. The volunteers were exposed to a skin multitest antigen before and after administration of the two agents and their skin reactions assessed. T lymphocyte responses were studied using phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced proliferation. Results showed that both drugs caused a significant depression of skin reactions in vivo but no depression in the T lymphocyte proliferation. PMID:7618660

  5. Cutaneous and systemic hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Basko-Plluska, Juliana L; Thyssen, Jacob P; Schalock, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous reactions to metal implants, orthopedic or otherwise, are well documented in the literature. The first case of a dermatitis reaction over a stainless steel fracture plate was described in 1966. Most skin reactions are eczematous and allergic in nature, although urticarial, bullous, and vasculitic eruptions may occur. Also, more complex immune reactions may develop around the implants, resulting in pain, inflammation, and loosening. Nickel, cobalt, and chromium are the three most common metals that elicit both cutaneous and extracutaneous allergic reactions from chronic internal exposure. However, other metal ions as well as bone cement components can cause such hypersensitivity reactions. To complicate things, patients may also develop delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to metals (ie, in-stent restenosis, prosthesis loosening, inflammation, pain, or allergic contact dermatitis) following the insertion of intravascular stents, dental implants, cardiac pacemakers, or implanted gynecologic devices. Despite repeated attempts by researchers and clinicians to further understand this difficult area of medicine, the association between metal sensitivity and cutaneous allergic reactions remains to be fully understood. This review provides an update of the current knowledge in this field and should be valuable to health care providers who manage patients with conditions related to this field. PMID:21504692

  6. [Hypersensitivity reactions to implantable cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators].

    PubMed

    Kreft, B

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays, for modern electrotherapy of cardiac arrhythmias different pacemaker systems are used. Antibradycardia pacing systems (e. g. single-chamber, two-chamber, three-chamber systems, frequency-adapted pacemaker) can be distinguished from antitachycardia pacing systems like implantable or portable cardioverter defibrillators and combined antibradycardia/antitachycardia systems. Cutaneous reactions overlying a pacemaker or defibrillator are often termed "pacemaker dermatitis". In terms of the differential diagnostic workup, these cutaneous reactions can have various causes. After exclusion of infection by analyzing clinical and laboratory-chemical results, "pressure dermatitis" or the often clinically asymptomatic "reticular telangiectatic erythema" (synonym "postimplantation erythema") must be considered. Histological examination of the affected skin can contribute to the diagnosis. In case of suspected contact hypersensitivity to implant material, allergological exploration should be realized. In addition to patch testing with commercially available contact allergens, product-related material metal alloy discs are often available from the pacemaker manufacturer for epicutaneous testing. Due to the lack of additional benefit compared to standardized patch testing, a clear recommendation for such metal alloy discs cannot be given. In selected cases of suspected hypersensitivity reaction, sensitization can eventually be analyzed by the lymphocyte transformation test. Positive reactions must always be critically interpreted taking into consideration the corresponding clinical signs. Depending on the cause, cutaneous reactions are occasionally self-limiting. In many cases, however, removal of the pacemaker is inevitable. PMID:26943358

  7. Cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions to freshwater cyanobacteria – human volunteer studies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ian; Robertson, Ivan M; Webb, Penelope M; Schluter, Philip J; Shaw, Glen R

    2006-01-01

    Background Pruritic skin rashes associated with exposure to freshwater cyanobacteria are infrequently reported in the medical and scientific literature, mostly as anecdotal and case reports. Diagnostic dermatological investigations in humans are also infrequently described. We sought to conduct a pilot volunteer study to explore the potential for cyanobacteria to elicit hypersensitivity reactions. Methods A consecutive series of adult patients presenting for diagnostic skin patch testing at a hospital outpatient clinic were invited to participate. A convenience sample of volunteers matched for age and sex was also enrolled. Patches containing aqueous suspensions of various cyanobacteria at three concentrations were applied for 48 hours; dermatological assessment was made 48 hours and 96 hours after application. Results 20 outpatients and 19 reference subjects were recruited into the study. A single outpatient produced unequivocal reactions to several cyanobacteria suspensions; this subject was also the only one of the outpatient group with a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. No subjects in the reference group developed clinically detectable skin reactions to cyanobacteria. Conclusion This preliminary clinical study demonstrates that hypersensitivity reactions to cyanobacteria appear to be infrequent in both the general and dermatological outpatient populations. As cyanobacteria are widely distributed in aquatic environments, a better appreciation of risk factors, particularly with respect to allergic predisposition, may help to refine health advice given to people engaging in recreational activities where nuisance cyanobacteria are a problem. PMID:16584576

  8. HLA Associations and Clinical Implications in T-Cell Mediated Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Hua; Chen, Wei-Li; Deng, Shin-Tarng; Chung, Wen-Hung

    2014-01-01

    T-cell mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions may range from mild rash to severe fatal reactions. Among them, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome/ toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), are some of the most life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Recent advances in pharmacogenetic studies show strong genetic associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and susceptibility to drug hypersensitivity. This review summarizes the literature on recent progresses in pharmacogenetic studies and clinical application of pharmacogenetic screening based on associations between SCARs and specific HLA alleles to avoid serious conditions associated with drug hypersensitivity. PMID:24901010

  9. Hypersensitivity reaction to the ingestion of mango flesh.

    PubMed

    Thoo, Caroline H F; Freeman, Susi

    2008-05-01

    A 42-year-old woman presented with a hypersensitivity reaction after the ingestion of a small amount of fresh mango gelato. She developed itchy palpable purpuric lesions over her arms, legs, neck and abdomen 4 days after ingestion. The lesions persisted for 5 weeks despite treatment with betamethasone-17 valerate 0.05% ointment and avoidance of mango. Resolution of these lesions was eventually achieved with continuing treatment. The patient denied any prior contact with mango skin but had experienced previous sensitizing reactions to mango flesh. Patch testing was strongly positive to mango skin and mango flesh. Skin-prick testing was negative. This case describes a systemic contact dermatitis to mango flesh, an entity less common than allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:18412816

  10. Hypersensitivity reactions to oxaliplatin and other antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Syrigou, Ekaterini; Syrigos, Kostas; Saif, M Wasif

    2008-03-01

    Although the reported incidence of hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) to antineoplastic agents is considered to be uncommon, it is difficult to evaluate their exact prevalence, mainly because their definition is vast and pathogenic mechanisms are vague. HSR include facial flushing, erythema, pruritus, fever, tachycardia, dyspnea, tongue swelling, rash/hives, headache, chills, weakness, vomiting, burning sensations, dizziness, and edema. Treatment and prevention consists of slowing the infusion rate, steroids, and type 1 and 2 histamine receptor antagonists. Desensitization could allow the small number of patients who experience severe HSR to receive effective therapy for their cancer. Reintroductions have only been reported as single case studies or small cohorts. Large-scale validation on desensitization strategies is still missing. With regard to oxaliplatin, knowledge of its rare but eminent toxicity is paramount, because this drug is widely used in treating colorectal cancer, the second-highest cause of cancer mortality in the United States. PMID:18377776

  11. Successful desensitization protocol for hypersensitivity reaction probably caused by dabrafenib in a patient with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Abu-Amna, Mahmoud; Hadad, Salim; Haim, Nissim; Shahar, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    Vemurafenib and dabrafenib are both orally bioavailable small molecule agents that block mitogen activated protein kinase signalling in patients with melanoma and BRAF(V600E) mutation. Generalized hypersensitivity reactions to vemurafenib or dabrafenib have not been described. Continuing vemurafenib or dabrafenib therapy despite hypersensitivity reaction is especially important in patients with melanoma and BRAF(V600E) mutation, in whom this mutation plays a critical role in tumour growth. Desensitization protocols to overcome hypersensitivity reactions by gradual reintroduction of small amounts of the offending drug up to full therapeutic doses are available for many anti-cancer agents, including vemurafenib but, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported for dabrafenib. We describe a patient with metastatic melanoma who developed Type I hypersensitivity reaction to vemurafenib and to subsequent treatment with dabrafenib, and who was successfully treated by drug desensitization which allowed safe prolonged continuation of dabrafenib. The development of hypersensitivity reactions for both dabrafenib and vemurafinib in the current case could be because these drugs have a similar chemical structure and cause a cross-reactivity. However, hypersensitivity reaction to a non-medicinal ingredient shared by the two drugs is also possible. Oral desensitization appears to be an option for patients with hypersensitivity Type I to dabrafenib. This approach may permit clinicians to safely administer dabrafenib to patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions to this life-prolonging medication. PMID:26056325

  12. Diagnosis and management of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to cephalosporins.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Scott D; Salazar, Kimberly C

    2013-08-01

    Cephalosporins are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of antibiotics. Immediate IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions have been reported with use of a specific cephalosporin, as a cross-reaction between different cephalosporins or as a cross-reaction to other β-lactam antibiotics, namely, penicillin. Historically, frequent reports of anaphylaxis following administration of first- and second-generation cephalosporins to patients with a history of penicillin allergy led to the belief of a high degree of allergic cross-reactivity. More recent evidence reveals a significantly lower risk of cross-reactivity between penicillins and the newer-generation cephalosporins. The current thought is that a shared side chain, rather than the β-lactam ring structure, is the determining factor in immunologic cross-reactivity. Understanding the chemical structure of these agents has allowed us to identify the allergenic determinants for penicillin; however, the exact allergenic determinants of cephalosporins are less well understood. For this reason, standardized diagnostic skin testing is not available for cephalosporins as it is for penicillin. Nevertheless, skin testing to the cephalosporin in question, using a nonirritating concentration, provides additional information, which can further guide the work-up of a patient suspected of having an allergy to that drug. Together, the history and the skin test results can assist the allergist in the decision to recommend continued drug avoidance or to perform a graded challenge versus an induction of tolerance procedure. PMID:23546989

  13. Clinical Abacavir Hypersensitivity Reaction among Children in India.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Jaya; Sharma, Saurabh; Johri, Anuradha; Chourasia, Ankita; Sundar, Shyam

    2016-08-01

    Abacavir is currently recommended as a part of first line regimen by National AIDS Control Organization. The objective of this study was to observe the incidence of clinically diagnosed abacavir Hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) among children on abacavir based therapy in the National program. In this observational study, all children started on abacavir were included and HSR reaction was diagnosed clinically as per National guidelines. HLA- B*5701 testing was done in children diagnosed with clinical abacavir HSR. Among 101 children started on abacavir during the study period, 8 [7.9 % (95 % CI 3.5-15.0 %)] children developed clinically diagnosed abacavir HSR. All children with concomitant illness (4/8) were HLA-B*5701 negative. Only 2 (25 %, 2/8) carried HLA-B*5701 allele. Fever with abdominal symptoms as compared to respiratory symptoms were more common in HLA-B*5701 positive cases. Overdiagnosis of clinically diagnosed abacavir HSR is common and could be decreased by treating concomitant illness before starting abacavir. PMID:26887762

  14. [Lethal reaction after contrast medium administration].

    PubMed

    Risgaard, Ole; Søe, Charlotte Krabbe; Zejden, Anna

    2008-04-21

    A 49-year-old healthy woman was admitted after a horse-riding accident. On arrival to the emergency department she complained of lower abdominal pain. A CT-scan of the abdomen with non ionic contrast media (iomeprol, 150 ml 4 ml/s) was conducted. The patient died nine hours later due to an anaphylactoid reaction to radio contrast media. The autopsy showed pulmonary oedema and pleural effusion, but did not show any sign of trauma. Early interventions with appropriate therapy had no effect on the fatal outcome. PMID:18462629

  15. An unexpected cause of an acute hypersensitivity reaction during recovery from anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Thong, C L; Lambros, M; Stewart, M G; Kam, P C A

    2005-08-01

    Acute hypersensitivity reactions to chlorhexidine in the operating room are probably more likely to occur during the early phases of anaesthesia because chlorhexidine is often used for cleaning the surgical field or during placement of indwelling catheters. We report a case of an acute hypersensitivity reaction that occurred in the post anaesthetic care unit. Subsequent skin testing suggested sensitivity to chlorhexidine, which had been applied over the vaginal mucosa at the end of surgery. Relevant issues in the investigation of acute hypersensitivity reactions in the post anaesthetic period are discussed. PMID:16119497

  16. Clinical Features of Oxaliplatin Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nusrat; Najam, Rahila; Qazi, Faaiza; Mateen, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a third generation novel platinum compound is the most effective first line chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer (CRC) in combination with 5FU and leucovorin. It is indicated for pancreatic, gastric and testicular cancers combined with bevacuzimab, capecitabine, irinotecan and other cytotoxic agents. However, moderate to severe hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) during or after oxaliplatin infusion usually require cessation of chemotherapy or substitution of the key therapeutic drug which largely interferes with improved patient prognosis. This mini- review showcases recent and accepted opinions/approaches in oxaliplatin induced HSR management. Physicians and oncologists have varying attitudes regarding the decision to rechallenge the patient after an HSR experience, efficacy of desensitization protocols, effectiveness and selection of drugs for premedication and possibilities of cross sensitivity to other platinum agents (e.g. carboplatin). A brief insight into underlying molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of oxaliplatin induced HSR is offered. We have also discussed the management of oxaliplatin induced HSR and risk stratification for a successful and complete chemotherapeutic plan. PMID:27221832

  17. Flare-up reactions in severe drug hypersensitivity: infection or ongoing T-cell hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Jörg-Walther, Lukas; Schnyder, Benno; Helbling, Arthur; Helsing, Karin; Schüller, Alexandra; Wochner, Annette; Pichler, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message “Flare-up” reactions are late manifestations of severe T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. Management is anti-inflammatory treatment and avoiding unnecessary medicines. Symptoms like fever, lymph node swelling, and blood count abnormalities may lead to confusion with bacterial infections. For prompt recognition it is important to keep the differential diagnosis in mind. PMID:26509009

  18. [Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated radiographic contrast agents: an update].

    PubMed

    Khachman, Dalia; Gandia, Peggy; Sallerin, François; Mailly, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic and interventional radiology of patients is nowadays crucial with increasing requirement for iodinated contrast agents infusion. Besides adverse reactions after administration of the iodinated contrast agents due to their toxicity, immediate hypersensitivity reactions and reactions resembling delayed hypersensitivity appearing from 1 hour to several days later, have been reported. Patients at high risk to develop such adverse events have to be detected on the basis of their risk factors in order to prevent or limit serious outcomes. Previous reactions to contrast media, asthma, atopy and cardiovascular disorders are risk factors for anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions. Female gender, age and beta-blockers increase the severity. This article aims to summarize the risk of allergic reactions related to the use of iodinated contrast agents and to suggest a way for diagnosis, treatment and prevention according to each clinical situation. PMID:19863909

  19. Hypersensitivity Reactions to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Children and Adolescents: Selective Reactions.

    PubMed

    Blanca-López, N; Cornejo-García, J A; Pérez-Alzate, D; Pérez-Sánchez, N; Plaza-Serón, M C; Doña, I; Torres, M J; Canto, G; Kidon, M; Perkins, J R; Blanca, M

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used throughout the world to treat pain and inflammation; however, they can trigger several types of drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) in all age groups. Although most such reactions occur through activation of the leukotriene pathway without specific immunological recognition (cross-intolerance), a significant number of DHRs to NSAIDs are due to immunological mechanisms (selective reactions [SRs]). SRs are thought to be induced by specific IgE antibodies or by T cells. In this manuscript, we focus on SRs, which are of great concern in children and adolescents and comprise a heterogeneous set of clinical pictures ranging from mild entities such as urticaria/angioedema to potentially life-threatening conditions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. Paracetamol and ibuprofen are the most frequent elicitors of IgE-mediated SRs, although pyrazolones have also been implicated. T cell-mediated reactions are infrequent in children but have been associated with ibuprofen, naproxen, and dipyrone. In this review, we analyze the available literature on SRs in children and adolescents, with emphasis on epidemiological data, mechanisms, and drugs involved, as well as on diagnostic procedures. PMID:26817135

  20. Hypersensitivity reaction to ranitidine: description of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Foti, Caterina; Cassano, Nicoletta; Panebianco, Rosanna; Calogiuri, Gian Franco; Vena, Gino A

    2009-01-01

    Ranitidine is an H2-receptor antagonist which is usually well tolerated. Hypersensitivity reactions to ranitidine, as well as other H2 antihistamines, have been rarely described. We report the case of a 47-year-old woman who developed an anaphylactic reaction to ranitidine used as intravenous premedication before anesthesia induction. The patient's history revealed that previous use of oral ranitidine for a peptic ulcer disease did not cause any adverse reaction. Intradermal test with ranitidine at a dilution of 1:100 gave an intense positive reaction. The protective role of H2-receptor antagonists as premedication is still unclear and should be carefully reconsidered on the basis of the available controversial evidence and the possible risk of hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:19694603

  1. An effective and more convenient drug regimen for prophylaxis against paclitaxel-associated hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Markman, M; Kennedy, A; Webster, K; Peterson, G; Kulp, B; Belinson, J

    1999-07-01

    "Standard" prophylaxis for paclitaxel-associated hypersensitivity reactions has included the systemic administration of H1 and H2 histamine antagonists, along with oral dexamethasone taken both the night prior to, and the morning of, each paclitaxel treatment. To improve patient convenience and compliance with steroid delivery, the Gynecologic Cancer Program of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation has treated patients with an all-intravenous prophylaxis regimen (diphenhydramine 50 mg, famotidine 20 mg, dexamethasone 20 mg) given 30 min prior to paclitaxel (without any earlier oral steroid dosing). To date, we have treated more than 200 patients who received all courses of paclitaxel with this simplified prophylactic regimen, of whom approximately 9% developed hypersensitivity reactions (major or minor). This incidence is comparable to our previously reported experience with hypersensitivity reactions in a similar number of patients receiving the standard prophylaxis (including oral dexamethasone) with their initial course of paclitaxel, and subsequent cycles employing this all-intravenous program. We conclude that this "modified" regimen for paclitaxel-associated hypersensitivity reactions (with all drugs administered approximately 30 min prior to the delivery of paclitaxel) is as effective as, and more convenient than, the standard regimen, and avoids delaying chemotherapy as a result of a patient failing to remember to take one or both oral steroid doses. PMID:10394964

  2. Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to intravascular iodine based radiocontrast media -- an update.

    PubMed

    Bumbăcea, Roxana Silvia; Petruţescu, Brînduşa; Bumbăcea, Dragoş; Strâmbu, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Used since 1929 in medical practice, nowadays four chemical varieties of intravascular iodine based radiocontrast media (I-RCM) are available: ionic monomers with high osmolarity, ionic dimers with low osmolarity, non-ionic monomers with low osmolarity and non-ionic iso-osmolar dimers. Increasing prescription of l-RCMs augments the number of reported hypersensitivity reactions. I-RCM induced hypersensitivity reactions can be dclasified in two types: immediate hypersensitivity reactions (IHRs - occurring within the first hour) and delayed hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs - occurring between 1 hour and 7 days). IHRs usually present as urticaria and angioedema but may associate severe respiratory and cardiovascular symptoms. Risk factors for an IHRs include a prior immediate reaction, personal history of atopic diseases (mainly asthma) and treatment with beta blocking agents. Diagnostic tests for IHRs include blood tests (serum tryptase) and skin tests (prick and intradermal) performed 2 to 6 months after IHR. High osmolarity of the I-RCM is the factor most strongly associated with IHRs. Primary prevention of IHRs involves the use of non-ionic low-osmolar or iso-osmolar agents for all intravascular procedures. DHRs are usually mild to moderate in severity, transient and self-limiting, presenting as maculopapular rash in more than 50% of cases. As with IHRs, the most important risk factor for DHRs is a previous reaction to I-RCM. Assessment of DHRs includes skin prick tests, intradermal and patch tests. Due to extensive cross-reactivity between I-RCM, a change of product is no guarantee against a repeated reaction. Current premedication procedures in patients with previous severe reactions can reduce symptoms, but may not prevent recurrent reactions. PMID:23781574

  3. [Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast agents used in radiology: a review].

    PubMed

    Moussa, Lina Menassa; Nabhane, Linda; Smayra, Tarek; Zebouni, Soha Haddad; Mohanna, Assaad; Abi Khalil, Samer; Aoun, Noel

    2012-01-01

    The use of iodinated contrast agents (IC) has become common practice nowadays in the daily diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in radiology. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions occurring up to the first hour after injection of IC, can be of serious consequences, occasionally leading to death. This justifies the establishment of a prevention algorithm, including a sharp identification of those at risk and the implementation of premedication with corticosteroids. A history of previous reaction to IC is the major risk factor of a new reaction. Other risk factors include asthma, atopy and cardiomyopathy. The factors that influence the severity of the hypersensitivity allergic reactions are female gender, age, and taking beta blockers or ACE inhibitor drugs. PMID:23198457

  4. Pathogenesis and diagnosis of delayed-type drug hypersensitivity reactions, from bedside to bench and back.

    PubMed

    Schrijvers, Rik; Gilissen, Liesbeth; Chiriac, Anca Mirela; Demoly, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) have been present since the advent of drugs. In particular T-cell mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions represent a heterogeneous clinical entity with a diverse pathogenesis and result in a considerable burden of morbidity and mortality not only driven by the reactions themselves but also by the use of alternatives which are sometimes less effective or even more dangerous. Diagnostic procedures rely on clinical history, skin testing and potential provocation testing, whereas validated in vitro diagnostic procedures are still lacking for most of them. Recent work in the field of pharmacogenomics combined with basic scientific research has provided insights in the pathogenesis of abacavir and carbamazepine hypersensitivities linked with certain human leucocyte antigen risk alleles. Nevertheless, important scientific questions on how other DHR arise and how host-drug interactions occur, remain unanswered. Recent work indicates an intricate relation between host, drug and pathogens in severe cutaneous and systemic reactions and provides more insights in the role of regulatory T-cells and viral reactivation in these reactions. In this review we focus on type IV delayed-type DHR, and address recent advances in the pathogenesis, pharmacogenomics, and diagnosis of these reactions with an emphasis on the understandings arising from basic research. PMID:26339470

  5. Systemic Immediate Hypersensitive Reactions after Treatment with Sweet Bee Venom: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: A previous study showed that bee venom (BV) could cause anaphylaxis or other hypersensitivity reactions. Although hypersensitivity reactions due to sweet bee venom (SBV) have been reported, SBV has been reported to be associated with significantly reduced sensitization compared to BV. Although no systemic immediate hypersensitive response accompanied by abnormal vital signs has been reported with respect to SBV, we report a systemic immediate hypersensitive response that we experienced while trying to use SBV clinically. Methods: The patient had undergone BV treatment several times at other Oriental medicine clinics and had experienced no adverse reactions. She came to acupuncture & moxibustion department at Semyung university hospital of Oriental medicine (Je-cheon, Korea) complaining of facial hypoesthesia and was treated using SBV injections, her first SBV treatment. SBV, 0.05 cc, was injected at each of 8 acupoints, for a total of 0.40 cc: Jichang (ST4), Daeyeong (ST5), Hyeopgeo (ST6), Hagwan (ST7), Yepung (TE17), Imun (TE21), Cheonghoe (GB2), and Gwallyeo (SI18). Results: The patient showed systemic immediate hypersensitive reactions. The main symptoms were abdominal pain, nausea and perspiration, but common symptoms associated with hypersensitivity, such as edema, were mild. Abdominal pain was the most long-lasting symptom and was accompanied by nausea. Her body temperature decreased due to sweating. Her diastolic blood pressure could not be measured on three occasions. She remained alert, though the symptoms persisted. The following treatments were conducted in sequence; intramuscular epinephrine, 1 mg/mL, injection, intramuscular dexamethasone, 5 mg/mL, injection, intramuscular buscopan, 20 mg/mL, injection, oxygen (O2) inhalation therapy, 1 L/minutes, via a nasal prong, and intravascular injection of normal saline, 1 L. After 12 hours of treatment, the symptoms had completely disappeared. Conclusion: This case shows that the use of SBV does not

  6. Phytoalexin Accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana during the Hypersensitive Reaction to Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae 1

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Jun; Jackson, Evelyn P.; Gage, Douglas A.; Hammerschmidt, Raymond; Somerville, Shauna C.

    1992-01-01

    Inoculation of leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. with the wheat pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae, resulted in the expression of the hypersensitive reaction and in phytoalexin accumulation. No phytoalexin accumulation was detected after infiltration of leaves with a mutant of P. s. syringae deficient in the ability to elicit a hypersensitive reaction; with the crucifer pathogen, Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris; or with 10 millimolar potassium phosphate buffer (pH 6.9). Phytoalexin accumulation was correlated with the restricted in vivo growth of P. s. syringae. A phytoalexin was purified by a combination of reverse phase flash chromatography, thin layer chromatography, followed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. The Arabidopsis phytoalexin was identified as 3-thiazol-2′-yl-indole on the basis of ultraviolet, infrared, mass spectral, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance data. PMID:16668792

  7. [Etiology of hypersensitivity reactions following Chinese or Indonesian meals].

    PubMed

    de Maat-Bleeker, F

    1992-02-01

    Various authors have criticised or confirmed the relation between adverse reactions to Chinese food ('The Chinese Restaurant Syndrome') and the use of monosodium glutamate (Vetsin). In our experience the occurrence of urticaria, angioedema or anaphylaxis after meals in Chinese or Indonesian restaurants is more often due to IgE-mediated Type I food allergy, caused by consumption of shrimp, peanut or spices, in particular those of the parsley family (e.g. coriander). A detailed description of four such cases is presented. PMID:1571051

  8. Hypersensitivity to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Children and Adolescents: Cross-Intolerance Reactions.

    PubMed

    Blanca-López, N; Cornejo-García, J A; Plaza-Serón, M C; Doña, I; Torres-Jaén, M J; Canto, G; Padilla-España, L; Kidon, M; Perkins, J R; Blanca, M

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used worldwide and are responsible for several types of drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) in all age groups. The 2 major groups of DHRs to NSAIDs are those induced by immunological mechanisms (selective reactions) and those where inflammatory mediators are released through activation of the prostaglandin-leukotriene pathway without specific immunological recognition (cross-intolerance). In the present review, we focus on cross-intolerance reactions, which are the most frequent DHRs and are becoming a topic of major interest in children and adolescents. Paracetamol and ibuprofen are the drugs that most frequently cause DHRs in children; other NSAIDs are responsible for reactions in adolescents. In vivo and in vitro tests are of limited diagnostic value, with some exceptions for the less common selective reactions. In cross-intolerance, the clinical history and controlled administration are in many instances the only way to establish a diagnosis and look for alternatives. The clinical history is diagnostic when consistent symptoms occur repeatedly after exposure to NSAIDs with different chemical structures. Cutaneous and respiratory symptoms often co-occur in young children. The natural history of these reactions in children is unknown, and some patients can develop tolerance over time. Atopy remains a major risk factor for cross-intolerant reactions. The increasing interest in hypersensitivity to NSAIDs with improvements in patient phenotyping and the information provided by pharmacogenetics will improve our understanding and management of these reactions in the near future. PMID:26310040

  9. Hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous iron: guidance for risk minimization and management

    PubMed Central

    Rampton, David; Folkersen, Joergen; Fishbane, Steven; Hedenus, Michael; Howaldt, Stefanie; Locatelli, Francesco; Patni, Shalini; Szebeni, Janos; Weiss, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous iron is widely used for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia when oral iron is inappropriate, ineffective or poorly tolerated. Acute hypersensitivity reactions during iron infusions are very rare but can be life-threatening. This paper reviews their frequency, pathogenesis and risk factors, and provides recommendations about their management and prevention. Complement activation-related pseudo-allergy triggered by iron nanoparticles is probably a more frequent pathogenetic mechanism in acute reactions to current formulations of intravenous iron than is an immunological IgE-mediated response. Major risk factors for hypersensitivity reactions include a previous reaction to an iron infusion, a fast iron infusion rate, multiple drug allergies, severe atopy, and possibly systemic inflammatory diseases. Early pregnancy is a contraindication to iron infusions, while old age and serious co-morbidity may worsen the impact of acute reactions if they occur. Management of iron infusions requires meticulous observation, and, in the event of an adverse reaction, prompt recognition and severity-related interventions by well-trained medical and nursing staff. PMID:25420283

  10. [Hypersensitive reaction after application of heparin with activation heparin induced trombocytopenia in initiation of intermittent haemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Masopust, Jan; Charvát, Jiří; Mokrá, Dana; Hloch, Ondřej; Háša, Jan

    2015-03-01

    Our report describes the case of patient with hypersensitive reaction regularly arising early after initiation of haemodialysis. This characteristic reaction with pletoric face coloration, bronchospasm, increase of blood pressure, anxiety and decrease of blood oxygen saturation at the consequence and central cyanosis was regularly present without dependence on type of dialysis membrane, drug premedication or prophylactic flushing haemodialysis system by isotonic natrium chloride solution. Low platelet value and trouble-free haemodialysis realized without heparin showed real cause of patients problem. Resolution of this state was regional citrate anticoagulation during intermitent haemodialysis. PMID:25873123

  11. Cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions to vitamin K: 2 case reports and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bruynzeel, I; Hebeda, C L; Folkers, E; Bruynzeel, D P

    1995-02-01

    Between 1964 and 1994, at least 52 patients with cutaneous adverse effects of vitamin K have been described in the European and North American literature. A review of the details of these patients is given and 2 new cases reported. Adverse effects are seen not only in patients with liver-function disturbances but also in patients without liver diseases, and occur mostly after intramuscular or subcutaneous administration of vitamin K1, independent of the total dose. Patch and intracutaneous tests often give positive reactions. The mechanism of action is probably in many patients a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:7758325

  12. Safe administration of iron sucrose in a patient with a previous hypersensitivity reaction to ferric gluconate.

    PubMed

    Sane, Radhika; Baribeault, David; Rosenberg, Carol L

    2007-04-01

    A 67-year-old woman with iron deficiency anemia required parenteral iron therapy and was treated with intravenous ferric gluconate. She tolerated the first dose, but after the second dose, she developed a tingling feeling all over her body, along with swelling in her hands and feet, and a rash with hives over most of her body. It was thought that she had likely experienced a hypersensitivity reaction to ferric gluconate. The decision was made to continue therapy; however, two modifications were made. The patient was given dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, and ibuprofen 1 hour before administering the third dose, and the infusion time was prolonged by 1 hour. Approximately 45 minutes after the infusion was completed, the patient developed hives on her arms and legs. At the patient's next clinic visit, it was decided that continuation of parenteral iron repletion was necessary, and the decision was made to attempt a challenge with iron sucrose. The patient was given dexamethasone 8 mg to be taken the night before and the morning of treatment. She successfully completed the iron repletion therapy with iron sucrose. Three parenteral iron products are available in the United States: iron dextran, sodium ferric gluconate complex, and iron sucrose. Iron dextran, the oldest of these products, carries the highest risk for hypersensitivity reactions. Available data suggest that either iron sucrose or ferric gluconate can be safely administered to patients with known hypersensitivity to iron dextran. Our patient's experience implies that it may be possible to safely administer iron sucrose to a patient with hypersensitivity to ferric gluconate. This finding has clinical implications and warrants confirmation in a larger population. PMID:17381390

  13. [The reactions of hypersensitivity: the mechanisms of development, clinical manifestations, principles of diagnostic (a lecture)].

    PubMed

    Tukavkina, S Yu; Kharseyeva, G G

    2014-05-01

    The article considers the principles of modern classification of hypersensitivity, pathogenic mechanisms of formation of its various types resulting in development of typical clinical symptoms and syndromes. The knowledge and comprehension of these issues is important for physicians of different specializations since it permits to properly make out and formulate diagnosis and timely send patient for examination and treatment to such specialist as allergist-immunologist. The particular attention was paid to description of pathogenesis of diseases and syndromes underlaid by IgE-mediated type of hypersensitivity since their share is highest and clinical manifestations frequently require emergency medical care. The diagnostic of allergic diseases is to be implemented sequentially (step-by-step) and include common clinical and special (specific) methods. In case of choosing of extent of specialized allergological examination the diagnostic significance of techniques and their safety is to be taken into account concerning condition of patient. The diagnosis is objectively formulated only by complex of examination results. It is worth to remember about possibility of development of syndromes similar to IgE-mediated allergy by their clinical manifestations but belonging to non-allergic type of hypersensitivity. It is important to know main causes, mechanisms and ways of formation of such reactions previously named as anaphylactoid ones. PMID:25338461

  14. The Incidence of Hypersensitivity Reactions to Pegylated Asparaginase in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A City-wide Experience.

    PubMed

    Alrazzak, Muaz; Beaupin, Lynda K; Kinyoun, Peter; Barth, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Asparaginase (ASNase) is an imperative component of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy. Pegylating the ASNase extends its biological half-life in vivo and has become the only ASNase available in the United States for frontline therapy of ALL and lymphoblastic lymphoma. It is either infused intravenously (IV) or injected intramuscularly (IM), administrations of which are associated with hypersensitivity reaction ranging from localized skin reaction to severe anaphylaxis. A retrospective review of 96 medical records of pediatric ALL patients was performed. We compared the incidence of hypersensitivity reaction associated with IV versus IM administration of pegylated ASNase. Ninety-one patients were included in the final analysis; 31 having received pegylated ASNase IV and 60 receiving it IM. The incidence of any grade ≥ 2 hypersensitivity reaction in patients who received IV ASNase was 32.2% compared with 13.3% in the IM group (P=0.032). There was no difference in higher grade hypersensitivity reactions (19.4% vs. 11.7%). Most reactions tended to occur during periods of leukemia therapy that did not include concomitant steroid therapy. Our retrospective analysis indicates that IV administration of pegylated ASNase increases the incidence of low-grade, but not grade 3-4, hypersensitivity reactions compared with IM administration. PMID:26558809

  15. Immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity reaction after intraperitoneal administration of vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Mun-Ju; Do, Jun-Young; Choi, Eun-Woo; Seo, Joon-Hyuk; Nam, Yoon-Jung; Yoon, Kyung-Woo; Park, Jong-Won; Cho, Kyu-Hyang; Kang, Seok-Hui; Jin, Hyun-Jung

    2015-03-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) vancomycin is widely used to treat Gram-positive peritonitis associated with peritoneal dialysis. There have been two cases of red man syndrome (RMS), a vancomycin-specific nonimmunologic reaction, associated with IP vancomycin. However, immune-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to IP vancomycin has not yet been reported. A 49 year old woman on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis developed her first peritonitis episode. The patient was treated with IP vancomycin once/wk for 4 weeks. She experienced mild itching and flushing throughout her body for 1 day after the second treatment. Whenever vancomycin was administered, generalized urticaria and a prickling sensation developed, and the intensity increased gradually; however, these symptoms improved after vancomycin was discontinued. An allergic skin test was performed 6 weeks after the previous urticarial episode, and an intradermal skin test revealed a positive response to vancomycin. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to IP vancomycin administration. PMID:26484021

  16. Immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity reaction after intraperitoneal administration of vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Mun-Ju; Do, Jun-Young; Choi, Eun-Woo; Seo, Joon-Hyuk; Nam, Yoon-Jung; Yoon, Kyung-Woo; Park, Jong-Won; Cho, Kyu-Hyang; Kang, Seok-Hui; Jin, Hyun-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) vancomycin is widely used to treat Gram-positive peritonitis associated with peritoneal dialysis. There have been two cases of red man syndrome (RMS), a vancomycin-specific nonimmunologic reaction, associated with IP vancomycin. However, immune-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to IP vancomycin has not yet been reported. A 49 year old woman on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis developed her first peritonitis episode. The patient was treated with IP vancomycin once/wk for 4 weeks. She experienced mild itching and flushing throughout her body for 1 day after the second treatment. Whenever vancomycin was administered, generalized urticaria and a prickling sensation developed, and the intensity increased gradually; however, these symptoms improved after vancomycin was discontinued. An allergic skin test was performed 6 weeks after the previous urticarial episode, and an intradermal skin test revealed a positive response to vancomycin. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to IP vancomycin administration. PMID:26484021

  17. Impact of Prophylactic Conversion to an Extended Infusion Schedule to Prevent Hypersensitivity Reactions in Ovarian Cancer Patients during Carboplatin Retreatment

    PubMed Central

    O’Cearbhaill, Roisin; Zhou, Qin; Iasonos, Alexia; Hensley, Martee L.; Tew, William P.; Aghajanian, Carol; Spriggs, David R.; Lichtman, Stuart M.; Sabbatini, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Repeated exposure to carboplatin can lead to hypersensitivity reactions during retreatment with carboplatin. This may prevent its further use in platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer patients. At our institution, an increasing proportion of patients are prophylactically converted to an extended schedule of infusion after 8 cycles of carboplatin. We sought to determine whether an incrementally increasing, extended 3-hour infusion of carboplatin was associated with a lower rate of hypersensitivity reactions compared to the standard 30-minute schedule in sequentially treated patients. Methods We performed a retrospective electronic medical record review of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer retreated with carboplatin at our institution from 01/98–12/08. Results Seven hundred seventy-seven patients with relapsed ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer were retreated with carboplatin and met study inclusion criteria. Of these, 117 (17%) developed hypersensitivity reactions during second-line or greater carboplatin-based treatment for recurrent disease. Only 6 (3.4%) of the 174 patients who received the extended schedule developed hypersensitivity reactions (0% grade 4; 1.7% grade 3) compared to 111 (21%) of 533 patients in the standard schedule group (12% grade 4; 77% grade 3). The first hypersensitivity episode occurred after a median of 16 platinum (carboplatin and cisplatin) treatments in the extended group compared to 9 in the standard group. Using the Fisher-exact test, there was an association with a reduced incidence of hypersensitivity reactions with the extended infusion schedule (P<0.001). Conclusion Our data suggest appropriate premedication and prophylactic conversion to an extended infusion during carboplatin retreatment may reduce hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:19944454

  18. Changes in delayed hypersensitivity reaction in mice exposed to O/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimaki, H.; Shiraishi, F.; Ashikawa, T.; Murakami, M.

    1987-06-01

    BALB/c mice were continuously exposed to 0.8 ppm O/sub 3/ for 1, 3, 7, and 14 days. Ozone exposure suppressed the delayed hypersensitivity (DH) reaction to sheep red blood cells (SRBC). The maximum effect was seen after 7 days of exposure. To estimate the suppression of the DH reaction by O/sub 3/ exposure, the numbers of lymphocytes in thymus and blood of exposed mice were compared with those of control mice. A decrease in the numbers of lymphocytes in both thymus and blood was observed in O/sub 3/-exposed mice. The percentage of T and B lymphocytes in blood of exposed mice was the same as that in blood of control mice. These results suggest that 0.8 ppm O/sub 3/ exposure affects the T lymphocytes required for DH reactions.

  19. Hapten-Induced Contact Hypersensitivity, Autoimmune Reactions, and Tumor Regression: Plausibility of Mediating Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Erkes, Dan A.; Selvan, Senthamil R.

    2014-01-01

    Haptens are small molecule irritants that bind to proteins and elicit an immune response. Haptens have been commonly used to study allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) using animal contact hypersensitivity (CHS) models. However, extensive research into contact hypersensitivity has offered a confusing and intriguing mechanism of allergic reactions occurring in the skin. The abilities of haptens to induce such reactions have been frequently utilized to study the mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to induce autoimmune-like responses such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia and to elicit viral wart and tumor regression. Hapten-induced tumor regression has been studied since the mid-1900s and relies on four major concepts: (1) ex vivo haptenation, (2) in situ haptenation, (3) epifocal hapten application, and (4) antigen-hapten conjugate injection. Each of these approaches elicits unique responses in mice and humans. The present review attempts to provide a critical appraisal of the hapten-mediated tumor treatments and offers insights for future development of the field. PMID:24949488

  20. A single-arm Phase II validation study of preventing oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions by dexamethasone: the AVOID trial

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoichiro; Hirata, Keiji; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Shigeyoshi; Kotaka, Masahito; Fujita, Hideto; Aisu, Naoya; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Kosaka, Takeo; Maeda, Kotaro; Kiyomi, Fumiaki; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin are at risk of hypersensitivity reactions, with the incidence estimated to be 12%–20%. Coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin could potentially reduce the incidence of these reactions, but oxaliplatin is reported to be incompatible with alkaline compounds in solution. However, in a previous retrospective study we found that the pH of a solution of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin was less than 7.4, and that hypersensitivity to oxaliplatin could have been prevented by coinfusion of dexamethasone. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin to prevent oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Patients and methods The AVOID trial was a prospective, multicenter, open-label, single-arm Phase II trial conducted from January to September 2013. The study included 73 patients who received capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) or XELOX plus bevacizumab therapy for colorectal cancer. In all patients, oxaliplatin was administered in combination with dexamethasone. The primary outcome measure was the presence of hypersensitivity reactions. Results Hypersensitivity reactions occurred in three patients (4.1%); all three experienced a cutaneous reaction (grade 1 erythema). None of the 73 patients developed respiratory symptoms, ocular symptoms, or anaphylaxis. Grade 3 or higher hemotoxicity occurred in 13.7% of the patients and grade 3 or higher nonhematological toxicity occurred in 13.7%. The response rate to treatment was 64.4%. Conclusion The coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin effectively reduced oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with colorectal cancer. This approach should be considered for all patients treated with oxaliplatin, allowing treatment to be completed as planned. PMID:26648694

  1. Basophil Reactivity as Biomarker in Immediate Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions-Potential and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Markus; Harrer, Andrea; Himly, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) resemble typical immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated symptoms. Clinical manifestations range from local skin reactions, gastrointestinal and/or respiratory symptoms to severe systemic involvement with potential fatal outcome. Depending on the substance group of the eliciting drug the correct diagnosis is a major challenge. Skin testing and in vitro diagnostics are often unreliable and not reproducible. The involvement of drug-specific IgE is questionable in many cases. The culprit substance (parent drug or metabolite) and potential cross-reacting compounds are difficult to identify, patient history and drug provocation testing often remain the only means for diagnosis. Hence, several groups proposed basophil activation test (BAT) for the diagnosis of immediate DHRs as basophils are well-known effector cells in allergic reactions. However, the usefulness of BAT in immediate DHRs is highly variable and dependent on the drug itself plus its capacity to spontaneously conjugate to serum proteins. Stimulation with pure solutions of the parent drug or metabolites thereof vs. drug-protein conjugates may influence sensitivity and specificity of the test. We thus, reviewed the available literature about the use of BAT for diagnosing immediate DHRs against drug classes such as antibiotics, radio contrast media, neuromuscular blocking agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and biologicals. Influencing factors like the selection of stimulants or of the identification and activation markers, the stimulation protocol, gating strategies, and cut-off definition are addressed in this overview on BAT performance. The overall aim is to evaluate the suitability of BAT as biomarker for the diagnosis of immediate drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:27378928

  2. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Hypersensitivity Reactions to Contrast Media.

    PubMed

    Rosado Ingelmo, A; Doña Diaz, I; Cabañas Moreno, R; Moya Quesada, M C; García-Avilés, C; García Nuñez, I; Martínez Tadeo, J I; Mielgo Ballesteros, R; Ortega-Rodríguez, N; Padial Vilchez, M A; Sánchez-Morillas, L; Vila Albelda, C; Moreno Rodilla, E; Torres Jaén, M J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of these guidelines is to ensure efficient and effective clinical practice. The panel of experts who produced this consensus document developed a research protocol based on a review of the literature. The prevalence of allergic reactions to iodinated contrast media (ICM) is estimated to be 1:170 000, that is, 0.05%-0.1% of patients undergoing radiologic studies with ICM (more than 75 million examinations per year worldwide). Hypersensitivity reactions can appear within the first hour after administration (immediate reactions) or from more than 1 hour to several days after administration (nonimmediate or delayed reactions). The risk factors for immediate reactions include poorly controlled bronchial asthma, concomitant medication (eg, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, ß-blockers, and proton-pump inhibitors), rapid administration of the ICM, mastocytosis, autoimmune diseases, and viral infections. The most common symptoms of immediate reactions are erythema and urticaria with or without angioedema, which appear in more than 70% of patients. Maculopapular rash is the most common skin feature of nonimmediate reactions (30%-90%). Skin and in vitro tests should be performed for diagnosis of both immediate and nonimmediate reactions. The ICM to be administered will therefore be chosen depending on the results of these tests, the ICM that induced the reaction (when known), the severity of the reaction, the availability of alternative ICM, and the information available on potential ICM cross-reactivity. Another type of contrast media, gadolinium derivatives, is used used for magnetic resonance imaging. Although rare, IgE-mediated reactions to gadolinium derivatives have been reported. PMID:27326981

  3. Multi-Scale Optical Imaging of the Delayed Type Hypersensitivity Reaction Attenuated by Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Meijie; Zhang, Zhihong; Li, Hui; Qiao, Sha; Liu, Zheng; Fu, Ling; Shen, Guanxin; Luo, Qingming

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages (MMs) play important roles in the development of cell-mediated delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH). However, the dynamics of neutrophils and MMs during the DTH reaction and how the immunosuppressant rapamycin modulates their behavior in vivo are rarely reported. Here, we take advantage of multi-scale optical imaging techniques and a footpad DTH reaction model to non-invasively investigate the dynamic behavior and properties of immune cells from the whole field of the footpad to the cellular level. During the classic elicitation phase of the DTH reaction, both neutrophils and MMs obviously accumulated at inflammatory foci at 24 h post-challenge. Rapamycin treatment resulted in advanced neutrophil recruitment and vascular hyperpermeability at an early stage (4 h), the reduced accumulation of neutrophils (> 50% inhibition ratio) at 48 h, and the delayed involvement of MMs in inflammatory foci. The motility parameters of immune cells in the rapamycin-treated reaction at 4 h post-challenge displayed similar mean velocities, arrest durations, mean displacements, and confinements as the classic DTH reaction at 24 h. These results indicate that rapamycin treatment shortened the initial preparation stage of the DTH reaction and attenuated its intensity, which may be due to the involvement of T helper type 2 cells or regulatory T cells. PMID:24465276

  4. [Administration of premedication with fexofenadine for paclitaxel-induced hypersensitive reactions in breast cancer patients complicated with closed-angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Kyoko; Kogure, Yuuki; Matsuhisa, Tetsuaki; Eguchi, Hisae

    2010-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the most important breast cancer treatment drugs. However, severe hypersensitivity reactions such as decreases in blood pressure and impaired breathing occur with high frequency. For the prevention of such hypersensitivity reactions, administration of a premedication composed of three components, diphenhydramine, ranitidine (or famotidine), and dexamethasone, has been advised in package insert information of medicine. Administration of diphenhydramine is difficult in breast cancer patients complicated with closed-angle glaucoma, because diphenhydramine has a weak anticholinergic adverse effect which can induce mydriasis and glaucoma attack. We studied the prevention of severe hypersensitivity reactions and of glaucoma attack in 2 breast cancer patients complicated with closed angle glaucoma at our hospital from April 2007 to March 2008. We switched from diphenhydramine to fexofenadine as the medicine to prevent hypersensitivity reactions. Hypersensitivity reactions were not observed throughout all courses in both patients, and no glaucoma attack was observed. PMID:20087041

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of two hypersensitive induced reaction genes from wheat infected by stripe rust pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel gene induced during hypersensitive reaction (HIR) in wheat was identified using in silico cloning and designated as TaHIR2. The TaHIR2 gene was deduced to encode a 284-amino acid protein, whose molecular mass and isoelectric point (pI) were 31.05 kD and 5.18, respectively. Amino acid sequenc...

  6. Animal models of complement-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to liposomes and other lipid-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Szebeni, János; Alving, Carl R; Rosivall, László; Bünger, Rolf; Baranyi, Lajos; Bedöcs, Péter; Tóth, Miklós; Barenholz, Yezheckel

    2007-01-01

    Intravenous injection of some liposomal drugs, diagnostic agents, micelles and other lipid-based nanoparticles can cause acute hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) in a high percentage (up to 45%) of patients, with hemodynamic, respiratory and cutaneous manifestations. The phenomenon can be explained with activation of the complement (C) system on the surface of lipid particles, leading to anaphylatoxin (C5a and C3a) liberation and subsequent release reactions of mast cells, basophils and possibly other inflammatory cells in blood. These reactions can be reproduced and studied in pigs, dogs and rats, animal models which differ from each other in sensitivity and spectrum of symptoms. In the most sensitive pig model, a few miligrams of liposome (phospholipid) can cause anaphylactoid shock, characterized by pulmonary hypertension, systemic hypotension, decreased cardiac output and major cardiac arrhythmias. Pigs also display cutaneous symptoms, such as flushing and rash. The sensitivity of dogs to hemodynamic changes is close to that of pigs, but unlike pigs, dogs also react to micellar lipids (such as Cremophor EL) and their response includes pronounced blood cell and vegetative neural changes (e.g., leukopenia followed by leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, fluid excretions). Rats are relatively insensitive inasmuch as hypotension, their most prominent response to liposomes, is induced only by one or two orders of magnitude higher phospholipid doses (based on body weight) compared to the reactogenic dose in pigs and dogs. It is suggested that the porcine and dog models are applicable for measuring and predicting the (pseudo)allergic activity of particulate "nanodrugs". PMID:17613700

  7. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2009.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects, as well as advances in allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2009. Among key epidemiologic observations, several westernized countries report that more than 1% of children have peanut allergy, and there is some evidence that environmental exposure to peanut is a risk factor. The role of regulatory T cells, complement, platelet-activating factor, and effector cells in the development and expression of food allergy were explored in several murine models and human studies. Delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meats appears to be related to IgE binding to the carbohydrate moiety galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, which also has implications for hypersensitivity to murine mAb therapeutics containing this oligosaccharide. Oral immunotherapy studies continue to show promise for the treatment of food allergy, but determining whether the treatment causes tolerance (cure) or temporary desensitization remains to be explored. Increased baseline serum tryptase levels might inform the risk of venom anaphylaxis and might indicate a risk for mast cell disorders in persons who have experienced such episodes. Reduced structural and immune barrier function contribute to local and systemic allergen sensitization in patients with atopic dermatitis, as well as increased propensity of skin infections in these patients. The use of increased doses of nonsedating antihistamines and potential usefulness of omalizumab for chronic urticaria was highlighted. These exciting advances reported in the Journal can improve patient care today and provide insights on how we can improve the diagnosis and treatment of these allergic diseases in the future. PMID:20109740

  8. Oral administration of IL-12 suppresses anaphylactic reactions in a murine model of peanut hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Huang, C K; Zhang, T F; Schofield, B H; Burks, A W; Bannon, G A; Sampson, H A; Li, X M

    2001-11-01

    There is no satisfactory therapeutic intervention for peanut allergy, which accounts for most life-threatening food allergic reactions. Since IL-12 has been found to inhibit allergic airway responses in a mouse model of asthma and to cure Th2 cytokine-mediated murine schistosomiasis, we hypothesized that IL-12 treatment might also inhibit peanut allergic reactions. Consequently, we investigated the effects of oral IL-12 treatment in a murine model of peanut allergy and found that oral administration of liposome encapsulated rIL-12 could both prevent and reverse peanut hypersensitivity and could reduce histamine release, peanut-specific serum IgE and IgG1, and fecal IgA levels. Oral IL-12 treatment also increased IFN-gamma but did not decrease IL-4 or IL-5 levels. We conclude that oral rIL-12 treatment has therapeutic as well as preventive effects on peanut allergy, which are associated with increased IFN-gamma production. PMID:11683581

  9. Psoriasis is characterized by deficient negative immune regulation compared to transient delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Nicholas; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Krueger, James G

    2015-01-01

    Diphencyprone (DPCP) is a hapten that causes delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in human skin, and is used as a topical therapeutic for alopecia areata, warts, and cutaneous melanoma metastases.  We examined peak DTH reactions induced by DPCP (3 days post-challenge) by comprehensive gene expression and histological analysis.  To better understand how these DTH reactions naturally resolve, we compared our DPCP biopsies to those from patients with psoriasis vulgaris, a chronic inflammatory disease that does not resolve.  By both microarray and qRT-PCR, we found that psoriasis lesional skin has significantly lower expression of many negative immune regulators compared to peak DPCP reactions.  These regulators include: interleukin-10, cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated 4 (CTLA4), programmed cell death 1 (PD1), programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PDL1), programmed cell death 1 ligand 2 (PDL2), and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1).  Their decreased expression was confirmed at the protein level by immunohistochemistry.  To more completely determine the balance of positive vs. negative immune regulators in both DPCP reactions and psoriasis, we developed one comprehensive gene list for positive regulatory (inflammatory) genes, and another for negative regulatory (immunosuppressive) genes, through Gene Ontology terms and literature review.  With this approach, we found that DPCP reactions have a higher ratio of negative to positive regulatory genes (both in terms of quantity and expression levels) than psoriasis lesional skin.  These data suggest that the disease chronicity that distinguishes psoriasis from transient DTH reactions may be related to absence of negative immune regulatory pathways, and induction of these is therefore of therapeutic interest.  Further study of these negative regulatory mechanisms that are present in DPCP reactions, but not in psoriasis, could reveal novel players in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation.  The DPCP system

  10. Psoriasis is characterized by deficient negative immune regulation compared to transient delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Nicholas; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Krueger, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Diphencyprone (DPCP) is a hapten that causes delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in human skin, and is used as a topical therapeutic for alopecia areata, warts, and cutaneous melanoma metastases.  We examined peak DTH reactions induced by DPCP (3 days post-challenge) by comprehensive gene expression and histological analysis.  To better understand how these DTH reactions naturally resolve, we compared our DPCP biopsies to those from patients with psoriasis vulgaris, a chronic inflammatory disease that does not resolve.  By both microarray and qRT-PCR, we found that psoriasis lesional skin has significantly lower expression of many negative immune regulators compared to peak DPCP reactions.  These regulators include: interleukin-10, cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated 4 (CTLA4), programmed cell death 1 (PD1), programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PDL1), programmed cell death 1 ligand 2 (PDL2), and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1).  Their decreased expression was confirmed at the protein level by immunohistochemistry.  To more completely determine the balance of positive vs. negative immune regulators in both DPCP reactions and psoriasis, we developed one comprehensive gene list for positive regulatory (inflammatory) genes, and another for negative regulatory (immunosuppressive) genes, through Gene Ontology terms and literature review.  With this approach, we found that DPCP reactions have a higher ratio of negative to positive regulatory genes (both in terms of quantity and expression levels) than psoriasis lesional skin.  These data suggest that the disease chronicity that distinguishes psoriasis from transient DTH reactions may be related to absence of negative immune regulatory pathways, and induction of these is therefore of therapeutic interest.  Further study of these negative regulatory mechanisms that are present in DPCP reactions, but not in psoriasis, could reveal novel players in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation.  The DPCP system

  11. Proposal of a skin tests based approach for the prevention of recurrent hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast media.

    PubMed

    Della-Torre, E; Berti, A; Yacoub, M R; Guglielmi, B; Tombetti, E; Sabbadini, M G; Voltolini, S; Colombo, G

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present work is to evaluate the efficacy of an approach that combines clinical history, skin tests results, and premedication, in preventing recurrent hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast media (ICM). Skin Prick tests, Intradermal tests, and Patch tests were performed in 36 patients with a previous reaction to ICM. All patients underwent a second contrast enhanced radiological procedure with an alternative ICM selected on the basis of the proposed approach. After alternative ICM re-injection, only one patient presented a mild NIR. The proposed algorithm, validated in clinical settings where repeated radiological exams are needed, offers a safe and practical approach for protecting patients from recurrent hypersensitivity reactions to ICM. PMID:25951145

  12. Self-reported sulphonamide hypersensitivity reactions in adults living in Ibadan, Nigeria: A cross-sectional, community-based study

    PubMed Central

    Mary, Akpan Richard; Olayinka, Kotila Adejoke; Onoja, Akpa Matthew; Olufunmilayo, Fawole; Adeyinka, Falusi Gladys; Chinedum, Babalola Peace

    2015-01-01

    Background: Documentation of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is critical to a safe health delivery system. The aim of our study was to explore the prevalence of self-reported sulphonamide hypersensitivity reactions in a community-based sample of the general population in Ibadan, Nigeria. We also examined sociodemographic factors associated with ADRs in the sample. Patients and Methods: The study was cross-sectional in design with study sites in urban, semiurban, and rural settlement areas. Pretested questionnaires were administered on a one-on-one basis by trained interviewers. Frequency tables and percentages were computed for various levels of the variables. Chi-square test was used to assess the relationship between sulphonamide hypersensitivity and variables such as sociodemographic characteristics of respondents, respondents' knowledge of drugs, as well as drug sources. Variables found to be significantly associated with sulphonamide hypersensitivity were further investigated using multiple logistic regressions analysis. Results: Out of the 1062 respondents, 15.5% reported hypersensitivity to sulphonamides with skin reactions being the most prevalent. The proportion reporting ADRs was significantly higher among respondents with tertiary education (23.1%) than any other level of education (P = 0.008). In addition, individuals who were very knowledgeable about drug use (odds ratio[OR]: 2.07; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.15–3.73) and persons who got drugs from hospitals (OR: 2.00; 95% CI: 1.10–3.65) were more likely to report ADRs than those who were ignorant about drugs and those who purchased drugs from open markets, respectively. Conclusion: Prevalence of sulphonamide hypersensitivity is high among respondents, and ADRs is likely to be reported by people who are knowledgeable about drug use. PMID:26903698

  13. Hypersensitivity to topical corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S M

    1994-01-01

    Contact hypersensitivity from topical corticosteroids is becoming increasingly recognized; it is present in 2-5% of the patients attending contact dermatitis clinics. The use of a corticosteroid series containing tixocortal pivalate 1% (petrolatum), to detect hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone, and other steroids 1% (ethanol), depending on local corticosteroid usage, detects the majority of cases of corticosteroid hypersensitivity. In selected cases, the use of intradermal tests further improves the diagnosis of corticosteroid hypersensitivity. Corticosteroid hypersensitivity occurs most frequently among patients with stasis dermatitis. However, corticosteroid hypersensitivity is also common in other types of dermatitis, occurring as frequently as hypersensitivity to several allergens (e.g. wool alcohols and colophony) in the European standard battery. Although hypersensitivity has mainly been reported with corticosteroids applied to the skin, reactions may also occur on mucosal surfaces, following systemic administration and with sex steroids. PMID:8313630

  14. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2013.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2014-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2013. Studies on food allergy suggest that (1) 7.6% of the US population is affected, (2) a "healthy" early diet might prevent food allergy, (3) the skin might be an important route of sensitization, (4) allergen component testing might aid diagnosis, (5) the prognosis of milk allergy might be predictable through early testing, (6) oral or sublingual immunotherapy show promise but also have caveats, and (7) preclinical studies show promising alternative modes of immunotherapy and desensitization. Studies on eosinophilic esophagitis show a relationship to connective tissue disorders and that dietary management is an effective treatment for adults. Markers of anaphylaxis severity have been determined and might inform potential diagnostics and therapeutic targets. Insights on serum tests for drug and insect sting allergy might result in improved diagnostics. Genetic and immune-mediated defects in skin epithelial differentiation contribute to the severity of atopic dermatitis. Novel management approaches to treatment of chronic urticaria, including use of omalizumab, are being identified. PMID:24373349

  15. Chronic delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction as a means to treat alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    ZÖLLER, M; FREYSCHMIDT-PAUL, P; VITACOLONNA, M; McELWEE, K J; HUMMEL, S; HOFFMANN, R

    2004-01-01

    The acute phase of alopecia areata (AA) is characterized by an increase in CD44v3+ and CD44v10+ skin-infiltrating leucocytes (SkIL). Induction of a contact eczema, one of the therapeutic options in AA, can be mitigated strongly by a blockade of CD44v10. The observation that induction of a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction abrogates an autoimmune reaction, where both responses apparently use similar effector mechanisms, is surprising and prompted us to search for the underlying mechanisms. AA-affected C3H/HeJ mice were treated with the contact sensitizer SADBE (squaric acid dibutylester) and leucocyte subpopulations and their activation state was evaluated in SkIL and draining lymph nodes. AA-affected mice exhibited an increased number of SkIL with a predominance of T lymphocytes. After treatment with the contact sensitizer SADBE recovery of SkIL was reduced and monocytes predominated. However, a significantly increased number of leucocytes was recovered from draining lymph nodes. Draining lymph node cells from untreated and treated AA mice exhibited all signs of recent activation with high-level expression of co-stimulatory and accessory molecules and an increased percentage of CD44v3+ and CD44v10+ leucocytes. In contrast, SkIL of SADBE-treated AA mice contained relatively few activated T cells and reduced numbers of CD44v3+ and CD44v10+ cells. Thus, the activation state and the distribution of leucocyte subsets in SADBE-treated AA mice are consistent with a blockade of leucocyte extravasation. Accordingly, the therapeutic effect of long-term SADBE treatment may rely on impaired leucocyte traffic. PMID:15008971

  16. Genetic variants associated with drugs-induced immediate hypersensitivity reactions: a PRISMA-compliant systematic review.

    PubMed

    Oussalah, A; Mayorga, C; Blanca, M; Barbaud, A; Nakonechna, A; Cernadas, J; Gotua, M; Brockow, K; Caubet, J-C; Bircher, A; Atanaskovic, M; Demoly, P; K Tanno, L; Terreehorst, I; Laguna, J J; Romano, A; Guéant, J-L

    2016-04-01

    Drug hypersensitivity includes allergic (AR) and nonallergic reactions (NARs) influenced by genetic predisposition. We performed a systematic review of genetic predictors of IgE-mediated AR and NAR with MEDLINE and PubMed search engine between January 1966 and December 2014. Among 3110 citations, the search selected 53 studies, 42 of which remained eligible. These eligible studies have evaluated genetic determinants of immediate reactions (IR) to beta-lactams (n = 19), NAR against aspirin (n = 12) and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (n = 8), and IR to biologics (n = 3). We reported two genomewide association studies and four case-control studies on candidate genes validated by replication. Genes involved in IR to beta-lactams belonged to HLA type 2 antigen processing, IgE production, atopy, and inflammation, including 4 genes validated by replications, HLA-DRA, ILR4, NOD2, and LGALS3. Genes involved in NAR to aspirin belonged to arachidonic acid pathway, membrane-spanning 4A gene family, histamine production pathway, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, while those involved in NAR to all NSAIDs belonged to arachidonic acid pathway and HLA antigen processing pathway. ALOX5 was a common predictor of studies on NAR to both aspirin and NSAIDs. Although these first conclusions could be drawn, this review highlights also the lack of reliable data and the need for replicating studies in contrasted populations, taking into account worldwide allele frequencies, gene-gene interactions, and contrasted situations of environmental exposure. PMID:26678823

  17. Loss and Gain of Elicitor Function of Soybean Mosaic Virus G7 Provoking Rsv1-Mediated Lethal Systemic Hypersensitive Response Maps to P3

    PubMed Central

    Hajimorad, M. R.; Eggenberger, A. L.; Hill, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    Rsv1, a single dominant resistance gene in soybean PI 96983 (Rsv1), confers extreme resistance against all known American strains of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), except G7 and G7d. SMV-G7 provokes a lethal systemic hypersensitive response (LSHR), whereas SMV-G7d, an experimentally evolved variant of SMV-G7, induces systemic mosaic. To identify the elicitor of Rsv1-mediated LSHR, chimeras were constructed by exchanging fragments between the molecularly cloned SMV-G7 (pSMV-G7) and SMV-G7d (pSMV-G7d), and their elicitor functions were assessed on PI 96983 (Rsv1). pSMV-G7-derived chimeras containing only P3 of SMV-G7d lost the elicitor function, while the reciprocal chimera of pSMV-G7d gained the function. The P3 regions of the two viruses differ by six nucleotides, of which two are translationally silent. The four amino acid differences are located at positions 823, 915, 953, and 1112 of the precursor polypeptide. Analyses of the site-directed point mutants of both the viruses revealed that nucleotide substitutions leading to translationally silent mutations as well as reciprocal amino acid substitution at position 915 did not influence the loss or gain of the elicitor function. pSMV-G7-derived mutants with amino acid substitutions at any of the other three positions lost the ability to provoke LSHR but induced SHR instead. Two concomitant amino acid substitutions at positions 823 (V to M) and 953 (K to E) abolished pSMV-G7 elicitor function, provoking Rsv1-mediated SHR. Conversely, pSMV-G7d gained the elicitor function of Rsv1-mediated LSHR by a single amino acid substitution at position 823 (M to V), and mutants with amino acid substitutions at position 953 or 1112 induced SHR instead of mosaic. Taken together, the data suggest that strain-specific P3 of SMV is the elicitor of Rsv1-mediated LSHR. PMID:15613348

  18. Herbex-kid Inhibits Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions in Mice and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rawal; Jogge, Nanjan Mulla; Bhojraj, Suresh; Emerson, Solomon F.; Prabakar, S.

    2008-01-01

    Herbex-kid (HK), a polyherbal formulation was evaluated in various experimental allergic models of Type I hypersensitivity reactions. Compound 48/80 (C 48/80) has been shown to induce rat mesentery mast cell degranulation and HK (1.07, 10.75 and 107.5 mg ml−1) inhibited the mast cell degranulation in a dose dependent manner. HK (1.07, 10.75 and 107.5 mg kg−1; p.o.) showed dose-dependent protection against C 48/80 induced systemic anaphylaxis in male Balb/C mice. In active anaphylaxis model, male Wistar rats orally administered with 10.75 and 107.5 mg kg−1 of HK showed significant (P < 0.01) protection against mast cell degranulation, while in passive anaphylaxis model, only at 107.5 mg kg−1 showed significant (P < 0.01) reduction in mast cell degranulation. HK at all dose levels was able to significantly decrease the time spent in nasal rubbing in Wistar rats sensitized to ovalbumin, while only at 107.5 mg kg−1 it showed significant (P < 0.01) reduction in number of sneezes. In C 48/80-induced skin itch model, all dose levels of HK significantly (P < 0.001) decreased the time spent in itching and the number of itches. HK did not produce any significant inhibition in histamine induced contraction in guinea pig ileum. From the above findings we conclude that the HK possesses antiallergic activity mediated by reducing of the release mediators from mast cells and also by 5-HT antagonism without the involvement of histamine (H1) receptors. PMID:18830458

  19. CD32a antibodies induce thrombocytopenia and type II hypersensitivity reactions in FCGR2A mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Todd; Robles-Carrillo, Liza; Davila, Monica; Brodie, Meghan; Desai, Hina; Rivera-Amaya, Mildred; Francis, John L; Amirkhosravi, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The CD32a immunoglobulin G (IgG) receptor (Fcγ receptor IIa) is a potential therapeutic target for diseases in which IgG immune complexes (ICs) mediate inflammation, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a promising strategy for treating such diseases. However, IV.3, perhaps the best characterized CD32a-blocking mAb, was recently shown to induce anaphylaxis in immunocompromised "3KO" mice. This anaphylactic reaction required a human CD32a transgene because mice lack an equivalent of this gene. The finding that IV.3 induces anaphylaxis in CD32a-transgenic mice was surprising because IV.3 had long been thought to lack the intrinsic capacity to trigger cellular activation via CD32a. Such an anaphylactic reaction would also limit potential therapeutic applications of IV.3. In the present study, we examine the molecular mechanisms by which IV.3 induces anaphylaxis. We now report that IV.3 induces anaphylaxis in immunocompetent CD32a-transgenic "FCGR2A" mice, along with the novel finding that IV.3 and 2 other well-characterized CD32a-blocking mAbs, AT-10 and MDE-8, also induce severe thrombocytopenia in FCGR2A mice. Using recombinant variants of these same mAbs, we show that IgG "Fc" effector function is necessary for the induction of anaphylaxis and thrombocytopenia in FCGR2A mice. Variants of these mAbs lacking the capacity to activate mouse IgG receptors not only failed to induce anaphylaxis or thrombocytopenia, but also very potently protected FCGR2A mice from near lethal doses of IgG ICs. Our findings show that effector-deficient IV.3, AT-10, and MDE-8 are promising candidates for developing therapeutic mAbs to treat CD32a-mediated diseases. PMID:26396093

  20. CD32a antibodies induce thrombocytopenia and type II hypersensitivity reactions in FCGR2A mice

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Carrillo, Liza; Davila, Monica; Brodie, Meghan; Desai, Hina; Rivera-Amaya, Mildred; Francis, John L.; Amirkhosravi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The CD32a immunoglobulin G (IgG) receptor (Fcγ receptor IIa) is a potential therapeutic target for diseases in which IgG immune complexes (ICs) mediate inflammation, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a promising strategy for treating such diseases. However, IV.3, perhaps the best characterized CD32a-blocking mAb, was recently shown to induce anaphylaxis in immunocompromised “3KO” mice. This anaphylactic reaction required a human CD32a transgene because mice lack an equivalent of this gene. The finding that IV.3 induces anaphylaxis in CD32a-transgenic mice was surprising because IV.3 had long been thought to lack the intrinsic capacity to trigger cellular activation via CD32a. Such an anaphylactic reaction would also limit potential therapeutic applications of IV.3. In the present study, we examine the molecular mechanisms by which IV.3 induces anaphylaxis. We now report that IV.3 induces anaphylaxis in immunocompetent CD32a-transgenic “FCGR2A” mice, along with the novel finding that IV.3 and 2 other well-characterized CD32a-blocking mAbs, AT-10 and MDE-8, also induce severe thrombocytopenia in FCGR2A mice. Using recombinant variants of these same mAbs, we show that IgG “Fc” effector function is necessary for the induction of anaphylaxis and thrombocytopenia in FCGR2A mice. Variants of these mAbs lacking the capacity to activate mouse IgG receptors not only failed to induce anaphylaxis or thrombocytopenia, but also very potently protected FCGR2A mice from near lethal doses of IgG ICs. Our findings show that effector-deficient IV.3, AT-10, and MDE-8 are promising candidates for developing therapeutic mAbs to treat CD32a-mediated diseases. PMID:26396093

  1. Delayed hypersensitivity reaction resulting in maculopapular-type eruption due to entecavir in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Jeong, Hye Won; Choi, Ki Hwa; Yoon, Tae Young; Sung, Nohyun; Choi, Young Ki; Kim, Eun Ha; Chae, Hee Bok

    2014-11-14

    Several clinical trials have demonstrated the potent antiviral efficacy of entecavir (ETV), and this relatively new nucleoside analogue drug has rapidly become a frequently prescribed therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) worldwide. While the studies have also shown a good overall safety profile for ETV, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in patients with advanced cirrhosis have been reported and represent a broad spectrum of drug-induced injuries, including lactic acidosis, myalgia, neuropathy, azotemia, hypophosphatemia, muscular weakness, and pancreatitis, as well as immune-mediated responses (i.e., allergic reactions). Cutaneous ADRs associated with ETV are very rare, with only two case reports in the publicly available literature; both of these cases were classified as unspecified hypersensitivity allergic (type I) ADR, but neither were reported as pathologically proven or as evaluated by cytokine release analysis. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with a generalized maculopapular rash after one week of ETV treatment for lamivudine-resistant CHB. The patient reported having experienced a similar skin eruption during a previous three-month regimen of ETV, for which she had self-discontinued the medication. Histopathological analysis of a skin biopsy showed acanthotic epidermis with focal parakeratosis and a perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate admixed with interstitial eosinophils in the papillary and reticular dermis, consistent with a diagnosis of drug sensitivity. A lymphocyte stimulation test showed significantly enhanced IL-4, indicating a classification of type IVb delayed hypersensitivity. The patient was switched to an adefovir-lamivudine combination regimen and the skin eruption resolved two weeks after the ETV withdrawal. This case represents the first pathologically and immunologically evidenced ETV-induced delayed type hypersensitivity skin reaction reported to date. Physicians should be aware of the potential, although rare

  2. Primary irritant and delayed-contact hypersensitivity reactions to the freshwater cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and its associated toxin cylindrospermopsin

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ian; Seawright, Alan A; Schluter, Philip J; Shaw, Glen R

    2006-01-01

    Background Freshwater cyanobacteria are common inhabitants of recreational waterbodies throughout the world; some cyanobacteria can dominate the phytoplankton and form blooms, many of which are toxic. Numerous reports in the literature describe pruritic skin rashes after recreational or occupational exposure to cyanobacteria, but there has been little research conducted on the cutaneous effects of cyanobacteria. Using the mouse ear swelling test (MEST), we sought to determine whether three toxin-producing cyanobacteria isolates and the purified cyanotoxin cylindrospermopsin produced delayed-contact hypersensitivity reactions. Methods Between 8 and 10 female Balb/c mice in each experiment had test material applied to depilated abdominal skin during the induction phase and 10 or 11 control mice had vehicle only applied to abdominal skin. For challenge (day 10) and rechallenge (day 17), test material was applied to a randomly-allocated test ear; vehicle was applied to the other ear as a control. Ear thickness in anaesthetised mice was measured with a micrometer gauge at 24 and 48 hours after challenge and rechallenge. Ear swelling greater than 20% in one or more test mice is considered a positive response. Histopathology examination of ear tissues was conducted by independent examiners. Results Purified cylindrospermopsin (2 of 9 test mice vs. 0 of 5 control mice; p = 0.51) and the cylindrospermopsin-producing cyanobacterium C. raciborskii (8 of 10 test mice vs. 0 of 10 control mice; p = 0.001) were both shown to produce hypersensitivity reactions. Irritant reactions were seen on abdominal skin at induction. Two other toxic cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaena circinalis) did not generate any responses using this model. Histopathology examinations to determine positive and negative reactions in ear tissues showed excellent agreement beyond chance between both examiners (κ = 0.83). Conclusion The irritant properties and cutaneous sensitising potential of

  3. Aspirin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borges, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to acetylsalicylic acid and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs constitute a major medical concern worldwide. This article presents an overview of the observations that led to the discovery of cyclooxygenase inhibitors, as a prerequisite to better understand the basic concepts supporting seminal investigations carried out in order to elucidate the clinical features, pathogenic mechanisms, diagnosis and modern management of these common conditions. There are some unmet needs in this clinical area which will have to be solved in the future, especially concerning the pathogenesis of these reactions and the availability of novel in vitro diagnostic methods sparing both patient and physician of the risks inherent to in vivo provocation tests. PMID:24925393

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of a Hypersensitive Reaction-Inducing Pantoea agglomerans Strain Isolated from Olive Knots Caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Chiaraluce; Cortese, Chiara; Passos da Silva, Daniel; Venturi, Vittorio; Torelli, Emanuela; Firrao, Giuseppe; Buonaurio, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans strains inducing a hypersensitive reaction in tobacco leaves are frequently isolated inside olive knots caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the Italian P. agglomerans strain, which is able to increase olive knot disease severity when coinoculated with P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi. PMID:25103763

  5. Potential Mechanisms for IgG4 Inhibition of Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    James, Louisa K; Till, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    IgG4 is the least abundant IgG subclass in human serum, representing less than 5 % of all IgG. Increases in IgG4 occur following chronic exposure to antigen and are generally associated with states of immune tolerance. In line with this, IgG4 is regarded as an anti-inflammatory antibody with a limited ability to elicit effective immune responses. Furthermore, IgG4 attenuates allergic responses by inhibiting the activity of IgE. The mechanism by which IgG4 inhibits IgE-mediated hypersensitivity has been investigated using a variety of model systems leading to two proposed mechanisms. First by sequestering antigen, IgG4 can function as a blocking antibody, preventing cross-linking of receptor bound IgE. Second IgG4 has been proposed to co-stimulate the inhibitory IgG receptor FcγRIIb, which can negatively regulate FcεRI signaling and in turn inhibit effector cell activation. Recent advances in our understanding of the structural features of human IgG4 have shed light on the unique functional and immunologic properties of IgG4. The aim of this review is to evaluate our current understanding of IgG4 biology and reassess the mechanisms by which IgG4 functions to inhibit IgE-mediated allergic responses. PMID:26892721

  6. Medical hazards of the tear gas CS. A case of persistent, multisystem, hypersensitivity reaction and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hill, A R; Silverberg, N B; Mayorga, D; Baldwin, H E

    2000-07-01

    A 30-year-old incarcerated man was sprayed with the "tear gas" ortho-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS). He was hospitalized 8 days later with erythroderma, wheezing, pneumonitis with hypoxemia, hepatitis with jaundice, and hypereosinophilia. During the subsequent months he continued to suffer from generalized dermatitis, recurrent cough and wheezing consistent with reactive airways dysfunction syndrome, and eosinophilia. These abnormalities responded to brief courses of systemic corticosteroid but recurred off therapy. The dermatitis resolved gradually over 6-7 months, but the patient still had asthma-like symptoms a year following exposure. Patch testing confirmed sensitization to CS. The mechanism of the patient's prolonged reaction is unknown but may involve cell-mediated hypersensitivity, perhaps to adducts of CS (or a metabolite) and tissue proteins. This is the first documented case in which CS apparently caused a severe, multisystem illness by hypersensitivity rather than direct tissue toxicity. Both the ethics and safety of CS use remain controversial, in part because of the difficulty documenting sporadic injuries received in the field, and also because the charged circumstances surrounding CS use may lead to both underreporting and exaggerated claims of medical harm. The medical literature on CS focuses mainly on its immediate irritant effects and on transient dermal and ocular injuries, with only 2 prior case reports of acute lung injury related to CS exposure. Given the paucity of documented lasting effects despite its widespread use for more than 3 decades, CS appears to be safe when deployed (outdoors) in a controlled manner, but it can cause important injuries if misused or if applied to a sensitized individual. PMID:10941352

  7. Is cancer a severe delayed hypersensitivity reaction and histamine a blueprint?

    PubMed

    Khatami, Mahin

    2016-12-01

    Longevity and accumulation of multiple context-dependent signaling pathways of long-standing inflammation (antigen-load or oxidative stress) are the results of decreased/altered regulation of immunity and loss of control switch mechanisms that we defined as Yin and Yang of acute inflammation or immune surveillance. Chronic inflammation is initiated by immune disruptors-induced progressive changes in physiology and function of susceptible host tissues that lead to increased immune suppression and multistep disease processes including carcinogenesis. The interrelated multiple hypotheses that are presented for the first time in this article are extension of author's earlier series of 'accidental' discoveries on the role of inflammation in developmental stages of immune dysfunction toward tumorigenesis and angiogenesis. Detailed analyses of data on chronic diseases suggest that nearly all age-associated illnesses, generally categorized as 'mild' (e.g., increased allergies), 'moderate' (e.g., hypertension, colitis, gastritis, pancreatitis, emphysema) or 'severe' (e.g., accelerated neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases or site-specific cancers and metastasis) are variations of hypersensitivity responses of tissues that are manifested as different diseases in immune-responsive or immune-privileged tissues. Continuous release/presence of low level histamine (subclinical) in circulation could contribute to sustained oxidative stress and induction of 'mild' or 'moderate' or 'severe' (immune tsunami) immune disorders in susceptible tissues. Site-specific cancers are proposed to be 'severe' (irreversible) forms of cumulative delayed hypersensitivity responses that would induce immunological chaos in favor of tissue growth in target tissues. Shared or special features of growth from fetus development into adulthood and aging processes and carcinogenesis are briefly compared with regard to energy requirements of highly complex function of Yin and Yang. Features of Yang

  8. Prevalence of HLA-B*5701 and Its Relationship with Abacavir Hypersensitivity Reaction in Iranian HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baniasadi, Shadi; Shokouhi, Shokoufeh Baradaran; Tabarsi, Payam; Alehashem, Maryam; Khalili, Hossein; Fahimi, Fanak

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) is a major adverse effect of abacavir (ABC), which occurs in 5–8% of Caucasians. The relationship between Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) and ABC HSR has been reported in various populations. It has been proposed to administer ABC only to HLA-B*5701 negative patients to avoid this reaction. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of HLA-B*5701 in Iranian HIV positive patients. We also sought to find the relationship between this allele with ABC HSR in patients who received the medication. Materials and Methods: We screened patients for HLA-B*5701 allele using SybrGreen real time PCR-melting method on blood samples from HIV positive patients who were referred to our hospital. The quality of the extracted genome was evaluated by B-globin housekeeping gene as internal control prior to HLA-B*5701 allele screening. Results: Of 198 HIV-infected patients, 6 (3.0%) had the HLA-B*5701 allele (95% CI, 1%–5%). Among the 28 patients who were given ABC, one individual had the HLA-B*5701 allele and experienced ABC HSR. Conclusion: Prevalence of HLA-B*5701 in Iranian patients was lower than that in Caucasians but was comparable with that of other Middle Eastern populations. Screening for HLA-B*5701 before ABC administration as part of antiretroviral therapy may reduce the risk of HSR.

  9. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents: mechanisms and treatment with rapid desensitization.

    PubMed

    Castells, Mariana; Sancho-Serra, Maria del Carmen; Simarro, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to chemotherapy drugs, such as taxanes and platins, and to monoclonal antibodies limit their therapeutic use due to the severity of some reactions and the fear of inducing a potentially lethal reaction in highly sensitized patients. Patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions face the prospect of abandoning first-line treatment and switching to a second-line, less effective therapy. Some of these reactions are mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions, a subset of which occur through an immunoglobulin (IgE)-dependent mechanism, and are thus true allergies. Others involve mast cells without a demonstrable IgE mechanism. Whether basophils can participate in these reactions has not been demonstrated. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) is a procedure that induces temporary tolerance to a drug, allowing a medication allergic patient to receive the optimal agent for his or her disease. Through RDD, patients with IgE and non-IgE HSRs can safely be administered important medications while minimizing or completely inhibiting adverse reactions. Due to the clinical expansion and success of RDD, the molecular mechanisms inducing the temporary tolerization have been investigated and are partially understood, allowing for safer and more effective protocols. This article reviews the current literature on molecular mechanisms of RDD with an emphasis in our recent contributions to this field as well as the indications, methods and outcomes of RDD for taxanes, platins, and monoclonal antibodies. PMID:22576054

  10. Hypersensitivity Reaction to Insulin Glargine and Insulin Detemir in a Pediatric Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Badik, Jennifer; Chen, Jimmy; Letvak, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Allergy to human insulin or its analogs is rare, but it is still a significant issue in current diabetes care. Allergic reactions can range from localized injection site reactions to generalized anaphylaxis, and they can be caused by excipients or the insulin molecules themselves. We presented a case of a 14-year-old male patient with generalized allergic reactions to insulin glargine and insulin detemir. The patient was successfully managed by being switched to a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion with insulin aspart. Allergic reactions to insulin detemir and insulin glargine have both been well described, with insulin detemir allergy appearing to be more common. There are several potential mechanisms for insulin allergy, and immunologic characteristics vary among different insulin analogs. After confirming insulin allergy in practice, management involves treating symptoms and switching insulin preparations. This is the first documented case of allergies to both insulin glargine and insulin detemir in a pediatric patient. Exact mechanism of insulin allergy is unknown, and management strategies must be individualized for each patient. PMID:26997933

  11. Hypersensitivity Reaction to Insulin Glargine and Insulin Detemir in a Pediatric Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Badik, Jennifer; Chen, Jimmy; Letvak, Kira; So, Tsz-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Allergy to human insulin or its analogs is rare, but it is still a significant issue in current diabetes care. Allergic reactions can range from localized injection site reactions to generalized anaphylaxis, and they can be caused by excipients or the insulin molecules themselves. We presented a case of a 14-year-old male patient with generalized allergic reactions to insulin glargine and insulin detemir. The patient was successfully managed by being switched to a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion with insulin aspart. Allergic reactions to insulin detemir and insulin glargine have both been well described, with insulin detemir allergy appearing to be more common. There are several potential mechanisms for insulin allergy, and immunologic characteristics vary among different insulin analogs. After confirming insulin allergy in practice, management involves treating symptoms and switching insulin preparations. This is the first documented case of allergies to both insulin glargine and insulin detemir in a pediatric patient. Exact mechanism of insulin allergy is unknown, and management strategies must be individualized for each patient. PMID:26997933

  12. Early skin testing is effective for diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions occurring during anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Javaloyes, G; Berroa, F; Goikoetxea, M J; Moncada, R; Núñez-Córdoba, J M; Cabrera-Freitag, P; D'Amelio, C; Sanz, M L; Gastaminza, G

    2013-06-01

    Allergic skin tests have to be performed 4-6 weeks after an allergic anesthetic reaction. Patients with allergic reactions during anesthesia were prospectively included (n = 44). Skin tests were performed in two stages: (i) Stage 1 (S1), 0-4 days after the reaction; and (ii) Stage 2 (S2), 4-8 weeks after. Five (11.5%) surgical procedures were suspended due to the reaction. Positive skin tests were obtained in 25/44 patients (57%). Allergic diagnosis was carried out at S1 in 15/25 (60%) and at S2 in 10/25 (40%). Three patients resulted positive only in S1. Overall agreement among S1 and S2 skin tests was 70.45%. The kappa statistic was 0.41 (P-value = 0.002). Odds ratio of obtaining a false negative in S1 (compared with S2) was 3.33. Early allergological study is useful, could minimize false negatives, but should be considered as a complement to late skin tests. PMID:23646901

  13. Localization of hydrogen peroxide accumulation during the hypersensitive reaction of lettuce cells to Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola.

    PubMed Central

    Bestwick, C S; Brown, I R; Bennett, M H; Mansfield, J W

    1997-01-01

    The active oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was detected cytochemically by its reaction with cerium chloride to produce electron-dense deposits of cerium perhydroxides. In uninoculated lettuce leaves, H2O2 was typically present within the secondary thickened walls of xylem vessels. Inoculation with wild-type cells of Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola caused a rapid hypersensitive reaction (HR) during which highly localized accumulation of H2O2 was found in plant cell walls adjacent to attached bacteria. Quantitative analysis indicated a prolonged burst of H2O2 occurring between 5 to 8 hr after inoculation in cells undergoing the HR during this example of non-host resistance. Cell wall alterations and papilla deposition, which occurred in response to both the wild-type strain and a nonpathogenic hrpD mutant, were not associated with intense staining for H2O2, unless the responding cell was undergoing the HR. Catalase treatment to decompose H2O2 almost entirely eliminated staining, but 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (catalase inhibitor) did not affect the pattern of distribution of H2O2 detected. H2O2 production was reduced more by the inhibition of plant peroxidases (with potassium cyanide and sodium azide) than by inhibition of neutrophil-like NADPH oxidase (with diphenylene iodonium chloride). Results suggest that CeCl3 reacts with excess H2O2 that is not rapidly metabolized during cross-linking reactions occurring in cell walls; such an excess of H2O2 in the early stages of the plant-bacterium interaction was only produced during the HR. The highly localized accumulation of H2O2 is consistent with its direct role as an antimicrobial agent and as the cause of localized membrane damage at sites of bacterial attachment. PMID:9061952

  14. Fifty-six-year-old man with anaphylaxis: A novel delayed food hypersensitivity reaction.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kendall D; Bell, Matthew C; Pesek, Robert D; Kennedy, Joshua L

    2015-11-01

    Anaphylaxis and urticaria are commonly seen in both primary care and allergy clinics. Foods, drugs, and insects are frequent culprits for immediate reactions; however, the trigger for recurring and/or chronic episodes is often unclear. We present a 56-year-old male with recurrent symptoms of urticaria, angioedema, and anaphylaxis found to be triggered by sensitization to galactose-alpha 1, 3-galactose (alpha-gal), a novel food allergen. PMID:26625604

  15. Hypersensitivity reaction in an infant fed hydrolyzed lactalbumin contained in a semielemental formula.

    PubMed

    Heyman, M B; Stoker, T W; Rudolph, C D; Frick, O L

    1990-02-01

    Following introduction of milk protein formula feedings, a 6-month-old male developed profuse, watery diarrhea progressing to shock, requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Reinstitution of enteral feedings with a formula containing hydrolyzed lactalbumin (Travasorb STD) resulted in recurrence of diarrhea with fever. Intestinal and rectal biopsies showed only nonspecific inflammatory changes. He was discharged on an elemental formula (Vivonex). Twenty-three months later, while admitted for evaluation of hypophosphatemic rickets, immunologic testing using the lymphocyte migration inhibition factor (LIF) test demonstrated positive reactions, especially to alpha-lactalbumin (56% inhibition) and whole cow's milk (22%, normal of less than 20% inhibition). Skin tests revealed sensitivity to cow's milk and eggs. Soy formula also produced diarrhea and bloody stools. Protein hydrolysate formulas, touted as hypoallergenic diets, are useful in infants with intolerance to milk protein. This is the first documented case of an immunological reaction to the hydrolyzed whey protein, lactalbumin. Although protein hydrolysate formulas are effective treatment in most infants with milk protein intolerance, allergic reactions are possible. Caution and close observation should be exercised in immunologically sensitized infants rechallenged with any formula. PMID:2135732

  16. Flavohaemoglobin HmpX from Erwinia chrysanthemi confers nitrosative stress tolerance and affects the plant hypersensitive reaction by intercepting nitric oxide produced by the host.

    PubMed

    Boccara, Martine; Mills, Catherine E; Zeier, Jürgen; Anzi, Chiara; Lamb, Chris; Poole, Robert K; Delledonne, Massimo

    2005-07-01

    Host cells respond to infection by generating nitric oxide (NO) as a cytotoxic weapon to facilitate killing of invading microbes. Bacterial flavohaemoglobins are well-known scavengers of NO and play a crucial role in protecting animal pathogens from nitrosative stress during infection. Erwinia chrysanthemi, which causes macerating diseases in a wide variety of plants, possesses a flavohaemoglobin (HmpX) whose function in plant pathogens has remained unclear. Here we show that HmpX consumes NO and prevents inhibition by NO of cell respiration, indicating a role in protection from nitrosative stress. Furthermore, infection of Saintpaulia ionantha plants with an HmpX-deficient mutant of E. chrysanthemi revealed that the lack of NO scavenging activity causes the accumulation of unusually high levels of NO in host tissue and triggers hypersensitive cell death. Introduction of the wild-type hmpX gene in an incompatible strain of Pseudomonas syringae had a dramatic effect on the hypersensitive cell death in soya bean cell suspensions, and markedly reduced the development of macroscopic symptoms in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. These observations indicate that HmpX not only protects against nitrosative stress but also attenuates host hypersensitive reaction during infection by intercepting NO produced by the plant for the execution of the hypersensitive cell death programme. PMID:15998309

  17. In vitro tests for drug hypersensitivity reactions: an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, C; Celik, G; Rouzaire, P; Whitaker, P; Bonadonna, P; Rodrigues-Cernadas, J; Vultaggio, A; Brockow, K; Caubet, J C; Makowska, J; Nakonechna, A; Romano, A; Montañez, M I; Laguna, J J; Zanoni, G; Gueant, J L; Oude Elberink, H; Fernandez, J; Viel, S; Demoly, P; Torres, M J

    2016-08-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are a matter of great concern, both for outpatient and in hospital care. The evaluation of these patients is complex, because in vivo tests have a suboptimal sensitivity and can be time-consuming, expensive and potentially risky, especially drug provocation tests. There are several currently available in vitro methods that can be classified into two main groups: those that help to characterize the active phase of the reaction and those that help to identify the culprit drug. The utility of these in vitro methods depends on the mechanisms involved, meaning that they cannot be used for the evaluation of all types of DHRs. Moreover, their effectiveness has not been defined by a consensus agreement between experts in the field. Thus, the European Network on Drug Allergy and Drug Allergy Interest Group of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has organized a task force to provide data and recommendations regarding the available in vitro methods for DHR diagnosis. We have found that although there are many in vitro tests, few of them can be given a recommendation of grade B or above mainly because there is a lack of well-controlled studies, most information comes from small studies with few subjects and results are not always confirmed in later studies. Therefore, it is necessary to validate the currently available in vitro tests in a large series of well-characterized patients with DHR and to develop new tests for diagnosis. PMID:26991315

  18. Current advances in ant venom proteins causing hypersensitivity reactions in the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Srisong, Hathairat; Daduang, Sakda; Lopata, Andreas L

    2016-01-01

    The main insects causing allergy reactions to stinging insect in humans are Apidae (bees), Vespidae (wasps, yellow jackets and hornets) and Formicidae (ants). Their venom stings are composed of various biologically active peptides and protein components, some of which can cause toxicity or anaphylaxis in humans. The protein venom demonstrate some common allergenic activity such as for fire ants and vespids, which have two common allergens that are phospholipase A1 (enzymatic activity) and antigen 5 with unknown biological activity. The common allergens seem to share some degree of immunological cross-reactivity, particularly when the sequence homology is above 70%. Therefore immunotherapeutic approaches targeting more than one specific species are of interest. Recent widespread increases of various ant species in many countries have resulted in higher number of reported about serious allergic reactions to stings. Most insect-allergy related cases have been reported for species from Solenopsis, Myrmecia and Pachycondyla genera, and their stings can often result in human fatalities. In addition, stinging ants can have serious health effects on livestock, agricultural damage adversely affecting the biodiversity of the region. This review discusses the impact of important ant species on human health in the Asia-Pacific region along with the molecular immunological aspects of the identified venoms and current status of diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:26641698

  19. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis usually occurs in people who work in places where there are high levels of organic dusts, fungus, or molds. Long-term exposure can lead to lung inflammation and acute lung disease . ...

  20. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Also known as extrinsic allergic alveolitis, bird fancier’s lung, farmer’s lung, hot tub lung, and ... May 27, 2016 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA OIG CONTACT US National ...

  1. Pharmacogenetics of drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J; Mallal, Simon A

    2010-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions and severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, are examples of serious adverse drug reactions mediated through a combination of metabolic and immunological mechanisms that could traditionally not have been predicted based on the pharmacological characteristics of the drug alone. The discovery of new associations between these syndromes and specific HLA has created the promise that risk for these reactions could be predicted through pharmacogenetic screening, thereby avoiding serious morbidity and mortality associated with these types of drug reactions. Despite this, several hurdles exist in the translation of these associations into pharmacogenetic tests that could be routinely used in the clinical setting. HLA-B*5701 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome is an example of a test now in widespread routine clinical use in the developed world. PMID:20602616

  2. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Executive Committee Board of Trustees Governance Past Presidents Staff/Contact History Awards Our Partners Membership Membership Categories Renew Your Membership Login Fellowship Academic Fellowship Affiliate Fellowship (AFAOM) Application Process Fellowship Study ...

  3. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Wysong, Kristi; Phillips, Jennan A; Hammond, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    Chronic exposure to a broad array of antigens after workers inhale aerosolized organic dust particles from mold, animal dander, bird droppings, and chemicals, especially pesticides or herbicides, increases risk for hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Several demographic characteristics of immigrant workers in farming, poultry processing, construction, and landscaping increase this worker population's risk. PMID:27067273

  4. Presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated reactions in periprosthetic tissue after aseptic loosening of total hip replacements with metal bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huber, Monika; Reinisch, Georg; Trettenhahn, Günter; Zweymüller, Karl; Lintner, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Aseptic loosening of articular implants is frequently associated with tissue reactions to wear particles. Some patients, who had received metal-on-metal articulations, present early symptoms including persistent pain and implant failure. These symptoms raise the suspicion about the development of an immunological response. Furthermore, the generation of rare corrosion products in association with metallic implants has been observed. Corrosion products are known to enhance third-body wear and contribute to the loss of the implant. The purpose of this study was to investigate periprosthetic tissue containing solid corrosion products after aseptic loosening of second-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements made of low-carbon cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy for the presence of immunologically determined tissue changes. Periprosthetic tissue of 11 cases containing uncommon solid deposits was investigated by light microscopy. In order to confirm the presence of corrosion products, additional methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) analysis were used. All investigated cases revealed solid chromium orthophosphate corrosion products as well as metallic wear particles to a various extent. Moreover, various intense tissue reactions characteristic of immune response were observed in all cases. The simultaneous presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated tissue reaction indicates that a relationship between corrosion development and implant-related hypersensitivity may exist. PMID:18725188

  5. Vaccination with polymerase chain reaction-generated linear expression cassettes protects mice against lethal influenza A challenge.

    PubMed

    Vilalta, Adrián; Jimenez, Gretchen; Rusalov, Denis; Planchon, Rodrick; Lalor, Peggy; Carner, Kristin; Chaplin, Jennifer A; Komai, Michael; Manthorpe, Marston; Kaslow, David C; Rolland, Alain

    2007-08-01

    The feasibility of a linear expression cassette (LEC)-based influenza A DNA vaccine was demonstrated in mice, using a lethal dose (LD90) of a mouse-adapted A/Hong Kong/8/68 (H3N2) influenza strain. LECs expressing hemagglutinin (HA) from either the homotypic H3N2 or the heterotypic H1N1 (A/Puerto Rico/8/34) influenza virus were produced by polymerase chain reaction and either phosphodiester- or phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotide primers. Survival subsequent to lethal viral challenge was used as a primary end point; weight loss was the secondary end point. Survival and weight loss data showed that protection can be achieved in mice with 50 microg of phosphate-buffered saline-formulated LEC DNA or 2 microg of Vaxfectin-formulated LEC DNA. Survival correlated with neutralizing antibody titers (hemagglutination inhibition, HAI); titers obtained after vaccination with LEC were equivalent to those obtained with HA (H3N2) plasmid DNA control. Vaccination with heterotypic H1 HA-LEC DNA provided no protection against viral challenge. PMID:17705698

  6. Sulfite hypersensitivity. A critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnison, A.F.; Jacobsen, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Sulfiting agents (sulfur dioxide and the sodium and potassium salts of bisulfite, sulfite, and metabisulfite) are widely used as preservatives in foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. Within the past 5 years, there have been numerous reports of adverse reactions to sulfiting agents. This review presents a comprehensive compilation and discussion of reports describing reactions to ingested, inhaled, and parenterally administered sulfite. Sulfite hypersensitivity is usually, but not exclusively, found within the chronic asthmatic population. Although there is some disagreement on its prevalence, a number of studies have indicated that 5 to 10% of all chronic asthmatics are sulfite hypersensitive. This review also describes respiratory sulfur dioxide sensitivity which essentially all asthmatics experience. Possible mechanisms of sulfite hypersensitivity and sulfur dioxide sensitivity are discussed in detail. Sulfite metabolism and the role of sulfite oxidase in the detoxification of exogenous sulfite are reviewed in relationship to the etiology of sulfite hypersensitivity. 147 references.

  7. The predictive value of the in vitro platelet toxicity assay (iPTA) for the diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions to sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Elzagallaai, Abdelbaset A; Koren, Gideon; Rieder, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are rare but potentially fatal adverse drug reactions (ADRs). A reliable test to diagnose DHRs would be a major advance in the clinical care for patients and in the evaluation of ADRs during drug development as well as for mechanistic studies of drug hypersensitivity. Available in vitro tests including the lymphocyte toxicity assay (LTA) have been used but are time-consuming, cumbersome, and expensive. We have developed a novel diagnostic test for DHRs, the in vitro platelet toxicity assay (iPTA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of the iPTA in diagnosis of DHRs to sulfonamides. We recruited 66 individuals (36 DHS-sulfa patients and 30 healthy controls) to participate in the study. Blood samples were obtained and LTA and iPTA were performed in parallel. There was concentration-dependent toxicity in the cells of patients when incubated with the reactive hydroxylamine metabolite of sulfamethoxazole for both the LTA and iPTA (P < .05). The iPTA was more sensitive than conventional LTA test in detecting susceptibility of patient cells to in vitro toxicity (P < .05). The novel iPTA has considerable potential as an investigative tool for DHS as it is more sensitive and cheaper, requiring no special reagents. PMID:23670648

  8. [DRESS syndrome. Rare and potentially lethal allergic reaction to carbamazepine - a case report].

    PubMed

    Werber, A; Schiltenwolf, M; Barié, A

    2013-08-01

    A 64-year-old man with chronic low back pain had been treated with tramadol, meloxicam and metamizole for several years. Due to additional neuropathic pain in the lower extremities, the medication was complemented with carbamazepine. After 5 weeks of treatment, the patient developed maculopapulose exanthema and fever, followed by hepatitis, leukocytosis and eosinophilia. The patient was diagnosed with so-called DRESS (drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) syndrome, a severe anaphylactic reaction to carbamazepine treatment. Immunosuppressive therapy was complicated by an additional septic reaction. After recovery, the patient was referred to our clinic for a multimodal pain therapy. Fear, depressive episodes and fear-avoidance behavior were additional social factors responsible for the chronic pain syndrome of the patient. The previously diagnosed neuropathic pain syndrome cannot be verified. After appropriate modification of therapy, the patient's pain perception was significantly reduced, allowing for complete withdrawal of pain-relieving medication. This case report illustrates that merely pharmacological treatment of chronic pain syndromes bears only little prospect of success but increased risk of side effects. PMID:23761029

  9. Tuberculin-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in a model of hu-PBMC-SCID mice grafted with autologous skin.

    PubMed Central

    Tsicopoulos, A.; Pestel, J.; Fahy, O.; Vorng, H.; Vandenbusche, F.; Porte, H.; Eraldi, L.; Wurtz, A.; Akoum, H.; Hamid, Q.; Wallaert, B.; Tonnel, A. B.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed an animal model to study human delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Previous studies in humans have shown after tuberculin injection the presence of a mononuclear cell infiltration, with almost no eosinophils, associated with a preferential Th-1-type cytokine profile. Human skin graft obtained from tuberculin-reactive donors was grafted onto the back of severe combined immunodeficient mice. After healing, mice were reconstituted intraperitoneally with peripheral mononuclear cells. Tuberculin and diluent were injected intradermally, and skin biopsies were performed 72 hours later. Skin grafts were divided into two parts, one for immunohistochemistry and one for in situ hybridization studies. Immunohistochemistry was performed on cryostat sections using the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique. In the tuberculin-injected sites as compared with the diluent-injected sites, there were significant increases in the number of CD45+ pan leukocytes and CD4+, CD8+, CD45RO+ T cells but not in CD68+ monocytes/macrophages and EG2 or MBP+ eosinophils. The activation markers CD25 and HLA-DR were up-regulated in the tuberculin-injected sites. In situ hybridization was performed using 35S-labeled riboprobes for interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-gamma, IL-4, and IL-5. After tuberculin injection, a preferential Th-1-type cytokine profile was observed with significant increases in the numbers of IL-2 and IFN-gamma mRNA-expressing cells. These results are similar to those reported after tuberculin-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity in humans, suggesting that this model might be useful to study cutaneous inflammatory reaction. Images Figure 4 PMID:9626072

  10. Tuberculin-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in a model of hu-PBMC-SCID mice grafted with autologous skin.

    PubMed

    Tsicopoulos, A; Pestel, J; Fahy, O; Vorng, H; Vandenbusche, F; Porte, H; Eraldi, L; Wurtz, A; Akoum, H; Hamid, Q; Wallaert, B; Tonnel, A B

    1998-06-01

    We have developed an animal model to study human delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Previous studies in humans have shown after tuberculin injection the presence of a mononuclear cell infiltration, with almost no eosinophils, associated with a preferential Th-1-type cytokine profile. Human skin graft obtained from tuberculin-reactive donors was grafted onto the back of severe combined immunodeficient mice. After healing, mice were reconstituted intraperitoneally with peripheral mononuclear cells. Tuberculin and diluent were injected intradermally, and skin biopsies were performed 72 hours later. Skin grafts were divided into two parts, one for immunohistochemistry and one for in situ hybridization studies. Immunohistochemistry was performed on cryostat sections using the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique. In the tuberculin-injected sites as compared with the diluent-injected sites, there were significant increases in the number of CD45+ pan leukocytes and CD4+, CD8+, CD45RO+ T cells but not in CD68+ monocytes/macrophages and EG2 or MBP+ eosinophils. The activation markers CD25 and HLA-DR were up-regulated in the tuberculin-injected sites. In situ hybridization was performed using 35S-labeled riboprobes for interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-gamma, IL-4, and IL-5. After tuberculin injection, a preferential Th-1-type cytokine profile was observed with significant increases in the numbers of IL-2 and IFN-gamma mRNA-expressing cells. These results are similar to those reported after tuberculin-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity in humans, suggesting that this model might be useful to study cutaneous inflammatory reaction. PMID:9626072

  11. Hypersensitivity to contrast media and dyes.

    PubMed

    Brockow, Knut; Sánchez-Borges, Mario

    2014-08-01

    This article updates current knowledge on hypersensitivity reactions to diagnostic contrast media and dyes. After application of a single iodinated radiocontrast medium (RCM), gadolinium-based contrast medium, fluorescein, or a blue dye, a hypersensitivity reaction is not a common finding; however, because of the high and still increasing frequency of those procedures, patients who have experienced severe reactions are nevertheless frequently encountered in allergy departments. Evidence on allergologic testing and management is best for iodinated RCM, limited for blue dyes, and insufficient for fluorescein. Skin tests can be helpful in the diagnosis of patients with hypersensitivity reactions to these compounds. PMID:25017677

  12. The Absence of CYP3A5*3 Is a Protective Factor to Anticonvulsants Hypersensitivity Reactions: A Case-Control Study in Brazilian Subjects

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Bernardo; Talib, Leda Leme; Yamaguti, Célia; Rodrigues, Helcio; Gattaz, Wagner Farid; Kalil, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Although aromatic anticonvulsants are usually well tolerated, they can cause cutaneous adverse drug reactions in up to 10% of patients. The clinical manifestations of the antiepileptics-induced hypersensitivity reactions (AHR) vary from mild skin rashes to severe cutaneous drug adverse reactions which are related to high mortality and significant morbidity. Genetic polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 genes are associated with altered enzymatic activity and may contribute to the risk of AHR. Here we present a case-control study in which we genotyped SNPs of CYP2C19, 2C9 and 3A5 of 55 individuals with varying severities of AHR, 83 tolerant, and 366 healthy control subjects from São Paulo, Brazil. Clinical characterization was based on standardized scoring systems and drug patch test. All in vivo investigation followed the ENDA (European Network of Drug Allergy) recommendations. Genotype was determined by real time PCR using peripheral blood DNA as a template. Of all 504 subjects, 65% were females, 45% self-identified as Afro-American, 38% as Caucasian and 17% as having non-African mixed ascendancy. Amongst 55 subjects with AHR, 44 had severe cutaneous drug adverse reactions. Of the 46 drug patch tests performed, 29 (63%) were positive. We found a strong association between the absence of CYP3A5*3 and tolerant subjects when compared to AHR (p = 0.0002, OR = 5.28 [CI95% 2.09–14.84]). None of our groups presented positive association with CYP2C19 and 2C9 polymorphisms, however, both SNPs contributed to separation of cases and tolerants in a Classification and Regression Tree. Our findings indicate that drug metabolism genes can contribute in the tolerability of antiepileptics. CYP3A5*3 is the most prevalent CYP3A5 allele associated with reduced enzymatic function. The current study provides evidence that normal CYP3A5 activity might be a protective factor to aromatic antiepileptics-induced hypersensitivity reactions in Brazilian subjects. PMID:26291084

  13. Murine eosinophils labeled with indium-111 oxine: localization to delayed hypersensitivity reactions against a schistosomal antigen and to lymphokine in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, T.H.; Clanton, J.A.; Runge, V.; English, D.; Colley, D.G.

    1983-04-01

    We have evaluated a method for quantitation of eosinophil migration to stimuli in vivo. Upon transfusion into normal syngeneic mice, 111In-labeled eosinophils had an intravascular half-life of 9.5 hr and distributed predominantly into spleen, bone marrow, and liver. In either Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice or recipients of lymphoid cells from infected mice, intradermal (ear pinna) injection of the schistosomal egg antigenic preparation (SEA) elicited time-dependent accumulation of 111In-labeled eosinophils detectable by either gamma scintillation counting of tissue samples or by nuclear medicine external imaging. Intradermal administration of a lymphokine fraction (containing eosinophil stimulation promoter activity) similarly caused accumulation of 111In-labeled eosinophils. Both reactions depended on the concentration of stimulus (SEA or lymphokine). 111In-labeled neutrophils or macrophages or 125I-albumin did not preferentially accumulate at the reactions examined to the extent found with 111In-labeled eosinophils, indicating that localization of label depends on an active process and is due to eosinophils rather than a contaminating cell type. The method was used to estimate how long eosinotactic lymphokine remained at dermal sites: 60% of initial activity was present 12 hr after injection. The model is discussed with regard to the role of lymphokines in hypersensitivity reactions with eosinophil involvement, such as the granulomatous response to S. mansoni eggs.

  14. Unique microRNAs appear at different times during the course of a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in human skin.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Nicholas; Løvendorf, Marianne B; Zibert, John R; Akat, Kemal M; Renwick, Neil; Tuschl, Thomas; Krueger, James G

    2015-12-01

    Diphencyprone (DPCP) is a hapten that induces delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression and have been implicated in various inflammatory skin diseases, but their role in DTH reactions is not well understood. We generated global miRNA expression profiles (using next-generation sequencing) of DPCP reactions in skin of seven healthy volunteers at 3, 14 and 120 days after challenge. Compared to placebo-treated sites, DPCP-challenged skin at 3 days (peak inflammation) had 127 miRNAs significantly deregulated. At 14 days (during resolution of inflammation), 43 miRNAs were deregulated and, at 120 days (when inflammation had completely resolved), six miRNAs were upregulated. While some miRNAs have been observed in psoriasis or atopic dermatitis, most of the deregulated miRNAs have not yet been studied in the context of skin biology or immunology. Across the three time points studied, many but not all miRNAs were uniquely expressed. As various miRNAs may influence T cell activation, this may indicate that the miRNAs exclusively expressed at different time points function to promote or resolve skin inflammation, and therefore, may inform on the paradoxical ability of DPCP to treat both autoimmune conditions (alopecia areata) and conditions of ineffective immunity (melanoma). PMID:26205579

  15. Hypersensitive Response-Like Reaction Is Associated with Hybrid Necrosis in Interspecific Crosses between Tetraploid Wheat and Aegilops tauschii Coss

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Hosogi, Naoki; Park, Pyoyun; Takumi, Shigeo

    2010-01-01

    Background Hybrid speciation is classified into homoploid and polyploid based on ploidy level. Common wheat is an allohexaploid species that originated from a naturally occurring interploidy cross between tetraploid wheat and diploid wild wheat Aegilops tauschii Coss. Aegilops tauschii provides wide naturally occurring genetic variation. Sometimes its triploid hybrids with tetraploid wheat show the following four types of hybrid growth abnormalities: types II and III hybrid necrosis, hybrid chlorosis, and severe growth abortion. The growth abnormalities in the triploid hybrids could act as postzygotic hybridization barriers to prevent formation of hexaploid wheat. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report on the geographical and phylogenetic distribution of Ae. tauschii accessions inducing the hybrid growth abnormalities and showed that they are widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Molecular and cytological characterization of the type III necrosis phenotype was performed. The hybrid abnormality causing accessions were widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Transcriptome analysis showed that a number of defense-related genes such as pathogenesis-related genes were highly up-regulated in the type III necrosis lines. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that cell death occurred accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species in leaves undergoing type III necrosis. The reduction of photosynthetic activity occurred prior to the appearance of necrotic symptoms on the leaves exhibiting hybrid necrosis. Conclusions/Significance Taking these results together strongly suggests that an autoimmune response might be triggered by intergenomic incompatibility between the tetraploid wheat and Ae. tauschii genomes in type III necrosis, and that genetically programmed cell death could be regarded as a hypersensitive response-like cell death similar to that observed in Arabidopsis intraspecific and Nicotiana

  16. Type I allergic hypersensitivity reactions due to ethylene oxide sterilised leucocyte filters in patients with thalassaemia: report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Belen, Burcu; Polat, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene oxide (EO) is a highly reactive gas used in sterilisation of heat sensitive medical devices, such as infusion sets, cannulae, intubation materials, ventriculoperitoneal shunts, dialysis catheters and stents. Allergic reactions due to EO have been reported in haemodialysis patients, patients undergoing extracorporeal photopheresis and donors of plasmapheresis. Clinical manifestations vary considerably and generally do not allow differentiation between IgE-mediated anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions. We report four patients with thalassaemia who experienced anaphylaxis during transfusion due to ethylene oxide sterilised leucocyte filters. The aim of this report is to highlight the fact that frequently transfused patients can have allergic reactions due to EO particles left in leucocyte filters. PMID:25725028

  17. Enhancement of delayed hypersensitivity inflammatory reactions in guinea pig skin by 12(R)-hydroxy-5,8,14-eicosatrienoic acid.

    PubMed

    Conners, M S; Schwartzman, M L; Quan, X; Heilman, E; Chauhan, K; Falck, J R; Godfrey, H P

    1995-01-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions are initiated by sensitized T cells. Their progression is dependent upon the local release of various autacoids, including cytokines and eicosanoids, by T cells, infiltrating inflammatory cells, and resident tissue cells. 12(R)-hydroxy-5,8,14-eicosatrienoic acid [12(R)-HETrE], an eicosanoid produced by skin and cornea, possesses potent proinflammatory properties at picomolar concentrations including vasodilation, increase in membrane permeability, neutrophil chemotaxis, and angiogenesis. Because DTH reactions are associated with many of these same phenomena, we examined the effect of 12(R)-HETrE and related 12-hydroxyeicosanoids on the expression of DTH to purified protein derivative of tuberculin in sensitized guinea pigs. In the absence of purified protein derivative of tuberculin, none of the eicosanoids evoked erythema or edema after intradermal injection at doses up to 100 pmol. When injected together with purified protein derivative of tuberculin, 12(R)-hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid [12(R)-HETE], but not its enantiomer 12(S)-HETE, significantly inhibited macroscopic expression of delayed reactivity (erythema) only at the highest dose tested, 10 pmol. In contrast, 12(R)-HETrE significantly enhanced expression of DTH at doses between 1 fmol and 1 pmol (50% and 30% increases above control, respectively). Its stereoisomer, 12(S)-HETrE, did not enhance DTH at any tested dose, but was able to block the activity of 12(R)-HETrE when injected simultaneously. Enhancement or inhibition of visible skin responses was not associated with qualitative or quantitative changes in cellular infiltrates at the reaction site. 12(R)-HETrE had no effect on the nonimmunologic inflammatory skin reaction induced by phorbol myristate acetate, suggesting selectivity toward DTH. We conclude that 12(R)-HETrE enhances DTH via a yet to be determined mechanism and that its stereoisomer, 12(S)-HETrE, may be a useful antagonist for

  18. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rashmi; Timshina, Dependra K; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is an adverse drug reaction commonly associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), viz., phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), lamotrigine, primidone, etc. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, gold derivatives, cyclosporine, captopril, diltiazem, terbinafine, azathioprine and allopurinol. Diagnosis of DHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalities and manifestations and because the syndrome may mimic infectious, neoplastic or collagen vascular disorders. The risk for developing hypersensitivity within 60 days of the first or second prescription in new users of PHT or CBZ was estimated to be 2.3-4.5 per 10,000 and 1-4.1 per 10,000, respectively. The syndrome is defined by the fever, skin rash, lymphadenopathy and internal organ involvement within the first 2-8 weeks after initiation of therapy. Internal manifestations include, among others, agranulocytosis, hepatitis, nephritis and myositis. Insufficient detoxification may lead to cell death or contribute to the formation of antigen that triggers an immune reaction. Cross-reactivity among PHT, CBZ and PB is as high as 70%-80%. Management mainly includes immediate withdrawal of the culprit drug, symptomatic treatment and systemic steroids or immunoglobulins. PMID:21220873

  19. Classification and pathophysiology of radiocontrast media hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Brockow, Knut; Ring, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to radiocontrast media (RCM) are unpredictable and are a concern for radiologists and cardiologists. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions manifest as anaphylaxis, and an allergic IgE-mediated mechanism has been continuously discussed for decades. Non-immediate reactions clinically are exanthemas resembling other drug-induced non-immediate hypersensitivities. During the past years, evidence is increasing that some of these reactions may be immunological. Repeated reactions after re-exposure, positive skin tests, and presence of specific IgE antibodies as well as positive basophil activation tests in some cases, and positive lymphocyte transformation or lymphocyte activation tests in others, indicate that a subgroup of both immediate and non-immediate reactions are of an allergic origin, although many questions remain unanswered. Recently reported cases highlight that pharmacological premedication is not safe to prevent RCM hypersensitivity in patients with previous severe reactions. These insights may have important consequences. A large multicenter study on the value of skin tests in RCM hypersensitivity concluded that skin testing is a useful tool for diagnosis of RCM allergy. It may have a role for the selection of a safe product in previous reactors, although confirmatory validation data is still scarce. In vitro tests to search for RCM-specific cell activation still are in development. In conclusion, recent data indicate that RCM hypersensitivity may have an allergic mechanism and that allergological testing is useful and may indicate tolerability. PMID:20519888

  20. CD22 expression mediates the regulatory functions of peritoneal B-1a cells during the remission phase of contact hypersensitivity reactions1

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroko; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Watanabe, Rei; Ishiura, Nobuko; Kuwano, Yoshihiro; Okochi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Sato, Shinichi; Tedder, Thomas F.; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    While contact hypersensitivity (CHS) has been considered a prototype of T cell-mediated immune reactions, recently a significant contribution of regulatory B cell subsets in the suppression of CHS has been demonstrated. CD22, one of the Siglecs, is a B cell-specific molecule that negatively regulates B cell receptor signaling. To clarify the roles of B cells in CHS, CHS in CD22-/- mice was investigated. CD22-/- mice showed delayed recovery from CHS reactions compared with wild type mice. Transfer of wild type peritoneal B-1a cells reversed the prolonged CHS reaction seen in CD22-/- mice, and this was blocked by the simultaneous injection with IL-10 receptor Ab. While CD22-/- peritoneal B-1a cells were capable of producing IL-10 at wild type levels, intraperitoneal injection of differentially labeled wild type/CD22-/- B cells demonstrated that a smaller number of CD22-/- B cells resided in lymphoid organs 5 days after CHS elicitation, suggesting a defect in survival or retention in activated CD22-/- peritoneal B-1 cells. Thus, our current study reveals a regulatory role for peritoneal B-1a cells in CHS. Two distinct regulatory B cell subsets cooperatively inhibit CHS responses. While splenic CD1dhiCD5+ B cells have a crucial role in suppressing the acute exacerbating phase of CHS, peritoneal B-1a cells are likely to suppress the late remission phase as “regulatory B cells”. CD22 deficiency results in disturbed CHS remission by impaired retention or survival of peritoneal B-1a cells that migrate into lymphoid organs. PMID:20335532

  1. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase in tobacco. Molecular cloning and gene expression during the hypersensitive reaction to tobacco mosaic virus and the response to a fungal elicitor.

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, L; Rohfritsch, O; Fritig, B; Legrand, M

    1994-01-01

    A tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Samsun NN) cDNA clone coding the enzyme phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) was isolated from a cDNA library made from polyadenylated RNA purified from tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-infected leaves. Southern analysis indicated that, in tobacco, PAL is encoded by a small family of two to four unclustered genes. Northern analysis showed that PAL genes are weakly expressed under normal physiological conditions, they are moderately and transiently expressed after wounding, but they are strongly induced during the hypersensitive reaction to TMV or to a fungal elicitor. Ribonuclease protection experiments confirmed this evidence and showed the occurrence of two highly homologous PAL messengers originating from a single gene or from two tightly co-regulated genes. By in situ RNA-RNA hybridization PAL transcripts were shown to accumulate in a narrow zone of leaf tissue surrounding necrotic lesions caused by TMV infection or treatment with the fungal elicitor. In this zone, no cell specificity was observed and there was a decreasing gradient of labeling from the edge of necrosis. Some labeling was also found in various cell types of young, healthy stems and was shown to accumulate in large amounts in the same cell types after the deposition of an elicitor solution at the top of the decapitated plant. PMID:7824656

  2. Immunization against an IL-6 peptide induces anti-IL-6 antibodies and modulates the Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity reaction in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Desallais, Lucille; Bouchez, Caroline; Mouhsine, Hadley; Moreau, Gabriel; Ratsimandresy, Rojo; Montes, Matthieu; Do, Hervé; Quintin-Colonna, Françoise; Zagury, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) overproduction has been involved in the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory diseases and the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody has been proven clinically efficient to treat them. However, the drawbacks of monoclonal antibodies have led our group to develop an innovative anti-IL-6 strategy using a peptide-based active immunization. This approach has previously shown its efficacy in a mouse model of systemic sclerosis. Here the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of this strategy was assessed in non human primates. No unscheduled death and clinical signs of toxicity was observed during the study. Furthermore, the cynomolgus monkeys immunized against the IL-6 peptide produced high levels of anti-IL-6 antibodies as well as neutralizing antibodies compared to control groups. They also showed an important decrease of the cumulative inflammatory score following a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction induced by the Tetanus vaccine compared to control groups (minus 57,9%, P = 0.014). These findings are highly significant because the immunizing IL-6 peptide used in this study is identical in humans and in monkeys and this novel anti-IL-6 strategy could thus represent a promising alternative to monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26782790

  3. Immunization against an IL-6 peptide induces anti-IL-6 antibodies and modulates the Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity reaction in cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Desallais, Lucille; Bouchez, Caroline; Mouhsine, Hadley; Moreau, Gabriel; Ratsimandresy, Rojo; Montes, Matthieu; Do, Hervé; Quintin-Colonna, Françoise; Zagury, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) overproduction has been involved in the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory diseases and the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody has been proven clinically efficient to treat them. However, the drawbacks of monoclonal antibodies have led our group to develop an innovative anti-IL-6 strategy using a peptide-based active immunization. This approach has previously shown its efficacy in a mouse model of systemic sclerosis. Here the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of this strategy was assessed in non human primates. No unscheduled death and clinical signs of toxicity was observed during the study. Furthermore, the cynomolgus monkeys immunized against the IL-6 peptide produced high levels of anti-IL-6 antibodies as well as neutralizing antibodies compared to control groups. They also showed an important decrease of the cumulative inflammatory score following a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction induced by the Tetanus vaccine compared to control groups (minus 57,9%, P = 0.014). These findings are highly significant because the immunizing IL-6 peptide used in this study is identical in humans and in monkeys and this novel anti-IL-6 strategy could thus represent a promising alternative to monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26782790

  4. The N-terminal fragment of the tomato torrado virus RNA1-encoded polyprotein induces a hypersensitive response (HR)-like reaction in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Przemysław; Obrępalska-Stęplowska, Aleksandra

    2016-07-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is a defence reaction observed during incompatible plant-pathogen interactions in plants infected with a wide range of fungi, bacteria and viruses. Here, we show that an N-terminal polyprotein fragment encoded by tomato torrado virus RNA1, located between the first ATG codon and the protease cofactor (ProCo) motif, induces an HR-like reaction in Nicotiana benthamiana. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of the first 105 amino acids (the calculated molecular weight of the fragment was ca. 11.33 kDa, hereafter refered to as the 11K domain) from ToTV RNA1 induced an HR-like phenotype in infiltrated leaves. To investigate whether the 11K domain could influence the virulence and pathogenicity of a recombinant virus, we created a potato virus X (PVX) with the 11K coding sequence inserted under a duplicated coat protein promoter. We found that 11K substantially increased the virulence of the recombinant virus. Disease phenotype induced in N. benthamiana by PVX-11K was characterized by strong local and systemic necrosis. This was not observed when the 11K domain was expressed from PVX in an antisense orientation. Further analyses revealed that the 11K domain could not suppress posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the N. benthamiana 16c line. In silico analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 11K domain indicated the presence of two putative helices that are highly conserved in tomato-infecting representatives of the genus Torradovirus. PMID:27072852

  5. Antidrug antibodies against TNF-blocking agents: correlations between disease activity, hypersensitivity reactions, and different classes of immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Maurizio; Li Gobbi, Francesca; Meacci, Francesca; Manfredi, Mariangela; Infantino, Maria; Severino, Maurizio; Testi, Sergio; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Ricci, Cristian; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2015-01-01

    Although anti-TNF drugs have changed the clinical course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), survival rates and resistance-to-therapy data confirm that about 30% of RA patients fail to respond. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations between the development of antidrug antibodies, specific IgG4 antibodies against TNF inhibitors, and resistance to therapy in RA patients. This retrospective study involved 129 patients with established RA naïve to biological agents (98 females and 32 males, mean age 56.7±12.3 years, disease duration 6.3±1.2 years, baseline Disease Activity Score [DAS]-28 3.2-5.6) who received treatment with anti-TNF agents after the failure of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (32 received infliximab [IFX], 58 etanercept [ETN], and 39 adalimumab [ADA]). After 6 months of treatment, the patients were classified as being in remission (DAS28 <2.6), having low disease activity (LDA; DAS28 2.6-3.2), or not responding (NR: DAS28 >3.2). The patients were also tested for serum antidrug antibodies and IgG4 antibodies against TNF inhibitors. After 24 weeks of treatment, 38% of the ETN-treated patients and 28% of those treated with ADA had injection-site reactions; the rate of systemic reactions in the IFX group was 25%. The differences among the three groups were not statistically significant (P=0.382; ETN versus ADA P=0.319). The percentages of patients with adverse events stratified by drug response were: LDA 8% and NR 18% in the ADA group; in remission 3%, LDA 22%, and NR 10% in the ETN group; and LDA 6% and NR 16% in the IFX group (P=0.051). The percentages of patients with antidrug antibodies were: ADA 33.3%, ETN 11.5%, and IFX 10.3% (P=0.025; ADA versus ETN P=0.015). The percentages of patients with IgG4 antibodies were: ADA 6%, ETN 13%, and IFX 26% (P=0.017; ADA versus ETN P=0.437). Associations between antidrug antibodies, specific IgG4 antibodies, and adverse reactions were not significant for any of the three drugs. IgG4

  6. Food hypersensitivity by inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Daniel A; Bahna, Sami L

    2009-01-01

    Though not widely recognized, food hypersensitivity by inhalation can cause major morbidity in affected individuals. The exposure is usually more obvious and often substantial in occupational environments but frequently occurs in non-occupational settings, such as homes, schools, restaurants, grocery stores, and commercial flights. The exposure can be trivial, as in mere smelling or being in the vicinity of the food. The clinical manifestations can vary from a benign respiratory or cutaneous reaction to a systemic one that can be life-threatening. In addition to strict avoidance, such highly-sensitive subjects should carry self-injectable epinephrine and wear MedicAlert® identification. Asthma is a strong predisposing factor and should be well-controlled. It is of great significance that food inhalation can cause de novo sensitization. PMID:19232116

  7. The Multi-Resistant Reaction of Drought-Tolerant Coffee 'Conilon Clone 14' to Meloidogyne spp. and Late Hypersensitive-Like Response in Coffea canephora.

    PubMed

    Lima, Edriana A; Furlanetto, Cleber; Nicole, Michel; Gomes, Ana C M M; Almeida, Maria R A; Jorge-Júnior, Aldemiro; Correa, Valdir R; Salgado, Sônia Maria; Ferrão, Maria A G; Carneiro, Regina M D G

    2015-06-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN), Meloidogyne spp., have major economic impact on coffee production in Central and South America. Genetic control of RKN constitutes an essential part for integrated pest management strategy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the resistance of Coffea canephora genotypes (clones) to Meloidogyne spp. Sensitive and drought-tolerant coffee genotypes were used to infer their resistance using nematode reproduction factor and histopathology. Eight clonal genotypes were highly resistant to M. paranaensis. 'Clone 14' (drought-tolerant) and 'ESN2010-04' were the only genotypes highly resistant and moderately resistant, respectively, to both M. incognita races 3 and 1. Several clones were highly resistant to both avirulent and virulent M. exigua. Clone 14 and ESN2010-04 showed multiple resistance to major RKNs tested. Roots of 'clone 14' (resistant) and 'clone 22' (susceptible) were histologically studied against infection by M. incognita race 3 and M. paranaensis. Reduction of juvenile (J2) penetration in clone 14 was first seen at 2 to 6 days after inoculation (DAI). Apparent early hypersensitive reaction (HR) was seen in root cortex between 4 and 6 DAI, which led to cell death and prevention of some nematode development. At 12 to 20 DAI, giant cells formed in the vascular cylinder, besides normal development into J3/J4. From 32 to 45 DAI, giant cells were completely degenerated. Late, intense HR and cell death were frequently observed around young females and giant cells reported for the first time in coffee pathosystem. These results provide rational bases for future studies, including prospection, characterization, and expression profiling of genomic loci involved in both drought tolerance and resistance to multiple RKN species. PMID:25738554

  8. Structural basis of metal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Dai, Shaodong

    2013-03-01

    Metal hypersensitivity is a common immune disorder. Human immune systems mount the allergic attacks on metal ions through skin contacts, lung inhalation and metal-containing artificial body implants. The consequences can be simple annoyances to life-threatening systemic illness. Allergic hyper-reactivities to nickel (Ni) and beryllium (Be) are the best-studied human metal hypersensitivities. Ni-contact dermatitis affects 10 % of the human population, whereas Be compounds are the culprits of chronic Be disease (CBD). αβ T cells (T cells) play a crucial role in these hypersensitivity reactions. Metal ions work as haptens and bind to the surface of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and peptide complex. This modifies the binding surface of MHC and triggers the immune response of T cells. Metal-specific αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) are usually MHC restricted, especially MHC class II (MHCII) restricted. Numerous models have been proposed, yet the mechanisms and molecular basis of metal hypersensitivity remain elusive. Recently, we determined the crystal structures of the Ni and Be presenting human MHCII molecules, HLA-DR52c (DRA*0101, DRB3*0301) and HLA-DP2 (DPA1*0103, DPB1*0201). These structures revealed unusual features of MHCII molecules and shed light on how metal ions are recognized by T cells. PMID:22983897

  9. Structural basis of metal hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Metal hypersensitivity is a common immune disorder. Human immune systems mount the allergic attacks on metal ions through skin contacts, lung inhalation and metal-containing artificial body implants. The consequences can be simple annoyances to life-threatening systemic illness. Allergic hyper-reactivities to nickel (Ni) and beryllium (Be) are the best-studied human metal hypersensitivities. Ni-contact dermatitis affects 10 % of the human population, whereas Be compounds are the culprits of chronic Be disease (CBD). αβ T cells (T cells) play a crucial role in these hypersensitivity reactions. Metal ions work as haptens and bind to the surface of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and peptide complex. This modifies the binding surface of MHC and triggers the immune response of T cells. Metal-specific αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) are usually MHC restricted, especially MHC class II (MHCII) restricted. Numerous models have been proposed, yet the mechanisms and molecular basis of metal hypersensitivity remain elusive. Recently, we determined the crystal structures of the Ni and Be presenting human MHCII molecules, HLA-DR52c (DRA*0101, DRB3*0301) and HLA-DP2 (DPA1*0103, DPB1*0201). These structures revealed unusual features of MHCII molecules and shed light on how metal ions are recognized by T cells. PMID:22983897

  10. Targeting a Cross-Reactive Gly m 5 Soy Peptide as Responsible for Hypersensitivity Reactions in a Milk Allergy Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Curciarello, Renata; Smaldini, Paola L.; Candreva, Angela M.; González, Virginia; Parisi, Gustavo; Cauerhff, Ana; Barrios, Ivana; Blanch, Luis Bruno; Fossati, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-reactivity between soybean allergens and bovine caseins has been previously reported. In this study we aimed to map epitopes of the major soybean allergen Gly m 5 that are co-recognized by casein specific antibodies, and to identify a peptide responsible for the cross-reactivity. Methods Cow's milk protein (CMP)-specific antibodies were used in different immunoassays (immunoblotting, ELISA, ELISA inhibition test) to evaluate the in vitro recognition of soybean proteins (SP). Recombinant Gly m 5 (α), a truncated fragment containing the C-terminal domain (α-T) and peptides of α-T were obtained and epitope mapping was performed with an overlapping peptide assay. Bioinformatics tools were used for epitope prediction by sequence alignment, and for modelling the cross-recognized soy proteins and peptides. The binding of SP to a monoclonal antibody was studied by surface Plasmon resonance (SPR). Finally, the in vivo cross-recognition of SP was assessed in a mouse model of milk allergy. Results Both α and α-T reacted with the different CMP-specific antibodies. α-T contains IgG and IgE epitopes in several peptides, particularly in the peptide named PA. Besides, we found similar values of association and dissociation constants between the α-casein specific mAb and the different milk and soy components. The food allergy mouse model showed that SP and PA contain the cross-reactive B and T epitopes, which triggered hypersensitivity reactions and a Th2-mediated response on CMP-sensitized mice. Conclusions Gly m 5 is a cross-reactive soy allergen and the α-T portion of the molecule contains IgG and IgE immunodominant epitopes, confined to PA, a region with enough conformation to be bound by antibodies. These findings contribute to explain the intolerance to SP observed in IgE-mediated CMA patients, primarily not sensitised to SP, as well as it sets the basis to propose a mucosal immunotherapy for milk allergy using this soy peptide. PMID:24416141

  11. Genotyping for Severe Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Eric; Phillips, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been significant advances in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis and pharmacogenomics of severe immunologically-mediated adverse drug reactions. Such T-cell-mediated adverse drug reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), drug-induced liver disease (DILI) and other drug hypersensitivity syndromes have more recently been shown to be mediated through interactions with various class I and II HLA alleles. Key examples have included the associations of HLA-B*15:02 and carbamazepine induced SJS/TEN in Southeast Asian populations and HLA-B*57:01 and abacavir hypersensitivity. HLA-B*57:01 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity exemplifies a successful translational roadmap from pharmacogenomic discovery through to widespread clinical implementation. Ultimately, our increased understanding of the interaction between drugs and the MHC could be used to inform drug design and drive pre-clinical toxicity programs to improve drug safety. PMID:24429903

  12. Antiepileptic drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schlienger, R G; Shear, N H

    1998-01-01

    The antiepileptic drug hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) is an adverse drug reaction associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), and primidone. The syndrome is defined by the triad of fever, skin rash, and internal organ involvement. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, terbinafine, azathioprine, and allopurinol. Diagnosis of AHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalities and manifestations and because the syndrome may mimic infectious, neoplastic, or collagen vascular disorders. The incidence is approximately 1 in 3,000 exposures. AHS starts with fever, rash, and lymphadenopathy, within the first 2-8 weeks after initiation of therapy. Internal manifestations include, among others, agranulocytosis, hepatitis, nephritis, and myostitis. AHS is associated with a relative excess of reactive oxidative metabolites of the AED. Insufficient detoxification may lead to cell death or contribute to the formation of antigen that triggers an immune reaction. Crossreactivity among PHT, CBZ, and PB is as high as 70-80%. PMID:9798755

  13. Clinical Management of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Hypersensitivity diseases caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are relatively common in the population. This article summarizes the present understanding on the various allergic and nonallergic clinical pictures produced through hypersensitivity to these drugs using the pathogenic classification of hypersensitivity reactions recently proposed by the Nomenclature Committee of the World Allergy Organization to guide clinicians in the diagnosis and management of patients with these conditions. PMID:23283307

  14. Radiocontrast media hypersensitivity in the Asia Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suh-Young; Lim, Kyoung-Whan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2014-04-01

    Radiocontrast media (RCM) is a major cause of drug hypersensitivity reactions as the medical application of RCM is increasing recently. RCM induced hypersensitivity reactions are considered as unpredictable type B reactions. Underlying mechanism of RCM induced hypersensitivity was previously regarded as nonimmunological mechanisms but recent studies suggest that immunological mechanisms could also be involved. As a result, the roles of skin tests and premedication are revisiting. As there has been no report that comprehensively summarized and analyzed the results of the studies on RCM hypersensitivity in the Asia Pacific region, we aimed to review the literatures on hypersensitivity reactions to RCM in terms of prevalence clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and preventive measures in the Asia Pacific region. PMID:24809018

  15. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs. PMID:18991707

  16. Hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Tahia D.; Ariza, Adriana; Palomares, Francisca; Montañez, María I.; Salas, María; Martín-Serrano, Angela; Fernández, Rubén; Ruiz, Arturo; Blanca, Miguel; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Torres, María J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although fluoroquinolones (FQs) are generally well-tolerated antibiotics, increasing numbers of hypersensitivity reactions have been reported. These can be evaluated in vitro by basophil activation tests (BATs); however, sensitivity is not optimal. Many factors could influence sensitivity such as basophil activation markers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2 different activations markers, CD63 and CD203c, on the sensitivity of BAT to FQ. We studied 17 patients with immediate allergic reactions to FQ. BAT was performed with moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin using CD193 (CCR3) for basophil selection and CD203c or CD63 as activation markers. Stimulation with ciprofloxacin induced a significantly higher expression of CD63 in ciprofloxacin-allergic patients compared to moxifloxacin-allergic patients (P = 0.002). In patients allergic to moxifloxacin with anaphylactic shock, we have observed an increase in the percentage of cells that upregulate CD203c, whereas patients with anaphylaxis preferentially upregulate CD63. The best sensitivity–specificity was obtained using a cutoff of 3 and the culprit FQ, using CD203c for moxifloxacin-allergic patients (sensitivity = 36.4%; specificity = 94.4%), and CD63 for ciprofloxacin-allergic patients (sensitivity = 83.3%; specificity = 88.9%). A negative correlation was found between the upregulation of CD63 and CD203c and the time interval between the reaction occurrence and the performance of the test (Spearman r = −0.446; P < 0.001 for CD63 and Spearman r = −0.386; P < 0.001 for CD203c). The performance of BAT for FQ allergy must be optimized for each drug, taking into account possible differences in the stimulation mechanism that leads to the upregulation of different activation markers. PMID:27281069

  17. Titanium hypersensitivity. A hidden threat for dental implant patients?

    PubMed

    Bilhan, Hakan; Bural, Canan; Geckili, Onur

    2013-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have been widely used for dental prosthetic devices because of their superior mechanical properties and biocompatibility. However, the incidence of titanium hypersensitivity or allergy is still unknown and the discussion about its existence is ongoing. Unexplained implant failures have also forced dental clinicians to investigate the possibility of titanium hypersensitivity or allergy. This review focuses on the potential of dental implant-related titanium hypersensitivity or allergic reactions. It includes an examination of the existing scientific literature and current knowledge. Evidence-based data and studies related to titanium hypersensitivity in dental implant patients are also discussed. PMID:24027897

  18. Chronic cough hypersensitivity syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chronic cough has been suggested to be due to three conditions, asthma, post nasal drip, and reflux disease. A different paradigm has evolved in which cough is viewed as the primary condition characterised by afferent neuronal hypersensitivity and different aspects of this syndrome are manifest in the different phenotypes of cough. There are several advantages to viewing cough hypersensitivity as the unifying diagnosis; Communication with patients is aided, aetiology is not restricted and therapeutic avenues opened. Cough Hypersensitivity Syndrome is a more applicable label to embrace the clinical manifestations of this disabling disease. PMID:23668427

  19. Carmine hypersensitivity masquerading as azithromycin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Greenhawt, Matthew; McMorris, Marc; Baldwin, James

    2009-01-01

    Macrolide hypersensitivity is a rarely reported event. However, carmine dye has become increasingly important as a provocative agent. We present a case of a woman with documented carmine hypersensitivity, who reported anaphylaxis 90 minutes after ingestion of a generic azithromycin. Our investigations revealed that this was an allergy to the carmine dye in the tablet's coating rather than to the antibiotic. Seven extracts were prepared including carmine dye, crushed dried female cochineal insects, crushed tablets of Zithromax (Pfizer Inc.) and generic azithromycin (Teva Pharmaceuticals), and the crushed colored coatings from both tablets. These were suspended in preservative-free normal saline, and then applied as a skin-prick test and read at 30 minutes. The skin-prick skin test results were 4+ to histamine and carmine dye, but negative to cochineal insect extract, Pfizer crushed tablets, and negative control. The patient was 1+ to the Teva crushed tablet, but was 4+ to the Teva brand coating and negative to the Pfizer brand coating, which did not contain carmine. The patient subsequently ingested Pfizer Zithromax without any sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of carmine anaphylaxis attributed to carmine-containing medication. Careful history and skin-prick testing to the appropriate agents allowed elucidation of the subtlety of the true offending agent without unnecessary avoidance of the medication class. Patients with a carmine hypersensitivity should actively check with their pharmacy or prescribing physician to verify their medications are free of this offending agent. PMID:19331724

  20. Diagnostic testing of dogs for food hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jeffers, J G; Shanley, K J; Meyer, E K

    1991-01-15

    Thirteen food-allergic dogs were studied to evaluate the efficacy of feeding a commercially available egg and rice diet, intradermal skin testing, and serologic testing by ELISA for diagnosing and/or characterizing food hypersensitivity. Feeding of a home-cooked whole lamb meat and rice diet for 3 weeks, followed by challenge with each dog's regular diet, served as the standard for diagnosing food hypersensitivity. Each dog underwent provocative testing with 6 individual ingredients to determine as many of its dietary allergens as possible. Prior to skin testing and serologic testing by ELISA, most dogs had been recently exposed to the offending diet and subsequently manifested clinical signs of allergy. All dogs that tolerated the aforementioned commercial diet were exposed to it for at least 7 weeks; 84.6% of food-hypersensitive dogs ate the commercial diet with impunity. Of the 2 reactors to the commercial diet, only 1 became pruritic in response to provocation testing with chicken eggs. Low sensitivity and high specificity were found for skin testing and the ELISA, indicating a lack of true- and false-positive reactions. Neither the positive nor negative predictive values adequately predicted positive and negative reactions, respectively, for either test. On the basis of these results, the commercial diet, skin testing, and anti-IgE ELISA cannot replace an owner-prepared food elimination diet for food hypersensitivity testing in dogs. PMID:2004984

  1. The frequency of HLA-B(∗)57:01 and the risk of abacavir hypersensitivity reactions in the majority population of Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Bolaños, Esteban; Madrigal, J Alejandro; Marsh, Steven G E; Shaw, Bronwen E; Salazar-Sánchez, Lizbeth

    2014-11-01

    HLA-B(∗)57:01 is a well-known and cost-effective pharmacogenetic marker for abacavir hypersensitivity. As with other HLA alleles, there is widespread variation in its frequency across populations. The Costa Rica Central Valley Population (CCVP) is the major population in this country. The frequency of HLA-B(∗)57:01 in this population has not been described yet. Thus, our aim was to determine the frequency of this allele in the CCVP. 200 unrelated healthy volunteer donors born in the CCVP were typed. HLA-B(∗)57-positive samples identified by HLA intermediate resolution typing methods were further typed by SBT to high resolution. An HLA-B(∗)57:01 carrier frequency of 5.00% was determined in this sample. This frequency is relatively high in comparison to reports from other populations in Latin America. These results suggest that there is a considerable frequency of HLA-B(∗)57:01 in the CCVP and that pharmacogenetic testing for HIV+ patients who are going to receive abacavir-based treatment should be considered in this country. PMID:25286002

  2. Arabidopsis TTR1 causes LRR-dependent lethal systemic necrosis, rather than systemic acquired resistance, to Tobacco ringspot virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most Arabidopsis ecotypes display tolerance to the Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), but a subset of Arabidopsis ecotypes, including Estland (Est), develop lethal systemic necrosis (LSN), which differs from the localized hypersensitive responses (HRs) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) characteristi...

  3. Dentin Hypersensitivity and Oxalates

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, J.; Stout, J.R.; Heaton, L.J.; Wataha, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of dentin hypersensitivity with oxalates is common, but oxalate efficacy remains unclear. Our objective was to systematically review clinical trials reporting an oxalate treatment compared with no treatment or placebo with a dentin hypersensitivity outcome. Risk-of-bias assessment and data extraction were performed independently by two reviewers. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were estimated by random-effects meta-analysis. Of 677 unique citations, 12 studies with high risk-of-bias were included. The summary SMD for 3% monohydrogen-monopotassium oxalate (n = 8 studies) was -0.71 [95% Confidence Interval: -1.48, 0.06]. Other treatments, including 30% dipotassium oxalate (n = 1), 30% dipotassium oxalate plus 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 3), 6% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 1), 6.8% ferric oxalate (n = 1), and oxalate-containing resin (n = 1), also were not statistically significantly different from placebo treatments. With the possible exception of 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate, available evidence currently does not support the recommendation of dentin hypersensitivity treatment with oxalates. PMID:21191127

  4. Drug Hypersensitivity: Pharmacogenetics and Clinical Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Chung, Wen-Hung; Mockenhaupt, Maja; Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Mallal, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    Severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) include syndromes such as drug reaction, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN). An important advance has been the discovery of associations between HLA alleles and many of these syndromes including abacavir hypersensitivity reaction, allopurinol DRESS/DIHS and SJS/TEN and SJS/TEN associated with aromatic amine anticonvulsants. These HLA associations have created the promise for prevention through screening and have additionally shed further light on the immunopathogenesis of SCARs. The roll-out of HLA-B*5701 into routine clinical practice as a genetic screening test to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity provides a translational roadmap for other drugs. Numerous hurdles exist in the widespread translation of several other drugs such as carbamazepine where the positive predictive value of HLA-B*1502 is low and the negative predictive value of HLA-B*1502 for SJS/TEN may not be 100% in all ethnic groups. International collaborative consortia have been formed with the goal of developing phenotype standardization and undertaking HLA and genome-wide analyses in diverse populations with these syndromes. PMID:21354501

  5. Relationship between Sympathetic Skin Responses and Auditory Hypersensitivity to Different Auditory Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Fumi; Iwanaga, Ryoichiro; Chono, Mami; Fujihara, Saori; Tokunaga, Akiko; Murata, Jun; Tanaka, Koji; Nakane, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Goro

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Auditory hypersensitivity has been widely reported in patients with autism spectrum disorders. However, the neurological background of auditory hypersensitivity is currently not clear. The present study examined the relationship between sympathetic nervous system responses and auditory hypersensitivity induced by different types of auditory stimuli. [Methods] We exposed 20 healthy young adults to six different types of auditory stimuli. The amounts of palmar sweating resulting from the auditory stimuli were compared between groups with (hypersensitive) and without (non-hypersensitive) auditory hypersensitivity. [Results] Although no group × type of stimulus × first stimulus interaction was observed for the extent of reaction, significant type of stimulus × first stimulus interaction was noted for the extent of reaction. For an 80 dB-6,000 Hz stimulus, the trends for palmar sweating differed between the groups. For the first stimulus, the variance became larger in the hypersensitive group than in the non-hypersensitive group. [Conclusion] Subjects who regularly felt excessive reactions to auditory stimuli tended to have excessive sympathetic responses to repeated loud noises compared with subjects who did not feel excessive reactions. People with auditory hypersensitivity may be classified into several subtypes depending on their reaction patterns to auditory stimuli. PMID:25140103

  6. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Hull, J H; Menon, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic cough often report symptoms arising in the throat, in response to non-specific stimuli. Accordingly, the concept of a 'hypersensitivity' of the larynx in chronic cough has evolved over the past ten years. Patients with cough and laryngeal hypersensitivity frequently report features that overlap other laryngeal dysfunction syndromes, including a tendency for the vocal cords to inappropriately adduct. The mechanisms underlying laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough are currently unclear, however recent studies provide new clinical and physiological techniques to aid detection and monitoring of laryngeal hypersensitivity. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field. PMID:26325433

  7. Drug hypersensitivity in students from São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ensina, Luis Felipe Chiaverini; Amigo, Maria Helena Lopes; Koch, Thais; Guzman, Evelyn; Paoli, Renata; Nunes, Inês Cristina Camelo

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug hypersensitivity is responsible for substantial mortality and morbidity, and increased health costs. However, epidemiological data on drug hypersensitivity in general or specific populations are scarce. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional survey of 1015 university students, using a self-reported questionnaire. RESULTS: The prevalence of self-reported drug hypersensitivity was 12,11% (123/1015). The most frequently implicated drugs were non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (45,9%) and beta-lactam and sulfonamide antibiotics (25,40%). The majority of the patients reported dermatological manifestations (99), followed by respiratory (40), digestive (23) and other (19). Forty-five patients had an immediate type reaction, and 76,72% (89) had the drug by oral route. CONCLUSION: The results showed that drug hypersensitivity is highly prevalent in university students, and that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and antibiotics (beta-lactams and sulfonamide) are the most frequently concerned drugs. PMID:21120302

  8. Azathioprine hypersensitivity syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fenaux, S; Tintillier, M; Cuvelier, Ch; Migali, G; Pochet, J M

    2013-01-01

    We report here the case of a 51-year-old man presenting to the Emergency Department with a febrile cutaneous eruption with diffuse arthralgia 10 days after the onset of azathioprine therapy. The clinical examination did not reveal any inflammatory syndrome and the results of all bacteriological tests were negative. A skin biopsy was performed, which revealed a granulocytary pustula with superficial dermal oedema and a neutrophil infiltration without sign of vasculitis. A side effect of azathioprine was suspected, and treatment was discontinued. Fortunately, the patient recovered within a few days. Azathioprine hypersensitivity syndrome is a rare side effect of azathioprine. Hypersensitivity syndrome is an idiosyncratic, non-IgE-mediated reaction that appears to be unrelated to thiopurine methyltransferase levels. Diagnosis is mainly clinical and requires an exclusion of other processes. The only treatment option available is to stop azathioprine intake. PMID:24156226

  9. Case of immediate hypersensitivity to beer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tomoko; Yagami, Akiko; Shimojo, Naoshi; Hara, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Masashi; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2016-06-01

    We report here a case of immediate hypersensitivity to beer, in which a female patient developed angioedema of the eyelids shortly after consuming beer. In skin prick tests, the patient showed positive reactions to the base ingredients of beer, particularly malt and barley. The specific serum immunoglobulin E antibodies against barley and malt displayed weakly positive reactivity. To identify the immunoreactive antigens, malt and barley proteins were separated by 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoreacted with the patient's serum. The results of mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the main antigen was a protein with similarity to protein z-type serpin. Notably, the identified antigen had a molecular weight of 20-25 kDa, which is markedly smaller than that previously reported for protein Z4 (44 kDa). Taken together, these analyses indicate that a possible new antigen which belongs to the protein Z family elicits immediate hypersensitivity to beer. PMID:26661797

  10. Contrast media hypersensitivity--scope of the problem.

    PubMed

    Brockow, Knut

    2005-04-15

    Hypersensitivity reactions to contrast media (CM) are frequent causes of anaphylactically induced fatalities. Adverse events after CM exposure are classified into immediate and non-immediate reactions, with differing pathomechanisms. In the majority of patients with immediate reactions, IgE-mediated allergy can not be demonstrated and the underlying mechanism remains unknown. However, recent data has provided evidence for skin test positivity and/or specific IgE in some patients with severe reactions. Cell-mediated hypersensitivity is the responsible mechanism for the majority of non-immediate skin eruptions. Skin tests have been employed to confirm this hypersensitivity. Previous reactors have an increased risk to develop new reactions upon repeated exposure, however, other risk factors are poorly defined. The use of skin tests for the selection of a "safe" CM is controversially discussed; information on sensitivity and specificity is lacking. New in-vitro assays have to be developed and/or validated. Premedication of previous reactors is common practice among radiologists, however, its precise role in the prevention of severe CM reactions to lower-osmolality CM has not been demonstrated. Thus, the main future tasks are to develop and validate allergic tests procedures, which may identify patients at risk and/or may confirm CM tolerance, and to reassess the value of different premedications in the prevention of hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:15767034

  11. Immediate-type hypersensitivity to polyethylene glycols: a review.

    PubMed

    Wenande, E; Garvey, L H

    2016-07-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) or macrogols are polyether compounds widely used in medical and household products. Although generally considered biologically inert, cases of mild to life-threatening immediate-type PEG hypersensitivity are reported with increasing frequency. Nevertheless, awareness of PEG's allergenic potential remains low, due to a general lack of suspicion towards excipients and insufficient product labelling. Information on immediate-type reactions to PEG is limited to anecdotal reports, and the potential for PEG sensitization and cross-sensitization to PEGylated drugs and structurally related derivatives is likely underestimated. Most healthcare professionals have no knowledge of PEG and thus do not suspect PEG's as culprit agents in hypersensitivity reactions. In consequence, patients are at risk of misdiagnosis and commonly present with a history of repeated, severe reactions to a range of unrelated products in hospital and at home. Increased awareness of PEG prevalence, PEG hypersensitivity, and improved access to PEG allergy testing, should facilitate earlier diagnosis and reduce the risk of inadvertent re-exposure. This first comprehensive review provides practical information for allergists and other healthcare professionals by describing the clinical picture of 37 reported cases of PEG hypersensitivity since 1977, summarizing instances where PEG hypersensitivity should be considered and proposing an algorithm for diagnostic management. PMID:27196817

  12. Stent hypersensitivity and infection in sinus cavities

    PubMed Central

    Soufras, George D.; Hahalis, George

    2013-01-01

    Persistent mucosal inflammation, granulation tissue formation, hypersensitivity, and multifactorial infection are newly described complications of retained drug-eluting stents from endoscopic sinus surgery for refractory rhinosinusitis. In an important report published in Allergy and Rhinology, a 45-year-old male patient suffering from recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery and was found, for the first time, to have steroid-eluting catheters that were inadvertently left in the ethmoid and frontal sinuses. The retained catheters had caused persistent mucosal inflammation and formation of granulation tissue denoting hypersensitivity reaction. These consequences had induced perpetuation of symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. Meticulous removal of the retained stents with the nitinol wings from inflamed tissues of the frontal, ethmoidal, and sphenoethmoidal recesses in which they were completely imbedded was successfully performed without polypoid regrowth. Cultures of specimens taken from both left and right stents showed heavy growth of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and moderate growth of Klebsiella oxytoca, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, and beta-hemolytic Streptococcus anginosus. Fungal infection was not detected. The current knowledge and experience regarding stent hypersensitivity and infection in relation with the use of stents in sinus cavities is reviewed. PMID:24498522

  13. Immunologic Evaluation of Immediate Hypersensitivity to Cefaclor

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hye-Soo; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Tae-Bum; Nam, Young-Hee; Ye, Young-Min

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cefaclor is widely prescribed for various infectious diseases. As its consumption increases, the number of hypersensitivity reactions to cefaclor has increased. This study aimed to evaluate the immunologic findings of immediate hypersensitivity to cefaclor. Materials and Methods We enrolled 47 patients with immediate hypersensitivity to cefaclor from Ajou University Hospital and Asan Medical Center. Serum specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 antibodies to cefaclor-human serum albumin (HSA) conjugate were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The most common phenotype was anaphylaxis (Group I, 78.7%), followed by urticaria (Group II, 21.3%). The detection of specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 to cefaclor-HSA conjugate by ELISA tended to be higher in Group I (40.5%, 41.7%, 21.6%) than in Group II (20.0%, 20.0%, 0%) with no statistical significance. Significant associations were found between specific IgE and IgG1 or IgG4 (p<0.001, p=0.019). ELISA inhibition tests showed significant inhibitions by both free cefaclor and cefaclor-HSA conjugate. For basophil activation tests in patients having no specific IgE antibody, the CD63 expression level on basophils increased with incubations of free cefaclor. Conclusion The most common manifestation of immediate hypersensitivity to cefaclor was anaphylaxis, most of which was mediated by IgE; however, a non-IgE mediated direct basophil activation mechanism was suggested in a subset of anaphylaxis patients. PMID:25323882

  14. Xanthomonas filamentous hemagglutinin-like protein Fha1 interacts with pepper hypersensitive-induced reaction protein CaHIR1 and functions as a virulence factor in host plants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Dae Sung; Kim, Nak Hyun; Jung, Ho Won; Ham, Jong Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2013-12-01

    Pathogens have evolved a variety of virulence factors to infect host plants successfully. We previously identified the pepper plasma-membrane-resident hypersensitive-induced reaction protein (CaHIR1) as a regulator of plant disease- and immunity-associated cell death. Here, we identified the small filamentous hemagglutinin-like protein (Fha1) of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria as an interacting partner of CaHIR1 using yeast two-hybrid screening. Coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments revealed that Fha1 specifically interacts with CaHIR1 in planta. The endocytic tracker FM4-64 staining showed that the CaHIR1-Fha1 complex localizes in the endocytic vesicle-like structure. The X. campestris pv. vesicatoria Δfha1 mutant strain exhibited significantly increased surface adherence but reduced swarming motility. Mutation of fha1 inhibited the growth of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria and X. campestris pv. vesicatoria ΔavrBsT in tomato and pepper leaves, respectively, suggesting that Fha1 acts as a virulence factor in host plants. Transient expression of fha1 and also infiltration with purified Fha1 proteins induced disease-associated cell death response through the interaction with CaHIR1 and suppressed the expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Silencing of CaHIR1 in pepper significantly reduced ΔavrBsT growth and Fha1-triggered susceptibility cell death. Overexpression of fha1 in Arabidopsis retarded plant growth and triggered disease-associated cell death, resulting in altered disease susceptibility. Taken together, these results suggest that the X. campestris pv. vesicatoria virulence factor Fha1 interacts with CaHIR1, induces susceptibility cell death, and suppresses PR gene expression in host plants. PMID:23931712

  15. [Type IV of hypersensitivity and its subtypes].

    PubMed

    Czarnobilska, Ewa; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Wsołek, Katarzyna

    2007-01-01

    Type IV of hypersensitivity reaction is usually manifested in the skin in different clinical pattern. According to traditional Gell and Coombs classification, the mechanism of IV type of allergic reaction has been associated with contact allergy with the activity of lymphocytes Th1 secreting interferon gamma. Now, this vision seems to be too simplified. In the last years there were publications, which can throw a new light on these complicated mechanisms leading to the development of the type IV of allergy, especially to drugs, nickel and other haptens and also can explain the differentiation of clinical pattern in respective patients. The skin symptoms in type IV of hypersensitivity are triggered by activation of specific T-cell CD4+ and CD8+. Immunohistochemical and functional analysis of reactive T-cell has shown that the delayed hypersensitivity reaction depends on the secreted cytokines. For example maculo-papular exanthema may be either triggered by Th1 or Th2 in nature and cytokines interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alfa or interleukin-4, 5 and 13. Bullous reactions (i.e. Stevens-Johnsons Syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis) are characterized by widespread keratinocyte apoptosis, a consequence of high CD8+ T-cell involvement and the molecular cytotoxicity of Fas, perforin and granzyme B. Pustular exanthema reactions are stimulated via the T-cell release of 11-8 and granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulatig factor (GM-CSF). For the better understanding of these inflammatory cascades deleted type IV of hypersensitivity reactions have been re-classified into four main subtypes: 1. IVa with Th1 and monocyte directed and cytokines: IFNgamma, IL-1, IL-2, 2. IVb with Th2 and eosinophils directed and cytokines: L-5, IL-4, IL-13, 3. IVc with T CD8+ directed and cytokines: perforin, granzyme B, Fas Ligand, 4. IVd with T CD4+, CD8+ and neutrophil directed and cytokines: IL8, GM-CSF. Clinically delayed hypersensitivity eruptions are often an overlap of cytokine

  16. Hypersensitivity and nanoparticles: update and research trends

    PubMed Central

    MOCAN, TEODORA; MATEA, CRISTIAN T.; IANCU, CORNEL; AGOSTON-COLDEA, LUCIA; MOCAN, LUCIAN; ORASAN, REMUS

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology holds a great promise for a wide range of medical-intent applications (diagnostic, treatment and prophylaxis of various diseases). Their advantages are due to their size, versatility and potential for multiple simultaneous applications. However, concerns have been formulated by scientific world due to insufficient data on toxicity of nanomaterials. One area of interest is represented by the interactions between nanoparticles and the components of the immune system. We review herein reported data on hypersensitivity reactions. The role exerted by nanoparticles in both immunostimulation and immunosuppression in allergen-driven mechanisms was studied, as well as future trends in worldwide research. PMID:27152071

  17. Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome not related to G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schulkes, Karlijn J G; Tervaert, J W Cohen; Rijken, Feiko; Haas, Lenneke E M

    2015-01-01

    Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is a rare, but potentially life-threatening reaction to dapsone. We describe a 55-year-old Caucasian woman with normal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase levels presenting with an extensive skin eruption, high-grade fever, pneumonitis and hepatitis, which occurred within 3 weeks after initiation of dapsone. In addition to supportive care, the patient was successfully treated with high-dose corticosteroids and antibiotics. The combination of high-grade fever, skin rash, lung and liver involvement made a dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome very likely. PMID:26682839

  18. Effect of Premedications in a Murine Model of Asparaginase Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Christian A.; Smith, Colton; Karol, Seth E.; Ramsey, Laura B.; Liu, Chengcheng; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima; Evans, William E.; Finkelman, Fred D.

    2015-01-01

    A murine model was developed that recapitulates key features of clinical hypersensitivity to Escherichia coli asparaginase. Sensitized mice developed high levels of anti-asparaginase IgG antibodies and had immediate hypersensitivity reactions to asparaginase upon challenge. Sensitized mice had complete inhibition of plasma asparaginase activity (P = 4.2 × 10−13) and elevated levels of mouse mast cell protease 1 (P = 6.1 × 10−3) compared with nonsensitized mice. We investigated the influence of pretreatment with triprolidine, cimetidine, the platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist CV-6209 [2-(2-acetyl-6-methoxy-3,9-dioxo-4,8-dioxa-2,10-diazaoctacos-1-yl)-1-ethyl-pyridinium chloride], or dexamethasone on the severity of asparaginase-induced allergies. Combining triprolidine and CV-6209 was best for mitigating asparaginase-induced hypersensitivity compared with nonpretreated, sensitized mice (P = 1.2 × 10−5). However, pretreatment with oral dexamethasone was the only agent capable of mitigating the severity of the hypersensitivity (P = 0.03) and partially restoring asparaginase activity (P = 8.3 × 10−4). To rescue asparaginase activity in sensitized mice without requiring dexamethasone, a 5-fold greater dose of asparaginase was needed to restore enzyme activity to a similar concentration as in nonsensitized mice. Our results suggest a role of histamine and PAF in asparaginase-induced allergies and indicate that mast cell–derived proteases released during asparaginase allergy may be a useful marker of clinical hypersensitivity. PMID:25573198

  19. Studies on the mechanism of systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity by UVB radiation. II. Differences in the suppression of delayed and contact hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kripke, M L; Morison, W L

    1986-05-01

    Exposing mice to UV radiation in the UVB range (280-320 nm) causes a selective immune suppression that contributes to the development of UVB-induced skin cancers. Among the immune responses suppressed by UVB irradiation are contact and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to haptens administered at unexposed sites. In these studies we provide evidence that delayed and contact hypersensitivity to the same hapten are not equivalent reactions and that they are suppressed in UVB-irradiated mice by 2 different mechanisms. This conclusion is based on the findings that: suppression of contact hypersensitivity could not be overcome by immunizing UVB-irradiated mice with hapten-coupled antigen-presenting cells derived from normal donors; and treatment of UVB-irradiated mice with methylprednisolone before immunization prevented the suppression of delayed hypersensitivity but had no effect on the suppression of contact hypersensitivity. The decreased ability to induce contact hypersensitivity in UVB-irradiated mice could be transferred to x-irradiated mice by reconstituting them with spleen cells from UVB-irradiated donors. The induction of hapten-specific suppressor cells, however, required both UVB irradiation and priming with hapten. Based on these results, we postulate that UVB irradiation induces a population of suppressor-inducer cells with specificity for a modified skin antigen and that this antigen serves as a carrier molecule for haptens that induce contact hypersensitivity and for tumor-specific transplantation antigens on UVB-induced tumors. PMID:3745963

  20. Biomaterial Hypersensitivity: Is It Real? Supportive Evidence and Approach Considerations for Metal Allergic Patients following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mihalko, William M.; Grupp, Thomas M.; Manning, Blaine T.; Dennis, Douglas A.; Goodman, Stuart B.; Saleh, Khaled J.

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of biomaterial hypersensitivity developing in response to joint implant materials was first presented more than 30 years ago. Many studies have established probable causation between first-generation metal-on-metal hip implants and hypersensitivity reactions. In a limited patient population, implant failure may ultimately be related to metal hypersensitivity. The examination of hypersensitivity reactions in current-generation metal-on-metal knee implants is comparatively limited. The purpose of this study is to summarize all available literature regarding biomaterial hypersensitivity after total knee arthroplasty, elucidate overall trends about this topic in the current literature, and provide a foundation for clinical approach considerations when biomaterial hypersensitivity is suspected. PMID:25883940

  1. Biomaterial hypersensitivity: is it real? Supportive evidence and approach considerations for metal allergic patients following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mitchelson, Andrew J; Wilson, Craig J; Mihalko, William M; Grupp, Thomas M; Manning, Blaine T; Dennis, Douglas A; Goodman, Stuart B; Tzeng, Tony H; Vasdev, Sonia; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of biomaterial hypersensitivity developing in response to joint implant materials was first presented more than 30 years ago. Many studies have established probable causation between first-generation metal-on-metal hip implants and hypersensitivity reactions. In a limited patient population, implant failure may ultimately be related to metal hypersensitivity. The examination of hypersensitivity reactions in current-generation metal-on-metal knee implants is comparatively limited. The purpose of this study is to summarize all available literature regarding biomaterial hypersensitivity after total knee arthroplasty, elucidate overall trends about this topic in the current literature, and provide a foundation for clinical approach considerations when biomaterial hypersensitivity is suspected. PMID:25883940

  2. LLLT in treating dentinary hypersensitivity: new concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Zanin, Fatima; Ladalardo, Thereza C.; Pinheiro, Antonio; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2006-02-01

    Dental hypersensitivity has been studied for several years and it is reported as a strikingly painful condition originating from the exposition of dentinal tubuli . The exposed area is subjected to several kinds of stimuli, resulting in a rapid sharp acute pain. LLLT has been shown to have antiinflammatory, analgesic and cellular effects in both hyperemia and inflammation of the dental pulp. Our previous histological study showed that irradiated animals presented an increased production of dentine and shutting of dentinal tubuli. On the other hand, non-irradiated subjects still showed signals of intense inflammatory reaction and even necrosis at the same experimental times. Irradiated teeth did not show cell degeneration. The LLLT was shown to be efficient in the stimulation of odontoblast cells, producing reparative dentin and closing dentin tubuli. Our clinical studies with 660nm, 790nm and 830nm diode laser, and the total dose per tooth of 4J/cm was shown effective in treating dentinal hypersensitivity as it quickly reduces pain and maintains a prolonged painless status in 91.27 % to 97% of the cases. In a recent study our team observed that significant levels of dentinal desensitization were only found in patients belonging to the 25-35 age group. In conclusion, the results demonstrated indeed that LLLT, when based on the use of correct irradiations parameters is effective in treating hypersensitivity, but the age of patients is one of the factors that may alter the success of treatment due to dentinal sclerosis, which makes the penetration of light more difficult.

  3. Food Hypersensitivity in Patients Over 14 Years of Age Suffering from Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Čelakovská, Jarmila; Ettler, K; Ettlerová, K; Vaněčková, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients suffering from atopic dermatitis often describe food hypersensitivity. Rising prevalence of food hypersensitivity and severe allergic reactions to foods have been reported, but the data are scarce. Aims and Objectives: Evaluation of food hypersensitivity reactions in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: The dermatological examination was performed in patients of age 14 years and above and the detailed history was taken concerning the food hypersensitivity. Results: A total of 228 patients were examined-72 men, 156 women, average age 26.2 (SD 9.5) years. The food hypersensitivity reactions were recorded in 196 patients from 228 (86%), no reactions were recorded in 32 patients (24%). Foods with the most often recorded reactions are: Nuts (in 35% of patients), tomatoes (in 20%), and kiwi (in 17, 5%), apples and spices (in 16%), tangerines and oranges (in 15%), capsicum (in 13%), fishes (in 12%), celery (in 9%), and chocolate (in 7%). Conclusion: Food hypersensitivity reactions are recorded in 86% of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Nuts, tomatoes, and pollen–associated foods play a role in the majority of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. PMID:24891679

  4. Occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis: an EAACI position paper.

    PubMed

    Quirce, S; Vandenplas, O; Campo, P; Cruz, M J; de Blay, F; Koschel, D; Moscato, G; Pala, G; Raulf, M; Sastre, J; Siracusa, A; Tarlo, S M; Walusiak-Skorupa, J; Cormier, Y

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this document was to provide a critical review of the current knowledge on hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by the occupational environment and to propose practical guidance for the diagnosis and management of this condition. Occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis (OHP) is an immunologic lung disease resulting from lymphocytic and frequently granulomatous inflammation of the peripheral airways, alveoli, and surrounding interstitial tissue which develops as the result of a non-IgE-mediated allergic reaction to a variety of organic materials or low molecular weight agents that are present in the workplace. The offending agents can be classified into six broad categories that include bacteria, fungi, animal proteins, plant proteins, low molecular weight chemicals, and metals. The diagnosis of OHP requires a multidisciplinary approach and relies on a combination of diagnostic tests to ascertain the work relatedness of the disease. Both the clinical and the occupational history are keys to the diagnosis and often will lead to the initial suspicion. Diagnostic criteria adapted to OHP are proposed. The cornerstone of treatment is early removal from exposure to the eliciting antigen, although the disease may show an adverse outcome even after avoidance of exposure to the causal agent. PMID:26913451

  5. [Application of basophil activation test in diagnosing aspirin hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Gawinowska, Marika; Specjalski, Krzysztof; Chełmińska, Marta; Łata, Jakub; Zieliński, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    In the face of increasing prevalence of hypersensitivity reactions, introduction of effective, reliable and safe methods plays a crucial role in their diagnosing. Among the currently available laboratory (in vitro) methods is basophil activation test (BAT). It is a flow- cytometry based assay that allows to identificate in the blood sample basophils and additionally to asses the degree of cell activation after exposure to an antigen. The most common superficial identification markers are CD63 and CD203c, which increase in number after activation. Basophil actvation test can be applied to confirm diagnosis of allergy to Hymenoptera venoms, food, pollens and hypersensitivity to drugs. The aim of present paper is to present theoretical methods of this test as well as its pros and cons. We focus also on presentation of clinical case where BAT seemed to be a necessary addition to a routine diagnostic pathway. We present a case of identification of the culprit drug which caused an anaphylactic reaction. PMID:25577537

  6. [Type I hypersensitivity to a silicone tube after laryngectomy].

    PubMed

    Stuck, B A; Hecksteden, K; Klimek, L; Hörmann, K

    2004-03-01

    While irritation of the tracheal mucosa is a common finding after laryngectomy, specific hypersensitivity to tracheal tubes or their components is extremely rare and has only been documented as a contact allergy. In this case report, we present type I hypersensitivity to tracheal tube components for the first time. The patient regularly used a special silicone tube for swimming after laryngectomy and complained about increasing tracheal irritation during and after the use of this tube. A standard skin prick test with common aeroallergens and a skin patch test with standard, rubber and adhesive allergens as well as with parts of the silicone tube was performed. Different parts of the tracheal tube were also tested with a scratch test. Total IgE as well as specific IgE for latex allergens was measured. Both skin prick and patch tests were negative. No specific IgE for latex allergens was detected. The scratch test generated strongly positive reactions against native tube material. The positive findings in the skin tests demonstrate specific hypersensitivity to the tracheal tube or its components in terms of a type I hypersensitivity. The causative component remains unclear. PMID:15007521

  7. Adolescents' experiences of being food-hypersensitive: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Marklund, Birgitta; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Ahlstedt, Staffan; Nordström, Gun

    2007-01-01

    Background Experiencing or being at risk of adverse reactions to certain food items is a common health issue, especially among children and adolescents. Research has shown that living with the risk of food reactions and always having to take measures to avoid certain food in one's diet has a negative impact on quality of life. The aim of this study was to illuminate adolescents' experiences of being food hypersensitive. Methods Three focus group interviews and six individual interviews were carried out with all together 17 adolescents, 14–18 years of age, who had exclusion diets at school due to food hypersensitivity. The interviews were taped and transcribed verbatim and a qualitative content analysis was carried out. Results Five categories with subcategories, and one pervading theme, emerged. The categories were: Perceiving oneself as being particular, Feeling constrained, Experiencing others' ignorance, Keeping control, and Feeling it's okay. A pervading theme was conceptualised as Striving to normalise the experience of being food-hypersensitive. The adolescents regarded themselves as competent and courageous, but also described how they avoided the extra attention it implied to ask for special food considerations taken into account. Their self-conceptions were probably essential for their management of and attitude toward the hypersensitivity condition. They felt deprived, and those at risk of severe food reactions experienced insecurity and fear. Feelings of being disregarded were expressed, as well as facing unreliability and a lack of understanding from others. The continual work of constant vigilance and decision-making was described as time-consuming and frustrating. However, the adolescents also experienced considerate and supportive surroundings and were at pains to tone down the negative experiences and consequences of being food-hypersensitive. Conclusion Food avoidance by itself, and not only the somatic food reactions, brings about consequences

  8. A case of hypersensitivity to progesterone presenting as an eczematous eruption.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, A; Tuchinda, P; Pigliacelli, F; Halvorson, C; Kao, G; Persechino, S; Gaspari, A A

    2016-05-01

    Hypersensitivity to progesterone is a rare condition, and it represents a hypersensitivity reaction to endogenous progesterone. Here we report a case of a woman who presented to our attention for evaluation of a rash for a few years on her posterior elbows, forearms, and right lateral lower extremity. We report this case because it describes a rare clinical entity, with an atypical clinical presentation pemphigoid-like, that is rarely described in literature. PMID:27152606

  9. Angioneurotic edema: a rare case of hypersensitivity to metoclopramide

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Aleksander; Matuszewski, Tomasz; Kruszewski, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    The case of a 30-year-old woman who had already experienced two incidents of angioneurotic edema and urticaria caused by drugs during the acute gastroenteritis. The allergological workup revealed hypersensitivity to metoclopramide. This case documents that metoclopramide, a drug commonly used to inhibit the vomiting, may cause not only bronchospastic reaction in an asthmatic patient but also angioneurotic edema of the tongue and larynx as well as urticaria. No similar cases in the literature were found. PMID:24278059

  10. Cracking the egg: An insight into egg hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dhanapala, Pathum; De Silva, Chamika; Doran, Tim; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2015-08-01

    Hypersensitivity to the chicken egg is a widespread disorder mainly affecting 1-2% of children worldwide. It is the second most common food allergy in children, next to cow's milk allergy. Egg allergy is mainly caused by hypersensitivity to four allergens found in the egg white; ovomucoid, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin and lysozyme. However, some research suggests the involvement of allergens exclusively found in the egg yolk such as chicken serum albumin and YGP42, which may play a crucial role in the overall reaction. In egg allergic individuals, these allergens cause conditions such as itching, atopic dermatitis, bronchial asthma, vomiting, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, laryngeal oedema and chronic urticaria, and anaphylaxis. Currently there is no permanent cure for egg allergy. Upon positive diagnosis for egg allergy, strict dietary avoidance of eggs and products containing traces of eggs is the most effective way of avoiding future hypersensitivity reactions. However, it is difficult to fully avoid eggs since they are found in a range of processed food products. An understanding of the mechanisms of allergic reactions, egg allergens and their prevalence, egg allergy diagnosis and current treatment strategies are important for future studies. This review addresses these topics and discusses both egg white and egg yolk allergy as a whole. PMID:25965316

  11. Antibiotic hypersensitivity in CF: drug-induced life-threatening hemolytic anemia in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Alma; Mian, Amir; Scurlock, Amy M; Blackall, Douglas; Com, Gulnur

    2010-12-01

    Adverse reactions to antibiotics in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are a growing concern. We report the case of a pediatric patient with CF with multiple comorbidities and a history of drug reactions, who developed life-threatening piperacillin-induced immune hemolytic anemia. We review drug-induced hemolytic anemia (DIIHA) in particular, and antibiotic hypersensitivity in CF in general, including the frequency, pathogenesis, and risk factors. Finally, we discuss the treatment options and propose an algorithm for the management of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with CF. PMID:20833594

  12. Cervical dentin hypersensitivity: a cross-sectional investigation in Athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Rahiotis, C; Polychronopoulou, A; Tsiklakis, K; Kakaboura, A

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of cervical dentin hypersensitivity in a cross-sectional investigation of Greek adults. Seven hundred and sixty-seven subjects were examined. Participants were patients processed for first examination in the Clinic of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Athens. The evaluation of hypersensitivity was performed using two methods: for each tooth, the response to a) tactile stimulus and b) air-blast stimulus was measured. Additional factors such as smoking habits, oral health behaviour, consumption of acidic foods, type of toothbrush, daily use of fluoride solution and of desensitising toothpaste, gingival recession and non-carious cervical lesions were recorded and evaluated as causative factors. Descriptive statistics on the demographics of the study sample, of oral health behaviour characteristics and of oral examination findings were performed. Comparisons of these characteristics in the presence or absence of hypersensitivity were conducted with the chi-square test. Data were further analysed using multiple logistic regression modelling. Among study participants, 21·3% had at least one cervical dentin hypersensitivity reaction to the tactile stimulus, and 38·6%, to the air-blast stimulus. Multivariate analysis detected association of the hypersensitivity in tactile or air-blast stimulus with the non-carious lesions and with the gingival recessions. Additionally, a relation between hypersensitivity and air-blast stimulus with gender (female) was found. There was no association between the hypersensitivity in both of the stimuli and the level of education, smoking, consumption of acidic foods, type of toothbrush and daily use of fluoride solution or desensitising toothpaste. The overall prevalence of cervical dentin hypersensitivity in the adult population in Athens ranged from 21·3% to 38·6% depending on the type of stimuli. Cervical non-carious lesions and gingival

  13. An outer membrane protein (porin) as an eliciting antigen for delayed-type hypersensitivity in murine salmonellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Udhayakumar, V; Muthukkaruppan, V R

    1987-01-01

    The porin, an outer membrane protein of Salmonella typhimurium, was found to be a suitable antigen for eliciting delayed-type hypersensitivity in mouse salmonellosis. Histological examination of the reaction site revealed that the porin was superior to other antigenic preparations in eliciting a typical delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction consisting of mononuclear cell infiltration without polymorphonuclear cell contamination. This study indicates the importance of using a suitable protein antigen from S. typhi for human application. Images PMID:3028963

  14. IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity disorders.

    PubMed

    Gotua, M; Lomidze, N; Dolidze, N; Gotua, T

    2008-04-01

    Food allergy has become a serious health concern especially in developed countries in the past two decades. In general population approximately 4-6% of children and 1-3% of adults experience food allergy. The article reviews IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity disorders. Epidemiology, Mechanism, Clinical manifestations, Genetically modified crops (GMOs), Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment of IgE-mediated food allergies are discussed. The investigations show that over 90% of IgE-mediated food allergies in childhood are caused by: cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, fish and shellfish. Also the causes of food allergy are food additives, genetically modified crops. Risk factors for food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis include asthma and previous allergic reactions to the causative food. Food allergy is one of the most common causes of systematic anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions, with an annual incidence of four cases per million populations and estimated 500 deaths annually. In addition to gastrointestinal symptoms, individuals may experience urticaria, angioedema, atopic dermatitis, oral syndrome, asthma, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, hypotension, shock and cardiac arrhythmias, caused by the massive release of mediators from mast cells and basophiles. Diagnosis of food allergy is based on history, detailed dietary analysis, skin testing, measuring specific IgE in blood serum and challenge tests. Treatment and prevention includes: avoidance diet, application of auto-injectable epinephrine, H1 and H2 antihistamines, corticosteroids, antileukotrienes, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors, cromolyn sodium, etc. PMID:18487689

  15. Paediatric feather duvet hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Louise E; Guy, Emma

    2015-01-01

    A previously well 12-year-old boy was admitted with a second insidious episode of dyspnoea, dry cough, anorexia, weight loss and chest pain. At admission, he had an oxygen requirement, significantly impaired lung function and reduced exercise tolerance. Initial forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 26%; a 3 min exercise test stopped at 1 min 50 when saturations dropped to 85%. CT scan showed ground-glass nodularity with lymphadenopathy. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and viruses were negative, and microbiology results for the BAL were reported in the absence of histology. This is because at the time the BAL samples were collected, a lung biopsy was performed. The biopsy was consistent with hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Echo was normal and CT pulmonary angiography negative. After taking a thorough history, exposure to feather duvets prior to each episode was elicited. IgG of avian precipitants was raised at 10.6 mgA/L (normal <10 mgA/L). Clinical improvement began with avoidance of exposure, while the boy was an inpatient. Antigen avoidance continued on discharge. He continues to improve since discharge. The condition was diagnosed as hypersensitivity pneumonitis secondary to exposure to antigens from feather duvets. PMID:26113584

  16. Pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in chronic pain: prevalence and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Michele; Müller, Monika; Ashraf, Aroosiah; Neziri, Alban Y; Streitberger, Konrad; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Hypersensitivity of pain pathways is considered a relevant determinant of symptoms in chronic pain patients, but data on its prevalence are very limited. To our knowledge, no data on the prevalence of spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity are available. We studied the prevalence of pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in 961 consecutive patients with various chronic pain conditions. Pain threshold and nociceptive withdrawal reflex threshold to electrical stimulation were used to assess pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity, respectively. Using 10th percentile cutoff of previously determined reference values, the prevalence of pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity (95% confidence interval) was 71.2 (68.3-74.0) and 80.0 (77.0-82.6), respectively. As a secondary aim, we analyzed demographic, psychosocial, and clinical characteristics as factors potentially associated with pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity using logistic regression models. Both hypersensitivity parameters were unaffected by most factors analyzed. Depression, catastrophizing, pain-related sleep interference, and average pain intensity were significantly associated with hypersensitivity. However, none of them was significant for both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Furthermore, the odds ratios were very low, indicating modest quantitative impact. To our knowledge, this is the largest prevalence study on central hypersensitivity and the first one on the prevalence of spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in chronic pain patients. The results revealed an impressively high prevalence, supporting a high clinical relevance of this phenomenon. Electrical pain thresholds and nociceptive withdrawal reflex explore aspects of pain processing that are mostly independent of sociodemographic, psychological, and clinical pain-related characteristics. PMID:26172555

  17. Pharmacovigilance of drug allergy and hypersensitivity using the ENDA-DAHD database and the GALEN platform. The Galenda project.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, P-J; Demoly, P; Romano, A; Aberer, W; Bircher, A; Blanca, M; Brockow, K; Pichler, W; Torres, M J; Terreehorst, I; Arnoux, B; Atanaskovic-Markovic, M; Barbaud, A; Bijl, A; Bonadonna, P; Burney, P G; Caimmi, S; Canonica, G W; Cernadas, J; Dahlen, B; Daures, J-P; Fernandez, J; Gomes, E; Gueant, J-L; Kowalski, M L; Kvedariene, V; Mertes, P-M; Martins, P; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, E; Papadopoulos, N; Ponvert, C; Pirmohamed, M; Ring, J; Salapatas, M; Sanz, M L; Szczeklik, A; Van Ganse, E; De Weck, A L; Zuberbier, T; Merk, H F; Sachs, B; Sidoroff, A

    2009-02-01

    Nonallergic hypersensitivity and allergic reactions are part of the many different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Databases exist for the collection of ADRs. Spontaneous reporting makes up the core data-generating system of pharmacovigilance, but there is a large under-estimation of allergy/hypersensitivity drug reactions. A specific database is therefore required for drug allergy and hypersensitivity using standard operating procedures (SOPs), as the diagnosis of drug allergy/hypersensitivity is difficult and current pharmacovigilance algorithms are insufficient. Although difficult, the diagnosis of drug allergy/hypersensitivity has been standardized by the European Network for Drug Allergy (ENDA) under the aegis of the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology and SOPs have been published. Based on ENDA and Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2)LEN, EU Framework Programme 6) SOPs, a Drug Allergy and Hypersensitivity Database (DAHD((R))) has been established under FileMaker((R)) Pro 9. It is already available online in many different languages and can be accessed using a personal login. GA(2)LEN is a European network of 27 partners (16 countries) and 59 collaborating centres (26 countries), which can coordinate and implement the DAHD across Europe. The GA(2)LEN-ENDA-DAHD platform interacting with a pharmacovigilance network appears to be of great interest for the reporting of allergy/hypersensitivity ADRs in conjunction with other pharmacovigilance instruments. PMID:19178398

  18. Hypersensitivity to aldesleukin (interleukin-2 and proleukin) presenting as facial angioedema and erythema.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Daryn; McGrath, Kris G

    2003-01-01

    Aldesleukin is a human recombinant interleukin-2 product. It also is known as interlukin-2 and Proleukin in the United States. It is indicated for the treatment of adults with metastatic renal cell carcinoma as well as for adults with metastatic melanoma. However, its use has been limited because of severe systemic toxicity. There have been no reports of aldesleukin producing a hypersensitivity reaction. This is the first reported case of an immediate systemic hypersensitivity reaction occurring after aldesleukin administration confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for specific immunoglobulin E against aldesleukin. PMID:12974198

  19. A case of hypersensitivity to soluble and isophane insulins but not to insulin glargine

    PubMed Central

    Belhekar, Mahesh N.; Pai, Sarayu; Tayade, Parimal; Dalwadi, Pradip; Munshi, Renuka; Varthakavi, Prema

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is an important agent for the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM). Allergic reactions to insulin therapy, although rare, have been evident since animal insulin became available for the treatment of DM in 1922. Hypersensitivity to insulin has considerably been reduced with the introduction of human insulin produced by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology. Here, we present a case of Type 2 DM who demonstrated immediate (Type 1) hypersensitivity reaction on the sites of subcutaneous injection of soluble and isophane insulin but insulin glargine was tolerated well and provided good glycemic control. PMID:25878390

  20. A case of hypersensitivity to soluble and isophane insulins but not to insulin glargine.

    PubMed

    Belhekar, Mahesh N; Pai, Sarayu; Tayade, Parimal; Dalwadi, Pradip; Munshi, Renuka; Varthakavi, Prema

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is an important agent for the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM). Allergic reactions to insulin therapy, although rare, have been evident since animal insulin became available for the treatment of DM in 1922. Hypersensitivity to insulin has considerably been reduced with the introduction of human insulin produced by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology. Here, we present a case of Type 2 DM who demonstrated immediate (Type 1) hypersensitivity reaction on the sites of subcutaneous injection of soluble and isophane insulin but insulin glargine was tolerated well and provided good glycemic control. PMID:25878390

  1. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Hypersensitivity in Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Although extensively studied in adults, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) hypersensitivity in children, especially in young children, remains poorly defined. Pediatricians, prescribing antipyretics for children, rarely encounter significant problems, but the few epidemiologic studies performed show conflicting results. Although it is clear that some patients with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)-sensitive asthma have their clinical onset of disease in childhood and bronchoconstriction after ASA challenge is seen in 0 to 22% of asthmatic children so challenged, ibuprofen at antipyretic doses may cause acute respiratory problems only in a very small number of mild to moderate asthmatics. The recently elucidated mechanism of action of acetaminophen may explain some occurrences of adverse reactions in patients with cross-reactive NSAID hypersensitivity on the basis of its inhibitory activity on the newly described enzyme, cyclooxygenase (COX)-3. This nonspecific sensitivity to inhibition of COX is most likely genetically determined and shows a remarkable association with atopic disease even in the very young age group and possibly an increased predilection in specific ethnic groups. This review summarizes state-of-the-art published data on NSAID hypersensitivity in preschool children. PMID:20525116

  2. Where Asthma and Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Meet and Differ

    PubMed Central

    Bogaert, Pieter; Tournoy, Kurt G.; Naessens, Thomas; Grooten, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a type-I allergic airway disease characterized by Th2 cells and IgE. Episodes of bronchial inflammation, eosinophilic in nature and promoting bronchoconstriction, may become chronic and lead to persistent respiratory symptoms and irreversible structural airway changes. Representative mostly of mild to moderate asthma, this clinical definition fails to account for the atypical and often more severe phenotype found in a considerable proportion of asthmatics who have increased neutrophil cell counts in the airways as a distinguishing trait. Neutrophilic inflammation is a hallmark of another type of allergic airway pathology, hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Considered as an immune counterpart of asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a prototypical type-III allergic inflammatory reaction involving the alveoli and lung interstitium, steered by Th1 cells and IgG and, in its chronic form, accompanied by fibrosis. Although pathologically very different and commonly approached as separate disorders, as discussed in this review, clinical studies as well as data from animal models reveal undeniable parallels between both airway diseases. Danger signaling elicited by the allergenic agent or by accompanying microbial patterns emerges as critical in enabling immune sensitization and in determining the type of sensitization and ensuing allergic disease. On this basis, we propose that asthma allergens cause severe noneosinophilic asthma because of sensitization in the presence of hypersensitivity pneumonitis-promoting danger signaling. PMID:19074616

  3. What we know about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pham, Duy Le; Kim, Ji-Hye; Trinh, Tu Hoang Kim; Park, Hae-Sim

    2016-05-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inf lammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely prescribed for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, but their use is frequently related to hypersensitivity reactions. This review outlines our current knowledge of NSAID hypersensitivity (NHS) with regard to its pathogenic, molecular, and genetic mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment. The presentation of NHS varies from a local (skin and/or airways) reaction to systemic reactions, including anaphylaxis. At the molecular level, NHS reactions can be classified as cross-reactive (mediated by cyclooxygenase inhibition) or selective (specific activation of immunoglobulin E antibodies or T cells). Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors have been shown to be closely associated with NHS, and may be useful as predictive markers. To diagnose NHS, inhalation or oral challenge tests are applied, with the exclusion of any cross-reactive NSAIDs. For patients diagnosed with NHS, absolute avoidance of NSAIDs/aspirin is essential, and pharmacological treatment, including biologics, is often used to control their respiratory and cutaneous symptoms. Finally, desensitization is recommended only for selected patients with NHS. However, further research is required to develop new diagnostic methods and more effective treatments against NHS. PMID:27030979

  4. What we know about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Duy Le; Kim, Ji-Hye; Trinh, Tu Hoang Kim; Park, Hae-Sim

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inf lammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely prescribed for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, but their use is frequently related to hypersensitivity reactions. This review outlines our current knowledge of NSAID hypersensitivity (NHS) with regard to its pathogenic, molecular, and genetic mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment. The presentation of NHS varies from a local (skin and/or airways) reaction to systemic reactions, including anaphylaxis. At the molecular level, NHS reactions can be classified as cross-reactive (mediated by cyclooxygenase inhibition) or selective (specific activation of immunoglobulin E antibodies or T cells). Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors have been shown to be closely associated with NHS, and may be useful as predictive markers. To diagnose NHS, inhalation or oral challenge tests are applied, with the exclusion of any cross-reactive NSAIDs. For patients diagnosed with NHS, absolute avoidance of NSAIDs/aspirin is essential, and pharmacological treatment, including biologics, is often used to control their respiratory and cutaneous symptoms. Finally, desensitization is recommended only for selected patients with NHS. However, further research is required to develop new diagnostic methods and more effective treatments against NHS. PMID:27030979

  5. An Extraordinary Case Associated with an Allergic Reaction to Clopidogrel: Coronary Artery Spasm or Kounis Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Liping, Zhang; Bin, Hui; Qiming, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Kounis syndrome is the concurrence of acute coronary syndrome with allergic reactions, such as anaphylaxis or anaphylactoid reactions. Here, we describe a unique case: CASs (coronary artery spasms) with both non-hypersensitivity and hypersensitivity aetiology (associated with clopidogrel hypersensitivity) were observed in a 61 year-old patient. Herein, the mechanism and clinical implications of this association are discussed. PMID:26138623

  6. [Remote results of prosthetic treatment of patients with nickel hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Spiechowicz, E; Grochowski, P; Glantz, P O; Axell, T

    1990-01-01

    Economic reasons are the cause that ever more frequently prosthetic replacements are made from alloys other than gold. The most widely used are: alloys based on nickel and chromium, and stainless steel. In some alloys the content of nickel may be over 80%. The studies carried out in early 1980s showed that these materials had a higher hardness, mechanical strength and elasticity module than gold alloys. Nickel is one of the main components of these alloys, and its compounds may exert a harmful toxic, and even more frequently, allergic effect on the human organism. In the light of a survey of the literature and own clinical, experimental and epidemiological investigations it was tried to trace the effect of dental replacements made of nickel-containing alloys on the mucous membranes and skin of subjects with confirmed hypersensitivity to nickel. The studied material comprised a group of patients selected at random from those attending the Allergology Outpatient Clinic at the Department of Dermatology, Medical Academy in Warsaw, who had verified hypersensitivity to nickel and had indications to preparation of crowns and bridges for wearing. In each case before and after prosthetic treatment and before any control stomatological examination patch tests were done for demonstrating nickel hypersensitivity. In all patients permanent prostheses were done from an allow containing up to 70% of nickel with baked porcelain. In most cases fragments of oral mucosa were taken for histological examination. The patients were examined twice yearly. The longest follow-up is presently over 8 years. In no case exacerbation of hypersensitivity reactions was noted. PMID:2103014

  7. Lethality test system

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.; Sims, J.R.; Parker, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    The Lethality Test System (LTS), presently under construction at Los Alamos, is an electromagnetic launcher facility designed to perform impact experiments at velocities up to 15 km/s. The launcher is a 25 mm round bore, plasma armature railgun extending 22 m in length. Preinjection is accomplished with a two-stage gas gun capable of 7 km/s. The railgun power supply utilizes traction motors, vacuum interrupters, and pulse transformers. An assembly of 28 traction motors, equipped with flywheels, stores approximately 80 MJ at 92% of full speed and energizes the primary windings of three pulse transformers at a current of 50 kA. At peak current an array of vacuum interrupters disconnects the transformer primary windings and forces the current to flow in the secondary windings. The secondary windings are connected to the railgun, and by staging the vacuum interrupter openings, a 1 MA to 1.3 MA ramped current waveform will be delivered to the railgun.

  8. The Lethality Test System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, W. M.; Sims, J. R.; Parker, J. V.

    1986-11-01

    The Lethality Test System (LTS) under construction at Los Alamos is an electromagnetic launcher facility designed to perform impact experiments at velocities up to 15 km/sec. The launcher is a 25 mm round bore, plasma armature railgun 22 m in length. Preinjection is accomplished with a two-stage light gas gun capable of 7 km/sec. The railgun power supply utilizes traction motors, vacuum interrupters, and pulse transformers. An assembly of 28 traction motors, equipped with flywheels, stores approximately 80 MJ at 92 percent of full speed and energizes the primary windings of three pulse transformers at a current of 50 kA. At peak current an array of vacuum interrupters disconnects the transformer primary windings and forces the current to flow in the secondary windings. The secondary windings are connected to the railgun, and by staging the vacuum interrupter openings, a 1-1.3 MA ramped current waveform will be delivered to the railgun.

  9. Adverse events to monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy: Focus on hypersensitivity responses.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A

    2013-10-01

    Fifteen monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently registered and approved for the treatment of a range of different cancers. These mAbs are specific for a limited number of targets (9 in all). Four of these molecules are indeed directed against the B-lymphocyte antigen CD20; 3 against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErbB2), 2 against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and 1 each against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD30, CD52, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 11 (TNFSF11, best known as RANKL), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4). Collectively, the mAbs provoke a wide variety of systemic and cutaneous adverse events including the full range of true hypersensitivities: Type I immediate reactions (anaphylaxis, urticaria); Type II reactions (immune thrombocytopenia, neutopenia, hemolytic anemia); Type III responses (vasculitis, serum sickness; some pulmonary adverse events); and Type IV delayed mucocutaneous reactions as well as infusion reactions/cytokine release syndrome (IRs/CRS), tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and cardiac events. Although the term "hypersensitivity" is widely used, no common definition has been adopted within and between disciplines and the requirement of an immunological basis for a true hypersensitivity reaction is sometimes overlooked. Consequently, some drug-induced adverse events are sometimes incorrectly described as "hypersensitivities" while others that should be described are not. PMID:24251081

  10. A rare case of pseudotumor formation associated with methyl methacrylate hypersensitivity in a patient following cemented total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kenan, Shachar; Kahn, Leonard; Haramati, Noga; Kenan, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Hypersensitivity to orthopedic implant materials has been well documented with potential catastrophic consequences if not addressed pre-operatively. The spectrum of reactions is wide, from mild non-specific pain with localized erythema to severe periprosthetic inflammatory destruction and pseudotumor formation. It is therefore essential to identify patients who have or are at risk for implant-associated hypersensitivity. Although metal sensitivity is commonly cited as the cause of these reactions, methyl methacrylate (MMA) has rarely been implicated. To the best of our knowledge, methyl methacrylate-associated pseudotumor formation has not yet been described. The following is a case report of a 68-year-old female who, after undergoing a routine cemented right total knee arthroplasty, developed a painless, enlarging mass during a 13-year period. This mass was found to be a pseudotumor in association with methyl methacrylate hypersensitivity. A review of pseudotumor pathogenesis, methyl methacrylate hypersensitivity, and preoperative preventative care is discussed. PMID:27022733

  11. Sympathoinhibition and hypotension in carotid sinus hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Smith, M L; Ellenbogen, K A; Eckberg, D L

    1992-12-01

    Carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity is a known cause of syncope in humans. The condition is characterized by cardioinhibition and vasodepression, each to varying degrees. The extent and importance of sympathoinhibition has not been determined in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity. This study reports on the extent of sympathoinhibition measured directly directly during carotid massage with and without atrioventricular sequential pacing, in a patient with symptomatic carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity. Carotid massage elicited asystole, hypotension and complete inhibition of muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Carotid massage during atrioventricular pacing produced similar sympathoinhibition, but with minimal hypotension. Therefore, sympathoinhibition did not contribute importantly to the hypotension during carotid massage in the supine position in this patient. Further investigations are required to elucidate the relation of sympathoinhibition to hypotension in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity in the upright position. PMID:1290922

  12. Sympathoinhibition and hypotension in carotid sinus hypersensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity is a known cause of syncope in humans. The condition is characterized by cardioinhibition and vasodepression, each to varying degrees. The extent and importance of sympathoinhibition has not been determined in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity. This study reports on the extent of sympathoinhibition measured directly directly during carotid massage with and without atrioventricular sequential pacing, in a patient with symptomatic carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity. Carotid massage elicited asystole, hypotension and complete inhibition of muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Carotid massage during atrioventricular pacing produced similar sympathoinhibition, but with minimal hypotension. Therefore, sympathoinhibition did not contribute importantly to the hypotension during carotid massage in the supine position in this patient. Further investigations are required to elucidate the relation of sympathoinhibition to hypotension in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity in the upright position.

  13. Drug-Hypersensitivity Syndrome: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Rose L.

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disorder that results in mucocutaneous symptoms ranging in severity from mild pruritus to life-threatening skin and mucosal loss, with different nomenclature depending on the severity of the symptoms. The purpose of this article is to review the recent advances in understanding the pathology of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, as well as current recommendations for both medical and wound management. PMID:24527369

  14. Cockatiel-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, James D; Haight, Robert R; Brooks, Stuart M

    2002-01-01

    Diagnosing an environmental or occupationally related pulmonary disorder often involves a process of elimination. Unlike commonly diagnosed conditions in other specialties, a cause-and-effect relationship may be implied, yet other factors such as temporality and biologic plausibility are lacking. Our patient was referred with a suspected work-related pulmonary disorder. For several years, she had suffered with dyspnea on exertion and repeated flulike illnesses. She worked at an automobile repair garage that performed a large number of emission tests, and there was concern that her workplace exposures were the cause of her symptoms. After a careful review of her history, physical examination, and laboratory testing, we came to the conclusion that she had hypersensitivity pneumonitis related to pet cockatiels in her home. Clinical points of emphasis include the importance of a complete environmental history and careful auscultation of the chest when performing the physical examination. In addition, we encountered an interesting physical diagnostic clue, a respiratory sound that assisted with the eventual diagnosis. PMID:12117652

  15. Seven Steps to the Diagnosis of NSAIDs Hypersensitivity: How to Apply a New Classification in Real Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Makowska, Joanna S.

    2015-01-01

    Frequent use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been paralleled by increasing occurrence of adverse reactions, which vary from mild local skin rashes or gastric irritation to severe, generalized symptoms and even life-threatening anaphylaxis. NSAID-induced hypersensitivity reactions may involve both immunological and non-immunological mechanisms and should be differentiated from type A adverse reactions. Clinical diagnosis and effective management of a hypersensitive patient cannot be achieved without identifying the underlying mechanism. In this review, we discuss the current classification of NSAID-induced adverse reactions and propose a practical diagnostic algorithm that involves 7 steps leading to the determination of the type of NSAID-induced hypersensitivity and allows for proper patient management. PMID:25749768

  16. Seven steps to the diagnosis of NSAIDs hypersensitivity: how to apply a new classification in real practice?

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Marek L; Makowska, Joanna S

    2015-07-01

    Frequent use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been paralleled by increasing occurrence of adverse reactions, which vary from mild local skin rashes or gastric irritation to severe, generalized symptoms and even life-threatening anaphylaxis. NSAID-induced hypersensitivity reactions may involve both immunological and non-immunological mechanisms and should be differentiated from type A adverse reactions. Clinical diagnosis and effective management of a hypersensitive patient cannot be achieved without identifying the underlying mechanism. In this review, we discuss the current classification of NSAID-induced adverse reactions and propose a practical diagnostic algorithm that involves 7 steps leading to the determination of the type of NSAID-induced hypersensitivity and allows for proper patient management. PMID:25749768

  17. Power toothbrushes, gender, and dentin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hefti, A F; Stone, C

    2000-06-01

    Power toothbrushes require less force for plaque removal than manual brushes. In addition, in vitro studies have indicated that brushing with low force could occlude patent dentin tubules by formation of a smear layer. Hence, lessening the force necessary to remove plaque may reduce dentin hypersensitivity. However, it was recently suggested that the use of an oscillating/rotating power toothbrush could decrease tooth sensitivity as compared to a sonic power toothbrush. Therefore, the objective of the present research was to compare the effect on dentin hypersensitivity of two different types of power brushes, the Optiva Sonicare and the Braun Oral B Ultra Plaque Remover. The null hypothesis was tested in an 8-week, randomized, parallel group, examiner-blind clinical trial. Fifty-nine subjects with a history of dentin hypersensitivity participated. Dentin hypersensitivity-associated pain was elicited using tactile and evaporative stimuli and assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) instrument. Clinical examinations were carried out at screening and baseline and repeated after 8 weeks of twice daily use of the power brushes. Data analysis was performed on VAS scores obtained at the final visit following adjustment for group differences at baseline. A 35% to 40% reduction in pain as compared to baseline was observed in both treatment groups. Treatment-related differences were not statistically significant. A gender-related effect on dentin hypersensitivity was observed using the tactile stimulus and may merit further investigation. PMID:11218507

  18. Subgroups of Paediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Might Differ Significantly in Genetic Predisposition to Asparaginase Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kutszegi, Nóra; Semsei, Ágnes F; Gézsi, András; Sági, Judit C; Nagy, Viktória; Csordás, Katalin; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Lautner-Csorba, Orsolya; Gábor, Krisztina Míta; Kovács, Gábor T; Erdélyi, Dániel J; Szalai, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    L-asparaginase (ASP) is a key element in the treatment of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to ASP are major challenges in paediatric patients. Our aim was to investigate genetic variants that may influence the risk to Escherichia coli-derived ASP hypersensitivity. Sample and clinical data collection was carried out from 576 paediatric ALL patients who were treated according to protocols from the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster Study Group. A total of 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GRIA1 and GALNT10 genes were genotyped. Patients with GRIA1 rs4958351 AA/AG genotype showed significantly reduced risk to ASP hypersensitivity compared to patients with GG genotype in the T-cell ALL subgroup (OR = 0.05 (0.01-0.26); p = 4.70E-04), while no such association was found in pre-B-cell ALL. In the medium risk group two SNPs of GRIA1 (rs2055083 and rs707176) were associated significantly with the occurrence of ASP hypersensitivity (OR = 0.21 (0.09-0.53); p = 8.48E-04 and OR = 3.02 (1.36-6.73); p = 6.76E-03, respectively). Evaluating the genders separately, however, the association of rs707176 with ASP HSRs was confined only to females. Our results suggest that genetic variants of GRIA1 might influence the risk to ASP hypersensitivity, but subgroups of patients can differ significantly in this respect. PMID:26457809

  19. Hypersensitivity and vaccines: an update.

    PubMed

    Barbaud, Annick; Deschildre, Antoine; Waton, Julie; Raison-Peyron, Nadia; Tréchot, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Allergic reactions to vaccines can be classified as sensitivity to one of the vaccine components, pseudo-allergic reactions, often after hyperimmunization, and exacerbation of atopic symptoms or vasculitis. Pseudo-allergic reactions, some possibly due to hyperimmunization, are probably more common than true allergies. Atopic reactions should not be confused with the "flash" phenomenon, defined as an exacerbation of an allergic reaction due to a reduction in the allergic reactivity threshold following the vaccine injection. BCGitis occurs frequently, and for this reason, guidelines for Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) have been modified. The vaccine is now reserved for people at risk of exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review provides an update on the vaccination modalities for people allergic to eggs, on the assessment that should be performed when a reaction occurs due to tetanus vaccination, on the urticaria after hepatitis vaccination, on an aluminum granuloma, which is more and more frequent in young children, and vasculitis after flu vaccination and BCGitis. The side effects associated with new, recently released vaccines, such as anti-influenza A H1N1 or anti-human papilloma virus (HPV) will also be presented. PMID:23238161

  20. Hypothesis on how to measure electromagnetic hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tuengler, Andreas; von Klitzing, Lebrecht

    2013-09-01

    Electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) is an ill-defined term to describe the fact that people who experience health symptoms in the vicinity of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) regard them as causal for their complaints. Up to now most scientists assume a psychological cause for the suffering of electromagnetic hypersensitive individuals. This paper addresses reasons why most provocation studies could not find any association between EMF exposure and EHS and presents a hypothesis on diagnosis and differentiation of this condition. Simultaneous recordings of heart rate variability, microcirculation and electric skin potentials are used for classification of EHS. Thus, it could be possible to distinguish "genuine" electromagnetic hypersensitive individuals from those who suffer from other conditions. PMID:23301924

  1. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis from ordinary residential exposures.

    PubMed Central

    Apostolakos, M J; Rossmoore, H; Beckett, W S

    2001-01-01

    A previously healthy woman developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis of such severity that she required chronic systemic corticosteroid therapy for symptom control. Detailed investigation of her workplace and home environments revealed fungi in her typical suburban home, to which she had specific serum precipitating antibodies. Efforts to remove mold from the home were unsuccessful in relieving symptoms, and moving to another residence was the only intervention that allowed her to be withdrawn from corticosteroid therapy. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is commonly associated with occupational or avocational exposures, such as moldy hay in farmers or bird antigen in bird breeders. We propose that hypersensitivity pneumonitis may occur in North America, as it does in Japan, from domestic exposures alone. PMID:11673130

  2. TRPA1 Contributes to Cold Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Donato del; Murphy, Sarah; Heiry, Melissa; Barrett, Lee B.; Earley, Taryn J.; Cook, Colby A.; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhao, Michael; D'Amours, Marc; Deering, Nate; Brenner, Gary J.; Costigan, Michael; Hayward, Neil J.; Chong, Jayhong A.; Fanger, Christopher M.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Moran, Magdalene M.

    2010-01-01

    TRPA1 is a non-selective cation channel expressed by nociceptors. While it is widely accepted that TRPA1 serves as a broad irritancy receptor for a variety of reactive chemicals, its role in cold sensation remains controversial. Here, we demonstrate that mild cooling markedly increases agonist-evoked rat TRPA1 currents. In the absence of an agonist, even noxious cold only increases current amplitude slightly. These results suggest that TRPA1 is a key mediator of cold hypersensitivity in pathological conditions where reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory activators of the channel are present, but likely plays a comparatively minor role in acute cold sensation. Supporting this, cold hypersensitivity can be induced in wild-type but not Trpa1-/- mice by subcutaneous administration of a TRPA1 agonist. Furthermore, the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 reduces cold hypersensitivity in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:21068322

  3. Hypersensitive dentinal pain attenuation with potassium nitrate.

    PubMed

    Touyz, L Z; Stern, J

    1999-01-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity occurs when gingival recession exposes dentin at the cervical margins of teeth. Twenty-four periodontal patients, with postoperative hypersensitive dentin were treated by burnishing saturated potassium nitrate (KNO3) to relieve pain. Using a visual analogue scale with participants acting as their own control, a subjective assessment of pain was measured and compared before and after KNO3 application. Thirty-six regions involving 98 teeth were assessed. A significant reduction of sensitivity and pain was achieved by using a saturated KNO3 solution (p < .0001 Student-t). PMID:10321150

  4. Definition of lethality thresholds for KE less-lethal projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadros, Jaime H.

    1997-01-01

    The interest in the definition and application of the lethality threshold for KE less-lethal projectiles has increased in the last few years, as the demand for proper use of these weapons has increased from the public at large and the law enforcement community. Experiments have been performed and reported utilizing commercially available projectiles in 12 ga., 37 mm against an anthropomorphic dummy and damage criteria developed by the automobile industry. The utility of the method is discussed and future trends are presented.

  5. Hypersensitivities to sesame and other common edible seeds.

    PubMed

    Patel, A; Bahna, S L

    2016-10-01

    Several seeds have been increasingly incorporated in various food items, with consequent risk of hypersensitivity reactions that are often severe. Identification of the specific seed as the culprit is often not explored or is difficult to verify. In this article, we reviewed the English literature from January 1930 to March 2016 using PubMed and Google Scholar searching for publications relevant to hypersensitivity to common edible seeds, namely sesame, sunflower seed, poppy seed, pumpkin seed, flaxseed, and mustard seed. Considering the worldwide consumption of those seeds, the number of published articles on the subject was relatively small and was mainly as case reports rather than large series. Allergy to sesame was more reported than to other seeds, with an estimated prevalence of 0.1-0.2%. In this review, we summarize the information relevant to each of the six seeds and their oils regarding the manifestations, routes of exposure, identified major allergens, and cross-reactivity with other seeds or other foods. We also addressed the important role of a thorough history taking in suspecting seed allergy, the limited reliability of routine diagnostic procedures, and the importance of verification by appropriate challenge tests. At present, management is basically dietary avoidance and the use of symptomatic medications that may include epinephrine auto-injectors. We did not encounter any well-designed studies on immunotherapy for seed allergy, but it is hoped that such a gap be filled by the development of safe effective protocols in the near future. PMID:27332789

  6. Beyond the black box: drug- and device-associated hypersensitivity events

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Charles L; Adegboro, Olatokunbo S; Calhoun, Elizabeth A; Raisch, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Background: Drug- and device-associated hypersensitivity reactions are serious toxicities that can result in respiratory failure or acute cardiac ischemic events, or even severe hypersensitivity syndromes such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome. These toxicities are usually poorly described in the “black box” warnings section of the product labels. Methods: Adverse event reports contained in databases maintained by the Project on Medical Research on Adverse Drug Events and Reports (Med-RADAR), product labels, safety advisories disseminated by pharmaceutical manufacturers, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were reviewed. Results: Adverse event reports identified three health care workers who developed nevirapine-associated Stevens–Johnson syndrome following occupational exposure to HIV-infected blood or blood products; four persons with localized hypersensitivity and fatal cardiac events associated with rapamycin- or paclitaxel-coated coronary artery stent placements; and six persons with breast cancer who developed severe or fatal anaphylaxis after receiving adjuvant chemotherapy with Cremophor-EL containing paclitaxel. Safety advisories from the FDA, CDC, and the relevant pharmaceutical manufacturers were ambiguous in their description in “black box” warning sections of package inserts describing these serious and potentially fatal toxicities. Conclusion: Improvements are needed in pharmacovigilance and subsequent dissemination of safety advisories for drug/device-associated hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:21701613

  7. The efficacy of single premedication with antihistamines for radiocontrast media hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-Hee; Park, Heung-Woo; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2016-01-01

    Background Single premedication with antihistamines for radiocontrast media (RCM) hypersensitivity is frequently used in real world at the emergent situation although its efficacy is not proven. Objective To evaluate the effect of intravenous antihistamines as a premedication in general population who had experience of mild adverse reactions to iodinated RCM. Methods A retrospective observational study on 14,785 subjects who had RCM-enhanced computed tomography scans between January 2014 and December 2015 in Seoul National University Hospital Gangnam Healthcare Center, Seoul, South Korea. Results Among 453 subjects who had a history of mild RCM-induced hypersensitivity reactions, 273 subjects had a single premedication of intravenous antihistamine. When comparing antihistamine-premedication group and nonpremedication group, there is no protective effect of antihistamines on the incidence rate and severity of hypersensitivity (10.6% vs. 11.7%, p = 0.729). Conclusion The clinical efficacy of a single premedication of antihistamines for mild RCM-induced hypersensitivity was not confirmed. PMID:27489788

  8. Oral corn pollen hypersensitivity in Arizona Native Americans: some sociologic aspects of allergy practice.

    PubMed

    Freeman, G L

    1994-05-01

    Thirty-three Navajo patients were seen in a private allergy consultation practice in Flagstaff, Arizona between 1978 and 1990. Sufficient skin test and historical data were available from nine atopic patients to evaluate hypersensitivity reactions to oral corn pollen used in the Navajo ceremonials. Six of the nine patients had positive skin test reactions to corn pollen and four of these six reported symptoms from oral corn pollen. The symptoms included various combinations of oral and ear itching, sneezing, cough, and wheezing. One corn pollen skin test-negative patient reported slight throat itching from the pollen. In no case did the patient or referring primary care physician associate the symptoms with ceremonial oral corn pollen use. This is the first report of hypersensitivity reactions to the ceremonial use of oral corn pollen in native Americans. PMID:8179227

  9. Severe Hyperacusis, Photophobia, and Skin Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fioretti, Alessandra Barbara; Varakliotis, Theodoros; Poli, Otello; Cantagallo, Manuela; Eibenstein, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with severe hyperacusis, photophobia, and skin hypersensitivity. The patient was initially treated with sound therapy and medical therapy for 4 months and successfully with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and cognitive behavioral therapy which improved her mood and the tolerance for sounds and light. PMID:26981300

  10. Hydrocodone snorting leading to hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, Vimala

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by intranasal abuse of the prescription narcotic hydrocodone. The patient's clinical course was complicated by acute respiratory failure. A chest radiograph showed diffuse bilateral opacities. The patient was treated with noninvasive ventilation, a high dose of intravenous steroids, and bronchodilators, resulting in improvement of symptoms and radiographic appearance. PMID:27365873

  11. Fasting mitigates immediate hypersensitivity: a pivotal role of endogenous D-beta-hydroxybutyrate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fasting is a rigorous type of dietary restriction that is associate with a number of health benefits. During fasting, ketone bodies significantly increase in blood and become major body fuels, thereby sparing glucose. In the present study, we investigated effects of fasting on hypersensitivity. In addition, we also investigated the possible role of D-beta-hydroxybutyrate provoked by fasting in the attenuation of immediate hypersensitivity by fasting. Methods Effects of fasting on systemic anaphylaxis were examined using rat model of toluene 2, 4-diisocyanate induced nasal allergy. In addition to food restriction, a ketogenic high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet that accelerates fatty acid oxidation and systemic instillation of D-beta-hydroxybutyrate were employed to elevate internal D-beta-hydroxybutyrate concentration. We assessed relationship between degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells and internal D-beta-hydroxybutyrate concentration in each treatment. Changes in [Ca2+]i responses to compound 48/80 were analyzed in fura 2-loaded rat peritoneal mast cells derived from the ketogenic diet and fasting. Results Immediate hypersensitivity reaction was significantly suppressed by fasting. A significant reduction in mast cells degranulation, induced by mast cell activator compound 48/80, was observed in rat peritoneal mast cells delivered from the 24 hours fasting treatment. In addition, mast cells delivered from a ketogenic diet and D-beta-hydroxybutyrate infusion treatment also had reduced mast cell degranulation and systemic D-beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were elevated to similar extent as the fasting state. The peak increase in [Ca2+]i was significantly lower in the ketogenic diet and fasting group than that in the control diet group. Conclusions The results of the present study demonstrates that fasting suppress hypersensitivity reaction, and indicate that increased level of D-beta-hydroxybutyrate by fasting plays an important role, via the

  12. IgE-Mediated Hypersensitivity and Desensitisation with Recombinant Enzymes in Pompe Disease and Type I and Type VI Mucopolysaccharidosis.

    PubMed

    Capanoglu, Murat; Dibek Misirlioglu, Emine; Azkur, Dilek; Vezir, Emine; Guvenir, Hakan; Gunduz, Mehmet; Toyran, Muge; Civelek, Ersoy; Kocabas, Can Naci

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is important for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders. Hypersensitivity reactions with ERT have been reported, and in these cases, desensitisation with the enzyme is necessary. Here we report the cases of 3 patients with lysosomal storage disorders, including Pompe disease and mucopolysaccharidosis type I and VI, who had IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and positive skin tests. Successful desensitisation protocols with the culprit enzyme solution were used for these patients. All 3 patients were able to safely receive ERT with the desensitisation protocol. PMID:27144408

  13. Treatments for hypersensitive noncarious cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Veitz-Keenan, Analia; Barna, Julie Ann; Strober, Brad; Matthews, Abigail G.; Collie, Damon; Vena, Donald; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning (PEARL) Network conducted a three-armed randomized clinical study to determine the comparative effectiveness of three treatments for hypersensitive noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs): use of a potassium nitrate dentifrice for treatment of hypersensitivity, placement of a resin-based composite restoration and placement of a sealant. Methods Seventeen trained practitioner-investigators (P-Is) in the PEARL Network enrolled participants (N = 304) with hypersensitive posterior NCCLs who met enrollment criteria. Participants were assigned to treatments randomly. Evaluations were conducted at baseline and at one, three and six months thereafter. Primary outcomes were the reduction or elimination of hypersensitivity as measured clinically and by means of patient-reported outcomes. Results Lesion depth and pretreatment sensitivity (mean, 5.3 on a 0- to 10-point scale) were balanced across treatments, as was sleep bruxism (present in 42.2 percent of participants). The six-month participant recall rate was 99 percent. Treatments significantly reduced mean sensitivity (P < .01), with the sealant and restoration groups displaying a significantly higher reduction (P < .01) than did the dentifrice group. The dentifrice group’s mean (standard deviation) sensitivity at six months was 2.1 (2.1); those of the sealant and restoration groups were 1.0 (1.6) and 0.8 (1.4), respectively. Patient-reported sensitivity (to cold being most pronounced) paralleled clinical measurements at each evaluation. Conclusions Sealing and restoration treatments were effective overall in reducing NCCL hypersensitivity. The potassium nitrate dentifrice reduced sensitivity with increasing effectiveness through six months but not to the degree offered by the other treatments. Practical Implications Sealant or restoration placement is an effective method of immediately reducing NCCL sensitivity. Although a potassium nitrate dentifrice

  14. New genetic findings lead the way to a better understanding of fundamental mechanisms of drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pirmohamed, Munir; Ostrov, David A; Park, B Kevin

    2015-08-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions are an important clinical problem for both health care and industry. Recent advances in genetics have identified a number of HLA alleles associated with a range of these adverse reactions predominantly affecting the skin but also other organs, such as the liver. The associations between abacavir hypersensitivity and HLA-B*57:01 and carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and HLA-B*15:02 have been implemented in clinical practice. There are many different mechanisms proposed in the pathogenesis of drug hypersensitivity reactions, including the hapten hypothesis, direct binding to T-cell receptors (the pharmacologic interaction hypothesis), and peptide-binding displacement. A problem with all the hypotheses is that they are largely based on in vitro findings, with little direct in vivo evidence. Although most studies have focused on individual mechanisms, it is perhaps more important to consider them all as being complementary, potentially occurring at the same time with the same drug in the same patient. This might at least partly account for the heterogeneity of the immune response seen in different patients. There is a need to develop novel methodologies to evaluate how the in vitro mechanisms relate to the in vivo situation and how the highly consistent genetic findings with different HLA alleles can be more consistently used for both prediction and prevention of these serious adverse reactions. PMID:26254050

  15. New genetic findings lead the way to a better understanding of fundamental mechanisms of drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pirmohamed, Munir; Ostrov, David A.; Park, B. Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions are an important clinical problem for both health care and industry. Recent advances in genetics have identified a number of HLA alleles associated with a range of these adverse reactions predominantly affecting the skin but also other organs, such as the liver. The associations between abacavir hypersensitivity and HLA-B*57:01 and carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and HLA-B*15:02 have been implemented in clinical practice. There are many different mechanisms proposed in the pathogenesis of drug hypersensitivity reactions, including the hapten hypothesis, direct binding to T-cell receptors (the pharmacologic interaction hypothesis), and peptide-binding displacement. A problem with all the hypotheses is that they are largely based on in vitro findings, with little direct in vivo evidence. Although most studies have focused on individual mechanisms, it is perhaps more important to consider them all as being complementary, potentially occurring at the same time with the same drug in the same patient. This might at least partly account for the heterogeneity of the immune response seen in different patients. There is a need to develop novel methodologies to evaluate how the in vitro mechanisms relate to the in vivo situation and how the highly consistent genetic findings with different HLA alleles can be more consistently used for both prediction and prevention of these serious adverse reactions. PMID:26254050

  16. T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Fenfen; Lee, Frederick J; Pichler, Werner J

    2016-01-01

    T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity represents a significant proportion of immune mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. In the recent years, there has been an increase in understanding the immune mechanisms behind T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity. According to hapten mechanism, drug specific T-cell response is stimulated by drug-protein conjugate presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as it is presented as a new antigenic determinant. On the other hand, p-i concept suggests that a drug can stimulate T cells via noncovalent direct interaction with T-cell receptor and/or peptide-MHC. The drug binding site is quite variable and this leads to several different mechanisms within p-i concept. Altered peptide repertoire can be regarded as an 'atypical' subset of p-i concept since the mode of the drug binding and the binding site are essentially identical to p-i concept. However, the intracellular binding of abacavir to HLA-B*57:01 additionally results in alteration in peptide repertoire. Furthermore the T-cell response to altered peptide repertoire model is only shown for abacavir and HLA-B*57:01 and therefore it may not be generalised to other drug hypersensitivity. Danger hypothesis has been postulated to play an important role in drug hypersensitivity by providing signal 2 but its experimental data is lacking at this point in time. Furthermore, the recently described allo-immune response suggests that danger signal may be unnecessary. Finally, in view of these new understanding, the classification and the definition of type B adverse drug reaction should be revised. PMID:27141480

  17. T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Yun, James; Cai, Fenfen; Lee, Frederick J; Pichler, Werner J

    2016-04-01

    T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity represents a significant proportion of immune mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. In the recent years, there has been an increase in understanding the immune mechanisms behind T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity. According to hapten mechanism, drug specific T-cell response is stimulated by drug-protein conjugate presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as it is presented as a new antigenic determinant. On the other hand, p-i concept suggests that a drug can stimulate T cells via noncovalent direct interaction with T-cell receptor and/or peptide-MHC. The drug binding site is quite variable and this leads to several different mechanisms within p-i concept. Altered peptide repertoire can be regarded as an 'atypical' subset of p-i concept since the mode of the drug binding and the binding site are essentially identical to p-i concept. However, the intracellular binding of abacavir to HLA-B(*)57:01 additionally results in alteration in peptide repertoire. Furthermore the T-cell response to altered peptide repertoire model is only shown for abacavir and HLA-B(*)57:01 and therefore it may not be generalised to other drug hypersensitivity. Danger hypothesis has been postulated to play an important role in drug hypersensitivity by providing signal 2 but its experimental data is lacking at this point in time. Furthermore, the recently described allo-immune response suggests that danger signal may be unnecessary. Finally, in view of these new understanding, the classification and the definition of type B adverse drug reaction should be revised. PMID:27141480

  18. In vitro Models to Evaluate Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity: Potential Test Based on Activation of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Kummer, Elena; Corsini, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated (“allergic”) and non-immune-mediated (“pseudo allergic”) reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon. We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells. PMID:27462271

  19. In vitro Models to Evaluate Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity: Potential Test Based on Activation of Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Kummer, Elena; Corsini, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated ("allergic") and non-immune-mediated ("pseudo allergic") reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon. We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells. PMID:27462271

  20. A controlled study of gold contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fleming, C; Lucke, T; Forsyth, A; Rees, S; Lever, R; Wray, D; Aldridge, R; MacKie, R

    1998-03-01

    1203 patients attending for routine patch testing at 3 hospitals and 105 volunteers were tested with 0.5% and 0.05% gold sodium thiosulfate (GST). 38 patients (3.2%) and 5 volunteers (4.8%) had positive patch tests to GST. There were no significant differences between volunteers and patients with respect to age, sex, atopy or exposure to gold in dental restorations, jewellery or through occupation. There were no significant differences in prevalence of GST hypersensitivity in the 3 hospitals, or between patients and controls. This is the 1st controlled study of hypersensitivity to GST, and suggests that routine patch testing to gold is of limited clinical benefit. PMID:9536404

  1. Hemoptysis and Acute Respiratory Syndrome (ARDS) as Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity After FOLFOX4 Plus Bevacizumab Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Takaaki; Masaki, Tadahiko; Kogawa, Koji; Matsuoka, Hiroyoshi; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    As there have been many multidrug regimens introduced in colorectal cancer treatment, hypersensitivity is more often encountered than in the past. Though most allergic adverse events of oxaliplatin are mainly classified as type I reaction, a limited number of case reports of type IV reaction (delayed-type hypersensitivity) have been reported. A 73-year-old man was hospitalized for receiving the third cycle of FOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab. Forty-two hours after administration, he had dyspnea and hemoptysis. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was suspected, and the patient underwent mechanical ventilation and steroid pulse therapy. Delayed-type hypersensitivity is induced by induction of inflammation via IL-1, TNF-α and IL-6. The serum level of IL-6 in patients with advanced colorectal cancers is usually greater than the normal range. Therefore, delayed-type hypersensitivity may be easily induced in those patients. We should pay special attention to delayed-type hypersensitivity in advanced colorectal cancer patients undergoing FOLFOX treatment. PMID:24229039

  2. Consensus expert recommendations for identification and management of asparaginase hypersensitivity and silent inactivation

    PubMed Central

    van der Sluis, Inge M.; Vrooman, Lynda M.; Pieters, Rob; Baruchel, Andre; Escherich, Gabriele; Goulden, Nicholas; Mondelaers, Veerle; de Toledo, Jose Sanchez; Rizzari, Carmelo; Silverman, Lewis B.; Whitlock, James A.

    2016-01-01

    L-asparaginase is an integral component of therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, asparaginase-related complications, including the development of hypersensitivity reactions, can limit its use in individual patients. Of considerable concern in the setting of clinical allergy is the development of neutralizing antibodies and associated asparaginase inactivity. Also problematic in the use of asparaginase is the potential for the development of silent inactivation, with the formation of neutralizing antibodies and reduced asparaginase activity in the absence of a clinically evident allergic reaction. Here we present guidelines for the identification and management of clinical hypersensitivity and silent inactivation with Escherichia coli- and Erwinia chrysanthemi- derived asparaginase preparations. These guidelines were developed by a consensus panel of experts following a review of the available published data. We provide a consensus of expert opinions on the role of serum asparaginase level assessment, indications for switching asparaginase preparation, and monitoring after change in asparaginase preparation. PMID:26928249

  3. Hypersensitive transitions in f-electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, B.R.

    1980-01-01

    After almost twenty years of work on the hypersensitive transitions, their origins are far from clear. In addition to the mechanisms discussed, others have been introduced from time to time. The effect of charge transfer may not be negligible, though its importance has been discounted by Peacock. It may be that different mechanisms play roles of varying importance from system to system; but until more experimental and theoretical work is carried out the question must remain open.

  4. Hypersensitivity to intravenous iron: classification, terminology, mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Szebeni, J; Fishbane, S; Hedenus, M; Howaldt, S; Locatelli, F; Patni, S; Rampton, D; Weiss, G; Folkersen, J

    2015-11-01

    Intravenous (IV) iron therapy is widely used in iron deficiency anaemias when oral iron is not tolerated or ineffective. Administration of IV-iron is considered a safe procedure, but severe hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) can occur at a very low frequency. Recently, new guidelines have been published by the European Medicines Agency with the intention of making IV-iron therapy safer; however, the current protocols are still non-specific, non-evidence-based empirical measures which neglect the fact that the majority of IV-iron reactions are not IgE-mediated anaphylactic reactions. The field would benefit from new specific and effective methods for the prevention and treatment of these HSRs, and the main goal of this review was to highlight a possible new approach based on the assumption that IV-iron reactions represent complement activation-related pseudo-allergy (CARPA), at least in part. The review compares the features of IV-iron reactions to those of immune and non-immune HSRs caused by a variety of other infused drugs and thus make indirect inferences on IV-iron reactions. The process of comparison highlights many unresolved issues in allergy research, such as the unsettled terminology, multiple redundant classifications and a lack of validated animal models and lege artis clinical studies. Facts and arguments are listed in support of the involvement of CARPA in IV-iron reactions, and the review addresses the mechanism of low reactogenic administration protocols (LRPs) based on slow infusion. It is suggested that consideration of CARPA and the use of LRPs might lead to useful new additions to the management of high-risk IV-iron patients. PMID:26265306

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Porto, Isabel C C M; Andrade, Ana K M; Montes, Marcos A J R

    2009-09-01

    This bibliographic review provides a general view of the etiology, characteristics and treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity, so that professionals can use this information in the therapeutic management of this clinical condition. For this purpose, the authors have analyzed whole texts of relevant articles on the subject. This study showed that the predisposing factors associated with the causes of dentinal hypersensitivity must be controlled or eliminated, by educating the patient regarding the excessive intake of acidic food, as well as providing guidance on the proper tooth brushing technique and analysis of occlusion. Effective treatment must be preceded by a proper diagnosis, established after the exclusion of any other possible causes of the pain. These cases must be managed efficiently, quickly and permanently. The availability of a wide variety of treatment could be an indicator that there is still no effective desensitizing agent to completely resolve the patient's discomfort, or that it is difficult to treat, irrespective of the available treatment options. Even with the large number of published studies, it has not been possible to reach a consensus about the product that represents the gold standard in the treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity. PMID:19776498

  6. Milk hypersensitivities: where is the grey line regarding their dietary management?

    PubMed

    Vassilopoulou, E; Efthymiou, D

    2016-09-01

    The proportion of people suffering or reporting to have a hypersensitivity caused by cow's milk consumption is increasing, and even health professionals often face difficulties into elaborating properly with a milk reaction due to misdiagnosis. The scope of this review is to present literature data that lead into putting the border line between cow's milk allergy and cow's milk intolerance, mainly focusing on how the different pathophysiology leads to their different dietary diagnosis and management. PMID:27608472

  7. Safe full-dose one-step nabumetone challenge in patients with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Goldberg, Arnon

    2003-01-01

    Aspirin and all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a chemically heterogeneous group of compounds that share the ability to inhibit the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX). This inhibitory effect, especially of COX-1, is suggested as the mechanism underlying NSAID-induced hypersensitivity reactions. In this study, we evaluated the safety and convenience of a single full-dose challenge with nabumetone, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, in patients with hypersensitivity to nonselective NSAIDs (ns-NSAIDs). Twenty-four subjects with a history of hypersensitivity reactions to at least two different ns-NSAIDs on two different occasions were enrolled in the study. The patients were otherwise healthy and did not suffer from NSAID- or aspirin-induced asthma or urticaria. All subjects were orally challenged by a single full dose (1000 mg) of nabumetone, monitored closely in the hospital for the next 4 hours and contacted by telephone the next morning and 3-12 months afterward. Twenty-two patients tolerated nabumetone without any reaction during and after the challenge. One patient had a single urticarial lesion and one patient reported mild pruritus without objective signs, both of which resolved spontaneously. Thirteen patients, including the patient who responded with pruritus to the challenge, used nabumetone on several occasions during the follow-up period without any adverse reaction. Our study shows that in patients with a history of aspirin- and ns-NSAID-induced hypersensitivity reaction, a rapid one-step challenge with nabumetone was well tolerated. These initial data support the possibility that a single full dose of nabumetone can be tried as a safe alternative in most patients with a hypersensitivity reaction to ns-NSAIDs. PMID:12974196

  8. A Systematic Desensitization Paradigm to Treat Hypersensitivity to Auditory Stimuli in Children with Autism in Family Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koegel, Robert L.; Openden, Daniel; Koegel, Lynn Kern

    2004-01-01

    Many children with autism display reactions to auditory stimuli that seem as if the stimuli were painful or otherwise extremely aversive. This article describes, within the contexts of three experimental designs, how procedures of systematic desensitization can be used to treat hypersensitivity to auditory stimuli in three young children with…

  9. Subgroups of Paediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Might Differ Significantly in Genetic Predisposition to Asparaginase Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kutszegi, Nóra; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Gézsi, András; Sági, Judit C.; Nagy, Viktória; Csordás, Katalin; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Lautner-Csorba, Orsolya; Gábor, Krisztina Míta; Kovács, Gábor T.; Erdélyi, Dániel J.; Szalai, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    L-asparaginase (ASP) is a key element in the treatment of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to ASP are major challenges in paediatric patients. Our aim was to investigate genetic variants that may influence the risk to Escherichia coli-derived ASP hypersensitivity. Sample and clinical data collection was carried out from 576 paediatric ALL patients who were treated according to protocols from the Berlin—Frankfurt—Münster Study Group. A total of 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GRIA1 and GALNT10 genes were genotyped. Patients with GRIA1 rs4958351 AA/AG genotype showed significantly reduced risk to ASP hypersensitivity compared to patients with GG genotype in the T-cell ALL subgroup (OR = 0.05 (0.01–0.26); p = 4.70E-04), while no such association was found in pre-B-cell ALL. In the medium risk group two SNPs of GRIA1 (rs2055083 and rs707176) were associated significantly with the occurrence of ASP hypersensitivity (OR = 0.21 (0.09–0.53); p = 8.48E-04 and OR = 3.02 (1.36–6.73); p = 6.76E-03, respectively). Evaluating the genders separately, however, the association of rs707176 with ASP HSRs was confined only to females. Our results suggest that genetic variants of GRIA1 might influence the risk to ASP hypersensitivity, but subgroups of patients can differ significantly in this respect. PMID:26457809

  10. Gastroenterology case report of mesalazine-induced cardiopulmonary hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ferrusquía, José; Pérez-Martínez, Isabel; Gómez de la Torre, Ricardo; Fernández-Almira, María Luisa; de Francisco, Ruth; Rodrigo, Luis; Riestra, Sabino

    2015-01-01

    Mesalazine is a 5-aminosalicylic acid derivative that has been widely used to treat patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Accumulating evidence indicates that mesalazine has a very low rate of adverse drug reactions and is well tolerated by patients. However, a few cases of pulmonary and cardiac disease related to mesalazine have been reported in the past, though infrequently, preventing clinicians from diagnosing the conditions early. We describe the case of a 32-year-old man with ulcerative colitis who was admitted with a two-month history of persistent fever following mesalazine treatment initiated 14 mo earlier. At the time of admission, mesalazine dose was increased from 1.5 to 3.0 g/d, and antibiotic therapy was started with no improvement. Three weeks after admission, the patient developed dyspnea, non-productive cough, and chest pain. Severe eosinophilia was detected in laboratory tests, and a computed tomography scan revealed interstitial infiltrates in both lungs, as well as a large pericardial effusion. The bronchoalveolar lavage reported a CD4/CD8 ratio of 0.5, and an increased eosinophil count. Transbronchial biopsy examination showed a severe eosinophilic infiltrate of the lung tissue. Mesalazine-induced cardiopulmonary hypersensitivity was suspected after excluding other possible etiologies. Consequently, mesalazine treatment was suspended, and corticosteroid therapy was initiated, resulting in resolution of symptoms and radiologic abnormalities. We conclude that mesalazine-induced pulmonary and cardiac hypersensitivity should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained cardiopulmonary symptoms and radiographic abnormalities in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25852295

  11. X-ray induction of persistent hypersensitivity to mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, J.P.; Williams, J.R.

    1982-04-16

    The progeny of x-irradiated V79 cells are hypersensitive to PUVA-(8-methoxypsoralen plus longwave ultraviolet light) induced mutation at the locus for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. This hypersensitivity is most evident at low doses of pUVA that do not induce mutation in non-x-irradiated cells. The hypersensitivity is evoked by x-irradiation delivered as a single dose or as multiple fractions over a long period and persists for at least 108 days of exponential growth. This radiation-induced hypersensitivity to subsequent mutation is a new phenomenon that may be relevant to multistage carcinogenesis.

  12. Phenytoin-induced acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Periwal, Pallavi; Joshi, Sharad; Gothi, Rajesh; Talwar, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Lungs are target organs for toxic effects of various drugs due to many reasons. Diphenylhydantoin (DPH) is reported to have many extrapulmonary side effects. We are presenting a case of acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) secondary to DPH, presenting with respiratory failure. Acute HP with respiratory failure is an uncommon drug side effect of the DPH therapy and is a diagnosis of exclusion. It requires detailed workup and exclusion of other causes along with evidence of improvement in the patient's condition after withholding DPH. PMID:26664176

  13. Phenytoin-induced acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Periwal, Pallavi; Joshi, Sharad; Gothi, Rajesh; Talwar, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Lungs are target organs for toxic effects of various drugs due to many reasons. Diphenylhydantoin (DPH) is reported to have many extrapulmonary side effects. We are presenting a case of acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) secondary to DPH, presenting with respiratory failure. Acute HP with respiratory failure is an uncommon drug side effect of the DPH therapy and is a diagnosis of exclusion. It requires detailed workup and exclusion of other causes along with evidence of improvement in the patient's condition after withholding DPH. PMID:26664176

  14. Use of lymphoblastoid cell lines to evaluate the hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation in Cockayne syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, F.; Tarone, R.E.; Cayeux, S.; Robbins, J.H.

    1984-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by acute sun sensitivity, cachectic dwarfism, and neurologic and skeletal abnormalities. Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with this disease are known to be hypersensitive to the lethal effects of 254-nm UV radiation. The authors have studied the sensitivity of 254-nm UV radiation of lymphoblastoid lines derived from 3 typical CS patients, 1 atypical CS patient who had a very late age of onset of clinical manifestations, 2 patients who had both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and typical CS, and 3 heterozygous parents of these patients. Post-UV survival was determined by the trypan-blue dye-exclusion method. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 3 typical CS patients, the atypical CS patient, and the 2 patients with both CS and XP had decreased post-UV viability in comparison with lines from normal donors. Lines from the heterozygous parents had normal post-UV viability. The post-UV viability of the typical CS lines was similar to that of a XP complementation group C line. The relative post-UV viability of lymphoblastoid lines from the typical CS patients was similar to the relative post-UV survival of their fibroblast lines. The lymphoblastoid line from the atypical CS patient had a post-UV viability similar to that of the typical CS patients. Thus, the relative hypersensitivity of CS patients cells in vitro does not reflect the severity or age of onset of the patients clinical manifestations. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 2 patients who had both CS and XP were significantly more sensitive to the UV radiation than those from patients with only CS. Our studies demonstrate that lymphoblastoid lines from patients with CS are appropriate and useful cell lines for the study of the inherited hypersensitivity to UV radiation.

  15. Tasers--less than lethal!

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abiram; Theivacumar, Nada S; Souka, Hesham M

    2009-05-01

    We report a case of potentially lethal injury associated with the use of Taser. A 42-year-old man was stopped by police for potential detention. He held a large carving knife over his epigasrium threatening to stab himself. With a view to achieving immobilisation, a Taser gun was used. On activation of the Taser, the subject suffered a 7-cm wide and 10-cm deep stab injury to the upper abdomen. In this case, activation of the Taser resulted in the contraction of skeletal muscles, flexors more intensely than extensors, resulting in the stab injury. PMID:19416583

  16. Tasers – Less than Lethal!

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Abiram; Theivacumar, Nada S; Souka, Hesham M

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of potentially lethal injury associated with the use of Taser. A 42-year-old man was stopped by police for potential detention. He held a large carving knife over his epigasrium threatening to stab himself.With a view to achieving immobilisation, a Taser gun was used. On activation of the Taser, the subject suffered a 7-cm wide and 10-cm deep stab injury to the upper abdomen. In this case, activation of the Taser resulted in the contraction of skeletal muscles, flexors more intensely than extensors, resulting in the stab injury. PMID:19416583

  17. Human herpes virus 6 encephalitis in allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Taro; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Tohyama, Mikiko; Koda, Yoshiyuki; Okuda, Shiho; Maeda, Nobuya; Kanda, Fumio; Yasukawa, Masaki; Hashimoto, Koji; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Ueda, Masato

    2003-01-01

    Hypersensitivity syndrome is one of the most severe forms of drug eruption, and is characterized by a severe, potentially lethal, multiorgan involvement. Recently, reactivation of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) has been suggested to be involved in this syndrome, although the exact role of HHV-6 remains elusive. In addition to exanthem subitum, neurological illnesses, such as infantile febrile illness without rash and encephalitis in immunocompromised patients have been attributed to HHV-6. A 51-year-old man developed a generalized erythematous eruption during treatment with allopurinol. Prednisolone improved his condition, but after the dose of prednisolone was reduced neurological abnormalities such as mental deterioration and positive meningeal signs developed. HHV-6 DNA in his blood by PCR analysis was positive. Furthermore, we detected HHV-6 DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. The titers of anti-HHV-6-IgG increased during the course. His neurological symptoms gradually improved and no neurological sequelae were noted. Neurological abnormalities associated with hypersensitivity syndrome are very rare. However, the detection of HHV-6 DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid strongly indicates an involvement of reactivated HHV-6 in encephalitis. PMID:12735642

  18. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma mimicking 5-aminosalicylate hypersensitivity in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Kong, L M; Fok, K C; Tsui, A; Qian, C; Fisher, L

    2013-10-01

    5-aminosalicylates (5-ASA) remain an important strategy in the induction and maintenance of remission of inflammatory bowel diseases especially in ulcerative colitis. The prototypical drug of this class, sulfasalazine is generally well tolerated with severe hypersensitivity reactions and hepatotoxicity also described within the literature. When approaching a patient with an adverse reaction to 5-ASA, it can be difficult to differentiate clinically between a sulfa allergy versus a 5-ASA allergy versus a malignancy. We report on a case with initial signs and symptoms suggestive of a sulfa/5-ASA allergy that was subsequently found to be malignant in nature. PMID:24134170

  19. Complement activation-related pseudoallergy: a stress reaction in blood triggered by nanomedicines and biologicals.

    PubMed

    Szebeni, Janos

    2014-10-01

    Intravenous injection of a variety of nanotechnology enhanced (liposomal, micellar, polymer-conjugated) and protein-based (antibodies, enzymes) drugs can lead to hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), also known as infusion, or anaphylactoid reactions. The molecular mechanism of mild to severe allergy symptoms may differ from case to case and is mostly not known, however, in many cases a major cause, or contributing factor is activation of the complement (C) system. The clinical relevance of C activation-related HSRs, a non-IgE-mediated pseudoallergy (CARPA), lies in its unpredictability and occasional lethal outcome. Accordingly, there is an unmet medical need to develop laboratory assays and animal models that quantitate CARPA. This review provides basic information on CARPA; a short history, issues of nomenclature, incidence, classification of reactogenic drugs and symptoms, and the mechanisms of C activation via different pathways. It is pointed out that anaphylatoxin-induced mast cell release may not entirely explain the severe reactions; a "second hit" on allergy mediating cells may also contribute. In addressing the increasing requirements for CARPA testing, the review evaluates the available assays and animal models, and proposes a possible algorithm for the screening of reactogenic drugs and hypersensitive patients. Finally, an analogy is proposed between CARPA and the classic stress reaction, suggesting that CARPA represents a "blood stress" reaction, a systemic fight of the body against harmful biological and chemical agents via the anaphylatoxin/mast-cell/circulatory system axis, in analogy to the body's fight of physical and emotional stress via the hypothalamo/pituitary/adrenal axis. In both cases the response to a broad variety of noxious effects are funneled into a uniform pattern of physiological changes. PMID:25124145

  20. BPD'S INTERPERSONAL HYPERSENSITIVITY PHENOTYPE: A GENE-ENVIRONMENT-DEVELOPMENTAL MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, John G.; Lyons-Ruth, Karlen

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the development of BPD as it might emerge in the child's early interpersonal reactions and how such reactions might evolve into the interpersonal pattern that typifies BPD. It begins to bridge the relevant bodies of clinical literature on the borderline's prototypic interpersonal problems with the concurrently expanding relevant literature on early child development. We will start by considering how a psychobiological disposition to BPD is likely to include a constitutional diathesis for relational reactivity, that is, for hypersensitivity to interpersonal stressors. Data relevant to this disposition's manifestations in adult clinical samples and to its heritability and neurobiology will be reviewed. We then consider how such a psychobiological disposition for interpersonal reactivity might contribute to the development of a disorganized-ambivalent form of attachment, noting especially the likely contributions of both the predisposed child and of parents who are themselves predisposed to maladaptive responses, leading to an escalation of problematic transactions. Evidence concerning both the genetics and the developmental pathways associated with disorganized attachments will be considered. Emerging links between such developmental pathways and adult BPD will be described, in particular the potential appearance by early- to middle-childhood of controlling-caregiving or controlling-punitive interpersonal strategies. Some implications from this gene-environment interactional theory for a better developmental understanding of BPD's etiology are discussed. PMID:18312121

  1. Lymphatic Function Regulates Contact Hypersensitivity Dermatitis in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Savetsky, Ira L; Albano, Nicholas J; Cuzzone, Daniel A; Gardenier, Jason C; Torrisi, Jeremy S; García Nores, Gabriela D; Nitti, Matthew D; Hespe, Geoffrey E; Nelson, Tyler S; Kataru, Raghu P; Dixon, J Brandon; Mehrara, Babak J

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for inflammatory dermatologic diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. In addition, recent studies have shown that obesity impairs lymphatic function. As the lymphatic system is a critical regulator of inflammatory reactions, we tested the hypothesis that obesity-induced lymphatic dysfunction is a key regulator of cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions in obese mice. We found that obese mice have impaired lymphatic function, characterized by leaky capillary lymphatics and decreased collecting vessel pumping capacity. In addition, obese mice displayed heightened dermatitis responses to inflammatory skin stimuli, resulting in both higher peak inflammation and a delayed clearance of inflammatory responses. Injection of recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor-C remarkably increased lymphangiogenesis, lymphatic function, and lymphatic endothelial cell expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21, while decreasing inflammation and expression of inducible nitrous oxide synthase. These changes resulted in considerably decreased dermatitis responses in both lean and obese mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that obesity-induced changes in the lymphatic system result in an amplified and a prolonged inflammatory response. PMID:26176761

  2. Hemolysate-mediated renal vasoconstriction and hypersensitization.

    PubMed

    Burke, T J; Falk, S; Conger, J D; Voelkel, N F

    1999-01-01

    The present studies measured vessel diameter, before and after addition of hemolysate, in isolated afferent arterioles (AA) and efferent arterioles (EA) obtained from the rat kidney. Human red blood cells (RBC) were hemolyzed in distilled water and membranes were discarded after centrifugation. Hemolysate added to the bath solution caused vigorous AA and EA contraction and, after washout, hypersensitized the AA and EA to doses of angiotensin II (AII) which would normally only elicit 50% contraction (EC50). Neither the contraction nor the hypersensitization were mimicked by pure human hemoglobin. The vasoconstrictive responses in the AA and EA were accompanied by increased cytosolic-free calcium concentration. Further purification (desalting) of the hemolysate to remove substance of < or = 1000 Da (which include ATP) did not eliminate the vasoconstrictive component from the hemolysate. Finally, cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells also demonstrated a rapid increase in (Ca2+i) when exposed to hemolysate. This increase in (Ca2+i) was, in part, dependent on Ca2+ influx since it could be attenuated with diltiazem (10(-5) M). In conclusion, hemolysate contains a factor which induces contractions of the isolated rat kidney AA and EA and rapid elevations in (Ca2+i). This factor, from hemolyzed RBC, is not hemoglobin itself. PMID:10048115

  3. Central Hypersensitivity in Chronic Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Jennifer Soo; Paul, Tracy; Chae, John; Wilson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to examine the association of hemiplegic shoulder pain with central hypersensitivity through pressure-pain thresholds (PPT) at healthy, distant tissues. Design This study is a cross-sectional study. A total of 40 patients (n=20 hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP), n=20 stroke without HSP) were enrolled in this study. Pressure-pain thresholds were measured at the affected deltoid and contralateral deltoid and tibialis anterior using a handheld algometer. Differences in PPTs were analyzed by Wilcoxon Rank Sum test and with linear regression analysis controlling for gender, a known confounder of PPTs. Results Subjects with hemiplegic shoulder pain had lower local PPTs than stroke control subjects when comparing the painful to dominant shoulders and comparing the non-painful shoulder and tibialis anterior to the non-dominant side controls. Similarly, those with hemiplegic shoulder pain had lower PPTs when comparing to controls in contralesional-to-contralesional comparisons as well as ipsilesional-to-ipsilesional comparisons. Conclusions Subjects with hemiplegic shoulder pain have lower local and distal PPTs than subjects without hemiplegic shoulder pain. Our study suggests that chronic shoulder pain may be associated with widespread central hypersensitivity, which has been previously found to be associated with other chronic pain syndromes. This further understanding can then help develop better treatment options for those with this hemiplegic shoulder pain. PMID:23255268

  4. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

  5. Electroshock weapons can be lethal!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    Electroshock weapons (EWs)-stun guns, tasers, riot shields-are electroconductive devices designed to safely incapacitate healthy men neuromuscularly, so they are called nonlethal or less-lethal. EW firms seeking large nonmilitary markets targeted law enforcement and corrections personnel, who began using EWs in prisons/jails and on public patrol in 1980 in the USA. This shifted the EW-shocked population from healthy soldiers to a heterogeneous mix of both sexes, ages 6-92, in a wide variety of health conditions! An EW operates by disrupting normal physiological processes, producing transient effects in healthy people. But if a person's health is sufficiently compromised, the margin of safety can be lost, resulting in death or permanent health problems. 325 people have died after EW shock since 1980. Did the EW cause these deaths? Evidence indicates that EWs do play a causal role in most such deaths. EWs can be lethal for people in diabetic shock^1 (hypoglycemia), which may be why Robert Dziekanski-a Polish immigrant to Canada-died so quickly after he was tasered at Vancouver Airport: not having eaten for over 10 hours, he likely was severely hypoglycemic. The EW death rate in North America is 30 times higher than need be, because EW users have not been properly trained to use EWs on a heterogeneous population safely! ^1J. Clinical Engineering 30(3):111(2005).

  6. 21 CFR 866.5500 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... system. 866.5500 Section 866.5500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Systems § 866.5500 Hypersensitivity pneumonitis immunological test system. (a) Identification. A hypersensitivity pneumonitis immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure...

  7. Hipersensitivity Reactions to Corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Berbegal, L; DeLeon, F J; Silvestre, J F

    2016-03-01

    Corticosteroids are widely used drugs in the clinical practice, especially by topic application in dermatology. These substances may act as allergens and produce immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Allergic contact dermatitis is the most frequent presentation of corticosteroid allergy and it should be studied by patch testing in specific units. The corticosteroids included in the Spanish standard battery are good markers but not ideal. Therefore, if those makers are positive, it is useful to apply a specific battery of corticosteroids and the drugs provided by patients. Immediate reactions are relatively rare but potentially severe, and it is important to confirm the sensitization profile and to guide the use of alternative corticosteroids, because they are often necessary in several diseases. In this article we review the main concepts regarding these two types of hypersensitivity reactions in corticosteroid allergy, as well as their approach in the clinical practice. PMID:26621334

  8. Cutaneous reactions to vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Adena E; Stein, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinations are important for infectious disease prevention; however, there are adverse effects of vaccines, many of which are cutaneous. Some of these reactions are due to nonspecific inflammation and irritation at the injection site, whereas other reactions are directly related to the live attenuated virus. Rarely, vaccinations have been associated with generalized hypersensitivity reactions, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. The onset of certain inflammatory dermatologic conditions, such as lichen planus, granuloma annulare, and pemphigoid, were reported to occur shortly after vaccine administration. Allergic contact dermatitis can develop at the injection site, typically due to adjuvant ingredients in the vaccine, such as thimerosal and aluminum. Vaccinations are important to promote development of both individual and herd immunity. Although most vaccinations are considered relatively safe, there may be adverse effects associated with any vaccine. Cutaneous manifestations make up a large portion of the types of reactions associated with vaccines. There are many different reasons for the development of a cutaneous reaction to a vaccination. Some are directly related to the injection of a live attenuated virus, such as varicella or vaccinia (for immunity to smallpox), whereas others cause more nonspecific erythema and swelling at the injection site, as a result of local inflammation or irritation. Vaccinations have also been associated in rare reports with generalized hypersensitivity reactions, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. There have been case reports associating the administration of a vaccine with the new onset of a dermatologic condition, such as lichen planus, granuloma annulare, and Sweet syndrome. Finally, allergic contact

  9. Mi2β Shows Chromatin Enzyme Specificity by Erasing a DNase I-hypersensitive Site Established by ACF*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Haruhiko; Du, Hansen; Zhang, Zhaoqing; Henderson, Angus; Sen, Ranjan; Pazin, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes are linked to changes in gene expression; however, it is not clear how the multiple remodeling enzymes found in eukaryotes differ in function and work together. In this report, we demonstrate that the ATP-dependent remodeling enzymes ACF and Mi2β can direct consecutive, opposing chromatin-remodeling events, when recruited to chromatin by different transcription factors. In a cell-free system based on the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene enhancer, we show that TFE3 induces a DNase I-hypersensitive site in an ATP-dependent reaction that requires ACF following transcription factor binding to chromatin. In a second step, PU.1 directs Mi2β to erase an established DNase I-hypersensitive site, in an ATP-dependent reaction subsequent to PU.1 binding to chromatin, whereas ACF will not support erasure. Erasure occurred without displacing the transcription factor that initiated the site. Other tested enzymes were unable to erase the DNase I-hypersensitive site. Establishing and erasing the DNase I-hypersensitive site required transcriptional activation domains from TFE3 and PU.1, respectively. Together, these results provide important new mechanistic insight into the combinatorial control of chromatin structure. PMID:19158090

  10. Arabidopsis TTR1 causes LRR-dependent lethal systemic necrosis, rather than systemic acquired resistance, to Tobacco ringspot virus.

    PubMed

    Nam, Moon; Koh, Serry; Kim, Sung Uk; Domier, Leslie L; Jeon, Jae Heung; Kim, Hong Gi; Lee, Su-Heon; Bent, Andrew F; Moon, Jae Sun

    2011-11-01

    Most Arabidopsis ecotypes display tolerance to the Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), but a subset of Arabidopsis ecotypes, including Estland (Est), develop lethal systemic necrosis (LSN), which differs from the localized hypersensitive responses (HRs) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) characteristic of incompatible reactions. Neither viral replication nor the systemic movement of TRSV was restricted in tolerant or sensitive Arabidopsis ecotypes; therefore, the LSN phenotype shown in the sensitive ecotypes might not be due to viral accumulation. In the present study, we identified the Est TTR1 gene (tolerance to Tobacco ringspot virus 1) encoding a TIR-NBS-LRR protein that controls the ecotype-dependent tolerant/sensitive phenotypes by a map-based cloning method. The tolerant Col-0 ecotype Arabidopsis transformed with the sensitive Est TTR1 allele developed an LSN phenotype upon TRSV infection, suggesting that the Est TTR1 allele is dominant over the tolerant ttr1 allele of Col-0. Multiple sequence alignments of 10 tolerant ecotypes from those of eight sensitive ecotypes showed that 10 LRR amino acid polymorphisms were consistently distributed across the TTR1/ttr1 alleles. Site-directed mutagenesis of these amino acids in the LRR region revealed that two sites, L956S and K1124Q, completely abolished the LSN phenotype. VIGS study revealed that TTR1 is dependent on SGT1, rather than EDS1. The LSN phenotype by TTR1 was shown to be transferred to Nicotiana benthamiana, demonstrating functional conservation of TTR1 across plant families, which are involved in SGT-dependent defense responses, rather than EDS1-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:22057987