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1

High throughput synthetic lethality screen reveals a tumorigenic role of adenylate cyclase in fumarate hydratase-deficient cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Background Synthetic lethality is an appealing technique for selectively targeting cancer cells which have acquired molecular changes that distinguish them from normal cells. High-throughput RNAi-based screens have been successfully used to identify synthetic lethal pathways with well-characterized tumor suppressors and oncogenes. The recent identification of metabolic tumor suppressors suggests that the concept of synthetic lethality can be applied to selectively target cancer metabolism as well. Results Here, we perform a high-throughput RNAi screen to identify synthetic lethal genes with fumarate hydratase (FH), a metabolic tumor suppressor whose loss-of-function has been associated with hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC). Our unbiased screen identified synthetic lethality between FH and several genes in heme metabolism, in accordance with recent findings. Furthermore, we identified an enrichment of synthetic lethality with adenylate cyclases. The effects were validated in an embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293T) and in HLRCC-patient derived cells (UOK262) via both genetic and pharmacological inhibition. The reliance on adenylate cyclases in FH-deficient cells is consistent with increased cyclic-AMP levels, which may act to regulate cellular energy metabolism. Conclusions The identified synthetic lethality of FH with adenylate cyclases suggests a new potential target for treating HLRCC patients. PMID:24568598

2014-01-01

2

A Screen for F1 Hybrid Male Rescue Reveals No Major-Effect Hybrid Lethality Loci in the Drosophila melanogaster Autosomal Genome  

PubMed Central

Hybrid sons between Drosophila melanogaster females and D. simulans males die as 3rd instar larvae. Two genes, D. melanogaster Hybrid male rescue (Hmr) on the X chromosome, and D. simulans Lethal hybrid rescue (Lhr) on chromosome II, interact to cause this lethality. Loss-of-function mutations in either gene suppress lethality, but several pieces of evidence suggest that additional factors are required for hybrid lethality. Here we screen the D. melanogaster autosomal genome by using the Bloomington Stock Center Deficiency kit to search for additional regions that can rescue hybrid male lethality. Our screen is designed to identify putative hybrid incompatibility (HI) genes similar to Hmr and Lhr which, when removed, are dominant suppressors of lethality. After screening 89% of the autosomal genome, we found no regions that rescue males to the adult stage. We did, however, identify several regions that rescue up to 13% of males to the pharate adult stage. This weak rescue suggests the presence of multiple minor-effect HI loci, but we were unable to map these loci to high resolution, presumably because weak rescue can be masked by genetic background effects. We attempted to test one candidate, the dosage compensation gene male specific lethal-3 (msl-3), by using RNA interference with short hairpin microRNA constructs targeted specifically against D. simulans msl-3 but failed to achieve knockdown, in part due to off-target effects. We conclude that the D. melanogaster autosomal genome likely does not contain additional major-effect HI loci. We also show that Hmr is insufficient to fully account for the lethality associated with the D. melanogaster X chromosome, suggesting that additional X-linked genes contribute to hybrid lethality. PMID:25352540

Cuykendall, Tawny N.; Satyaki, P.; Ji, Shuqing; Clay, Derek M.; Edelman, Nathaniel B.; Kimchy, Alexandra; Li, Ling-Hei; Nuzzo, Erin A.; Parekh, Neil; Park, Suna; Barbash, Daniel A.

2014-01-01

3

A Screen for F1 Hybrid Male Rescue Reveals No Major-Effect Hybrid Lethality Loci in the Drosophila melanogaster Autosomal Genome.  

PubMed

Hybrid sons between Drosophila melanogaster females and D. simulans males die as 3rd instar larvae. Two genes, D. melanogaster Hybrid male rescue (Hmr) on the X chromosome, and D. simulans Lethal hybrid rescue (Lhr) on chromosome II, interact to cause this lethality. Loss-of-function mutations in either gene suppress lethality, but several pieces of evidence suggest that additional factors are required for hybrid lethality. Here we screen the D. melanogaster autosomal genome by using the Bloomington Stock Center Deficiency kit to search for additional regions that can rescue hybrid male lethality. Our screen is designed to identify putative hybrid incompatibility (HI) genes similar to Hmr and Lhr which, when removed, are dominant suppressors of lethality. After screening 89% of the autosomal genome, we found no regions that rescue males to the adult stage. We did, however, identify several regions that rescue up to 13% of males to the pharate adult stage. This weak rescue suggests the presence of multiple minor-effect HI loci, but we were unable to map these loci to high resolution, presumably because weak rescue can be masked by genetic background effects. We attempted to test one candidate, the dosage compensation gene male specific lethal-3 (msl-3), by using RNA interference with short hairpin microRNA constructs targeted specifically against D. simulans msl-3 but failed to achieve knockdown, in part due to off-target effects. We conclude that the D. melanogaster autosomal genome likely does not contain additional major-effect HI loci. We also show that Hmr is insufficient to fully account for the lethality associated with the D. melanogaster X chromosome, suggesting that additional X-linked genes contribute to hybrid lethality. PMID:25352540

Cuykendall, Tawny N; Satyaki, P; Ji, Shuqing; Clay, Derek M; Edelman, Nathaniel B; Kimchy, Alexandra; Li, Ling-Hei; Nuzzo, Erin A; Parekh, Neil; Park, Suna; Barbash, Daniel A

2014-01-01

4

Synthetic Lethality Reveals Mechanisms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resistance to ?-Lactams  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Most ?-lactam antibiotics are ineffective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis due to the microbe’s innate resistance. The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains has prompted interest to repurpose this class of drugs. To identify the genetic determinants of innate ?-lactam resistance, we carried out a synthetic lethality screen on a transposon mutant library for susceptibility to imipenem, a carbapenem ?-lactam antibiotic. Mutations in 74 unique genes demonstrated synthetic lethality. The majority of mutations were in genes associated with cell wall biosynthesis. A second quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR)-based synthetic lethality screen of randomly selected mutants confirmed the role of cell wall biosynthesis in ?-lactam resistance. The global transcriptional response of the bacterium to ?-lactams was investigated, and changes in levels of expression of cell wall biosynthetic genes were identified. Finally, we validated these screens in vivo using the MT1616 transposon mutant, which lacks a functional acyl-transferase gene. Mice infected with the mutant responded to ?-lactam treatment with a 100-fold decrease in bacillary lung burden over 4 weeks, while the numbers of organisms in the lungs of mice infected with wild-type bacilli proliferated. These findings reveal a road map of genes required for ?-lactam resistance and validate synthetic lethality screening as a promising tool for repurposing existing classes of licensed, safe, well-characterized antimicrobials against tuberculosis. PMID:25227469

Lun, Shichun; Miranda, David; Kubler, Andre; Guo, Haidan; Maiga, Mariama C.; Winglee, Kathryn; Pelly, Shaaretha

2014-01-01

5

Actin Dosage Lethality Screening in Yeast Mediated by Selective Ploidy Ablation Reveals Links to Urmylation/Wobble Codon Recognition and Chromosome Stability  

PubMed Central

The actin cytoskeleton exists in a dynamic equilibrium with monomeric and filamentous states of its subunit protein actin. The spatial and temporal regulation of actin dynamics is critical to the many functions of actin. Actin levels are remarkably constant, suggesting that cells have evolved to function within a narrow range of actin concentrations. Here we report the results of screens in which we have increased actin levels in strains deleted for the ~4800 nonessential yeast genes using a technical advance called selective ploidy ablation. We detected 83 synthetic dosage interactions with actin, 78 resulted in reduced growth, whereas in 5 cases overexpression of actin suppressed the growth defects caused by the deleted genes. The genes were highly enriched in several classes, including transfer RNA wobble uridine modification, chromosome stability and segregation, cell growth, and cell division. We show that actin overexpression sequesters a limited pool of eEF1A, a bifunctional protein involved in aminoacyl-transfer RNA recruitment to the ribosome and actin filament cross-linking. Surprisingly, the largest class of genes is involved in chromosome stability and segregation. We show that actin mutants have chromosome segregation defects, suggesting a possible role in chromosome structure and function. Monomeric actin is a core component of the INO80 and SWR chromatin remodeling complexes and the NuA4 histone modification complex, and our results suggest these complexes may be sensitive to actin stoichiometry. We propose that the resulting effects on chromatin structure can lead to synergistic effects on chromosome stability in strains lacking genes important for chromosome maintenance. PMID:23450344

Haarer, Brian; Mi-Mi, Lei; Cho, Jessica; Cortese, Matthew; Viggiano, Susan; Burke, Daniel; Amberg, David

2013-01-01

6

A mouse chromosome 4 balancer ENU-mutagenesis screen isolates eleven lethal lines  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

ENU-mutagenesis is a powerful technique to identify genes regulating mammalian development. To functionally annotate the distal region of mouse chromosome 4, we performed an ENU-mutagenesis screen using a balancer chromosome targeted to this region of the genome. We isolated 11 lethal lines that map...

7

Synthetic lethal screens as a means to understand and treat MYC-driven cancers  

PubMed Central

While therapeutics against MYC could potentially be employed against a wide range of human cancers, MYC targeted therapies have proven difficult to develop. The convergence of breakthroughs in human genomics and in gene silencing using RNA interference (RNAi), have recently allowed functional interrogation of the genome and systematic identification of synthetic lethal interactions with hyper-active MYC. Here, we focus on the pathways that have emerged through RNAi screens and present evidence that a subset of genes exhibiting synthetic lethality with MYC are significantly interconnected and linked to chromatin, and transcriptional processes, as well as to DNA repair and cell-cycle checkpoints. Other synthetic lethal interactions with MYC point to novel pathways and potentially broaden the repertoire of targeted therapies. The elucidation of MYC synthetic lethal interactions is still in its infancy and how these interactions may be influenced by tissue specific programs and by concurrent genetic change will require further investigation. Nevertheless, we predict that these studies may lead the way to novel therapeutic approaches and new insights into the role of MYC in cancer. PMID:24591535

Cermelli, Silvia; Jang, In Sock; Bernard, Brady; Grandori, Carla

2014-01-01

8

Evaluation of Caenorhabditis elegans as an acute lethality and a neurotoxicity screening model  

SciTech Connect

This investigation evaluated C. elegans as a lethality and neurotoxicity screening model. The lethality experiments were performed in both agar and an aquatic medium. The salts of 8 metals (Hg, Be, Al, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, and Sr) were used in the agar studies and the salts of 14 metals (Ag, Hg, Cu, Be, Al, Pb, Cr, As, Tl, Zn, Cd, Ni, Sr, and Sb) were used in the aquatic tests. In each of these tests an LC50 value was determined. The data from the agar plates were compared to the published mammalian oral LD50 values for salts of the same metals. Within this set of chemicals C. elegans was found to be a predictor of mammalian acute lethality, generating LC50 values parallel to the rat and mouse LD50 values. The aquatic data were compared to data from EPA Ambient Water Quality Criteria documents. C. elegans was found to be less sensitive than Daphnia but generally more sensitive than the other invertebrate organisms that are presently used. The neurotoxicity testing also was performed in both agar and an aquatic media. The testing in agar was conducted with the salts of 4 metals (Cu, Be, Pb, and Hg) and 2 organophosphate pesticides (malathion and vapona). The studies in an aquatic medium tested the salts of 4 metals (Cu, Be, Pb, and Hg).

Williams, P.L.

1988-01-01

9

A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies multiple synthetic lethal interactions with the Ras oncogene  

PubMed Central

Oncogenic mutations in the small GTPase Ras are highly prevalent in cancer, but an understanding of the vulnerabilities of these cancers is lacking. We undertook a genome-wide RNAi screen to identify synthetic lethal interactions with the KRAS oncogene. We discovered a diverse set of proteins whose depletion selectively impaired the viability of Ras mutant cells. Among these we observed a strong enrichment for genes with mitotic functions. We describe a pathway involving the mitotic kinase PLK1, the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome and the proteasome that, when inhibited, results in prometaphase accumulation and the subsequent death of Ras mutant cells. Gene expression analysis indicates that reduced expression of genes in this pathway correlates with increased survival of patients bearing tumors with a Ras transcriptional signature. Our results suggest a previously underappreciated role for Ras in mitotic progression and demonstrate a pharmacologically tractable pathway for the potential treatment of cancers harboring Ras mutations. PMID:19490893

Luo, Ji; Emanuele, Michael J.; Li, Danan; Creighton, Chad J.; Schlabach, Michael R.; Westbrook, Thomas F.; Wong, Kwok-kin; Elledge, Stephen J.

2009-01-01

10

Synthetic Lethal Screen of an EGFR-Centered Network to Improve Targeted Therapies  

PubMed Central

Intrinsic and acquired cellular resistance factors limit the efficacy of most targeted cancer therapeutics. Synthetic lethal screens in lower eukaryotes suggest that networks of genes closely linked to therapeutic targets would be enriched for determinants of drug resistance. We developed a protein network centered on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is a validated cancer therapeutic target, and used siRNA screening to comparatively probe this network for proteins that regulate the effectiveness of both EGFR-targeted agents and nonspecific cytotoxic agents. We identified subnetworks of proteins influencing resistance, with putative resistance determinants enriched among proteins that interacted with proteins at the core of the network. We found that EGFR antagonists and clinically relevant drugs targeting proteins connected in the EGFR network, such as the kinases protein kinase C or Aurora kinase A, or the transcriptional regulator STAT3, synergized to reduce cell viability and tumor size, suggesting the potential for a direct path to clinical exploitation. Such a focused approach can potentially improve the coherent design of combination cancer therapies. PMID:20858866

Astsaturov, Igor; Ratushny, Vladimir; Sukhanova, Anna; Einarson, Margret B.; Bagnyukova, Tetyana; Zhou, Yan; Devarajan, Karthik; Silverman, Joshua S.; Tikhmyanova, Nadezhda; Skobeleva, Natalya; Pecherskaya, Anna; Nasto, Rochelle E.; Sharma, Catherine; Jablonski, Sandra A.; Serebriiskii, Ilya G.; Weiner, Louis M.; Golemis, Erica A.

2010-01-01

11

A genetic screen for zygotic embryonic lethal mutations affecting cuticular morphology in the wasp Nasonia vitripennis.  

PubMed Central

We have screened for zygotic embryonic lethal mutations affecting cuticular morphology in Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera; Chalcidoidea). Our broad goal was to investigate the use of Nasonia for genetically surveying conservation and change in regulatory gene systems, as a means to understand the diversity of developmental strategies that have arisen during the course of evolution. Specifically, we aim to compare anteroposterior patterning gene functions in two long germ band insects, Nasonia and Drosophila. In Nasonia, unfertilized eggs develop as haploid males while fertilized eggs develop as diploid females, so the entire genome can be screened for recessive zygotic mutations by examining the progeny of F1 females. We describe 74 of >100 lines with embryonic cuticular mutant phenotypes, including representatives of coordinate, gap, pair-rule, segment polarity, homeotic, and Polycomb group functions, as well as mutants with novel phenotypes not directly comparable to those of known Drosophila genes. We conclude that Nasonia is a tractable experimental organism for comparative developmental genetic study. The mutants isolated here have begun to outline the extent of conservation and change in the genetic programs controlling embryonic patterning in Nasonia and Drosophila. PMID:10866651

Pultz, M A; Zimmerman, K K; Alto, N M; Kaeberlein, M; Lange, S K; Pitt, J N; Reeves, N L; Zehrung, D L

2000-01-01

12

Lethality in PARP-1/Ku80 double mutant mice reveals physiologicalsynergy during early embryogenesis  

SciTech Connect

Ku is an abundant heterodimeric nuclear protein, consisting of 70-kDa and 86-kDa tightly associated subunits that comprise the DNA binding component of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Poly(ADP)ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a 113-kDa protein that catalyzes the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) on target proteins. Both Ku and PARP-1 recognize and bind to DNA ends. Ku functions in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway whereas PARP-1 functions in the single strand break repair and base excision repair (BER) pathways. Recent studies have revealed that PARP-1 and Ku80 interact in vitro. To determine whether the association of PARP-1 and Ku80 has any physiological significance or synergistic function in vivo, mice lacking both PARP-1 and Ku80 were generated. The resulting offspring died during embryonic development displaying abnormalities around the gastrulation stage. In addition, PARP-1-/-Ku80-/- cultured blastocysts had an increased level of apoptosis. These data suggest that the functions of both Ku80 and PARP-1 are essential for normal embryogenesis and that a loss of genomic integrity leading to cell death through apoptosis is likely the cause of the embryonic lethality observed in these mice.

Henrie, Melinda S.; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Menissier-de Murcia, Josiane; de Murcia, Gilbert; Li, Gloria C.; Chen,David J.

2002-09-24

13

Synthetic lethality: General principles, utility and detection using genetic screens in human cells  

PubMed Central

Synthetic lethality occurs when the simultaneous perturbation of two genes results in cellular or organismal death. Synthetic lethality also occurs between genes and small molecules, and can be used to elucidate the mechanism of action of drugs. This area has recently attracted attention because of the prospect of a new generation of anti-cancer drugs. Based on studies ranging from yeast to human cells, this review provides an overview of the general principles that underlie synthetic lethality and relates them to its utility for identifying gene function, drug action and cancer therapy. It also identifies the latest strategies for the large-scale mapping of synthetic lethalities in human cells which bring us closer to the generation of comprehensive human genetic interaction maps. PMID:21094158

Nijman, Sebastian M.B.

2011-01-01

14

Alkylation sensitivity screens reveal a conserved cross-species functionome.  

PubMed

To identify genes that contribute to chemotherapy resistance in glioblastoma, we conducted a synthetic lethal screen in a chemotherapy-resistant glioblastoma-derived cell line with the clinical alkylator temozolomide (TMZ) and an siRNA library tailored toward "druggable" targets. Select DNA repair genes in the screen were validated independently, confirming the DNA glycosylases uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG) and A/G-specific adenine DNA glycosylase (MYH) as well as methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) to be involved in the response to high dose TMZ. The involvement of UNG and MYH is likely the result of a TMZ-induced burst of reactive oxygen species. We then compared the human TMZ sensitizing genes identified in our screen with those previously identified from alkylator screens conducted in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The conserved biologic processes across all three species compose an alkylation functionome that includes many novel proteins not previously thought to impact alkylator resistance. This high-throughput screen, validation and cross-species analysis was then followed by a mechanistic analysis of two essential nodes: base excision repair (BER) DNA glycosylases (UNG, human and mag1, S. cerevisiae) and protein modification systems, including UBE3B and ICMT in human cells or pby1, lip22, stp22 and aim22 in S. cerevisiae. The conserved processes of BER and protein modification were dual targeted and yielded additive sensitization to alkylators in S. cerevisiae. In contrast, dual targeting of BER and protein modification genes in human cells did not increase sensitivity, suggesting an epistatic relationship. Importantly, these studies provide potential new targets to overcome alkylating agent resistance. PMID:23038810

Svilar, David; Dyavaiah, Madhu; Brown, Ashley R; Tang, Jiang-bo; Li, Jianfeng; McDonald, Peter R; Shun, Tong Ying; Braganza, Andrea; Wang, Xiao-hong; Maniar, Salony; St Croix, Claudette M; Lazo, John S; Pollack, Ian F; Begley, Thomas J; Sobol, Robert W

2012-12-01

15

A screen for dynein synthetic lethals in Aspergillus nidulans identifies spindle assembly checkpoint genes and other genes involved in mitosis.  

PubMed Central

Cytoplasmic dynein is a ubiquitously expressed microtubule motor involved in vesicle transport, mitosis, nuclear migration, and spindle orientation. In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, inactivation of cytoplasmic dynein, although not lethal, severely impairs nuclear migration. The role of dynein in mitosis and vesicle transport in this organism is unclear. To investigate the complete range of dynein function in A. nidulans, we searched for synthetic lethal mutations that significantly reduced growth in the absence of dynein but had little effect on their own. We isolated 19 sld (synthetic lethality without dynein) mutations in nine different genes. Mutations in two genes exacerbate the nuclear migration defect seen in the absence of dynein. Mutations in six other genes, including sldA and sldB, show a strong synthetic lethal interaction with a mutation in the mitotic kinesin bimC and, thus, are likely to play a role in mitosis. Mutations in sldA and sldB also confer hypersensitivity to the microtubule-destabilizing drug benomyl. sldA and sldB were cloned by complementation of their mutant phenotypes using an A. nidulans autonomously replicating vector. Sequencing revealed homology to the spindle assembly checkpoint genes BUB1 and BUB3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic interaction between dynein and spindle assembly checkpoint genes, as well as other mitotic genes, indicates that A. nidulans dynein plays a role in mitosis. We suggest a model for dynein motor action in A. nidulans that can explain dynein involvement in both mitosis and nuclear distribution. PMID:9584089

Efimov, V P; Morris, N R

1998-01-01

16

A screen for mutations that prevent lethality caused by expression of activated sevenless and Ras1 in the Drosophila embryo.  

PubMed

Ras1 plays a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signal transduction pathways that function during Drosophila development. We demonstrate that mis-expression of constitutively active forms of Ras1 (Ras1V12) and the Sevenless (Sev) RTK (SevS11) during embryogenesis causes lethality due to inappropriate activation of RTK/Ras1 signaling pathways. Genetic and molecular data indicate that the rate of SevS11/sev-Ras1V12 lethality is sensitive to the expression level of both transgenes. To identify genes that encode components of RTK/Ras1 signaling pathways or modulators of RNA polymerase II transcription, we took advantage of the dose-sensitivity of the system and screened for second site mutations that would dominantly suppress the lethality. The collection of identified suppressors includes the PR55 subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A indicating that downstream of Sev and Ras1 this subunit acts as a negative regulator of phosphatase activity. The isolation of mutations in the histone deacetylase RPD3 suggests that it functions as positive regulator of sev enhancer-driven transcription. Finally, the isolation of mutations in the Trithorax group gene devenir and the characterized allelism with the Breathless RTK encoding gene provides evidence for Ras1-mediated regulation of homeotic genes. PMID:9883586

Maixner, A; Hecker, T P; Phan, Q N; Wassarman, D A

1998-01-01

17

Statistical analysis, optimization, and prioritization of virtual screening parameters for zinc enzymes including the anthrax toxin lethal factor.  

PubMed

The anthrax toxin lethal factor (LF) and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3, stromelysin-1) are popular zinc metalloenzyme drug targets, with LF primarily responsible for anthrax-related toxicity and host death, while MMP-3 is involved in cancer- and rheumatic disease-related tissue remodeling. A number of in silico screening techniques, most notably docking and scoring, have proven useful for identifying new potential drug scaffolds targeting LF and MMP-3, as well as for optimizing lead compounds and investigating mechanisms of action. However, virtual screening outcomes can vary significantly depending on the specific docking parameters chosen, and systematic statistical significance analyses are needed to prioritize key parameters for screening small molecules against these zinc systems. In the current work, we present a series of chi-square statistical analyses of virtual screening outcomes for cocrystallized LF and MMP-3 inhibitors docked into their respective targets, evaluated by predicted enzyme-inhibitor dissociation constant and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) between predicted and experimental bound configurations, and we present a series of preferred parameters for use with these systems in the industry-standard Surflex-Dock screening program, for use by researchers utilizing in silico techniques to discover and optimize new scaffolds. PMID:25373478

Maize, Kimberly M; Zhang, Xia; Amin, Elizabeth Ambrose

2014-01-01

18

Regulation of a Virus-Induced Lethal Disease in Tomato Revealed by LongSAGE Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infection of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and D satellite RNA (satRNA) in tomato plants induces rapid plant death, which has caused catastrophic crop losses. We conducted long serial analysis of gene expression (LongSAGE) in con- trol and virus-infected plants to identify the genes that may be involved in the development of this lethal tomato dis- ease. The transcriptomes were compared

Saeed Irian; Ping Xu; Xinbin Dai; Patrick X. Zhao; Marilyn J. Roossinck

2007-01-01

19

A synthetic lethal screen identifies the Vitamin D receptor as a novel gemcitabine sensitizer in pancreatic cancer cells.  

PubMed

Overcoming chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer (PCa) cells should significantly extend patient survival. The current treatment modalities rely on a variety of DNA damaging agents including gemcitabine, FOLFIRINOX, and Abraxane that activate cell cycle checkpoints, which allows cells to survive these drug treaments. Indeed, these treatment regimens have only extended patient survival by a few months. The complex microenvironment of PCa tumors has been shown to complicate drug delivery thus decreasing the sensitivity of PCa tumors to chemotherapy. In this study, a genome-wide siRNA library was used to conduct a synthetic lethal screen of Panc1 cells that was treated with gemcitabine. A sublethal dose (50 nM) of the drug was used to model situations of limiting drug availability to PCa tumors in vivo. Twenty-seven validated sensitizer genes were identified from the screen including the Vitamin D receptor (VDR). Gemcitabine sensitivity was shown to be VDR dependent in multiple PCa cell lines in clonogenic survival assays. Sensitization was not achieved through checkpoint override but rather through disrupting DNA repair. VDR knockdown disrupted the cells' ability to form phospho-?H2AX and Rad51 foci in response to gemcitabine treatment. Disruption of Rad51 foci formation, which compromises homologous recombination, was consistent with increased sensitivity of PCa cells to the PARP inhibitor Rucaparib. Thus inhibition of VDR in PCa cells provides a new way to enhance the efficacy of genotoxic drugs. PMID:25558828

Bhattacharjee, V; Zhou, Y; Yen, Tj

2014-12-15

20

Synthetic lethal screening with small molecule inhibitors provides a pathway to rational combination therapies for melanoma  

PubMed Central

Recent data demonstrate that extracellular signals are transmitted through a network of proteins rather than hierarchical signaling pathways suggesting why inhibition of a single component of a canonical pathway is insufficient for the treatment of cancer. The biological outcome of signaling through a network is inherently more robust and resistant to inhibition of a single network component. In this study, we performed a functional chemical genetic screen to identify novel interactions between signaling inhibitors that would not be predicted based on our current understanding of signaling networks. We screened over 300 drug combinations in nine melanoma cell lines and have identified pairs of compounds that show synergistic cytotoxicity. The synergistic cytotoxicities identified did not correlate with the known RAS and BRAF mutational status of the melanoma cell lines. Among the most robust results was synergy between sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor with activity against RAF, and diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Drug substitution experiments using the NSAIDs celecoxib and ibuprofen or the MEK inhibitor PD325901 and the RAF inhibitor RAF265 suggest that inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) and MAP kinase signaling are targets for the synergistic cytotoxicity of sorafenib and diclofenac. Co-treatment with sorafenib and diclofenac interrupts a positive feedback signaling loop involving ERK, cPLA2, and COX. Genome-wide expression profiling demonstrates synergy-specific down-regulation of survival-related genes. This study has uncovered novel functional drug combinations and suggests that the underlying signaling networks that control responses to targeted agents can vary substantially depending on unexplored components of the cell genotype. PMID:22962324

Roller, Devin; Axelrod, Mark; Capaldo, Brian; Jensen, Karin; Mackey, Aaron; Weber, Michael J; Gioeli, Daniel

2012-01-01

21

A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies a Role for the Cortical Actin Patch\\/Endocytosis Complex in the Response to Nutrient Deprivation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Saccharomyces cerevisiae whi2 cells are unable to halt cell division in response to nutrient limitation and are sensitive to a wide variety of stresses. A synthetic lethal screen resulted in the isolation of siw mutants that had a phenotype similar to that of whi2. Among these were mutations affecting SIW14, FEN2, SLT2, and THR4. Fluid-phase endocytosis is severely reduced or

Alison Care; Katherine A. Vousden; Katie M. Binley; Pippa Radcliffe; Janet Trevethick; Ilaria Mannazzu; Peter E. Sudbery

2004-01-01

22

Combining chemical genomics screens in yeast to reveal spectrum of effects of chemical inhibition of sphingolipid biosynthesis  

PubMed Central

Background Single genome-wide screens for the effect of altered gene dosage on drug sensitivity in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae provide only a partial picture of the mechanism of action of a drug. Results Using the example of the tumor cell invasion inhibitor dihydromotuporamine C, we show that a more complete picture of drug action can be obtained by combining different chemical genomics approaches – analysis of the sensitivity of ?0 cells lacking mitochondrial DNA, drug-induced haploinsufficiency, suppression of drug sensitivity by gene overexpression and chemical-genetic synthetic lethality screening using strains deleted of nonessential genes. Killing of yeast by this chemical requires a functional mitochondrial electron-transport chain and cytochrome c heme lyase function. However, we find that it does not require genes associated with programmed cell death in yeast. The chemical also inhibits endocytosis and intracellular vesicle trafficking and interferes with vacuolar acidification in yeast and in human cancer cells. These effects can all be ascribed to inhibition of sphingolipid biosynthesis by dihydromotuporamine C. Conclusion Despite their similar conceptual basis, namely altering drug sensitivity by modifying gene dosage, each of the screening approaches provided a distinct set of information that, when integrated, revealed a more complete picture of the mechanism of action of a drug on cells. PMID:19144191

2009-01-01

23

The genesis of an exceptionally lethal venom in the timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) revealed through comparative venom-gland transcriptomics  

PubMed Central

Background Snake venoms generally show sequence and quantitative variation within and between species, but some rattlesnakes have undergone exceptionally rapid, dramatic shifts in the composition, lethality, and pharmacological effects of their venoms. Such shifts have occurred within species, most notably in Mojave (Crotalus scutulatus), South American (C. durissus), and timber (C. horridus) rattlesnakes, resulting in some populations with extremely potent, neurotoxic venoms without the hemorrhagic effects typical of rattlesnake bites. Results To better understand the evolutionary changes that resulted in the potent venom of a population of C. horridus from northern Florida, we sequenced the venom-gland transcriptome of an animal from this population for comparison with the previously described transcriptome of the eastern diamondback rattlesnake (C. adamanteus), a congener with a more typical rattlesnake venom. Relative to the toxin transcription of C. adamanteus, which consisted primarily of snake-venom metalloproteinases, C-type lectins, snake-venom serine proteinases, and myotoxin-A, the toxin transcription of C. horridus was far simpler in composition and consisted almost entirely of snake-venom serine proteinases, phospholipases A2, and bradykinin-potentiating and C-type natriuretic peptides. Crotalus horridus lacked significant expression of the hemorrhagic snake-venom metalloproteinases and C-type lectins. Evolution of shared toxin families involved differential expansion and loss of toxin clades within each species and pronounced differences in the highly expressed toxin paralogs. Toxin genes showed significantly higher rates of nonsynonymous substitution than nontoxin genes. The expression patterns of nontoxin genes were conserved between species, despite the vast differences in toxin expression. Conclusions Our results represent the first complete, sequence-based comparison between the venoms of closely related snake species and reveal in unprecedented detail the rapid evolution of snake venoms. We found that the difference in venom properties resulted from major changes in expression levels of toxin gene families, differential gene-family expansion and loss, changes in which paralogs within gene families were expressed at high levels, and higher nonsynonymous substitution rates in the toxin genes relative to nontoxins. These massive alterations in the genetics of the venom phenotype emphasize the evolutionary lability and flexibility of this ecologically critical trait. PMID:23758969

2013-01-01

24

2D NMR-spectroscopic screening reveals polyketides in ladybugs.  

PubMed

Small molecules of biological origin continue to yield the most promising leads for drug design, but systematic approaches for exploring nature's cache of structural diversity are lacking. Here, we demonstrate the use of 2D NMR spectroscopy to screen a library of biorationally selected insect metabolite samples for partial structures indicating the presence of new chemical entities. This NMR-spectroscopic survey enabled detection of novel compounds in complex metabolite mixtures without prior fractionation or isolation. Our screen led to discovery and subsequent isolation of two families of tricyclic pyrones in Delphastus catalinae, a tiny ladybird beetle that is employed commercially as a biological pest control agent. The D. catalinae pyrones are based on 23-carbon polyketide chains forming 1,11-dioxo-2,6,10-trioxaanthracene and 4,8-dioxo-1,9,13-trioxaanthracene derivatives, representing ring systems not previously found in nature. This study highlights the utility of 2D NMR-spectroscopic screening for exploring nature's structure space and suggests that insect metabolomes remain vastly underexplored. PMID:21646540

Deyrup, Stephen T; Eckman, Laura E; McCarthy, Patrick H; Smedley, Scott R; Meinwald, Jerrold; Schroeder, Frank C

2011-06-14

25

2D NMR-spectroscopic screening reveals polyketides in ladybugs  

PubMed Central

Small molecules of biological origin continue to yield the most promising leads for drug design, but systematic approaches for exploring nature’s cache of structural diversity are lacking. Here, we demonstrate the use of 2D NMR spectroscopy to screen a library of biorationally selected insect metabolite samples for partial structures indicating the presence of new chemical entities. This NMR-spectroscopic survey enabled detection of novel compounds in complex metabolite mixtures without prior fractionation or isolation. Our screen led to discovery and subsequent isolation of two families of tricyclic pyrones in Delphastus catalinae, a tiny ladybird beetle that is employed commercially as a biological pest control agent. The D. catalinae pyrones are based on 23-carbon polyketide chains forming 1,11-dioxo-2,6,10-trioxaanthracene and 4,8-dioxo-1,9,13-trioxaanthracene derivatives, representing ring systems not previously found in nature. This study highlights the utility of 2D NMR-spectroscopic screening for exploring nature’s structure space and suggests that insect metabolomes remain vastly underexplored. PMID:21646540

Deyrup, Stephen T.; Eckman, Laura E.; McCarthy, Patrick H.; Smedley, Scott R.; Meinwald, Jerrold; Schroeder, Frank C.

2011-01-01

26

A synthetic lethal screen identifies a role for the cortical actin patch/endocytosis complex in the response to nutrient deprivation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.  

PubMed

Saccharomyces cerevisiae whi2Delta cells are unable to halt cell division in response to nutrient limitation and are sensitive to a wide variety of stresses. A synthetic lethal screen resulted in the isolation of siw mutants that had a phenotype similar to that of whi2Delta. Among these were mutations affecting SIW14, FEN2, SLT2, and THR4. Fluid-phase endocytosis is severely reduced or abolished in whi2Delta, siw14Delta, fen2Delta, and thr4Delta mutants. Furthermore, whi2Delta and siw14Delta mutants produce large actin clumps in stationary phase similar to those seen in prk1Delta ark1Delta mutants defective in protein kinases that regulate the actin cytoskeleton. Overexpression of SIW14 in a prk1Delta strain resulted in a loss of cortical actin patches and cables and was lethal. Overexpression of SIW14 also rescued the caffeine sensitivity of the slt2 mutant isolated in the screen, but this was not due to alteration of the phosphorylation state of Slt2. These observations suggest that endocytosis and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton are required for the proper response to nutrient limitation. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that rvs161Delta, sla1Delta, sla2Delta, vrp1Delta, ypt51Delta, ypt52Delta, and end3Delta mutations, which disrupt the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and/or reduce endocytosis, have a phenotype similar to that of whi2Delta mutants. PMID:15020461

Care, Alison; Vousden, Katherine A; Binley, Katie M; Radcliffe, Pippa; Trevethick, Janet; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Sudbery, Peter E

2004-02-01

27

A synthetic lethal screen identifies a role for the cortical actin patch/endocytosis complex in the response to nutrient deprivation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.  

PubMed Central

Saccharomyces cerevisiae whi2Delta cells are unable to halt cell division in response to nutrient limitation and are sensitive to a wide variety of stresses. A synthetic lethal screen resulted in the isolation of siw mutants that had a phenotype similar to that of whi2Delta. Among these were mutations affecting SIW14, FEN2, SLT2, and THR4. Fluid-phase endocytosis is severely reduced or abolished in whi2Delta, siw14Delta, fen2Delta, and thr4Delta mutants. Furthermore, whi2Delta and siw14Delta mutants produce large actin clumps in stationary phase similar to those seen in prk1Delta ark1Delta mutants defective in protein kinases that regulate the actin cytoskeleton. Overexpression of SIW14 in a prk1Delta strain resulted in a loss of cortical actin patches and cables and was lethal. Overexpression of SIW14 also rescued the caffeine sensitivity of the slt2 mutant isolated in the screen, but this was not due to alteration of the phosphorylation state of Slt2. These observations suggest that endocytosis and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton are required for the proper response to nutrient limitation. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that rvs161Delta, sla1Delta, sla2Delta, vrp1Delta, ypt51Delta, ypt52Delta, and end3Delta mutations, which disrupt the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and/or reduce endocytosis, have a phenotype similar to that of whi2Delta mutants. PMID:15020461

Care, Alison; Vousden, Katherine A; Binley, Katie M; Radcliffe, Pippa; Trevethick, Janet; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Sudbery, Peter E

2004-01-01

28

Synthetic Lethality with the dut Defect in Escherichia coli Reveals Layers of DNA Damage of Increasing Complexity Due to Uracil Incorporation?  

PubMed Central

Synthetic lethality is inviability of a double-mutant combination of two fully viable single mutants, commonly interpreted as redundancy at an essential metabolic step. The dut-1 defect in Escherichia coli inactivates dUTPase, causing increased uracil incorporation in DNA and known synthetic lethalities [SL(dut) mutations]. According to the redundancy logic, most of these SL(dut) mutations should affect nucleotide metabolism. After a systematic search for SL(dut) mutants, we did identify a single defect in the DNA precursor metabolism, inactivating thymidine kinase (tdk), that confirmed the redundancy explanation of synthetic lethality. However, we found that the bulk of mutations interacting genetically with dut are in DNA repair, revealing layers of damage of increasing complexity that uracil-DNA incorporation sends through the chromosomal metabolism. Thus, we isolated mutants in functions involved in (i) uracil-DNA excision (ung, polA, and xthA); (ii) double-strand DNA break repair (recA, recBC, and ruvABC); and (iii) chromosomal-dimer resolution (xerC, xerD, and ftsK). These mutants in various DNA repair transactions cannot be redundant with dUTPase and instead reveal “defect-damage-repair” cycles linking unrelated metabolic pathways. In addition, two SL(dut) inserts (phoU and degP) identify functions that could act to support the weakened activity of the Dut-1 mutant enzyme, suggesting the “compensation” explanation for this synthetic lethality. We conclude that genetic interactions with dut can be explained by redundancy, by defect-damage-repair cycles, or as compensation. PMID:18586941

Ting, Helen; Kouzminova, Elena A.; Kuzminov, Andrei

2008-01-01

29

Yeast genetic screen reveals novel therapeutic strategy for ALS  

PubMed Central

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a selective loss of motor neurons. There is no cure and few effective treatments. The RNA-binding protein TDP-43 contributes to the pathogenesis of ALS. TDP-43 is depleted from the nucleus and accumulates in cytoplasmic aggregates in the degenerating neurons and glia of most ALS patients. Furthermore, mutations in the TDP-43 gene cause rare familial and sporadic forms of the disease. Thus, therapeutic strategies targeting TDP-43 may be efficacious. We have used the yeast model system to identify the mechanisms by which TDP-43 aggregation contributes to ALS and to identify approaches to protect cells from the toxic effects of TDP-43 aggregation. Using an unbiased yeast genetic screen we discovered Dbr1 as a potent suppressor of TDP-43 toxicity. Yeast cells in which Dbr1 is deleted are resistant to TDP-43 toxicity. Dbr1 inhibition in mammalian cells is also sufficient to protect against TDP-43 cytotoxicity. Here, we review this recent discovery, highlighting future approaches aimed at extending these studies and pursuing Dbr1 as a novel therapeutic target for ALS. PMID:25002991

Figley, Matthew D.; Gitler, Aaron D.

2013-01-01

30

In trans complementation of lethal factor reveal roles in colonization and dissemination in a murine mouse model.  

PubMed

Lethal factor (LF) is a component of the B. anthracis exotoxin and critical for pathogenesis. The roles of LF in early anthrax pathogenesis, such as colonization and dissemination from the initial site of infection, are poorly understood. In mice models of infection, LF-deficient strains either have altered dissemination patterns or do not colonize, precluding analysis of the role of LF in colonization and dissemination from the portal of entry. Previous reports indicate rabbit and guinea pig models infected with LF-deficient strains have decreased virulence, yet the inability to use bioluminescent imaging techniques to track B. anthracis growth and dissemination in these hosts makes analysis of early pathogenesis challenging. In this study, the roles of LF early in infection were analyzed using bioluminescent signature tagged libraries of B. anthracis with varying ratios of LF-producing and LF-deficient clones. Populations where all clones produced LF and populations where only 40% of clones produce LF were equally virulent. The 40% LF-producing clones trans complimented the LF mutants and permitted them to colonize and disseminate. Decreases of the LF producing strains to 10% or 0.3% of the population led to increased host survival and decreased trans complementation of the LF mutants. A library with 10% LF producing clones could replicate and disseminate, but fewer clones disseminated and the mutant clones were less competitive than wild type. The inoculum with 0.3% LF producing clones could not colonize the host. This strongly suggests that between 10% and 0.3% of the population must produce LF in order to colonize. In total, these findings suggest that a threshold of LF must be produced in order for colonization and dissemination to occur in vivo. These observations suggest that LF has a major role in the early stages of colonization and dissemination. PMID:24763227

Lowe, David E; Ya, Jason; Glomski, Ian J

2014-01-01

31

RNAi Screen in Drosophila Cells Reveals the Involvement of the Tom Complex  

E-print Network

RNAi Screen in Drosophila Cells Reveals the Involvement of the Tom Complex in Chlamydia Infection developmental cycle in Drosophila SL2 cells. Using this model system, we have performed a genome-wide RNA of nuclear-encoded proteins to the mitochondria, as required for C. caviae infection of Drosophila cells

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

32

What to Do if Your Baby's Screening Reveals a Possible Hearing Problem  

MedlinePLUS

Home Health Info Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness What to Do if Your Baby’s Screening Reveals a Possible Hearing Problem What to Do if ... One of the most common tools is the hearing aid, a device worn in or behind the ear that helps make sounds louder. Hearing aids have ...

33

Lethal, potentially lethal lesion model  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical framework to describe the formation of lethal mutations by radiation is presented. Lesions that are repaired (and misrepaired) in each type of experiment described (delayed plating and split dose) are assumed to be the same. In this model the same (potentially lethal) lesions cause both sublethal and potentially lethal damage. Potentially lethal damage is defined as damage which may be modified by alterations in postirradiation conditions. Sublethal damage is cellular damage whose accumulation may lead to lethality. A crucial consideration in the expression of the damage is the kind of medium in which the cells are placed during the repair period. Fresh or growth medium (F-medium) is assumed to cause fixation of damage after about 3 hours, while no fixation (only misrepair) occurs in conditioned medium (C-medium).

Curtis, S.B.

1983-07-01

34

Histopathology reveals correlative and unique phenotypes in a high-throughput mouse phenotyping screen  

PubMed Central

The Mouse Genetics Project (MGP) at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute aims to generate and phenotype over 800 genetically modified mouse lines over the next 5 years to gain a better understanding of mammalian gene function and provide an invaluable resource to the scientific community for follow-up studies. Phenotyping includes the generation of a standardized biobank of paraffin-embedded tissues for each mouse line, but histopathology is not routinely performed. In collaboration with the Pathology Core of the Centre for Modeling Human Disease (CMHD) we report the utility of histopathology in a high-throughput primary phenotyping screen. Histopathology was assessed in an unbiased selection of 50 mouse lines with (n=30) or without (n=20) clinical phenotypes detected by the standard MGP primary phenotyping screen. Our findings revealed that histopathology added correlating morphological data in 19 of 30 lines (63.3%) in which the primary screen detected a phenotype. In addition, seven of the 50 lines (14%) presented significant histopathology findings that were not associated with or predicted by the standard primary screen. Three of these seven lines had no clinical phenotype detected by the standard primary screen. Incidental and strain-associated background lesions were present in all mutant lines with good concordance to wild-type controls. These findings demonstrate the complementary and unique contribution of histopathology to high-throughput primary phenotyping of mutant mice. PMID:24652767

Adissu, Hibret A.; Estabel, Jeanne; Sunter, David; Tuck, Elizabeth; Hooks, Yvette; Carragher, Damian M.; Clarke, Kay; Karp, Natasha A.; Project, Sanger Mouse Genetics; Newbigging, Susan; Jones, Nora; Morikawa, Lily; White, Jacqueline K.; McKerlie, Colin

2014-01-01

35

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Find Funding - Contracts - 290 siRNA Resource for Synthetic Lethal Screening of DNA Repair and Damage Signaling Networks  

Cancer.gov

Human cancers appear to be highly and differentially vulnerable to targeted attack on individual gene expression within their DNA repair networks, especially those pathways that are closely associated with DNA replication. However such lethal combinations (i.e., synthetic lethals) are generally not obvious or easily predicted a priori.

36

A network of conserved damage survival pathways revealed by a genomic RNAi screen.  

PubMed

Damage initiates a pleiotropic cellular response aimed at cellular survival when appropriate. To identify genes required for damage survival, we used a cell-based RNAi screen against the Drosophila genome and the alkylating agent methyl methanesulphonate (MMS). Similar studies performed in other model organisms report that damage response may involve pleiotropic cellular processes other than the central DNA repair components, yet an intuitive systems level view of the cellular components required for damage survival, their interrelationship, and contextual importance has been lacking. Further, by comparing data from different model organisms, identification of conserved and presumably core survival components should be forthcoming. We identified 307 genes, representing 13 signaling, metabolic, or enzymatic pathways, affecting cellular survival of MMS-induced damage. As expected, the majority of these pathways are involved in DNA repair; however, several pathways with more diverse biological functions were also identified, including the TOR pathway, transcription, translation, proteasome, glutathione synthesis, ATP synthesis, and Notch signaling, and these were equally important in damage survival. Comparison with genomic screen data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed no overlap enrichment of individual genes between the species, but a conservation of the pathways. To demonstrate the functional conservation of pathways, five were tested in Drosophila and mouse cells, with each pathway responding to alkylation damage in both species. Using the protein interactome, a significant level of connectivity was observed between Drosophila MMS survival proteins, suggesting a higher order relationship. This connectivity was dramatically improved by incorporating the components of the 13 identified pathways within the network. Grouping proteins into "pathway nodes" qualitatively improved the interactome organization, revealing a highly organized "MMS survival network." We conclude that identification of pathways can facilitate comparative biology analysis when direct gene/orthologue comparisons fail. A biologically intuitive, highly interconnected MMS survival network was revealed after we incorporated pathway data in our interactome analysis. PMID:19543366

Ravi, Dashnamoorthy; Wiles, Amy M; Bhavani, Selvaraj; Ruan, Jianhua; Leder, Philip; Bishop, Alexander J R

2009-06-01

37

Analysis of high-throughput screening reveals the effect of surface topographies on cellular morphology.  

PubMed

Surface topographies of materials considerably impact cellular behavior as they have been shown to affect cell growth, provide cell guidance, and even induce cell differentiation. Consequently, for successful application in tissue engineering, the contact interface of biomaterials needs to be optimized to induce the required cell behavior. However, a rational design of biomaterial surfaces is severely hampered because knowledge is lacking on the underlying biological mechanisms. Therefore, we previously developed a high-throughput screening device (TopoChip) that measures cell responses to large libraries of parameterized topographical material surfaces. Here, we introduce a computational analysis of high-throughput materiome data to capture the relationship between the surface topographies of materials and cellular morphology. We apply robust statistical techniques to find surface topographies that best promote a certain specified cellular response. By augmenting surface screening with data-driven modeling, we determine which properties of the surface topographies influence the morphological properties of the cells. With this information, we build models that predict the cellular response to surface topographies that have not yet been measured. We analyze cellular morphology on 2176 surfaces, and find that the surface topography significantly affects various cellular properties, including the roundness and size of the nucleus, as well as the perimeter and orientation of the cells. Our learned models capture and accurately predict these relationships and reveal a spectrum of topographies that induce various levels of cellular morphologies. Taken together, this novel approach of high-throughput screening of materials and subsequent analysis opens up possibilities for a rational design of biomaterial surfaces. PMID:25554402

Hulsman, Marc; Hulshof, Frits; Unadkat, Hemant; Papenburg, Bernke J; Stamatialis, Dimitrios F; Truckenmüller, Roman; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan; Reinders, Marcel J T

2015-03-01

38

Multiparameter screening reveals a role for Na+ channels in cytokine-induced ?-cell death.  

PubMed

Pancreatic ?-cell death plays a role in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but clinical treatments that specifically target ?-cell survival have not yet been developed. We have recently developed live-cell imaging-based, high-throughput screening methods capable of identifying factors that modulate pancreatic ?-cell death, with the hope of finding drugs that can intervene in this process. In the present study, we used a high-content screen and the Prestwick Chemical Library of small molecules to identify drugs that block cell death resulting from exposure to a cocktail of cytotoxic cytokines (25 ng/mL TNF-?, 10 ng/mL IL-1?, and 10 ng/mL IFN-?). Data analysis with self-organizing maps revealed that 19 drugs had profiles similar to that of the no cytokine condition, indicating protection. Carbamazepine, an antiepileptic Na(+) channel inhibitor, was particularly interesting because Na(+) channels are not generally considered targets for antiapoptotic therapy in diabetes and because the function of these channels in ?-cells has not been well studied. We analyzed the expression and characteristics of Na(+) currents in mature ?-cells from MIP-GFP mice. We confirmed the dose-dependent protective effects of carbamazepine and another use-dependent Na(+) channel blocker in cytokine-treated mouse islet cells. Carbamazepine down-regulated the proapoptotic and endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling induced by cytokines. Together, these studies point to Na(+) channels as a novel therapeutic target in diabetes. PMID:24438339

Yang, Yu Hsuan Carol; Vilin, Yury Y; Roberge, Michel; Kurata, Harley T; Johnson, James D

2014-03-01

39

Physical and genetic-interaction density reveals functional organization and informs significance cutoffs in genome-wide screens  

PubMed Central

Genome-wide experiments often measure quantitative differences between treated and untreated cells to identify affected strains. For these studies, statistical models are typically used to determine significance cutoffs. We developed a method termed “CLIK” (Cutoff Linked to Interaction Knowledge) that overlays biological knowledge from the interactome on screen results to derive a cutoff. The method takes advantage of the fact that groups of functionally related interacting genes often respond similarly to experimental conditions and, thus, cluster in a ranked list of screen results. We applied CLIK analysis to five screens of the yeast gene disruption library and found that it defined a significance cutoff that differed from traditional statistics. Importantly, verification experiments revealed that the CLIK cutoff correlated with the position in the rank order where the rate of true positives drops off significantly. In addition, the gene sets defined by CLIK analysis often provide further biological perspectives. For example, applying CLIK analysis retrospectively to a screen for cisplatin sensitivity allowed us to identify the importance of the Hrq1 helicase in DNA crosslink repair. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of CLIK to determine optimal treatment conditions by analyzing genome-wide screens at multiple rapamycin concentrations. We show that CLIK is an extremely useful tool for evaluating screen quality, determining screen cutoffs, and comparing results between screens. Furthermore, because CLIK uses previously annotated interaction data to determine biologically informed cutoffs, it provides additional insights into screen results, which supplement traditional statistical approaches. PMID:23589890

Dittmar, John C.; Pierce, Steven; Rothstein, Rodney; Reid, Robert J. D.

2013-01-01

40

Genome-wide shRNA screen reveals increased mitochondrial dependence upon mTORC2 addiction.  

PubMed

Release from growth factor dependence and acquisition of signalling pathway addiction are critical steps in oncogenesis. To identify genes required on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) addiction, we performed a genome-wide short hairpin RNA screen on a v-H-ras-transformed Pten-deficient cell line that displayed two alternative growth modes, interleukin (IL)-3-independent/mTOR-addicted proliferation (transformed growth mode) and IL-3-dependent/mTOR-non-addicted proliferation (normal growth mode). We screened for genes required only in the absence of IL-3 and thus specifically for the transformed growth mode. The top 800 hits from this conditional lethal screen were analyzed in silico and 235 hits were subsequently rescreened in two additional Pten-deficient cell lines to generate a core set of 47 genes. Hits included genes encoding mTOR and the mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) component rictor and several genes encoding mitochondrial functions including components of the respiratory chain, adenosine triphosphate synthase, the mitochondrial ribosome and mitochondrial fission factor. Small interfering RNA knockdown against a sizeable fraction of these genes triggered apoptosis in human cancer cell lines but not in normal fibroblasts. We conclude that mTORC2-addicted cells require mitochondrial functions that may be novel drug targets in human cancer. PMID:21170086

Colombi, M; Molle, K D; Benjamin, D; Rattenbacher-Kiser, K; Schaefer, C; Betz, C; Thiemeyer, A; Regenass, U; Hall, M N; Moroni, C

2011-03-31

41

An in vivo chemical library screen in Xenopus tadpoles reveals novel pathways involved in angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis  

PubMed Central

Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are essential for organogenesis but also play important roles in tissue regeneration, chronic inflammation, and tumor progression. Here we applied in vivo forward chemical genetics to identify novel compounds and biologic mechanisms involved in (lymph)angiogenesis in Xenopus tadpoles. A novel 2-step screening strategy involving a simple phenotypic read-out (edema formation or larval lethality) followed by semiautomated in situ hybridization was devised and used to screen an annotated chemical library of 1280 bioactive compounds. We identified 32 active compounds interfering with blood vascular and/or lymphatic development in Xenopus. Selected compounds were also tested for activities in a variety of endothelial in vitro assays. Finally, in a proof-of-principle study, the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 7-chloro-4-hydroxy-2-phenyl-1,8-naphthyridine, an inhibitor of blood vascular and lymphatic development in Xenopus, was shown to act also as a potent antagonist of VEGFA-induced adult neovascularization in mice. Taken together, the present chemical library screening strategy in Xenopus tadpoles represents a rapid and highly efficient approach to identify novel pathways involved in (lymph)angiogenesis. In addition, the recovered compounds represent a rich resource for in-depth analysis, and their drug-like features will facilitate further evaluation in preclinical models of inflammation and cancer metastasis. PMID:19478043

Kälin, Roland E.; Bänziger-Tobler, Nadja E.; Detmar, Michael

2009-01-01

42

Elaborate cellulosome architecture of Acetivibrio cellulolyticus revealed by selective screening of cohesin–dockerin interactions  

PubMed Central

Cellulosic waste represents a significant and underutilized carbon source for the biofuel industry. Owing to the recalcitrance of crystalline cellulose to enzymatic degradation, it is necessary to design economical methods of liberating the fermentable sugars required for bioethanol production. One route towards unlocking the potential of cellulosic waste lies in a highly complex class of molecular machines, the cellulosomes. Secreted mainly by anaerobic bacteria, cellulosomes are structurally diverse, cell surface-bound protein assemblies that can contain dozens of catalytic components. The key feature of the cellulosome is its modularity, facilitated by the ultra-high affinity cohesin–dockerin interaction. Due to the enormous number of cohesin and dockerin modules found in a typical cellulolytic organism, a major bottleneck in understanding the biology of cellulosomics is the purification of each cohesin- and dockerin-containing component, prior to analyses of their interaction. As opposed to previous approaches, the present study utilized proteins contained in unpurified whole-cell extracts. This strategy was made possible due to an experimental design that allowed for the relevant proteins to be “purified” via targeted affinity interactions as a function of the binding assay. The approach thus represents a new strategy, appropriate for future medium- to high-throughput screening of whole genomes, to determine the interactions between cohesins and dockerins. We have selected the cellulosome of Acetivibrio cellulolyticus for this work due to its exceptionally complex cellulosome systems and intriguing diversity of its cellulosomal modular components. Containing 41 cohesins and 143 dockerins, A. cellulolyticus has one of the largest number of potential cohesin–dockerin interactions of any organism, and contains unusual and novel cellulosomal features. We have surveyed a representative library of cohesin and dockerin modules spanning the cellulosome’s total cohesin and dockerin sequence diversity, emphasizing the testing of unusual and previously-unknown protein modules. The screen revealed several novel cell-bound cellulosome architectures, thus expanding on those previously known, as well as soluble cellulose systems that are not bound to the bacterial cell surface. This study sets the stage for screening the entire complement of cellulosomal components from A. cellulolyticus and other organisms with large cellulosome systems. The knowledge gained by such efforts brings us closer to understanding the exceptional catalytic abilities of cellulosomes and will allow the use of novel cellulosomal components in artificial assemblies and in enzyme cocktails for sustainable energy-related research programs. PMID:25374780

Hamberg, Yuval; Ruimy-Israeli, Vered; Dassa, Bareket; Barak, Yoav; Lamed, Raphael; Cameron, Kate; Fontes, Carlos M.G.A.

2014-01-01

43

Wnt inhibitor screen reveals iron dependence of ?-catenin signaling in cancers.  

PubMed

Excessive signaling from the Wnt pathway is associated with numerous human cancers. Using a high throughput screen designed to detect inhibitors of Wnt/?-catenin signaling, we identified a series of acyl hydrazones that act downstream of the ?-catenin destruction complex to inhibit both Wnt-induced and cancer-associated constitutive Wnt signaling via destabilization of ?-catenin. We found that these acyl hydrazones bind iron in vitro and in intact cells and that chelating activity is required to abrogate Wnt signaling and block the growth of colorectal cancer cell lines with constitutive Wnt signaling. In addition, we found that multiple iron chelators, desferrioxamine, deferasirox, and ciclopirox olamine similarly blocked Wnt signaling and cell growth. Moreover, in patients with AML administered ciclopirox olamine, we observed decreased expression of the Wnt target gene AXIN2 in leukemic cells. The novel class of acyl hydrazones would thus be prime candidates for further development as chemotherapeutic agents. Taken together, our results reveal a critical requirement for iron in Wnt signaling and they show that iron chelation serves as an effective mechanism to inhibit Wnt signaling in humans. PMID:22009536

Song, Siyuan; Christova, Tania; Perusini, Stephen; Alizadeh, Solmaz; Bao, Ren-Yue; Miller, Bryan W; Hurren, Rose; Jitkova, Yulia; Gronda, Marcela; Isaac, Methvin; Joseph, Babu; Subramaniam, Ratheesh; Aman, Ahmed; Chau, Anh; Hogge, Donna E; Weir, Scott J; Kasper, James; Schimmer, Aaron D; Al-awar, Rima; Wrana, Jeff L; Attisano, Liliana

2011-12-15

44

In Vivo RNAi Screen Reveals Neddylation Genes as Novel Regulators of Hedgehog Signaling  

PubMed Central

Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is highly conserved in all metazoan animals and plays critical roles in many developmental processes. Dysregulation of the Hh signaling cascade has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer. Although key components of the Hh pathway have been identified, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the regulation of individual Hh signaling molecules. Here, we report the identification of novel regulators of the Hh pathway, obtained from an in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila. By selectively targeting critical genes functioning in post-translational modification systems utilizing ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like proteins, we identify two novel genes (dUba3 and dUbc12) that negatively regulate Hh signaling activity. We provide in vivo and in vitro evidence illustrating that dUba3 and dUbc12 are essential components of the neddylation pathway; they function in an enzyme cascade to conjugate the ubiquitin-like NEDD8 modifier to Cullin proteins. Neddylation activates the Cullin-containing ubiquitin ligase complex, which in turn promotes the degradation of Cubitus interruptus (Ci), the downstream transcription factor of the Hh pathway. Our study reveals a conserved molecular mechanism of the neddylation pathway in Drosophila and sheds light on the complex post-translational regulations in Hh signaling. PMID:21931660

Su, Ying; Liu, Min; Ospina, Jason K.; Yang, Shengyuan; Zhu, Alan Jian

2011-01-01

45

A single-cell imaging screen reveals multiple effects of secreted small molecules on bacteria  

PubMed Central

Bacteria cells exist in close proximity to other cells of both the same and different species. Bacteria secrete a large number of different chemical species, and the local concentrations of these compounds at the surfaces of nearby cells may reach very high levels. It is fascinating to imagine how individual cells might sense and respond to the complex mix of signals at their surface. However, it is difficult to measure exactly what the local environmental composition looks like, or what the effects of individual compounds on nearby cells are. Here, an electron microscopy imaging screen was designed that would detect morphological changes induced by secreted small molecules. This differs from conventional approaches by detecting structural changes in individual cells rather than gene expression or growth rate changes at the population level. For example, one of the changes detected here was an increase in outer membrane vesicle production, which does not necessarily correspond to a change in gene expression. This initial study focussed on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Burkholderia dolosa, and revealed an intriguing range of effects of secreted small molecules on cells both within and between species. PMID:24910069

Salje, Jeanne

2014-01-01

46

Comprehensive Bee Pathogen Screening in Belgium Reveals Crithidia mellificae as a New Contributory Factor to Winter Mortality  

PubMed Central

Since the last decade, unusually high honey bee colony losses have been reported mainly in North-America and Europe. Here, we report on a comprehensive bee pathogen screening in Belgium covering 363 bee colonies that were screened for 18 known disease-causing pathogens and correlate their incidence in summer with subsequent winter mortality. Our analyses demonstrate that, in addition to Varroa destructor, the presence of the trypanosomatid parasite Crithidia mellificae and the microsporidian parasite Nosema ceranae in summer are also predictive markers of winter mortality, with a negative synergy being observed between the two in terms of their effects on colony mortality. Furthermore, we document the first occurrence of a parasitizing phorid fly in Europe, identify a new fourth strain of Lake Sinai Virus (LSV), and confirm the presence of other little reported pathogens such as Apicystis bombi, Aphid Lethal Paralysis Virus (ALPV), Spiroplasma apis, Spiroplasma melliferum and Varroa destructor Macula-like Virus (VdMLV). Finally, we provide evidence that ALPV and VdMLV replicate in honey bees and show that viruses of the LSV complex and Black Queen Cell Virus tend to non-randomly co-occur together. We also noticed a significant correlation between the number of pathogen species and colony losses. Overall, our results contribute significantly to our understanding of honey bee diseases and the likely causes of their current decline in Europe. PMID:23991113

Ravoet, Jorgen; Maharramov, Jafar; Meeus, Ivan; De Smet, Lina; Wenseleers, Tom; Smagghe, Guy; de Graaf, Dirk C.

2013-01-01

47

An optimized lentivirus-mediated RNAi screen reveals kinase modulators of kinesin-5 inhibitor sensitivity.  

PubMed

Abstract: Induction of RNA interference (RNAi) in human cells has enabled comprehensive functional annotation of the human genome via reverse genetic screens. Here we describe an optimized semiautomated method to produce, titrate, and screen large collections of short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-containing lentiviral vectors. We also present results from a pilot lentiviral RNAi screen for kinases whose silencing modulates sensitivity to a mitotic spindle protein kinesin-5 inhibitor (kinesin-5i). Our screen identified three distinct serine/threonine kinase 6 shRNA vectors within our library as enhancers of kinesin-5i-mediated HT29 cell growth inhibition. In contrast, three distinct shRNAs targeting cell division cycle 2/cyclin-dependent kinase 1 resulted in kinesin-5i resistance. These results demonstrate the feasibility of screening with large collections of lentiviral vectors to identify drug enhancers and suppressors. PMID:18205551

Klinghoffer, Richard A; Roberts, Brian; Annis, James; Frazier, Jason; Lewis, Patrick; Linsley, Peter S; Cleary, Michele A

2008-02-01

48

A genome scale overexpression screen to reveal drug activity in human cells  

PubMed Central

Target identification is a critical step in the lengthy and expensive process of drug development. Here, we describe a genome-wide screening platform that uses systematic overexpression of pooled human ORFs to understand drug mode-of-action and resistance mechanisms. We first calibrated our screen with the well-characterized drug methotrexate. We then identified new genes involved in the bioactivity of diverse drugs including antineoplastic agents and biologically active molecules. Finally, we focused on the transcription factor RHOXF2 whose overexpression conferred resistance to DNA damaging agents. This approach represents an orthogonal method for functional screening and, to our knowledge, has never been reported before. PMID:24944581

2014-01-01

49

ResponseNet: revealing signaling and regulatory networks linking genetic transcriptomic screening data  

E-print Network

Cellular response to stimuli is typically complex and involves both regulatory and metabolic processes. Large-scale experimental efforts to identify components of these processes often comprise of genetic screening and ...

Lan, Alex

50

ResponseNet: revealing signaling and regulatory networks linking genetic and transcriptomic screening data  

E-print Network

Cellular response to stimuli is typically complex and involves both regulatory and metabolic processes. Large-scale experimental efforts to identify components of these processes often comprise of genetic screening and ...

Lan, Alex

51

Antileishmanial High-Throughput Drug Screening Reveals Drug Candidates with New Scaffolds  

E-print Network

), Institut Pasteur Korea, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, 2 Screening Technology & Pharmacology Group, Institut Pasteur Korea, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, 3 Active Compound Space Group, Institut Pasteur Korea, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, 4 Image Mining Group, Institut Pasteur Korea

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

52

A Directed Mutagenesis Screen in Drosophila melanogaster Reveals New Mutants That Influence hedgehog Signaling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hedgehog signaling pathway has been recognized as essential for patterning processes in develop- ment of metazoan animal species. The signaling pathway is, however, not entirely understood. To start to address this problem, we set out to isolate new mutations that influence Hedgehog signaling. We performed a mutagenesis screen for mutations that dominantly suppress Hedgehog overexpression pheno- types in the

Nicola Haines; Marcel van den Heuvel

53

MicroSCALE Screening Reveals Genetic Modifiers of Therapeutic Response in Melanoma  

PubMed Central

Cell microarrays are a promising tool for performing large-scale functional genomic screening in mammalian cells at reasonable cost, but due to technical limitations, have been restricted for use with a narrow range of cell lines and short-term assays. Here, we describe MicroSCALE (Microarrays of Spatially Confined Adhesive Lentiviral Features), a cell microarray-based platform that enables application of this technology to a wide range of cell types and longer term assays. We used MicroSCALE to uncover kinases that when overexpressed partially desensitized B-RAFV600E-mutant melanoma cells to inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) RAF, the MAPKKs MEK1 and 2, mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), or PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase). These screens indicated that cells treated with inhibitors acting through common mechanisms were affected by a similar profile of overexpressed proteins. In contrast, screens involving inhibitors acting through distinct mechanisms yielded unique profiles, a finding that has potential relevance for small molecule target identification and combination drugging studies. Further, by integrating large-scale functional screening results with cancer cell line gene expression and pharmacological sensitivity data, we validated the nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) pathway as a potential mediator of resistance to MAPK pathway inhibitors. The MicroSCALE platform described here may enable new classes of large-scale, resource-efficient screens that were not previously feasible, including those involving combinations of cell lines, perturbations, and assay outputs or those involving limited numbers of cells and limited or expensive reagents. PMID:22589389

Wood, Kris C.; Konieczkowski, David J.; Johannessen, Cory M.; Boehm, Jesse S.; Tamayo, Pablo; Botvinnik, Olga B.; Mesirov, Jill P.; Hahn, William C.; Root, David E.; Garraway, Levi A.; Sabatini, David M.

2012-01-01

54

Phenotypic Screening Reveals Topoisomerase I as a Breast Cancer Stem Cell Therapeutic Target  

PubMed Central

Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation generally thought to be responsible for cancer initiation and progression. Because CSCs are often rare in the total tumor cell population and differentiate rapidly when grown in culture, it has been challenging to uncover compounds that selectively target CSCs. We previously described CSC-emulating cells derived from breast cancer cell lines that maintained a stable undifferentiated state. We optimized a phenotypic assay with these cells and screened 1,280-bioactive compounds, identifying five that preferentially inhibited CSC-like cell proliferation. Using a compound-guided target identification approach, we found high topoisomerase I (Topo I) expression levels in breast CSC-like cells and primary breast CSCs. Structurally unrelated small molecules targeting Topo I preferentially inhibited CSC-like cells. These results illustrate the substantial power of this CSC phenotypic screening platform and promote Topo I as a potential molecular therapeutic target for therapies aimed at expunging CSCs. PMID:22948175

Zhang, Fang; Rothermund, Kristi; Gangadharan, Sajithlal B.; Pommier, Yves; Prochownik, Edward V.; Lazo, John S.

2012-01-01

55

Functional proteomic screens reveal an essential extracellular role for hsp90? in cancer cell invasiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tumour cell invasiveness is crucial for cancer metastasis and is not yet understood. Here we describe two functional screens for proteins required for the invasion of fibrosarcoma cells that identified the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (hsp90). The hsp90? isoform, but not hsp90?, is expressed extracellularly where it interacts with the matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). Inhibition of extracellular hsp90?

Brenda K. Eustace; Takashi Sakurai; Jean K. Stewart; Dean Yimlamai; Christine Unger; Carol Zehetmeier; Blanca Lain; Claudia Torella; Stefan W. Henning; Gerald Beste; Bradley T. Scroggins; Len Neckers; Leodevico L. Ilag; Daniel G. Jay

2004-01-01

56

A Whole Cell Pathway Screen Reveals Seven Novel Chemosensitizers to Combat Chloroquine Resistant Malaria  

PubMed Central

Due to the widespread prevalence of resistant parasites, chloroquine (CQ) was removed from front-line antimalarial chemotherapy in the 1990s despite its initial promise of disease eradication. Since then, resistance-conferring mutations have been identified in transporters such as the PfCRT, that allow for the efflux of CQ from its primary site of action, the parasite digestive vacuole. Chemosensitizing/chemoreversing compounds interfere with the function of these transporters thereby sensitizing parasites to CQ once again. However, compounds identified thus far have disappointing in vivo efficacy and screening for alternative candidates is required to revive this strategy. In this study, we propose a simple and direct means to rapidly screen for such compounds using a fluorescent-tagged CQ molecule. When this screen was applied to a small library, seven novel chemosensitizers (octoclothepin, methiothepin, metergoline, loperamide, chlorprothixene, L-703,606 and mibefradil) were quickly elucidated, including two which showed greater potency than the classical chemosensitizers verapamil and desipramine. PMID:23615863

Ch'ng, Jun-Hong; Mok, Sachel; Bozdech, Zbynek; Lear, Martin James; Boudhar, Aicha; Russell, Bruce; Nosten, Francois; Tan, Kevin Shyong-Wei

2013-01-01

57

A whole cell pathway screen reveals seven novel chemosensitizers to combat chloroquine resistant malaria.  

PubMed

Due to the widespread prevalence of resistant parasites, chloroquine (CQ) was removed from front-line antimalarial chemotherapy in the 1990s despite its initial promise of disease eradication. Since then, resistance-conferring mutations have been identified in transporters such as the PfCRT, that allow for the efflux of CQ from its primary site of action, the parasite digestive vacuole. Chemosensitizing/chemoreversing compounds interfere with the function of these transporters thereby sensitizing parasites to CQ once again. However, compounds identified thus far have disappointing in vivo efficacy and screening for alternative candidates is required to revive this strategy. In this study, we propose a simple and direct means to rapidly screen for such compounds using a fluorescent-tagged CQ molecule. When this screen was applied to a small library, seven novel chemosensitizers (octoclothepin, methiothepin, metergoline, loperamide, chlorprothixene, L-703,606 and mibefradil) were quickly elucidated, including two which showed greater potency than the classical chemosensitizers verapamil and desipramine. PMID:23615863

Ch'ng, Jun-Hong; Mok, Sachel; Bozdech, Zbynek; Lear, Martin James; Boudhar, Aicha; Russell, Bruce; Nosten, Francois; Tan, Kevin Shyong-Wei

2013-01-01

58

Systematic combination screening reveals synergism between rapamycin and sunitinib against human lung cancer.  

PubMed

Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) acts as a hub integrating signals from nutrient availability and growth factors and plays central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth, which has been validated as a promising target for cancer therapy. Rapamycin and its analogues have emerged as the first generation of mTOR inhibitors, but their efficacy is modest in clinical settings. Combinatorial use of rapamycin with other drugs is a promising strategy to improve its anticancer activity. Here we developed an unbiased systematic binary screening platform aiming to discover new remedy for rapamycin-based cancer therapy. We found that sunitinib emerged as one of the clinically available anticancer drugs screened that displayed significant synergy with rapamycin in NSCLC cells. Combination of rapamycin with sunitinib resulted in enhanced cell cycle arrest in G1 phase, which was accompanied with enhanced suppression of mTOR signaling and disruption of the negative feedback loop that activate AKT upon mTORC1 inhibition. Furthermore, sunitinib and rapamycin displayed synergistic activity against tube formation by human microvessel endothelial cells as well as outgrowth of endothelial tubes and microvessels both in vitro and in vivo, which is associated with down-regulation of VEGF secretion and HIF1? expression. Our study demonstrated that new combinatorial regimen could be identified via systematic drug combination screening and established a mechanistic rationale for a combination approach using rapalogs and sunitinib in the treatment of human NSCLC. PMID:24018642

Li, Xian; Tong, Lin-Jiang; Ding, Jian; Meng, Ling-Hua

2014-01-01

59

Synthetic Protection Short Interfering RNA Screen Reveals Glyburide as a Novel Radioprotector  

PubMed Central

To assist in screening existing drugs for use as potential radioprotectors, we used a human unbiased 16,560 short interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting the druggable genome. We performed a synthetic protection screen that was designed to identify genes that, when silenced, protected human glioblastoma T98G cells from ?-radiation-induced cell death. We identified 116 candidate protective genes, then identified 10 small molecule inhibitors of 13 of these candidate gene products and tested their radioprotective effects. Glyburide, a clinically used second-generation hypoglycemic drug, effectively decreased radiation-induced cell death in several cell lines including T98G, glioblastoma U-87 MG, and normal lung epithelial BEAS-2B and in primary cultures of astrocytes. Glyburide significantly increased the survival of 32D cl3 murine hematopoietic progenitor cells when administrated before irradiation. Glyburide was radioprotective in vivo (90% of C57BL/6NHsd female mice pretreated with 10 mg/kg glyburide survived 9.5 Gy total-body irradiation compared to 42% of irradiated controls, P = 0.0249). These results demonstrate the power of unbiased siRNA synthetic protection screening with a druggable genome library to identify new radioprotectors. PMID:19772462

Jiang, Jianfei; McDonald, Peter R.; Dixon, Tracy M.; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Nie, Suhua; Epperly, Laura D.; Huang, Zhentai; Kagan, Valerian E.; Lazo, John S.; Epperly, Michael W.; Greenberger, Joel S.

2009-01-01

60

Copper Complexation Screen Reveals Compounds with Potent Antibiotic Properties against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus  

PubMed Central

Macrophages take advantage of the antibacterial properties of copper ions in the killing of bacterial intruders. However, despite the importance of copper for innate immune functions, coordinated efforts to exploit copper ions for therapeutic interventions against bacterial infections are not yet in place. Here we report a novel high-throughput screening platform specifically developed for the discovery and characterization of compounds with copper-dependent antibacterial properties toward methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We detail how one of the identified compounds, glyoxal-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (GTSM), exerts its potent strictly copper-dependent antibacterial properties on MRSA. Our data indicate that the activity of the GTSM-copper complex goes beyond the general antibacterial effects of accumulated copper ions and suggest that, in contrast to prevailing opinion, copper complexes can indeed exhibit species- and target-specific activities. Based on experimental evidence, we propose that copper ions impose structural changes upon binding to the otherwise inactive GTSM ligand and transfer antibacterial properties to the chelate. In turn, GTSM determines target specificity and utilizes a redox-sensitive release mechanism through which copper ions are deployed at or in close proximity to a putative target. According to our proof-of-concept screen, copper activation is not a rare event and even extends to already established drugs. Thus, copper-activated compounds could define a novel class of anti-MRSA agents that amplify copper-dependent innate immune functions of the host. To this end, we provide a blueprint for a high-throughput drug screening campaign which considers the antibacterial properties of copper ions at the host-pathogen interface. PMID:24752262

Haeili, Mehri; Moore, Casey; Davis, Christopher J. C.; Cochran, James B.; Shah, Santosh; Shrestha, Tej B.; Zhang, Yaofang; Bossmann, Stefan H.; Benjamin, William H.

2014-01-01

61

A Targeted RNA Interference Screen Reveals Novel Epigenetic Factors That Regulate Herpesviral Gene Expression  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus (HSV) utilizes and subverts host chromatin mechanisms to express its lytic gene products in mammalian cells. The host cell attempts to silence the incoming viral genome by epigenetic mechanisms, but the viral VP16 and ICP0 proteins promote active chromatin on the viral genome by recruiting other host epigenetic factors. However, the dependence on VP16 and ICP0 differs in different cell lines, implying cell type-dependent functional contributions of epigenetic factors for HSV gene expression. In this study, we performed a targeted RNA interference (RNAi) screen for cellular chromatin factors that are involved in regulation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) gene expression in U2OS osteosarcoma cells, a cell line that complements ICP0 mutant and VP16 mutant virus replication. In this screen, we found the same general classes of chromatin factors that regulate HSV gene expression in U2OS cells as in other cell types, including histone demethylases (HDMs), histone deacetylases (HDACs), histone acetyltransferases (HATs), and chromatin-remodeling factors, but the specific factors within these classes are different from those identified previously for other cell types. For example, KDM3A and KDM1A (LSD1) both demethylate mono- and dimethylated H3K9, but KDM3A emerged in our screen of U2OS cells. Further, small interfering RNA (siRNA) and inhibitor studies support the idea that KDM1A is more critical in HeLa cells, as observed previously, while KDM3A is more critical in U2OS cells. These results argue that different cellular chromatin factors are critical in different cell lines to carry out the positive and negative epigenetic effects exerted on the HSV genome. PMID:24496796

Oh, Hyung Suk; Bryant, Kevin F.; Nieland, Thomas J. F.; Mazumder, Aprotim; Bagul, Mukta; Bathe, Mark; Root, David E.; Knipe, David M.

2014-01-01

62

A Genome-Wide Tethering Screen Reveals Novel Potential Post-Transcriptional Regulators in Trypanosoma brucei  

PubMed Central

In trypanosomatids, gene expression is regulated mainly by post-transcriptional mechanisms, which affect mRNA processing, translation and degradation. Currently, our understanding of factors that regulate either mRNA stability or translation is rather limited. We know that often, the regulators are proteins that bind to the 3?-untranslated region; they presumably interact with ribonucleases and translation factors. However, very few such proteins have been characterized in any detail. Here we describe a genome-wide screen to find proteins implicated in post-transcriptional regulation in Trypanosoma brucei. We made a library of random genomic fragments in a plasmid that was designed for expression of proteins fused to an RNA-binding domain, the lambda-N peptide. This was transfected into cells expressing mRNAs encoding a positive or negative selectable marker, and bearing the “boxB” lambda-N recognition element in the 3?-untranslated region. The screen identified about 300 proteins that could be implicated in post-transcriptional mRNA regulation. These included known regulators, degradative enzymes and translation factors, many canonical RNA-binding proteins, and proteins that act via multi-protein complexes. However there were also nearly 150 potential regulators with no previously annotated function, or functions unrelated to mRNA metabolism. Almost 50 novel regulators were shown to bind RNA using a targeted proteome array. The screen also provided fine structure mapping of the hit candidates' functional domains. Our findings not only confirm the key role that RNA-binding proteins play in the regulation of gene expression in trypanosomatids, but also suggest new roles for previously uncharacterized proteins. PMID:24945722

Erben, Esteban D.; Fadda, Abeer; Lueong, Smiths; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Clayton, Christine

2014-01-01

63

A cell-based screen reveals that the albendazole metabolite, albendazole sulfone, targets Wolbachia.  

PubMed

Wolbachia endosymbionts carried by filarial nematodes give rise to the neglected diseases African river blindness and lymphatic filariasis afflicting millions worldwide. Here we identify new Wolbachia-disrupting compounds by conducting high-throughput cell-based chemical screens using a Wolbachia-infected, fluorescently labeled Drosophila cell line. This screen yielded several Wolbachia-disrupting compounds including three that resembled Albendazole, a widely used anthelmintic drug that targets nematode microtubules. Follow-up studies demonstrate that a common Albendazole metabolite, Albendazole sulfone, reduces intracellular Wolbachia titer both in Drosophila melanogaster and Brugia malayi, the nematode responsible for lymphatic filariasis. Significantly, Albendazole sulfone does not disrupt Drosophila microtubule organization, suggesting that this compound reduces titer through direct targeting of Wolbachia. Accordingly, both DNA staining and FtsZ immunofluorescence demonstrates that Albendazole sulfone treatment induces Wolbachia elongation, a phenotype indicative of binary fission defects. This suggests that the efficacy of Albendazole in treating filarial nematode-based diseases is attributable to dual targeting of nematode microtubules and their Wolbachia endosymbionts. PMID:23028321

Serbus, Laura R; Landmann, Frederic; Bray, Walter M; White, Pamela M; Ruybal, Jordan; Lokey, R Scott; Debec, Alain; Sullivan, William

2012-09-01

64

Novel skin phenotypes revealed by a genome-wide mouse reverse genetic screen  

PubMed Central

Permanent stop-and-shop large-scale mouse mutant resources provide an excellent platform to decipher tissue phenogenomics. Here we analyse skin from 538 knockout mouse mutants generated by the Sanger Institute Mouse Genetics Project. We optimize immunolabelling of tail epidermal wholemounts to allow systematic annotation of hair follicle, sebaceous gland and interfollicular epidermal abnormalities using ontology terms from the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. Of the 50 mutants with an epidermal phenotype, 9 map to human genetic conditions with skin abnormalities. Some mutant genes are expressed in the skin, whereas others are not, indicating systemic effects. One phenotype is affected by diet and several are incompletely penetrant. In-depth analysis of three mutants, Krt76, Myo5a (a model of human Griscelli syndrome) and Mysm1, provides validation of the screen. Our study is the first large-scale genome-wide tissue phenotype screen from the International Knockout Mouse Consortium and provides an open access resource for the scientific community. PMID:24721909

Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Heath, Emma; Smedley, Damian P.; Estabel, Jeanne; Sunter, David; DiTommaso, Tia; White, Jacqueline K.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Smyth, Ian; Steel, Karen P.; Watt, Fiona M.

2014-01-01

65

Chemical Genetics Screening Reveals KIAA1363 as a Cytokine-Lowering Target.  

PubMed

Inflammation is a hallmark of many human diseases, including pain, arthritis, atherosclerosis, obesity and diabetes, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Although there are several successfully marketed small molecules anti-inflammatory drugs such as cyclooxygenase inhibitors and glucocorticoids, many of these compounds are also associated with various adverse cardiovascular or immunosuppressive side effects. Thus, identifying novel anti-inflammatory small molecules and their targets is critical for developing safer and more effective next-generation treatment strategies for inflammatory diseases. Here, we have conducted a chemical genetics screen to identify small molecules that suppress the release of the inflammatory cytokine TNF? from stimulated macrophages. We have used an enzyme class-directed chemical library for our screening efforts to facilitate subsequent target identification using activity-based protein profiling (ABPP). Using this strategy, we have found that KIAA1363 is a novel target for lowering key pro-inflammatory cytokines through affecting key ether lipid metabolism pathways. Our study highlights the application of combining chemical genetics with chemoproteomic and metabolomic approaches toward identifying and characterizing anti-inflammatory smal molecules and their targets. PMID:25343321

Hunerdosse, Devon M; Morris, Patrick J; Miyamoto, David K; Fisher, Karl J; Bateman, Leslie A; Ghazaleh, Jonathan R; Zhong, Sharon; Nomura, Daniel K

2014-12-19

66

A Cell-Based Screen Reveals that the Albendazole Metabolite, Albendazole Sulfone, Targets Wolbachia  

PubMed Central

Wolbachia endosymbionts carried by filarial nematodes give rise to the neglected diseases African river blindness and lymphatic filariasis afflicting millions worldwide. Here we identify new Wolbachia-disrupting compounds by conducting high-throughput cell-based chemical screens using a Wolbachia-infected, fluorescently labeled Drosophila cell line. This screen yielded several Wolbachia-disrupting compounds including three that resembled Albendazole, a widely used anthelmintic drug that targets nematode microtubules. Follow-up studies demonstrate that a common Albendazole metabolite, Albendazole sulfone, reduces intracellular Wolbachia titer both in Drosophila melanogaster and Brugia malayi, the nematode responsible for lymphatic filariasis. Significantly, Albendazole sulfone does not disrupt Drosophila microtubule organization, suggesting that this compound reduces titer through direct targeting of Wolbachia. Accordingly, both DNA staining and FtsZ immunofluorescence demonstrates that Albendazole sulfone treatment induces Wolbachia elongation, a phenotype indicative of binary fission defects. This suggests that the efficacy of Albendazole in treating filarial nematode-based diseases is attributable to dual targeting of nematode microtubules and their Wolbachia endosymbionts. PMID:23028321

Bray, Walter M.; White, Pamela M.; Ruybal, Jordan; Lokey, R. Scott; Debec, Alain; Sullivan, William

2012-01-01

67

Combined zebrafish-yeast chemical-genetic screens reveal gene–copper-nutrition interactions that modulate melanocyte pigmentation  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Hypopigmentation is a feature of copper deficiency in humans, as caused by mutation of the copper (Cu2+) transporter ATP7A in Menkes disease, or an inability to absorb copper after gastric surgery. However, many causes of copper deficiency are unknown, and genetic polymorphisms might underlie sensitivity to suboptimal environmental copper conditions. Here, we combined phenotypic screens in zebrafish for compounds that affect copper metabolism with yeast chemical-genetic profiles to identify pathways that are sensitive to copper depletion. Yeast chemical-genetic interactions revealed that defects in intracellular trafficking pathways cause sensitivity to low-copper conditions; partial knockdown of the analogous Ap3s1 and Ap1s1 trafficking components in zebrafish sensitized developing melanocytes to hypopigmentation in low-copper environmental conditions. Because trafficking pathways are essential for copper loading into cuproproteins, our results suggest that hypomorphic alleles of trafficking components might underlie sensitivity to reduced-copper nutrient conditions. In addition, we used zebrafish-yeast screening to identify a novel target pathway in copper metabolism for the small-molecule MEK kinase inhibitor U0126. The zebrafish-yeast screening method combines the power of zebrafish as a disease model with facile genome-scale identification of chemical-genetic interactions in yeast to enable the discovery and dissection of complex multigenic interactions in disease-gene networks. PMID:20713646

Ishizaki, Hironori; Spitzer, Michaela; Wildenhain, Jan; Anastasaki, Corina; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Dolma, Sonam; Shaw, Michael; Madsen, Erik; Gitlin, Jonathan; Marais, Richard; Tyers, Mike; Patton, E. Elizabeth

2010-01-01

68

What RNAi screens in model organisms revealed about microbicidal response in mammals?  

PubMed Central

The strategies evolved by pathogens to infect hosts and the mechanisms used by the host to eliminate intruders are highly complex. Because several biological pathways and processes are conserved across model organisms, these organisms have been used for many years to elucidate and understand the mechanisms of the host-pathogen relationship and particularly to unravel the molecular processes enacted by the host to kill pathogens. The emergence of RNA interference (RNAi) and the ability to apply it toward studies in model organisms have allowed a breakthrough in the elucidation of host-pathogen interactions. The aim of this mini-review is to highlight and describe recent breakthroughs in the field of host-pathogen interactions using RNAi screens of model organisms. We will focus specifically on the model organisms Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Danio rerio. Moreover, a recent study examining the immune system of planarian will be discussed. PMID:25629007

Abnave, Prasad; Conti, Filippo; Torre, Cedric; Ghigo, Eric

2015-01-01

69

RNAi screening reveals a large signaling network controlling the Golgi apparatus in human cells  

PubMed Central

The Golgi apparatus has many important physiological functions, including sorting of secretory cargo and biosynthesis of complex glycans. These functions depend on the intricate and compartmentalized organization of the Golgi apparatus. To investigate the mechanisms that regulate Golgi architecture, we developed a quantitative morphological assay using three different Golgi compartment markers and quantitative image analysis, and performed a kinome- and phosphatome-wide RNAi screen in HeLa cells. Depletion of 159 signaling genes, nearly 20% of genes assayed, induced strong and varied perturbations in Golgi morphology. Using bioinformatics data, a large regulatory network could be constructed. Specific subnetworks are involved in phosphoinositides regulation, acto-myosin dynamics and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. Most gene depletion also affected Golgi functions, in particular glycan biosynthesis, suggesting that signaling cascades can control glycosylation directly at the Golgi level. Our results provide a genetic overview of the signaling pathways that control the Golgi apparatus in human cells. PMID:23212246

Chia, Joanne; Goh, Germaine; Racine, Victor; Ng, Susanne; Kumar, Pankaj; Bard, Frederic

2012-01-01

70

Phenotypic screening of a targeted mutant library reveals Campylobacter jejuni defenses against oxidative stress.  

PubMed

During host colonization, Campylobacter jejuni is exposed to harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced from the host immune system and from the gut microbiota. Consequently, identification and characterization of oxidative stress defenses are important for understanding how C. jejuni survives ROS stress during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. Previous transcriptomic studies have defined the genes belonging to oxidant stimulons within C. jejuni. We have constructed isogenic deletion mutants of these identified genes to assess their role in oxidative stress survival. Phenotypic screening of 109 isogenic deletion mutants identified 22 genes which were either hypersensitive or hyposensitive to oxidants, demonstrating important roles for these genes in oxidant defense. The significance of these genes in host colonization was also assessed in an in vivo chick model of C. jejuni colonization. Overall, our findings identify an indirect role for motility in resistance to oxidative stress. We found that a nonmotile flagellum mutant, the ?motAB mutant, displayed increased sensitivity to oxidants. Restoration of sensitivity to superoxide in the ?motAB mutant was achieved by fumarate supplementation or tandem deletion of motAB with ccoQ, suggesting that disruption of the proton gradient across the inner membrane resulted in increased superoxide production in this strain. Furthermore, we have identified genes involved in cation transport and binding, detoxification, and energy metabolism that are also important factors in oxidant defense. This report describes the first isogenic deletion mutant library construction for screening of relevant oxidative stress defense genes within C. jejuni, thus providing a comprehensive analysis of the total set of oxidative stress defenses. PMID:24643543

Flint, Annika; Sun, Yi-Qian; Butcher, James; Stahl, Martin; Huang, Hongsheng; Stintzi, Alain

2014-06-01

71

Phenotypic Screening of a Targeted Mutant Library Reveals Campylobacter jejuni Defenses against Oxidative Stress  

PubMed Central

During host colonization, Campylobacter jejuni is exposed to harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced from the host immune system and from the gut microbiota. Consequently, identification and characterization of oxidative stress defenses are important for understanding how C. jejuni survives ROS stress during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. Previous transcriptomic studies have defined the genes belonging to oxidant stimulons within C. jejuni. We have constructed isogenic deletion mutants of these identified genes to assess their role in oxidative stress survival. Phenotypic screening of 109 isogenic deletion mutants identified 22 genes which were either hypersensitive or hyposensitive to oxidants, demonstrating important roles for these genes in oxidant defense. The significance of these genes in host colonization was also assessed in an in vivo chick model of C. jejuni colonization. Overall, our findings identify an indirect role for motility in resistance to oxidative stress. We found that a nonmotile flagellum mutant, the ?motAB mutant, displayed increased sensitivity to oxidants. Restoration of sensitivity to superoxide in the ?motAB mutant was achieved by fumarate supplementation or tandem deletion of motAB with ccoQ, suggesting that disruption of the proton gradient across the inner membrane resulted in increased superoxide production in this strain. Furthermore, we have identified genes involved in cation transport and binding, detoxification, and energy metabolism that are also important factors in oxidant defense. This report describes the first isogenic deletion mutant library construction for screening of relevant oxidative stress defense genes within C. jejuni, thus providing a comprehensive analysis of the total set of oxidative stress defenses. PMID:24643543

Flint, Annika; Sun, Yi-Qian; Butcher, James; Stahl, Martin; Huang, Hongsheng

2014-01-01

72

Variable resistance to Quambalaria pitereka in spotted gum reveal opportunities for disease screening  

E-print Network

Variable resistance to Quambalaria pitereka in spotted gum reveal opportunities for disease the development of spotted gum (Corymbia citriodora subsp. citriodora, C. citriodora subsp. variegata, C. henryi of plantations using spotted gum and Cor- ymbia hybrids. The aim of this study was to determine whether

73

Suppressors of nmtl-181, a conditional lethal allele of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae myristoyl-CoA:protein N-myristoyltransferase gene, reveal proteins involved in regulating protein N-myristoylation.  

PubMed Central

Several essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins require myristate to be covalently bound to their amino-terminal glycine for biological activity. Protein N-myristoylation is catalyzed by myristoyl-CoA:protein N-myristoyl-transferase, Nmt1p. nmt1-181 encodes a mutant enzyme with a Gly451-->Asp substitution. nmt181p has a reduced affinity for myristoyl-CoA and produces global defects in protein N-myristoylation at > or = 30 degrees C. nmt1-181 results in growth arrest at various stages of the cell cycle within 1 hr after cells are shifted to > or = 30 degrees C and lethality within 8 hr. The growth-arrest phenotype and loss of viability do not require components of the mating pathway and are associated with lysis sensitivity that may be related to undermyristoylation of two protein phosphatases, Ppz1p and Ppz2p. Growth can be rescued at 30 degrees C by adding myristate or sorbitol to the medium or by removing inosine. Cells can be rescued at 37 degrees C by overexpressing nmt1-181p or Nmt1p or by adding myristate to the medium. Selection of high-copy suppressors of the myristate auxotrophy and lethality observed at 37 degrees C yielded only NMT1, whereas six unlinked suppressors of the myristoylation defect (SMD1-6) were obtained when the screen was conducted at 30 degrees C. The protein products of three SMD loci were identified: (i) cdc39-delta 1.7p, which transactivates NMT1; (ii) Fas1p, the beta subunit of the fatty acid synthetase complex, activates FAS2's promoter and increases myristoylation of Gpa1p; and (iii) Pho5p, the major secreted acid phosphatase produced by this yeast. PHO5 is normally induced when yeast are grown in phosphate-depleted medium. Removal of inorganic phosphate from the medium also rescues nmt1-181 cells at 30 degrees C. PHO5's mechanism of suppression of nmt1-181 appears to involve, at least in part, activation of FAS2 transcription and a resulting effect on FAS1 expression. There is an inverse relationship between cellular N-myristoyltransferase and secreted acid phosphatase activities. These observations provide a potential mechanism for coupling phosphate metabolism with the regulation of myristoyl-CoA synthesis and protein N-myristoylation. Images PMID:7937855

Johnson, D R; Cok, S J; Feldmann, H; Gordon, J I

1994-01-01

74

A genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Reveals Pathways affected By Arsenic Toxicity  

PubMed Central

We have used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify toxicologically important proteins and pathways involved in arsenic-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity in humans. We performed a systemic screen of the complete set of 4,733 haploid S. cerevisiae single gene deletion mutants to identify those that have decreased or increased growth, relative to wild-type, after exposure to sodium arsenite (NaAsO2). IC50 values for all mutants were determined to further validate our results. Ultimately we identified 248 mutants sensitive to arsenite and 5 mutants resistant to arsenite exposure. We analyzed the proteins corresponding to arsenite-sensitive mutants and determined that they belonged to functional categories that include protein binding, phosphate metabolism, vacuolar/lysosomal transport, protein targeting, sorting, and translocation, cell growth/morphogenesis, cell polarity and filament formation. Furthermore, these data were mapped onto a protein interactome to identify arsenite toxicity-modulating networks. These networks are associated with the cytoskeleton, ubiquitination, histone acetylation and the MAPK signaling pathway. Our studies have potential implications for understanding toxicity and carcinogenesis in arsenic-induced human conditions, such as cancer and aging. PMID:19631266

Zhou, Xue; Arita, Adriana; Ellen, Thomas P.; Liu, Xin; Bai, Jingxiang; Rooney, John P.; Kurtz, Adrienne D.; Klein, Catherine B.; Dai, Wei; Begley, Thomas J.; Costa, Max

2009-01-01

75

Screen for mitochondrial DNA copy number maintenance genes reveals essential role for ATP synthase  

PubMed Central

The machinery of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance is only partially characterized and is of wide interest due to its involvement in disease. To identify novel components of this machinery, plus other cellular pathways required for mtDNA viability, we implemented a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila S2 cells, assaying for loss of fluorescence of mtDNA nucleoids stained with the DNA-intercalating agent PicoGreen. In addition to previously characterized components of the mtDNA replication and transcription machineries, positives included many proteins of the cytosolic proteasome and ribosome (but not the mitoribosome), three proteins involved in vesicle transport, some other factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis or nuclear gene expression, > 30 mainly uncharacterized proteins and most subunits of ATP synthase (but no other OXPHOS complex). ATP synthase knockdown precipitated a burst of mitochondrial ROS production, followed by copy number depletion involving increased mitochondrial turnover, not dependent on the canonical autophagy machinery. Our findings will inform future studies of the apparatus and regulation of mtDNA maintenance, and the role of mitochondrial bioenergetics and signaling in modulating mtDNA copy number. PMID:24952591

Fukuoh, Atsushi; Cannino, Giuseppe; Gerards, Mike; Buckley, Suzanne; Kazancioglu, Selena; Scialo, Filippo; Lihavainen, Eero; Ribeiro, Andre; Dufour, Eric; Jacobs, Howard T

2014-01-01

76

High-throughput random mutagenesis screen reveals TRPM8 residues specifically required for activation by menthol.  

PubMed

Menthol is a cooling compound derived from mint leaves and is extensively used as a flavoring chemical. Menthol activates transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8), an ion channel also activated by cold, voltage and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Here we investigated the mechanism by which menthol activates mouse TRPM8. Using a new high-throughput approach, we screened a random mutant library consisting of approximately 14,000 individual TRPM8 mutants for clones that are affected in their response to menthol while retaining channel function. We identified determinants of menthol sensitivity in two regions: putative transmembrane segment 2 (S2) and the C-terminal TRP domain. Analysis of these mutants indicated that activation by menthol involves a gating mechanism distinct and separable from gating by cold, voltage or PIP2. Notably, TRP domain mutations mainly attenuated menthol efficacy, suggesting that this domain influences events downstream of initial binding. In contrast, S2 mutations strongly shifted the concentration dependence of menthol activation, raising the possibility that S2 influences menthol binding. PMID:16520735

Bandell, Michael; Dubin, Adrienne E; Petrus, Matt J; Orth, Anthony; Mathur, Jayanti; Hwang, Sun Wook; Patapoutian, Ardem

2006-04-01

77

Systematic screen with kinases inhibitors reveals kinases play distinct roles in growth of osteoprogenitor cells  

PubMed Central

Cancer treatment-related bone loss has become growing problematic, especially in breast and prostate cancer treated with hormone/endocrine therapy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, bone loss caused by targeted therapy in cancer patients is largely unknown yet. In present study, a kinase inhibitors screen was applied for MC3T3-E1, a murine osteoprogenitor cell line, and seven kinase inhibitors (GSK1838705A, PF-04691502, Dasatinib, Masitinib, GDC-0941, XL880 and Everolimus) were found to suppress the cell viability with dose- and time-dependent manner. The most interesting is that many kinase inhibitors (such as lapatinib, erlotinib and sunitinib) can promote MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation at 0.01 ?M. 4 out of 7 inhibitors were selected to perform the functional study and found that they lead to cell cycle dysregulation, treatments of PF-04691502 (AKT inhibitor), Dasatinib (Src inhibitor) and Everolimus (mTOR inhibitor) lead to G1 arrest of MC3T3-E1 cells via downregulation of cyclin D1 and p-AKT, whereas XL880 (MET and VEGFR inhibitor) treatment results in increase of sub-G1 and G2/M phase by upregulation of p53 protein. Our work provides important indications for the comprehensive care of cancer patients treated with some targeted drugs. PMID:24133586

Bao, Ni-Rong; Lu, Meng; Bin, Fan-Wen; Chang, Zhi-Yong; Meng, Jia; Zhou, Li-Wu; Guo, Ting; Zhao, Jian-Ning

2013-01-01

78

Development of synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics.  

PubMed

The concept of synthetic lethality (the creation of a lethal phenotype from the combined effects of mutations in two or more genes) has recently been exploited in various efforts to develop new genotype-selective anticancer therapeutics. These efforts include screening for novel anticancer agents, identifying novel therapeutic targets, characterizing mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy, and improving efficacies through the rational design of combination therapy. This review discusses recent developments in synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics, including poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitors for BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutant cancers, checkpoint inhibitors for p53 mutant cancers, and small molecule agents targeting RAS gene mutant cancers. Because cancers are caused by mutations in multiple genes and abnormalities in multiple signaling pathways, synthetic lethality for a specific tumor suppressor gene or oncogene is likely cell context-dependent. Delineation of the mechanisms underlying synthetic lethality and identification of treatment response biomarkers will be critical for the success of synthetic lethality anticancer therapy. PMID:24893124

Fang, Bingliang

2014-10-01

79

Comprehensive screening for mutations associated with colorectal cancer in unselected cases reveals penetrant and nonpenetrant mutations.  

PubMed

Germline mutation testing in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) is offered only to a subset of patients with a clinical presentation or tumor histology suggestive of familial CRC syndromes, probably underestimating familial CRC predisposition. The aim of our study was to determine whether unbiased screening of newly diagnosed CRC cases with next generation sequencing (NGS) increases the overall detection rate of germline mutations. We analyzed 152 consecutive CRC patients for germline mutations in 18 CRC-associated genes using NGS. All patients were also evaluated for Bethesda criteria and all tumors were investigated for microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry for mismatch repair proteins and the BRAF*V600E somatic mutation. NGS based sequencing identified 27 variants in 9 genes in 23 out of 152 patients studied (18%). Three of them were already reported as pathogenic and 12 were class 3 germline variants with an uncertain prediction of pathogenicity. Only 1 of these patients fulfilled Bethesda criteria and had a microsatellite instable tumor and an MLH1 germline mutation. The others would have been missed with current approaches: 2 with a MSH6 premature termination mutation and 12 uncertain, potentially pathogenic class 3 variants in APC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, MSH3 and MLH3. The higher NGS mutation detection rate compared with current testing strategies based on clinicopathological criteria is probably due to the large genetic heterogeneity and overlapping clinical presentation of the various CRC syndromes. It can also identify apparently nonpenetrant germline mutations complicating the clinical management of the patients and their families. PMID:25142776

Kraus, Cornelia; Rau, Tilman T; Lux, Philipp; Erlenbach-Wünsch, Katharina; Löhr, Sabine; Krumbiegel, Mandy; Thiel, Christian T; Stöhr, Robert; Agaimy, Abbas; Croner, Roland S; Stürzl, Michael; Hohenberger, Werner; Hartmann, Arndt; Reis, André

2015-03-15

80

Screening of Escherichia coli Species Biodiversity Reveals New Biofilm-Associated Antiadhesion Polysaccharides  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Bacterial biofilms often form multispecies communities in which complex but ill-understood competition and cooperation interactions occur. In light of the profound physiological modifications associated with this lifestyle, we hypothesized that the biofilm environment might represent an untapped source of natural bioactive molecules interfering with bacterial adhesion or biofilm formation. We produced cell-free solutions extracted from in vitro mature biofilms formed by 122 natural Escherichia coli isolates, and we screened these biofilm extracts for antiadhesion molecules active on a panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using this approach, we showed that 20% of the tested biofilm extracts contained molecules that antagonize bacterial growth or adhesion. We characterized a compound, produced by a commensal animal E. coli strain, for which activity is detected only in biofilm extract. Biochemical and genetic analyses showed that this compound corresponds to a new type of released high-molecular-weight polysaccharide whose biofilm-associated production is regulated by the RfaH protein. We demonstrated that the antiadhesion activity of this polysaccharide was restricted to Gram-positive bacteria and that its production reduced susceptibility to invasion and provided rapid exclusion of Staphylococcus aureus from mixed E. coli and S. aureus biofilms. Our results therefore demonstrate that biofilms contain molecules that contribute to the dynamics of mixed bacterial communities and that are not or only poorly detected in unconcentrated planktonic supernatants. Systematic identification of these compounds could lead to strategies that limit pathogen surface colonization and reduce the burden associated with the development of bacterial biofilms on medical devices. PMID:21558434

Rendueles, Olaya; Travier, Laetitia; Latour-Lambert, Patricia; Fontaine, Thierry; Magnus, Julie; Denamur, Erick; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

2011-01-01

81

An integrated systems genetics screen reveals the transcriptional structure of inherited predisposition to metastatic disease  

PubMed Central

Metastasis is the result of stochastic genomic and epigenetic events leading to gene expression profiles that drive tumor dissemination. Here we exploit the principle that metastatic propensity is modified by the genetic background to generate prognostic gene expression signatures that illuminate regulators of metastasis. We also identify multiple microRNAs whose germline variation is causally linked to tumor progression and metastasis. We employ network analysis of global gene expression profiles in tumors derived from a panel of recombinant inbred mice to identify a network of co-expressed genes centered on Cnot2 that predicts metastasis-free survival. Modulating Cnot2 expression changes tumor cell metastatic potential in vivo, supporting a functional role for Cnot2 in metastasis. Small RNA sequencing of the same tumor set revealed a negative correlation between expression of the Mir216/217 cluster and tumor progression. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis (eQTL) identified cis-eQTLs at the Mir216/217 locus, indicating that differences in expression may be inherited. Ectopic expression of Mir216/217 in tumor cells suppressed metastasis in vivo. Finally, small RNA sequencing and mRNA expression profiling data were integrated to reveal that miR-3470a/b target a high proportion of network transcripts. In vivo analysis of Mir3470a/b demonstrated that both promote metastasis. Moreover, Mir3470b is a likely regulator of the Cnot2 network as its overexpression down-regulated expression of network hub genes and enhanced metastasis in vivo, phenocopying Cnot2 knockdown. The resulting data from this strategy identify Cnot2 as a novel regulator of metastasis and demonstrate the power of our systems-level approach in identifying modifiers of metastasis. PMID:24322557

Faraji, Farhoud; Hu, Ying; Wu, Gang; Goldberger, Natalie E.; Walker, Renard C.; Zhang, Jinghui; Hunter, Kent W.

2014-01-01

82

New aspects of the phosphatase VHZ revealed by a high-resolution structure with vanadate and substrate screening  

PubMed Central

The recently discovered 150-residue human VHZ (VH1 related protein, Z member) is one of the smallest protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) known, and contains only the minimal structural elements common to all PTPs. We report a substrate screening analysis and a crystal structure of the VHZ complex with vanadate at 1.1 Å resolution, with a detailed structural comparison with other members of the protein tyrosine phosphatase family, including classical tyrosine-specific protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and dual specific phosphatases (DSPs). A screen with 360 phosphorylated peptides shows VHZ efficiently catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospho-tyrosine(pY)-containing peptides, but exhibits no activity toward phospho-serine (pS) or phospho-threonine (pT) peptides. The new structure reveals a deep and narrow active site more typical of the classical tyrosine specific PTPs. Despite the high structural and sequence similarities between VHZ and classical PTPs, its general acid IPD-loop is most likely conformationally rigid, in contrast to the flexible WPD counterpart of classical PTPs. VHZ also lacks substrate recognition domains and other domains typically found on classical PTPs. It is therefore proposed that VHZ is more properly classified as an atypical PTP rather than an atypical DSP, as has been suggested. PMID:23145819

Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I.; Hengge, Alvan C.; Johnson, Sean J.

2013-01-01

83

Quantitative Genome-Wide Genetic Interaction Screens Reveal Global Epistatic Relationships of Protein Complexes in Escherichia coli  

PubMed Central

Large-scale proteomic analyses in Escherichia coli have documented the composition and physical relationships of multiprotein complexes, but not their functional organization into biological pathways and processes. Conversely, genetic interaction (GI) screens can provide insights into the biological role(s) of individual gene and higher order associations. Combining the information from both approaches should elucidate how complexes and pathways intersect functionally at a systems level. However, such integrative analysis has been hindered due to the lack of relevant GI data. Here we present a systematic, unbiased, and quantitative synthetic genetic array screen in E. coli describing the genetic dependencies and functional cross-talk among over 600,000 digenic mutant combinations. Combining this epistasis information with putative functional modules derived from previous proteomic data and genomic context-based methods revealed unexpected associations, including new components required for the biogenesis of iron-sulphur and ribosome integrity, and the interplay between molecular chaperones and proteases. We find that functionally-linked genes co-conserved among ?-proteobacteria are far more likely to have correlated GI profiles than genes with divergent patterns of evolution. Overall, examining bacterial GIs in the context of protein complexes provides avenues for a deeper mechanistic understanding of core microbial systems. PMID:24586182

Kumar, Ashwani; Stewart, Geordie; Samanfar, Bahram; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Wagih, Omar; Vlasblom, James; Phanse, Sadhna; Lad, Krunal; Yeou Hsiung Yu, Angela; Graham, Christopher; Jin, Ke; Brown, Eric; Golshani, Ashkan; Kim, Philip; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Greenblatt, Jack; Houry, Walid A.; Parkinson, John; Emili, Andrew

2014-01-01

84

A Loss of Function Screen of Identified Genome-Wide Association Study Loci Reveals New Genes Controlling Hematopoiesis  

PubMed Central

The formation of mature cells by blood stem cells is very well understood at the cellular level and we know many of the key transcription factors that control fate decisions. However, many upstream signalling and downstream effector processes are only partially understood. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have been particularly useful in providing new directions to dissect these pathways. A GWAS meta-analysis identified 68 genetic loci controlling platelet size and number. Only a quarter of those genes, however, are known regulators of hematopoiesis. To determine function of the remaining genes we performed a medium-throughput genetic screen in zebrafish using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) to knock down protein expression, followed by histological analysis of selected genes using a wide panel of different hematopoietic markers. The information generated by the initial knockdown was used to profile phenotypes and to position candidate genes hierarchically in hematopoiesis. Further analysis of brd3a revealed its essential role in differentiation but not maintenance and survival of thrombocytes. Using the from-GWAS-to-function strategy we have not only identified a series of genes that represent novel regulators of thrombopoiesis and hematopoiesis, but this work also represents, to our knowledge, the first example of a functional genetic screening strategy that is a critical step toward obtaining biologically relevant functional data from GWA study for blood cell traits. PMID:25010335

Bielczyk-Maczy?ska, Ewa; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Ferreira, Lauren; Soranzo, Nicole; Stemple, Derek L.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Cvejic, Ana

2014-01-01

85

MAPK signaling to the early secretory pathway revealed by kinase/phosphatase functional screening.  

PubMed

To what extent the secretory pathway is regulated by cellular signaling is unknown. In this study, we used RNA interference to explore the function of human kinases and phosphatases in controlling the organization of and trafficking within the secretory pathway. We identified 122 kinases/phosphatases that affect endoplasmic reticulum (ER) export, ER exit sites (ERESs), and/or the Golgi apparatus. Numerous kinases/phosphatases regulate the number of ERESs and ER to Golgi protein trafficking. Among the pathways identified, the Raf-MEK (MAPK/ERK [extracellular signal-regulated kinase] kinase)-ERK cascade, including its regulatory proteins CNK1 (connector enhancer of the kinase suppressor of Ras-1) and neurofibromin, controls the number of ERESs via ERK2, which targets Sec16, a key regulator of ERESs and COPII (coat protein II) vesicle biogenesis. Our analysis reveals an unanticipated complexity of kinase/phosphatase-mediated regulation of the secretory pathway, uncovering a link between growth factor signaling and ER export. PMID:20548102

Farhan, Hesso; Wendeler, Markus W; Mitrovic, Sandra; Fava, Eugenio; Silberberg, Yael; Sharan, Roded; Zerial, Marino; Hauri, Hans-Peter

2010-06-14

86

MAPK signaling to the early secretory pathway revealed by kinase/phosphatase functional screening  

PubMed Central

To what extent the secretory pathway is regulated by cellular signaling is unknown. In this study, we used RNA interference to explore the function of human kinases and phosphatases in controlling the organization of and trafficking within the secretory pathway. We identified 122 kinases/phosphatases that affect endoplasmic reticulum (ER) export, ER exit sites (ERESs), and/or the Golgi apparatus. Numerous kinases/phosphatases regulate the number of ERESs and ER to Golgi protein trafficking. Among the pathways identified, the Raf–MEK (MAPK/ERK [extracellular signal-regulated kinase] kinase)–ERK cascade, including its regulatory proteins CNK1 (connector enhancer of the kinase suppressor of Ras-1) and neurofibromin, controls the number of ERESs via ERK2, which targets Sec16, a key regulator of ERESs and COPII (coat protein II) vesicle biogenesis. Our analysis reveals an unanticipated complexity of kinase/phosphatase-mediated regulation of the secretory pathway, uncovering a link between growth factor signaling and ER export. PMID:20548102

Farhan, Hesso; Wendeler, Markus W.; Mitrovic, Sandra; Fava, Eugenio; Silberberg, Yael; Sharan, Roded; Zerial, Marino

2010-01-01

87

Screening for Hydrolytic Enzymes Reveals Ayr1p as a Novel Triacylglycerol Lipase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*  

PubMed Central

Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as other eukaryotes, preserves fatty acids and sterols in a biologically inert form, as triacylglycerols and steryl esters. The major triacylglycerol lipases of the yeast S. cerevisiae identified so far are Tgl3p, Tgl4p, and Tgl5p (Athenstaedt, K., and Daum, G. (2003) YMR313c/TGL3 encodes a novel triacylglycerol lipase located in lipid particles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 23317–23323; Athenstaedt, K., and Daum, G. (2005) Tgl4p and Tgl5p, two triacylglycerol lipases of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are localized to lipid particles. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 37301–37309). We observed that upon cultivation on oleic acid, triacylglycerol mobilization did not come to a halt in a yeast strain deficient in all currently known triacylglycerol lipases, indicating the presence of additional not yet characterized lipases/esterases. Functional proteome analysis using lipase and esterase inhibitors revealed a subset of candidate genes for yet unknown hydrolytic enzymes on peroxisomes and lipid droplets. Based on the conserved GXSXG lipase motif, putative functions, and subcellular localizations, a selected number of candidates were characterized by enzyme assays in vitro, gene expression analysis, non-polar lipid analysis, and in vivo triacylglycerol mobilization assays. These investigations led to the identification of Ayr1p as a novel triacylglycerol lipase of yeast lipid droplets and confirmed the hydrolytic potential of the peroxisomal Lpx1p in vivo. Based on these results, we discuss a possible link between lipid storage, lipid mobilization, and peroxisomal utilization of fatty acids as a carbon source. PMID:24187129

Ploier, Birgit; Scharwey, Melanie; Koch, Barbara; Schmidt, Claudia; Schatte, Jessica; Rechberger, Gerald; Kollroser, Manfred; Hermetter, Albin; Daum, Günther

2013-01-01

88

Genome-wide haploinsufficiency screen reveals a novel role for ?-TuSC in spindle organization and genome stability  

PubMed Central

How subunit dosage contributes to the assembly and function of multimeric complexes is an important question with implications in understanding biochemical, evolutionary, and disease mechanisms. Toward identifying pathways that are susceptible to decreased gene dosage, we performed a genome-wide screen for haploinsufficient (HI) genes that guard against genome instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This led to the identification of all three genes (SPC97, SPC98, and TUB4) encoding the evolutionarily conserved ?-tubulin small complex (?-TuSC), which nucleates microtubule assembly. We found that hemizygous ?-TuSC mutants exhibit higher rates of chromosome loss and increases in anaphase spindle length and elongation velocities. Fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, electron tomography, and model convolution simulation of spc98/+ mutants revealed improper regulation of interpolar (iMT) and kinetochore (kMT) microtubules in anaphase. The underlying cause is likely due to reduced levels of Tub4, as overexpression of TUB4 suppressed the spindle and chromosome segregation defects in spc98/+ mutants. We propose that ?-TuSC is crucial for balanced assembly between iMTs and kMTs for spindle organization and accurate chromosome segregation. Taken together, the results show how gene dosage studies provide critical insights into the assembly and function of multisubunit complexes that may not be revealed by using traditional studies with haploid gene deletion or conditional alleles. PMID:23825022

Choy, John S.; O'Toole, Eileen; Schuster, Breanna M.; Crisp, Matthew J.; Karpova, Tatiana S.; McNally, James G.; Winey, Mark; Gardner, Melissa K.; Basrai, Munira A.

2013-01-01

89

A chemically-defined screening platform reveals behavioral similarities between primary human mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial cells  

PubMed Central

Chemically defined substrates, which rigorously control protein-surface and cell-surface interactions, can be used to probe the effects of specific biomolecules on cell behavior. Here we combined a chemically-defined, array-based format with automated, time-lapse microscopy to efficiently screen cell-substrate interactions. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates bearing oligo(ethylene glycol) units and reactive terminal groups were used to present cell adhesion peptides while minimizing non-specific protein interactions. Specifically, we describe rapid fabrication of arrays of 1 mm spots, which present varied densities of the integrin-binding ligand Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro (GRGDSP). Results indicate that cell attachment, cell spreading, and proliferation exhibit strong dependencies on GRGDSP density for both human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Furthermore, relative spreading and proliferation over a broad range of GRGDSP densities are similar for both primary cell types, and detailed comparison between cell behaviors identified a 1:1 correlation between spreading and proliferation for both HUVECs and hMSCs. Finally, time-lapse microscopy of SAM arrays revealed distinct adhesion-dependent migratory behaviors for HUVECs and hMSCs. These results demonstrate the benefits of using an array-based screening platform for investigating cell function. While the proof-of-concept focuses on simple cellular properties, the quantitative similarities observed for hMSCs and HUVECs provides a direct example of how phenomena that would not easily be predicted can be shown to correlate between different cell types. PMID:23147838

Koepsel, Justin T.; Loveland, Samuel G.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Zorn, Stefan; Belair, David G.; Le, Ngoc Nhi; Murphy, William L.

2012-01-01

90

A Complex Regulatory Network Coordinating Cell Cycles During C. elegans Development Is Revealed by a Genome-Wide RNAi Screen  

PubMed Central

The development and homeostasis of multicellular animals requires precise coordination of cell division and differentiation. We performed a genome-wide RNA interference screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to reveal the components of a regulatory network that promotes developmentally programmed cell-cycle quiescence. The 107 identified genes are predicted to constitute regulatory networks that are conserved among higher animals because almost half of the genes are represented by clear human orthologs. Using a series of mutant backgrounds to assess their genetic activities, the RNA interference clones displaying similar properties were clustered to establish potential regulatory relationships within the network. This approach uncovered four distinct genetic pathways controlling cell-cycle entry during intestinal organogenesis. The enhanced phenotypes observed for animals carrying compound mutations attest to the collaboration between distinct mechanisms to ensure strict developmental regulation of cell cycles. Moreover, we characterized ubc-25, a gene encoding an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme whose human ortholog, UBE2Q2, is deregulated in several cancers. Our genetic analyses suggested that ubc-25 acts in a linear pathway with cul-1/Cul1, in parallel to pathways employing cki-1/p27 and lin-35/pRb to promote cell-cycle quiescence. Further investigation of the potential regulatory mechanism demonstrated that ubc-25 activity negatively regulates CYE-1/cyclin E protein abundance in vivo. Together, our results show that the ubc-25-mediated pathway acts within a complex network that integrates the actions of multiple molecular mechanisms to control cell cycles during development. PMID:24584095

Roy, Sarah H.; Tobin, David V.; Memar, Nadin; Beltz, Eleanor; Holmen, Jenna; Clayton, Joseph E.; Chiu, Daniel J.; Young, Laura D.; Green, Travis H.; Lubin, Isabella; Liu, Yuying; Conradt, Barbara; Saito, R. Mako

2014-01-01

91

A Genome-wide siRNA Screen Reveals Diverse Cellular Processes and Pathways that Mediate Genome Stability  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Signaling pathways that respond to DNA damage are essential for the maintenance of genome stability and are linked to many diseases, including cancer. Here, a genome-wide siRNA screen was employed to identify novel genes involved in genome stabilization by monitoring phosphorylation of the histone variant H2AX, an early mark of DNA damage. We identified hundreds of genes whose down-regulation led to elevated levels of H2AX phosphorylation (?H2AX) and revealed new links to cellular complexes and to genes with unclassified functions. We demonstrate a widespread role for mRNA processing factors in preventing DNA damage, which in some cases is caused by aberrant RNA-DNA structures. Furthermore, we connect increased ?H2AX levels to the neurological disorder, Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) syndrome, and we find a role for several CMT proteins in the DNA damage response. These data indicate that preservation of genome stability is mediated by a larger network of biological processes than previously appreciated. PMID:19647519

Paulsen, Renee D.; Soni, Deena V.; Wollman, Roy; Hahn, Angela T.; Yee, Muh-Ching; Guan, Anna; Hesley, Jayne A.; Miller, Steven C.; Cromwell, Evan F.; Solow-Cordero, David E.; Meyer, Tobias; Cimprich, Karlene A.

2009-01-01

92

Functional drug screening reveals anticonvulsants as enhancers of mTOR-independent autophagic killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis through inositol depletion  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) remains a major challenge to global health made worse by the spread of multidrug resistance. We therefore examined whether stimulating intracellular killing of mycobacteria through pharmacological enhancement of macroautophagy might provide a novel therapeutic strategy. Despite the resistance of MTB to killing by basal autophagy, cell-based screening of FDA-approved drugs revealed two anticonvulsants, carbamazepine and valproic acid, that were able to stimulate autophagic killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis within primary human macrophages at concentrations achievable in humans. Using a zebrafish model, we show that carbamazepine can stimulate autophagy in vivo and enhance clearance of M. marinum, while in mice infected with a highly virulent multidrug-resistant MTB strain, carbamazepine treatment reduced bacterial burden, improved lung pathology and stimulated adaptive immunity. We show that carbamazepine induces antimicrobial autophagy through a novel, evolutionarily conserved, mTOR-independent pathway controlled by cellular depletion of myo-inositol. While strain-specific differences in susceptibility to in vivo carbamazepine treatment may exist, autophagy enhancement by repurposed drugs provides an easily implementable potential therapy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant mycobacterial infection. PMID:25535254

Schiebler, Mark; Brown, Karen; Hegyi, Krisztina; Newton, Sandra M; Renna, Maurizio; Hepburn, Lucy; Klapholz, Catherine; Coulter, Sarah; Obregón-Henao, Andres; Henao Tamayo, Marcela; Basaraba, Randall; Kampmann, Beate; Henry, Katherine M; Burgon, Joseph; Renshaw, Stephen A; Fleming, Angeleen; Kay, Robert R; Anderson, Karen E; Hawkins, Phillip T; Ordway, Diane J; Rubinsztein, David C; Floto, Rodrigo Andres

2015-01-01

93

A complex regulatory network coordinating cell cycles during C. elegans development is revealed by a genome-wide RNAi screen.  

PubMed

The development and homeostasis of multicellular animals requires precise coordination of cell division and differentiation. We performed a genome-wide RNA interference screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to reveal the components of a regulatory network that promotes developmentally programmed cell-cycle quiescence. The 107 identified genes are predicted to constitute regulatory networks that are conserved among higher animals because almost half of the genes are represented by clear human orthologs. Using a series of mutant backgrounds to assess their genetic activities, the RNA interference clones displaying similar properties were clustered to establish potential regulatory relationships within the network. This approach uncovered four distinct genetic pathways controlling cell-cycle entry during intestinal organogenesis. The enhanced phenotypes observed for animals carrying compound mutations attest to the collaboration between distinct mechanisms to ensure strict developmental regulation of cell cycles. Moreover, we characterized ubc-25, a gene encoding an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme whose human ortholog, UBE2Q2, is deregulated in several cancers. Our genetic analyses suggested that ubc-25 acts in a linear pathway with cul-1/Cul1, in parallel to pathways employing cki-1/p27 and lin-35/pRb to promote cell-cycle quiescence. Further investigation of the potential regulatory mechanism demonstrated that ubc-25 activity negatively regulates CYE-1/cyclin E protein abundance in vivo. Together, our results show that the ubc-25-mediated pathway acts within a complex network that integrates the actions of multiple molecular mechanisms to control cell cycles during development. PMID:24584095

Roy, Sarah H; Tobin, David V; Memar, Nadin; Beltz, Eleanor; Holmen, Jenna; Clayton, Joseph E; Chiu, Daniel J; Young, Laura D; Green, Travis H; Lubin, Isabella; Liu, Yuying; Conradt, Barbara; Saito, R Mako

2014-05-01

94

In vitro breast cancer cell lethality of Brazilian plant extracts.  

PubMed

In this study we screened the cytotoxicity of 1220 plant extracts obtained from 351 plants belonging to 74 families occurring in the Amazon and Atlantic rain forests against MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines. All extracts were tested at a dose of 100 microg/mL. Only 11 aqueous or organic extracts belonging to the Annonaceae, Apocynaceae, Araceae, Clusiaceae, Flacourtiaceae, Leguminosae, Olacaceae and Violaceae showed marked lethal activity. Vismia guianensis and Annona hypoglauca extracts showed the greatest lethal activity. PMID:18236788

Suffredini, I B; Paciencia, M L B; Frana, S A; Varella, A D; Younes, R N

2007-10-01

95

A Suppressor/Enhancer Screen in Drosophila Reveals a Role for Wnt-Mediated Lipid Metabolism in Primordial Germ Cell Migration  

PubMed Central

Wnt proteins comprise a large family of secreted ligands implicated in a wide variety of biological roles. WntD has previously been shown to inhibit the nuclear accumulation of Dorsal/NF-?B protein during embryonic dorsal/ventral patterning and the adult innate immune response, independent of the well-studied Armadillo/?-catenin pathway. In this paper, we present a novel phenotype for WntD mutant embryos, suggesting that this gene is involved in migration of primordial germ cells (PGC) to the embryonic gonad. Additionally, we describe a genetic suppressor/enhancer screen aimed at identifying genes required for WntD signal transduction, based on the previous observation that maternal overexpression of WntD results in lethally dorsalized embryos. Using an algorithm to narrow down our hits from the screen, we found two novel WntD signaling components: Fz4, a member of the Frizzled family, and the Drosophila Ceramide Kinase homolog, Dcerk. We show here that Dcerk and Dmulk (Drosophila Multi-substrate lipid kinase) redundantly mediate PGC migration. Our data are consistent with a model in which the activity of lipid phosphate phosphatases shapes a concentration gradient of ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P), the product of Dcerk, allowing proper PGC migration. PMID:22069480

McElwain, Mark A.; Ko, Dennis C.; Gordon, Michael D.; Fyrst, Henrik; Saba, Julie D.; Nusse, Roel

2011-01-01

96

Lethality of suicide methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To (a) quantify the lethality of suicide methods used in Australia in the period 1 July 1993 to 30 June 2003, (b) examine method-specific case fatality by age and sex, and (c) identify changes in case fatality during the study period. Methods: Two sources of data on episodes of self-harm in Australia were used, mortality and hospital separation data.

A A Elnour; J Harrison

2008-01-01

97

Small Interfering RNA Screens Reveal Enhanced Cisplatin Cytotoxicity in Tumor Cells Having both BRCA Network and TP53 Disruptions  

Microsoft Academic Search

RNA interference technology allows the systematic genetic analysis of the molecular alterations in cancer cells and how these alterations affect response to therapies. Here we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens to identify genes that enhance the cytotoxicity (enhancers) of established anticancer chemotherapeu- tics. Hits identified in drug enhancer screens of cisplatin, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel were largely unique to the

Steven R. Bartz; Zhan Zhang; Julja Burchard; Maki Imakura; Melissa Martin; Anthony Palmieri; Rachel Needham; Jie Guo; Marcia Gordon; Namjin Chung; Paul Warrener; Aimee L. Jackson; Michael Carleton; Melissa Oatley; Louis Locco; Francesca Santini; Todd Smith; Priya Kunapuli; Marc Ferrer; Berta Strulovici; Stephen H. Friend; Peter S. Linsley

2006-01-01

98

Lethal midline granuloma.  

PubMed

Lethal midline granuloma is a relatively rare disease characterized by destruction and mutilation of the nose and other structures of respiratory passages. The nonspecificity of symptoms obscures the correct diagnosis and is responsible for the delay in treatment which can be detrimental as this grave disease calls for urgent intervention. We present a case report of this disease in a 35 year old male who gave a short two month history of the clinical symptoms. PMID:23440011

Mallya, Varuna; Singh, Avninder; Pahwa, Manish

2013-01-01

99

Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals role for multi-pass membrane protein in endosome-to-Golgi retrieval  

E-print Network

: endosome-to-Golgi retrieval, siRNA screen, retromer, SFT2D2, ZDHHC5, GRINA. Running Title: genome-wide screen for endosome-to-Golgi genes 2 Summary Endosome-to-Golgi retrieval is an essential membrane trafficking pathway required for many... are a number of multi-pass membrane spanning proteins, a class of proteins often overlooked with respect to a role in membrane trafficking. We further demonstrate a novel role for three multi-pass membrane proteins, SFT2D2, ZDHHC5 and GRINA, in endosome...

Breusegem, Sophia Y.; Seaman, Matthew N. J.

2014-01-01

100

Establishing Genetic Interactions by a Synthetic Dosage Lethality Phenotype  

PubMed Central

We have devised a genetic screen, termed synthetic dosage lethality, in which a cloned ``reference'' gene is inducibly overexpressed in a set of mutant strains carrying potential ``target'' mutations. To test the specificity of the method, two reference genes, CTF13, encoding a centromere binding protein, and ORC6, encoding a subunit of the origin of replication binding complex, were overexpressed in a large collection of mutants defective in either chromosome segregation or replication. CTF13 overexpression caused synthetic dosage lethality in combination with ctf14-42 (cbf2, ndc10), ctf17-61 (chl4), ctf19-58 and ctf19-26. ORC6 overexpression caused synthetic dosage lethality in combination with cdc2-1, cdc6-1, cdc14-1, cdc16-1 and cdc46-1. These relationships reflect specific interactions, as overexpression of CTF13 caused lethality in kinetochore mutants and overexpression of ORC6 caused lethality in replication mutants. In contrast, only one case of dosage suppression was observed. We suggest that synthetic dosage lethality identifies a broad spectrum of interacting mutations and is of general utility in detecting specific genetic interactions using a cloned wild-type gene as a starting point. Furthermore, synthetic dosage lethality is easily adapted to the study of cloned genes in other organisms. PMID:8722765

Kroll, E. S.; Hyland, K. M.; Hieter, P.; Li, J. J.

1996-01-01

101

Evaluation of lethal and non-lethal sampling methods for the detection of white sturgeon iridovirus infection in white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus (Richardson).  

PubMed

Pectoral fin tissue of white sturgeon was investigated as a potential non-lethal sample source for the detection of white sturgeon iridovirus (WSIV) infection. Histopathology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results using fin tissue were compared with the standard lethal histopathology sampling method that utilizes head tissue. Tissues for each of the three sampling methods were collected weekly for 8 weeks from individual sturgeon undergoing an experimental cohabitation challenge with fish infected with the Abernathy isolate of WSIV. Non-lethal fin histopathological evaluation did not reveal infection during the first 3 weeks of sampling, while non-lethal PCR and the lethal method were variable. However, all three sampling methods were equally capable of identifying infection from 4 to 8 weeks post-exposure. Of the survivors tested, all were negative by PCR and the lethal method, and only one fish was identified as being positive by non-lethal fin histopathology. In another experiment, all three sampling methods were applied to asymptomatic WSIV carriers in a case study conducted at the Kootenai Tribal Sturgeon Conservation Hatchery. Results showed that both lethal and non-lethal fin histopathology were equally effective in detecting infection, but PCR was unable to identify this strain of WSIV. Depending on the virus isolate, these results suggest that non-lethal sampling of fin tissue (histopathology or PCR) is comparable with the lethal sampling method at identifying WSIV infection once infection is established, and under certain circumstances may provide an alternative to lethal sampling. PMID:17498180

Drennan, J D; Lapatra, S E; Samson, C A; Ireland, S; Eversman, K F; Cain, K D

2007-06-01

102

Identification of Genes Important for Cutaneous Function Revealed by a Large Scale Reverse Genetic Screen in the Mouse  

PubMed Central

The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP). A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1), while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1). The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation. PMID:25340873

DiTommaso, Tia; Jones, Lynelle K.; Cottle, Denny L.; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Watt, Fiona M.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P.; Sundberg, John P.; White, Jacqueline K.; Smyth, Ian M.

2014-01-01

103

Small Interfering RNA Screens Reveal Enhanced Cisplatin Cytotoxicity in Tumor Cells Having both BRCA Network and TP53 Disruptions? ‡  

PubMed Central

RNA interference technology allows the systematic genetic analysis of the molecular alterations in cancer cells and how these alterations affect response to therapies. Here we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens to identify genes that enhance the cytotoxicity (enhancers) of established anticancer chemotherapeutics. Hits identified in drug enhancer screens of cisplatin, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel were largely unique to the drug being tested and could be linked to the drug's mechanism of action. Hits identified by screening of a genome-scale siRNA library for cisplatin enhancers in TP53-deficient HeLa cells were significantly enriched for genes with annotated functions in DNA damage repair as well as poorly characterized genes likely having novel functions in this process. We followed up on a subset of the hits from the cisplatin enhancer screen and validated a number of enhancers whose products interact with BRCA1 and/or BRCA2. TP53+/? matched-pair cell lines were used to determine if knockdown of BRCA1, BRCA2, or validated hits that associate with BRCA1 and BRCA2 selectively enhances cisplatin cytotoxicity in TP53-deficient cells. Silencing of BRCA1, BRCA2, or BRCA1/2-associated genes enhanced cisplatin cytotoxicity ?4- to 7-fold more in TP53-deficient cells than in matched TP53 wild-type cells. Thus, tumor cells having disruptions in BRCA1/2 network genes and TP53 together are more sensitive to cisplatin than cells with either disruption alone. PMID:17000754

Bartz, Steven R.; Zhang, Zhan; Burchard, Julja; Imakura, Maki; Martin, Melissa; Palmieri, Anthony; Needham, Rachel; Guo, Jie; Gordon, Marcia; Chung, Namjin; Warrener, Paul; Jackson, Aimee L.; Carleton, Michael; Oatley, Melissa; Locco, Louis; Santini, Francesca; Smith, Todd; Kunapuli, Priya; Ferrer, Marc; Strulovici, Berta; Friend, Stephen H.; Linsley, Peter S.

2006-01-01

104

High throughput flow cytometry screening reveals a novel role for JAM-A as a cancer stem cell maintenance factor  

PubMed Central

Summary Stem cells reside in niches that regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation. The identity of a stem cell is linked with the ability to interact with its niche through adhesion mechanisms. To identify targets that disrupt cancer stem cell (CSC) adhesion, we performed a flow cytometry screen on patient derived glioblastoma (GBM) cells and identified junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) as a CSC adhesion mechanism essential for self-renewal and tumor growth. JAM-A was dispensable for normal neural stem/progenitor cell (NPC) function and JAM-A expression was reduced in normal brain versus GBM. Targeting JAM-A compromises the self-renewal of CSCs. JAM-A expression negatively correlated to GBM patient prognosis. Our results demonstrate that novel GBM targeting strategies can be identified through screening adhesion receptors and JAM-A represents a novel mechanism for niche driven CSC maintenance. PMID:24373972

Lathia, Justin D.; Li, Meizhang; Sinyuk, Maksim; Alvarado, Alvaro G.; Flavahan, William A.; Stoltz, Kevin; Rosager, Ann Mari; Hale, James; Hitomi, Masahiro; Gallagher, Joseph; Wu, Qiulian; Martin, Jody; Vidal, Jason G.; Nakano, Ichiro; Dahlrot, Rikke H.; Hansen, Steinbjørn; McLendon, Roger E.; Sloan, Andrew E.; Bao, Shideng; Hjelmeland, Anita B.; Carson, Christian T.; Naik, Ulhas P.; Kristensen, Bjarne; Rich, Jeremy N.

2014-01-01

105

Small interfering RNA screens reveal enhanced cisplatin cytotoxicity in tumor cells having both BRCA network and TP53 disruptions.  

PubMed

RNA interference technology allows the systematic genetic analysis of the molecular alterations in cancer cells and how these alterations affect response to therapies. Here we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens to identify genes that enhance the cytotoxicity (enhancers) of established anticancer chemotherapeutics. Hits identified in drug enhancer screens of cisplatin, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel were largely unique to the drug being tested and could be linked to the drug's mechanism of action. Hits identified by screening of a genome-scale siRNA library for cisplatin enhancers in TP53-deficient HeLa cells were significantly enriched for genes with annotated functions in DNA damage repair as well as poorly characterized genes likely having novel functions in this process. We followed up on a subset of the hits from the cisplatin enhancer screen and validated a number of enhancers whose products interact with BRCA1 and/or BRCA2. TP53(+/-) matched-pair cell lines were used to determine if knockdown of BRCA1, BRCA2, or validated hits that associate with BRCA1 and BRCA2 selectively enhances cisplatin cytotoxicity in TP53-deficient cells. Silencing of BRCA1, BRCA2, or BRCA1/2-associated genes enhanced cisplatin cytotoxicity approximately 4- to 7-fold more in TP53-deficient cells than in matched TP53 wild-type cells. Thus, tumor cells having disruptions in BRCA1/2 network genes and TP53 together are more sensitive to cisplatin than cells with either disruption alone. PMID:17000754

Bartz, Steven R; Zhang, Zhan; Burchard, Julja; Imakura, Maki; Martin, Melissa; Palmieri, Anthony; Needham, Rachel; Guo, Jie; Gordon, Marcia; Chung, Namjin; Warrener, Paul; Jackson, Aimee L; Carleton, Michael; Oatley, Melissa; Locco, Louis; Santini, Francesca; Smith, Todd; Kunapuli, Priya; Ferrer, Marc; Strulovici, Berta; Friend, Stephen H; Linsley, Peter S

2006-12-01

106

Genome-wide shRNA screen reveals increased mitochondrial dependence upon mTORC2 addiction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Release from growth factor dependence and acquisition of signalling pathway addiction are critical steps in oncogenesis. To identify genes required on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) addiction, we performed a genome-wide short hairpin RNA screen on a v-H-ras-transformed Pten-deficient cell line that displayed two alternative growth modes, interleukin (IL)-3-independent\\/mTOR-addicted proliferation (transformed growth mode) and IL-3-dependent\\/mTOR-non-addicted proliferation (normal growth mode). We

M Colombi; K D Molle; D Benjamin; K Rattenbacher-Kiser; C Schaefer; C Betz; A Thiemeyer; U Regenass; M N Hall; C Moroni

2011-01-01

107

A cell protection screen reveals potent inhibitors of multiple stages of the hepatitis C virus life cycle  

PubMed Central

The hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle involves multiple steps, but most current drug candidates target only viral replication. The inability to systematically discover inhibitors targeting multiple steps of the HCV life cycle has hampered antiviral development. We present a simple screen for HCV antivirals based on the alleviation of HCV-mediated cytopathic effect in an engineered cell line—n4mBid. This approach obviates the need for a secondary screen to avoid cytotoxic false-positive hits. Application of our screen to 1280 compounds, many in clinical trials or approved for therapeutic use, yielded >200 hits. Of the 55 leading hits, 47 inhibited one or more aspects of the HCV life cycle by >40%. Six compounds blocked HCV entry to levels similar to an antibody (JS-81) targeting the HCV entry receptor CD81. Seven hits inhibited HCV replication and/or infectious virus production by >100-fold, with one (quinidine) inhibiting infectious virus production by 450-fold relative to HCV replication levels. This approach is simple and inexpensive and should enable the rapid discovery of new classes of HCV life cycle inhibitors. PMID:20142494

Chockalingam, Karuppiah; Simeon, Rudo L.; Rice, Charles M.; Chen, Zhilei

2010-01-01

108

Comparative RNAi Screens in C. elegans and C. briggsae Reveal the Impact of Developmental System Drift on Gene Function  

PubMed Central

Although two related species may have extremely similar phenotypes, the genetic networks underpinning this conserved biology may have diverged substantially since they last shared a common ancestor. This is termed Developmental System Drift (DSD) and reflects the plasticity of genetic networks. One consequence of DSD is that some orthologous genes will have evolved different in vivo functions in two such phenotypically similar, related species and will therefore have different loss of function phenotypes. Here we report an RNAi screen in C. elegans and C. briggsae to identify such cases. We screened 1333 genes in both species and identified 91 orthologues that have different RNAi phenotypes. Intriguingly, we find that recently evolved genes of unknown function have the fastest evolving in vivo functions and, in several cases, we identify the molecular events driving these changes. We thus find that DSD has a major impact on the evolution of gene function and we anticipate that the C. briggsae RNAi library reported here will drive future studies on comparative functional genomics screens in these nematodes. PMID:24516395

Verster, Adrian J.; Ramani, Arun K.; McKay, Sheldon J.; Fraser, Andrew G.

2014-01-01

109

[Lethal midline granuloma].  

PubMed

Lethal midline granuloma is a rare clinical syndrome. In clinical practice the destructive process of the facial midline may appear as a symptom of various infective, malignant or autoimmune diseases. A physician must have a good knowledge of the problem in order to make a rational approach to diagnosis. The present paper discusses the case of a 34-year old patient with destructive changes of midline, nose, perforating of palatal cleft and destruction of bone structure of nose, maxillary and ethmoid sinus. For histopathologic diagnosis of T-lymphoma it was necessary to make immunohistological study of the biopsy specimen. Irradiation therapy with total dose of 5600 cGy showed an extremely good therapeutic result. Three years after irradiation therapy the patient is still in a remission. PMID:15628680

Skitareli?, Neven; Dominis, Mara; Matuli?, Zlatko; Dujella, Josip; Dzelalija, Boris

2004-01-01

110

Genome-Wide Small Interfering RNA Screens Reveal VAMP3 as a Novel Host Factor Required for Uukuniemi Virus Late Penetration  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT The Bunyaviridae constitute a large family of enveloped animal viruses, many of which are important emerging pathogens. How bunyaviruses enter and infect mammalian cells remains largely uncharacterized. We used two genome-wide silencing screens with distinct small interfering RNA (siRNA) libraries to investigate host proteins required during infection of human cells by the bunyavirus Uukuniemi virus (UUKV), a late-penetrating virus. Sequence analysis of the libraries revealed that many siRNAs in the screens inhibited infection by silencing not only the intended targets but additional genes in a microRNA (miRNA)-like manner. That the 7-nucleotide seed regions in the siRNAs can cause a perturbation in infection was confirmed by using synthetic miRNAs (miRs). One of the miRs tested, miR-142-3p, was shown to interfere with the intracellular trafficking of incoming viruses by regulating the v-SNARE VAMP3, a strong hit shared by both siRNA screens. Inactivation of VAMP3 by the tetanus toxin led to a block in infection. Using fluorescence-based techniques in fixed and live cells, we found that the viruses enter VAMP3+ endosomal vesicles 5 min after internalization and that colocalization was maximal 15 min thereafter. At this time, LAMP1 was associated with the VAMP3+ virus-containing endosomes. In cells depleted of VAMP3, viruses were mainly trapped in LAMP1-negative compartments. Together, our results indicated that UUKV relies on VAMP3 for penetration, providing an indication of added complexity in the trafficking of viruses through the endocytic network. IMPORTANCE Bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to humans and livestock globally. Unfortunately, relatively little is known about these emerging pathogens. We report here the first human genome-wide siRNA screens for a bunyavirus. The screens resulted in the identification of 562 host cell factors with a potential role in cell entry and virus replication. To demonstrate the robustness of our approach, we confirmed and analyzed the role of the v-SNARE VAMP3 in Uukuniemi virus entry and infection. The information gained lays the basis for future research into the cell biology of bunyavirus infection and new antiviral strategies. In addition, by shedding light on serious caveats in large-scale siRNA screening, our experimental and bioinformatics procedures will be valuable in the comprehensive analysis of past and future high-content screening data. PMID:24850728

Meier, Roger; Franceschini, Andrea; Horvath, Peter; Tetard, Marilou; Mancini, Roberta; von Mering, Christian; Helenius, Ari

2014-01-01

111

Genomic Screening of Fibroblast Growth-Factor Receptor 2 Reveals a Wide Spectrum of Mutations in Patients with Syndromic Craniosynostosis  

PubMed Central

It has been known for several years that heterozygous mutations of three members of the fibroblast growth-factor–receptor family of signal-transduction molecules—namely, FGFR1, FGFR2, and FGFR3—contribute significantly to disorders of bone patterning and growth. FGFR3 mutations, which predominantly cause short-limbed bone dysplasia, occur in all three major regions (i.e., extracellular, transmembrane, and intracellular) of the protein. By contrast, most mutations described in FGFR2 localize to just two exons (IIIa and IIIc), encoding the IgIII domain in the extracellular region, resulting in syndromic craniosynostosis including Apert, Crouzon, or Pfeiffer syndromes. Interpretation of this apparent clustering of mutations in FGFR2 has been hampered by the absence of any complete FGFR2-mutation screen. We have now undertaken such a screen in 259 patients with craniosynostosis in whom mutations in other genes (e.g., FGFR1, FGFR3, and TWIST) had been excluded; part of this screen was a cohort-based study, enabling unbiased estimates of the mutation distribution to be obtained. Although the majority (61/62 in the cohort sample) of FGFR2 mutations localized to the IIIa and IIIc exons, we identified mutations in seven additional exons—including six distinct mutations of the tyrosine kinase region and a single mutation of the IgII domain. The majority of patients with atypical mutations had diagnoses of Pfeiffer syndrome or Crouzon syndrome. Overall, FGFR2 mutations were present in 9.8% of patients with craniosynostosis who were included in a prospectively ascertained sample, but no mutations were found in association with isolated fusion of the metopic or sagittal sutures. We conclude that the spectrum of FGFR2 mutations causing craniosynostosis is wider than previously recognized but that, nevertheless, the IgIIIa/IIIc region represents a genuine mutation hotspot. PMID:11781872

Kan, Shih-hsin; Elanko, Navaratnam; Johnson, David; Cornejo-Roldan, Laura; Cook, Jackie; Reich, Elsa W.; Tomkins, Susan; Verloes, Alain; Twigg, Stephen R. F.; Rannan-Eliya, Sahan; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Wall, Steven A.; Muenke, Maximilian; Wilkie, Andrew O. M.

2002-01-01

112

Fragment screening reveals salicylic hydroxamic acid as an inhibitor of Trypanosoma brucei GPI GlcNAc-PI de-N-acetylase  

PubMed Central

The zinc-metalloenzyme GlcNAc-PI de-N-acetylase is essential for the biosynthesis of mature GPI anchors and has been genetically validated in the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei, which causes African sleeping sickness. We screened a focused library of zinc-binding fragments and identified salicylic hydroxamic acid as a GlcNAc-PI de-N-acetylase inhibitor with high ligand efficiency. This is the first small molecule inhibitor reported for the trypanosome GPI pathway. Investigating the structure activity relationship revealed that hydroxamic acid and 2-OH are essential for potency, and that substitution is tolerated at the 4- and 5-positions. PMID:24589444

Urbaniak, Michael D.; Capes, Amy S.; Crossman, Arthur; O’Neill, Sandra; Thompson, Stephen; Gilbert, Ian H.; Ferguson, Michael A.J.

2014-01-01

113

Potential lethal and non-lethal effects of predators on dispersal of spider mites.  

PubMed

Predators can affect prey dispersal lethally by direct consumption or non-lethally by making prey hesitate to disperse. These lethal and non-lethal effects are detectable only in systems where prey can disperse between multiple patches. However, most studies have drawn their conclusions concerning the ability of predatory mites to suppress spider mites based on observations of their interactions on a single patch or on heavily infested host plants where spider mites could hardly disperse toward intact patches. In these systems, specialist predatory mites that penetrate protective webs produced by spider mites quickly suppress the spider mites, whereas generalist predators that cannot penetrate the webs were ineffective. By using a connected patch system, we revealed that a generalist ant, Pristomyrmex punctatus Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), effectively prevented dispersal of spider mites, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae), by directly consuming dispersing individuals. We also revealed that a generalist predatory mite, Euseius sojaensis Ehara (Acari: Phytoseiidae), prevented between-patch dispersal of T. kanzawai by making them hesitate to disperse. In contrast, a specialist phytoseiid predatory mite, Neoseiulus womersleyi Schicha, allowed spider mites to escape an initial patch, increasing the number of colonized patches within the system. Our results suggest that ants and generalist predatory mites can effectively suppress Tetranychus species under some conditions, and should receive more attention as agents for conservation biological control in agroecosystems. PMID:24867061

Otsuki, Hatsune; Yano, Shuichi

2014-11-01

114

Screen of FDA-approved drug library reveals compounds that protect hair cells from aminoglycosides and cisplatin  

PubMed Central

Loss of mechanosensory hair cells in the inner ear accounts for many hearing loss and balance disorders. Several beneficial pharmaceutical drugs cause hair cell death as a side effect. These include aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as neomycin, kanamycin and gentamicin, and several cancer chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin. Discovering new compounds that protect mammalian hair cells from toxic insults is experimentally difficult because of the inaccessibility of the inner ear. We used the zebrafish lateral line sensory system as an in vivo screening platform to survey a library of FDA-approved pharmaceuticals for compounds that protect hair cells from neomycin, gentamicin, kanamycin and cisplatin. Ten compounds were identified that provide protection from at least two of the four toxins. The resulting compounds fall into several drug classes, including serotonin and dopamine-modulating drugs, adrenergic receptor ligands, and estrogen receptor modulators. The protective compounds show different effects against the different toxins, supporting the idea that each toxin causes hair cell death by distinct, but partially overlapping, mechanisms. Furthermore, some compounds from the same drug classes had different protective properties, suggesting that they might not prevent hair cell death by their known target mechanisms. Some protective compounds blocked gentamicin uptake into hair cells, suggesting that they may block mechanotransduction or other routes of entry. The protective compounds identified in our screen will provide a starting point for studies in mammals as well as further research discovering the cellular signaling pathways that trigger hair cell death. PMID:22967486

Vlasits, Anna L.; Simon, Julian A.; Raible, David W.; Rubel, Edwin W; Owens, Kelly N.

2012-01-01

115

A Direct Pre-screen for Marine Bacteria Producing Compounds Inhibiting Quorum Sensing Reveals Diverse Planktonic Bacteria that are Bioactive.  

PubMed

A promising new strategy in antibacterial research is inhibition of the bacterial communication system termed quorum sensing. In this study, a novel and rapid pre-screening method was developed to detect the production of chemical inhibitors of this system (quorum-quenching compounds) by bacteria isolated from marine and estuarine waters. This method involves direct screening of mixed populations on an agar plate, facilitating specific isolation of bioactive colonies. The assay showed that between 4 and 46 % of culturable bacteria from various samples were bioactive, and of the 95 selectively isolated bacteria, 93.7 % inhibited Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence without inhibiting growth, indicating potential production of quorum-quenching compounds. Of the active isolates, 21 % showed further activity against quorum-sensing-regulated pigment production by Serratia marcescens. The majority of bioactive isolates were identified by 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) amplification and sequencing as belonging to the genera Vibrio and Pseudoalteromonas. Extracts of two strongly bioactive Pseudoalteromonas isolates (K1 and B2) were quantitatively assessed for inhibition of growth and quorum-sensing-regulated processes in V. harveyi, S. marcescens and Chromobacterium violaceum. Extracts of the isolates reduced V. harveyi bioluminescence by as much as 98 % and C. violaceum pigment production by 36 % at concentrations which had no adverse effect on growth. The activity found in the extracts indicated that the isolates may produce quorum-quenching compounds. This study further supports the suggestion that quorum quenching may be a common attribute among culturable planktonic marine and estuarine bacteria. PMID:25082352

Linthorne, Jamie S; Chang, Barbara J; Flematti, Gavin R; Ghisalberti, Emilio L; Sutton, David C

2015-02-01

116

RNAi Screen of Endoplasmic Reticulum–Associated Host Factors Reveals a Role for IRE1? in Supporting Brucella Replication  

PubMed Central

Brucella species are facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause brucellosis, a global zoonosis of profound importance. Although recent studies have demonstrated that Brucella spp. replicate within an intracellular compartment that contains endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident proteins, the molecular mechanisms by which the pathogen secures this replicative niche remain obscure. Here, we address this issue by exploiting Drosophila S2 cells and RNA interference (RNAi) technology to develop a genetically tractable system that recapitulates critical aspects of mammalian cell infection. After validating this system by demonstrating a shared requirement for phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activities in supporting Brucella infection in both host cell systems, we performed an RNAi screen of 240 genes, including 110 ER-associated genes, for molecules that mediate bacterial interactions with the ER. We uncovered 52 evolutionarily conserved host factors that, when depleted, inhibited or increased Brucella infection. Strikingly, 29 of these factors had not been previously suggested to support bacterial infection of host cells. The most intriguing of these was inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), a transmembrane kinase that regulates the eukaryotic unfolded protein response (UPR). We employed IRE1??/? murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to demonstrate a role for this protein in supporting Brucella infection of mammalian cells, and thereby, validated the utility of the Drosophila S2 cell system for uncovering novel Brucella host factors. Finally, we propose a model in which IRE1?, and other ER-associated genes uncovered in our screen, mediate Brucella replication by promoting autophagosome biogenesis. PMID:18654626

Qin, Qing-Ming; Pei, Jianwu; Ancona, Veronica; Shaw, Brian D.; Ficht, Thomas A.; de Figueiredo, Paul

2008-01-01

117

An unbiased in vivo screen reveals multiple transcription factors that control HPV E6-regulated hTERT in keratinocytes  

PubMed Central

Activation of telomerase by human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6 is a critical step for cell immortalization and transformation in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs). Multiple transcription factors have been identified as being involved in E6-induced hTERT expression. Here, we adapted an unbiased in vivo screen using a LacO-LacI system in human cells to discover hTERT promoter-interacting regulators. This approach allowed us to identify a novel hTERT repressor, Maz, which bound the hTERT promoter. E6 expression reduced Maz binding and correspondingly increased Sp1 binding at the hTERT promoter. Knockdown of Maz further increased histone acetylation, as well as hTERT expression in the presence of E6. Overall, these data indicate the utility of a novel screen for promoter-interacting and transcription-regulating proteins. These data also highlight multiple factors that normally regulate hTERT repression in HFKs, and therefore are targeted by E6 for hTERT expression. PMID:24074563

Xu, Mei; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A.; Grandori, Carla; Galloway, Denise A.

2013-01-01

118

High Content Screening of a Kinase-Focused Library Reveals Compounds Broadly-Active against Dengue Viruses  

PubMed Central

Dengue virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that has a large impact in global health. It is considered as one of the medically important arboviruses, and developing a preventive or therapeutic solution remains a top priority in the medical and scientific community. Drug discovery programs for potential dengue antivirals have increased dramatically over the last decade, largely in part to the introduction of high-throughput assays. In this study, we have developed an image-based dengue high-throughput/high-content assay (HT/HCA) using an innovative computer vision approach to screen a kinase-focused library for anti-dengue compounds. Using this dengue HT/HCA, we identified a group of compounds with a 4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-methylthiazol-2-amine as a common core structure that inhibits dengue viral infection in a human liver-derived cell line (Huh-7.5 cells). Compounds CND1201, CND1203 and CND1243 exhibited strong antiviral activities against all four dengue serotypes. Plaque reduction and time-of-addition assays suggests that these compounds interfere with the late stage of viral infection cycle. These findings demonstrate that our image-based dengue HT/HCA is a reliable tool that can be used to screen various chemical libraries for potential dengue antiviral candidates. PMID:23437413

Li, Xiaolan; Milan Bonotto, Rafaela; No, Joo Hwan; Kim, Keum Hyun; Baek, Sungmin; Kim, Hee Young; Windisch, Marc Peter; Pamplona Mosimann, Ana Luiza; de Borba, Luana; Liuzzi, Michel; Hansen, Michael Adsetts Edberg; Nunes Duarte dos Santos, Claudia; Freitas-Junior, Lucio Holanda

2013-01-01

119

High-Throughput 3D Screening Reveals Differences in Drug Sensitivities between Culture Models of JIMT1 Breast Cancer Cells  

PubMed Central

The traditional method for studying cancer in vitro is to grow immortalized cancer cells in two-dimensional monolayers on plastic. However, many cellular features are impaired in these artificial conditions, and large changes in gene expression compared to tumors have been reported. Three-dimensional cell culture models have become increasingly popular and are suggested to be better models than two-dimensional monolayers due to improved cell-to-cell contact and structures that resemble in vivo architecture. The aim of this study was to develop a simple high-throughput three-dimensional drug screening method and to compare drug responses in JIMT1 breast cancer cells when grown in two dimensions, in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced anchorage-independent three-dimensional models, and in Matrigel three-dimensional cell culture models. We screened 102 compounds with multiple concentrations and biological replicates for their effects on cell proliferation. The cells were either treated immediately upon plating, or they were allowed to grow in three-dimensional cultures for 4 days before the drug treatment. Large variations in drug responses were observed between the models indicating that comparisons of culture model-influenced drug sensitivities cannot be made based on the effects of a single drug. However, we show with the 63 most prominent drugs that, in general, JIMT1 cells grown on Matrigel were significantly more sensitive to drugs than cells grown in two-dimensional cultures, while the responses of cells grown in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) resembled those of the two-dimensional cultures. Furthermore, comparing the gene expression profiles of the cell culture models to xenograft tumors indicated that cells cultured in Matrigel and as xenografts most closely resembled each other. In this study, we also suggest that three-dimensional cultures can provide a platform for systematic experimentation of larger compound collections in a high-throughput mode and be used as alternatives to traditional two-dimensional screens for better comparability to the in vivo state. PMID:24194875

Fey, Vidal; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kleivi Sahlberg, Kristine; Kallioniemi, Olli; Perälä, Merja

2013-01-01

120

Genomic library screening for viruses from the human dental plaque revealed pathogen-specific lytic phage sequences.  

PubMed

Bacterial pathogenesis presents an astounding arsenal of virulence factors that allow them to conquer many different niches throughout the course of infection. Principally fascinating is the fact that some bacterial species are able to induce different diseases by expression of different combinations of virulence factors. Nevertheless, studies aiming at screening for the presence of bacteriophages in humans have been limited. Such screening procedures would eventually lead to identification of phage-encoded properties that impart increased bacterial fitness and/or virulence in a particular niche, and hence, would potentially be used to reverse the course of bacterial infections. As the human oral cavity represents a rich and dynamic ecosystem for several upper respiratory tract pathogens. However, little is known about virus diversity in human dental plaque which is an important reservoir. We applied the culture-independent approach to characterize virus diversity in human dental plaque making a library from a virus DNA fraction amplified using a multiple displacement method and sequenced 80 clones. The resulting sequence showed 44% significant identities to GenBank databases by TBLASTX analysis. TBLAST homology comparisons showed that 66% was viral; 18% eukarya; 10% bacterial; 6% mobile elements. These sequences were sorted into 6 contigs and 45 single sequences in which 4 contigs and a single sequence showed significant identity to a small region of a putative prophage in the Corynebacterium diphtheria genome. These findings interestingly highlight the uniqueness of over half of the sequences, whilst the dominance of a pathogen-specific prophage sequences imply their role in virulence. PMID:21969025

Al-Jarbou, Ahmed Nasser

2012-01-01

121

Biochemical evaluation of virtual screening methods reveals a cell-active inhibitor of the cancer-promoting phosphatases of regenerating liver  

PubMed Central

Computationally supported development of small molecule inhibitors has successfully been applied to protein tyrosine phosphatases in the past, revealing a number of cell-active compounds. Similar approaches have also been used to screen for small molecule inhibitors for the cancer-related phosphatases of regenerating liver (PRL) family. Still, selective and cell-active compounds are of limited availability. Since especially PRL-3 remains an attractive drug target due to its clear role in cancer metastasis, such compounds are highly demanded. In this study, we investigated various virtual screening approaches for their applicability to identify novel small molecule entities for PRL-3 as target. Biochemical evaluation of purchasable compounds revealed ligand-based approaches as well suited for this target, compared to docking-based techniques that did not perform well in this context. The best hit of this study, a 2-cyano-2-ene-ester and hence a novel chemotype targeting the PRLs, was further optimized by a structure–activity-relationship (SAR) study, leading to a low micromolar PRL inhibitor with acceptable selectivity over other protein tyrosine phosphatases. The compound is active in cells, as shown by its ability to specifically revert PRL-3 induced cell migration, and exhibits similar effects on PRL-1 and PRL-2. It is furthermore suitable for fluorescence microscopy applications, and it is commercially available. These features make it the only purchasable, cell-active and acceptably selective PRL inhibitor to date that can be used in various cellular applications. PMID:25159123

Hoeger, Birgit; Diether, Maren; Ballester, Pedro J.; Köhn, Maja

2014-01-01

122

Functional screen reveals essential roles of miR-27a/24 in differentiation of embryonic stem cells.  

PubMed

MicroRNAs play important roles in controlling the embryonic stem cell (ESC) state. Although much is known about microRNAs maintaining ESC state, microRNAs that are responsible for promoting ESC differentiation are less reported. Here, by screening 40 microRNAs pre-selected by their expression patterns and predicted targets in Dgcr8-null ESCs, we identify 14 novel differentiation-associated microRNAs. Among them, miR-27a and miR-24, restrained by c-Myc in ESC, exert their roles of silencing self-renewal through directly targeting several important pluripotency-associated factors, such as Oct4, Foxo1 and Smads. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of all miR-27/24 in ESCs leads to serious deficiency in ESC differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, depleting of them in mouse embryonic fibroblasts can evidently promote somatic cell reprogramming. Altogether, our findings uncover the essential role of miR-27 and miR-24 in ESC differentiation and also demonstrate novel microRNAs responsible for ESC differentiation. PMID:25519956

Ma, Yanni; Yao, Nan; Liu, Guang; Dong, Lei; Liu, Yufang; Zhang, Meili; Wang, Fang; Wang, Bin; Wei, Xueju; Dong, He; Wang, Lanlan; Ji, Shaowei; Zhang, Junwu; Wang, Yangming; Huang, Yue; Yu, Jia

2015-02-01

123

RNAi screening reveals requirement for host cell secretory pathway in infection by diverse families of negative-strand RNA viruses  

PubMed Central

Negative-strand (NS) RNA viruses comprise many pathogens that cause serious diseases in humans and animals. Despite their clinical importance, little is known about the host factors required for their infection. Using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototypic NS RNA virus in the family Rhabdoviridae, we conducted a human genome-wide siRNA screen and identified 72 host genes required for viral infection. Many of these identified genes were also required for infection by two other NS RNA viruses, the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus of the Arenaviridae family and human parainfluenza virus type 3 of the Paramyxoviridae family. Genes affecting different stages of VSV infection, such as entry/uncoating, gene expression, and assembly/release, were identified. Depletion of the proteins of the coatomer complex I or its upstream effectors ARF1 or GBF1 led to detection of reduced levels of VSV RNA. Coatomer complex I was also required for infection of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type 3. These results highlight the evolutionarily conserved requirements for gene expression of diverse families of NS RNA viruses and demonstrate the involvement of host cell secretory pathway in the process. PMID:22065774

Panda, Debasis; Das, Anshuman; Dinh, Phat X.; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Nayak, Debasis; Barrows, Nicholas J.; Pearson, James L.; Thompson, Jesse; Kelly, David L.; Ladunga, Istvan; Pattnaik, Asit K.

2011-01-01

124

A forward chemical genetic screen reveals an inhibitor of the Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 complex  

PubMed Central

The MRN (Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1)-ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) pathway is essential for sensing and signaling from DNA double-strand breaks. The MRN complex acts as a DNA damage sensor, maintains genome stability during DNA replication, promotes homology-dependent DNA repair and activates ATM. MRN is essential for cell viability, which has limited functional studies of the complex. Small-molecule inhibitors of MRN could circumvent this experimental limitation and could also be used as cellular radio- and chemosensitization compounds. Using cell-free systems that recapitulate faithfully the MRN-ATM signaling pathway, we designed a forward chemical genetic screen to identify inhibitors of the pathway, and we isolated Z-5-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-2-imino-1,3-thiazolidin-4-one (mirin, 1) as an inhibitor of MRN. Mirin prevents MRN-dependent activation of ATM without affecting ATM protein kinase activity, and it inhibits Mre11-associated exonuclease activity. Consistent with its ability to target the MRN complex, mirin abolishes the G2/M checkpoint and homology-dependent repair in mammalian cells. PMID:18176557

Dupré, Aude; Boyer-Chatenet, Louise; Sattler, Rose M; Modi, Ami P; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Nicolette, Matthew L; Kopelovich, Levy; Jasin, Maria; Baer, Richard; Paull, Tanya T; Gautier, Jean

2009-01-01

125

A forward chemical genetic screen reveals an inhibitor of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 complex.  

PubMed

The MRN (Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1)-ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) pathway is essential for sensing and signaling from DNA double-strand breaks. The MRN complex acts as a DNA damage sensor, maintains genome stability during DNA replication, promotes homology-dependent DNA repair and activates ATM. MRN is essential for cell viability, which has limited functional studies of the complex. Small-molecule inhibitors of MRN could circumvent this experimental limitation and could also be used as cellular radio- and chemosensitization compounds. Using cell-free systems that recapitulate faithfully the MRN-ATM signaling pathway, we designed a forward chemical genetic screen to identify inhibitors of the pathway, and we isolated 6-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydro-4(1H)-pyrimidinone (mirin, 1) as an inhibitor of MRN. Mirin prevents MRN-dependent activation of ATM without affecting ATM protein kinase activity, and it inhibits Mre11-associated exonuclease activity. Consistent with its ability to target the MRN complex, mirin abolishes the G2/M checkpoint and homology-dependent repair in mammalian cells. PMID:18176557

Dupré, Aude; Boyer-Chatenet, Louise; Sattler, Rose M; Modi, Ami P; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Nicolette, Matthew L; Kopelovich, Levy; Jasin, Maria; Baer, Richard; Paull, Tanya T; Gautier, Jean

2008-02-01

126

Histochemical screening, metabolite profiling and expression analysis reveal Rosaceae roots as the site of flavan-3-ol biosynthesis.  

PubMed

Histochemical screening of 30 Rosaceae genera representing all classic subfamilies demonstrated flavan-3-ols (catechins) as general secondary metabolites in roots of Rosaceae. Semi-quantitative LC-MS analyses confirmed the presence of catechin, epicatechin and various dimeric flavan-3-ols (also representing higher polymeric proanthocyanidins) as prominent polyphenols in root tips of Fragaria (strawberry), Malus (apple), Rosa (rose), Pyrus (pear) and Prunus (plum). Distinct patterns of flavan-3-ol distribution at the cellular level were found in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) and apple (Malus × domestica) root tips. The calyptras (root caps) showed the most prominent flavan-3-ol staining for these two genera. Border cells of Fragaria and Malus, as first demonstrated here for Rosaceae, were also found to contain flavan-3-ols. Transcript analyses with cDNA demonstrated root expression of known flavonoid genes expressed in the respective fruits and leaves. Primarily, this proves in situ biosynthesis of flavan-3-ols in these roots. Knowledge of the distinct cellular distribution patterns and their in situ biosynthesis in roots provides a basis for analysis of the functional roles of Rosaceae root flavan-3-ols. PMID:21973223

Hoffmann, T; Friedlhuber, R; Steinhauser, C; Tittel, I; Skowranek, K; Schwab, W; Fischer, T C

2012-01-01

127

Genome-wide RNAi Screen Reveals a Role for Multipass Membrane Proteins in Endosome-to-Golgi Retrieval.  

PubMed

Endosome-to-Golgi retrieval is an essential membrane trafficking pathway required for many important physiological processes and linked to neurodegenerative disease and infection by bacterial and viral pathogens. The prototypical cargo protein for this pathway is the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CIMPR), which delivers lysosomal hydrolases to endosomes. Efficient retrieval of CIMPR to the Golgi requires the retromer complex, but other aspects of the endosome-to-Golgi retrieval pathway are poorly understood. Employing an image-based antibody-uptake assay, we conducted a genome-wide RNAi loss-of-function screen for novel regulators of this trafficking pathway and report ?90 genes that are required for endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of a CD8-CIMPR reporter protein. Among these regulators of endosome-to-Golgi retrieval are a number of multipass membrane-spanning proteins, a class of proteins often overlooked with respect to a role in membrane trafficking. We further demonstrate a role for three multipass membrane proteins, SFT2D2, ZDHHC5, and GRINA, in endosome-to-Golgi retrieval. PMID:25464851

Breusegem, Sophia Y; Seaman, Matthew N J

2014-12-11

128

Large-scale screening of transcription factor-promoter interactions in spruce reveals a transcriptional network involved in vascular development.  

PubMed

This research aimed to investigate the role of diverse transcription factors (TFs) and to delineate gene regulatory networks directly in conifers at a relatively high-throughput level. The approach integrated sequence analyses, transcript profiling, and development of a conifer-specific activation assay. Transcript accumulation profiles of 102 TFs and potential target genes were clustered to identify groups of coordinately expressed genes. Several different patterns of transcript accumulation were observed by profiling in nine different organs and tissues: 27 genes were preferential to secondary xylem both in stems and roots, and other genes were preferential to phelloderm and periderm or were more ubiquitous. A robust system has been established as a screening approach to define which TFs have the ability to regulate a given promoter in planta. Trans-activation or repression effects were observed in 30% of TF-candidate gene promoter combinations. As a proof of concept, phylogenetic analysis and expression and trans-activation data were used to demonstrate that two spruce NAC-domain proteins most likely play key roles in secondary vascular growth as observed in other plant species. This study tested many TFs from diverse families in a conifer tree species, which broadens the knowledge of promoter-TF interactions in wood development and enables comparisons of gene regulatory networks found in angiosperms and gymnosperms. PMID:24713992

Duval, Isabelle; Lachance, Denis; Giguère, Isabelle; Bomal, Claude; Morency, Marie-Josée; Pelletier, Gervais; Boyle, Brian; MacKay, John J; Séguin, Armand

2014-06-01

129

Systematic screening of polyphosphate (poly P) levels in yeast mutant cells reveals strong interdependence with primary metabolism  

PubMed Central

Background Inorganic polyphosphate (poly P) occurs universally in all organisms from bacteria to man. It functions, for example, as a phosphate and energy store, and is involved in the activation and regulation of proteins. Despite its ubiquitous occurrence and important functions, it is unclear how poly P is synthesized or how poly P metabolism is regulated in higher eukaryotes. This work describes a systematic analysis of poly P levels in yeast knockout strains mutated in almost every non-essential gene. Results After three consecutive screens, 255 genes (almost 4% of the yeast genome) were found to be involved in the maintenance of normal poly P content. Many of these genes encoded proteins functioning in the cytoplasm, the vacuole or in transport and transcription. Besides reduced poly P content, many strains also exhibited reduced total phosphate content, showed altered ATP and glycogen levels and were disturbed in the secretion of acid phosphatase. Conclusion Cellular energy and phosphate homeostasis is suggested to result from the equilibrium between poly P, ATP and free phosphate within the cell. Poly P serves as a buffer for both ATP and free phosphate levels and is, therefore, the least essential and consequently most variable component in this network. However, strains with reduced poly P levels are not only affected in their ATP and phosphate content, but also in other components that depend on ATP or free phosphate content, such as glycogen or secreted phosphatase activity. PMID:17107617

Freimoser, Florian M; Hürlimann, Hans Caspar; Jakob, Claude A; Werner, Thomas P; Amrhein, Nikolaus

2006-01-01

130

A GFP-based genetic screen reveals mutations that disrupt the architecture of the zebrafish retinotectal projection.  

PubMed

The retinotectal projection is a premier model system for the investigation of molecular mechanisms that underlie axon pathfinding and map formation. Other important features, such as the laminar targeting of retinal axons, the control of axon fasciculation and the intrinsic organization of the tectal neuropil, have been less accessible to investigation. In order to visualize these processes in vivo, we generated a transgenic zebrafish line expressing membrane-targeted GFP under control of the brn3c promoter/enhancer. The GFP reporter labels a distinct subset of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which project mainly into one of the four retinorecipient layers of the tectum and into a small subset of the extratectal arborization fields. In this transgenic line, we carried out an ENU-mutagenesis screen by scoring live zebrafish larvae for anatomical phenotypes. Thirteen recessive mutations in 12 genes were discovered. In one mutant, ddl, the majority of RGCs fail to differentiate. Three of the mutations, vrt, late and tard, delay the orderly ingrowth of retinal axons into the tectum. Two alleles of drg disrupt the layer-specific targeting of retinal axons. Three genes, fuzz, beyo and brek, are required for confinement of the tectal neuropil. Fasciculation within the optic tract and adhesion within the tectal neuropil are regulated by vrt, coma, bluk, clew and blin. The mutated genes are predicted to encode molecules essential for building the intricate neural architecture of the visual system. PMID:15930106

Xiao, Tong; Roeser, Tobias; Staub, Wendy; Baier, Herwig

2005-07-01

131

Multi-Mycotoxin Screening Reveals the Occurrence of 139 Different Secondary Metabolites in Feed and Feed Ingredients  

PubMed Central

The development of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)/mass spectrometry (MS) methods for the simultaneous detection and quantification of a broad spectrum of mycotoxins has facilitated the screening of a larger number of samples for contamination with a wide array of less well-known “emerging” mycotoxins and other metabolites. In this study, 83 samples of feed and feed raw materials were analysed. All of them were found to contain seven to 69 metabolites. The total number of detected metabolites amounts to 139. Fusarium mycotoxins were most common, but a number of Alternaria toxins also occurred very often. Furthermore, two so-called masked mycotoxins (i.e., mycotoxin conjugates), namely deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (75% positives) and zearalenone-4-sulfate (49% positives), were frequently detected. Although the observed median concentrations of the individual analytes were generally in the low ?g/kg range, evaluating the toxicological potential of a given sample is difficult. Toxicity data on less well-known mycotoxins and other detected metabolites are notoriously scarce, as an overview on the available information on the most commonly detected metabolites shows. Besides, the possible synergistic effects of co-occurring substances have to be considered. PMID:23529186

Streit, Elisabeth; Schwab, Christina; Sulyok, Michael; Naehrer, Karin; Krska, Rudolf; Schatzmayr, Gerd

2013-01-01

132

Large-scale screening of transcription factor–promoter interactions in spruce reveals a transcriptional network involved in vascular development  

PubMed Central

This research aimed to investigate the role of diverse transcription factors (TFs) and to delineate gene regulatory networks directly in conifers at a relatively high-throughput level. The approach integrated sequence analyses, transcript profiling, and development of a conifer-specific activation assay. Transcript accumulation profiles of 102 TFs and potential target genes were clustered to identify groups of coordinately expressed genes. Several different patterns of transcript accumulation were observed by profiling in nine different organs and tissues: 27 genes were preferential to secondary xylem both in stems and roots, and other genes were preferential to phelloderm and periderm or were more ubiquitous. A robust system has been established as a screening approach to define which TFs have the ability to regulate a given promoter in planta. Trans-activation or repression effects were observed in 30% of TF–candidate gene promoter combinations. As a proof of concept, phylogenetic analysis and expression and trans-activation data were used to demonstrate that two spruce NAC-domain proteins most likely play key roles in secondary vascular growth as observed in other plant species. This study tested many TFs from diverse families in a conifer tree species, which broadens the knowledge of promoter–TF interactions in wood development and enables comparisons of gene regulatory networks found in angiosperms and gymnosperms. PMID:24713992

Lachance, Denis; Giguère, Isabelle; Séguin, Armand

2014-01-01

133

Screening of lactic acid bacteria from Indonesia reveals glucansucrase and fructansucrase genes in two different Weissella confusa strains from soya.  

PubMed

Homopolysaccharide (glucan and fructan) synthesis from sucrose by sucrase enzymes in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been well studied in the genera Leuconostoc, Streptococcus and Lactobacillus. This study aimed to identify and characterize genes encoding glucansucrase/glucosyltransferase (GTF) and fructansucrases/fructosyltransferase (FTF) enzymes from genomic DNA of 'rare' Indonesian exopolysaccharide-producing LAB. From a total of 63 exopolysaccharide-producing LAB isolates obtained from foods, beverages and environmental samples, 18 isolates showing the most slimy and mucoid colony morphologies on sucrose were chosen for further study. By comparing bacterial growth on De Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS)-sucrose with that on MRS-raffinose, and using the results of a previous PCR screening study with degenerate primer pairs targeting the conserved catalytic domain of GTFs, various strains were identified as producers of fructan (13), of glucan only (five) or as potential producers of both glucan and fructan (nine). Here, we report the characteristics of three gtf genes and one ftf gene obtained from Weissella confusa strains MBF8-1 and MBF8-2. Strain MBF8-1 harbored two putative gtf genes with high sequence similarity to GTFB of Lactobacillus reuteri 121 and GTF180 of L. reuteri 180, respectively. Strain MBF8-2 possessed single gtf and ftf genes with high sequence similarity to GTFKg3 of Lactobacillus fermentum Kg3 and DSRWC of Weissella cibaria, and FTF levansucrase of L. reuteri 121, respectively. PMID:19758326

Malik, Amarila; Radji, Maksum; Kralj, Slavko; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

2009-11-01

134

DNA repair and synthetic lethality  

PubMed Central

Tumors often have DNA repair defects, suggesting additional inhibition of other DNA repair pathways in tumors may lead to synthetic lethality. Accumulating data demonstrate that DNA repair-defective tumors, in particular homologous recombination (HR), are highly sensitive to DNA-damaging agents. Thus, HR-defective tumors exhibit potential vulnerability to the synthetic lethality approach, which may lead to new therapeutic strategies. It is well known that poly (adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors show the synthetically lethal effect in tumors defective in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes encoded proteins that are required for efficient HR. In this review, we summarize the strategies of targeting DNA repair pathways and other DNA metabolic functions to cause synthetic lethality in HR-defective tumor cells. PMID:22010575

Guo, Gong-she; Zhang, Feng-mei; Gao, Rui-jie; Delsite, Robert; Feng, Zhi-hui; Powell, Simon N

2011-01-01

135

A Screen of Coxiella burnetii Mutants Reveals Important Roles for Dot/Icm Effectors and Host Autophagy in Vacuole Biogenesis  

PubMed Central

Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in a lysosome-derived vacuole. The molecular mechanisms used by this bacterium to create a pathogen-occupied vacuole remain largely unknown. Here, we conducted a visual screen on an arrayed library of C. burnetii NMII transposon insertion mutants to identify genes required for biogenesis of a mature Coxiella-containing vacuole (CCV). Mutants defective in Dot/Icm secretion system function or the PmrAB regulatory system were incapable of intracellular replication. Several mutants with intracellular growth defects were found to have insertions in genes encoding effector proteins translocated into host cells by the Dot/Icm system. These included mutants deficient in the effector proteins Cig57, CoxCC8 and Cbu1754. Mutants that had transposon insertions in genes important in central metabolism or encoding tRNA modification enzymes were identified based on the appearance filamentous bacteria intracellularly. Lastly, mutants that displayed a multi-vacuolar phenotype were identified. All of these mutants had a transposon insertion in the gene encoding the effector protein Cig2. Whereas vacuoles containing wild type C. burnetii displayed robust accumulation of the autophagosome protein LC3, the vacuoles formed by the cig2 mutant did not contain detectible amounts of LC3. Furthermore, interfering with host autophagy during infection by wild type C. burnetii resulted in a multi-vacuolar phenotype similar to that displayed by the cig2 mutant. Thus, a functional Cig2 protein is important for interactions between the CCV and host autophagosomes and this drives a process that enhances the fusogenic properties of this pathogen-occupied organelle. PMID:25080348

Newton, Hayley J.; Kohler, Lara J.; McDonough, Justin A.; Temoche-Diaz, Morayma; Crabill, Emerson; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Roy, Craig R.

2014-01-01

136

Screening the 3' region of the polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) gene reveals six novel mutations.  

PubMed Central

Recently, the gene for the most common form of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), PKD1 (polycystic kidney disease 1), has been fully characterized and shown to encode an integral membrane protein, polycystin, involved in cell-cell and/or cell-matrix interactions. Study of the PKD1 gene has been complicated because most of the gene lies in a genomic region reiterated several times elsewhere on the same chromosome, and consequently only seven mutations have been described so far. Here we report a systematic screen covering approximately 80% of the approximately 2.75 kb of translated transcript that is encoded by single-copy DNA. We have identified and characterized six novel mutations that, together with the previously described changes, amount to a detection rate of 10%-15% in the population studied. The newly described mutations are two deletions, an insertion of a T-nucleotide causing a frame shift, two single-base-pair substitutions resulting in premature stop codons, and a G-->C transversion that may be a missense mutation. These results have important implications for genetic diagnosis of PKD1 because they indicate that the majority of mutations lie within the duplicated area, which is difficult to study. The regions of polycystin removed in each mutation so far described are assessed for their functional significance; an area disrupted by two new small in-frame changes is highlighted. PKD1 mutations are contrasted with those in the PKD1/TSC2 contiguous-gene syndrome, and the likely mutational mechanism in PKD1 is considered. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8554072

Peral, B.; San Millán, J. L.; Ong, A. C.; Gamble, V.; Ward, C. J.; Strong, C.; Harris, P. C.

1996-01-01

137

Feedback inhibition by thiols outranks glutathione depletion: a luciferase-based screen reveals glutathione-deficient ?-ECS and glutathione synthetase mutants impaired in cadmium-induced sulfate assimilation.  

PubMed

Plants exposed to heavy metals rapidly induce changes in gene expression that activate and enhance detoxification mechanisms, including toxic-metal chelation and the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. However, the mechanisms mediating toxic heavy metal-induced gene expression remain largely unknown. To genetically elucidate cadmium-specific transcriptional responses in Arabidopsis, we designed a genetic screen based on the activation of a cadmium-inducible reporter gene. Microarray studies identified a high-affinity sulfate transporter (SULTR1;2) among the most robust and rapid cadmium-inducible transcripts. The SULTR1;2 promoter (2.2?kb) was fused with the firefly luciferase reporter gene to quantitatively report the transcriptional response of plants exposed to cadmium. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines were ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized, and stable M(2) seedlings were screened for an abnormal luciferase response during exposure to cadmium. The screen identified non-allelic mutant lines that fell into one of three categories: (i) super response to cadmium (SRC) mutants; (ii) constitutive response to cadmium (CRC) mutants; or (iii) non-response and reduced response to cadmium (NRC) mutants. Two nrc mutants, nrc1 and nrc2, were mapped, cloned and further characterized. The nrc1 mutation was mapped to the ?-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene and the nrc2 mutation was identified as the first viable recessive mutant allele in the glutathione synthetase gene. Moreover, genetic, HPLC mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis of the nrc1 and nrc2 mutants, revealed that intracellular glutathione depletion alone would be insufficient to induce gene expression of sulfate uptake and assimilation mechanisms. Our results modify the glutathione-depletion driven model for sulfate assimilation gene induction during cadmium stress, and suggest that an enhanced oxidative state and depletion of upstream thiols, in addition to glutathione depletion, are necessary to induce the transcription of sulfate assimilation genes during early cadmium stress. PMID:22283708

Jobe, Timothy O; Sung, Dong-Yul; Akmakjian, Garo; Pham, Allis; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

2012-06-01

138

An EST screen from the annelid Pomatoceros lamarckii reveals patterns of gene loss and gain in animals  

PubMed Central

Background Since the drastic reorganisation of the phylogeny of the animal kingdom into three major clades of bilaterians; Ecdysozoa, Lophotrochozoa and Deuterostomia, it became glaringly obvious that the selection of model systems with extensive molecular resources was heavily biased towards only two of these three clades, namely the Ecdysozoa and Deuterostomia. Increasing efforts have been put towards redressing this imbalance in recent years, and one of the principal phyla in the vanguard of this endeavour is the Annelida. Results In the context of this effort we here report our characterisation of an Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) screen in the serpulid annelid, Pomatoceros lamarckii. We have sequenced over 5,000 ESTs which consolidate into over 2,000 sequences (clusters and singletons). These sequences are used to build phylogenetic trees to estimate relative branch lengths amongst different taxa and, by comparison to genomic data from other animals, patterns of gene retention and loss are deduced. Conclusion The molecular phylogenetic trees including the P. lamarckii sequences extend early observations that polychaetes tend to have relatively short branches in such trees, and hence are useful taxa with which to reconstruct gene family evolution. Also, with the availability of lophotrochozoan data such as that of P. lamarckii, it is now possible to make much more accurate reconstructions of the gene complement of the ancestor of the bilaterians than was previously possible from comparisons of ecdysozoan and deuterostome genomes to non-bilaterian outgroups. It is clear that the traditional molecular model systems for protostomes (e.g. Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans), which are restricted to the Ecdysozoa, have undergone extensive gene loss during evolution. These ecdysozoan systems, in terms of gene content, are thus more derived from the bilaterian ancestral condition than lophotrochozoan systems like the polychaetes, and thus cannot be used as good, general representatives of protostome genomes. Currently sequenced insect and nematode genomes are less suitable models for deducing bilaterian ancestral states than lophotrochozoan genomes, despite the array of powerful genetic and mechanistic manipulation techniques in these ecdysozoans. A distinct category of genes that includes those present in non-bilaterians and lophotrochozoans, but which are absent from ecdysozoans and deuterostomes, highlights the need for further lophotrochozoan data to gain a more complete understanding of the gene complement of the bilaterian ancestor. PMID:19781084

2009-01-01

139

Screening of Metagenomic and Genomic Libraries Reveals Three Classes of Bacterial Enzymes That Overcome the Toxicity of Acrylate  

PubMed Central

Acrylate is produced in significant quantities through the microbial cleavage of the highly abundant marine osmoprotectant dimethylsulfoniopropionate, an important process in the marine sulfur cycle. Acrylate can inhibit bacterial growth, likely through its conversion to the highly toxic molecule acrylyl-CoA. Previous work identified an acrylyl-CoA reductase, encoded by the gene acuI, as being important for conferring on bacteria the ability to grow in the presence of acrylate. However, some bacteria lack acuI, and, conversely, many bacteria that may not encounter acrylate in their regular environments do contain this gene. We therefore sought to identify new genes that might confer tolerance to acrylate. To do this, we used functional screening of metagenomic and genomic libraries to identify novel genes that corrected an E. coli mutant that was defective in acuI, and was therefore hyper-sensitive to acrylate. The metagenomic libraries yielded two types of genes that overcame this toxicity. The majority encoded enzymes resembling AcuI, but with significant sequence divergence among each other and previously ratified AcuI enzymes. One other metagenomic gene, arkA, had very close relatives in Bacillus and related bacteria, and is predicted to encode an enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase, in the same family as FabK, which catalyses the final step in fatty-acid biosynthesis in some pathogenic Firmicute bacteria. A genomic library of Novosphingobium, a metabolically versatile alphaproteobacterium that lacks both acuI and arkA, yielded vutD and vutE, two genes that, together, conferred acrylate resistance. These encode sequential steps in the oxidative catabolism of valine in a pathway in which, significantly, methacrylyl-CoA is a toxic intermediate. These findings expand the range of bacteria for which the acuI gene encodes a functional acrylyl-CoA reductase, and also identify novel enzymes that can similarly function in conferring acrylate resistance, likely, again, through the removal of the toxic product acrylyl-CoA. PMID:24848004

Curson, Andrew R. J.; Burns, Oliver J.; Voget, Sonja; Daniel, Rolf; Todd, Jonathan D.; McInnis, Kathryn; Wexler, Margaret; Johnston, Andrew W. B.

2014-01-01

140

A high-throughput chemical screen with FDA approved drugs reveals that the antihypertensive drug Spironolactone impairs cancer cell survival by inhibiting homology directed repair  

PubMed Central

DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most severe type of DNA damage. DSBs are repaired by non-homologous end-joining or homology directed repair (HDR). Identifying novel small molecules that affect HDR is of great importance both for research use and therapy. Molecules that elevate HDR may improve gene targeting whereas inhibiting molecules can be used for chemotherapy, since some of the cancers are more sensitive to repair impairment. Here, we performed a high-throughput chemical screen for FDA approved drugs, which affect HDR in cancer cells. We found that HDR frequencies are increased by retinoic acid and Idoxuridine and reduced by the antihypertensive drug Spironolactone. We further revealed that Spironolactone impairs Rad51 foci formation, sensitizes cancer cells to DNA damaging agents, to Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and cross-linking agents and inhibits tumor growth in xenografts, in mice. This study suggests Spironolactone as a new candidate for chemotherapy. PMID:24682826

Shahar, Or David; Kalousi, Alkmini; Eini, Lital; Fisher, Benoit; Weiss, Amelie; Darr, Jonatan; Mazina, Olga; Bramson, Shay; Kupiec, Martin; Eden, Amir; Meshorer, Eran; Mazin, Alexander V.; Brino, Laurent; Goldberg, Michal; Soutoglou, Evi

2014-01-01

141

Dipoid-Specific Genome Stability Genes of S. cerevisiae: Genomic Screen Reveals Haploidization as an Escape from Persisting DNA Rearrangement Stress  

PubMed Central

Maintaining a stable genome is one of the most important tasks of every living cell and the mechanisms ensuring it are similar in all of them. The events leading to changes in DNA sequence (mutations) in diploid cells occur one to two orders of magnitude more frequently than in haploid cells. The majority of those events lead to loss of heterozygosity at the mutagenesis marker, thus diploid-specific genome stability mechanisms can be anticipated. In a new global screen for spontaneous loss of function at heterozygous forward mutagenesis marker locus, employing three different mutagenesis markers, we selected genes whose deletion causes genetic instability in diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. We have found numerous genes connected with DNA replication and repair, remodeling of chromatin, cell cycle control, stress response, and in particular the structural maintenance of chromosome complexes. We have also identified 59 uncharacterized or dubious ORFs, which show the genome instability phenotype when deleted. For one of the strongest mutators revealed in our screen, ctf18?/ctf18? the genome instability manifests as a tendency to lose the whole set of chromosomes. We postulate that this phenomenon might diminish the devastating effects of DNA rearrangements, thereby increasing the cell's chances of surviving stressful conditions. We believe that numerous new genes implicated in genome maintenance, together with newly discovered phenomenon of ploidy reduction, will help revealing novel molecular processes involved in the genome stability of diploid cells. They also provide the clues in the quest for new therapeutic targets to cure human genome instability-related diseases. PMID:21695049

Alabrudzinska, Malgorzata; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna

2011-01-01

142

Assembly of anthrax toxin pore: lethal-factor complexes into lipid nanodiscs.  

PubMed

We have devised a procedure to incorporate the anthrax protective antigen (PA) pore complexed with the N-terminal domain of anthrax lethal factor (LFN ) into lipid nanodiscs and analyzed the resulting complexes by negative-stain electron microscopy. Insertion into nanodiscs was performed without relying on primary and secondary detergent screens. The preparations were relatively pure, and the percentage of PA pore inserted into nanodiscs on EM grids was high (?43%). Three-dimensional analysis of negatively stained single particles revealed the LFN -PA nanodisc complex mirroring the previous unliganded PA pore nanodisc structure, but with additional protein density consistent with multiple bound LFN molecules on the PA cap region. The assembly procedure will facilitate collection of higher resolution cryo-EM LFN -PA nanodisc structures and use of advanced automated particle selection methods. PMID:23389868

Akkaladevi, N; Hinton-Chollet, L; Katayama, H; Mitchell, J; Szerszen, L; Mukherjee, S; Gogol, E P; Pentelute, B L; Collier, R J; Fisher, M T

2013-04-01

143

Single-cell screening of cytosolic [Ca(2+)] reveals cell-selective action by the Alzheimer's A? peptide ion channel.  

PubMed

Interaction of the Alzheimer's A? peptides with the plasma membrane of cells in culture results in chronic increases in cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. Such increases can cause a variety of secondary effects leading to impaired cell growth or cell degeneration. In this investigation, we made a comprehensive study of the changes in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in single PC12 cells and human neurons stressed by continuous exposure to a medium containing A?42 for several days. The differential timing and magnitude of the A?42-induced increase in [Ca(2+)] reveal subpopulations of cells with differential sensitivity to A?42. These results suggest that the effect produced by A? on the level of cytosolic [Ca(2+)] depends on the type of cell being monitored. Moreover, the results obtained of using potent inhibitors of A? cation channels such as Zn(2+) and the small peptide NA7 add further proof to the suggestion that the long-term increases in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in cells stressed by continuous exposure to A? is the result of A? ion channel activity. PMID:25366568

Lin, Hopi; Arispe, Nelson J

2015-03-01

144

Distinct isoform of FABP7 revealed by screening for retroelement-activated genes in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.  

PubMed

Remnants of ancient transposable elements (TEs) are abundant in mammalian genomes. These sequences harbor multiple regulatory motifs and hence are capable of influencing expression of host genes. In response to environmental changes, TEs are known to be released from epigenetic repression and to become transcriptionally active. Such activation could also lead to lineage-inappropriate activation of oncogenes, as one study described in Hodgkin lymphoma. However, little further evidence for this mechanism in other cancers has been reported. Here, we reanalyzed whole transcriptome data from a large cohort of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) compared with normal B-cell centroblasts to detect genes ectopically expressed through activation of TE promoters. We have identified 98 such TE-gene chimeric transcripts that were exclusively expressed in primary DLBCL cases and confirmed several in DLBCL-derived cell lines. We further characterized a TE-gene chimeric transcript involving a fatty acid-binding protein gene (LTR2-FABP7), normally expressed in brain, that was ectopically expressed in a subset of DLBCL patients through the use of an endogenous retroviral LTR promoter of the LTR2 family. The LTR2-FABP7 chimeric transcript encodes a novel chimeric isoform of the protein with characteristics distinct from native FABP7. In vitro studies reveal a dependency for DLBCL cell line proliferation and growth on LTR2-FABP7 chimeric protein expression. Taken together, these data demonstrate the significance of TEs as regulators of aberrant gene expression in cancer and suggest that LTR2-FABP7 may contribute to the pathogenesis of DLBCL in a subgroup of patients. PMID:25114248

Lock, Frances E; Rebollo, Rita; Miceli-Royer, Katharine; Gagnier, Liane; Kuah, Sabrina; Babaian, Artem; Sistiaga-Poveda, Maialen; Lai, C Benjamin; Nemirovsky, Oksana; Serrano, Isabel; Steidl, Christian; Karimi, Mohammad M; Mager, Dixie L

2014-08-26

145

Antibacterial and brine shrimp lethality effect of marine actinobacterium Streptomyces sp. CAS72 against human pathogenic bacteria  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the in vitro antibacterial activity against human pathogenic bacteria and brine shrimp lethality bioassay of the marine actinobacterium. Methods Forty six marine actinobacterial strains were isolated from sediment samples of Uppanar estuary, Cuddalore, India. Preliminary screening was done by cross-streak method and the potential strain was identified by morphological, chemotaxonomical and molecular methods. Fermentation was done and the metabolite was obtained by liquid-liquid extraction using ethyl acetate and purified by silica gel (100-200 mesh) column chromatography. The purified metabolite was tested for antibacterial activity, minimal inhibitory concentration and brine shrimp lethality bioassay. Results Among the forty six strains, CAS72 was found effective against human pathogenic bacteria. The strain CAS72 was identified as Streptomyces sp. The purified metabolite exhibited a significant in vitro antibacterial activity. The MIC value was also determined against human pathogenic bacteria and a strong cytotoxic activity in brine shrimp lethality assay was observed and the LC50 value was 23.5 µg/mL. Conclusions The present investigation reveals that the marine actinobacteria are well obtainable in Uppanar estuary environment and it can provide a definite source for novel bioactive metabolites.

Sivasankar, Palaniappan; Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Vijayanand, Packiyaraj; Sivakumar, Kannan; Sugesh, Shanmugam; Poongodi, Subramaniam; Maharani, Viswanathan; Vijayalakshmi, Shanmugam; Balasubramanian, Thangavel

2013-01-01

146

Lethal Traffic Jam  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This perspective discusses new discoveries on the effects of the antibiotics chloramphenicol and tetracycline. The antibiotics chloramphenicol and tetracycline were discovered in the late 1940s shortly after the introduction of penicillin. Elucidation of the structure of the ribosome revealed how they bind to this target structure and inhibit protein synthesis. In a recent report, van Stelten et al. demonstrate another mode of action for these antibiotics, involving the destruction of a complex that allows proteins to be translocated across (or into) the bacterial membrane.

Eefjan Breukink (Utrecht University;Department of Chemical Biology and Organic Chemistry)

2009-08-07

147

Heterochromatin position effects on circularized sex chromosomes cause filicidal embryonic lethality in Drosophila melanogaster.  

PubMed

Some circularized X-Y chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster are mitotically unstable and induce early embryonic lethality, but the genetic basis is unknown. Our experiments suggest that a large region of X-linked satellite DNA causes anaphase bridges and lethality when placed into a new heterochromatic environment within certain circularized X-Y chromosomes. These results reveal that repetitive sequences can be incompatible with one another in cis. The lethal phenotype also bears a remarkable resemblance to a case of interspecific hybrid lethality. PMID:24478337

Ferree, Patrick M; Gomez, Karina; Rominger, Peter; Howard, Dagnie; Kornfeld, Hannah; Barbash, Daniel A

2014-04-01

148

Synthetic antibodies with a human framework that protect mice from lethal Sudan ebolavirus challenge.  

PubMed

The ebolaviruses cause severe and rapidly progressing hemorrhagic fever. There are five ebolavirus species; although much is known about Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV) and its neutralization by antibodies, little is known about Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV), which is emerging with increasing frequency. Here we describe monoclonal antibodies containing a human framework that potently inhibit infection by SUDV and protect mice from lethal challenge. The murine antibody 16F6, which binds the SUDV envelope glycoprotein (GP), served as the starting point for design. Sequence and structural alignment revealed similarities between 16F6 and YADS1, a synthetic antibody with a humanized scaffold. A focused phage library was constructed and screened to impart 16F6-like recognition properties onto the YADS1 scaffold. A panel of 17 antibodies were characterized and found to have a range of neutralization potentials against a pseudotype virus infection model. Neutralization correlated with GP binding as determined by ELISA. Two of these clones, E10 and F4, potently inhibited authentic SUDV and conferred protection and memory immunity in mice from lethal SUDV challenge. E10 and F4 were further shown to bind to the same epitope on GP as 16F6 with comparable affinities. These antibodies represent strong immunotherapeutic candidates for treatment of SUDV infection. PMID:25140871

Chen, Gang; Koellhoffer, Jayne F; Zak, Samantha E; Frei, Julia C; Liu, Nina; Long, Hua; Ye, Wei; Nagar, Kaajal; Pan, Guohua; Chandran, Kartik; Dye, John M; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Lai, Jonathan R

2014-10-17

149

Synthetic Antibodies with a Human Framework That Protect Mice from Lethal Sudan Ebolavirus Challenge  

PubMed Central

The ebolaviruses cause severe and rapidly progressing hemorrhagic fever. There are five ebolavirus species; although much is known about Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV) and its neutralization by antibodies, little is known about Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV), which is emerging with increasing frequency. Here we describe monoclonal antibodies containing a human framework that potently inhibit infection by SUDV and protect mice from lethal challenge. The murine antibody 16F6, which binds the SUDV envelope glycoprotein (GP), served as the starting point for design. Sequence and structural alignment revealed similarities between 16F6 and YADS1, a synthetic antibody with a humanized scaffold. A focused phage library was constructed and screened to impart 16F6-like recognition properties onto the YADS1 scaffold. A panel of 17 antibodies were characterized and found to have a range of neutralization potentials against a pseudotype virus infection model. Neutralization correlated with GP binding as determined by ELISA. Two of these clones, E10 and F4, potently inhibited authentic SUDV and conferred protection and memory immunity in mice from lethal SUDV challenge. E10 and F4 were further shown to bind to the same epitope on GP as 16F6 with comparable affinities. These antibodies represent strong immunotherapeutic candidates for treatment of SUDV infection. PMID:25140871

2014-01-01

150

MicroRNA screen of human embryonic stem cell differentiation reveals miR-105 as an enhancer of megakaryopoiesis from adult CD34+ cells.  

PubMed

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can control stem cell differentiation by targeting mRNAs. Using 96-well plate electroporation, we screened 466 human miRNA mimics by four-color flow cytometry to explore differentiation of common myeloid progenitors (CMP) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The transfected cells were then cultured in a cytokine cocktail that supported multiple hematopoietic lineages. At 4-5 days post-transfection, flow cytometry of erythroid (CD235(+)CD41(-)), megakaryocyte (CD41(+)CD42(+)), and myeloid (CD18(+)CD235(-)) lineages revealed miR-105 as a novel enhancer of megakaryocyte production during in vitro primitive hematopoiesis. In hESC-derived CMPs, miR-105 caused a sixfold enhancement in megakaryocyte production. miR-513a, miR-571, and miR-195 were found to be less potent megakaryocyte enhancers. We confirmed the relevance of miR-105 in adult megakaryopoiesis by demonstrating increased megakaryocyte yield and megakaryocyte colony forming potential in human adult CD34(+) cells derived from peripheral blood. In addition, adult CD34(+) cells express endogenous miR-105 during megakaryocyte differentiation. siRNA knockdown of the hematopoietic transcription factor c-Myb caused a similar enhancement of megakaryocyte production as miR-105. Finally, a luciferase/c-Myb-3'UTR construct and Western blot analysis demonstrated that the hematopoietic transcription factor c-Myb mRNA was a target of miR-105. We report a novel hESC-based miR screening platform and demonstrate that miR-105 is an enhancer of megakaryopoiesis in both primitive and definitive hematopoiesis. PMID:24446170

Kamat, Viraj; Paluru, Prasuna; Myint, Melissa; French, Deborah L; Gadue, Paul; Diamond, Scott L

2014-05-01

151

Uncovering Buffered Pleiotropy: A Genome-Scale Screen for mel-28 Genetic Interactors in Caenorhabditis elegans  

PubMed Central

mel-28 (maternal-effect-lethal-28) encodes a conserved protein required for nuclear envelope function and chromosome segregation in Caenorhabditis elegans. Because mel-28 is a strict maternal-effect lethal gene, its function is required in the early embryo but appears to be dispensable for larval development. We wanted to test the idea that mel-28 has postembryonic roles that are buffered by the contributions of other genes. To find genes that act coordinately with mel-28, we did an RNA interference?based genetic interaction screen using mel-28 and wild-type larvae. We screened 18,364 clones and identified 65 genes that cause sterility in mel-28 but not wild-type worms. Some of these genes encode components of the nuclear pore. In addition we identified genes involved in dynein and dynactin function, vesicle transport, and cell-matrix attachments. By screening mel-28 larvae we have bypassed the requirement for mel-28 in the embryo, uncovering pleiotropic functions for mel-28 later in development that are normally provided by other genes. This work contributes toward revealing the gene networks that underlie cellular processes and reveals roles for a maternal-effect lethal gene later in development. PMID:24281427

Fernandez, Anita G.; Mis, Emily K.; Lai, Allison; Mauro, Michael; Quental, Angela; Bock, Carly; Piano, Fabio

2013-01-01

152

Caenorhabditis elegans Semi-Automated Liquid Screen Reveals a Specialized Role for the Chemotaxis Gene cheB2 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes infections in a variety of animal and plant hosts. Caenorhabditis elegans is a simple model with which one can identify bacterial virulence genes. Previous studies with C. elegans have shown that depending on the growth medium, P. aeruginosa provokes different pathologies: slow or fast killing, lethal paralysis and red death. In

Steven Garvis; Antje Munder; Geneviève Ball; Sophie de Bentzmann; Lutz Wiehlmann; Jonathan J. Ewbank; Burkhard Tümmler; Alain Filloux

2009-01-01

153

Functional screening and in vitro analysis reveal thioesterases with enhanced substrate specificity profiles that improve short-chain fatty acid production in Escherichia coli.  

PubMed

Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) biosynthesis is pertinent to production of biofuels, industrial compounds, and pharmaceuticals from renewable resources. To expand on Escherichia coli SCFA products, we previously implemented a coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent pathway that condenses acetyl-CoA to a diverse group of short-chain fatty acyl-CoAs. To increase product titers and reduce premature pathway termination products, we conducted in vivo and in vitro analyses to understand and improve the specificity of the acyl-CoA thioesterase enzyme, which releases fatty acids from CoA. A total of 62 putative bacterial thioesterases, including 23 from the cow rumen microbiome, were inserted into a pathway that condenses acetyl-CoA to an acyl-CoA molecule derived from exogenously provided propionic or isobutyric acid. Functional screening revealed thioesterases that increase production of saturated (valerate), unsaturated (trans-2-pentenoate), and branched (4-methylvalerate) SCFAs compared to overexpression of E. coli thioesterase tesB or native expression of endogenous thioesterases. To determine if altered thioesterase acyl-CoA substrate specificity caused the increase in product titers, six of the most promising enzymes were analyzed in vitro. Biochemical assays revealed that the most productive thioesterases rely on promiscuous activity but have greater specificity for product-associated acyl-CoAs than for precursor acyl-CoAs. In this study, we introduce novel thioesterases with improved specificity for saturated, branched, and unsaturated short-chain acyl-CoAs, thereby expanding the diversity of potential fatty acid products while increasing titers of current products. The growing uncertainty associated with protein database annotations denotes this study as a model for isolating functional biochemical pathway enzymes in situations where experimental evidence of enzyme function is absent. PMID:24271180

McMahon, Matthew D; Prather, Kristala L J

2014-02-01

154

Functional Screening and In Vitro Analysis Reveal Thioesterases with Enhanced Substrate Specificity Profiles That Improve Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production in Escherichia coli  

PubMed Central

Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) biosynthesis is pertinent to production of biofuels, industrial compounds, and pharmaceuticals from renewable resources. To expand on Escherichia coli SCFA products, we previously implemented a coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent pathway that condenses acetyl-CoA to a diverse group of short-chain fatty acyl-CoAs. To increase product titers and reduce premature pathway termination products, we conducted in vivo and in vitro analyses to understand and improve the specificity of the acyl-CoA thioesterase enzyme, which releases fatty acids from CoA. A total of 62 putative bacterial thioesterases, including 23 from the cow rumen microbiome, were inserted into a pathway that condenses acetyl-CoA to an acyl-CoA molecule derived from exogenously provided propionic or isobutyric acid. Functional screening revealed thioesterases that increase production of saturated (valerate), unsaturated (trans-2-pentenoate), and branched (4-methylvalerate) SCFAs compared to overexpression of E. coli thioesterase tesB or native expression of endogenous thioesterases. To determine if altered thioesterase acyl-CoA substrate specificity caused the increase in product titers, six of the most promising enzymes were analyzed in vitro. Biochemical assays revealed that the most productive thioesterases rely on promiscuous activity but have greater specificity for product-associated acyl-CoAs than for precursor acyl-CoAs. In this study, we introduce novel thioesterases with improved specificity for saturated, branched, and unsaturated short-chain acyl-CoAs, thereby expanding the diversity of potential fatty acid products while increasing titers of current products. The growing uncertainty associated with protein database annotations denotes this study as a model for isolating functional biochemical pathway enzymes in situations where experimental evidence of enzyme function is absent. PMID:24271180

McMahon, Matthew D.

2014-01-01

155

A Trans-Amazonian Screening of mtDNA Reveals Deep Intraspecific Divergence in Forest Birds and Suggests a Vast Underestimation of Species Diversity  

PubMed Central

The Amazonian avifauna remains severely understudied relative to that of the temperate zone, and its species richness is thought to be underestimated by current taxonomy. Recent molecular systematic studies using mtDNA sequence reveal that traditionally accepted species-level taxa often conceal genetically divergent subspecific lineages found to represent new species upon close taxonomic scrutiny, suggesting that intraspecific mtDNA variation could be useful in species discovery. Surveys of mtDNA variation in Holarctic species have revealed patterns of variation that are largely congruent with species boundaries. However, little information exists on intraspecific divergence in most Amazonian species. Here we screen intraspecific mtDNA genetic variation in 41 Amazonian forest understory species belonging to 36 genera and 17 families in 6 orders, using 758 individual samples from Ecuador and French Guiana. For 13 of these species, we also analyzed trans-Andean populations from the Ecuadorian Chocó. A consistent pattern of deep intraspecific divergence among trans-Amazonian haplogroups was found for 33 of the 41 taxa, and genetic differentiation and genetic diversity among them was highly variable, suggesting a complex range of evolutionary histories. Mean sequence divergence within families was the same as that found in North American birds (13%), yet mean intraspecific divergence in Neotropical species was an order of magnitude larger (2.13% vs. 0.23%), with mean distance between intraspecific lineages reaching 3.56%. We found no clear relationship between genetic distances and differentiation in plumage color. Our results identify numerous genetically and phenotypically divergent lineages which may result in new species-level designations upon closer taxonomic scrutiny and thorough sampling, although lineages in the tropical region could be older than those in the temperate zone without necessarily representing separate species. In-depth phylogeographic surveys are urgently needed to avoid underestimating tropical diversity, and the use of mtDNA markers can be instrumental in identifying and prioritizing taxa for species discovery. PMID:22815761

Milá, Borja; Tavares, Erika S.; Muñoz Saldaña, Alberto; Karubian, Jordan; Smith, Thomas B.; Baker, Allan J.

2012-01-01

156

Induction of autophagy by anthrax lethal toxin.  

PubMed

Autophagy is an evolutionary conserved intracellular process whereby cells break down long-lived proteins and organelles. Accumulating evidences suggest increasing physiological significance of autophagy in pathogenesis of infectious diseases. Anthrax lethal toxin (LT) exerts its influence on numerous cells and herein, we report a novel effect of LT-induced autophagy on mammalian cells. Several autophagy biochemical markers including LC3-II conversion, increased punctuate distribution of GFP-LC3 and development of acidic vesicular organelles (AVO) were detected in cells treated with LT. Analysis of individual LT component revealed a moderate increase in LC3-II conversion for protective antigen-treated cells, whereas the LC3-II level in lethal factor-treated cells remained unchanged. In addition, our preliminary findings suggest a protective role of autophagy in LT intoxication as autophagy inhibition resulted in accelerated cell death. This study presents a hitherto undescribed effect of LT-induced autophagy on cells and provides the groundwork for future studies on the implication of autophagy in anthrax pathogenesis. PMID:19103170

Tan, Yian Kim; Kusuma, Caroline M; St John, Lena J; Vu, Hao A; Alibek, Kenneth; Wu, Aiguo

2009-02-01

157

An in-tumor genetic screen reveals that the BET bromodomain protein, BRD4, is a potential therapeutic target in ovarian carcinoma.  

PubMed

High-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC) is the most common and aggressive form of epithelial ovarian cancer, for which few targeted therapies exist. To search for new therapeutic target proteins, we performed an in vivo shRNA screen using an established human HGSOC cell line growing either subcutaneously or intraperitoneally in immunocompromised mice. We identified genes previously implicated in ovarian cancer such as AURKA1, ERBB3, CDK2, and mTOR, as well as several novel candidates including BRD4, VRK1, and GALK2. We confirmed, using both genetic and pharmacologic approaches, that the activity of BRD4, an epigenetic transcription modulator, is necessary for proliferation/survival of both an established human ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR8) and a subset of primary serous ovarian cancer cell strains (DFs). Among the DFs tested, the strains sensitive to BRD4 inhibition revealed elevated expression of either MYCN or c-MYC, with MYCN expression correlating closely with JQ1 sensitivity. Accordingly, primary human xenografts derived from high-MYCN or c-MYC strains exhibited sensitivity to BRD4 inhibition. These data suggest that BRD4 inhibition represents a new therapeutic approach for MYC-overexpressing HGSOCs. PMID:25535366

Baratta, Maria Giuseppina; Schinzel, Anna C; Zwang, Yaara; Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Bowman-Colin, Christian; Kutt, Jennifer; Curtis, Jennifer; Piao, Huiying; Wong, Laura C; Kung, Andrew L; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bradner, James E; Drapkin, Ronny; Hahn, William C; Liu, Joyce F; Livingston, David M

2015-01-01

158

Formation of Hydrogen Sulfide from Cysteine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4742: Genome Wide Screen Reveals a Central Role of the Vacuole  

PubMed Central

Discoveries on the toxic effects of cysteine accumulation and, particularly, recent findings on the many physiological roles of one of the products of cysteine catabolism, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), are highlighting the importance of this amino acid and sulfur metabolism in a range of cellular activities. It is also highlighting how little we know about this critical part of cellular metabolism. In the work described here, a genome-wide screen using a deletion collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed a surprising set of genes associated with this process. In addition, the yeast vacuole, not previously associated with cysteine catabolism, emerged as an important compartment for cysteine degradation. Most prominent among the vacuole-related mutants were those involved in vacuole acidification; we identified each of the eight subunits of a vacuole acidification sub-complex (V1 of the yeast V-ATPase) as essential for cysteine degradation. Other functions identified included translation, RNA processing, folate-derived one-carbon metabolism, and mitochondrial iron-sulfur homeostasis. This work identified for the first time cellular factors affecting the fundamental process of cysteine catabolism. Results obtained significantly contribute to the understanding of this process and may provide insight into the underlying cause of cysteine accumulation and H2S generation in eukaryotes. PMID:25517415

Winter, Gal; Cordente, Antonio G.; Curtin, Chris

2014-01-01

159

Cultivation-Independent Screening Revealed Hot Spots of IncP-1, IncP-7 and IncP-9 Plasmid Occurrence in Different Environmental Habitats  

PubMed Central

IncP-1, IncP-7 and IncP-9 plasmids often carry genes encoding enzymes involved in the degradation of man-made and natural contaminants, thus contributing to bacterial survival in polluted environments. However, the lack of suitable molecular tools often limits the detection of these plasmids in the environment. In this study, PCR followed by Southern blot hybridization detected the presence of plasmid-specific sequences in total community (TC-) DNA or fosmid DNA from samples originating from different environments and geographic regions. A novel primer system targeting IncP-9 plasmids was developed and applied along with established primers for IncP-1 and IncP-7. Screening TC-DNA from biopurification systems (BPS) which are used on farms for the purification of pesticide-contaminated water revealed high abundances of IncP-1 plasmids belonging to different subgroups as well as IncP-7 and IncP-9. The novel IncP-9 primer-system targeting the rep gene of nine IncP-9 subgroups allowed the detection of a high diversity of IncP-9 plasmid specific sequences in environments with different sources of pollution. Thus polluted sites are “hot spots” of plasmids potentially carrying catabolic genes. PMID:24587126

Dealtry, Simone; Ding, Guo-Chun; Weichelt, Viola; Dunon, Vincent; Schlüter, Andreas; Martini, María Carla; Papa, María Florencia Del; Lagares, Antonio; Amos, Gregory Charles Auton; Wellington, Elizabeth Margaret Helen; Gaze, William Hugo; Sipkema, Detmer; Sjöling, Sara; Springael, Dirk; Heuer, Holger; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Thomas, Christopher; Smalla, Kornelia

2014-01-01

160

Identification of cetrimonium bromide and irinotecan as compounds with synthetic lethality against NDRG1 deficient prostate cancer cells.  

PubMed

The N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) has been identified as a metastasis-suppressor gene in prostate cancer (PCa). Compounds targeting PCa cells deficient in NDRG1 could potentially decrease invasion/metastasis of PCa. A cell based screening strategy was employed to identify small molecules that selectively target NDRG1 deficient PCa cells. DU-145 PCa cells rendered deficient in NDRG1 expression by a lentiviral shRNA-mediated knockdown strategy were used in the primary screen. Compounds filtered from the primary screen were further validated through proliferation and clonogenic survival assays in parental and NDRG1 knockdown PCa cells. Screening of 3360 compounds revealed irinotecan and cetrimonium bromide (CTAB) as compounds that exhibited synthetic lethality against NDRG1 deficient PCa cells. A three-dimensional (3-D) invasion assay was utilized to test the ability of CTAB to inhibit invasion of DU-145 cells. CTAB was found to remarkably decrease invasion of DU-145 cells in collagen matrix. Our results suggest that CTAB and irinotecan could be further explored for their potential clinical benefit in patients with NDRG1 deficient PCa. PMID:23377825

Wissing, Michel D; Mendonca, Janet; Kim, Eunice; Kim, Eugene; Shim, Joong S; Kaelber, Nadine S; Kant, Huub; Hammers, Hans; Commes, Therese; Van Diest, Paul J; Liu, Jun O; Kachhap, Sushant K

2013-05-01

161

Introduction to Lethal School Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this chapter, we offer an introduction to the topic of the book, lethal school violence (LSV). We begin with an introduction\\u000a to and definition of LSV, and then highlight five different situations that often result in fatalities (i.e., suicide, rampage\\u000a shootings, gang-related deaths, domestic murder\\/suicide that occurs on campus, and barricaded captive events). We then turn\\u000a our attention to

Jeffrey A. Daniels; Mary C. Bradley

162

High-throughput Screening of ToxCast" Phase I Chemicals in an Embryonic Stem Cell Assay Reveals Potential Disruption of a Critical Developmental Signaling Pathway  

EPA Science Inventory

Little is known about the developmental toxicity of the expansive chemical landscape in existence today. Significant efforts are being made to apply novel methods to predict developmental activity of chemicals utilizing high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (...

163

Genetic Screens for Enhancers of brahma Reveal Functional Interactions Between the BRM Chromatin-Remodeling Complex and the Delta-Notch Signal Transduction Pathway in Drosophila  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Drosophila trithorax group gene brahma (brm) encodes the ATPase subunit of a 2-MDa chromatin- remodeling complex. brm was identified in a screen for transcriptional activators of homeotic genes and subsequently shown to play a global role in transcription by RNA polymerase II. To gain insight into the targeting, function, and regulation of the BRM complex, we screened for mutations

Jennifer A. Armstrong; Adam S. Sperling; Renate Deuring; Laurina Manning; Sarah L. Moseley; Ophelia Papoulas; Caroline I. Piatek; Chris Q. Doe; John W. Tamkun

2005-01-01

164

Early events of lethal action by tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa  

SciTech Connect

The immediate activities of the aminoglycoside antibiotic, tobramycin, were investigated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The influence of carbon growth substate and the antibiotic exposure environment in the magnitude of activity were examined. Lethality by 8 {mu}g/ml tobramycin occurred rapidly (1 to 3 minutes). The release of specific cellular components into the supernatant was associated with lethality. This material was initially detected as an increase in UV-absorbance. Magnesium in the reaction mixture provided protection against lethality and leakage, but did not reverse lethal damage after a 3 minute tobramycin treatment. Also, uptake of {sup 3}H-tobramycin was reduced in the presence of magnesium. Cells grown with glucose as a carbon source were more susceptible than organic acid grown cells as was the rapidity and amount of cell damage. Analyses of the leakage material revealed a 2-fold increase of protein in the supernatant after a 1-3 minute treatment which paralleled lethality. A prominent 29 kDa protein was observed by SDS-PAGE in the released material, which has been identified as the periplasmic enzyme, {beta}-lactamase. The immediate activities of tobramycin did not involve (i) release of overall cell protein, (ii) massive loss of total pool amino acids, (iii) cell lysis, (iv) inhibition of proline uptake, (v) release of lipopolysaccharide, or (vi) leakage of ATP. Electron microscopy showed no apparent damage after a 3 minute exposure. 40% inhibition of protein synthesis had occurred by 3 minutes of exposure, while release of UV-absorbing material and lethality were detectable after only 1 minute. Resistant cystic fibrosis isolates of P. aeruginosa did not leak under the same experimental conditions, but one of two susceptible strains examined did show increased UV-absorbance following treatment.

Raulston, J.E.

1988-01-01

165

Ethical language and decision-making for prenatally diagnosed lethal malformations.  

PubMed

In clinical practice, and in the medical literature, severe congenital malformations such as trisomy 18, anencephaly, and renal agenesis are frequently referred to as 'lethal' or as 'incompatible with life'. However, there is no agreement about a definition of lethal malformations, nor which conditions should be included in this category. Review of outcomes for malformations commonly designated 'lethal' reveals that prolonged survival is possible, even if rare. This article analyses the concept of lethal malformations and compares it to the problematic concept of 'futility'. We recommend avoiding the term 'lethal' and suggest that counseling should focus on salient prognostic features instead. For conditions with a high chance of early death or profound impairment in survivors despite treatment, perinatal and neonatal palliative care would be ethical. However, active obstetric and neonatal management, if desired, may also sometimes be appropriate. PMID:25200733

Wilkinson, Dominic; de Crespigny, Lachlan; Xafis, Vicki

2014-10-01

166

Acute and sub-lethal response to mercury in Arctic and boreal calanoid copepods.  

PubMed

Acute lethal toxicity, expressed as LC50 values, is a widely used parameter in risk assessment of chemicals, and has been proposed as a tool to assess differences in species sensitivities to chemicals between climatic regions. Arctic Calanus glacialis and boreal Calanus finmarchicus were exposed to mercury (Hg(2+)) under natural environmental conditions including sea temperatures of 2° and 10°C, respectively. Acute lethal toxicity (96 h LC50) and sub-lethal molecular response (GST expression; in this article gene expression is used as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression is also regulated, e.g., at translation and protein stability level) were studied. The acute lethal toxicity was monitored for 96 h using seven different Hg concentrations. The sub-lethal experiment was set up on the basis of nominal LC50 values for each species using concentrations equivalent to 50, 5 and 0.5% of their 96 h LC50 value. No significant differences were found in acute lethal toxicity between the two species. The sub-lethal molecular response revealed large differences both in response time and the fold induction of GST, where the Arctic species responded both faster and with higher mRNA levels of GST after 48 h exposure. Under the natural exposure conditions applied in the present study, the Arctic species C. glacialis may potentially be more susceptible to mercury exposure on the sub-lethal level. PMID:25036619

Overjordet, Ida Beathe; Altin, Dag; Berg, Torunn; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Gabrielsen, Geir Wing; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik

2014-10-01

167

Histopathological effects of anthrax lethal factor on rat liver.  

PubMed

Abstract Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, has become an increasingly important scientific topic due to its potential role in bioterrorism. The lethal toxin (LT) of B. anthracis consists of lethal factor (LF) and a protective antigen (PA). This study investigated whether only lethal factor was efficient as a hepatotoxin in the absence of the PA. To achieve this aim, LF (100?µg/kg body weight, dissolved in sterile distilled water) or distilled water vehicle were intraperitoneally injected once into adult rats. At 24?h post-injection, the hosts were euthanized and their livers removed and tissue samples examined under light and electron microscopes. As a result of LF application, hepatic injury - including cytoplasmic and nuclear damage in hepatocytes, sinusoidal dilatation, and hepatocellular lysis - became apparent. Further, light microscopic analyses of liver sections from the LF-injected rats revealed ballooning degeneration and cytoplasmic loss within hepatocytes, as well as peri-sinusoidal inflammation. Additionally, an increase in the numbers of Kupffer cells was evident. Common vascular injuries were also found in the liver samples; these injuries caused hypoxia and pathological changes. In addition, some cytoplasmic and nuclear changes were detected within the liver ultrastructure. The results of these studies allow one to suggest that LF could be an effective toxicant alone and that PA might act in situ to modify the effect of this agent (or the reverse situation wherein LF modifies effects of PA) such that lethality results. PMID:24344743

Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Ozbek, Elvan

2015-01-01

168

Stability and Function of Mammalian Lethal Giant Larvae-1 Oncoprotein Are Regulated by the Scaffolding Protein RanBPM*  

PubMed Central

The evolutionarily conserved lethal giant larvae (Lgl) tumor suppressor gene has an essential role in establishing apical-basal cell polarity, cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue organization. However, the precise molecular mechanism by which the Lgl carries out its function remains obscure. In the current study, we have identified Ran-binding protein M (RanBPM) as a novel binding partner of Mgl-1, a mammalian homolog of Drosophila tumor suppressor protein lethal (2) giant larvae (L(2)gl) by yeast two-hybrid screening. RanBPM seems to act as a scaffolding protein with a modulatory function with respect to Mgl-1. The Mgl-1 and RanBPM association was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down experiments. Additionally, expression of RanBPM resulted in inhibition of Mgl-1 degradation, and thereby extended the half-life of Mgl-1. Furthermore, the ability of Mgl-1 activity in cell migration and colony formation assay was enhanced by RanBPM. Taken together, our findings reveal that RanBPM plays a novel role in regulating Mgl-1 stability and contributes to its biological function as a tumor suppressor. PMID:20829363

Suresh, Bharathi; Ramakrishna, Suresh; Kim, Yong-Soo; Kim, Sun-Myoung; Kim, Myung-Sun; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

2010-01-01

169

Alcohol Consumption and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a case-control study of the association between nearly lethal suicide attempts and facets of alcohol consumption; namely, drinking frequency, drinking quantity, binge drinking, alcoholism, drinking within 3 hours of suicide attempt, and age began drinking. In bivariate analyses, all measures were associated with nearly lethal suicide…

Powell, Kenneth E.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Swann, Alan C.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Lee, Roberta K.; Bayer, Timothy L.

2002-01-01

170

High-throughput Screening of ToxCast? Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell (mESC) Assay Reveals Disruption of Potential Toxicity Pathways  

EPA Science Inventory

Little information is available regarding the potential for many commercial chemicals to induce developmental toxicity. The mESC Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytoxicity (ACDC) assay is a high-throughput screen used to close this data gap. Thus, ToxCast? Phase I chemicals wer...

171

Lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter species  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with a large number of gastroduodenal disorders. Clearance of the bacteria has been shown to benefit patients with duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers, and certain rare types of gastric tumors. Broad-spectrum antibiotics are the mainstay of current treatment strategies but side-effects, poor compliance, and drug resistance limit their usefulness. We sensitized H. pylori with toluidine blue, haematoporphyrin derivative, aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine, methylene blue or protoporphyrin IX prior to exposure to low-power laser light from either a gallium aluminum arsenide laser or a helium neon gas laser. All 5 sensitizers caused reductions of greater than 1000-fold in the number of viable bacteria. Light alone had no effect and only HpD caused a significant decrease in bacterial numbers without laser light. Next, we sensitized H. mustelae on explanted ferret gastric mucosa (ex vivo) with the same sensitizers and exposed them to light from a copper vapor pumped dye laser tuned appropriately. MB caused significant reductions in bacterial counts. Successful lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter pylori both in vitro and ex vivo raises the possibility of a local method for eradicating the bacteria, especially as the bacteria are only found in those parts of the upper gastrointestinal tract that are accessible to the endoscope.

Millson, Charles E.; Wilson, Michael; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Thurrell, Wendy; Mlkvy, Peter; Davies, Claire; Bown, Stephen G.

1995-01-01

172

Lethal Effects of Helianthemum lippii (L.) on Acanthamoeba castellanii Cysts in Vitro  

PubMed Central

Acanthamoeba spp. commonly cause Acanthamoeba keratitis which is typically associated with the wear of contact lenses. Therefore, finding an economic, efficient, and safe therapy of natural origin is of outmost importance. This study examined the in vitro lethal potential of ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Helianthemum lippii (L.) (sun roses) against Acanthamoeba castellanii cysts isolated from patients with amoebic keratitis. Both extracts proved to be potent as regard to their lethal effects on A. castellanii cysts with comparable results to chlorhexidine. The ethyl acetate was more promising with cumulative lethality. It showed a highly significant lethal percentage along the duration of treatment. The analysis of the more potent ethyl acetate extract revealed the presence of 2.96 mg/100 g of total phenolics, 0.289 mg/100 ml of total flavonoids and 37 mg/100 mg of total tannins which highlighted their phytomedicinal role. PMID:25031463

Badria, F.A.; Hetta, M.H.; Sarhan, Rania M.; Ezz El-Din, M.H.

2014-01-01

173

Lethal effects of Helianthemum lippii (L.) on Acanthamoeba castellanii cysts in vitro.  

PubMed

Acanthamoeba spp. commonly cause Acanthamoeba keratitis which is typically associated with the wear of contact lenses. Therefore, finding an economic, efficient, and safe therapy of natural origin is of outmost importance. This study examined the in vitro lethal potential of ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Helianthemum lippii (L.) (sun roses) against Acanthamoeba castellanii cysts isolated from patients with amoebic keratitis. Both extracts proved to be potent as regard to their lethal effects on A. castellanii cysts with comparable results to chlorhexidine. The ethyl acetate was more promising with cumulative lethality. It showed a highly significant lethal percentage along the duration of treatment. The analysis of the more potent ethyl acetate extract revealed the presence of 2.96 mg/100 g of total phenolics, 0.289 mg/100 ml of total flavonoids and 37 mg/100 mg of total tannins which highlighted their phytomedicinal role. PMID:25031463

Badria, F A; Hetta, M H; Sarhan, Rania M; Ezz El-Din, M H

2014-06-01

174

3-Dimensional Culture Systems for Anti-Cancer Compound Profiling and High-Throughput Screening Reveal Increases in EGFR Inhibitor-Mediated Cytotoxicity Compared to Monolayer Culture Systems  

PubMed Central

3-dimensional (3D) culture models have the potential to bridge the gap between monolayer cell culture and in vivo studies. To benefit anti-cancer drug discovery from 3D models, new techniques are needed that enable their use in high-throughput (HT) screening amenable formats. We have established miniaturized 3D culture methods robust enough for automated HT screens. We have applied these methods to evaluate the sensitivity of normal and tumorigenic breast epithelial cell lines against a panel of oncology drugs when cultured as monolayers (2D) and spheroids (3D). We have identified two classes of compounds that exhibit preferential cytotoxicity against cancer cells over normal cells when cultured as 3D spheroids: microtubule-targeting agents and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors. Further improving upon our 3D model, superior differentiation of EC50 values in the proof-of-concept screens was obtained by co-culturing the breast cancer cells with normal human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Further, the selective sensitivity of the cancer cells towards chemotherapeutics was observed in 3D co-culture conditions, rather than as 2D co-culture monolayers, highlighting the importance of 3D cultures. Finally, we examined the putative mechanisms that drive the differing potency displayed by EGFR inhibitors. In summary, our studies establish robust 3D culture models of human cells for HT assessment of tumor cell-selective agents. This methodology is anticipated to provide a useful tool for the study of biological differences within 2D and 3D culture conditions in HT format, and an important platform for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. PMID:25247711

Howes, Amy L.; Richardson, Robyn D.; Finlay, Darren; Vuori, Kristiina

2014-01-01

175

Hypomorphic Lethal Mutations and Their Implications for the Interpretation of Lethal Complementation Studies in Drosophila  

PubMed Central

In a small region of the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster, we have found that a third of the mutations that appear to act as lethals in segmental haploids are viable in homozygous mutant individuals. These viable mutations fall into four complementation groups. The most reasonable explanation of these mutations is that they are a subset of functionally hypomorphic alleles of essential genes: hypomorphic mutations with activity levels above a threshold required for survival, but below twice that level, should behave in this manner. We refer to these mutations as "haplo-specific lethal mutations." In studies of autosomal lethals, haplo-specific lethal mutations can be included in lethal complementation tests without being identified as such. Accidental inclusion of disguised haplo-specific lethals in autosomal complementation tests will generate spurious examples of interallelic complementation. PMID:17246184

Nash, David; Janca, Frank C.

1983-01-01

176

Reaming experiments for the lethality test system  

SciTech Connect

Various reaming techniques were tried for use on the barrel of the Lethality Test System railgun. This report covers the successes and failures of the reamers and the techniques that were tried. 5 figs.

Hooten, D.; Stanley, P.

1988-01-01

177

High-throughput screen using a single-cell tyrosine phosphatase assay reveals biologically active inhibitors of tyrosine phosphatase CD45  

PubMed Central

Many cellular signaling events are regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation and mediated by the opposing actions of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases. Protein tyrosine phosphatases are emerging as drug targets, but poor cell permeability of inhibitors has limited the development of drugs targeting these enzymes [Tautz L, et al. (2006) Expert Opin Ther Targets 10:157–177]. Here we developed a method to monitor tyrosine phosphatase activity at the single-cell level and applied it to the identification of cell-permeable inhibitors. The method takes advantage of the fluorogenic properties of phosphorylated coumaryl amino propionic acid (pCAP), an analog of phosphotyrosine, which can be incorporated into peptides. Once delivered into cells, pCAP peptides were dephosphorylated by protein tyrosine phosphatases, and the resulting cell fluorescence could be monitored by flow cytometry and high-content imaging. The robustness and sensitivity of the assay was validated using peptides preferentially dephosphorylated by CD45 and T-cell tyrosine phosphatase and available inhibitors of these two enzymes. The assay was applied to high-throughput screening for inhibitors of CD45, an important target for autoimmunity and infectious diseases [Hermiston ML, et al. (2003) Annu Rev Immunol 21:107–137]. We identified four CD45 inhibitors that showed activity in T cells and macrophages. These results indicate that our assay can be applied to primary screening for inhibitors of CD45 and of other protein tyrosine phosphatases to increase the yield of biologically active inhibitors. PMID:22891353

Stanford, Stephanie M.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Walker, Logan M.; Wu, Dennis J.; Falk, Matthew D.; Mitra, Sayantan; Damle, Sagar S.; Ruble, David; Kaltcheva, Teodora; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Bavari, Sina; Barrios, Amy M.; Bottini, Nunzio

2012-01-01

178

Pharmacophore modeling, homology modeling, and in silico screening reveal mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitory activities for sotalol, glyburide, metipranolol, sulfamethizole, glipizide, and pioglitazone.  

PubMed

Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase and member of the PI3K-related kinase (PIKK) family. It plays a central role in integrating signals from metabolism, energy homeostasis, cell cycle, and stress response. Aberrant PI3K/mTOR activation is commonly observed in diseases such as cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, we developed common feature binding hypotheses for a set of 6 potent mTOR antagonists. The generated models were validated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. To gain better insight into ligand-mTOR interactions, a homology model for the kinase domain of mTOR was built using the crystallographic structure of PI3K? as template. The optimal pharmacophore model was further improved based on detailed docking studies of potent training compound in the homology model. The modified binding model was employed as 3D search query to screen our in-house-built database of established drugs. Subsequent in vitro screening of captured hits showed that six of them have submicromolar to low micromolar bioactivities, namely, glyburide, metipranolol, sulfamethizole, glipizide, pioglitazone, and sotalol. PMID:23545333

Khanfar, Mohammad A; AbuKhader, Majed M; Alqtaishat, Saja; Taha, Mutasem O

2013-05-01

179

A Genome-Wide Screen for Interactions Reveals a New Locus on 4p15 Modifying the Effect of Waist-to-Hip Ratio on Total Cholesterol  

PubMed Central

Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies described 95 loci controlling serum lipid levels. These common variants explain ?25% of the heritability of the phenotypes. To date, no unbiased screen for gene–environment interactions for circulating lipids has been reported. We screened for variants that modify the relationship between known epidemiological risk factors and circulating lipid levels in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) data from 18 population-based cohorts with European ancestry (maximum N?=?32,225). We collected 8 further cohorts (N?=?17,102) for replication, and rs6448771 on 4p15 demonstrated genome-wide significant interaction with waist-to-hip-ratio (WHR) on total cholesterol (TC) with a combined P-value of 4.79×10?9. There were two potential candidate genes in the region, PCDH7 and CCKAR, with differential expression levels for rs6448771 genotypes in adipose tissue. The effect of WHR on TC was strongest for individuals carrying two copies of G allele, for whom a one standard deviation (sd) difference in WHR corresponds to 0.19 sd difference in TC concentration, while for A allele homozygous the difference was 0.12 sd. Our findings may open up possibilities for targeted intervention strategies for people characterized by specific genomic profiles. However, more refined measures of both body-fat distribution and metabolic measures are needed to understand how their joint dynamics are modified by the newly found locus. PMID:22028671

Karssen, Lennart C.; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka P.; Middelberg, Rita P. S.; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ried, Janina S.; Lamina, Claudia; Mangino, Massimo; Igl, Wilmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Lagou, Vasiliki; van der Harst, Pim; Mateo Leach, Irene; Esko, Tõnu; Kutalik, Zoltán; Wainwright, Nicholas W.; Struchalin, Maksim V.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Kangas, Antti J.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Perola, Markus; Rantanen, Taina; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Soininen, Pasi; Johansson, Åsa; Soranzo, Nicole; Heath, Andrew C.; Papamarkou, Theodore; Prokopenko, Inga; Tönjes, Anke; Kronenberg, Florian; Döring, Angela; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Montgomery, Grant W.; Whitfield, John B.; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Freimer, Nelson B.; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Palotie, Aarno; Sandhu, Manj S.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Metspalu, Andres; Stumvoll, Michael; Uitterlinden, André G.; Jula, Antti; Navis, Gerjan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Spector, Tim D.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Salomaa, Veikko; Oostra, Ben A.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Gieger, Christian; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hofman, Albert; McCarthy, Mark I.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Ripatti, Samuli

2011-01-01

180

An RNAi-based screen reveals PLK1, CDK1 and NDC80 as potential therapeutic targets in malignant pleural mesothelioma  

PubMed Central

Background: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive tumour originating in the thoracic mesothelium. Prognosis remains poor with 9- to 12-month median survival, and new targets for treatments are desperately needed. Methods: Utilising an RNA interference (RNAi)-based screen of 40 genes overexpressed in tumours, including genes involved in the control of cell cycle, DNA replication and repair, we investigated potential therapeutic targets for MPM. Following in vitro characterisation of the effects of target silencing on MPM cells, candidates were assessed in tumour samples from 154 patients. Results: Gene knockdown in MPM cell lines identified growth inhibition following knockdown of NDC80, CDK1 and PLK1. Target knockdown induced cell-cycle arrest and increased apoptosis. Using small-molecule inhibitors specific for these three proteins also led to growth inhibition of MPM cell lines, and Roscovitine (inhibitor of CDK1) sensitised cells to cisplatin. Protein expression was also measured in tumour samples, with markedly variable levels of CDK1 and PLK1 noted. PLK1 expression in over 10% of cells correlated significantly with a poor prognosis. Conclusion: These results suggest that RNAi-based screening has utility in identifying new targets for MPM, and that inhibition of NDC80, CDK1 and PLK1 may hold promise for treatment of this disease. PMID:24327015

Linton, A; Cheng, Y Y; Griggs, K; Kirschner, M B; Gattani, S; Srikaran, S; Chuan-Hao Kao, S; McCaughan, B C; Klebe, S; van Zandwijk, N; Reid, G

2014-01-01

181

A High-Content Phenotypic Screen Reveals the Disruptive Potency of Quinacrine and 3?,4?-Dichlorobenzamil on the Digestive Vacuole of Plasmodium falciparum  

PubMed Central

Plasmodium falciparum is the etiological agent of malignant malaria and has been shown to exhibit features resembling programmed cell death. This is triggered upon treatment with low micromolar doses of chloroquine or other lysosomotrophic compounds and is associated with leakage of the digestive vacuole contents. In order to exploit this cell death pathway, we developed a high-content screening method to select compounds that can disrupt the parasite vacuole, as measured by the leakage of intravacuolar Ca2+. This assay uses the ImageStream 100, an imaging-capable flow cytometer, to assess the distribution of the fluorescent calcium probe Fluo-4. We obtained two hits from a small library of 25 test compounds, quinacrine and 3?,4?-dichlorobenzamil. The ability of these compounds to permeabilize the digestive vacuole in laboratory strains and clinical isolates was validated by confocal microscopy. The hits could induce programmed cell death features in both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant laboratory strains. Quinacrine was effective at inhibiting field isolates in a 48-h reinvasion assay regardless of artemisinin clearance status. We therefore present as proof of concept a phenotypic screening method with the potential to provide mechanistic insights to the activity of antimalarial drugs. PMID:24217693

Lee, Yan Quan; Goh, Amanda S. P.; Ch'ng, Jun Hong; Nosten, François H.; Preiser, Peter Rainer; Pervaiz, Shazib; Yadav, Sanjiv Kumar

2014-01-01

182

High Content Image-Based Screening of a Protease Inhibitor Library Reveals Compounds Broadly Active against Rift Valley Fever Virus and Other Highly Pathogenic RNA Viruses  

PubMed Central

High content image-based screening was developed as an approach to test a protease inhibitor small molecule library for antiviral activity against Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and to determine their mechanism of action. RVFV is the causative agent of severe disease of humans and animals throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Of the 849 compounds screened, 34 compounds exhibited ?50% inhibition against RVFV. All of the hit compounds could be classified into 4 distinct groups based on their unique chemical backbone. Some of the compounds also showed broad antiviral activity against several highly pathogenic RNA viruses including Ebola, Marburg, Venezuela equine encephalitis, and Lassa viruses. Four hit compounds (C795-0925, D011-2120, F694-1532 and G202-0362), which were most active against RVFV and showed broad-spectrum antiviral activity, were selected for further evaluation for their cytotoxicity, dose response profile, and mode of action using classical virological methods and high-content imaging analysis. Time-of-addition assays in RVFV infections suggested that D011-2120 and G202-0362 targeted virus egress, while C795-0925 and F694-1532 inhibited virus replication. We showed that D011-2120 exhibited its antiviral effects by blocking microtubule polymerization, thereby disrupting the Golgi complex and inhibiting viral trafficking to the plasma membrane during virus egress. While G202-0362 also affected virus egress, it appears to do so by a different mechanism, namely by blocking virus budding from the trans Golgi. F694-1532 inhibited viral replication, but also appeared to inhibit overall cellular gene expression. However, G202-0362 and C795-0925 did not alter any of the morphological features that we examined and thus may prove to be good candidates for antiviral drug development. Overall this work demonstrates that high-content image analysis can be used to screen chemical libraries for new antivirals and to determine their mechanism of action and any possible deleterious effects on host cellular biology. PMID:25144302

Mudhasani, Rajini; Kota, Krishna P.; Retterer, Cary; Tran, Julie P.; Whitehouse, Chris A.; Bavari, Sina

2014-01-01

183

A Genome-wide In Vitro Bacterial-Infection Screen Reveals Human Variation in the Host Response Associated with Inflammatory Disease  

PubMed Central

Recent progress in cataloguing common genetic variation has made possible genome-wide studies that are beginning to elucidate the causes and consequences of our genetic differences. Approaches that provide a mechanistic understanding of how genetic variants function to alter disease susceptibility and why they were substrates of natural selection would complement other approaches to human-genome analysis. Here we use a novel cell-based screen of bacterial infection to identify human variation in Salmonella-induced cell death. A loss-of-function allele of CARD8, a reported inhibitor of the proinflammatory protease caspase-1, was associated with increased cell death in vitro (p = 0.013). The validity of this association was demonstrated through overexpression of alternative alleles and RNA interference in cells of varying genotype. Comparison of mammalian CARD8 orthologs and examination of variation among different human populations suggest that the increase in infectious-disease burden associated with larger animal groups (i.e., herds and colonies), and possibly human population expansion, may have naturally selected for loss of CARD8. We also find that the loss-of-function CARD8 allele shows a modest association with an increased risk of systemic inflammatory response syndrome in a small study (p = 0.05). Therefore, a by-product of the selected benefit of loss of CARD8 could be increased inflammatory diseases. These results demonstrate the utility of genome-wide cell-based association screens with microbes in the identification of naturally selected variants that can impact human health. PMID:19664744

Ko, Dennis C.; Shukla, Kajal P.; Fong, Christine; Wasnick, Michael; Brittnacher, Mitchell J.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Holden, Tarah D.; O'Keefe, Grant E.; Van Yserloo, Brian; Akey, Joshua M.; Miller, Samuel I.

2009-01-01

184

Drug Repurposing Screen Reveals FDA-Approved Inhibitors of Human HMG-CoA Reductase and Isoprenoid Synthesis That Block Cryptosporidium parvum Growth  

PubMed Central

Cryptosporidiosis, a diarrheal disease usually caused by Cryptosporidium parvum or Cryptosporidium hominis in humans, can result in fulminant diarrhea and death in AIDS patients and chronic infection and stunting in children. Nitazoxanide, the current standard of care, has limited efficacy in children and is no more effective than placebo in patients with advanced AIDS. Unfortunately, the lack of financial incentives and the technical difficulties associated with working with Cryptosporidium parasites have crippled efforts to develop effective treatments. In order to address these obstacles, we developed and validated (Z? score = 0.21 to 0.47) a cell-based high-throughput assay and screened a library of drug repurposing candidates (the NIH Clinical Collections), with the hopes of identifying safe, FDA-approved drugs to treat cryptosporidiosis. Our screen yielded 21 compounds with confirmed activity against C. parvum growth at concentrations of <10 ?M, many of which had well-defined mechanisms of action, making them useful tools to study basic biology in addition to being potential therapeutics. Additional work, including structure-activity relationship studies, identified the human 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor itavastatin as a potent inhibitor of C. parvum growth (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 0.62 ?M). Bioinformatic analysis of the Cryptosporidium genomes indicated that the parasites lack all known enzymes required for the synthesis of isoprenoid precursors. Additionally, itavastatin-induced growth inhibition of C. parvum was partially reversed by the addition of exogenous isopentenyl pyrophosphate, suggesting that itavastatin reduces Cryptosporidium growth via on-target inhibition of host HMG-CoA reductase and that the parasite is dependent on the host cell for synthesis of isoprenoid precursors. PMID:23380723

Bessoff, Kovi; Sateriale, Adam; Lee, K. Kyungae

2013-01-01

185

Essential Plasticity and Redundancy of Metabolism Unveiled by Synthetic Lethality Analysis  

PubMed Central

We unravel how functional plasticity and redundancy are essential mechanisms underlying the ability to survive of metabolic networks. We perform an exhaustive computational screening of synthetic lethal reaction pairs in Escherichia coli in a minimal medium and we find that synthetic lethal pairs divide in two different groups depending on whether the synthetic lethal interaction works as a backup or as a parallel use mechanism, the first corresponding to essential plasticity and the second to essential redundancy. In E. coli, the analysis of pathways entanglement through essential redundancy supports the view that synthetic lethality affects preferentially a single function or pathway. In contrast, essential plasticity, the dominant class, tends to be inter-pathway but strongly localized and unveils Cell Envelope Biosynthesis as an essential backup for Membrane Lipid Metabolism. When comparing E. coli and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, we find that the metabolic networks of the two organisms exhibit a large difference in the relative importance of plasticity and redundancy which is consistent with the conjecture that plasticity is a sophisticated mechanism that requires a complex organization. Finally, coessential reaction pairs are explored in different environmental conditions to uncover the interplay between the two mechanisms. We find that synthetic lethal interactions and their classification in plasticity and redundancy are basically insensitive to medium composition, and are highly conserved even when the environment is enriched with nonessential compounds or overconstrained to decrease maximum biomass formation. PMID:24854166

2014-01-01

186

Identification of a De Novo Heterozygous Missense FLNB Mutation in Lethal Atelosteogenesis Type I by Exome Sequencing  

PubMed Central

Background Atelosteogenesis type I (AO-I) is a rare lethal skeletal dysplastic disorder characterized by severe short-limbed dwarfism and dislocated hips, knees, and elbows. AO-I is caused by mutations in the filamin B (FLNB) gene; however, several other genes can cause AO-like lethal skeletal dysplasias. Methods In order to screen all possible genes associated with AO-like lethal skeletal dysplasias simultaneously, we performed whole-exome sequencing in a female newborn having clinical features of AO-I. Results Exome sequencing identified a novel missense variant (c.517G>A; p.Ala173Thr) in exon 2 of the FLNB gene in the patient. Sanger sequencing validated this variant, and genetic analysis of the patient's parents suggested a de novo occurrence of the variant. Conclusions This study shows that exome sequencing can be a useful tool for the identification of causative mutations in lethal skeletal dysplasia patients. PMID:24624349

Jeon, Ga Won; Lee, Mi-Na; Jung, Ji Mi; Hong, Seong Yeon; Kim, Young Nam; Sin, Jong Beom

2014-01-01

187

Sensitivity of seven PCRs for early detection of koi herpesvirus in experimentally infected carp, Cyprinus carpio L., by lethal and non-lethal sampling methods.  

PubMed

Koi herpesvirus (KHV) causes an economically important, highly infectious disease in common carp and koi, Cyprinus carpio L. Since the occurrence of mass mortalities worldwide, highly specific and sensitive molecular diagnostic methods have been developed for KHV detection. The sensitivity and reliability of these assays have essentially focused at the detection of low viral DNA copy numbers during latent or persistent infections. However, the efficacy of these assays has not been investigated with regard to low-level viraemia during acute infection stages. This study was conducted to compare the sensitivity of seven different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to detect KHV during the first hours and days post-infection (hpi; dpi), using lethal and non-lethal sampling methods. The results highlight the limitations of the assays for detecting virus during the first 4 dpi despite rapid mortality in experimentally infected carp. False-negative results were associated with time post-infection and the tissue sampled. Non-lethal sampling appears effective for KHV screening, with efficient detection in mucus samples obtained from external swabs during this early infection period (<5 dpi), while biopsies from gills and kidney were negative using the same PCR assays. Non-lethal sampling may improve the reliability of KHV detection in subclinical, acutely infected carp. PMID:24547985

Monaghan, S J; Thompson, K D; Adams, A; Bergmann, S M

2014-02-18

188

Synthetic Lethality of Cohesins with PARPs and Replication Fork Mediators  

PubMed Central

Synthetic lethality has been proposed as a way to leverage the genetic differences found in tumor cells to affect their selective killing. Cohesins, which tether sister chromatids together until anaphase onset, are mutated in a variety of tumor types. The elucidation of synthetic lethal interactions with cohesin mutants therefore identifies potential therapeutic targets. We used a cross-species approach to identify robust negative genetic interactions with cohesin mutants. Utilizing essential and non-essential mutant synthetic genetic arrays in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we screened genome-wide for genetic interactions with hypomorphic mutations in cohesin genes. A somatic cell proliferation assay in Caenorhabditis elegans demonstrated that the majority of interactions were conserved. Analysis of the interactions found that cohesin mutants require the function of genes that mediate replication fork progression. Conservation of these interactions between replication fork mediators and cohesin in both yeast and C. elegans prompted us to test whether other replication fork mediators not found in the yeast were required for viability in cohesin mutants. PARP1 has roles in the DNA damage response but also in the restart of stalled replication forks. We found that a hypomorphic allele of the C. elegans SMC1 orthologue, him-1(e879), genetically interacted with mutations in the orthologues of PAR metabolism genes resulting in a reduced brood size and somatic cell defects. We then demonstrated that this interaction is conserved in human cells by showing that PARP inhibitors reduce the viability of cultured human cells depleted for cohesin components. This work demonstrates that large-scale genetic interaction screening in yeast can identify clinically relevant genetic interactions and suggests that PARP inhibitors, which are currently undergoing clinical trials as a treatment of homologous recombination-deficient cancers, may be effective in treating cancers that harbor cohesin mutations. PMID:22412391

Barrett, Irene; Ferree, Elizabeth; van Pel, Derek M.; Ushey, Kevin; Sipahimalani, Payal; Bryan, Jennifer; Rose, Ann M.; Hieter, Philip

2012-01-01

189

An interaction type of genetic screen reveals a role of the Rab11 gene in oskar mRNA localization in the developing Drosophila melanogaster oocyte.  

PubMed Central

Abdomen and germ cell development of Drosophila melanogaster embryo requires proper localization of oskar mRNA to the posterior pole of the developing oocyte. oskar mRNA localization depends on complex cell biological events like cell-cell communication, dynamic rearrangement of the microtubule network, and function of the actin cytoskeleton of the oocyte. To investigate the cellular mechanisms involved, we developed a novel interaction type of genetic screen by which we isolated 14 dominant enhancers of a sensitized genetic background composed of mutations in oskar and in TropomyosinII, an actin binding protein. Here we describe the detailed analysis of two allelic modifiers that identify Drosophila Rab11, a gene encoding small monomeric GTPase. We demonstrate that mutation of the Rab11 gene, involved in various vesicle transport processes, results in ectopic localization of oskar mRNA, whereas localization of gurken and bicoid mRNAs and signaling between the oocyte and the somatic follicle cells are unaffected. We show that the ectopic oskar mRNA localization in the Rab11 mutants is a consequence of an abnormally polarized oocyte microtubule cytoskeleton. Our results indicate that the internal membranous structures play an important role in the microtubule organization in the Drosophila oocyte and, thus, in oskar RNA localization. PMID:11454766

Jankovics, F; Sinka, R; Erdélyi, M

2001-01-01

190

Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals the E3 SUMO-protein ligase gene SIZ1 as a novel determinant of furfural tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

PubMed Central

Background Furfural is a major growth inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates and improving furfural tolerance of microorganisms is critical for rapid and efficient fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, we used the RNAi-Assisted Genome Evolution (RAGE) method to select for furfural resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified a new determinant of furfural tolerance. Results By using a genome-wide RNAi (RNA-interference) screen in S. cerevisiae for genes involved in furfural tolerance, we identified SIZ1, a gene encoding an E3 SUMO-protein ligase. Disruption of SIZ1 gene function by knockdown or deletion conferred significantly higher furfural tolerance compared to other previously reported metabolic engineering strategies in S. cerevisiae. This improved furfural tolerance of siz1? cells is accompanied by rapid furfural reduction to furfuryl alcohol and leads to higher ethanol productivity in the presence of furfural. In addition, the siz1? mutant also exhibited tolerance towards oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress tolerance related proteins may be under the SUMO regulation of SIZ1p and responsible for furfural tolerance. Conclusions Using a genome-wide approach, we identified a novel determinant for furfural tolerance, providing valuable insights into the design of recombinant microbes for efficient lignocellulose fermentation. PMID:24904688

2014-01-01

191

A genome-wide siRNA screen reveals multiple mTORC1 independent signaling pathways regulating autophagy under normal nutritional conditions  

PubMed Central

Summary Autophagy is a cellular catabolic mechanism that plays an essential function in protecting multicellular eukaryotes from neurodegeneration, cancer and other diseases. However, we still know very little about mechanisms regulating autophagy under normal homeostatic conditions when nutrients are not limiting. In a genome-wide human siRNA screen, we demonstrate that under normal nutrient conditions up regulation of autophagy requires the type III PI3 kinase, but not inhibition of mTORC1, the essential negative regulator of starvation-induced autophagy. We show that a group of growth factors and cytokines inhibit the type III PI3 kinase through multiple pathways, including the MAPK-ERK1/2, Stat3, Akt/Foxo3 and CXCR4/GPCR, which are all known to positively regulate cell growth and proliferation. Our study suggests that the type III PI3 kinase integrates diverse signals to regulate cellular levels of autophagy, and that autophagy and cell proliferation may represent two alternative cell fates that are regulated in a mutually exclusive manner. PMID:20627085

Lipinski, Marta M.; Hoffman, Greg; Ng, Aylwin; Zhou, Wen; Py, Bénédicte F.; Hsu, Emily; Liu, Xuxin; Eisenberg, Jason; Liu, Jun; Blenis, John; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Yuan, Junying

2010-01-01

192

RNAi screening with shRNAs against histone methylation-related genes reveals determinants of sorafenib sensitivity in hepatocellular carcinoma cells  

PubMed Central

Sorafenib is the first drug currently approved to treat advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, very low response rate and acquired drug resistance makes rare patients benefit from sorafenib therapy, therefore it is urgent to find biomarkers for sorafenib sensitivity. Histone modifications, including histone methylation, have been demonstrated to influence the initiation and progression of HCC. It is of great interest to elicit the possibility whether histone methylation plays a role in regulation of sorafenib sensitivity. In present work, a high throughput RNAi screening with 176 shRNA pools against 88 histone methyltransferases (HMTs) and histone demethyltransferases genes was applied to HepG2 cells. Silencing of 3 genes (ASH1L, C17ORF49 and SETD4) was validated to specifically promote HepG2 cells sensitivity to sorafenib. Western blotting results showed that those 3 HMT genes knockdown alone or sorafenib treatments alone both induce AKT/ERK activation. However, combination treatment with sorafenib and silencing of C17ORF49 or SETD4 downregulated AKT phosphorylation and hence induced HCC cells death. Our work may provide potential biomarkers for sorafenib sensitivity and therapeutic combination for sorafenib treatment in HCC patients. PMID:24696725

Li, Guang-Ming; Wang, Yu-Gang; Pan, Qin; Wang, Jun; Fan, Jian-Gao; Sun, Chao

2014-01-01

193

Cyclic AMP Effectors in African Trypanosomes Revealed by Genome-Scale RNA Interference Library Screening for Resistance to the Phosphodiesterase Inhibitor CpdA  

PubMed Central

One of the most promising new targets for trypanocidal drugs to emerge in recent years is the cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity encoded by TbrPDEB1 and TbrPDEB2. These genes were genetically confirmed as essential, and a high-affinity inhibitor, CpdA, displays potent antitrypanosomal activity. To identify effectors of the elevated cAMP levels resulting from CpdA action and, consequently, potential sites for adaptations giving resistance to PDE inhibitors, resistance to the drug was induced. Selection of mutagenized trypanosomes resulted in resistance to CpdA as well as cross-resistance to membrane-permeable cAMP analogues but not to currently used trypanocidal drugs. Resistance was not due to changes in cAMP levels or in PDEB genes. A second approach, a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) library screen, returned four genes giving resistance to CpdA upon knockdown. Validation by independent RNAi strategies confirmed resistance to CpdA and suggested a role for the identified cAMP Response Proteins (CARPs) in cAMP action. CARP1 is unique to kinetoplastid parasites and has predicted cyclic nucleotide binding-like domains, and RNAi repression resulted in >100-fold resistance. CARP2 and CARP4 are hypothetical conserved proteins associated with the eukaryotic flagellar proteome or with flagellar function, with an orthologue of CARP4 implicated in human disease. CARP3 is a hypothetical protein, unique to Trypanosoma. CARP1 to CARP4 likely represent components of a novel cAMP signaling pathway in the parasite. As cAMP metabolism is validated as a drug target in Trypanosoma brucei, cAMP effectors highly divergent from the mammalian host, such as CARP1, lend themselves to further pharmacological development. PMID:23877697

Gould, Matthew K.; Bachmaier, Sabine; Ali, Juma A. M.; Alsford, Sam; Tagoe, Daniel N. A.; Munday, Jane C.; Schnaufer, Achim C.; Horn, David

2013-01-01

194

Screening a wide host-range, waste-water metagenomic library in tryptophan auxotrophs of Rhizobium leguminosarum and of Escherichia coli reveals different classes of cloned trp genes.  

PubMed

A metagenomic cosmid library was constructed, in which the insert DNA was derived from bacteria in a waste-water treatment plant and the vector was the wide host-range cosmid pLAFR3. The library was screened for clones that could correct defined tryptophan auxotrophs of the alpha-proteobacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum and of Escherichia coli. A total of 26 different cosmids that corrected at least one trp mutant in one or both of these species were obtained. Several cosmids corrected the auxotrophy of one or more R. leguminosarum trp mutants, but not the corresponding mutants in E. coli. Conversely, one cosmid corrected trpA, B, C, D and E mutants of E. coli but none of the trp mutants of R. leguminosarum. Two of the Trp+ cosmids were examined in more detail. One contained a trp operon that resembled that of the pathogen Chlamydophila caviae, containing the unusual kynU gene, which specifies kynureninase. The other, whose trp genes functioned in R. leguminosarum but not in E. coli, contained trpDCFBA in an operon that is likely co-transcribed with five other genes, most of which had no known link with tryptophan synthesis. The sequences of these TRP proteins, and the products of nine other genes encoded by this cosmid, failed to affiliate them with any known bacterial lineage. For one metagenomic cosmid, lac reporter fusions confirmed that its cloned trp genes were transcribed in R. leguminosarum, but not in E. coli. Thus, rhizobia, with their many sigma-factors, may be well-suited hosts for metagenomic libraries, cloned in wide host-range vectors. PMID:16309391

Li, Youguo; Wexler, Margaret; Richardson, David J; Bond, Philip L; Johnston, Andrew W B

2005-12-01

195

A kinase inhibitor screen reveals protein kinase C-dependent endocytic recycling of ErbB2 in breast cancer cells.  

PubMed

ErbB2 overexpression drives oncogenesis in 20-30% cases of breast cancer. Oncogenic potential of ErbB2 is linked to inefficient endocytic traffic into lysosomes and preferential recycling. However, regulation of ErbB2 recycling is incompletely understood. We used a high-content immunofluorescence imaging-based kinase inhibitor screen on SKBR-3 breast cancer cells to identify kinases whose inhibition alters the clearance of cell surface ErbB2 induced by Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG. Less ErbB2 clearance was observed with broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220. A similar effect was observed with Go 6976, a selective inhibitor of classical Ca(2+)-dependent PKCs (?, ?1, ?II, and ?). PKC activation by PMA promoted surface ErbB2 clearance but without degradation, and ErbB2 was observed to move into a juxtanuclear compartment where it colocalized with PKC-? and PKC-? together with the endocytic recycling regulator Arf6. PKC-? knockdown impaired the juxtanuclear localization of ErbB2. ErbB2 transit to the recycling compartment was also impaired upon PKC-? knockdown. PMA-induced Erk phosphorylation was reduced by ErbB2 inhibitor lapatinib, as well as by knockdown of PKC-? but not that of PKC-?. Our results suggest that activation of PKC-? and -? mediates a novel positive feedback loop by promoting ErbB2 entry into the endocytic recycling compartment, consistent with reported positive roles for these PKCs in ErbB2-mediated tumorigenesis. As the endocytic recycling compartment/pericentrion has emerged as a PKC-dependent signaling hub for G-protein-coupled receptors, our findings raise the possibility that oncogenesis by ErbB2 involves previously unexplored PKC-dependent endosomal signaling. PMID:25225290

Bailey, Tameka A; Luan, Haitao; Tom, Eric; Bielecki, Timothy Alan; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Ahmad, Gulzar; George, Manju; Kelly, David L; Natarajan, Amarnath; Raja, Srikumar M; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

2014-10-31

196

Isotope-Assisted Screening for Iron-Containing Metabolites Reveals a High Degree of Diversity among Known and Unknown Siderophores Produced by Trichoderma spp.  

PubMed Central

Due to low iron availability under environmental conditions, many microorganisms excrete iron-chelating agents (siderophores) to cover their iron demands. A novel screening approach for the detection of siderophores using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry was developed to study the production of extracellular siderophores of 10 wild-type Trichoderma strains. For annotation of siderophores, an in-house library comprising 422 known microbial siderophores was established. After 96 h of cultivation, 18 different iron chelators were detected. Four of those (dimerum acid, fusigen, coprogen, and ferricrocin) were identified by measuring authentic standards. cis-Fusarinine, fusarinine A and B, and des-diserylglycylferrirhodin were annotated based on high-accuracy mass spectral analysis. In total, at least 10 novel iron-containing metabolites of the hydroxamate type were found. On average Trichoderma spp. produced 12 to 14 siderophores, with 6 common to all species tested. The highest number (15) of siderophores was detected for the most common environmental opportunistic and strongly fungicidic species, Trichoderma harzianum, which, however, did not have any unique compounds. The tropical species T. reesei had the most distinctive pattern, producing one unique siderophore (cis-fusarinine) and three others that were present only in T. harzianum and not in other species. The diversity of siderophores did not directly correlate with the antifungal potential of the species tested. Our data suggest that the high diversity of siderophores produced by Trichoderma spp. might be the result of further modifications of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) products and not due to diverse NRPS-encoding genes. PMID:23064341

Lehner, Sylvia M.; Atanasova, Lea; Neumann, Nora K. N.; Krska, Rudolf; Lemmens, Marc; Druzhinina, Irina S.

2013-01-01

197

A genome-wide miRNA screen revealed miR-603 as a MGMT-regulating miRNA in glioblastomas  

PubMed Central

MGMT expression is a critical determinant for therapeutic resistance to DNA alkylating agents. We previously demonstrated that MGMT expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-181d and other miRNAs. Here, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Candidate miRNAs were further tested for inverse correlation with MGMT expression in clinical specimens. We identified 15 candidate miRNAs and characterized the top candidate, miR-603. Transfection of miR-603 suppressed MGMT mRNA/protein expression in vitro and in vivo; this effect was reversed by transfection with antimiR-603. miR-603 affinity-precipitated with MGMT mRNA and suppressed luciferase activity in an MGMT-3'UTR-luciferase assay, suggesting direct interaction between miR-603 and MGMT 3'UTR. miR-603 transfection enhanced the temozolomide (TMZ) sensitivity of MGMT-expressing glioblastoma cell lines. Importantly, miR-603 mediated MGMT suppression and TMZ resistance were reversed by expression of an MGMT cDNA. In a collection of 74 clinical glioblastoma specimens, both miR-603 and miR-181d levels inversely correlated with MGMT expression. Moreover, a combined index of the two miRNAs better reflected MGMT expression than each individually. These results suggest that MGMT is co-regulated by independent miRNAs. Characterization of these miRNAs should contribute toward strategies for enhancing the efficacy of DNA alkylating agents. PMID:24994119

Ng, Kimberly; Steed, Tyler; Nguyen, Thien; Futalan, Diahnn; Akers, Johnny C.; Sarkaria, Jann; Jiang, Tao; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Carter, Bob S.; Chen, Clark C.

2014-01-01

198

Midline lethal granuloma--a clinical enigma.  

PubMed

Midline Lethal granuloma is characterized by progressive destruction of nose, paranasal sinuses and palate. Till date, the diagnosis of this mutilating process remains as enigma due to the non specific histological and systemic findings. However, over the years the clinicians have been able to divide the "Lethal midline granuoloma syndrome" into clinical entities: Idiopathic midline destructive disease, Wegener's granulomatosis, polymorphic retiaculosis and Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. This article attempts to distinguish between these disease entities in the light of 2 case reports of Idiopathic midline destructive disease. PMID:15164661

Batra, P; Shah, N; Mathur, S

2003-01-01

199

A Quantitative, High-Throughput Reverse Genetic Screen Reveals Novel Connections between Pre–mRNA Splicing and 5? and 3? End Transcript Determinants  

PubMed Central

Here we present the development and implementation of a genome-wide reverse genetic screen in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that couples high-throughput strain growth, robotic RNA isolation and cDNA synthesis, and quantitative PCR to allow for a robust determination of the level of nearly any cellular RNA in the background of 5,500 different mutants. As an initial test of this approach, we sought to identify the full complement of factors that impact pre–mRNA splicing. Increasing lines of evidence suggest a relationship between pre–mRNA splicing and other cellular pathways including chromatin remodeling, transcription, and 3? end processing, yet in many cases the specific proteins responsible for functionally connecting these pathways remain unclear. Moreover, it is unclear whether all pathways that are coupled to splicing have been identified. As expected, our approach sensitively detects pre–mRNA accumulation in the vast majority of strains containing mutations in known splicing factors. Remarkably, however, several additional candidates were found to cause increases in pre–mRNA levels similar to that seen for canonical splicing mutants, none of which had previously been implicated in the splicing pathway. Instead, several of these factors have been previously implicated to play roles in chromatin remodeling, 3? end processing, and other novel categories. Further analysis of these factors using splicing-sensitive microarrays confirms that deletion of Bdf1, a factor that links transcription initiation and chromatin remodeling, leads to a global splicing defect, providing evidence for a novel connection between pre–mRNA splicing and this component of the SWR1 complex. By contrast, mutations in 3? end processing factors such as Cft2 and Yth1 also result in pre–mRNA splicing defects, although only for a subset of transcripts, suggesting that spliceosome assembly in S. cerevisiae may more closely resemble mammalian models of exon-definition. More broadly, our work demonstrates the capacity of this approach to identify novel regulators of various cellular RNAs. PMID:22479188

Albulescu, Laura-Oana; Sabet, Nevin; Gudipati, Mohanram; Stepankiw, Nicholas; Bergman, Zane J.; Huffaker, Tim C.; Pleiss, Jeffrey A.

2012-01-01

200

Disease screening of three breeding populations of adult exhibition budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) in New Zealand reveals a high prevalence of a novel polyomavirus and avian malaria infection.  

PubMed

Disease surveillance is vital to the management of New Zealand's endemic and threatened avian species. Three infectious agents that are potential threats to New Zealand's endemic birds include avian polyomavirus (APV), beak and feather disease virus (BFDV), and avian malaria. All three agents have been reported in New Zealand; however, possible reservoir populations have not been identified. In this communication, we report the first study of APV, BFDV, and avian malaria in introduced adult exhibition budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) in New Zealand. Blood samples were collected from 90 living adult budgerigars from three breeding locations in the North Island of New Zealand. An overall APV prevalence of 22% was determined using a broad-spectrum nested PCR that amplified the major capsid protein VP1 gene of polyomavirus. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 gene revealed a unique isolate of APV, which had a sequence divergence of 32% to previously reported budgerigar fledgling disease strains and 33% to the recently reported New Zealand finch isolate. All of the budgerigars sampled were found to be PCR negative for BFDV, and an overall prevalence of 30% was detected by PCR for avian malaria. Sequencing revealed the presence of ubiquitous malarial strains and also the potentially destructive Plasmodium relictum strain. The results of this study suggest that both APV and avian malaria are present in New Zealand adult budgerigars, and our study highlights the need for further studies to determine whether these pathogens in captive bird populations may be a threat or spill over into New Zealand's endemic and threatened avifauna and whether prevention and control methods need to be implemented. PMID:24758122

Baron, Hamish R; Howe, Laryssa; Varsani, Arvind; Doneley, Robert J T

2014-03-01

201

Isolation of temperature sensitive mutations blocking clone development in Drosophila melanogaster , and the effects of a temperature sensitive cell lethal mutation on pattern formation in imaginal discs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method of isolating temperature-sensitive (ts) mutations blocking clone development, based on the analysis of twin spots produced by X-ray induced somatic recombination is reported. From this screen 10 ts mutations were recovered which caused an absence of the lethal-bearing clone at the restrictive temperature. Eight of these mutations were analyzed. Seven proved to be autonomous ts cell lethals and

Pat Simpson; Howard A. Schneiderman

1975-01-01

202

CSNK1E/CTNNB1 Are Synthetic Lethal To TP53 in Colorectal Cancer and Are Markers for Prognosis  

PubMed Central

Two genes are called synthetic lethal (SL) if their simultaneous mutations lead to cell death, but each individual mutation does not. Targeting SL partners of mutated cancer genes can kill cancer cells specifically, but leave normal cells intact. We present an integrated approach to uncovering SL pairs in colorectal cancer (CRC). Screening verified SL pairs using microarray gene expression data of cancerous and normal tissues, we first identified potential functionally relevant (simultaneously differentially expressed) gene pairs. From the top-ranked pairs, ~ 20 genes were chosen for immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining in 171 CRC patients. To find novel SL pairs, all 169 combined pairs from the individual IHC were synergistically correlated to five clinicopathological features, e.g. overall survival. Of the 11 predicted SL pairs, MSH2-POLB and CSNK1E-MYC were consistent with literature, and we validated the top two pairs, CSNK1E-TP53 and CTNNB1-TP53 using RNAi knockdown and small molecule inhibitors of CSNK1E in isogenic HCT-116 and RKO cells. Furthermore, synthetic lethality of CSNK1E and TP53 was verified in mouse model. Importantly, multivariate analysis revealed that CSNK1E-P53, CTNNB1-P53, MSH2-RB1, and BRCA1-WNT5A were independent prognosis markers from stage, with CSNK1E-P53 applicable to early-stage and the remaining three throughout all stages. Our findings suggest that CSNK1E is a promising target for TP53-mutant CRC patients which constitute ~ 40% to 50% of patients, while to date safety regarding inhibition of TP53 is controversial. Thus the integrated approach is useful in finding novel SL pairs for cancer therapeutics, and it is readily accessible and applicable to other cancers. PMID:24947187

Tiong, Khong-Loon; Chang, Kuo-Ching; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Wu, Jia-Hong; Hsieh, Ping-Heng; Lin, Shu-Hui; Lai, Wei-Yun; Hsu, Yu-Chin; Chen, Jeou-Yuan; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Shieh, Grace S.

2014-01-01

203

Medical Conditions and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This population-based, case-control study examined physical illness as a risk factor for suicidal behavior. Case patients were more likely than controls to report having any serious medical conditions. Results suggest that young men with medical conditions are at increased risk for nearly lethal suicide attempts. (Contains 33 references and 3…

Ikeda, Robin M.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Powell, Kenneth E.; Simon, Thomas R.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Durant, Tonji M.; Swahn, Monica H.

2002-01-01

204

Deadly Lessons: Understanding Lethal School Violence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of papers is the outcome of the National Academies' effort to glean information from six different case studies of student-perpetrated school shootings. Part 1, "Case Studies of Lethal School Violence," includes: "The Copycat Factor: Mental Illness, Guns, and the Shooting Incident at Heritage High School, Rockdale County, Georgia"…

Moore, Mark H., Ed.; Petrie, Carol V., Ed.; Braga, Anthony A., Ed.; McLaughlin, Brenda L., Ed.

205

Sarcocystis Species Lethal for Domestic Pigeons  

PubMed Central

A large number of Sarcocystis spp. infect birds as intermediate hosts, but pigeons are rarely affected. We identified a novel Sarcocystis sp. that causes lethal neurologic disease in domestic pigeons in Germany. Experimental infections indicated transmission by northern goshawks, and sequence analyses indicated transnational distribution. Worldwide spread is possible. PMID:20202429

Gruber, Achim D.; Kohls, Andrea; Hafez, Hafez M.; Heydorn, Alfred Otto; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Lierz, Michael

2010-01-01

206

H2AX phosphorylation screen of cells from radiosensitive cancer patients reveals a novel DNA double-strand break repair cellular phenotype  

PubMed Central

Background: About 1–5% of cancer patients suffer from significant normal tissue reactions as a result of radiotherapy (RT). It is not possible at this time to predict how most patients' normal tissues will respond to RT. DNA repair dysfunction is implicated in sensitivity to RT particularly in genes that mediate the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Phosphorylation of histone H2AX (phosphorylated molecules are known as ?H2AX) occurs rapidly in response to DNA DSBs, and, among its other roles, contributes to repair protein recruitment to these damaged sites. Mammalian cell lines have also been crucial in facilitating the successful cloning of many DNA DSB repair genes; yet, very few mutant cell lines exist for non-syndromic clinical radiosensitivity (RS). Methods: Here, we survey DNA DSB induction and repair in whole cells from RS patients, as revealed by ?H2AX foci assays, as potential predictive markers of clinical radiation response. Results: With one exception, both DNA focus induction and repair in cell lines from RS patients were comparable with controls. Using ?H2AX foci assays, we identified a RS cancer patient cell line with a novel ionising radiation-induced DNA DSB repair defect; these data were confirmed by an independent DNA DSB repair assay. Conclusion: ?H2AX focus measurement has limited scope as a pre-RT predictive assay in lymphoblast cell lines from RT patients; however, the assay can successfully identify novel DNA DSB repair-defective patient cell lines, thus potentially facilitating the discovery of novel constitutional contributions to clinical RS. PMID:20461094

Vasireddy, R S; Sprung, C N; Cempaka, N L; Chao, M; McKay, M J

2010-01-01

207

40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.  

...species. Dominant lethals are generally accepted to be the result of chromosomal damage (structural and numerical anomalies) but gene mutations and toxic effects cannot be excluded. (b) Definition. A dominant lethal mutation is one occurring in a...

2014-07-01

208

40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...species. Dominant lethals are generally accepted to be the result of chromosomal damage (structural and numerical anomalies) but gene mutations and toxic effects cannot be excluded. (b) Definition. A dominant lethal mutation is one occurring in a...

2012-07-01

209

40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...species. Dominant lethals are generally accepted to be the result of chromosomal damage (structural and numerical anomalies) but gene mutations and toxic effects cannot be excluded. (b) Definition. A dominant lethal mutation is one occurring in a...

2011-07-01

210

40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...species. Dominant lethals are generally accepted to be the result of chromosomal damage (structural and numerical anomalies) but gene mutations and toxic effects cannot be excluded. (b) Definition. A dominant lethal mutation is one occurring in a...

2013-07-01

211

40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...species. Dominant lethals are generally accepted to be the result of chromosomal damage (structural and numerical anomalies) but gene mutations and toxic effects cannot be excluded. (b) Definition. A dominant lethal mutation is one occurring in a...

2010-07-01

212

Mutations Synthetically Lethal with Tpm1? Lie in Genes Involved in Morphogenesis  

PubMed Central

Yeast contains two genes, TPM1 and TPM2, encoding tropomyosins, either of which can provide an essential function in the yeast cytoskeleton. To elucidate more clearly the function of the major tropomyosin, encoded by TPM1, we have isolated mutations that confer synthetic lethality with the null mutant of TPM1. Here we describe a phenotypic and genetic analysis of mutations in TSL1/BEM2, TSL2, TSL3, TSL5, and TSL6 (tropomyosin synthetic lethal). All the mutants exhibit clear morphological and some actin cytoskeletal defects, but are not noticeably defective in secretion, endocytosis, or organelle segregation. The lethality conferred by tsl tpm1? mutations could be specifically suppressed by either TPM1 or an additional copy of TPM2. This implies that the essential function compromised in the tsl tpm1? constructs is the same essential function for which Tpm1p or Tpm2p is necessary. Synthetic interactions and unlinked noncomplementation were observed between the tsl mutants, suggesting that they participate in related functions involving morphogenesis. In support of this, tsl6-1 was identified as an allele of the nonessential gene SLT2 or MPK1 whose product is a MAP kinase regulating cell wall synthesis. These results indicate that this synthetic lethality approach provides a sensitive screen for the isolation of mutations affecting morphogenesis, many of which are likely to be in nonessential genes, like BEM2 and SLT2. PMID:9409824

Wang, T.; Bretscher, A.

1997-01-01

213

Summary report on the performance of the dominant lethal test in rodents  

SciTech Connect

The dominant lethal test procedure in mice and rats screens mainly for induced changes in parental germ cells that lead to chromosomal elimination and death among some of the first-generation progeny of animals treated with mutagenic agent. The classes of chromosomal aberrations that result in dominant lethality are either of chromatid- or chromosome-type deletions and exchanges. Embryonic death resulting from dominant lethal mutations usually are expressed between the two-cell stage and shortly after implantation. Mutagenicity of the test compound is decided by a combination of the increase in the frequency of dead implantation,increase in the number of females with one or more dead implants, reduction in the average number of living embryos, reduction in the average number of implantations, and reduction in the frequency of fertile matings. Generally, the first three criteria, and, in some cases (when the induction rate is high), the fourth criterion are expressed together. The fifth criterion is expressed only when dominant-lethal induction approaches 100% and embryonic death occurs prior to implantation.

Generoso, W.M.

1985-01-01

214

Toxicology screen  

MedlinePLUS

A toxicology screen refers to various tests to determine the type and approximate amount of legal and illegal drugs ... Toxicology screening is most often done using a blood or urine sample. However, it may be done ...

215

Whole-Transcriptome Shotgun Sequencing (RNA-seq) Screen Reveals Upregulation of Cellobiose and Motility Operons of Lactobacillus ruminis L5 during Growth on Tetrasaccharides Derived from Barley ?-Glucan  

PubMed Central

Lactobacillus ruminis is an inhabitant of human bowels and bovine rumens. None of 10 isolates (three from bovine rumen, seven from human feces) of L. ruminis that were tested could utilize barley ?-glucan for growth. Seven of the strains of L. ruminis were, however, able to utilize tetrasaccharides (3-O-?-cellotriosyl-d-glucose [LDP4] or 4-O-?-laminaribiosyl-d-cellobiose [CDP4]) present in ?-glucan hydrolysates for growth. The tetrasaccharides were generated by the use of lichenase or cellulase, respectively. To learn more about the utilization of tetrasaccharides by L. ruminis, whole-transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-seq) was tested as a transcriptional screen to detect altered gene expression when an autochthonous human strain (L5) was grown in medium containing CDP4. RNA-seq results were confirmed and extended by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR assays of selected genes in two upregulated operons when cells were grown as batch cultures in medium containing either CDP4 or LDP4. The cellobiose utilization operon had increased transcription, particularly in early growth phase, whereas the chemotaxis/motility operon was upregulated in late growth phase. Phenotypic changes were seen in relation to upregulation of chemotaxis/flagellar operons: flagella were rarely seen by electron microscopy on glucose-grown cells but cells cultured in tetrasaccharide medium were commonly flagellated. Chemotactic movement toward tetrasaccharides was demonstrated in capillary cultures. L. ruminis utilized 3-O-?-cellotriosyl-d-glucose released by ?-glucan hydrolysis due to bowel commensal Coprococcus sp., indicating that cross feeding of tetrasaccharide between bacteria could occur. Therefore, the RNA-seq screen and subsequent experiments had utility in revealing foraging attributes of gut commensal Lactobacillus ruminis. PMID:23851085

Lawley, Blair; Sims, Ian M.

2013-01-01

216

In Silico Screening for Palmitoyl Substrates Reveals a Role for DHHC1/3/10 (zDHHC1/3/11)-mediated Neurochondrin Palmitoylation in Its Targeting to Rab5-positive Endosomes*  

PubMed Central

Protein palmitoylation, a common post-translational lipid modification, plays an important role in protein trafficking and functions. Recently developed palmitoyl-proteomic methods identified many novel substrates. However, the whole picture of palmitoyl substrates has not been clarified. Here, we performed global in silico screening using the CSS-Palm 2.0 program, free software for prediction of palmitoylation sites, and selected 17 candidates as novel palmitoyl substrates. Of the 17 candidates, 10 proteins, including 6 synaptic proteins (Syd-1, transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein (TARP) ?-2, TARP ?-8, cornichon-2, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II?, and neurochondrin (Ncdn)/norbin), one focal adhesion protein (zyxin), two ion channels (TRPM8 and TRPC1), and one G-protein-coupled receptor (orexin 2 receptor), were palmitoylated. Using the DHHC palmitoylating enzyme library, we found that all tested substrates were palmitoylated by the Golgi-localized DHHC3/7 subfamily. Ncdn, a regulator for neurite outgrowth and synaptic plasticity, was robustly palmitoylated by the DHHC1/10 (zDHHC1/11; z1/11) subfamily, whose substrate has not yet been reported. As predicted by CSS-Palm 2.0, Cys-3 and Cys-4 are the palmitoylation sites for Ncdn. Ncdn was specifically localized in somato-dendritic regions, not in the axon of rat cultured neurons. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy revealed that Ncdn was localized to Rab5-positive early endosomes in a palmitoylation-dependent manner, where DHHC1/10 (z1/11) were also distributed. Knockdown of DHHC1, -3, or -10 (z11) resulted in the loss of Ncdn from Rab5-positive endosomes. Thus, through in silico screening, we demonstrate that Ncdn and the DHHC1/10 (z1/11) and DHHC3/7 subfamilies are novel palmitoyl substrate-enzyme pairs and that Ncdn palmitoylation plays an essential role in its specific endosomal targeting. PMID:23687301

Oku, Shinichiro; Takahashi, Naoki; Fukata, Yuko; Fukata, Masaki

2013-01-01

217

Unraveling the physiological complexities of antibiotic lethality.  

PubMed

We face an impending crisis in our ability to treat infectious disease brought about by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and a decline in the development of new antibiotics. Urgent action is needed. This review focuses on a less well-understood aspect of antibiotic action: the complex metabolic events that occur subsequent to the interaction of antibiotics with their molecular targets and play roles in antibiotic lethality. Independent lines of evidence from studies of the action of bactericidal antibiotics on diverse bacteria collectively suggest that the initial interactions of drugs with their targets cannot fully account for the antibiotic lethality and that these interactions elicit the production of reactive oxidants including reactive oxygen species that contribute to bacterial cell death. Recent challenges to this concept are considered in the context of the broader literature of this emerging area of research. Possible ways that this new knowledge might be exploited to improve antibiotic therapy are also considered. PMID:25251995

Dwyer, Daniel J; Collins, James J; Walker, Graham C

2015-01-01

218

Synthetic lethality to overcome cancer drug resistance.  

PubMed

A large body of evidence point out that the onset of synthetic lethality may provide a useful tool for amplifying the efficacy of drugs in anticancer regimens, to uncover interdependence between genes and to identify predictive factors that would be extremely useful to guide in the selection of more effective targeted drugs and drug combinations for each patient. Here, we provide an overview on the exploitation of synthetic lethality to overcome drug resistance to conventional chemotherapy in several types of solid tumors. We report recent findings on cellular markers and gene mutations which are specifically essential for the viability of cancer cells and for resistance to chemotherapeutics. In addition, new molecularly targeted strategies to overcome drug resistance are suggested. PMID:22788762

Porcelli, L; Quatrale, A E; Mantuano, P; Silvestris, N; Brunetti, A E; Calvert, H; Paradiso, A; Azzariti, A

2012-01-01

219

A genetic screen for temperature-sensitive cell-division mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans.  

PubMed Central

A novel screen to isolate conditional cell-division mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans has been developed. The screen is based on the phenotypes associated with existing cell-division mutations: some disrupt postembryonic divisions and affect formation of the gonad and ventral nerve cord-resulting in sterile, uncoordinated animals-while others affect embryonic divisions and result in lethality. We obtained 19 conditional mutants that displayed these phenotypes when shifted to the restrictive temperature at the appropriate developmental stage. Eighteen of these mutations have been mapped; 17 proved to be single alleles of newly identified genes, while 1 proved to be an allele of a previously identified gene. Genetic tests on the embryonic lethal phenotypes indicated that for 13 genes, embryogenesis required maternal expression, while for 6, zygotic expression could suffice. In all cases, maternal expression of wild-type activity was found to be largely sufficient for embryogenesis. Cytological analysis revealed that 10 mutants possessed embryonic cell-division defects, including failure to properly segregate DNA, failure to assemble a mitotic spindle, late cytokinesis defects, prolonged cell cycles, and improperly oriented mitotic spindles. We conclude that this approach can be used to identify mutations that affect various aspects of the cell-division cycle. PMID:9649522

O'Connell, K F; Leys, C M; White, J G

1998-01-01

220

Midline lethal granuloma complicating pregnancy: case report.  

PubMed

A case of midline lethal granuloma in a 28-year- old female Nigerian patient is reported. Oral, ocular and nasal lesions were present and these preceded a spontaneous abortion of a three month old pregnancy. The clinical course of the disease and its similarity to other granulomatous diseases, which are generally classified as midline granuloma syndrome, are highlighted. The prognosis is poor but early diagnosis and treatment appears to improve a patient's condition PMID:16167758

Saheeb, B D O; Ojo, M A

2003-07-01

221

Loss-of-function mutations in a glutathione S-transferase suppress the prune-Killer of prune lethal interaction.  

PubMed

The prune gene of Drosophila melanogaster is predicted to encode a phosphodiesterase. Null alleles of prune are viable but cause an eye-color phenotype. The abnormal wing discs gene encodes a nucleoside diphosphate kinase. Killer of prune is a missense mutation in the abnormal wing discs gene. Although it has no phenotype by itself even when homozygous, Killer of prune when heterozygous causes lethality in the absence of prune gene function. A screen for suppressors of transgenic Killer of prune led to the recovery of three mutations, all of which are in the same gene. As heterozygotes these mutations are dominant suppressors of the prune-Killer of prune lethal interaction; as homozygotes these mutations cause early larval lethality and the absence of imaginal discs. These alleles are loss-of-function mutations in CG10065, a gene that is predicted to encode a protein with several zinc finger domains and glutathione S-transferase activity. PMID:16143620

Provost, Elayne; Hersperger, Grafton; Timmons, Lisa; Ho, Wen Qi; Hersperger, Evelyn; Alcazar, Rosa; Shearn, Allen

2006-01-01

222

Lethal and Sub-lethal Effects of UVB on Juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Pulmonata)  

PubMed Central

Although Schistosoma mansoni occurs mainly in the tropics, where intense levels of solar radiation are present, the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light on schistosome transmission is not known. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential effects of UVB (290–320 nm) on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata, the snail intermediate host of S. mansoni. Albino and wild type snails were exposed to doses of UVB from UV-fluorescent lamps, and the following were measured: survival, photoreactivation (light-mediated DNA repair), effects on feeding behavior, and morphological tissue abnormalities. Irradiation with UVB is lethal to B. glabrata in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to white light subsequent to UVB irradiation enhances survival, probably by photoreactivation. The shell offers some, but not complete, protection. Experiments in which UVB transmittance through the shell was blocked with black nail polish suggest that injury to both exposed (headfoot) and shell-enclosed (mantle and visceral mass) tissues contributes to mortality in lethally-irradiated snails. Wild-type (pigmented) snails are less susceptible to lethal effects of UVB than albino snails, and they may be more capable of photoreactivation. UVB exposure inhibits snail feeding behavior, and causes tentacle forks and growths on the headfoot. Thus, UVB may influence the life cycle of S. mansoni by both lethal and sub-lethal damage to the snail intermediate host. However, the ability of snails to photoreactivate may mitigate these effects. PMID:16996081

Ruelas, Debbie S.; Karentz, Deneb; Sullivan, John T.

2007-01-01

223

mRNA Expression Signature of Gleason Grade Predicts Lethal Prostate Cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose Prostate-specific antigen screening has led to enormous overtreatment of prostate cancer because of the inability to distinguish potentially lethal disease at diagnosis. We reasoned that by identifying an mRNA signature of Gleason grade, the best predictor of prognosis, we could improve prediction of lethal disease among men with moderate Gleason 7 tumors, the most common grade, and the most indeterminate in terms of prognosis. Patients and Methods Using the complementary DNA–mediated annealing, selection, extension, and ligation assay, we measured the mRNA expression of 6,100 genes in prostate tumor tissue in the Swedish Watchful Waiting cohort (n = 358) and Physicians' Health Study (PHS; n = 109). We developed an mRNA signature of Gleason grade comparing individuals with Gleason ? 6 to those with Gleason ? 8 tumors and applied the model among patients with Gleason 7 to discriminate lethal cases. Results We built a 157-gene signature using the Swedish data that predicted Gleason with low misclassification (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.91); when this signature was tested in the PHS, the discriminatory ability remained high (AUC = 0.94). In men with Gleason 7 tumors, who were excluded from the model building, the signature significantly improved the prediction of lethal disease beyond knowing whether the Gleason score was 4 + 3 or 3 + 4 (P = .006). Conclusion Our expression signature and the genes identified may improve our understanding of the de-differentiation process of prostate tumors. Additionally, the signature may have clinical applications among men with Gleason 7, by further estimating their risk of lethal prostate cancer and thereby guiding therapy decisions to improve outcomes and reduce overtreatment. PMID:21537050

Penney, Kathryn L.; Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Fall, Katja; Pawitan, Yudi; Hoshida, Yujin; Kraft, Peter; Stark, Jennifer R.; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Perner, Sven; Finn, Stephen; Calza, Stefano; Flavin, Richard; Freedman, Matthew L.; Setlur, Sunita; Sesso, Howard D.; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Martin, Neil; Kantoff, Philip W.; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Rubin, Mark A.; Loda, Massimo; Golub, Todd R.; Andrén, Ove; Stampfer, Meir J.; Mucci, Lorelei A.

2011-01-01

224

Effect of N-1/C-8 Ring Fusion and C-7 Ring Structure on Fluoroquinolone Lethality?  

PubMed Central

Quinolones rapidly kill bacteria by two mechanisms, one that requires protein synthesis and one that does not. The latter, which is measured as lethal action in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol, is enhanced by N-1 cyclopropyl and C-8 methoxy substituents, as seen with the highly lethal compound PD161144. In some compounds, such as levofloxacin, the N-1 and C-8 substituents are fused. To assess the effect of ring fusion on killing, structural derivatives of levofloxacin and PD161144 differing at C-7 were synthesized and examined with Escherichia coli. A fused-ring derivative of PD161144 exhibited a striking absence of lethal activity in the presence of chloramphenicol. In general, ring fusion had little effect on lethal activity when protein synthesis was allowed, but fusion reduced lethal activity in the absence of protein synthesis to extents that depended on the C-7 ring structure. Additional fused-ring fluoroquinolones, pazufloxacin, marbofloxacin, and rufloxacin, also exhibited reduced activity in the presence of chloramphenicol. Energy minimization modeling revealed that steric interactions of the trans-oriented N-1 cyclopropyl and C-8 methoxy moieties skew the quinolone core, rigidly orient these groups perpendicular to core rings, and restrict the rotational freedom of C-7 rings. These features were not observed with fused-ring derivatives. Remarkably, structural effects on quinolone lethality were not explained by the recently described X-ray crystal structures of fluoroquinolone-topoisomerase IV-DNA complexes, suggesting the existence of an additional drug-binding state. PMID:20855738

Malik, Muhammad; Marks, Kevin R.; Schwanz, Heidi A.; German, Nadezhda; Drlica, Karl; Kerns, Robert J.

2010-01-01

225

Mutation Induced Extinction in Finite Populations: Lethal Mutagenesis and Lethal Isolation  

PubMed Central

Reproduction is inherently risky, in part because genomic replication can introduce new mutations that are usually deleterious toward fitness. This risk is especially severe for organisms whose genomes replicate “semi-conservatively,” e.g. viruses and bacteria, where no master copy of the genome is preserved. Lethal mutagenesis refers to extinction of populations due to an unbearably high mutation rate (U), and is important both theoretically and clinically, where drugs can extinguish pathogens by increasing their mutation rate. Previous theoretical models of lethal mutagenesis assume infinite population size (N). However, in addition to high U, small N can accelerate extinction by strengthening genetic drift and relaxing selection. Here, we examine how the time until extinction depends jointly on N and U. We first analytically compute the mean time until extinction (?) in a simplistic model where all mutations are either lethal or neutral. The solution motivates the definition of two distinct regimes: a survival phase and an extinction phase, which differ dramatically in both how ? scales with N and in the coefficient of variation in time until extinction. Next, we perform stochastic population-genetics simulations on a realistic fitness landscape that both (i) features an epistatic distribution of fitness effects that agrees with experimental data on viruses and (ii) is based on the biophysics of protein folding. More specifically, we assume that mutations inflict fitness penalties proportional to the extent that they unfold proteins. We find that decreasing N can cause phase transition-like behavior from survival to extinction, which motivates the concept of “lethal isolation.” Furthermore, we find that lethal mutagenesis and lethal isolation interact synergistically, which may have clinical implications for treating infections. Broadly, we conclude that stably folded proteins are only possible in ecological settings that support sufficiently large populations. PMID:22876168

Wylie, C. Scott; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

2012-01-01

226

Mutation induced extinction in finite populations: lethal mutagenesis and lethal isolation.  

PubMed

Reproduction is inherently risky, in part because genomic replication can introduce new mutations that are usually deleterious toward fitness. This risk is especially severe for organisms whose genomes replicate "semi-conservatively," e.g. viruses and bacteria, where no master copy of the genome is preserved. Lethal mutagenesis refers to extinction of populations due to an unbearably high mutation rate (U), and is important both theoretically and clinically, where drugs can extinguish pathogens by increasing their mutation rate. Previous theoretical models of lethal mutagenesis assume infinite population size (N). However, in addition to high U, small N can accelerate extinction by strengthening genetic drift and relaxing selection. Here, we examine how the time until extinction depends jointly on N and U. We first analytically compute the mean time until extinction (?) in a simplistic model where all mutations are either lethal or neutral. The solution motivates the definition of two distinct regimes: a survival phase and an extinction phase, which differ dramatically in both how ? scales with N and in the coefficient of variation in time until extinction. Next, we perform stochastic population-genetics simulations on a realistic fitness landscape that both (i) features an epistatic distribution of fitness effects that agrees with experimental data on viruses and (ii) is based on the biophysics of protein folding. More specifically, we assume that mutations inflict fitness penalties proportional to the extent that they unfold proteins. We find that decreasing N can cause phase transition-like behavior from survival to extinction, which motivates the concept of "lethal isolation." Furthermore, we find that lethal mutagenesis and lethal isolation interact synergistically, which may have clinical implications for treating infections. Broadly, we conclude that stably folded proteins are only possible in ecological settings that support sufficiently large populations. PMID:22876168

Wylie, C Scott; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

2012-01-01

227

Issues surrounding lethal injection as a means of capital punishment.  

PubMed

Lethal injection as a method of state-sanctioned capital punishment was initially proposed in the United States in 1977 and used for the first time in 1982. Most lethal injection protocols use a sequential drug combination of sodium thiopental, pancuronium bromide, and potassium chloride. Lethal injection was originally introduced as a more humane form of execution compared with existing mechanical methods such as electrocution, toxic gassing, hanging, or firing squad. Lethal injection has not, however, been without controversy. Several states are considering whether lethal injection meets constitutional scrutiny forbidding cruel and unusual punishment. Recently in the case of Ralph Baze and Thomas C. Bowling, Petitioners, v John D. Rees, Commissioner, Kentucky Department of Corrections et al, the United States Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the lethal injection protocol as carried out in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Most of the debate has surrounded the dosing and procedures used in lethal injection and whether the drug combinations and measures for administering the drugs truly produce a timely, pain-free, and fail-safe death. Many have also raised issues regarding the "medicalization" of execution and the ethics of health care professionals' participation in any part of the lethal injection process. As a result of all these issues, the future of lethal injection as a means of execution in the United States is under significant scrutiny. Outcomes of ongoing legislative and judicial reviews might result in cessation of lethal injection in totality or in alterations involving specific drug combinations or administration procedures. PMID:19025423

Romanelli, Frank; Whisman, Tyler; Fink, Joseph L

2008-12-01

228

Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin reduces human alveolar epithelial barrier function.  

PubMed

The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

2012-12-01

229

Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function  

PubMed Central

The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

2012-01-01

230

Scale for assessment of lethality of suicide attempt  

PubMed Central

Background: Lethality of suicidal attempt provides useful information regarding the behavior. There is a perceived need for a clinically useful scale that can be easily adapted to various methods and circumstances of attempt. Aims: The study intended to develop and test utility of a scale for measuring lethality that can reflect overall clinical observation taking into account various indicators of lethality and which can be used across clinical scenarios involving different methods. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional study in a hospital. Materials and Methods: The scale for assessment of lethality of suicide attempt (SALSA) has two components: The first component has four items indicating seriousness of the attempt and its likely consequences and the second component is the global impression of lethality. All the items are scored from 1 to 5, higher scores suggestive of increased lethality. SALSA was used to evaluate lethality of 82 consecutive suicide attempters; and it was compared with lethality of suicide attempt rating scale (LSARS) and risk-rescue rating scale. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square, t-test, analysis of variance, Cronbach's alpha, binary logistic regression. Result: There was significant correlation of SALSA score with that of LSARS (r: 0.89) and risk score of risk-rescue rating (r: 0.93, P < 0.001); and negative correlation with rescue score (r: ?0.569; P < 0.001). Internal consistency reliability of SALSA was high (Cronbach's alpha: 0.94). Lethality scores of SALSA differentiated known groups with different lethality, e.g. deceased and survived; attempters with different levels of medical intervention: In-patient only, intensive care, ventilator support. SALSA score significantly predicted the lethal outcome (odds ratio: 3.2, confidence interval: 1.12-8.98). Conclusion: SALSA is a useful instrument for assessment of lethality of suicidal behaviors during clinical evaluations considering the ease of administration, its ability to differentiate clinical groups with known variations of lethality and clinical outcomes.

Kar, Nilamadhab; Arun, Mohanram; Mohanty, Manoj K.; Bastia, Binaya K.

2014-01-01

231

Proteome-Wide Screening Reveals Immunodominance in the CD8 T Cell Response against Classical Swine Fever Virus with Antigen-Specificity Dependent on MHC Class I Haplotype Expression  

PubMed Central

Vaccination with live attenuated classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccines induces a rapid onset of protection which has been associated with virus-specific CD8 T cell IFN-? responses. In this study, we assessed the specificity of this response, by screening a peptide library spanning the CSFV C-strain vaccine polyprotein to identify and characterise CD8 T cell epitopes. Synthetic peptides were pooled to represent each of the 12 CSFV proteins and used to stimulate PBMC from four pigs rendered immune to CSFV by C-strain vaccination and subsequently challenged with the virulent Brescia strain. Significant IFN-? expression by CD8 T cells, assessed by flow cytometry, was induced by peptide pools representing the core, E2, NS2, NS3 and NS5A proteins. Dissection of these antigenic peptide pools indicated that, in each instance, a single discrete antigenic peptide or pair of overlapping peptides was responsible for the IFN-? induction. Screening and titration of antigenic peptides or truncated derivatives identified the following antigenic regions: core241–255 PESRKKLEKALLAWA and NS31902–1912 VEYSFIFLDEY, or minimal length antigenic peptides: E2996–1003 YEPRDSYF, NS21223–1230 STVTGIFL and NS5A3070–3078 RVDNALLKF. The epitopes are highly conserved across CSFV strains and variable sequence divergence was observed with related pestiviruses. Characterisation of epitope-specific CD8 T cells revealed evidence of cytotoxicity, as determined by CD107a mobilisation, and a significant proportion expressed TNF-? in addition to IFN-?. Finally, the variability in the antigen-specificity of these immunodominant CD8 T cell responses was confirmed to be associated with expression of distinct MHC class I haplotypes. Moreover, recognition of NS21223–1230 STVTGIFL and NS31902–1912 VEYSFIFLDEY by a larger group of C-strain vaccinated animals showed that these peptides could be restricted by additional haplotypes. Thus the antigenic regions and epitopes identified represent attractive targets for evaluation of their vaccine potential against CSFV. PMID:24376799

Franzoni, Giulia; Kurkure, Nitin V.; Essler, Sabine E.; Pedrera, Miriam; Everett, Helen E.; Bodman-Smith, Kikki B.; Crooke, Helen R.; Graham, Simon P.

2013-01-01

232

Genes in S and T Subgenomes Are Responsible for Hybrid Lethality in Interspecific Hybrids between Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana occidentalis  

PubMed Central

Background Many species of Nicotiana section Suaveolentes produce inviable F1 hybrids after crossing with Nicotiana tabacum (genome constitution SSTT), a phenomenon that is often called hybrid lethality. Through crosses with monosomic lines of N. tabacum lacking a Q chromosome, we previously determined that hybrid lethality is caused by interaction between gene(s) on the Q chromosome belonging to the S subgenome of N. tabacum and gene(s) in Suaveolentes species. Here, we examined if hybrid seedlings from the cross N. occidentalis (section Suaveolentes)×N. tabacum are inviable despite a lack of the Q chromosome. Methodology/Principal Findings Hybrid lethality in the cross of N. occidentalis×N. tabacum was characterized by shoots with fading color. This symptom differed from what has been previously observed in lethal crosses between many species in section Suaveolentes and N. tabacum. In crosses of monosomic N. tabacum plants lacking the Q chromosome with N. occidentalis, hybrid lethality was observed in hybrid seedlings either lacking or possessing the Q chromosome. N. occidentalis was then crossed with two progenitors of N. tabacum, N. sylvestris (SS) and N. tomentosiformis (TT), to reveal which subgenome of N. tabacum contains gene(s) responsible for hybrid lethality. Hybrid seedlings from the crosses N. occidentalis×N. tomentosiformis and N. occidentalis×N. sylvestris were inviable. Conclusions/Significance Although the specific symptoms of hybrid lethality in the cross N. occidentalis×N. tabacum were similar to those appearing in hybrids from the cross N. occidentalis×N. tomentosiformis, genes in both the S and T subgenomes of N. tabacum appear responsible for hybrid lethality in crosses with N. occidentalis. PMID:22563450

Tezuka, Takahiro; Marubashi, Wataru

2012-01-01

233

An F1 genetic screen for maternal-effect mutations affecting embryonic pattern formation in Drosophila melanogaster.  

PubMed Central

Large-scale screens for female-sterile mutations have revealed genes required maternally for establishment of the body axes in the Drosophila embryo. Although it is likely that the majority of components involved in axis formation have been identified by this approach, certain genes have escaped detection. This may be due to (1) incomplete saturation of the screens for female-sterile mutations and (2) genes with essential functions in zygotic development that mutate to lethality, precluding their identification as female-sterile mutations. To overcome these limitations, we performed a genetic mosaic screen aimed at identifying new maternal genes required for early embryonic patterning, including zygotically required ones. Using the Flp-FRT technique and a visible germline clone marker, we developed a system that allows efficient screening for maternal-effect phenotypes after only one generation of breeding, rather than after the three generations required for classic female-sterile screens. We identified 232 mutants showing various defects in embryonic pattern or morphogenesis. The mutants were ordered into 10 different phenotypic classes. A total of 174 mutants were assigned to 86 complementation groups with two alleles on average. Mutations in 45 complementation groups represent most previously known maternal genes, while 41 complementation groups represent new loci, including several involved in dorsoventral, anterior-posterior, and terminal patterning. PMID:15166158

Luschnig, Stefan; Moussian, Bernard; Krauss, Jana; Desjeux, Isabelle; Perkovic, Josip; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

2004-01-01

234

The lethal paraphiliac syndrome: accidental autoerotic deaths in four women and a review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four previously unpublished cases of female asphyxiophilia are presented. All women were found immobilised by obviously self-tied\\u000a ropes, string or handcuffs. The women, who were alone at the time of death, died of a lethal paraphilia. The autopsies revealed\\u000a asphyxiation as the cause of death, caused in two cases by suffocation as a result of hanging and strangulation and in

N. Behrendt; N. Buhl; S. Seidl

2002-01-01

235

Suicide Intent and Accurate Expectations of Lethality: Predictors of Medical Lethality of Suicide Attempts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The degree of intent to commit suicide and the severity of self-injury were examined in individuals (N = 180) who had recently attempted suicide. Although a minimal association was found between the degree of suicide intent and the degree of lethality of the attempt, the accuracy of expectations about the likelihood of dying was found to moderate…

Brown, Gregory K.; Henriques, Gregg R.; Sosdjan, Daniella; Beck, Aaron T.

2004-01-01

236

Mutation Induced Extinction in Finite Populations: Lethal Mutagenesis and Lethal Isolation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reproduction is inherently risky, in part because genomic replication can introduce new mutations that are usually deleterious toward fitness. This risk is especially severe for organisms whose genomes replicate “semi-conservatively,” e.g. viruses and bacteria, where no master copy of the genome is preserved. Lethal mutagenesis refers to extinction of populations due to an unbearably high mutation rate (U), and is

C. Scott Wylie; Eugene I. Shakhnovich

2012-01-01

237

Synthetic lethality for linking the mycophenolate mofetil mode of action with molecular disease and drug profiles.  

PubMed

Systematic study of the effect of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on the molecular level in the context of other drugs and molecular disease profiles became possible due to the availability of large scale molecular profiles on both disease characterization and drug mode of action. Such analysis is of particular value in elucidating alternative drug use for addressing clinically unmet needs, and the concept of synthetic lethality provides an alternative tool for such repositioning strategies. Resting on consolidation of transcriptomics data and literature mining, a MMF molecular footprint became available including a set of 170 genes specifically affected by the drug. Analysis of this profile on a molecular pathway level reveals a set of 14 pathways as affected. Next to assignment of molecular pathways and associated diseases synergistic drug combinations are proposed by utilizing the synthetic lethal interaction network. Of particular interest is the combination of MMF with adenosine deaminase inhibitors, sulfasalazine, and other selected drugs interfering with calcium-based regulatory pathways and metabolism. Indeed analysis of drugs in clinical trials positively identifies combinations with MMF in the context of synthetic lethality and affected pathways, particularly in diseases such as multiple sclerosis, vasculitis, GVHD and lupus nephritis. Importantly, the synthetic lethal interaction of the drug mode of action is an interesting basis for rational repositioning strategies by suggesting combinations which exhibit a synergistic rather than a mere additive effect, as for example is evident for the combination of tacrolimus and MMF. Inherent is also the assessment of possible adverse effects of drug combinations. PMID:23014771

Söllner, Johannes; Mayer, Paul; Heinzel, Andreas; Fechete, Raul; Siehs, Christian; Oberbauer, Rainer; Mayer, Bernd

2012-10-30

238

Enhancing CHK1 inhibitor lethality in glioblastoma.  

PubMed

The present studies were initiated to determine whether inhibitors of MEK1/2 or SRC signaling, respectively, enhance CHK1 inhibitor lethality in primary human glioblastoma cells. Multiple MEK1/2 inhibitors (CI-1040 (PD184352); AZD6244 (ARRY-142886)) interacted with multiple CHK1 inhibitors (UCN-01, AZD7762) to kill multiple primary human glioma cell isolates that have a diverse set of genetic alterations typically found in the disease. Inhibition of SRC family proteins also enhanced CHK1 inhibitor lethality. Combined treatment of glioma cells with (MEK1/2 + CHK1) inhibitors enhanced radiosensitivity. Combined (MEK1/2 + CHK1) inhibitor treatment led to dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 and S6 ribosomal protein, whereas the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 was increased. MEK1/2 + CHK1 inhibitor-stimulated cell death was associated with the cleavage of pro-caspases 3 and 7 as well as the caspase substrate (PARP). We also observed activation of pro-apoptotic BCL-2 effector proteins BAK and BAX and reduced levels of pro-survival BCL-2 family protein BCL-XL. Overexpression of BCL-XL alleviated but did not completely abolish MEK1/2 + CHK1 inhibitor cytotoxicity in GBM cells. These findings argue that multiple inhibitors of the SRC-MEK pathway have the potential to interact with multiple CHK1 inhibitors to kill glioma cells. PMID:22313687

Tang, Yong; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven; Dent, Paul

2012-04-01

239

Genetic Screening  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Many genetic disorders can be detected with tests of blood and chromosomes. Genetic screening is the large-scale use of these tests as part of the public health program. Different members of society, worldwide, have advocated genetic screening to achieve different goals. This chapter provides a critical analysis of this controversial issue.

Irwin Slesnick

2004-01-01

240

Non-lethal effects of predation in birds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Predators can affect individual fitness and population and community processes through lethal effects (direct consumption or 'density' effects), where prey is consumed, or through non-lethal effects (trait-mediated effects or interactions), where behavioural compensation to predation risk occurs, such as animals avoiding areas of high predation risk. Studies of invertebrates, fish and amphibians have shown that non-lethal effects may be larger

WILL CRESSWELL

2008-01-01

241

Genetic analysis and complementation by germ-line transformation of lethal mutations in the unc-22 IV region of Caenorhabditis elegans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The subject of this study is the organization of essential genes in the 2 map-unit unc-22 IV region of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome. With the goal of achieving mutational saturation of essential genes in this region, 6491 chromosomes mutagenized with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) were screened for the presence of lethal mutations in the unc-22 region. The genetic analysis of 21

Denise V. Clark; David L. Baillie

1992-01-01

242

Screen Time  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This game asks you a series of questions about how much time you spend in front of a screen, not being active. It begins by pointing out that since we spend a lot of time in front of computer screens at work or school, additional time at home can really affect how healthy we are. It asks how much time you spend watching TV, playing computer games, and using the computer each day. It then adds up the total amount of screen time you spend every day, and calculates how many hours you spend a year in front of a screen. It also tells you if that's a healthy amount, and suggests ways to stay active while in front of screens.

Omsi

2007-01-01

243

Genome-wide siRNA screen reveals a new cellular partner of NK cell receptor KIR2DL4: heparan sulfate directly modulates KIR2DL4-mediated responses.  

PubMed

KIR2DL4 (CD158d) is a distinct member of the killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) family in human NK cells that can induce cytokine production and cytolytic activity in resting NK cells. Soluble HLA-G, normally expressed only by fetal-derived trophoblast cells, was reported to be a ligand for KIR2DL4; however, KIR2DL4 expression is not restricted to the placenta and can be found in CD56(high) subset of peripheral blood NK cells. We demonstrated that KIR2DL4 can interact with alternative ligand(s), expressed by cells of epithelial or fibroblast origin. A genome-wide high-throughput siRNA screen revealed that KIR2DL4 recognition of cell-surface ligand(s) is directly regulated by heparan sulfate (HS) glucosamine 3-O-sulfotransferase 3B1 (HS3ST3B1). KIR2DL4 was found to directly interact with HS/heparin, and the D0 domain of KIR2DL4 was essential for this interaction. Accordingly, exogenous HS/heparin can regulate cytokine production by KIR2DL4-expressing NK cells and HEK293T cells (HEK293T-2DL4), and induces differential localization of KIR2DL4 to rab5(+) and rab7(+) endosomes, thus leading to downregulation of cytokine production and degradation of the receptor. Furthermore, we showed that intimate interaction of syndecan-4 (SDC4) HS proteoglycan (HSPG) and KIR2DL4 directly affects receptor endocytosis and membrane trafficking. PMID:24127555

Brusilovsky, Michael; Cordoba, Moti; Rosental, Benyamin; Hershkovitz, Oren; Andrake, Mark D; Pecherskaya, Anna; Einarson, Margret B; Zhou, Yan; Braiman, Alex; Campbell, Kerry S; Porgador, Angel

2013-11-15

244

Genetic screening  

PubMed Central

Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide a primer for primary care professionals who are increasingly called upon to discuss the growing number of genetic screening services available and to help patients make informed decisions about whether to participate in genetic screening, how to interpret results, and which interventions are most appropriate. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE As part of a larger research program, a wide literature relating to genetic screening was reviewed. PubMed and Internet searches were conducted using broad search terms. Effort was also made to identify the gray literature. MAIN MESSAGE Genetic screening is a type of public health program that is systematically offered to a specified population of asymptomatic individuals with the aim of providing those identified as high risk with prevention, early treatment, or reproductive options. Ensuring an added benefit from screening, as compared with standard clinical care, and preventing unintended harms, such as undue anxiety or stigmatization, depends on the design and implementation of screening programs, including the recruitment methods, education and counseling provided, timing of screening, predictive value of tests, interventions available, and presence of oversight mechanisms and safeguards. There is therefore growing apprehension that economic interests might lead to a market-driven approach to introducing and expanding screening before program effectiveness, acceptability, and feasibility have been demonstrated. As with any medical intervention, there is a moral imperative for genetic screening to do more good than harm, not only from the perspective of individuals and families, but also for the target population and society as a whole. CONCLUSION Primary care professionals have an important role to play in helping their patients navigate the rapidly changing terrain of genetic screening services by informing them about the benefits and risks of new genetic and genomic technologies and empowering them to make more informed choices. PMID:20393090

Andermann, Anne; Blancquaert, Ingeborg

2010-01-01

245

Lethal effect and in vivo genotoxicity of profenofos to Chinese native amphibian (Rana spinosa) tadpoles.  

PubMed

Amphibian populations are decreasing in size due to environmental stressors in most areas of southern China. Pesticides are known to be a group of potential stressors to amphibians, especially in agricultural ecosystems. Profenofos, an organophosphate insecticide and acaricide, is widely used for controlling insect pests in China. The aim of this study is to evaluate the acute lethality and genotoxicity of profenofos to amphibian under controlled conditions. Results showed that profenofos was highly lethal to tadpoles of Rana spinosa, with 50% lethal concentration (LC(50)) values of 1.59, 1.14, 0.77, and 0.58 mg l(-1) at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h, respectively. DNA damage of erythrocytes was observed by alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis assay at all tested sublethal concentrations. The study also showed, by micronucleus test, that profenofos at moderate to high sublethal concentration might have genotoxicity to the tadpole after 96 h exposure. Furthermore, based on our results, it is suggested that the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis assay could be used as a screening tool for biomonitoring of pesticide contamination in aquatic systems or agricultural ecosystems. PMID:20333372

Li, Xianbin; Li, Shaonan; Liu, Shaoying; Zhu, Guonian

2010-10-01

246

Hyperactivated Wnt Signaling Induces Synthetic Lethal Interaction with Rb Inactivation by Elevating TORC1 Activities  

PubMed Central

Inactivation of the Rb tumor suppressor can lead to increased cell proliferation or cell death depending on specific cellular context. Therefore, identification of the interacting pathways that modulate the effect of Rb loss will provide novel insights into the roles of Rb in cancer development and promote new therapeutic strategies. Here, we identify a novel synthetic lethal interaction between Rb inactivation and deregulated Wg/Wnt signaling through unbiased genetic screens. We show that a weak allele of axin, which deregulates Wg signaling and increases cell proliferation without obvious effects on cell fate specification, significantly alters metabolic gene expression, causes hypersensitivity to metabolic stress induced by fasting, and induces synergistic apoptosis with mutation of fly Rb ortholog, rbf. Furthermore, hyperactivation of Wg signaling by other components of the Wg pathway also induces synergistic apoptosis with rbf. We show that hyperactivated Wg signaling significantly increases TORC1 activity and induces excessive energy stress with rbf mutation. Inhibition of TORC1 activity significantly suppressed synergistic cell death induced by hyperactivated Wg signaling and rbf inactivation, which is correlated with decreased energy stress and decreased induction of apoptotic regulator expression. Finally the synthetic lethality between Rb and deregulated Wnt signaling is conserved in mammalian cells and that inactivation of Rb and APC induces synergistic cell death through a similar mechanism. These results suggest that elevated TORC1 activity and metabolic stress underpin the evolutionarily conserved synthetic lethal interaction between hyperactivated Wnt signaling and inactivated Rb tumor suppressor. PMID:24809668

Hsu, Fu-Ning; Zhang, Robin; Searle, Jennifer S.; Pei, Xun; Li, Xuan; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Du, Wei

2014-01-01

247

Sepsis screening.  

PubMed

NHS Education for Scotland has, in collaboration with the Scottish Patient Safety Programme, made the national early warning score (NEWS) and sepsis screening tool available as a smartphone app. The app provides: a NEWS calculator to alert clinicians to deteriorating patients and acute illness; a sepsis screening tool for the prompt recognition and initiation of treatment of patients with sepsis; an outline of the Sepsis 6 care bundle; and an algorithm to help identify organ dysfunction, severe sepsis, septic shock and when to escalate care. Go to tinyurl.com/sepsis-screening to download the app. PMID:25355121

2014-10-30

248

Ants defend aphids against lethal disease.  

PubMed

Social insects defend their own colonies and some species also protect their mutualist partners. In mutualisms with aphids, ants typically feed on honeydew produced by aphids and, in turn guard and shelter aphid colonies from insect natural enemies. Here we report that Formica podzolica ants tending milkweed aphids, Aphis asclepiadis, protect aphid colonies from lethal fungal infections caused by an obligate aphid pathogen, Pandora neoaphidis. In field experiments, bodies of fungal-killed aphids were quickly removed from ant-tended aphid colonies. Ant workers were also able to detect infective conidia on the cuticle of living aphids and responded by either removing or grooming these aphids. Our results extend the long-standing view of ants as mutualists and protectors of aphids by demonstrating focused sanitizing and quarantining behaviour that may lead to reduced disease transmission in aphid colonies. PMID:19923138

Nielsen, Charlotte; Agrawal, Anurag A; Hajek, Ann E

2010-04-23

249

Electronic combat and lethal defense suppression  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Air forces across the world strive to protect their valuable resources from both the air and ground threats. Over the past few years, the surface-to-air missile threat has become more sophisticated and more deadly. It is far cheaper and less technical for a country to own and operate a ground missile system than to maintain a credible air force. It is for this reason that the attention to the ground threat has grown over the past few years. This paper discusses the approach the U.S. Air Force has taken in protecting its aircraft from these ground threats and how the mission of Lethal Defense Suppression has evolved into the complimentary tasks of Reactive Suppression and Pre-emptive Destruction.

Rose, Leo. J.

1995-01-01

250

MRSA Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... Was this page helpful? Formal name: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus Screening Related tests: Wound Culture At a Glance ... Why Get Tested? To determine your methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carrier status When to Get Tested? When ...

251

TORCH screen  

MedlinePLUS

... different infections in a newborn. TORCH stands for toxoplasmosis , rubella , cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, and HIV, but it ... used to screen infants for infections such as toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, syphilis and others. These infections ...

252

Vision Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... regular well care office visits. In addition, many day care programs, churches, schools and health departments offer vision ... addition to vision screening that is offered at day care, school or church. In some states a documented ...

253

Ripcorder Screen  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ripcorder Screen application allows users to create movies from their Macs' on-screen activities. The application will capture whatever is played on the display and transform it into a QuickTime movie. This can be most useful for users who would like to share information with colleagues or friends seeking to learn more about a particular computer operation or process. This version is compatible with all operating systems running Mac OS X 10.7 and newer.

2012-11-06

254

Non-Lethal Midline Granuloma of the Nose  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five cases of non-lethal midline granuloma of the nose are reported. Although the histopathological picture in all cases was identical, showing pleomorphic cellular infiltration, scattered areas of necrosis and vasculitis, the clinical picture and course of the disease were completely different from lethal midline granuloma. All the patients were in good general condition and had lived for quite long periods

A. M. Talaat; A. M. Bassiouny; M. K. Kutty

1982-01-01

255

The Influence of Geographic Mobility on Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a population-based, case-control study of nearly lethal suicide attempts with 153 cases and 513 controls. Results indicate that moving in the past year is positively associated with a nearly lethal suicide attempt, as are specific characteristics of the move. Findings confirm and extend prior research by demonstrating a relationship…

Potter, Lloyd B.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Powell, Kenneth E.; Simon, Thomas R.; Mercy, James A.; Lee, Roberta K.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Swann, Alan C.; Bayer, Timothy; O'Carroll, Patrick W.

2002-01-01

256

Increasing use of radical prostatectomy for non-lethal prostate cancer in Sweden  

PubMed Central

Purpose The number of patients in Sweden treated with radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer has increased exponentially. The extent to which this increase reflects treatment of non-lethal disease detected through PSA screening is unknown. Experimental design We undertook a nationwide study of all 18,837 prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy in Sweden from 1988 to 2008 with complete follow-up through 2009. We compared cumulative incidence curves, fit Cox regression and cure models and performed a simulation study to determine changes in treatment of non-lethal cancer, in cancer-specific survival over time, and effect of lead-time due to PSA screening. Results The annual number of radical prostatectomies increased 25-fold during the study period. The five-year cancer-specific mortality decreased from 3.9% (95% CI 2.5 to 5.3) among patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1992 to 0.7% (95% CI 0.4–1.1) among those diagnosed between 1998 and 2002 (p for trend < 0.001). According to the cure model, the risk of not being cured declined by 13% (95% CI 12–14%) with each calendar year. The simulation study indicated that only about half of the improvement in disease-specific survival could be accounted for by lead-time. Conclusion Patients overdiagnosed with non-lethal prostate cancer appear to account for a substantial and growing part of the dramatic increase in radical prostatectomies in Sweden but increasing survival rates are likely also due to true reductions in the risk of disease-specific death over time. Because the magnitude of harm and costs due to overtreatment can be considerable, identification of men who likely benefit from radical prostatectomy is urgently needed. PMID:22927485

Etzioni, Ruth; Mucci, Lorelei; Chen, Shu; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Fall, Katja; Adami, Hans-Olov

2013-01-01

257

Lethal and sublethal toxicity of didecyldimethylammonium chloride in early life stages of white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to describe the acute lethality and latent toxicity of didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) on early life stages of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Fish responses to 0, 10, 50, 100, 250, 500 microg/L concentrations of DDAC were determined using a 96-h standard static renewal method for acute toxicity testing, with three replicates per concentration. Twenty fish per replicate were tested for 3, 11, and 42-d-old larvae, and 7 fish per replicate were tested for 78-d-old juveniles. Following exposure, survival and growth were evaluated in exposed fish raised in clean water for 2 weeks. The 96-h median lethal concentration (LC50) values for DDAC were 10.0 to 50.0, 58.5, and 99.7 microg/L for 3, 11, and 42-d-old larvae and 100 to 250 microg/L for 78-d-old juveniles. Significant decreases in larval growth and survival were noted at all tested concentrations and in all sturgeon age groups. Results of this study reveal age- and concentration-dependent responses to DDAC. Among the age groups tested, the 3-d-old larvae were the most sensitive group. Results also revealed that 96-h lethality testing alone is not adequate for determining the toxicity of DDAC to white sturgeon. PMID:12959544

Teh, Swee Joo; Wong, Cecilia; Furtula, Vesna; Teh, Foo-Ching

2003-09-01

258

Chronic Exposure of Corals to Fine Sediments: Lethal and Sub-Lethal Impacts  

PubMed Central

Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l?1 TSS (25 mg cm?2 day?1) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l?1 TSS (83 mg cm?2 day?1) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue. PMID:22662225

Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Smith, Luke D.; Cooper, Timothy F.; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P.

2012-01-01

259

Functional screen analysis reveals miR-26b and miR-128 as central regulators of pituitary somatomammotrophic tumor growth through activation of the PTEN-AKT pathway.  

PubMed

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been involved in the pathogenesis of different types of cancer; however, their function in pituitary tumorigenesis remains poorly understood. Cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase-defective pituitaries occasionally form aggressive growth-hormone (GH)-producing pituitary tumors in the background of hyperplasia caused by haploinsufficiency of the protein kinase's main regulatory subunit, PRKAR1A. The molecular basis for this development remains unknown. We have identified a 17-miRNA signature of pituitary tumors formed in the background of hyperplasia (caused in half of the cases by PRKAR1A-mutations). We selected two miRNAs on the basis of their functional screen analysis: inhibition of miR-26b expression and upregulation of miR-128 suppressed the colony formation ability and invasiveness of pituitary tumor cells. Furthermore, we identified that miR-26b and miR-128 affected pituitary tumor cell behavior through regulation of their direct targets, PTEN and BMI1, respectively. In addition, we found that miR-128 through BMI1 direct binding on the PTEN promoter affected PTEN expression levels and AKT activity in the pituitary tumor cells. Our in vivo data revealed that inhibition of miR-26b and overexpression of miR-128 could suppress pituitary GH3 tumor growth in xenografts. Taken together, we have identified a miRNA signature for GH-producing pituitary tumors and found that miR-26b and miR-128 regulate the activity of the PTEN-AKT pathway in these tumors. This is the first suggestion of the possible involvement of miRNAs regulating the PTEN-AKT pathway in GH-producing pituitary tumor formation in the context of hyperplasia or due to germline PRKAR1A defects. MiR-26b suppression and miR-128 upregulation could have therapeutic potential in GH-producing pituitary tumor patients. PMID:22614013

Palumbo, T; Faucz, F R; Azevedo, M; Xekouki, P; Iliopoulos, D; Stratakis, C A

2013-03-28

260

Sub-lethal effects of Roundup™ on tadpole anti-predator responses.  

PubMed

Roundup™ is a commonly used pesticide applied to agriculture and forest habitats. These areas are generally ideal for amphibians due to the presence of small, ephemeral water bodies. While Roundup™ has been shown to have lethal effects on many species of amphibians, effects on behaviour and sensory perception have yet to be considered. Here, we exposed wood frog tadpoles to a sub-lethal concentration of Roundup™ and showed that the ability of tadpoles to respond to injured conspecific cues, an important source of information regarding local predation risk, was impaired. Subsequent experiments revealed that impaired responses likely result from a chemical reaction between the Roundup™ and the cues and that tadpoles chronically exposed to Roundup™ had reduced basal movement rates compared with unexposed tadpoles. Our data demonstrate that environmentally-relevant concentrations of Roundup™ can drastically alter movement and anti-predator responses of tadpoles, with potential negative consequences for the population. PMID:25450945

Moore, Harrison; Chivers, Douglas P; Ferrari, Maud C O

2015-01-01

261

A Targetable GATA2-IGF2 Axis Confers Aggressiveness in Lethal Prostate Cancer.  

PubMed

Elucidating the determinants of aggressiveness in lethal prostate cancer may stimulate therapeutic strategies that improve clinical outcomes. We used experimental models and clinical databases to identify GATA2 as a regulator of chemotherapy resistance and tumorigenicity in this context. Mechanistically, direct upregulation of the growth hormone IGF2 emerged as a mediator of the aggressive properties regulated by GATA2. IGF2 in turn activated IGF1R and INSR as well as a downstream polykinase program. The characterization of this axis prompted a combination strategy whereby dual IGF1R/INSR inhibition restored the efficacy of chemotherapy and improved survival in preclinical models. These studies reveal a GATA2-IGF2 aggressiveness axis in lethal prostate cancer and identify a therapeutic opportunity in this challenging disease. PMID:25670080

Vidal, Samuel J; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Quinn, S Aidan; Rodriguez-Barrueco, Ruth; Lujambio, Amaia; Williams, Estrelania; Sun, Xiaochen; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Lee, Albert; Readhead, Ben; Chen, Xintong; Galsky, Matthew; Esteve, Berta; Petrylak, Daniel P; Dudley, Joel T; Rabadan, Raul; Silva, Jose M; Hoshida, Yujin; Lowe, Scott W; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

2015-02-01

262

Lethal altruists: itineraries along the dark outskirts of moralistic prosociality.  

PubMed

Suicide bombers are the most spectacular example of an impregnable morality toward one's own group that co-exists alongside a radical amorality toward members of another group. Suicide bombers carry out massacres with the utter conviction that they are acting in accordance with values associated with the greatest good. Suicidal attacks are conceived as a form of lethal altruism, a damaging drift from human cooperative tendencies and one that requires a detailed understanding. Strong altruism is a main component of a cluster of temperamental traits that may distinguish individuals with propensities to put themselves at the threshold of major progroupal sacrifices. Among all populations there will be pockets of extreme moralizing altruists willing to make high investments in others, investments involving great personal risk. A research framework is outlined to study other constitutionally based traits (dominance, boldness, aggressiveness, machiavellianism, narcissism, messianism, credulity/religiosity) that may also contribute to the different roles played by self-recruited members in combative cells that in turn are crucial for the ties they establish and the tactics employed. Individually oriented research may reveal profiles distinguishing between potential inducers and performers of martyrdom. As a rule, machiavellistic leaders do not usually squander their personal choices on group commitments; on the contrary, their gift for simulating altruism is used for individual gains. Potential martyrs, on the other hand, are by definition squanderers. Evidence accrued in recent years in fields going from behavioral economics to cognitive neuroimaging makes such an endeavor feasible. PMID:19580547

Tobeña, Adolf

2009-06-01

263

Phytochemical screening and anticonvulsant studies of ethyl acetate fraction of Globimetula braunii on laboratory animals  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the phytochemical properties and the anticonvulsant potential of the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of ethanol leaf extract of Globimetula braunii, a plant used in ethnomedicine for the treatment of epilepsy. Methods The phytochemical screening was carried out using standard protocol while the anticonvulsant activity was studied using maximal electroshock test in chicks, pentylenetetrazole and 4-aminopyridine-induced seizures in mice. Results The preliminary phytochemical screening carried out on the crude ethanol extract revealed the presence of saponins, carbohydrates, flavonoids, tannins, anthraquinones and steroids. Similarly, tannins, flavonoids and steroids/terpenes were found to be present in the ethyl acetate fraction. In the pharmacological screening, 150 mg/kg of the fraction protected 83.33% of animals against pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure in mice whereas sodium valproate a standard anti-epileptic drug offered 100% protection. In the 4-aminopyridine-induced seizure model, the fraction produced a significant (P<0.05) increase in the mean onset of seizure in unprotected animals. The fraction did not exhibit a significant activity against maximal electroshock convulsion. The median lethal dose of the fraction was found to be 1?261.91 mg/kg. Conclusions These results suggest that the ethyl acetate fraction of Globimetula braunii leaves extract possesses psychoactive compound that may be useful in the management of petit mal epilepsy and lend credence to the ethnomedical use of the plant in the management of epilepsy. PMID:25182552

Aliyu, Musa Mumammad; Musa, Abdullahi Isma'il; Kamal, Muhammad Ja'afar; Mohammed, Magaji Garba

2014-01-01

264

An Evolutionarily Conserved Synthetic Lethal Interaction Network Identifies FEN1 as a Broad-Spectrum Target for Anticancer Therapeutic Development  

PubMed Central

Harnessing genetic differences between cancerous and noncancerous cells offers a strategy for the development of new therapies. Extrapolating from yeast genetic interaction data, we used cultured human cells and siRNA to construct and evaluate a synthetic lethal interaction network comprised of chromosome instability (CIN) genes that are frequently mutated in colorectal cancer. A small number of genes in this network were found to have synthetic lethal interactions with a large number of cancer CIN genes; these genes are thus attractive targets for anticancer therapeutic development. The protein product of one highly connected gene, the flap endonuclease FEN1, was used as a target for small-molecule inhibitor screening using a newly developed fluorescence-based assay for enzyme activity. Thirteen initial hits identified through in vitro biochemical screening were tested in cells, and it was found that two compounds could selectively inhibit the proliferation of cultured cancer cells carrying inactivating mutations in CDC4, a gene frequently mutated in a variety of cancers. Inhibition of flap endonuclease activity was also found to recapitulate a genetic interaction between FEN1 and MRE11A, another gene frequently mutated in colorectal cancers, and to lead to increased endogenous DNA damage. These chemical-genetic interactions in mammalian cells validate evolutionarily conserved synthetic lethal interactions and demonstrate that a cross-species candidate gene approach is successful in identifying small-molecule inhibitors that prove effective in a cell-based cancer model. PMID:23382697

van Pel, Derek M.; Barrett, Irene J.; Shimizu, Yoko; Sajesh, Babu V.; Guppy, Brent J.; Pfeifer, Tom; McManus, Kirk J.; Hieter, Philip

2013-01-01

265

Lethal body burdens of polar narcotics: Chlorophenols  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the present study was to measure in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) the lethal body burden (LBB) of three chlorophenols that are known as polar narcotic chemicals. The LBBs of the chlorophenols were compared to LBBs of nonpolar narcotic chemicals to consider if the two classes of narcotic chemicals differ on a body burden level. The LBB of the most acidic chlorophenol was measured at two different levels of pH exposure to determine the influence of the degree of ionization on the magnitude of the LBB. Both n-octanol/water partition coefficients and n-hexane/water partition coefficients of the chlorophenols were determined at different pH levels to consider the influence of ionization on the partition coefficient and to determine the importance of a polar group in the organic phase on the partitioning behavior. Partitioning to n-octanol and n-hexane was used as input in a model to simulate the equilibrium partitioning between hydrophobic and nonhydrophobic and target and nontarget compartments in the fish.

Wezel, A.P. van; Punte, S.S. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Environmental Chemistry Group; Opperhuizen, A. [Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management, The Hague (Netherlands). National Institute for Coastal and Marine Management

1995-09-01

266

Hearing Screening  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hearing levels are threatened by modern life--headsets for music, rock concerts, traffic noises, etc. It is crucial we know our hearing levels so that we can draw attention to potential problems. This exercise requires that students receive a hearing screening for their benefit as well as for making the connection of hearing to listening.

Johnson-Curiskis, Nanette

2012-01-01

267

Laptop Screens  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Physics 2000 page, from the University of Colorado, offers an introductory explanation of how the flat screens used in laptop computers work. The discussion included a discussion of polarization, twisted cells, the used of electrical field to control twisted cells, liquid crystal displays, and how we view colors.

Goldman, Martin

2011-01-03

268

Thrombophilia Screening.  

PubMed

Although controversial, screening for thrombophilia has become common. Testing for antiphospholipid antibodies is indicated in order to guide treatment decisions if there is clinical suspicion for antiphospholipid syndrome. The utility of identifying other thrombophilias in symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) is questionable, as the risk of recurrence does not appear to be increased by an appreciable degree with the most common disorders (heterozygosity for factor V Leiden or prothrombin mutation). Although recurrence appears to be increased in those with homozygous or multiple abnormalities and potentially deficiencies in natural anticoagulants, screening to detect these conditions is difficult to justify based on their rarity. The American College of Chest Physicians' current guidelines note the increased risk of recurrence with idiopathic, proximal events regardless of thrombophilia status. They suggest duration of anticoagulation therapy be based on location and provoking factors rather than whether or not the individual has a thrombophilia. Because routine prophylaxis in asymptomatic individuals with thrombophilia is not recommended, screening of asymptomatic family members is difficult to justify. Screening prior to prescribing combination oral contraceptives is not cost effective, may result in unwanted pregnancies, and may have little effect on the overall rate of VTE. PMID:24739279

Hornsby, Lori B; Armstrong, Emily M; Bellone, Jessica M; Treadway, Sarah; Phillippe, Haley M

2014-04-16

269

Late-acting dominant lethal genetic systems and mosquito control  

PubMed Central

Background Reduction or elimination of vector populations will tend to reduce or eliminate transmission of vector-borne diseases. One potential method for environmentally-friendly, species-specific population control is the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). SIT has not been widely used against insect disease vectors such as mosquitoes, in part because of various practical difficulties in rearing, sterilization and distribution. Additionally, vector populations with strong density-dependent effects will tend to be resistant to SIT-based control as the population-reducing effect of induced sterility will tend to be offset by reduced density-dependent mortality. Results We investigated by mathematical modeling the effect of manipulating the stage of development at which death occurs (lethal phase) in an SIT program against a density-dependence-limited insect population. We found late-acting lethality to be considerably more effective than early-acting lethality. No such strains of a vector insect have been described, so as a proof-of-principle we constructed a strain of the principal vector of the dengue and yellow fever viruses, Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti, with the necessary properties of dominant, repressible, highly penetrant, late-acting lethality. Conclusion Conventional SIT induces early-acting (embryonic) lethality, but genetic methods potentially allow the lethal phase to be tailored to the program. For insects with strong density-dependence, we show that lethality after the density-dependent phase would be a considerable improvement over conventional methods. For density-dependent parameters estimated from field data for Aedes aegypti, the critical release ratio for population elimination is modeled to be 27% to 540% greater for early-acting rather than late-acting lethality. Our success in developing a mosquito strain with the key features that the modeling indicated were desirable demonstrates the feasibility of this approach for improved SIT for disease control. PMID:17374148

Phuc, Hoang Kim; Andreasen, Morten H; Burton, Rosemary S; Vass, Céline; Epton, Matthew J; Pape, Gavin; Fu, Guoliang; Condon, Kirsty C; Scaife, Sarah; Donnelly, Christl A; Coleman, Paul G; White-Cooper, Helen; Alphey, Luke

2007-01-01

270

Mechanism by Which Caffeine Potentiates Lethality of Nitrogen Mustard  

Microsoft Academic Search

Caffeine is synergistic with many DNA-damaging agents in increasing lethality to mammalian cells. The mechanism is not well understood. Our results show that caffeine potentiates the lethality of the nitrogen mustard 2-chloro-N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-methylethanamine (HN2) by inducing damaged cells to undergo mitosis before properly repairing lesions in their DNA. Treatment with low doses of HN2 (0.5 mu M for 1 hr) caused

Ching C. Lau; Arthur B. Pardee

1982-01-01

271

GPS targeting methods for non-lethal systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Non-lethal systems consist of devices and methods which can be used to incapacitate an adversary's capability, while minimizing casualties and collateral property or environmental damages. Examples of military non-lethal concepts include wire mesh entanglements to snag tank treads, highly expansive sticky foams to immobilize personnel and material, anti-material agents to degrade supplies, and information warfare tactics such as the use

Gerald Frost; Calvin Shipbaugh

1994-01-01

272

First Trimester Ultrasound Diagnosis of Lethal Multiple Pterygium Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Diagnosis of lethal multiple pterygium syndrome in the first trimester of pregnancy. Methods: A 38-year-old woman attended our ultrasound (US) clinic at 11.2 weeks gestation. She has had two previous stillbirths affected by lethal multiple pterygium syndrome. Transabdominal and transvaginal US were performed and identified a recurrence. Autopsy findings are compared to the fetal US findings. Results: Fetal US

Munire Gundogan; Katherine Fong; Sarah Keating; Jacqueline Pierre-Louis; David Chitayat

2006-01-01

273

Prenatal diagnosis of lethal fetal malformation in Irish obstetric practice.  

PubMed

The diagnosis of lethal fetal malformation prenatally has profound implications for the pregnancy, the expectant couple and the medical care provided. The aim of this study was to investigate these implications and the medical factors pertaining to prenatal diagnosis of lethal fetal abnormality in current obstetric practice in Ireland. Data was collected prospectively from all cases of lethal fetal malformation diagnosed at the Fetal Medicine Unit, University College Hospital Galway from December 1997 to June 1998 inclusive. Diagnosis was made on the basis of ultrasound findings and invasive procedures (amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling). Thirteen cases of lethal fetal abnormality were diagnosed: Edward's syndrome, Patau's syndrome, bilateral multicystic renal dysplasia, Potters sequence, hypoplastic left heart, anencephaly with craniorrhachischisis, lethal osteogenesis imperfecta and non-immune hydrops. Intrauterine death occurred in four cases. Four women had preterm complications e.g. preterm premature rupture of membranes, preterm labour, placental abruption, coagulopathy and severe pre-eclampsia. Three pregnancies progressed to term, two of which had a vaginal delivery and one had an elective caesarean section for malpresentation, all of which were early neonatal deaths. Three women chose to travel abroad in order to obtain a termination of pregnancy. Obstetric and neonatal dilemmas in management of lethal fetal malformation are discussed. PMID:10360111

Byrne, B M; Morrison, J J

1999-03-01

274

Vision Screening  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Visi Screen OSS-C, marketed by Vision Research Corporation, incorporates image processing technology originally developed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Its advantage in eye screening is speed. Because it requires no response from a subject, it can be used to detect eye problems in very young children. An electronic flash from a 35 millimeter camera sends light into a child's eyes, which is reflected back to the camera lens. The photorefractor then analyzes the retinal reflexes generated and produces an image of the child's eyes, which enables a trained observer to identify any defects. The device is used by pediatricians, day care centers and civic organizations that concentrate on children with special needs.

1993-01-01

275

High-resolution melting analysis of the common c.1905+1G>A mutation causing dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency and lethal 5-fluorouracil toxicity  

PubMed Central

Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency is a pharmacogenetic syndrome associated with life-threatening toxicity following exposure to the fluoropyrimidine drugs 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and capecitabine (CAP), widely used for the treatment of colorectal cancer and other solid tumors. The most prominent loss-of-function allele of the DPYD gene is the splice-site mutation c.1905+1G>A. In this study we report the case of a 73-year old woman with metastatic colorectal cancer who died from drug-induced toxicity after the first cycle of 5-FU-containing chemotherapy. Her symptoms included severe neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, mucositis and diarrhea; she died 16 days later despite intensive care measures. Post-mortem genetic analysis revealed that the patient was homozygous for the c.1905+1G>A deleterious allele and several family members consented to being screened for this mutation. This is the first report in Spain of a case of 5-FU-induced lethal toxicity associated with a genetic defect that results in the complete loss of the DPD enzyme. Although the frequency of c.1905+1G>A carriers in the white population ranges between 1 and 2%, the few data available for the Spanish population and the severity of this case prompted us to design a genotyping procedure to prevent future toxic effects of 5-FU/CAP. Since our group had previously developed a high-resolution melting (HRM) assay for the simultaneous detection of KRAS, BRAF, and/or EGFR somatic mutations in colorectal and lung cancer patients considered for EGFR-targeted therapies, we included the DPYD c.1905+1G>A mutation in the screening test that we describe herein. HRM provides a rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive method that can be easily implemented in diagnostic settings for the routine pre-therapeutic testing of a gene mutation panel with implications in the pharmacologic treatment. PMID:23335937

Borràs, Emma; Dotor, Emma; Arcusa, Àngels; Gamundi, Maria J.; Hernan, Imma; de Sousa Dias, Miguel; Mañé, Begoña; Agúndez, José A. G.; Blanca, Miguel; Carballo, Miguel

2013-01-01

276

Screening for skin cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Context: Malignant melanoma is often lethal, and its incidence in the United States has increased rapidly over the past 2 decades. Nonmelanoma skin cancer is seldom lethal, but, if advanced, can cause severe disfigurement and morbidity. Early detection and treatment of melanoma might reduce mortality, while early detection and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer might prevent major disfigurement and to

Mark Helfand; Susan M Mahon; Karen B Eden; Paul S Frame; C. Tracy Orleans

2001-01-01

277

Are High-Lethality Suicide Attempters With Bipolar Disorder a Distinct Phenotype?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because Bipolar Disorder (BD) individuals making highly lethal suicide attempts have greater injury burden and risk for suicide, early identification is critical. BD patients were classified as high- or low-lethality attempters. High-lethality attempts required inpatient medical treatment. Mixed effects logistic regression models and permutation analyses examined correlations between lethality, number, and order of attempts. High-lethality attempters reported greater suicidal intent

Maria A. Oquendo; Juan Jose Carballo; Namita Rajouria; Dianne Currier; Adrienne Tin; Jessica Merville; Hanga C. Galfalvy; Leo Sher; Michael F. Grunebaum; Ainsley K. Burke; J. John Mann

2009-01-01

278

Bacterial community composition of three candidate insect vectors of palm phytoplasma (Texas phoenix palm decline and lethal yellowing).  

PubMed

Texas Phoenix Palm Decline (TPPD) and Lethal Yellowing are two phytoplasma-linked diseases in palms. The phytoplasma causing TPPD is thought to be transmitted by three putative planthopper vectors, Ormenaria rufifascia, Omolicna joi, and Haplaxius crudus. These insects have been morphologically and molecularly described, and have screened positive for Candidatus Phytoplasma palmae. Individuals from each species were subjected to 16S bacterial community sequencing using the Roche 454 platform, providing new information regarding the previously unexplored bacterial communities present in putative vectors. PMID:25298076

Powell, Christopher M; Hail, Daymon; Potocnjak, Julia; Hanson, J Delton; Halbert, Susan H; Bextine, Blake R

2015-02-01

279

Cell Death Processes during Expression of Hybrid Lethality in Interspecific F1 Hybrid between Nicotiana gossei Domin and Nicotiana tabacum  

PubMed Central

Hybrid lethality, a type of reproductive isolation, is a genetically controlled event appearing at the seedling stage in interspecific hybrids. We characterized the lethality of F1 hybrid seedlings from Nicotiana gossei Domin and Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright-Yellow 4 using a number of traits including growth rate, microscopic features of tissues and cells, ion leakage, DNA degradation, reactive oxygen intermediates including superoxide radical (O2?) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and expression of stress response marker genes. Lethal symptoms appeared at 4 d after germination in the basal hypocotyl and extended toward both the hypocotyl and root of the plants grown at 26°C. Microscopic analysis revealed a prompt lysis of cell components during cell death. Membrane disruption and DNA degradation were found in the advanced stage of the lethality. The death of mesophyll cells in the cotyledon was initiated by the vascular bundle, suggesting that a putative factor inducing cell death diffused into surrounding cells from the vascular tissue. In contrast, these symptoms were not observed in the plants grown at 37°C. Seedlings grown at 26°C generated larger amounts of reactive oxygen intermediate in the hypocotyl than those grown at 37°C. A number of stress response marker genes were expressed at 26°C but not at 37°C. We proposed that a putative death factor moving systemically through the vascular system induced a prompt and successive lysis of the cytoplasm of cells and that massive cell death eventually led to the loss of the hybrid plant. PMID:12481061

Mino, Masanobu; Maekawa, Kenji; Ogawa, Ken'ichi; Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi

2002-01-01

280

Large Scale RNAi Screen Reveals That the Inhibitor of DNA Binding 2 (ID2) Protein Is Repressed by p53 Family Member p63 and Functions in Human Keratinocyte Differentiation*  

PubMed Central

The inhibitor of DNA binding 2, dominant negative helix-loop-helix protein, ID2, acts as an oncogene and elevated levels of ID2 have been reported in several malignancies. Whereas some inducers of the ID2 gene have been characterized, little is known regarding the proteins capable to repress its expression. We developed siRNA microarrays to perform a large scale loss-of-function screen in human adult keratinocytes engineered to express GFP under the control of the upstream region of ID2 gene. We screened the effect of siRNA-dependent inhibition of 220 cancer-associated genes on the expression of the ID2::GFP reporter construct. Three genes NBN, RAD21, and p63 lead to a repression of ID2 promoter activity. Strikingly NBN and RAD21 are playing on major role in cell cycle progression and mitosis arrest. These results underline the pregnant need to silence ID2 expression at transcript level to promote cell cycle exit. Central to this inhibitory mechanism we find p63, a key transcription factor in epithelial development and differentiation, which binds specific cis-acting sequence within the ID2 gene promoter both in vitro and in vivo. P63 would not suppress ID2 expression, but would rather prevent excessive expression of that protein to enable the onset of keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:21478550

Wu, Ning; Castel, David; Debily, Marie-Anne; Vigano, Maria Alessandra; Alibert, Olivier; Mantovani, Roberto; Iljin, Kristina; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Gidrol, Xavier

2011-01-01

281

Lethal shock in partially hepatectomized rats administered tumor necrosis serum.  

PubMed

A minute dose of bacterial endotoxin is known to cause lethal shock in BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guérin)-sensitized mice and rats. To gain insight into the mechanism of this hypersensitivity to endotoxin, serum (tumor necrosis serum: TNS) was prepared from BCG-sensitized Lewis rats following endotoxin challenge and injected intravenously into Lewis rats 2 days after their partial hepatectomy. TNS injection caused lethal shock in Hpx (partially hepatectomized) rats but not in normally fed, fasted, or sham-operated rats. Hpx rats survived injection of serum prepared by either BCG sensitization or endotoxin challenge alone. Biochemical and histological examination of the Hpx rats injected with TNS indicated that profound hypoglycemia, hepatic and renal injury, and dysfunction of the coagulation system accompanied by hemorrhage were involved in the lethal shock. These experiments also suggested that serum component(s), probably monokine(s) derived from activated macrophages, might participate in the endotoxin shock in BCG-sensitized rats. PMID:3056630

Fukushima, H; Ikeuchi, J; Tohkin, M; Matsubara, T; Harada, M

1988-09-01

282

Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects  

PubMed Central

We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light. PMID:25488603

Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

2014-01-01

283

Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects.  

PubMed

We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light. PMID:25488603

Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

2014-01-01

284

Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

2014-12-01

285

Identification of Novel Host-Targeted Compounds That Protect From Anthrax Lethal Toxin-Induced Cell Death  

PubMed Central

Studying how pathogens subvert the host to cause disease has contributed to the understanding of fundamental cell biology. Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, produces the virulence factor lethal toxin to disarm host immunity and cause pathology. We conducted a phenotypic small molecule screen to identify inhibitors of lethal toxin-induced macrophage cell death and used an ordered series of secondary assays to characterize the hits and determine their effects on cellular function. We identified a structurally diverse set of small molecules that act at various points along the lethal toxin pathway, including inhibitors of endocytosis; natural product inhibitors of organelle acidification (e.g. the botulinum neurotoxin inhibitor, toosendanin); and a novel proteasome inhibitor, 4MNB (4-methoxy-2-[2-(5-methoxy-2-nitrosophenyl)ethyl]-1-nitrosobenzene). Many of the compounds, including three drugs approved for use in humans, also protected against the related Clostridium difficile toxin TcdB, further demonstrating their value as novel tools for perturbation and study of toxin biology and host cellular processes, and highlighting potential new strategies for intervening on toxin-mediated diseases. PMID:23343607

Slater, Louise H.; Hett, Erik C.; Mark, Kevin; Chumbler, Nicole M.; Patel, Deepa; Lacy, D. Borden; Collier, R. John; Hung, Deborah T.

2013-01-01

286

Phytochemical screening and toxicity studies on the methanol extract of the seeds of moringa oleifera.  

PubMed

The seeds of Moringa oleifera were collected, air-dried, pulverized, and subjected to cold extraction with methanol. The methanol extract was screened phytochemically for its chemical components and used for acute and sub-acute toxicity studies in rats. The phytochemical screening revealed the presence of saponins, tannins, terpenes, alkaloids, flavonoids, carbohydrates, and cardiac glycosides but the absence of anthraquinones. Although signs of acute toxicity were observed at a dose of 4,000 mg kg-1 in the acute toxicity test, and mortality was recorded at 5,000 mg kg-1, no adverse effect was observed at concentrations lower than 3,000 mg kg-1. The median lethal dose of the extract in rat was 3,873 mg kg-1. Sub-acute administration of the seed extract caused significant (p<0.05) increase in the levels of alanine and aspartate transferases (ALT and AST), and significant (p<0.05) decrease in weight of experimental rats, at 1,600 mg kg-1. The study concludes that the extract of seeds of M. oleifera is safe both for medicinal and nutritional uses. PMID:23652639

Ajibade, Temitayo Olabisi; Arowolo, Ruben; Olayemi, Funsho Olakitike

2013-01-01

287

Lethal toxicity of cadmium to Cyprinus carpio and Tilapia aurea  

SciTech Connect

There have been several studies of the lethal toxicity of cadmium to freshwater fishes, but further information is required on a number of points. For example, the shallow slope which is characteristic of the cadmium toxicity curve makes interspecific comparisons difficult. There also is a paucity of information on cadmium toxicity to non-Salmonid European species. As part of a study of the water quality requirements of cultured fish species in the Mediterranean, the authors report on the lethal toxicity of cadmium to two such species, the common carp Cyprinus carpio, and Tilapia aurea, for which little information has previously been reported.

Not Available

1986-09-01

288

TOPS: a versatile software tool for statistical analysis and visualization of combinatorial gene-gene and gene-drug interaction screens  

PubMed Central

Background Measuring the impact of combinations of genetic or chemical perturbations on cellular fitness, sometimes referred to as synthetic lethal screening, is a powerful method for obtaining novel insights into gene function and drug action. Especially when performed at large scales, gene-gene or gene-drug interaction screens can reveal complex genetic interactions or drug mechanism of action or even identify novel therapeutics for the treatment of diseases. The result of such large-scale screen results can be represented as a matrix with a numeric score indicating the cellular fitness (e.g. viability or doubling time) for each double perturbation. In a typical screen, the majority of combinations do not impact the cellular fitness. Thus, it is critical to first discern true "hits" from noise. Subsequent data exploration and visualization methods can assist to extract meaningful biological information from the data. However, despite the increasing interest in combination perturbation screens, no user friendly open-source program exists that combines statistical analysis, data exploration tools and visualization. Results We developed TOPS (Tool for Combination Perturbation Screen Analysis), a Java and R-based software tool with a simple graphical user interface that allows the user to import, analyze, filter and plot data from double perturbation screens as well as other compatible data. TOPS was designed in a modular fashion to allow the user to add alternative importers for data formats or custom analysis scripts not covered by the original release. We demonstrate the utility of TOPS on two datasets derived from functional genetic screens using different methods. Dataset 1 is a gene-drug interaction screen and is based on Luminex xMAP technology. Dataset 2 is a gene-gene short hairpin (sh)RNAi screen exploring the interactions between deubiquitinating enzymes and a number of prominent oncogenes using massive parallel sequencing (MPS). Conclusions TOPS provides the benchtop scientist with a free toolset to analyze, filter and visualize data from functional genomic gene-gene and gene-drug interaction screens with a flexible interface to accommodate different technologies and analysis algorithms in addition to those already provided here. TOPS is freely available for academic and non-academic users and is released as open source. PMID:24712852

2014-01-01

289

Podophyllum hexandrum-Mediated Survival Protection and Restoration of Other Cellular Injuries in Lethally Irradiated Mice.  

PubMed

This study aims at the development of a safe and effective formulation to counter the effects of lethal irradiation. The sub-fraction (G-001M), prepared from Podophyllum hexandrum has rendered high degree of survival (>90%) at a dose of 6?mg?kg(-1) body weight (intramuscular) in lethally irradiated mice. Therapeutic dose of G-001M, at about 20 times lower concentration than its LD(100), has revealed a DRF of 1.62. Comet assay studies in peripheral blood leukocytes have reflected that, treatment of G-001M before irradiation has significantly reduced DNA tail length (P < .001) and DNA damage score (P < .001), as compared to radiation-only group. Spleen cell counts in irradiated animals had declined drastically at the very first day of exposure, and the fall continued till the 5th day (P < .001). In the treated irradiated groups, there was a steep reduction in the counts initially, but this phase did not prolong. More than 60% decline in thymocytes of irradiated group animals was registered at 5?h of irradiation when compared with controls, and the fall progressed further downwards with the similar pace till 5th day of exposure (P < .001). At later intervals, thymus was found fully regressed. In G-001M pre-treated irradiated groups also, thymocytes decreased till the 5th day but thereafter rejuvenated and within 30 days of treatment the values were close to normal. Current studies have explicitly indicated that, G-001M in very small doses has not only rendered high survivability in lethally irradiated mice, but also protected their cellular DNA, besides supporting fast replenishment of the immune system. PMID:19553386

Sankhwar, Sanghmitra; Gupta, Manju Lata; Gupta, Vanita; Verma, Savita; Suri, Krishna Avtar; Devi, Memita; Sharma, Punita; Khan, Ehsan Ahmed; Alam, M Sarwar

2011-01-01

290

Exosomes from Plasmodium yoelii-infected reticulocytes protect mice from lethal infections.  

PubMed

Exosomes are 30-100-nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin that are released after the fusion of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) with the plasma membrane. While initial studies suggested that the role of exosomes was limited to the removal of proteins during the maturation of reticulocytes to erythrocytes, recent studies indicate that they are produced by different types of cells and are involved in promoting inter-cellular communication and antigen presentation. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of exosomes from peripheral blood of BALB/c mice infected with the reticulocyte-prone non-lethal Plasmodium yoelii 17X strain. Importantly, proteomic analysis revealed the presence of parasite proteins in these vesicles. Moreover, immunization of mice with purified exosomes elicited IgG antibodies capable of recognizing P. yoelii-infected red blood cells. Furthermore, lethal challenge of immunized mice with the normocyte-prone lethal P. yoelii 17XL strain caused a significant attenuation in the course of parasitaemia, increased survival time, and altered the cell tropism to reticulocytes. These results were obtained also when the exosomes were isolated from a P. yoelii-infected reticulocyte culture indicating that reticulocyte-derived exosomes carry antigens and are involved in immune modulation. Moreover, inclusion of CpG ODN 1826 in exosome immunizations elicited IgG2a and IgG2b antibodies and promoted survival, clearance of parasites and subsequent sterile protection of 83% of the animals challenged with P. yoelli 17XL. To our knowledge, this is the first report of immune responses elicited by exosomes derived from reticulocytes opening new avenues for the modulation of anti-malaria responses. PMID:22046311

Martin-Jaular, Lorena; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Ferrer, Mireia; Almeida, Igor C; Del Portillo, Hernando A

2011-01-01

291

Dominant lethal mutations in Tilapia mossambica (Peters) elicited by myleran.  

PubMed

Tilapia mossambica (Peters) Teleostei, Cichlidae, is of commercial importance being farmed for human consumption. An effective means of sterilization would be of value since prolific breeding under farming conditions reduces growth rate. The possibility of using the antileukaemic drug myleran as a chemosterilant has been investigated previously, however the present study indicated that it can induce dominant lethal mutations in this species. PMID:7219436

Wardhaugh, A A

1981-02-01

292

[Lethal uropathies: prenatal diagnosis and feto-pathologic aspects].  

PubMed

Forty-three prenatal diagnoses of lethal urinary tract abnormalities were carried out during a five-year-period. The abnormalities were bilateral renal agenesis (56%), autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (16%), autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (14%), MECKEL-GRUBER syndrome and Prune-Belly syndrome (4%). The pregnancy was interrupted in thirty-five cases (81.4%). PMID:10894048

Boutheina, B R; Aïda, M; Lamia, S; Ali, M; MedBadis, C; Samy, J; Issam, L; Ezzeddine, S; Raouf, C; Zohra, M; Faouzia, Z; Hedi, R; Naïma, K; Hela, C; Soumeya, G S

2000-02-01

293

Potentially Lethal Suicide Attempts Using Sharp Objects During Psychotic Illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Recent studies have reported that serious violence toward self and others is more common in the first episode of psychosis than after treatment. Aims: To estimate the proportion of survivors of potentially lethal suicide attempts with sharp objects who have a diagnosis of psychotic illness, and the proportion of those patients who had never received treatment for psychosis with

Olav B. Nielssen; Matthew M. Large

2011-01-01

294

Biopsy findings in malignant histiocytosis presenting as lethal midline granuloma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nasal biopsy findings in malignant histiocytosis presenting clinically as lethal midline granuloma are characterised by necrosis and infiltration of atypical histiocytic cells with a diffuse positive reaction for non-specific esterase. This cellular character was common to midline malignant reticulosis, and midline malignant reticulosis and malignant histiocytosis are thought to be the same disease. Patterns of histiocytic infiltration in the nasal

K Aozasa

1982-01-01

295

Regulation of apoptosis by lethal cytokines in human mesothelial cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regulation of apoptosis by lethal cytokines in human mesothelial cells.BackgroundDysregulation of peritoneal cell death may contribute to the complications of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Chronic peritoneal dialysis and acute peritonitis are both associated with loss of mesothelial cells. In addition, acute peritonitis is characterized by sudden changes in the number of peritoneal leukocytes. However, the factors regulating peritoneal cell survival are

Marina Penélope Catalan; Dolores Subirá; Ana Reyero; Rafael Selgas; Arturo Ortiz-Gonzalez; Jesús Egido; Alberto Ortiz

2003-01-01

296

Analysis of Ebola Glycoprotein Sequences from Strains of Varying Lethality  

E-print Network

Analysis of Ebola Glycoprotein Sequences from Strains of Varying Lethality Biochem 218 Spring 2002 Tammy Doukas tdoukas@stanford.edu I. Background and Significance Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a disease in humans, chimpanzees, and monkeys, caused by infection with Ebola virus, and associated with high

297

The Prevalence, Lethality and Intent of Suicide Attempts among Adolescents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although suicide is the second leading cause of death among adolescents in the United States, little is known about the prevalence or characteristics of suicide attempts among adolescents. Data from 1,710 adolescents attending 9 high schools in 5 communities were examined to determine the prevalence of suicide attempts and the lethality and intent…

Andrews, Judy A.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.

298

Subcutaneous wounding postirradiation reduces radiation lethality in mice.  

PubMed

The detonation of an improvised nuclear device during a radiological terrorist attack could result in the exposure of thousands of civilians and first responders to lethal or potentially lethal doses of ionizing radiation (IR). There is a major effort in the United States to develop phamacological mitigators of radiation lethality that would be effective particularly if administered after irradiation. We show here that giving female C57BL/6 mice a subcutaneous surgical incision after whole body exposure to an LD50/30 X-ray dose protects against radiation lethality and increases survival from 50% to over 90% (P = 0.0001). The increase in survival, at least in part, appears to be due to enhanced recovery of hematopoiesis, notably red blood cells, neutrophils and platelets. While a definitive mechanism has yet to be elucidated, we propose that this approach may be used to identify potentially novel mechanisms and pathways that could aid in the development of novel pharmacological radiation countermeasures. PMID:24811864

Garrett, Joy; Orschell, Christie M; Mendonca, Marc S; Bigsby, Robert M; Dynlacht, Joseph R

2014-06-01

299

Help-Seeking Behavior Prior to Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The association between help-seeking and nearly lethal suicide attempts was evaluated using data from a population-based, case-control study. Measures of help-seeking included type of consultant contacted, and whether suicide was discussed. Findings suggest efforts to better understand the role of help-seeking in suicide prevention deserves…

Barnes, Lauren Seymour; Ikeda, Robin M.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo

2002-01-01

300

Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice  

SciTech Connect

Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

Generoso, W.M.

1983-01-01

301

Conditional lethality strains for the biological control of Anastrepha species  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Pro-apoptotic cell death genes are promising candidates for biologically-based autocidal control of pest insects as demonstrated by tetracycline (tet)-suppressible systems for conditional embryonic lethality in Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) and the medfly, Ceratitis capitata (Cc). However, for medfly...

302

Targeting lethal minimal residual disease in small cell lung cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the last three decades, treatment for small cell lung cancer has improved with advances in chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Almost all patients respond initially to standard chemotherapy, and some patients with limited stage disease are cured with the combination of chemotherapy and thoracic irradiation. Nonetheless, the majority of patients will experience lethal relapse from chemotherapy-resistant micrometastatic disease, and this has

Jyoti D. Patel; Lee M. Krug; Christopher G. Azzoli; Jorge Gomez; Mark G. Kris; Vincent A. Miller

2003-01-01

303

The "Lethal Chamber": Further Evidence of the Euthanasia Option.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Historical discussions of the euthanasia or "lethal chamber" option in relation to people with mental retardation are presented. The paper concludes that eugenic beliefs in the primacy of heredity over environment and the positive role of natural selection may have condoned the poor conditions characteristic of large, segregated institutions and…

Elks, Martin A.

1993-01-01

304

Galactosamine-Induced Sensitization to the Lethal Effects of Endotoxin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Treatment of rabbits, rats, and mice with D-galactosamine increased their sensitivity to the lethal effects of lipopolysaccharide several thousand fold. The susceptibility of the animals was highest when the lipopolysacharide was injected together with galactosamine and decreased successively when injection was carried out 1, 2, and 3 hr later. Sensitization was absent when the lipopolysaccharide was administered 1 hr before

Chris Galanos; Marina A. Freudenberg; Werner Reutter

1979-01-01

305

Small Molecule Inhibitors of Anthrax Lethal Factor Toxin  

PubMed Central

This manuscript describes the preparation of new small molecule inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis lethal factor. Our starting point was the symmetrical, bis-quinolinyl compound 1 (NSC 12155). Optimization of one half of this molecule led to new LF inhibitors that were desymmetrized to afford more drug-like compounds. PMID:24290062

Williams, John D.; Khan, Atiyya R.; Cardinale, Steven C.; Butler, Michelle M.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Peet, Norton P.

2014-01-01

306

The Lethal "Femme Fatale" in the Noir Tradition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traces the lethal seductress through Hollywood's "noir" history from "Double Indemnity" (1944) to "The Last Seduction" (1996). Examines how this figure largely abjures traditional romance and passive domesticity, choosing instead to apply her sexuality to homicidal plots toward greed. Argues that her narrative positioning serves as a barometer of…

Boozer, Jack

2000-01-01

307

Health Screenings and Immunizations  

MedlinePLUS

... your primary doctor. Blood Tests – A Common Screening Method (Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Click ... tests, see What Are Blood Tests? Other Screening Methods Doctors can't screen for all diseases and ...

308

Screen time and children  

MedlinePLUS

"Screen time" is a term used for activities done in front of a screen, such as watching TV, working on a computer, or playing video games. Screen time is sedentary activity, meaning you are being physically ...

309

Georgia Revealed  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

OneWorld Journeys.com and Washingtonpost.com present Georgia Revealed: Searching for the Soul of the Caucasus. The site showcases a Georgia expedition that occurred April 16-29, the first of three explorations OneWorldJourneys.com have planned this year. Wilderness and nature photographers, journalists, and technicians collaborate here to bring users on their journey through the Caucasus Mountains Region of the Country of Georgia. Georgia Revealed not only features daily journal entries (text, streaming video and audio, and photographs) of the expedition, but also has sections providing background on history, travel, culture, and more. Altogether, this is a very well organized, educational site. We look forward to the next expedition to the Sonoran Desert.

310

Toxicological screening  

PubMed Central

Toxicity testing of new compounds is essential for drug development process. The preclinical toxicity testing on various biological systems reveals the species-, organ- and dose- specific toxic effects of an investigational product. The toxicity of substances can be observed by (a) studying the accidental exposures to a substance (b) in vitro studies using cells/ cell lines (c) in vivo exposure on experimental animals. This review mainly focuses on the various experimental animal models and methods used for toxicity testing of substances. The pre-clinical toxicity testing helps to calculate “No Observed Adverse Effect Level” which is needed to initiate the clinical evaluation of investigational products. PMID:21772764

Parasuraman, S.

2011-01-01

311

Role of Natural Killer Cells in Innate Protection against Lethal Ebola Virus Infection  

E-print Network

Ebola virus is a highly lethal human pathogen and is rapidly driving many wild primate populations toward extinction. Several lines of evidence suggest that innate, nonspecific host factors are potentially critical for survival after Ebola virus infection. Here, we show that nonreplicating Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), containing the glycoprotein (GP) and matrix protein virus protein (VP)40, administered 1–3 d before Ebola virus infection rapidly induced protective immunity. VLP injection enhanced the numbers of natural killer (NK) cells in lymphoid tissues. In contrast to live Ebola virus, VLP treatment of NK cells enhanced cytokine secretion and cytolytic activity against NK-sensitive targets. Unlike wild-type mice, treatment of NK-deficient or-depleted mice with VLPs had no protective effect against Ebola virus infection and NK cells treated with VLPs protected against Ebola virus infection when adoptively transferred to naive mice. The mechanism of NK cell–mediated protection clearly depended on perforin, but not interferon-? secretion. Particles containing only VP40 were sufficient to induce NK cell responses and provide protection from infection in the absence of the viral GP. These findings revealed a decisive role for NK cells during lethal Ebola virus infection. This work should open new doors for better understanding

Kelly L. Warfield; Jeremy G. Perkins; Dana L. Swenson; Emily M. Deal; Catharine M. Bosio; M. Javad Aman; Wayne M. Yokoyama; Howard A. Young; Sina Bavari

312

Malignant gangliocytic paraganglioma of the duodenum with distant metastases and a lethal course.  

PubMed

Gangliocytic paraganglioma (GP) is rare and has been regarded as benign in general with a good prognosis. We present a patient with duodenal GP showing a malignant and lethal clinical course. A 47-year-old male patient was found to have a duodenal tumor and enlarged regional lymph nodes. The patient initially underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy to resect the tumor and involved lymph nodes completely. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses showed findings typical of GP. However, the distant metastatic lesions in the liver and pelvic cavity were rapidly observed after surgery. The patient underwent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, as well as a second surgery to partly remove the metastatic mass in the pelvic cavity. The histological examination revealed no significant difference in histological features between the primary duodenal tumor and the metastatic pelvic mass. However, the patient finally died of the tumor due to the recurrence of the residual pelvic lesion and increased liver mass. To our knowledge, this is the first report of lethal GP with multifocal metastases. Our case confirms that GP should be regarded as a malignant potential tumor with behavior code of "1", rather than a benign tumor of "0". PMID:25386095

Li, Bin; Li, Yang; Tian, Xiao-Ying; Luo, Bo-Ning; Li, Zhi

2014-11-01

313

Malignant gangliocytic paraganglioma of the duodenum with distant metastases and a lethal course  

PubMed Central

Gangliocytic paraganglioma (GP) is rare and has been regarded as benign in general with a good prognosis. We present a patient with duodenal GP showing a malignant and lethal clinical course. A 47-year-old male patient was found to have a duodenal tumor and enlarged regional lymph nodes. The patient initially underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy to resect the tumor and involved lymph nodes completely. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses showed findings typical of GP. However, the distant metastatic lesions in the liver and pelvic cavity were rapidly observed after surgery. The patient underwent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, as well as a second surgery to partly remove the metastatic mass in the pelvic cavity. The histological examination revealed no significant difference in histological features between the primary duodenal tumor and the metastatic pelvic mass. However, the patient finally died of the tumor due to the recurrence of the residual pelvic lesion and increased liver mass. To our knowledge, this is the first report of lethal GP with multifocal metastases. Our case confirms that GP should be regarded as a malignant potential tumor with behavior code of “1”, rather than a benign tumor of “0”. PMID:25386095

Li, Bin; Li, Yang; Tian, Xiao-Ying; Luo, Bo-Ning; Li, Zhi

2014-01-01

314

Significant conservation of synthetic lethal genetic interaction networks between distantly related eukaryotes  

PubMed Central

Synthetic lethal genetic interaction networks define genes that work together to control essential functions and have been studied extensively in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the synthetic genetic array (SGA) analysis technique (ScSGA). The extent to which synthetic lethal or other genetic interaction networks are conserved between species remains uncertain. To address this question, we compared literature-curated and experimentally derived genetic interaction networks for two distantly related yeasts, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and S. cerevisiae. We find that 23% of interactions in a novel, high-quality S. pombe literature-curated network are conserved in the existing S. cerevisiae network. Next, we developed a method, called S. pombe SGA analysis (SpSGA), enabling rapid, high-throughput isolation of genetic interactions in this species. Direct comparison by SpSGA and ScSGA of ?220 genes involved in DNA replication, the DNA damage response, chromatin remodeling, intracellular transport, and other processes revealed that ?29% of genetic interactions are common to both species, with the remainder exhibiting unique, species-specific patterns of genetic connectivity. We define a conserved yeast network (CYN) composed of 106 genes and 144 interactions and suggest that this network may help understand the shared biology of diverse eukaryotic species. PMID:18931302

Dixon, Scott J.; Fedyshyn, Yaroslav; Koh, Judice L. Y.; Prasad, T. S. Keshava; Chahwan, Charly; Chua, Gordon; Toufighi, Kiana; Baryshnikova, Anastasija; Hayles, Jacqueline; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Park, Han-Oh; Myers, Chad L.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Durocher, Daniel; Andrews, Brenda J.; Boone, Charles

2008-01-01

315

Georgians Revealed  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What was life like during the Georgian era in Britain? During the period between 1714 and 1830, cities and towns were transformed, conspicuous consumption became the pastime of the emerging middle classes, and gardening and shopping for leisure became commonplace. This digital companion to the British Library's "Georgians Revealed" exhibit brings together some of the key books and newspapers from the period, along with details about guided tours through the physical exhibitions, a Georgian London walking tour, and more. For those unable to view the exhibit in person, this companion site provides brief but detailed narratives on interesting facets of the exhibit, including dancing with the Georgians and celebrity culture. The site is rounded out by an excellent timeline of key events from the time of George I (1714-1727) to George IV (1820-1830) accompanied by vivid illustrations and portraiture.

316

Cervical Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

What is cervical cancer screening? Cervical cancer screening is used to find changes in the cells of the cervix that could lead to ... the FAQ Human Papillomavirus [HPV] Infection). How is cervical cancer screening done? Cervical cancer screening is simple and fast. ...

317

Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... ongoing clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site . Three tests are used by health care providers to screen ... ongoing clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site . Risks of Breast Cancer Screening Screening tests have risks. Decisions about screening tests can be ...

318

Streptomycin-Suppressible Lethal Mutations in Escherichia coli1  

PubMed Central

Forty-one mutants have been isolated which require streptomycin for growth on complete medium. These streptomycin-suppressible lethal mutations are located randomly around the Escherichia coli genetic map; during growth in liquid culture, they exhibit a variety of responses to the removal of streptomycin as judged by turbidity, cell morphology, and macromolecular synthesis. In particular, some mutants are primarily affected in protein or ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis (or both), one in deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, and two in lipid synthesis. Ten mutants affected in protein synthesis were examined for the activities of all twenty aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases, and three were found to have altered glutamyl-transfer RNA synthetase activities. The advantages of this method for isolating a wide variety of conditional lethal mutants are discussed. PMID:4912524

Murgola, E. J.; Adelberg, E. A.

1970-01-01

319

Medicare Preventive and Screening Services  

MedlinePLUS

... management training Glaucoma tests HIV screening Mammograms (screening) Nutrition therapy services Obesity screenings & counseling One-time “Welcome to Medicare” preventive visit Prostate cancer screenings Sexually transmitted infections screening & counseling Shots: Flu ...

320

Methylmercury: teratogenic and lethal effects in frog embryos  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rana pipiens embryos at the cleavage, blastula, gastrula, and neural-plate stages of development were treated with methylmercuric chloride in concentrations of 0.5-200 parts per billion (ppb) to determine embryocidal and teratogenic effects. Concentrations of 40 ppb and above were lethal to embryos treated during the cleavage stage. Embryos at the blastula, gastrula, and neural-plate stages were treated for 5 days

Norman A. Dial

1976-01-01

321

Recovery of plants from “Near-Lethal” stress  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study reports on the dieback and recovery of red-osier dogwood, Cornus sericea L. plants from “near-lethal” (NL, sublethal) stress after varying lengths of post-stress environment (PSE). Intact dormant stems were subjected to 47° C for one hour during either October, November or December, and then placed into either constant 0° C or 23° C (dark condition) or kept under

A. M. Shirazi; L. H. Fuchigami

1993-01-01

322

Plasma Screen Floating Mount  

DOEpatents

A mounting system for a flat display screen, particularly a plasma display screen, suspends the screen separately in each of the x-, y- and z-directions. A series of frames located by linear bearings and isolated by springs and dampers allows separate controlled movement in each axis. The system enables the use of relatively larger display screens in vehicles in which plasma screen are subject to damage from vibration.

Eakle, Robert F. (New Ellenton, SC); Pak, Donald J. (Martine, GA)

2004-10-26

323

Beta-lactam antibiotics induce a lethal malfunctioning of the bacterial cell wall synthesis machinery.  

PubMed

Penicillin and related beta-lactams comprise one of our oldest and most widely used antibiotic therapies. These drugs have long been known to target enzymes called penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) that build the bacterial cell wall. Investigating the downstream consequences of target inhibition and how they contribute to the lethal action of these important drugs, we demonstrate that beta-lactams do more than just inhibit the PBPs as is commonly believed. Rather, they induce a toxic malfunctioning of their target biosynthetic machinery involving a futile cycle of cell wall synthesis and degradation, thereby depleting cellular resources and bolstering their killing activity. Characterization of this mode of action additionally revealed a quality control function for enzymes that cleave bonds in the cell wall matrix. The results thus provide insight into the mechanism of cell wall assembly and suggest how best to interfere with the process for future antibiotic development. PMID:25480295

Cho, Hongbaek; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Bernhardt, Thomas G

2014-12-01

324

Haploid Genetic Screens Identify an Essential Role for PLP2 in the Downregulation of Novel Plasma Membrane Targets by Viral E3 Ubiquitin Ligases  

PubMed Central

The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus gene products K3 and K5 are viral ubiquitin E3 ligases which downregulate MHC-I and additional cell surface immunoreceptors. To identify novel cellular genes required for K5 function we performed a forward genetic screen in near-haploid human KBM7 cells. The screen identified proteolipid protein 2 (PLP2), a MARVEL domain protein of unknown function, as essential for K5 activity. Genetic loss of PLP2 traps the viral ligase in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is unable to ubiquitinate and degrade its substrates. Subsequent analysis of the plasma membrane proteome of K5-expressing KBM7 cells in the presence and absence of PLP2 revealed a wide range of novel K5 targets, all of which required PLP2 for their K5-mediated downregulation. This work ascribes a critical function to PLP2 for viral ligase activity and underlines the power of non-lethal haploid genetic screens in human cells to identify the genes involved in pathogen manipulation of the host immune system. PMID:24278019

Timms, Richard T.; Duncan, Lidia M.; Tchasovnikarova, Iva A.; Antrobus, Robin; Smith, Duncan L.; Dougan, Gordon; Weekes, Michael P.; Lehner, Paul J.

2013-01-01

325

Revealing Rembrandt  

PubMed Central

The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

Parker, Andrew J.

2014-01-01

326

Germline mutations in RYR1 are associated with foetal akinesia deformation sequence/lethal multiple pterygium syndrome.  

PubMed

IntroductionFoetal akinesia deformation sequence syndrome (FADS) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterised by the combination of foetal akinesia and developmental defects which may include pterygia (joint webbing). Traditionally multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) has been divided into two forms: prenatally lethal (LMPS) and non-lethal Escobar type (EVMPS) types. Interestingly, FADS, LMPS and EVMPS may be allelic e.g. each of these phenotypes may result from mutations in the foetal acetylcholine receptor gamma subunit gene (CHRNG). Many cases of FADS and MPS do not have a mutation in a known FADS/MPS gene and we undertook molecular genetic studies to identify novel causes of these phenotypes.ResultsAfter mapping a novel locus for FADS/LMPS to chromosome 19, we identified a homozygous null mutation in the RYR1 gene in a consanguineous kindred with recurrent LMPS pregnancies. Resequencing of RYR1 in a cohort of 66 unrelated probands with FADS/LMPS/EVMPS (36 with FADS/LMPS and 30 with EVMPS) revealed two additional homozygous mutations (in frame deletions). The overall frequency of RYR1 mutations in probands with FADS/LMPS was 8.3%.ConclusionsOur findings report, for the first time, a homozygous RYR1 null mutation and expand the range of RYR1-related phenotypes to include early lethal FADS/LMPS. We suggest that RYR1 mutation analysis should be performed in cases of severe FADS/LMPS even in the absence of specific histopathological indicators of RYR1-related disease. PMID:25476234

McKie, Arthur B; Al-Saedi, Atif; Vogt, Julie; Stuurman, Kyra E; Weiss, Marjan M; Shakeel, Hassan; Tee, Louise; Morgan, Neil V; Nikkels, Peter G J; van Haaften, Gijs; Park, Soo-Mi; van der Smagt, Jasper J; Bugiani, Marianna; Maher, Eamonn R

2014-12-01

327

Genotoxicity of ziram established through wing, eye and female germ-line mosaic assays and the sex-linked recessive lethal test in Drosophila melanogaster.  

PubMed

The genotoxicity of ziram (zinc-dimethyl dithiocarbamate, CAS No. 137-30-4), a carbamate fungicide, is studied in the wing, eye and female germ-line mosaic assays and the sex-linked recessive lethal test in Drosophila melanogaster. First-, second- and third-instar larvae, carrying suitable recessive genetic markers on their first and third chromosomes, were exposed to ziram. Wings and eyes of adults were screened for the induction of mosaic spots and the eggs laid by adult females for germ-line mosaicism. The Basc method was used to detect sex-linked recessive lethals. Ziram is genotoxic to the somatic and germ cells of Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:2507911

Tripathy, N K; Majhi, B; Dey, L; Das, C C

1989-10-01

328

Expanded substrate screenings of human and Drosophila type 10 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) reveal multiple specificities in bile acid and steroid hormone metabolism: characterization of multifunctional 3alpha/7alpha/7beta/17beta/20beta/21-HSD.  

PubMed Central

17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17beta-HSDs) catalyse the conversion of 17beta-OH (-hydroxy)/17-oxo groups of steroids, and are essential in mammalian hormone physiology. At present, eleven 17beta-HSD isoforms have been defined in mammals, with different tissue-expression and substrate-conversion patterns. We analysed 17beta-HSD type 10 (17beta-HSD10) from humans and Drosophila, the latter known to be essential in development. In addition to the known hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and 3alpha-OH and 17beta-OH activities with sex steroids, we here demonstrate novel activities of 17beta-HSD10. Both species variants oxidize the 20beta-OH and 21-OH groups in C21 steroids, and act as 7beta-OH dehydrogenases of ursodeoxycholic or isoursodeoxycholic acid (also known as 7beta-hydroxylithocholic acid or 7beta-hydroxyisolithocholic acid respectively). Additionally, the human orthologue oxidizes the 7alpha-OH of chenodeoxycholic acid (5beta-cholanic acid, 3alpha,7alpha-diol) and cholic acid (5beta-cholanic acid). These novel substrate specificities are explained by homology models based on the orthologous rat crystal structure, showing a wide hydrophobic cleft, capable of accommodating steroids in different orientations. These properties suggest that the human enzyme is involved in glucocorticoid and gestagen catabolism, and participates in bile acid isomerization. Confocal microscopy and electron microscopy studies reveal that the human form is localized to mitochondria, whereas Drosophila 17beta-HSD10 shows a cytosolic localization pattern, possibly due to an N-terminal sequence difference that in human 17beta-HSD10 constitutes a mitochondrial targeting signal, extending into the Rossmann-fold motif. PMID:12917011

Shafqat, Naeem; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Filling, Charlotta; Nordling, Erik; Wu, Xiao-Qiu; Björk, Lars; Thyberg, Johan; Mårtensson, Eva; Salim, Samina; Jörnvall, Hans; Oppermann, Udo

2003-01-01

329

Investigation of Phenolic Profiles, Cytotoxic Potential and Phytochemical Screening of Different Extracts of Drynaria quercifolia J. Smith (Leaves)  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The present study is aimed to evaluate phenolic profiles, cytotoxic activity and phytochemical screening of different extracts of Drynaria quercifolia leaves. Methods: The dried and powder leaves were extracted with methanol at room temperature and the concentrated methanolic extract was fractionated by the modified Kupchan partitioning method to provide pet-ether, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform and aqueous soluble fractions. Phenolic profiles were determined by using Folin-Ciocalteau reagent, which results were expressed in gallic acid equivalent (mg of GAE/g of sample). Phytochemical properties of different extractives of plant materials were tested by the method of Trease and Evans. Brine shrimp lethality bioassay was used to investigate the cytotoxic potential of D. quercifolia. Results: The phytochemical screening revealed the potent source of different phytochemical constituents on different extractives including alkaloid, glycosides, tannin, saponins, proteins and amino acids, flavonoids, triterpenes, phenols, phytosterols and carbohydrate. In the determination of phenolic profiles, different extractives showed a significant content of phenolic compounds ranging from 103.43 -132.23 mg of GAE/g of extractive. Compared to vincristine sulfate different extractives of plant materials demonstrated moderate cytotoxic potential (having LC50 of 12.45 ?g/ml, 13.02 ?g/ml 15.83 ?g/ml, 14.95 ?g/ml and 7.612 ?g/ml, respectively). Conclusion: It is concluded from this study that D. quercifolia is an excellent source of phenolic content and phytoconstitutes as well as possesses moderate cytotoxic activity. PMID:24312880

Runa, Jannatul Ferdous; Hossain, Marjan; Hasanuzzaman, Md.; Ali, Md. Ramjan

2013-01-01

330

Screening of copy number variants in the 22q11.2 region of congenital heart disease patients from the São Miguel Island, Azores, revealed the second patient with a triplication.  

PubMed

BackgroundThe rearrangements in the 22q11.2 chromosomal region, responsible for the 22q11.2 deletion and microduplication syndromes, are frequently associated with congenital heart disease (CHD). The present work aimed to identify the genetic basis of CHD in 87 patients from the São Miguel Island, Azores, through the detection of copy number variants (CNVs) in the 22q11.2 region. These structural variants were searched using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). In patients with CNVs, we additionally performed fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for the assessment of the exact number of 22q11.2 copies among each chromosome, and array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) for the determination of the exact length of CNVs.ResultsWe found that four patients (4.6%; A to D) carried CNVs. Patients A and D, both affected with a ventricular septal defect, carried a de novo 2.5 Mb deletion of the 22q11.2 region, which was probably originated by inter-chromosomal (inter-chromatid) non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) events in the regions containing low-copy repeats (LCRs). Patient C, with an atrial septal defect, carried a de novo 2.5 Mb duplication of 22q11.2 region, which could have been probably generated during gametogenesis by NAHR or by unequal crossing-over; additionally, this patient presented a benign 288 Kb duplication, which included the TOP3B gene inherited from her healthy mother. Finally, patient B showed a 3 Mb triplication associated with dysmorphic facial features, cognitive deficit and heart defects, a clinical feature not reported in the only case described so far in the literature. The evaluation of patient B¿s parents revealed a 2.5 Mb duplication in her father, suggesting a paternal inheritance with an extra copy.ConclusionsThis report allowed the identification of rare deletion and microduplication syndromes in Azorean CHD patients. Moreover, we report the second patient with a 22q11.2 triplication, and we suggest that patients with triplications of chromosome 22q11.2, although they share some characteristic features with the deletion and microduplication syndromes, present a more severe phenotype probably due to the major dosage of implicated genes. PMID:25376777

Pires, Renato; Pires, Luís M; Vaz, Sara O; Maciel, Paula; Anjos, Rui; Moniz, Raquel; Branco, Claudia C; Cabral, Rita; Carreira, Isabel M; Mota-Vieira, Luisa

2014-11-01

331

[Lung cancer screening].  

PubMed

Lung cancer is a very important disease, curable in early stages. There have been trials trying to show the utility of chest x-ray or computed tomography in Lung Cancer Screening for decades. In 2011, National Lung Screening Trial results were published, showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality in patients with low dose computed tomography screened for three years. These results are very promising and several scientific societies have included lung cancer screening in their guidelines. Nevertheless we have to be aware of lung cancer screening risks, such as: overdiagnosis, radiation and false positive results. Moreover, there are many issues to be solved, including choosing the appropriate group to be screened, the duration of the screening program, intervals between screening and its cost-effectiveness. Ongoing trials will probably answer some of these questions. This article reviews the current evidence on lung cancer screening. PMID:23830728

Sánchez González, M

2014-01-01

332

Japanese quail acute exposure to methamidophos: experimental design, lethal, sub-lethal effects and cholinesterase biochemical and histochemical expression.  

PubMed

We exposed the Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) to the organophosphate methamidophos using acute oral test. Mortality and sub-lethal effects were recorded in accordance to internationally accepted protocols. In addition cholinesterases were biochemically estimated in tissues of the quail: brain, liver and plasma. Furthermore, brain, liver and duodenum cryostat sections were processed for cholinesterase histochemistry using various substrates and inhibitors. Mortalities occurred mainly in the first 1-2h following application. Sub-lethal effects, such as ataxia, ruffled feathers, tremor, salivation and reduced or no reaction to external stimuli were observed. Biochemical analysis in the brain, liver and plasma indicates a strong cholinesterase dependent inhibition with respect to mortality and sub-lethal effects of the quail. The histochemical staining also indicated a strong cholinesterase inhibition in the organs examined and the analysis of the stained sections allowed for an estimation and interpretation of the intoxication effects of methamidophos, in combination with tissue morphology visible by Haematoxylin and Eosin staining. We conclude that the use of biochemistry and histochemistry for the biomarker cholinesterase, may constitute a significantly novel approach for understanding the results obtained by the acute oral test employed in order to assess the effects of methamidophos and other chemicals known to inhibit this very important nervous system enzyme. PMID:23146311

Foudoulakis, Manousos; Balaskas, Christos; Csato, Attila; Szentes, Csaba; Arapis, Gerassimos

2013-04-15

333

Species Origin of Genomic Factors in Nicotiana nudicaulis Watson Controlling Hybrid Lethality in Interspecific Hybrids between N. nudicaulis Watson and N. tabacum L  

PubMed Central

Hybrid lethality is expressed at 28°C in the cross Nicotiana nudicaulis×N. tabacum. The S subgenome of N. tabacum has been identified as controlling this hybrid lethality. To clarify the responsible genomic factor(s) of N. nudicaulis, we crossed N. trigonophylla (paternal progenitor of N. nudicaulis) with N. tabacum, because hybrids between N. sylvestris (maternal progenitor of N. nudicaulis) and N. tabacum are viable when grown in a greenhouse. In the cross N. trigonophylla×N. tabacum, approximately 50% of hybrids were vitrified, 20% were viable, and 20% were nonviable at 28°C. To reveal which subgenome of N. tabacum was responsible for these phenotypes, we crossed N. trigonophylla with two progenitors of N. tabacum, N. sylvestris (SS) and N. tomentosiformis (TT). In the cross N. sylvestris×N. trigonophylla, we confirmed that over half of hybrids of N. sylvestris×N. trigonophylla were vitrified, and none of the hybrids of N. trigonophylla×N. tomentosiformis were. The results imply that the S subgenome, encoding a gene or genes inducing hybrid lethality in the cross between N. nudicaulis and N. tabacum, has one or more genomic factors that induce vitrification. Furthermore, in vitrified hybrids of N. trigonophylla×N. tabacum and N. sylvestris×N. trigonophylla, we found that nuclear fragmentation, which progresses during expression of hybrid lethality, was accompanied by vitrification. This observation suggests that vitrification has a relationship to hybrid lethality. Based on these results, we speculate that when N. nudicaulis was formed approximately 5 million years ago, several causative genomic factors determining phenotypes of hybrid seedlings were inherited from N. trigonophylla. Subsequently, genome downsizing and various recombination-based processes took place. Some of the causative genomic factors were lost and some became genomic factor(s) controlling hybrid lethality in extant N. nudicaulis. PMID:24806486

Liu, Hongshuo; Marubashi, Wataru

2014-01-01

334

Physical and Genetic Characterization of a 75-Kilobase Deletion Associated with A(l), a Recessive Lethal Allele at the Mouse Agouti Locus  

PubMed Central

The agouti locus (A) of the mouse determines the timing and type of pigment deposition in the growing hair bulb, and several alleles at this locus are lethal when homozygous. Apparent instances of intragenic recombination and complementation between different recessive lethal alleles have suggested that the locus has a complex structure. We have begun to investigate the molecular basis of agouti gene action and recessive lethality by using a series of genetically linked DNA probes and pulsed field gel electrophoresis to detect structural alterations in radiation-induced agouti mutations. Hybridization probes from the Src and Emv-15 loci do not reveal molecular alterations in DNA corresponding to the a(e), a(x), and a(l) alleles, but a probe from the parotid secretory protein gene (Psp) detects a 75-kilobase (kb) deletion in DNA containing the non-agouti lethal allele (a(l)). The deletion is defined by a 75-kb reduction in the size of BssHII, NotI, NruI and SacII high molecular weight restriction fragments detected with the Psp probe and is located between 25 kb and 575 kb from Psp coding sequences. Because the genetic distance between A and Emv-15 is much less than A and Psp, there may be a preferred site of recombination close to Psp, or suppression of recombination between A and Emv-15. The a(l) deletion has allowed us to determine the genotype of mice heterozygous for different recessive lethal alleles. We find that three different recessive lethal complementation groups are present at the agouti locus, two of which are contained within the a(l) deletion. PMID:2566558

Barsh, G. S.; Epstein, C. J.

1989-01-01

335

Two Cases of Lethal Complications Following Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Fine-Needle Biopsy of the Liver  

SciTech Connect

Two cases with lethal complications are reported among 1750 ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous fine-needle liver biopsies performed in our department. The first patient had angiosarcoma of the liver which was not suspected after computed tomography (CT) and US studies had been performed. The other patient had hepatocellular carcinoma in advanced hepatic cirrhosis. Death was due to bleeding in both cases. Pre-procedure laboratory tests did not reveal the existence of major bleeding disorders in either case. Normal liver tissue was interposed in the needle track between the liver capsule and the lesions which were targeted.

Drinkovic, Ivan; Brkljacic, Boris [Department of Radiology, Ultrasonic Center, Medical School of the University of Zagreb, University Hospital 'Merkur', Zajceva 19, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

1996-09-15

336

Standard protocol for the dominant lethal test on male mice set up by the work group “dominant lethal mutations of the ad hoc Committee Chemogenetics”  

Microsoft Academic Search

The members of the work group “Dominant Lethal Mutations of the ad hoc Committee Chemogenetics” jointly carried out experimental studies in the period from November 1972 until February 1976. On the basis of the results obtained and the experience gained, they worked out on February 27, 1976, a standard protocol for the dominant lethal test (DLT) on male mice. The

U. H. Ehling; L. Machemer; W. Buselmaier; J. Dýcka; H. Frohberg; J. Kratochvilova; R. Lang; D. Lorke; D. Müller; J. Peh; G. Röhrborn; R. Roll; M. Schulze-Schencking; H. Wiemann

1978-01-01

337

Oral Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... available from the NCI Web site . There is no standard or routine screening test for oral cancer. ... other areas by the time they are found. No studies have shown that screening would decrease the ...

338

Screening for Gestational Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... Grade B), it is because it has more potential benefits than potential harms. When there is not enough evidence to ... information on screening in this population to determine potential benefits and harms. 1 2 Getting Screened for ...

339

Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... the lower right-hand corner of the player. Breast Cancer Screening HealthDay December 3, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Mammography Women's Health Transcript Mammography screening strategies based ...

340

Screening for Birth Defects  

MedlinePLUS

... extra chromosome. A common trisomy is trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) . Other trisomies include trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and ... Test Test Type What Does It Screen for? Down Syndrome Detection Rate Combined firsttrimester screening Blood test for ...

341

National Lung Screening Trial  

Cancer.gov

Information about the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), a research study sponsored by the National Cancer Institute that used low-dose helical CT scans or chest X-ray to screen men and women at risk for lung cancer.

342

Periodic Screening Evaluation  

Cancer.gov

Statistical Software Periodic Screening Evaluation (Written by Stuart G. Baker) New Approach (Simplified Approximation): See Baker SG. Evaluating periodic cancer screening without a randomized control group: a simplified design and analysis. In: Duffy

343

Screening for Cervical Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... in women age 21 to 65 years with cytology (Pap smear) every 3 years or, for women ... the screening interval, screening with a combination of cytology and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing every 5 years. ...

344

Video Screen Capture Basics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

Dunbar, Laura

2014-01-01

345

Cervical Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

346

International Cancer Screening Network  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Working Together to Evaluate Cancer Screening and Improve Outcomes Internationally About the ICSN Overview Participating Countries Contact

347

The mutational landscape of lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer.  

PubMed

Characterization of the prostate cancer transcriptome and genome has identified chromosomal rearrangements and copy number gains and losses, including ETS gene family fusions, PTEN loss and androgen receptor (AR) amplification, which drive prostate cancer development and progression to lethal, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, less is known about the role of mutations. Here we sequenced the exomes of 50 lethal, heavily pre-treated metastatic CRPCs obtained at rapid autopsy (including three different foci from the same patient) and 11 treatment-naive, high-grade localized prostate cancers. We identified low overall mutation rates even in heavily treated CRPCs (2.00 per megabase) and confirmed the monoclonal origin of lethal CRPC. Integrating exome copy number analysis identified disruptions of CHD1 that define a subtype of ETS gene family fusion-negative prostate cancer. Similarly, we demonstrate that ETS2, which is deleted in approximately one-third of CRPCs (commonly through TMPRSS2:ERG fusions), is also deregulated through mutation. Furthermore, we identified recurrent mutations in multiple chromatin- and histone-modifying genes, including MLL2 (mutated in 8.6% of prostate cancers), and demonstrate interaction of the MLL complex with the AR, which is required for AR-mediated signalling. We also identified novel recurrent mutations in the AR collaborating factor FOXA1, which is mutated in 5 of 147 (3.4%) prostate cancers (both untreated localized prostate cancer and CRPC), and showed that mutated FOXA1 represses androgen signalling and increases tumour growth. Proteins that physically interact with the AR, such as the ERG gene fusion product, FOXA1, MLL2, UTX (also known as KDM6A) and ASXL1 were found to be mutated in CRPC. In summary, we describe the mutational landscape of a heavily treated metastatic cancer, identify novel mechanisms of AR signalling deregulated in prostate cancer, and prioritize candidates for future study. PMID:22722839

Grasso, Catherine S; Wu, Yi-Mi; Robinson, Dan R; Cao, Xuhong; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M; Khan, Amjad P; Quist, Michael J; Jing, Xiaojun; Lonigro, Robert J; Brenner, J Chad; Asangani, Irfan A; Ateeq, Bushra; Chun, Sang Y; Siddiqui, Javed; Sam, Lee; Anstett, Matt; Mehra, Rohit; Prensner, John R; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Ryslik, Gregory A; Vandin, Fabio; Raphael, Benjamin J; Kunju, Lakshmi P; Rhodes, Daniel R; Pienta, Kenneth J; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Tomlins, Scott A

2012-07-12

348

Targeting GLUT1 and the Warburg Effect in Renal Cell Carcinoma by Chemical Synthetic Lethality  

PubMed Central

Identifying new targeted therapies that kill tumor cells while sparing normal tissue is a major challenge of cancer research. Using a high-throughput chemical synthetic lethal screen, we sought to identify compounds that exploit the loss of the von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene, which occurs in about 80% of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). RCCs, like many other cancers, are dependent on aerobic glycolysis for ATP production, a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect. The dependence of RCCs on glycolysis is in part a result of induction of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Here, we report the identification of a class of compounds, the 3-series, exemplified by STF-31, which selectively kills RCCs by specifically targeting glucose uptake through GLUT1 and exploiting the unique dependence of these cells on GLUT1 for survival. Treatment with these agents inhibits the growth of RCCs by binding GLUT1 directly and impeding glucose uptake in vivo without toxicity to normal tissue. Activity of STF-31 in these experimental renal tumors can be monitored by [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake by micro–positron emission tomography imaging, and therefore, these agents may be readily tested clinically in human tumors. Our results show that the Warburg effect confers distinct characteristics on tumor cells that can be selectively targeted for therapy. PMID:21813754

Chan, Denise A.; Sutphin, Patrick D.; Nguyen, Phuong; Turcotte, Sandra; Lai, Edwin W.; Banh, Alice; Reynolds, Gloria E.; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Wu, Jason; Solow-Cordero, David E.; Bonnet, Muriel; Flanagan, Jack U.; Bouley, Donna M.; Graves, Edward E.; Denny, William A.; Hay, Michael P.; Giaccia, Amato J.

2013-01-01

349

Screening for Lung Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background: Lung cancer is by far the major cause of cancer deaths largely because in the majority of patients it is at an advanced stage at the time it is discovered, when curative treatment is no longer feasible. This article examines the data regarding the ability of screening to decrease the number of lung cancer deaths. Methods: A systematic review was conducted of controlled studies that address the effectiveness of methods of screening for lung cancer. Results: Several large randomized controlled trials (RCTs), including a recent one, have demonstrated that screening for lung cancer using a chest radiograph does not reduce the number of deaths from lung cancer. One large RCT involving low-dose CT (LDCT) screening demonstrated a significant reduction in lung cancer deaths, with few harms to individuals at elevated risk when done in the context of a structured program of selection, screening, evaluation, and management of the relatively high number of benign abnormalities. Whether other RCTs involving LDCT screening are consistent is unclear because data are limited or not yet mature. Conclusions: Screening is a complex interplay of selection (a population with sufficient risk and few serious comorbidities), the value of the screening test, the interval between screening tests, the availability of effective treatment, the risk of complications or harms as a result of screening, and the degree with which the screened individuals comply with screening and treatment recommendations. Screening with LDCT of appropriate individuals in the context of a structured process is associated with a significant reduction in the number of lung cancer deaths in the screened population. Given the complex interplay of factors inherent in screening, many questions remain on how to effectively implement screening on a broader scale. PMID:23649455

Mazzone, Peter J.; Naidich, David P.; Bach, Peter B.

2013-01-01

350

Lethal Mutagenesis of Poliovirus Mediated by a Mutagenic Pyrimidine Analogue  

E-print Network

: REFERENCES http://jvi.asm.org/content/81/20/11256#ref-list-1at: This article cites 59 articles, 29 of which can be accessed free CONTENT ALERTS more»articles cite this article), Receive: RSS Feeds, eTOCs, free email alerts (when new http... http://jvi.asm.org/ D ow nloaded from JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY, Oct. 2007, p. 11256–11266 Vol. 81, No. 20 0022-538X/07/$08.00#1;0 doi:10.1128/JVI.01028-07 Copyright © 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Lethal Mutagenesis...

Graci, Jason D.; Harki, Daniel A.; Korneeva, Victoria S.; Edathil, Jocelyn P.; Too, Kathleen; Franco, David; Smidansky, Eric D.; Paul, Aniko V.; Peterson, Blake R.; Brown, Daniel M.; Loakes, David; Cameron, Craig E.

2007-10-01

351

Advanced antisense therapies for postexposure protection against lethal filovirus infections.  

PubMed

Currently, no vaccines or therapeutics are licensed to counter Ebola or Marburg viruses, highly pathogenic filoviruses that are causative agents of viral hemorrhagic fever. Here we show that administration of positively charged phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOplus), delivered by various dosing strategies initiated 30-60 min after infection, protects>60% of rhesus monkeys against lethal Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV) and 100% of cynomolgus monkeys against Lake Victoria Marburg virus (MARV) infection. PMOplus may be useful for treating these and other highly pathogenic viruses in humans. PMID:20729866

Warren, Travis K; Warfield, Kelly L; Wells, Jay; Swenson, Dana L; Donner, Kelly S; Van Tongeren, Sean A; Garza, Nicole L; Dong, Lian; Mourich, Dan V; Crumley, Stacy; Nichols, Donald K; Iversen, Patrick L; Bavari, Sina

2010-09-01

352

Intimate partner homicide: new insights for understanding lethality and risks.  

PubMed

Research on covictims, family members, and close friends who have lost loved ones to intimate partner homicide (IPH) is a neglected area of study. We conducted phenomenological interviews with covictims to gain insights into risk and lethality, examined affidavits from criminal case files, and reviewed news releases. The data uncovered acute risk factors prior to the homicide, identified changes in the perpetrators' behavior and the perpetrators' perceived loss of control over the victim, and described barriers that victims faced when attempting to gain safety. Findings suggest that recognizing acute risk factors is an important area for future IPH research. PMID:25540257

Sheehan, Brynn E; Murphy, Sharon B; Moynihan, Mary M; Dudley-Fennessey, Erin; Stapleton, Jane G

2015-02-01

353

[Lethal intravenous infusion of a wound antiseptic containing polyhexanide].  

PubMed

Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is considered to be highly histocompatible and is one of the most frequently used wound antiseptics. Only one case of intoxication has been reported so far. The present case of a lethal intoxication is the first fatal incident described where causality is substantiated by a temporal coincidence between application and ascertainable organ damage. The laboratory-chemical and histological investigations verified the toxicity of this substance after intravenous application with the main findings being severe hepatic and pancreatic damage. PMID:19432089

Wehner, Frank; Wehner, Heinz-Dieter; Schulz, Martin Manfred

2009-01-01

354

Ocular manifestations of the potentially lethal rheumatologic and vasculitic disorders.  

PubMed

Vision threatening ocular inflammation may occur in patients with any of the acquired connective tissue disorders and vasculitic diseases. Additionally, the ocular inflammation may be the presenting manifestation of the disease, which leads the patient to seek medical care. Other manifestations of the potentially lethal disease may be subtle or absent, presenting the thoughtful ophthalmologist with the opportunity to make life saving discoveries. Necrotizing scleritis, peripheral ulcerative keratitis, and retinal vasculitis are the ocular findings which should prompt the ophthalmologist to initiate very aggressive measures aimed at discovering any evidence of extra-ocular abnormalities, laboratory or otherwise. Appropriate therapy will be sight saving and may be life saving. PMID:23688612

Foster, C Stephen

2013-06-01

355

Breast cancer screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiographic imaging of the breast began in the early years of the twentieth century. Continuous advances in film quality, energy sources, targets, grids, and filters have all contributed to superior image resolution. Federal quality standards now regulate screening mammography, and mass screening for breast cancer has become widely accepted in the United States. Wider application of screening has resulted in

Kathleen M. Harris; Victor G. Vogel

1997-01-01

356

Cancer Screening: How Do Screening Tests Become Standard Tests?  

MedlinePLUS

... cancer symptoms. There are different kinds of screening tests. Screening tests include the following: Physical exam and ... are linked to some types of cancer. Screening tests have risks. Not all screening tests are helpful ...

357

Improvement in Screening Radiologists' Performance in an Organized Screening Program  

Cancer.gov

Improvement in Screening Radiologists’ Performance in an Organized Screening Program Nancy A. T. Wadden, MD, FRCPC Gregory Doyle, BSc, MBA Breast Screening Program for Newfoundland and Labrador Canada Background • Breast Screening Program for Newfoundland

358

Antibiotics induce redox-related physiological alterations as part of their lethality.  

PubMed

Deeper understanding of antibiotic-induced physiological responses is critical to identifying means for enhancing our current antibiotic arsenal. Bactericidal antibiotics with diverse targets have been hypothesized to kill bacteria, in part by inducing production of damaging reactive species. This notion has been supported by many groups but has been challenged recently. Here we robustly test the hypothesis using biochemical, enzymatic, and biophysical assays along with genetic and phenotypic experiments. We first used a novel intracellular H2O2 sensor, together with a chemically diverse panel of fluorescent dyes sensitive to an array of reactive species to demonstrate that antibiotics broadly induce redox stress. Subsequent gene-expression analyses reveal that complex antibiotic-induced oxidative stress responses are distinct from canonical responses generated by supraphysiological levels of H2O2. We next developed a method to quantify cellular respiration dynamically and found that bactericidal antibiotics elevate oxygen consumption, indicating significant alterations to bacterial redox physiology. We further show that overexpression of catalase or DNA mismatch repair enzyme, MutS, and antioxidant pretreatment limit antibiotic lethality, indicating that reactive oxygen species causatively contribute to antibiotic killing. Critically, the killing efficacy of antibiotics was diminished under strict anaerobic conditions but could be enhanced by exposure to molecular oxygen or by the addition of alternative electron acceptors, indicating that environmental factors play a role in killing cells physiologically primed for death. This work provides direct evidence that, downstream of their target-specific interactions, bactericidal antibiotics induce complex redox alterations that contribute to cellular damage and death, thus supporting an evolving, expanded model of antibiotic lethality. PMID:24803433

Dwyer, Daniel J; Belenky, Peter A; Yang, Jason H; MacDonald, I Cody; Martell, Jeffrey D; Takahashi, Noriko; Chan, Clement T Y; Lobritz, Michael A; Braff, Dana; Schwarz, Eric G; Ye, Jonathan D; Pati, Mekhala; Vercruysse, Maarten; Ralifo, Paul S; Allison, Kyle R; Khalil, Ahmad S; Ting, Alice Y; Walker, Graham C; Collins, James J

2014-05-20

359

Antibiotics induce redox-related physiological alterations as part of their lethality  

PubMed Central

Deeper understanding of antibiotic-induced physiological responses is critical to identifying means for enhancing our current antibiotic arsenal. Bactericidal antibiotics with diverse targets have been hypothesized to kill bacteria, in part by inducing production of damaging reactive species. This notion has been supported by many groups but has been challenged recently. Here we robustly test the hypothesis using biochemical, enzymatic, and biophysical assays along with genetic and phenotypic experiments. We first used a novel intracellular H2O2 sensor, together with a chemically diverse panel of fluorescent dyes sensitive to an array of reactive species to demonstrate that antibiotics broadly induce redox stress. Subsequent gene-expression analyses reveal that complex antibiotic-induced oxidative stress responses are distinct from canonical responses generated by supraphysiological levels of H2O2. We next developed a method to quantify cellular respiration dynamically and found that bactericidal antibiotics elevate oxygen consumption, indicating significant alterations to bacterial redox physiology. We further show that overexpression of catalase or DNA mismatch repair enzyme, MutS, and antioxidant pretreatment limit antibiotic lethality, indicating that reactive oxygen species causatively contribute to antibiotic killing. Critically, the killing efficacy of antibiotics was diminished under strict anaerobic conditions but could be enhanced by exposure to molecular oxygen or by the addition of alternative electron acceptors, indicating that environmental factors play a role in killing cells physiologically primed for death. This work provides direct evidence that, downstream of their target-specific interactions, bactericidal antibiotics induce complex redox alterations that contribute to cellular damage and death, thus supporting an evolving, expanded model of antibiotic lethality. PMID:24803433

Dwyer, Daniel J.; Belenky, Peter A.; Yang, Jason H.; MacDonald, I. Cody; Martell, Jeffrey D.; Takahashi, Noriko; Chan, Clement T. Y.; Lobritz, Michael A.; Braff, Dana; Schwarz, Eric G.; Ye, Jonathan D.; Pati, Mekhala; Vercruysse, Maarten; Ralifo, Paul S.; Allison, Kyle R.; Khalil, Ahmad S.; Ting, Alice Y.; Walker, Graham C.; Collins, James J.

2014-01-01

360

Abundant genetic variability in Drosophila simulans for hybrid female lethality in interspecific crosses to Drosophila melanogaster.  

PubMed

Intrinsic postzygotic reproductive isolation is thought to result from the substitution of multiple harmless or beneficial genetic differences between species that are incidentally deleterious when combined in species hybrids, causing hybrid sterility or inviability. Genetic variability for hybrid sterility or inviability phenotypes is, however, rarely assessed in natural populations. Here, we assess variation for Drosophila simulans-encoded maternal factor(s) that cause lethality in D. simulans-Drosophila melanogaster F(1) hybrid females. First, we survey genetic variability in the strength of D. simulans-mediated maternal effect hybrid lethality among 37 geographic and laboratory isolates. We find abundant variability in the strength of maternal effect hybrid lethality, ranging from complete lethality to none. Second, we assess maternal effect hybrid lethality for a subset of wild isolates made heterozygous with two so-called hybrid rescue strains. The results suggest that the D. simulans maternal effect hybrid lethality involves a diversity of alleles and/or multiple loci. PMID:22353244

Gérard, Pierre R; Presgraves, Daven C

2012-02-01

361

Amifostine alleviates radiation-induced lethal small bowel damage via promotion of 14-3-3?-mediated nuclear p53 accumulation  

PubMed Central

Amifostine (AM) is a radioprotector that scavenges free radicals and is used in patients undergoing radiotherapy. p53 has long been implicated in cell cycle arrest for cellular repair after radiation exposure. We therefore investigated the protective p53-dependent mechanism of AM on small bowel damage after lethal whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI). AM increased both the survival rate of rats and crypt survival following lethal 18 Gy WAI. The p53 inhibitor PFT-? compromised AM-mediated effects when administered prior to AM administration. AM significantly increased clonogenic survival in IEC-6 cells expressing wild type p53 but not in p53 knockdown cells. AM significantly increased p53 nuclear accumulation and p53 tetramer expression before irradiation through the inhibition of p53 degradation. AM inhibited p53 interactions with MDM2 but enhanced p53 interactions with 14-3-3?. Knockdown of 14-3-3? also compromised the effect of AM on clonogenic survival and p53 nuclear accumulation in IEC-6 cells. For the first time, our data reveal that AM alleviates lethal small bowel damage through the induction of 14-3-3? and subsequent accumulation of p53. Enhancement of the p53/14-3-3? interaction results in p53 tetramerization in the nucleus that rescues lethal small bowel damage. PMID:25230151

Chen, Yu-Min; Chen, Yi-Fan; Wang, Chung-Chi; Lin, I-Hui; Huang, Yu-Jie; Yang, Kuender D.

2014-01-01

362

Injury Risk Assessment of Non-Lethal Projectile Head Impacts  

PubMed Central

Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as “force wall approach” suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the “force wall approach” and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics. PMID:25400712

Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

2014-01-01

363

Injury risk assessment of non-lethal projectile head impacts.  

PubMed

Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as "force wall approach" suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the "force wall approach" and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics. PMID:25400712

Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

2014-01-01

364

Rad52 inactivation is synthetically lethal with BRCA2 deficiency  

PubMed Central

Synthetic lethality is a powerful approach to study selective cell killing based on genotype. We show that loss of Rad52 function is synthetically lethal with breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) deficiency, whereas there was no impact on cell growth and viability in BRCA2-complemented cells. The frequency of both spontaneous and double-strand break-induced homologous recombination and ionizing radiation-induced Rad51 foci decreased by 2–10 times when Rad52 was depleted in BRCA2-deficient cells, with little to no effect in BRCA2-complemented cells. The absence of both Rad52 and BRCA2 resulted in extensive chromosome aberrations, especially chromatid-type aberrations. Ionizing radiation-induced and S phase-associated Rad52-Rad51 foci form equally well in the presence or absence of BRCA2, indicating that Rad52 can respond to DNA double-strand breaks and replication stalling independently of BRCA2. Rad52 thus is an independent and alternative repair pathway of homologous recombination and a target for therapy in BRCA2-deficient cells. PMID:21148102

Feng, Zhihui; Scott, Shaun P.; Bussen, Wendy; Sharma, Girdhar G.; Guo, Gongshe; Pandita, Tej K.; Powell, Simon N.

2011-01-01

365

Lethal and mutagenic action of hydrogen peroxide on Haemophilus influenzae.  

PubMed Central

The lethal and mutagenic effects of H2O2 on wild-type Haemophilus influenzae Rd and on uvr1, uvr2, rec1, and rec2 mutant strains were studied. The first two mutants are sensitive to UV, and the second two are defective in recombination. Rd, urv1, and rec1 strains were more sensitive to the killing effect of H2O2 treatment than were uvr2 and rec2 strains. There were peaks of mutagenesis at two H2O2 concentrations over a range of 30 to 275 mM. Our results suggest a specific repair of H2O2 damage that is independent of the Uvr2 and Rec2 gene products. Sensitivity to the killing effect of H2O2 and to the lethal action of near-UV light were similar for Rd and uvr1 strains. This finding suggests that the mechanisms of killing by and repair of H2O2 damage may have some overlap with those of near-UV radiation. PMID:1917884

Sánchez-Rincón, D A; Cabrera-Juárez, E

1991-01-01

366

Equation of state and fragmentation issues in computational lethality analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to summarize the status of computational analysis of hypervelocity impact lethality in relatively nontechnical terms from the perspective of the author. It is not intended to be a review of the technical literature on the problems of concern. The discussion is focused by concentrating on two phenomenology areas which are of particular concern in computational impact studies. First, the material`s equation of state, specifically the treatment of expanded states of metals undergoing shock vaporization, is discussed. Second, the process of dynamic fragmentation is addressed. In both cases, the context of the discussion deals with inaccuracies and difficulties associated with numerical hypervelocity impact simulations. Laboratory experimental capabilities in hypervelocity impact for impact velocities greater than 10.0 km/s are becoming increasingly viable. This paper also gives recommendations for experimental thrusts which utilize these capabilities that will help to resolve the uncertainties in the numerical lethality studies that are pointed out in the present report.

Trucano, T.G.

1993-07-01

367

The lethal effects of Cyperus iria on Aedes aegypti.  

PubMed

The sedge Cyperus iria, a common weed in rice, contains large amounts of the insect hormone (10R) juvenile hormone III (JH III). Given its widespread distribution in Asia and Africa, we examined the possibility that C. iria could be used as a safe, inexpensive, and readily available mosquito larvicide. Plants of varying ages were harvested and leaves tested for lethal effects on larvae of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. The median lethal doses (LD50s) for frozen leaves from 1- and 2-month-old plants were 267 and 427 mg/100 ml of water, respectively. Leaves from 1-month-old C. iria contained 193 micrograms JH III/g fresh weight, whereas leaves from 2-month-old plants contained 143 micrograms JH III/g fresh weight. Larval sensitivity to the plant differed with age; 4-day-old larvae displayed the greatest mortality followed in decreasing sensitivity by larvae 5, 6, 3, and 2 days old. Six Cyperus species (C. albostriatus, C. alternifolius, C. esculentus, C. iria, C. miliifolius, and C. papyrus) of similar developmental stage were assayed for JH III content. Only C. iria was found to contain significant levels of JH III. PMID:9599328

Schwartz, A M; Paskewitz, S M; Orth, A P; Tesch, M J; Toong, Y C; Goodman, W G

1998-03-01

368

Suppressive Effects of Anthrax Lethal Toxin on Megakaryopoiesis  

PubMed Central

Anthrax lethal toxin (LT) is a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis. LT challenge suppresses platelet counts and platelet function in mice, however, the mechanism responsible for thrombocytopenia remains unclear. LT inhibits cellular mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are vital pathways responsible for cell survival, differentiation, and maturation. One of the MAPKs, the MEK1/2-extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway, is particularly important in megakaryopoiesis. This study evaluates the hypothesis that LT may suppress the progenitor cells of platelets, thereby inducing thrombocytopenic responses. Using cord blood-derived CD34+ cells and mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells to perform in vitro differentiation, this work shows that LT suppresses megakaryopoiesis by reducing the survival of megakaryocytes. Thrombopoietin treatments can reduce thrombocytopenia, megakaryocytic suppression, and the quick onset of lethality in LT-challenged mice. These results suggest that megakaryocytic suppression is one of the mechanisms by which LT induces thrombocytopenia. These findings may provide new insights for developing feasible approaches against anthrax. PMID:23555687

Lin, Guan-Ling; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Lai, Yi-Ling; Lin, Ting-Kai; Hsieh, Ming-Chun; Kau, Jyh-Hwa; Huang, Hsin-Hsien; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Liao, Chi-Yuan; Sun, Der-Shan

2013-01-01

369

Functional wiring of the yeast kinome revealed by global analysis of genetic network motifs  

PubMed Central

A combinatorial genetic perturbation strategy was applied to interrogate the yeast kinome on a genome-wide scale. We assessed the global effects of gene overexpression or gene deletion to map an integrated genetic interaction network of synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) and loss-of-function genetic interactions (GIs) for 92 kinases, producing a meta-network of 8700 GIs enriched for pathways known to be regulated by cognate kinases. Kinases most sensitive to dosage perturbations had constitutive cell cycle or cell polarity functions under standard growth conditions. Condition-specific screens confirmed that the spectrum of kinase dosage interactions can be expanded substantially in activating conditions. An integrated network composed of systematic SDL, negative and positive loss-of-function GIs, and literature-curated kinase–substrate interactions revealed kinase-dependent regulatory motifs predictive of novel gene-specific phenotypes. Our study provides a valuable resource to unravel novel functional relationships and pathways regulated by kinases and outlines a general strategy for deciphering mutant phenotypes from large-scale GI networks. PMID:22282571

Sharifpoor, Sara; van Dyk, Dewald; Costanzo, Michael; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Friesen, Helena; Douglas, Alison C.; Youn, Ji-Young; VanderSluis, Benjamin; Myers, Chad L.; Papp, Balázs; Boone, Charles; Andrews, Brenda J.

2012-01-01

370

The Maternally Expressed WRKY Transcription Factor TTG2 Controls Lethality in Interploidy Crosses of Arabidopsis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The molecular mechanisms underlying lethality of F1 hybrids between diverged parents are one target of speciation research. Crosses between diploid and tetraploid individuals of the same genotype can result in F1 lethality, and this dosage-sensitive incompatibility plays a role in polyploid speciation. We have identified variation in F1 lethality in interploidy crosses of Arabidopsis thaliana and determined the genetic architecture

Brian P Dilkes; Melissa Spielman; Renate Weizbauer; Brian Watson; Diana Burkart-Waco; Rod J Scott; Luca Comai

2008-01-01

371

Impulsivity, aggression and brain structure in high and low lethality suicide attempters with borderline personality disorder.  

PubMed

Impulsivity and aggressiveness are trait dispositions associated with the vulnerability to suicidal behavior across diagnoses. They are associated with structural and functional abnormalities in brain networks involved in regulation of mood, impulse and behavior. They are also core characteristics of borderline personality disorder (BPD), a disorder defined, in part, by recurrent suicidal behavior. We assessed the relationships between personality traits, brain structure and lethality of suicide attempts in 51 BPD attempters using multiple regression analyses on structural MRI data. BPD was diagnosed by the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline Patients-revised, impulsivity by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), aggression by the Brown-Goodwin Lifetime History of Aggression (LHA), and high lethality by a score of 4 or more on the Lethality Rating Scale (LRS). Sixteen High Lethality attempters were compared to 35 Low Lethality attempters, with no significant differences noted in gender, co-morbidity, childhood abuse, BIS or LHA scores. Degree of medical lethality (LRS) was negatively related to gray matter volumes across multiple fronto-temporal-limbic regions. Effects of impulsivity and aggression on gray matter volumes discriminated High from Low Lethality attempters and differed markedly within lethality groups. Lethality of suicide attempts in BPD may be related to the mediation of these personality traits by specific neural networks. PMID:24656768

Soloff, Paul; White, Richard; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A

2014-06-30

372

Defective Kernel Mutants of Maize. I. Genetic and Lethality Studies  

PubMed Central

A planting of 3,919 M1 kernels from normal ears crossed by EMS-treated pollen produced 3,461 M1 plants and 3,172 selfed ears. These plants yielded 2,477 (72%) total heritable changes; the selfed ears yielded 2,457 (78%) recessive mutants, including 855 (27%) recessive kernel mutants and 8 (0.23%) viable dominant mutants. The ratio of recessive to dominant mutants was 201:1. The average mutation frequency for four known loci was three per 3,172 genomes analyzed. The estimated total number of loci mutated was 535 and the estimated number of kernel mutant loci mutated was 285. Among the 855 kernel mutants, 432 had a nonviable embryo, and 59 germinated but had a lethal seedling. A sample of 194 of the latter two types was tested for heritability, lethality, chromosome arm location and endosperm-embryo interaction between mutant and nonmutant tissues in special hyper-hypoploid combinations produced by manipulation of B-A translocations. The selected 194 mutants were characterized and catalogued according to endosperm phenotype and investigated to determine their effects on the morphology and development of the associated embryo. The possibility of rescuing some of the lethal mutants by covering the mutant embryo with a normal endosperm was investigated. Ninety of these 194 mutants were located on 17 of the 18 chromosome arms tested. Nineteen of the located mutants were examined to determine the effect of having a normal embryo in the same kernel with a mutant endosperm, and vice versa, as compared to the expression observed in kernels with both embryo and endosperm in a mutant condition. In the first situation, for three of the 19 mutants, the mutant endosperm was less extreme (the embryo helped); for seven cases, the mutant endosperm was more extreme (the embryo hindered); and for nine cases, there was no change. In the reverse situation, for four cases the normal endosperm helped the mutant embryo; for 14 cases there was no change and one case was inconclusive. PMID:17249053

Neuffer, M. G.; Sheridan, William F.

1980-01-01

373

Complex physiological traits as biomarkers of the sub-lethal toxicological effects of pollutant exposure in fishes.  

PubMed

Complex physiological traits, such as routine aerobic metabolic rate or exercise performance, are indicators of the functional integrity of fish that can reveal sub-lethal toxicological effects of aquatic pollutants. These traits have proved valuable in laboratory investigations of the sub-lethal effects of heavy metals, ammonia and various xenobiotics. It is not known, however, whether they can also function as biomarkers of the complex potential range of effects upon overall functional integrity caused by exposure to mixtures of chemicals in polluted natural environments. The current study used portable swimming respirometers to compare exercise performance and respiratory metabolism of fish exposed in cages for three weeks to either clean or polluted sites on three urban European river systems: the river Lambro, Milan, Italy; the rivers Blythe, Cole and Tame, Birmingham, UK; and the river Amstel, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The UK and Italian rivers were variously polluted with high levels of both bioavailable heavy metals and organics, and the Amstel by mixtures of bioavailable organics at high concentrations. In both the UK and Italy, indigenous chub (Leuciscus cephalus) exposed to clean or polluted sites swam equally well in an initial performance test, but the chub from polluted sites could not repeat this performance after a brief recovery interval. These animals were unable to raise the metabolic rate and allocate oxygen towards exercise in the second trial, an effect confirmed in successive campaigns in Italy. Swimming performance was therefore a biomarker indicator of pollutant exposure in chub exposed at these sites. Exposure to polluted sites on the river Amstel did not affect the repeat swimming performance of cultured cloned carp (Cyprinus carpio), indicating either a species-specific tolerance or relative absence of heavy metals. However, measurements of oxygen uptake during swimming revealed increased rates of routine aerobic metabolism in both chub and carp at polluted sites in all of the rivers studied, indicating a sub-lethal metabolic loading effect. Therefore, the physiological traits of exercise performance and metabolic rate have potential as biomarkers of the overall sub-lethal toxic effects of exposure to complex mixtures of pollutants in rivers, and may also provide insight into why fish do not colonize some polluted environments. PMID:17475615

McKenzie, D J; Garofalo, E; Winter, M J; Ceradini, S; Verweij, F; Day, N; Hayes, R; van der Oost, R; Butler, P J; Chipman, J K; Taylor, E W

2007-11-29

374

Active versus Passive Screen Time for Young Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we report some initial findings from our investigations into the Australian Government's Longitudinal Study of Australian Children dataset. It is revealed that the majority of Australian children are exceeding the government's Screen Time recommendations and that most of their screen time is spent as TV viewing, as opposed to video…

Sweetser, Penelope; Johnson, Daniel; Ozdowska, Anne; Wyeth, Peta

2012-01-01

375

Screening for Cancer by Residents in an Internal Medicine Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of cancer screening by internal medicine residents in an inner-city clinic revealed that screening was more frequent for male patients, and breast examinations and Pap smears were performed on less than a third of female patients, suggesting a need for more intensive early-detection education of residents. (MSE)

Lynch, Garrett R.; Prout, Marianne N.

1986-01-01

376

On the phenomenology of lethal applications of insulin.  

PubMed

This study deals with the postmortem findings in cases of lethal hypoglycaemia due to injections of insulin. In 12 cases (four female; eight male; mean age 42 years) the following aspects were evaluated retrospectively: circumstances of life, scene of death, pathomorphological findings and postmortem biochemistry on cerebrospinal fluid, vitreous humour, blood, and urine (levels of glucose, lactate, hemoglobin A1C and insulin). Furthermore, analyses of ethanol in blood and urine as well as toxicological and histological examinations were performed. Unexpectedly, the dead persons rarely represented diabetics, relatives of diabetics, or medical personnel. It is concluded, that the diagnosis of fatal hypoglycaemia can only be established by a synopsis of postmortem biochemistry, pathomorphological alterations and anamnesis. Besides, this diagnosis must always be made "per exclusionem". PMID:9618911

Kernbach-Wighton, G; Püschel, K

1998-04-22

377

Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection and lethal chytridiomycosis in caecilian amphibians (Gymnophiona).  

PubMed

Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is commonly termed the 'amphibian chytrid fungus' but thus far has been documented to be a pathogen of only batrachian amphibians (anurans and caudatans). It is not proven to infect the limbless, generally poorly known, and mostly soil-dwelling caecilians (Gymnophiona). We conducted the largest qPCR survey of Bd in caecilians to date, for more than 200 field-swabbed specimens from five countries in Africa and South America, representing nearly 20 species, 12 genera, and 8 families. Positive results were recovered for 58 specimens from Tanzania and Cameroon (4 families, 6 genera, 6+ species). Quantities of Bd were not exceptionally high, with genomic equivalent (GE) values of 0.052-17.339. In addition, we report the first evidence of lethal chytridiomycosis in caecilians. Mortality in captive (wild-caught, commercial pet trade) Geotrypetes seraphini was associated with GE scores similar to those we detected for field-swabbed, wild animals. PMID:23677560

Gower, David J; Doherty-Bone, Thomas; Loader, Simon P; Wilkinson, Mark; Kouete, Marcel T; Tapley, Benjamin; Orton, Frances; Daniel, Olivia Z; Wynne, Felicity; Flach, Edmund; Müller, Hendrik; Menegon, Michele; Stephen, Ian; Browne, Robert K; Fisher, Mathew C; Cunningham, Andrew A; Garner, Trenton W J

2013-06-01

378

Moving forward with reactive oxygen species involvement in antimicrobial lethality.  

PubMed

Support for the contribution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to antimicrobial lethality has been refined and strengthened. Killing by diverse antimicrobials is enhanced by defects in genes that protect against ROS, inhibited by compounds that block hydroxyl radical accumulation, and is associated with surges in intracellular ROS. Moreover, support has emerged for a genetic pathway that controls the level of ROS. Since some antimicrobials kill in the absence of ROS, ROS must add to, rather than replace, known killing mechanisms. New work has addressed many of the questions concerning the specificity of dyes used to detect intracellular ROS and the specificity of perturbations that influence ROS surges. However, complexities associated with killing under anaerobic conditions remain to be resolved. Distinctions among primary lesion formation, resistance, direct lesion-mediated killing and a self-destructive stress response are discussed to facilitate efforts to potentiate ROS-mediated bacterial killing and improve antimicrobial efficacy. PMID:25422287

Zhao, Xilin; Hong, Yuzhi; Drlica, Karl

2015-03-01

379

Composite scintillator screen  

DOEpatents

A scintillator screen for an X-ray system includes a substrate of low-Z material and bodies of a high-Z material embedded within the substrate. By preselecting the size of the bodies embedded within the substrate, the spacial separation of the bodies and the thickness of the screen, the sensitivity of the screen to X-rays within a predetermined energy range can be predicted.

Zeman, Herbert D. (1687 Peach St., Memphis, TN 38112)

1994-01-01

380

ScreenFlow  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Capturing images and screen shots can be tricky, and it's nice to hear about new applications that can help out with such tasks. ScreenFlow allows users to create screen recordings and it also includes an array of editing options. Visitors should note that this is a trial version, and that the full-featured version costs $99. This version is compatible with computers running Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard.

2008-01-01

381

Lethal Dietary Toxicities of Environmental Contaminants and Pesticides to Coturnix  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Five-day subacute dietary toxicity tests of 193 potential environmental contaminants, pesticides, organic solvents, and various adjuvants are presented for young coturnix (Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica Temminck and Schlegel). The report provides the most comprehensive data base available for avian subacute dietary toxicity tests and is primarily intended for use in ranking toxicities by a standard method that has a reasonable degree of environmental relevance. Findings are presented in two parts: Part I is a critique of selected drugs that includes discussion of subacute toxicity in relation to chemical class and structure, pesticide formulation, and age of animals; Part II is a summary of toxicologic findings for each test substance and provides a statistically basis for comparing toxicities. Data presented include the median lethal concentration (LC50), slope of the probit regression curve (dose-response curve), response chronology, and food consumption. We observed that: 1) fewer than 15% of the compounds were classed 'very' or 'highly' toxic (i.e, LC50 < 200 ppm) and all of these were either chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphates, or organometallics; 2) subacute toxicity may vary widely among structurally similar chemicals and between different formulations of the same chemical; therefore, conclusions about lethal hazard must be made cautiously until the actual formulation of inset has been tested: 3) inclusion of a general standard in each battery of tests is useful for detection of atypical trials and monitoring population changes but should not be used indiscriminantly for adjusting LC50's for intertest differences unless the chemicals of concern and the standard elicit their toxicities through the same action; 4) although other species have been tested effectively under the subacute protocol, coturnix were ideal for the stated purpose of this research because they are inexpensive, well-adapted to the laboratory environment, and yield good intertest reproducibility of response.

Hill, E.F.; Camardese, M.B.

1986-01-01

382

An exome sequencing strategy to diagnose lethal autosomal recessive disorders.  

PubMed

Rare disorders resulting in prenatal or neonatal death are genetically heterogeneous. For some conditions, affected fetuses can be diagnosed by ultrasound scan, but this is not usually possible until mid-gestation. There is often limited fetal DNA available for investigation. We investigated a strategy for diagnosing autosomal recessive lethal disorders in non-consanguineous pedigrees with multiple affected fetuses. Exome sequencing was performed to identify genes where each parent is heterozygous for a rare non-synonymous-coding or splicing variant. Putative pathogenic variants were tested for cosegregation in affected fetuses and unaffected siblings. In eight couples of European ancestry, we found on average 1.75 genes (range 0-4) where both parents were heterozygous for rare potentially deleterious variants. A proof-of-principle study detected heterozygous DYNC2H1 variants in a couple whose five fetuses had short-rib polydactyly. Prospective analysis of two couples with multiple pregnancy terminations for fetal akinesia syndrome was performed and a diagnosis was obtained in both the families. The first couple were each heterozygous for a previously reported GLE1 variant, p.Arg569His or p.Val617Met; both were inherited by their two affected fetuses. The second couple were each heterozygous for a novel RYR1 variant, c.14130-2A>G or p.Ser3074Phe; both were inherited by their three affected fetuses but not by their unaffected child. Biallelic GLE1 and RYR1 disease-causing variants have been described in other cases with fetal akinesia syndrome. We conclude that exome sequencing of parental samples can be an effective tool for diagnosing lethal recessive disorders in outbred couples. This permits early prenatal diagnosis in future pregnancies. PMID:24961629

Ellard, Sian; Kivuva, Emma; Turnpenny, Peter; Stals, Karen; Johnson, Matthew; Xie, Weijia; Caswell, Richard; Lango Allen, Hana

2015-03-01

383

Breast Screening Revisited  

PubMed Central

Breast screening is the medical screening of asymptomatic, apparently healthy women for breast lump in an attempt to achieve an earlier diagnosis. The assumption is that the early detection will improve outcomes. In western countries, breast screening programs have led to a significant reduction in mortality and improved prognosis of patients with breast cancer. However in India, although the number of breast cancer are on the rise there is no such organized program. This article emphasizes on the importance of breast screening and protocol to be followed in our country where it can have significant impact on the prognosis.

Agrawal, Alka; Tripathi, Prem; Sahu, Abhinav; Daftary, Jalpa

2014-01-01

384

Combination of hearing screening and genetic screening for deafness-susceptibility genes in newborns  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of the results of screening of newborn hearing and the incidence of deafness-susceptibility genes. One thousand newborn babies in the Handan Center Hospital (Handan, China) underwent screening of hearing and deafness-susceptibility genes. The first screening test was carried out using otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Babies with hearing loss who failed to pass the initial screening were scheduled for rescreening at 42 days after birth. Cord blood was used for the screening of deafness-susceptibility genes, namely the GJB2, SLC26A4 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA (MTRNR1) genes. Among the 1,000 neonates that underwent the first hearing screening, 25 exhibited left-sided hearing loss, 21 exhibited right-sided hearing loss and 15 cases had binaural hearing loss. After rescreening 42 days later, only one of the initial 61 cases exhibited hearing loss under OAE testing. The neonatal deafness gene tests showed two cases with 1555A>G mutation and two cases with 1494C>T mutation of the MTRNR1 gene. In the SLC26A4 gene screening, four cases exhibited the heterozygous IVS7-2A>G mutation and one case exhibited heterozygous 1226G>A mutation. In the GJB2 gene screening, two cases exhibited the homozygous 427C>T mutation and 10 exhibited the heterozygous 235delC mutation. The genetic screening revealed 21 newborns with mutations in the three deafness-susceptibility genes. The overall carrier rate was 2.1% (21/1,000). The association of hearing and gene screening may be the promising screening strategy for the diagnosis of hearing loss. PMID:24348793

YAO, GEN-DONG; LI, SHOU-XIA; CHEN, DING-LI; FENG, HAI-QIN; ZHAO, SU-BIN; LIU, YONG-JIE; GUO, LI-LI; YANG, ZHI-MING; ZHANG, XIAO-FANG; SUN, CAI-XIA; WANG, ZE-HUI; ZHANG, WEI-YONG

2014-01-01

385

Co-lethality studied as an asset against viral drug escape: the HIV protease case  

PubMed Central

Background Co-lethality, or synthetic lethality is the documented genetic situation where two, separately non-lethal mutations, become lethal when combined in one genome. Each mutation is called a "synthetic lethal" (SL) or a co-lethal. Like invariant positions, SL sets (SL linked couples) are choice targets for drug design against fast-escaping RNA viruses: mutational viral escape by loss of affinity to the drug may induce (synthetic) lethality. Results From an amino acid sequence alignment of the HIV protease, we detected the potential SL couples, potential SL sets, and invariant positions. From the 3D structure of the same protein we focused on the ones that were close to each other and accessible on the protein surface, to possibly bind putative drugs. We aligned 24,155 HIV protease amino acid sequences and identified 290 potential SL couples and 25 invariant positions. After applying the distance and accessibility filter, three candidate drug design targets of respectively 7 (under the flap), 4 (in the cantilever) and 5 (in the fulcrum) amino acid positions were found. Conclusions These three replication-critical targets, located outside of the active site, are key to our anti-escape strategy. Indeed, biological evidence shows that 2/3 of those target positions perform essential biological functions. Their mutational variations to escape antiviral medication could be lethal, thus limiting the apparition of drug-resistant strains. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian, Shamil Sunyaev and Claus Wilke. PMID:20565756

2010-01-01

386

Evaluating the Predictive Validity of Suicidal Intent and Medical Lethality in Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: To examine whether suicidal intent and medical lethality of past suicide attempts are predictive of future attempts, the association between intent and lethality, and the consistency of these characteristics across repeated attempts among youth. Method: Suicide attempts in a 15-year prospective study of 180 formerly psychiatrically…

Sapyta, Jeffrey; Goldston, David B.; Erkanli, Alaattin; Daniel, Stephanie S.; Heilbron, Nicole; Mayfield, Andrew; Treadway, S. Lyn

2012-01-01

387

Improving on Army Field Gauze for Lethal Vascular Injuries: Challenges in Dressing Development  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Accounting for half of all deaths, uncontrolled hemorrhage remains the leading cause of death on the battlefield. Gaining hemostatic control of lethal vascular injuries sustained in combat using topical agents remains a challenge. Recent animal testing using a lethal arterial injury model compared a...

388

Non-lethal effect of the invasive predator Bythotrephes longimanus on Daphnia mendotae  

E-print Network

Non-lethal effect of the invasive predator Bythotrephes longimanus on Daphnia mendotae KEVIN L Arbor, MI, U.S.A. SUMMARY 1. We evaluated the antipredator behaviour of Daphnia mendotae to the invasive (referred to as a non-lethal effect of the predator). 2. In a laboratory experiment, Daphnia in the absence

389

The Danger Assessment: Validation of a Lethality Risk Assessment Instrument for Intimate Partner Femicide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Danger Assessment (DA) is an instrument designed to assess the likelihood of lethality or near lethality occurring in a case of intimate partner violence. This article describes the development, psychometric validation, and suggestions for use of the DA. An 11-city study of intimate partner femicide used multivariate analysis to test the…

Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Webster, Daniel W.; Glass, Nancy

2009-01-01

390

Examining the Impact of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Comorbidity on the Medical Lethality of Adolescent "Suicide Attempts"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Specific psychiatric diagnoses and comorbidity patterns were examined to determine if they were related to the medical lethality of "suicide attempts" among adolescents presenting to an urban general hospital (N = 375). Bivariate analysis showed that attempters with substance abuse disorders had higher levels of lethality than attempters without…

Mc Manama O'Brien, Kimberly H.; Berzin, Stephanie C.

2012-01-01

391

ORIGINAL PAPER Evaluating the impact of non-lethal DNA sampling on two  

E-print Network

from the US Fish and Wildlife Service to sample DNA from N. m. mitchellii populations. We suggestORIGINAL PAPER Evaluating the impact of non-lethal DNA sampling on two butterflies, Vanessa cardui not be desirable or permitted. We set out to develop a demonstrably non-lethal method of obtaining DNA from

Landis, Doug

392

Lethality and Autonomous Systems: The Roboticist Demographic Lilia V. Moshkina and Ronald C. Arkin  

E-print Network

responded. Section IV presents a summary and future work, some of which is already underway. 2. Survey of lethal force in warfare. The main objective of the survey is to determine the level of acceptance, of the employment of potentially lethal robots in warfare, as well as their attitude towards related ethical issues

393

Structure, Culture, and Lethality: An Integrated Model Approach to American Indian Suicide and Homicide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Investigations of lethal violence in the United States have primarily focused on Whites and\\/or African Americans, generally ignoring American Indians. Interestingly, statistics indicate that homicide and suicide rates among American Indians are often higher than other racial\\/ethnic groups within the United States. In an attempt to understand these lethal violence patterns, the current study utilizes the integrated model of suicide

Christina Lanier

2010-01-01

394

Searching for Synergies: Matrix Algebraic Approaches for Efficient Pair Screening  

PubMed Central

Functionally interacting perturbations, such as synergistic drugs pairs or synthetic lethal gene pairs, are of key interest in both pharmacology and functional genomics. However, to find such pairs by traditional screening methods is both time consuming and costly. We present a novel computational-experimental framework for efficient identification of synergistic target pairs, applicable for screening of systems with sizes on the order of current drug, small RNA or SGA (Synthetic Genetic Array) libraries (>1000 targets). This framework exploits the fact that the response of a drug pair in a given system, or a pair of genes' propensity to interact functionally, can be partly predicted by computational means from (i) a small set of experimentally determined target pairs, and (ii) pre-existing data (e.g. gene ontology, PPI) on the similarities between targets. Predictions are obtained by a novel matrix algebraic technique, based on cyclical projections onto convex sets. We demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method using drug-drug interaction data from seven cancer cell lines and gene-gene interaction data from yeast SGA screens. Our protocol increases the rate of synergism discovery significantly over traditional screening, by up to 7-fold. Our method is easy to implement and could be applied to accelerate pair screening for both animal and microbial systems. PMID:23935877

Gerlee, Philip; Schmidt, Linnéa; Monsefi, Naser; Kling, Teresia; Jörnsten, Rebecka; Nelander, Sven

2013-01-01

395

Lung cancer screening.  

PubMed

The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in adults of age 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and are currently smoking or have quit within the past 15 years. This recommendation is largely based on the findings of the National Lung Screening Trial. Both policy-level and clinical decision-making about LDCT screening must consider the potential benefits of screening (reduced mortality from lung cancer) and possible harms. Effective screening requires an appreciation that screening should be limited to individuals at high risk of death from lung cancer, and that the risk of harm related to false positive findings, overdiagnosis, and unnecessary invasive testing is real. A comprehensive understanding of these aspects of screening will inform appropriate implementation, with the objective that an evidence-based and systematic approach to screening will help to reduce the enormous mortality burden of lung cancer. PMID:25369325

Tanoue, Lynn T; Tanner, Nichole T; Gould, Michael K; Silvestri, Gerard A

2015-01-01

396

Screening for dementia in \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among elderly people who do not present with complaints of memory impairment, dementia is often missed by physicians, and time-consuming screening tests requiring expertise to administer and interpret are rarely done. Easily administered, reliable and cost effective dementia screening tests are needed for elderly individuals. The \\

Joan M. Swearer; David A. Drachman; Lynn Li; Kevin J. Kane; Brian Dessureau; Patricia Tabloski

2002-01-01

397

Screening for School Entry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Screening programs are now widely used with children who are age-eligible for school entry. Screening is used to identify children who may be at risk of future difficulty in school (e.g., inability to meet academic expectations) and those who may have special needs in learning (e.g., extraordinary abilities and talents or handicapping conditions).…

Hills, Tynette Wilson

398

Scoliosis Screening in Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The booklet outlines New York state school policy and procedures for screening students for scoliosis, lateral curvature of the spine. It is explained that screening is designed to discover spinal deformities early enough to prevent surgery. Planning aspects, including organizing a planning team for the school district, are discussed. Among…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Pupil Personnel Services.

399

Film Screening and Conversation  

E-print Network

Film Screening and Conversation 2011 6-9pm Smithsonian Asian Paci c American Program Rasmuson Director John Sayles Film Run Time: 124 minutes Closest Metro: L'Enfant Plaza Related Traveling Exhibition, the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program presents a screening of the film Amigo and a conversation

Mathis, Wayne N.

400

Breast cancer screening.  

PubMed

Mammography remains the primary technique for breast cancer screening. Women with dense breast tissue may benefit from digital mammography and tomosynthesis, and women at high risk may benefit from magnetic resonance imaging. However, false-positive results are problematic. The North Carolina breast density law necessitates education about screening options for women with dense breasts. PMID:24663133

Freimanis, Rita I; Yacobozzi, Margaret

2014-01-01

401

Development of a detection sensor for lethal H2S gas.  

PubMed

The gas which may be lethal to human body with short-term exposure in common industrial fields or workplaces in LAB may paralyze the olfactory sense and impose severe damages to central nervous system and lung. This study is concerned with the gas sensor which allows individuals to avoid the toxic gas that may be generated in the space with residues of organic wastes under 50 degrees C or above. This study investigates response and selectivity of the sensor to hydrogen sulfide gas with operating temperatures and catalysts. The thick-film semiconductor sensor for hydrogen sulfide gas detection was fabricated WO3/SnO2 prepared by sol-gel and precipitation methods. The nanosized SnO2 powder mixed with the various metal oxides (WO3, TiO2, and ZnO) and doped with transition metals (Au, Ru, Pd Ag and In). Particle sizes, specific surface areas and phases of sensor materials were investigated by SEM, BET and XRD analyses. The metal-WO3/SnO2 thick films were prepared by screen-printing method. The measured response to hydrogen sulfide gas is defined as the ratio (Ra/R,) of the resistance of WO3ISnO2 film in air to the resistance of WO3/SnO2 film in a hydrogen sulfide gas. It was shown that the highest response and selectivity of the sensor for hydrogen sulfide by doping with 1 wt% Ru and 10 wt% WO3 to SnO2 at the optimum operating temperature of 200 degrees C. PMID:22966558

Park, Young-Ho; Kim, Yong-Jae; Lee, Chang-Seop

2012-07-01

402

Spinal Cord Compression Revealing an Intraosseous Schwannoma  

PubMed Central

A 68-year-old female presented with inflammatory lumbalgia and cruralgia. Physical examination revealed a lumbar stiffness without neurological deficit. Secondarily, paraplegia and urinary retention appeared. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a vertebral compaction of L3 vertebra with medullar compression. Emergent surgery revealed an epidural tumor involving largely the L3 vertebral body. Histology found schwannoma with positive protein S100 on the immunohistochemical study. Metastasis screening revealed bilateral nodular lesions of the lungs and a trochanter high scintigraphic signal. It was a malignant schwannoma. The patient underwent radiotherapy in addition to the total tumor resection. PMID:24381595

Metoui, Leila; Ajili, Faïda; Maiza, Mouna; Ben Ammar, Mehdi; Gharsallah, Imen; M'sakni, Issam; Louzir, Bassem; Othmani, Salah

2013-01-01

403

Reconstructing the Lethal Part of the 1790 Eruption at Kilauea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The most lethal known eruption from a volcano in the United States took place in November 1790 at Kilauea, killing perhaps 400-800 people (estimates range widely) who were crossing the summit on their way to a distant battle site. The eruption culminated ca. 300 years of sporadic explosive activity after the formation of Kilauea Caldera in about 1500. No contemporary account exists of the 1790 activity, but an eruption plume was observed from Kawaihae, 100 km NW of Kilauea, that probably was 10 km or higher. We are attempting to piece together the lethal event from a study of the 1790 and enclosing deposits and by using published accounts, written several decades later, based on interviews with survivors or others with knowledge of the tragedy. Determining what deposits actually formed in November 1790 is crucial. The best tie to that date is a deposit of phreatomagmatic lithic lapilli and ash that occurs SE of the caldera and must have been advected by high-level (>~10 km) westerly winds rather than low-level NE trade winds. It is the only contender for deposits from the high column observed in 1790. Small lapilli from the high column fell onto, and sank deeply into, a 3-5-cm-thick accretionary lapilli layer that was wet and likely no more than a few hours old. The wet ash occurs south of the caldera, where the lithic lapilli fell into it, and is also found west of the caldera in the saddle between Kilauea and Mauna Loa, where the victims were probably walking along a main foot trail still visible today. A lithic pyroclastic surge swept across the saddle, locally scouring away the wet accretionary lapilli layer but generally leaving a deposit <1 to 15 cm thick on the ash and embedding 1-cm lithic lapilli deeply within it. This indicates that the surge also erupted in November 1790, while the underlying ash was still wet. Though scattered ballistic blocks later fell in the area, the surge left the youngest continuous deposit on the west flank of Kilauea. An account written in 1843 by Rev. Sheldon Dibble describes the dead victims as lying on the surface or "sitting upright clasping with dying grasp their wives and children," not buried by ash or battered by falling debris, and "thoroughly scorched" but "in no place deeply burnt." These gruesome details suggest that the surge engulfed the victims, some of whom were clasping one another to keep from being blown away. The surge deposit covers an area of 12-15 sq km on the western flank of Kilauea between the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) and the main highway around the island. The fatalities probably took place in this area, now visited daily by 5000 travelers to Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. Several human footprints, barely discernible through the thin surge deposit, indent the surface of the accretionary lapilli ash near HVO. Do they record someone's last footsteps? We do not yet know when the eruption started or how many units older than the accretionary lapilli ash were also erupted in 1790. But we think we have identified the lethal surge of the eruption, and it is sobering to realize that it overwhelmed the place where this abstract is being written 221 years later.

Swanson, D.; Weaver, S. J.; Houghton, B. F.

2011-12-01

404

Lipid-enriched diet rescues lethality and slows down progression in a murine model of VCP-associated disease.  

PubMed

Valosin-containing protein (VCP)-associated disease caused by mutations in the VCP gene includes combinations of a phenotypically heterogeneous group of disorders such as hereditary inclusion body myopathy, Paget's disease of bone, frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Currently, there are no effective treatments for VCP myopathy or dementia. VCP mouse models carrying the common R155H mutation include several of the features typical of the human disease. In our previous investigation, VCP(R155H/R155H) homozygous mice exhibited progressive weakness and accelerated pathology prior to their early demise. Herein, we report that feeding pregnant VCP(R155H/+) heterozygous dams with a lipid-enriched diet (LED) results in the reversal of the lethal phenotype in VCP(R155H/R155H) homozygous offspring. We examined the effects of this diet on homozygous and wild-type mice from birth until 9 months of age. The LED regimen improved survival, motor activity, muscle pathology and the autophagy cascade. A targeted lipidomic analysis of skeletal muscle and liver revealed elevations in tissue levels of non-esterified palmitic acid and ceramide (d18:1/16:0), two lipotoxic substances, in the homozygous mice. The ability to reverse lethality, increase survival, and ameliorate myopathy and lipids deficits in the VCP(R155H/R155H) homozygous animals suggests that lipid supplementation may be a promising therapeutic strategy for patients with VCP-associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24158850

Llewellyn, Katrina J; Nalbandian, Angèle; Jung, Kwang-Mook; Nguyen, Christopher; Avanesian, Agnesa; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Piomelli, Daniele; Kimonis, Virginia E

2014-03-01

405

New strain of mouse hepatitis virus as the cause of lethal enteritis in infant mice.  

PubMed Central

A new strain of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) was isolated from pooled gut suspensions from an epizootic of lethal enteritis in newborn mice. Negative-contrast electron microscopy showed an abundance of coronavirus particles in the intestinal contents and intestinal epithelium of moribund mice. We found no other virus in the epizootic. Dams seroconverted to MHV polyvalent antigen and to the agent isolated, but did not develop antibodies to other known mouse pathogens. Virus propagated in NCTC-1469 tissue culture produced enteric disease in suckling mice but not fatal diarrhea; the dams of these mice also developed antibodies to MHV and to the isolates. By complement fixation, single radial hemolysis, and quantal neutralization tests, we found the isolates antigenically most closely related to MHV-S, unilaterally related to MHV-JHM, and more distantly related to MHV-1, MHV-3, MHV-A59, and human coronavirus OC-43. We also studied cross-reactions among the murine and human coronaviruses in detail. Tissues of infected newborn mice were examined by light microscopy, thin-section electron microscopy, and frozen-section indirect immunofluorescence, revealing that viral antigen, virus particles, and pathological changes were limited to the intestinal tract. We have designated our isolates as MHV-S/CDC. Images PMID:222687

Hierholzer, J C; Broderson, J R; Murphy, F A

1979-01-01

406

Hyperactivation of Alk induces neonatal lethality in knock-in AlkF1178L mice  

PubMed Central

The ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) gene encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor preferentially expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. A syndromic presentation associating congenital neuroblastoma with severe encephalopathy and an abnormal shape of the brainstem has been described in patients harbouring de novo germline F1174V and F1245V ALK mutations. Here, we investigated the phenotype of knock-in (KI) mice bearing the AlkF1178L mutation (F1174L in human). Although heterozygous KI mice did not reproduce the severe breathing and feeding difficulties observed in human patients, behavioral tests documented a reduced activity during dark phases and an increased anxiety of mutated mice. Matings of heterozygotes yielded the expected proportions of wild-type, heterozygotes and homozygotes at birth but a high neonatal lethality was noticed for homozygotes. We documented Alk expression in several motor nuclei of the brainstem involved in the control of sucking and swallowing. Evaluation of basic physiological functions 12 hours after birth revealed slightly more apneas but a dramatic reduced milk intake for homozygotes compared to control littermates. Overall, our data demonstrate that Alk activation above a critical threshold is not compatible with survival in mice, in agreement with the extremely severe phenotype of patients carrying aggressive de novo ALK germline mutations. PMID:24811761

Lopez-Delisle, Lucille; Pierre-Eugène, Cécile; Bloch-Gallego, Evelyne; Birling, Marie-Christine; Duband, Jean-Loup; Durand, Estelle; Bourgeois, Thomas; Matrot, Boris; Sorg, Tania; Huerre, Michel; Meziane, Hamid; Roux, Michel J.; Champy, Marie-France; Gallego, Jorge; Delattre, Olivier; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle

2014-01-01

407

Lethal giant larvae 2 regulates development of the ciliated organ Kupffer’s vesicle  

PubMed Central

Motile cilia perform crucial functions during embryonic development and throughout adult life. Development of organs containing motile cilia involves regulation of cilia formation (ciliogenesis) and formation of a luminal space (lumenogenesis) in which cilia generate fluid flows. Control of ciliogenesis and lumenogenesis is not yet fully understood, and it remains unclear whether these processes are coupled. In the zebrafish embryo, lethal giant larvae 2 (lgl2) is expressed prominently in ciliated organs. Lgl proteins are involved in establishing cell polarity and have been implicated in vesicle trafficking. Here, we identified a role for Lgl2 in development of ciliated epithelia in Kupffer’s vesicle, which directs left-right asymmetry of the embryo; the otic vesicles, which give rise to the inner ear; and the pronephric ducts of the kidney. Using Kupffer’s vesicle as a model ciliated organ, we found that depletion of Lgl2 disrupted lumen formation and reduced cilia number and length. Immunofluorescence and time-lapse imaging of Kupffer’s vesicle morphogenesis in Lgl2-deficient embryos suggested cell adhesion defects and revealed loss of the adherens junction component E-cadherin at lateral membranes. Genetic interaction experiments indicate that Lgl2 interacts with Rab11a to regulate E-cadherin and mediate lumen formation that is uncoupled from cilia formation. These results uncover new roles and interactions for Lgl2 that are crucial for both lumenogenesis and ciliogenesis and indicate that these processes are genetically separable in zebrafish. PMID:23482490

Tay, Hwee Goon; Schulze, Sabrina K.; Compagnon, Julien; Foley, Fiona C.; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Yost, H. Joseph; Abdelilah-Seyfried, Salim; Amack, Jeffrey D.

2013-01-01

408

Embryonic viability, lipase deficiency, hypertriglyceridemia and neonatal lethality in a novel LMF1-deficient mouse model  

PubMed Central

Background Lipase Maturation Factor 1 (LMF1) is an ER-chaperone involved in the post-translational maturation and catalytic activation of vascular lipases including lipoprotein lipase (LPL), hepatic lipase (HL) and endothelial lipase (EL). Mutations in LMF1 are associated with lipase deficiency and severe hypertriglyceridemia indicating the critical role of LMF1 in plasma lipid homeostasis. The currently available mouse model of LMF1 deficiency is based on a naturally occurring truncating mutation, combined lipase deficiency (cld), which may represent a hypomorphic allele. Thus, development of LMF1-null mice is needed to explore the phenotypic consequences of complete LMF1 deficiency. Findings In situ hybridization and qPCR analysis in the normal mouse embryo revealed ubiquitous and high-level LMF1 expression. To investigate if LMF1 was required for embryonic viability, a novel mouse model based on a null-allele of LMF1 was generated and characterized. LMF1-/- progeny were born at Mendelian ratios and exhibited combined lipase deficiency, hypertriglyceridemia and neonatal lethality. Conclusion Our results raise the possibility of a previously unrecognized role for LMF1 in embryonic development, but indicate that LMF1 is dispensable for the viability of mouse embryo. The novel mouse model developed in this study will be useful to investigate the full phenotypic spectrum of LMF1 deficiency. PMID:25302068

2014-01-01