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Sample records for lethality screen reveals

  1. High throughput synthetic lethality screen reveals a tumorigenic role of adenylate cyclase in fumarate hydratase-deficient cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Synthetic lethality is an appealing technique for selectively targeting cancer cells which have acquired molecular changes that distinguish them from normal cells. High-throughput RNAi-based screens have been successfully used to identify synthetic lethal pathways with well-characterized tumor suppressors and oncogenes. The recent identification of metabolic tumor suppressors suggests that the concept of synthetic lethality can be applied to selectively target cancer metabolism as well. Results Here, we perform a high-throughput RNAi screen to identify synthetic lethal genes with fumarate hydratase (FH), a metabolic tumor suppressor whose loss-of-function has been associated with hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC). Our unbiased screen identified synthetic lethality between FH and several genes in heme metabolism, in accordance with recent findings. Furthermore, we identified an enrichment of synthetic lethality with adenylate cyclases. The effects were validated in an embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293T) and in HLRCC-patient derived cells (UOK262) via both genetic and pharmacological inhibition. The reliance on adenylate cyclases in FH-deficient cells is consistent with increased cyclic-AMP levels, which may act to regulate cellular energy metabolism. Conclusions The identified synthetic lethality of FH with adenylate cyclases suggests a new potential target for treating HLRCC patients. PMID:24568598

  2. Synthetic lethal screening reveals FGFR as one of the combinatorial targets to overcome resistance to Met-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, B; Wang, S; Lee, J M; Jeong, Y; Ahn, T; Son, D-S; Park, H W; Yoo, H-s; Song, Y-J; Lee, E; Oh, Y M; Lee, S B; Choi, J; Murray, J C; Zhou, Y; Song, P H; Kim, K-A; Weiner, L M

    2015-02-26

    Met is a receptor tyrosine kinase that promotes cancer progression. In addition, Met has been implicated in resistance of tumors to various targeted therapies such as epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors in lung cancers, and has been prioritized as a key molecular target for cancer therapy. However, the underlying mechanism of resistance to Met-targeting drugs is poorly understood. Here, we describe screening of 1310 genes to search for key regulators related to drug resistance to an anti-Met therapeutic antibody (SAIT301) by using a small interfering RNA-based synthetic lethal screening method. We found that knockdown of 69 genes in Met-amplified MKN45 cells sensitized the antitumor activity of SAIT301. Pathway analysis of these 69 genes implicated fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) as a key regulator for antiproliferative effects of Met-targeting drugs. Inhibition of FGFR3 increased target cell apoptosis through the suppression of Bcl-xL expression, followed by reduced cancer cell growth in the presence of Met-targeting drugs. Treatment of cells with the FGFR inhibitors substantially restored the efficacy of SAIT301 in SAIT301-resistant cells and enhanced the efficacy in SAIT301-sensitive cells. In addition to FGFR3, integrin ?3 is another potential target for combination treatment with SAIT301. Suppression of integrin ?3 decreased AKT phosphorylation in SAIT301-resistant cells and restored SAIT301 responsiveness in HCC1954 cells, which are resistant to SAIT301. Gene expression analysis using CCLE database shows that cancer cells with high levels of FGFR and integrin ?3 are resistant to crizotinib treatment, suggesting that FGFR and integrin ?3 could be used as predictive markers for Met-targeted therapy and provide a potential therapeutic option to overcome acquired and innate resistance for the Met-targeting drugs. PMID:24662823

  3. Chemistry & Biology Synthetic Lethal Screening Identifies Compounds

    E-print Network

    Stockwell, Brent R.

    , oncogenic RAS cannot hydrolyze bound GTP and consequently binds downstream signaling proteins, including RAF screening. RAS is proposed to interact with more than 360 proteins (Bernards, 2005), and it is possible-Dependent, Nonapoptotic Cell Death in Oncogenic-RAS-Harboring Cancer Cells Wan Seok Yang1 and Brent R. Stockwell1,2,* 1

  4. RAS Synthetic Lethal Screens Revisited: Still Seeking the Elusive Prize?

    PubMed Central

    Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The RAS genes are critical oncogenic drivers activated by point mutation in some 20% of human malignancies. However, no pharmacological approaches to targeting RAS proteins directly have yet succeeded, leading to suggestions that these proteins may be “undruggable.” This has led to two alternative indirect approaches to targeting RAS function in cancer. One has been to target RAS signaling pathways downstream at tractable enzymes such as kinases, particularly in combination. The other, which is the focus of this review, has been to seek targets that are essential in cells bearing an activated RAS oncogene, but not those without. This synthetic lethal approach, while rooted in ideas from invertebrate genetics, has been inspired most strongly by the successful use of PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, in the clinic to treat BRCA defective cancers. Several large-scale screens have been carried out using RNA interference-mediated expression silencing to find genes that are uniquely essential to RAS mutant but not wild type cells. These screens have been notable for the low degree of overlap between their results, with the possible exception of proteasome components, and have yet to lead to successful new clinical approaches to the treatment of RAS mutant cancers. Possible reasons for these disappointing results are discussed here, along with a re-evaluation of the approaches taken. Based on experience to date, RAS synthetic lethality has so far fallen some way short of its original promise and remains unproven as an approach to finding effective new ways of tackling RAS mutant cancers. PMID:25878361

  5. A mouse chromosome 4 balancer ENU-mutagenesis screen isolates eleven lethal lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ENU-mutagenesis is a powerful technique to identify genes regulating mammalian development. To functionally annotate the distal region of mouse chromosome 4, we performed an ENU-mutagenesis screen using a balancer chromosome targeted to this region of the genome. We isolated 11 lethal lines that map...

  6. Synthetic lethal screening in the mammalian central nervous system identifies Gpx6 as a modulator of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shema, Reut; Kulicke, Ruth; Cowley, Glenn S.; Stein, Rachael; Root, David E.; Heiman, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease, the most common inherited neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by a dramatic loss of deep-layer cortical and striatal neurons, as well as morbidity in midlife. Human genetic studies led to the identification of the causative gene, huntingtin. Recent genomic advances have also led to the identification of hundreds of potential interacting partners for huntingtin protein and many hypotheses as to the molecular mechanisms whereby mutant huntingtin leads to cellular dysfunction and death. However, the multitude of possible interacting partners and cellular pathways affected by mutant huntingtin has complicated efforts to understand the etiology of this disease, and to date no curative therapeutic exists. To address the general problem of identifying the disease-phenotype contributing genes from a large number of correlative studies, here we develop a synthetic lethal screening methodology for the mammalian central nervous system, called SLIC, for synthetic lethal in the central nervous system. Applying SLIC to the study of Huntington’s disease, we identify the age-regulated glutathione peroxidase 6 (Gpx6) gene as a modulator of mutant huntingtin toxicity and show that overexpression of Gpx6 can dramatically alleviate both behavioral and molecular phenotypes associated with a mouse model of Huntington’s disease. SLIC can, in principle, be used in the study of any neurodegenerative disease for which a mouse model exists, promising to reveal modulators of neurodegenerative disease in an unbiased fashion, akin to screens in simpler model organisms. PMID:25535386

  7. Synthetic lethal RNAi screening identifies sensitizing targets for gemcitabine therapy in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azorsa, David O; Gonzales, Irma M; Basu, Gargi D; Choudhary, Ashish; Arora, Shilpi; Bisanz, Kristen M; Kiefer, Jeffrey A; Henderson, Meredith C; Trent, Jeffrey M; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Mousses, Spyro

    2009-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer retains a poor prognosis among the gastrointestinal cancers. It affects 230,000 individuals worldwide, has a very high mortality rate, and remains one of the most challenging malignancies to treat successfully. Treatment with gemcitabine, the most widely used chemotherapeutic against pancreatic cancer, is not curative and resistance may occur. Combinations of gemcitabine with other chemotherapeutic drugs or biological agents have resulted in limited improvement. Methods In order to improve gemcitabine response in pancreatic cancer cells, we utilized a synthetic lethal RNAi screen targeting 572 known kinases to identify genes that when silenced would sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Results Results from the RNAi screens identified several genes that, when silenced, potentiated the growth inhibitory effects of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells. The greatest potentiation was shown by siRNA targeting checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1). Validation of the screening results was performed in MIA PaCa-2 and BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells by examining the dose response of gemcitabine treatment in the presence of either CHK1 or CHK2 siRNA. These results showed a three to ten-fold decrease in the EC50 for CHK1 siRNA-treated cells versus control siRNA-treated cells while treatment with CHK2 siRNA resulted in no change compared to controls. CHK1 was further targeted with specific small molecule inhibitors SB 218078 and PD 407824 in combination with gemcitabine. Results showed that treatment of MIA PaCa-2 cells with either of the CHK1 inhibitors SB 218078 or PD 407824 led to sensitization of the pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Conclusion These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of synthetic lethal RNAi screening as a tool for identifying sensitizing targets to chemotherapeutic agents. These results also indicate that CHK1 could serve as a putative therapeutic target for sensitizing pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. PMID:19519883

  8. Lethality in PARP-1/Ku80 double mutant mice reveals physiologicalsynergy during early embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Henrie, Melinda S.; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Menissier-de Murcia, Josiane; de Murcia, Gilbert; Li, Gloria C.; Chen,David J.

    2002-09-24

    Ku is an abundant heterodimeric nuclear protein, consisting of 70-kDa and 86-kDa tightly associated subunits that comprise the DNA binding component of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Poly(ADP)ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a 113-kDa protein that catalyzes the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) on target proteins. Both Ku and PARP-1 recognize and bind to DNA ends. Ku functions in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway whereas PARP-1 functions in the single strand break repair and base excision repair (BER) pathways. Recent studies have revealed that PARP-1 and Ku80 interact in vitro. To determine whether the association of PARP-1 and Ku80 has any physiological significance or synergistic function in vivo, mice lacking both PARP-1 and Ku80 were generated. The resulting offspring died during embryonic development displaying abnormalities around the gastrulation stage. In addition, PARP-1-/-Ku80-/- cultured blastocysts had an increased level of apoptosis. These data suggest that the functions of both Ku80 and PARP-1 are essential for normal embryogenesis and that a loss of genomic integrity leading to cell death through apoptosis is likely the cause of the embryonic lethality observed in these mice.

  9. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies a Role for Lin-44/Wnt in C. elegans Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hartin, Samantha N.; Hudson, Martin L.; Yingling, Curtis; Ackley, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The C. elegans proteins PTP-3/LAR-RPTP and SDN-1/Syndecan are conserved cell adhesion molecules. Loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in either ptp-3 or sdn-1 result in low penetrance embryonic developmental defects. Work from other systems has shown that syndecans can function as ligands for LAR receptors in vivo. We used double mutant analysis to test whether ptp-3 and sdn-1 function in a linear genetic pathway during C. elegans embryogenesis. Results We found animals with LOF in both sdn-1 and ptp-3 exhibited a highly penetrant synthetic lethality (SynLet), with only a small percentage of animals surviving to adulthood. Analysis of the survivors demonstrated that these animals had a synergistic increase in the penetrance of embryonic developmental defects. Together, these data strongly suggested PTP-3 and SDN-1 function in parallel during embryogenesis. We subsequently used RNAi to knockdown ~3,600 genes predicted to encode secreted and/or transmembrane molecules to identify genes that interacted with ptp-3 or sdn-1. We found that the Wnt ligand, lin-44, was SynLet with sdn-1, but not ptp-3. We used 4-dimensional time-lapse analysis to characterize the interaction between lin-44 and sdn-1. We found evidence that loss of lin-44 caused defects in the polarization and migration of endodermal precursors during gastrulation, a previously undescribed role for lin-44 that is strongly enhanced by the loss of sdn-1. Conclusions PTP-3 and SDN-1 function in compensatory pathways during C. elegans embryonic and larval development, as simultaneous loss of both genes has dire consequences for organismal survival. The Wnt ligand lin-44 contributes to the early stages of gastrulation in parallel to sdn-1, but in a genetic pathway with ptp-3. Overall, the SynLet phenotype provides a robust platform to identify ptp-3 and sdn-1 interacting genes, as well as other genes that function in development, yet might be missed in traditional forward genetic screens. PMID:25938228

  10. An Arrayed Genome-Scale Lentiviral-Enabled Short Hairpin RNA Screen Identifies Lethal and Rescuer Gene Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Bhavneet; Antczak, Christophe; Ramirez, Christina N.; Shum, David; Liu-Sullivan, Nancy; Radu, Constantin; Frattini, Mark G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract RNA interference technology is becoming an integral tool for target discovery and validation.; With perhaps the exception of only few studies published using arrayed short hairpin RNA (shRNA) libraries, most of the reports have been either against pooled siRNA or shRNA, or arrayed siRNA libraries. For this purpose, we have developed a workflow and performed an arrayed genome-scale shRNA lethality screen against the TRC1 library in HeLa cells. The resulting targets would be a valuable resource of candidates toward a better understanding of cellular homeostasis. Using a high-stringency hit nomination method encompassing criteria of at least three active hairpins per gene and filtered for potential off-target effects (OTEs), referred to as the Bhinder–Djaballah analysis method, we identified 1,252 lethal and 6 rescuer gene candidates, knockdown of which resulted in severe cell death or enhanced growth, respectively. Cross referencing individual hairpins with the TRC1 validated clone database, 239 of the 1,252 candidates were deemed independently validated with at least three validated clones. Through our systematic OTE analysis, we have identified 31 microRNAs (miRNAs) in lethal and 2 in rescuer genes; all having a seed heptamer mimic in the corresponding shRNA hairpins and likely cause of the OTE observed in our screen, perhaps unraveling a previously unknown plausible essentiality of these miRNAs in cellular viability. Taken together, we report on a methodology for performing large-scale arrayed shRNA screens, a comprehensive analysis method to nominate high-confidence hits, and a performance assessment of the TRC1 library highlighting the intracellular inefficiencies of shRNA processing in general. PMID:23198867

  11. Alkylation sensitivity screens reveal a conserved cross-species functionome

    PubMed Central

    Svilar, David; Dyavaiah, Madhu; Brown, Ashley R.; Tang, Jiang-bo; Li, Jianfeng; McDonald, Peter R.; Shun, Tong Ying; Braganza, Andrea; Wang, Xiao-hong; Maniar, Salony; St Croix, Claudette M.; Lazo, John S.; Pollack, Ian F.; Begley, Thomas J.; Sobol, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    To identify genes that contribute to chemotherapy resistance in glioblastoma, we conducted a synthetic lethal screen in a chemotherapy-resistant glioblastoma derived cell line with the clinical alkylator temozolomide (TMZ) and an siRNA library tailored towards “druggable” targets. Select DNA repair genes in the screen were validated independently, confirming the DNA glycosylases UNG and MYH as well as MPG to be involved in the response to high dose TMZ. The involvement of UNG and MYH is likely the result of a TMZ-induced burst of reactive oxygen species. We then compared the human TMZ sensitizing genes identified in our screen with those previously identified from alkylator screens conducted in E. coli and S. cerevisiae. The conserved biological processes across all three species composes an Alkylation Functionome that includes many novel proteins not previously thought to impact alkylator resistance. This high-throughput screen, validation and cross-species analysis was then followed by a mechanistic analysis of two essential nodes: base excision repair (BER) DNA glycosylases (UNG, human and mag1, S. cerevisiae) and protein modification systems, including UBE3B and ICMT in human cells or pby1, lip22, stp22 and aim22 in S. cerevisiae. The conserved processes of BER and protein modification were dual targeted and yielded additive sensitization to alkylators in S. cerevisiae. In contrast, dual targeting of BER and protein modification genes in human cells did not increase sensitivity, suggesting an epistatic relationship. Importantly, these studies provide potential new targets to overcome alkylating agent resistance. PMID:23038810

  12. Preventing lethal violence in schools: the case for entry-based weapons screening.

    PubMed

    Mawson, Anthony R; Lapsley, Peter M; Hoffman, Allan M; Guignard, John C

    2002-04-01

    Violence-related behavior in schools has declined in recent years, but the perception of risk remains high. Disturbingly high percentages of students and teachers report staying home out of fear, and many students bring weapons to school for protection. Current proposals for preventing school violence include punishing the violence-prone, expulsion for weapon carriers, and creating a culture of nonviolence through various behavioral methods like conflict resolution. None of these proposals address the issue of lethal violence and hence personal safety. The risk of lethal violence in schools (related mainly to firearms) could be substantially reduced by creating an effective barrier between firearms and people. This could be achieved by using entry-based weapons detection systems similar to those now used in airports and courts. Decreasing the risk and fear of violence by converting schools into weapons-free zones would also be expected to increase attendance and improve scholastic performance. Randomized, controlled studies should be undertaken to evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of entry-based weapons detection systems for achieving these outcomes. PMID:12043897

  13. Genome-wide RNAi screen for synthetic lethal interactions with the C. elegans kinesin-5 homolog BMK-1

    PubMed Central

    Maia, André F.; Tanenbaum, Marvin E.; Galli, Matilde; Lelieveld, Daphne; Egan, David A.; Gassmann, Reto; Sunkel, Claudio E.; van den Heuvel, Sander; Medema, René H.

    2015-01-01

    Kinesins are a superfamily of microtubule-based molecular motors that perform various transport needs and have essential roles in cell division. Among these, the kinesin-5 family has been shown to play a major role in the formation and maintenance of the bipolar mitotic spindle. Moreover, recent work suggests that kinesin-5 motors may have additional roles. In contrast to most model organisms, the sole kinesin-5 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans, bmk-1, is not required for successful mitosis and animals lacking bmk-1 are viable and fertile. To gain insight into factors that may act redundantly with BMK-1 in spindle assembly and to identify possible additional cellular pathways involving BMK-1, we performed a synthetic lethal screen using the bmk-1 deletion allele ok391. We successfully knocked down 82% of the C. elegans genome using RNAi and assayed viability in bmk-1(ok391) and wild type strains using an automated high-throughput approach based on fluorescence microscopy. The dataset includes a final list of 37 synthetic lethal interactions whose further study is likely to provide insight into kinesin-5 function. PMID:25984351

  14. High-throughput simultaneous screen and counterscreen identifies homoharringtonine as synthetic lethal with von Hippel-Lindau loss in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Nicholas C.; Pavía-Jiménez, Andrea; Tcheuyap, Vanina T.; Alexander, Shane; Vishwanath, Mridula; Christie, Alana; Xie, Xian-Jin; Williams, Noelle S.; Kapur, Payal; Posner, Bruce; McKay, Renée M.; Brugarolas, James

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 85% of primary renal neoplasms, and is rarely curable when metastatic. Approximately 70% of RCCs are clear-cell type (ccRCC), and in >80% the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene is mutated or silenced. We developed a novel, high-content, screening strategy for the identification of small molecules that are synthetic lethal with genes mutated in cancer. In this strategy, the screen and counterscreen are conducted simultaneously by differentially labeling mutant and reconstituted isogenic tumor cell line pairs with different fluorochromes and using a highly sensitive high-throughput imaging-based platform. This approach minimizes confounding factors from sequential screening, and more accurately replicates the in vivo cancer setting where cancer cells are adjacent to normal cells. A screen of ~12,800 small molecules identified homoharringtonine (HHT), an FDA-approved drug for treating chronic myeloid leukemia, as a VHL-synthetic lethal agent in ccRCC. HHT induced apoptosis in VHL-mutant, but not VHL-reconstituted, ccRCC cells, and inhibited tumor growth in 30% of VHL-mutant patient-derived ccRCC tumorgraft lines tested. Building on a novel screening strategy and utilizing a validated RCC tumorgraft model recapitulating the genetics and drug responsiveness of human RCC, these studies identify HHT as a potential therapeutic agent for a subset of VHL-deficient ccRCCs. PMID:26219258

  15. Functional genomics reveals the induction of inflammatory response and metalloproteinase gene expression during lethal Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cilloniz, Cristian; Ebihara, Hideki; Ni, Chester; Neumann, Gabriele; Korth, Marcus J; Kelly, Sara M; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Feldmann, Heinz; Katze, Michael G

    2011-09-01

    Ebola virus is the etiologic agent of a lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates with mortality rates of up to 90%. Previous studies with Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV), mouse-adapted virus (MA-ZEBOV), and mutant viruses (ZEBOV-NP(ma), ZEBOV-VP24(ma), and ZEBOV-NP/VP24(ma)) allowed us to identify the mutations in viral protein 24 (VP24) and nucleoprotein (NP) responsible for acquisition of high virulence in mice. To elucidate specific molecular signatures associated with lethality, we compared global gene expression profiles in spleen samples from mice infected with these viruses and performed an extensive functional analysis. Our analysis showed that the lethal viruses (MA-ZEBOV and ZEBOV-NP/VP24(ma)) elicited a strong expression of genes 72 h after infection. In addition, we found that although the host transcriptional response to ZEBOV-VP24(ma) was nearly the same as that to ZEBOV-NP/VP24(ma), the contribution of a mutation in the NP gene was required for a lethal phenotype. Further analysis indicated that one of the most relevant biological functions differentially regulated by the lethal viruses was the inflammatory response, as was the induction of specific metalloproteinases, which were present in our newly identify functional network that was associated with Ebola virus lethality. Our results suggest that this dysregulated proinflammatory response increased the severity of disease. Consequently, the newly discovered molecular signature could be used as the starting point for the development of new drugs and therapeutics. To our knowledge, this is the first study that clearly defines unique molecular signatures associated with Ebola virus lethality. PMID:21734050

  16. The genesis of an exceptionally lethal venom in the timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) revealed through comparative venom-gland transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Snake venoms generally show sequence and quantitative variation within and between species, but some rattlesnakes have undergone exceptionally rapid, dramatic shifts in the composition, lethality, and pharmacological effects of their venoms. Such shifts have occurred within species, most notably in Mojave (Crotalus scutulatus), South American (C. durissus), and timber (C. horridus) rattlesnakes, resulting in some populations with extremely potent, neurotoxic venoms without the hemorrhagic effects typical of rattlesnake bites. Results To better understand the evolutionary changes that resulted in the potent venom of a population of C. horridus from northern Florida, we sequenced the venom-gland transcriptome of an animal from this population for comparison with the previously described transcriptome of the eastern diamondback rattlesnake (C. adamanteus), a congener with a more typical rattlesnake venom. Relative to the toxin transcription of C. adamanteus, which consisted primarily of snake-venom metalloproteinases, C-type lectins, snake-venom serine proteinases, and myotoxin-A, the toxin transcription of C. horridus was far simpler in composition and consisted almost entirely of snake-venom serine proteinases, phospholipases A2, and bradykinin-potentiating and C-type natriuretic peptides. Crotalus horridus lacked significant expression of the hemorrhagic snake-venom metalloproteinases and C-type lectins. Evolution of shared toxin families involved differential expansion and loss of toxin clades within each species and pronounced differences in the highly expressed toxin paralogs. Toxin genes showed significantly higher rates of nonsynonymous substitution than nontoxin genes. The expression patterns of nontoxin genes were conserved between species, despite the vast differences in toxin expression. Conclusions Our results represent the first complete, sequence-based comparison between the venoms of closely related snake species and reveal in unprecedented detail the rapid evolution of snake venoms. We found that the difference in venom properties resulted from major changes in expression levels of toxin gene families, differential gene-family expansion and loss, changes in which paralogs within gene families were expressed at high levels, and higher nonsynonymous substitution rates in the toxin genes relative to nontoxins. These massive alterations in the genetics of the venom phenotype emphasize the evolutionary lability and flexibility of this ecologically critical trait. PMID:23758969

  17. Genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 Screens Reveal Loss of Redundancy between PKMYT1 and WEE1 in Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Chad M; Ding, Yu; Hoellerbauer, Pia; Davis, Ryan J; Basom, Ryan; Girard, Emily J; Lee, Eunjee; Corrin, Philip; Hart, Traver; Bolouri, Hamid; Davison, Jerry; Zhang, Qing; Hardcastle, Justin; Aronow, Bruce J; Plaisier, Christopher L; Baliga, Nitin S; Moffat, Jason; Lin, Qi; Li, Xiao-Nan; Nam, Do-Hyun; Lee, Jeongwu; Pollard, Steven M; Zhu, Jun; Delrow, Jeffery J; Clurman, Bruce E; Olson, James M; Paddison, Patrick J

    2015-12-22

    To identify therapeutic targets for glioblastoma (GBM), we performed genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 knockout (KO) screens in patient-derived GBM stem-like cells (GSCs) and human neural stem/progenitors (NSCs), non-neoplastic stem cell controls, for genes required for their in vitro growth. Surprisingly, the vast majority GSC-lethal hits were found outside of molecular networks commonly altered in GBM and GSCs (e.g., oncogenic drivers). In vitro and in vivo validation of GSC-specific targets revealed several strong hits, including the wee1-like kinase, PKMYT1/Myt1. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that PKMYT1 acts redundantly with WEE1 to inhibit cyclin B-CDK1 activity via CDK1-Y15 phosphorylation and to promote timely completion of mitosis in NSCs. However, in GSCs, this redundancy is lost, most likely as a result of oncogenic signaling, causing GBM-specific lethality. PMID:26673326

  18. A Synthetic Lethality Screen Using a Focused siRNA Library to Identify Sensitizers to Dasatinib Therapy for the Treatment of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Harsh B.; Zhou, Yan; Sethi, Geetika; Hirst, Jeff; Schilder, Russell J.; Golemis, Erica A.; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular targeted therapies have been the focus of recent clinical trials for the treatment of patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). The majority have not fared well as monotherapies for improving survival of these patients. Poor bioavailability, lack of predictive biomarkers, and the presence of multiple survival pathways can all diminish the success of a targeted agent. Dasatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the Src-family kinases (SFK) and in preclinical studies shown to have substantial activity in EOC. However, when evaluated in a phase 2 clinical trial for patients with recurrent or persistent EOC, it was found to have minimal activity. We hypothesized that synthetic lethality screens performed using a cogently designed siRNA library would identify second-site molecular targets that could synergize with SFK inhibition and improve dasatinib efficacy. Using a systematic approach, we performed primary siRNA screening using a library focused on 638 genes corresponding to a network centered on EGFR, HER2, and the SFK-scaffolding proteins BCAR1, NEDD9, and EFS to screen EOC cells in combination with dasatinib. We followed up with validation studies including deconvolution screening, quantitative PCR to confirm effective gene silencing, correlation of gene expression with dasatinib sensitivity, and assessment of the clinical relevance of hits using TCGA ovarian cancer data. A refined list of five candidates (CSNK2A1, DAG1, GRB2, PRKCE, and VAV1) was identified as showing the greatest potential for improving sensitivity to dasatinib in EOC. Of these, CSNK2A1, which codes for the catalytic alpha subunit of protein kinase CK2, was selected for additional evaluation. Synergistic activity of the clinically relevant inhibitor of CK2, CX-4945, with dasatinib in reducing cell proliferation and increasing apoptosis was observed across multiple EOC cell lines. This overall approach to improving drug efficacy can be applied to other targeted agents that have similarly shown poor clinical activity. PMID:26637171

  19. Identification of unique sensitizing targets for anti-inflammatory CDDO-Me in metastatic melanoma by a large-scale synthetic lethal RNAi screening.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yong; Deng, Wuguo; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Grimm, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    CDDO-Me has been shown to exert potent anti-inflammatory activity for chronic kidney disease and antitumor activity for several tumors, including melanoma, in early clinical trials. To improve CDDO-Me response in melanoma, we utilized a large-scale synthetic lethal RNAi screen targeting 6000 human druggable genes to identify targets that would sensitize melanoma cells to CDDO-Me. Based on screening results, five unique genes (GNPAT, SUMO1, SPINT2, FLI1, and SSX1) significantly potentiated the growth inhibitory effects of CDDO-Me and induced apoptosis in A375, a BRAF mutated melanoma line (P < 0.001). These five genes were then individually validated as targets to potentiate CDDO-Me activity, and related downstream signaling pathways of these genes were analyzed. In addition, the levels of phosphorylated Erk1/2, Akt, GSK-2, and PRAS40 were dramatically decreased by downregulating each of these five genes separately, suggesting a set of common mediators. Our findings indicate that GNPAT, SUMO1, SPINT2, FLI1, and SSX1 play critical roles in synergy with inflammation pathways in modulating melanoma cell survival and could serve as sensitizing targets to enhance CDDO-Me efficacy in melanoma growth control. PMID:23020131

  20. A selective screen reveals discrete functional domains in Drosophila Nanos.

    PubMed

    Arrizabalaga, G; Lehmann, R

    1999-12-01

    The Drosophila protein Nanos encodes an evolutionarily conserved protein with two zinc finger motifs. In the embryo, Nanos protein function is required for establishment of the anterior-posterior body pattern and for the migration of primordial germ cells. During oogenesis, Nanos protein is involved in the establishment and maintenance of germ-line stem cells and the differentiation of oocyte precursor cells. To establish proper embryonic patterning, Nanos acts as a translational regulator of hunchback RNA. Nanos' targets for germ cell migration and development are not known. Here, we describe a selective genetic screen aimed at isolating new nanos alleles. The molecular and genetic analysis of 68 new alleles has allowed us to identify amino acids critical for nanos function. This analysis shows that the CCHC motifs, which coordinate two metal ions, are essential for all known functions of Nanos protein. Furthermore, a region C-terminal to the zinc fingers seems to constitute a novel functional domain within the Nanos protein. This "tail region" of Nanos is required for abdomen formation and germ cell migration, but not for oogenesis. PMID:10581288

  1. Small Molecule Screen Reveals Regulation of Survival Motor Neuron Protein Abundance by Ras Proteins

    E-print Network

    Stockwell, Brent R.

    Small Molecule Screen Reveals Regulation of Survival Motor Neuron Protein Abundance by Ras Proteins revealed that increasing Ras signaling upregulates SMN protein abundance via an increase in translation States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Small molecule modulators of protein activity have proven

  2. A Genome-Wide RNAi Screen for Enhancers of par Mutants Reveals New Contributors to Early Embryonic Polarity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Diane G.; Hoose, Wendy A.; Kemphues, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    The par genes of Caenorhabditis elegans are essential for establishment and maintenance of early embryo polarity and their homologs in other organisms are crucial polarity regulators in diverse cell types. Forward genetic screens and simple RNAi depletion screens have identified additional conserved regulators of polarity in C. elegans; genes with redundant functions, however, will be missed by these approaches. To identify such genes, we have performed a genome-wide RNAi screen for enhancers of lethality in conditional par-1 and par-4 mutants. We have identified 18 genes for which depletion is synthetically lethal with par-1 or par-4, or both, but produces little embryo lethality in wild type. Fifteen of the 18 genes identified in our screen are not previously known to function in C. elegans embryo polarity and 11 of them also increase lethality in a par-2 mutant. Among the strongest synthetic lethal genes, polarity defects are more apparent in par-2 early embryos than in par-1 or par-4, except for strd-1(RNAi), which enhances early polarity phenotypes in all three mutants. One strong enhancer of par-1 and par-2 lethality, F25B5.2, corresponds to nop-1, a regulator of actomyosin contractility for which the molecular identity was previously unknown. Other putative polarity enhancers identified in our screen encode cytoskeletal and membrane proteins, kinases, chaperones, and sumoylation and deubiquitylation proteins. Further studies of these genes should give mechanistic insight into pathways regulating establishment and maintenance of cell polarity. PMID:22887819

  3. Identification of lethal mutations in yeast threonyl-tRNA synthetase revealing critical residues in its human homolog.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Zhi-Rong; Fang, Zhi-Peng; Ye, Qing; Lei, Hui-Yan; Eriani, Gilbert; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Wang, En-Duo

    2015-01-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are a group of ancient enzymes catalyzing aminoacylation and editing reactions for protein biosynthesis. Increasing evidence suggests that these critical enzymes are often associated with mammalian disorders. Therefore, complete determination of the enzymes functions is essential for informed diagnosis and treatment. Here, we show that a yeast knock-out strain for the threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) gene is an excellent platform for such an investigation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ThrRS has a unique modular structure containing four structural domains and a eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension. Using randomly mutated libraries of the ThrRS gene (thrS) and a genetic screen, a set of loss-of-function mutants were identified. The mutations affected the synthetic and editing activities and influenced the dimer interface. The results also highlighted the role of the N-terminal extension for enzymatic activity and protein stability. To gain insights into the pathological mechanisms induced by mutated aaRSs, we systematically introduced the loss-of-function mutations into the human cytoplasmic ThrRS gene. All mutations induced similar detrimental effects, showing that the yeast model could be used to study pathology-associated point mutations in mammalian aaRSs. PMID:25416776

  4. A Translational Murine Model of Sub-Lethal Intoxication with Shiga Toxin 2 Reveals Novel Ultrastructural Findings in the Brain Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Tironi-Farinati, Carla; Geoghegan, Patricia A.; Cangelosi, Adriana; Pinto, Alipio; Loidl, C. Fabian; Goldstein, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Infection by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli causes hemorrhagic colitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), acute renal failure, and also central nervous system complications in around 30% of the children affected. Besides, neurological deficits are one of the most unrepairable and untreatable outcomes of HUS. Study of the striatum is relevant because basal ganglia are one of the brain areas most commonly affected in patients that have suffered from HUS and since the deleterious effects of a sub-lethal dose of Shiga toxin have never been studied in the striatum, the purpose of this study was to attempt to simulate an infection by Shiga toxin-producing E. coli in a murine model. To this end, intravenous administration of a sub-lethal dose of Shiga toxin 2 (0.5 ?g per mouse) was used and the correlation between neurological manifestations and ultrastructural changes in striatal brain cells was studied in detail. Neurological manifestations included significant motor behavior abnormalities in spontaneous motor activity, gait, pelvic elevation and hind limb activity eight days after administration of the toxin. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the toxin caused early perivascular edema two days after administration, as well as significant damage in astrocytes four days after administration and significant damage in neurons and oligodendrocytes eight days after administration. Interrupted synapses and mast cell extravasation were also found eight days after administration of the toxin. We thus conclude that the chronological order of events observed in the striatum could explain the neurological disorders found eight days after administration of the toxin. PMID:23383285

  5. Research paper Screen of FDA-approved drug library reveals compounds that protect hair cells

    E-print Network

    Rubel, Edwin

    Accepted 9 August 2012 Available online xxx a b s t r a c t Loss of mechanosensory hair cells in the innerResearch paper Screen of FDA-approved drug library reveals compounds that protect hair cells from ear accounts for many hearing loss and balance disorders. Several beneficial pharmaceutical drugs

  6. Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals a role for the ESCRT complex in rotavirus cell entry

    E-print Network

    Higgins, Darren

    Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals a role for the ESCRT complex in rotavirus cell entry Daniela Silva) Rotavirus (RV) is the major cause of childhood gastroenteritis worldwide. This study presents a functional for comprehen- sively studying the interaction between viruses and their host cells. Rotaviruses (RVs), members

  7. A genetic screen reveals a periplasmic copper chaperone required for nitrite reductase activity in pathogenic Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Jen, Freda E-C; Djoko, Karrera Y; Bent, Stephen J; Day, Christopher J; McEwan, Alastair G; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-09-01

    Under conditions of low oxygen availability, Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are able to respire via a partial denitrification pathway in which nitrite is converted to nitrous oxide. In this process, nitrite reductase (AniA), a copper (Cu)-containing protein converts nitrite to NO, and this product is converted to nitrous oxide by nitric oxide reductase (NorB). NorB also confers protection against toxic NO, and so we devised a conditional lethal screen, using a norB mutant, to identify mutants that were resistant to nitrite-dependent killing. After random-deletion mutagenesis of N. meningitidis, this genetic screen identified a gene encoding a Cu chaperone that is essential for AniA function, AccA. Purified AccA binds one Cu (I) ion and also possesses a second binding site for Cu (II). This novel periplasmic Cu chaperone (AccA) appears to be essential for provision of Cu ions to AniA of pathogenic Neisseria to generate an active nitrite reductase. Apart from the Neisseria genus, AccA is distributed across a wide range of environmental Proteobacteria species. PMID:26031293

  8. NCI: SBIR & STTR - Find Funding - Contracts - 290 siRNA Resource for Synthetic Lethal Screening of DNA Repair and Damage Signaling Networks

    Cancer.gov

    Human cancers appear to be highly and differentially vulnerable to targeted attack on individual gene expression within their DNA repair networks, especially those pathways that are closely associated with DNA replication. However such lethal combinations (i.e., synthetic lethals) are generally not obvious or easily predicted a priori.

  9. Histopathology reveals correlative and unique phenotypes in a high-throughput mouse phenotyping screen

    PubMed Central

    Adissu, Hibret A.; Estabel, Jeanne; Sunter, David; Tuck, Elizabeth; Hooks, Yvette; Carragher, Damian M.; Clarke, Kay; Karp, Natasha A.; Project, Sanger Mouse Genetics; Newbigging, Susan; Jones, Nora; Morikawa, Lily; White, Jacqueline K.; McKerlie, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The Mouse Genetics Project (MGP) at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute aims to generate and phenotype over 800 genetically modified mouse lines over the next 5 years to gain a better understanding of mammalian gene function and provide an invaluable resource to the scientific community for follow-up studies. Phenotyping includes the generation of a standardized biobank of paraffin-embedded tissues for each mouse line, but histopathology is not routinely performed. In collaboration with the Pathology Core of the Centre for Modeling Human Disease (CMHD) we report the utility of histopathology in a high-throughput primary phenotyping screen. Histopathology was assessed in an unbiased selection of 50 mouse lines with (n=30) or without (n=20) clinical phenotypes detected by the standard MGP primary phenotyping screen. Our findings revealed that histopathology added correlating morphological data in 19 of 30 lines (63.3%) in which the primary screen detected a phenotype. In addition, seven of the 50 lines (14%) presented significant histopathology findings that were not associated with or predicted by the standard primary screen. Three of these seven lines had no clinical phenotype detected by the standard primary screen. Incidental and strain-associated background lesions were present in all mutant lines with good concordance to wild-type controls. These findings demonstrate the complementary and unique contribution of histopathology to high-throughput primary phenotyping of mutant mice. PMID:24652767

  10. A sensitised RNAi screen reveals a ch-TOG genetic interaction network required for spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Alexis R.; Bakal, Chris

    2015-01-01

    How multiple spindle assembly pathways are integrated to drive bipolar spindle assembly is poorly understood. We performed an image-based double RNAi screen to identify genes encoding Microtubule-Associated Proteins (MAPs) that interact with the highly conserved ch-TOG gene to regulate bipolar spindle assembly in human cells. We identified a ch-TOG centred network of genetic interactions which promotes ensures centrosome-mediated microtubule polymerisation, leading to the incorporation of microtubules polymerised by all pathways into a bipolar structure. Our genetic screen also reveals that ch-TOG maintains a dynamic microtubule population, in part, through modulating HSET activity. ch-TOG ensures that spindle assembly is robust to perturbation but sufficiently dynamic such that spindles can explore a diverse shape space in search of structures that can align chromosomes. PMID:26037491

  11. Novel microscopy-based screening method reveals regulators of contact-dependent intercellular transfer

    PubMed Central

    Michael Frei, Dominik; Hodneland, Erlend; Rios-Mondragon, Ivan; Burtey, Anne; Neumann, Beate; Bulkescher, Jutta; Schölermann, Julia; Pepperkok, Rainer; Gerdes, Hans-Hermann; Kögel, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Contact-dependent intercellular transfer (codeIT) of cellular constituents can have functional consequences for recipient cells, such as enhanced survival and drug resistance. Pathogenic viruses, prions and bacteria can also utilize this mechanism to spread to adjacent cells and potentially evade immune detection. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying this intercellular transfer process. Here, we present a novel microscopy-based screening method to identify regulators and cargo of codeIT. Single donor cells, carrying fluorescently labelled endocytic organelles or proteins, are co-cultured with excess acceptor cells. CodeIT is quantified by confocal microscopy and image analysis in 3D, preserving spatial information. An siRNA-based screening using this method revealed the involvement of several myosins and small GTPases as codeIT regulators. Our data indicates that cellular protrusions and tubular recycling endosomes are important for codeIT. We automated image acquisition and analysis to facilitate large-scale chemical and genetic screening efforts to identify key regulators of codeIT. PMID:26271723

  12. The iBeetle large-scale RNAi screen reveals gene functions for insect development and physiology.

    PubMed

    Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schultheis, Dorothea; Schwirz, Jonas; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Majumdar, Upalparna; Dao, Van Anh; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Tech, Maike; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Theis, Mirko; Schild, Inga; Trauner, Jochen; Koniszewski, Nikolaus D B; Küster, Elke; Kittelmann, Sebastian; Hu, Yonggang; Lehmann, Sabrina; Siemanowski, Janna; Ulrich, Julia; Panfilio, Kristen A; Schröder, Reinhard; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Stanke, Mario; Buchhholz, Frank; Frasch, Manfred; Roth, Siegfried; Wimmer, Ernst A; Schoppmeier, Michael; Klingler, Martin; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screens are powerful tools to identify the genes required for a given biological process. However, for technical reasons, comprehensive screens have been restricted to very few model organisms. Therefore, although deep sequencing is revealing the genes of ever more insect species, the functional studies predominantly focus on candidate genes previously identified in Drosophila, which is biasing research towards conserved gene functions. RNAi screens in other organisms promise to reduce this bias. Here we present the results of the iBeetle screen, a large-scale, unbiased RNAi screen in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, which identifies gene functions in embryonic and postembryonic development, physiology and cell biology. The utility of Tribolium as a screening platform is demonstrated by the identification of genes involved in insect epithelial adhesion. This work transcends the restrictions of the candidate gene approach and opens fields of research not accessible in Drosophila. PMID:26215380

  13. The iBeetle large-scale RNAi screen reveals gene functions for insect development and physiology

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schultheis, Dorothea; Schwirz, Jonas; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Majumdar, Upalparna; Dao, Van Anh; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Tech, Maike; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Theis, Mirko; Schild, Inga; Trauner, Jochen; Koniszewski, Nikolaus D. B.; Küster, Elke; Kittelmann, Sebastian; Hu, Yonggang; Lehmann, Sabrina; Siemanowski, Janna; Ulrich, Julia; Panfilio, Kristen A.; Schröder, Reinhard; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Stanke, Mario; Buchhholz, Frank; Frasch, Manfred; Roth, Siegfried; Wimmer, Ernst A.; Schoppmeier, Michael; Klingler, Martin; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screens are powerful tools to identify the genes required for a given biological process. However, for technical reasons, comprehensive screens have been restricted to very few model organisms. Therefore, although deep sequencing is revealing the genes of ever more insect species, the functional studies predominantly focus on candidate genes previously identified in Drosophila, which is biasing research towards conserved gene functions. RNAi screens in other organisms promise to reduce this bias. Here we present the results of the iBeetle screen, a large-scale, unbiased RNAi screen in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, which identifies gene functions in embryonic and postembryonic development, physiology and cell biology. The utility of Tribolium as a screening platform is demonstrated by the identification of genes involved in insect epithelial adhesion. This work transcends the restrictions of the candidate gene approach and opens fields of research not accessible in Drosophila. PMID:26215380

  14. A Network of Conserved Damage Survival Pathways Revealed by a Genomic RNAi Screen

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Dashnamoorthy; Wiles, Amy M.; Bhavani, Selvaraj; Ruan, Jianhua; Leder, Philip; Bishop, Alexander J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Damage initiates a pleiotropic cellular response aimed at cellular survival when appropriate. To identify genes required for damage survival, we used a cell-based RNAi screen against the Drosophila genome and the alkylating agent methyl methanesulphonate (MMS). Similar studies performed in other model organisms report that damage response may involve pleiotropic cellular processes other than the central DNA repair components, yet an intuitive systems level view of the cellular components required for damage survival, their interrelationship, and contextual importance has been lacking. Further, by comparing data from different model organisms, identification of conserved and presumably core survival components should be forthcoming. We identified 307 genes, representing 13 signaling, metabolic, or enzymatic pathways, affecting cellular survival of MMS–induced damage. As expected, the majority of these pathways are involved in DNA repair; however, several pathways with more diverse biological functions were also identified, including the TOR pathway, transcription, translation, proteasome, glutathione synthesis, ATP synthesis, and Notch signaling, and these were equally important in damage survival. Comparison with genomic screen data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed no overlap enrichment of individual genes between the species, but a conservation of the pathways. To demonstrate the functional conservation of pathways, five were tested in Drosophila and mouse cells, with each pathway responding to alkylation damage in both species. Using the protein interactome, a significant level of connectivity was observed between Drosophila MMS survival proteins, suggesting a higher order relationship. This connectivity was dramatically improved by incorporating the components of the 13 identified pathways within the network. Grouping proteins into “pathway nodes” qualitatively improved the interactome organization, revealing a highly organized “MMS survival network.” We conclude that identification of pathways can facilitate comparative biology analysis when direct gene/orthologue comparisons fail. A biologically intuitive, highly interconnected MMS survival network was revealed after we incorporated pathway data in our interactome analysis. PMID:19543366

  15. Characterization of Synthetic-Lethal Mutants Reveals a Role for the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor Cdc24p in Vacuole Function and Na(+) Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    White, W. H.; Johnson, D. I.

    1997-01-01

    Cdc24p is the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for the Cdc42p GTPase, which controls cell polarity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify new genes that may affect cell polarity, we characterized six UV-induced csl (CDC24 synthetic-lethal) mutants that exhibited synthetic-lethality with cdc24-4(ts) at 23°. Five mutants were not complemented by plasmid-borne CDC42, RSR1, BUD5, BEM1, BEM2, BEM3 or CLA4 genes, which are known to play a role in cell polarity. The csl3 mutant displayed phenotypes similar to those observed with calcium-sensitive, Pet(-) vma mutants defective in vacuole function. CSL5 was allelic to VMA5, the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunit C, and one third of csl5 cdc24-4(ts) cells were elongated or had misshapen buds. A cdc24-4(ts) ?vma5::LEU2 double mutant did not exhibit synthetic lethality, suggesting that the csl5/vma5 cdc24-4(ts) synthetic-lethality was not simply due to altered vacuole function. The cdc24-4(ts) mutant, like ?vma5::LEU2 and csl3 mutants, was sensitive to high levels of Ca(2+) as well as Na(+) in the growth media, which did not appear to be a result of a fragile cell wall because the phenotypes were not remedied by 1 M sorbitol. Our results indicated that Cdc24p was required in one V-ATPase mutant and another mutant affecting vacuole morphology, and also implicated Cdc24p in Na(+) tolerance. PMID:9286667

  16. Genome-wide RNAi screen for nuclear actin reveals a network of cofilin regulators

    PubMed Central

    Dopie, Joseph; Rajakylä, Eeva K.; Joensuu, Merja S.; Huet, Guillaume; Ferrantelli, Evelina; Xie, Tiao; Jäälinoja, Harri; Jokitalo, Eija; Vartiainen, Maria K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear actin plays an important role in many processes that regulate gene expression. Cytoplasmic actin dynamics are tightly controlled by numerous actin-binding proteins, but regulation of nuclear actin has remained unclear. Here, we performed a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells to identify proteins that influence either nuclear polymerization or import of actin. We validate 19 factors as specific hits, and show that Chinmo (known as Bach2 in mammals), SNF4A? (Prkag1 in mammals) and Rab18 play a role in nuclear localization of actin in both fly and mammalian cells. We identify several new regulators of cofilin activity, and characterize modulators of both cofilin kinases and phosphatase. For example, Chinmo/Bach2, which regulates nuclear actin levels also in vivo, maintains active cofilin by repressing the expression of the kinase Cdi (Tesk in mammals). Finally, we show that Nup98 and lamin are candidates for regulating nuclear actin polymerization. Our screen therefore reveals new aspects of actin regulation and links nuclear actin to many cellular processes. PMID:26021350

  17. A forward genetic screen reveals essential and non-essential RNAi factors in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Marker, Simone; Carradec, Quentin; Tanty, Véronique; Arnaiz, Olivier; Meyer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways form complex interacting networks. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, at least two RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms coexist, involving distinct but overlapping sets of protein factors and producing different types of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). One is specifically triggered by high-copy transgenes, and the other by feeding cells with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-producing bacteria. In this study, we designed a forward genetic screen for mutants deficient in dsRNA-induced silencing, and a powerful method to identify the relevant mutations by whole-genome sequencing. We present a set of 47 mutant alleles for five genes, revealing two previously unknown RNAi factors: a novel Paramecium-specific protein (Pds1) and a Cid1-like nucleotidyl transferase. Analyses of allelic diversity distinguish non-essential and essential genes and suggest that the screen is saturated for non-essential, single-copy genes. We show that non-essential genes are specifically involved in dsRNA-induced RNAi while essential ones are also involved in transgene-induced RNAi. One of the latter, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR2, is further shown to be required for all known types of siRNAs, as well as for sexual reproduction. These results open the way for the dissection of the genetic complexity, interconnection, mechanisms and natural functions of RNAi pathways in P. tetraurelia. PMID:24860163

  18. Genome-wide siRNA screen reveals coupling between mitotic apoptosis and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Martínez, Laura A; Karamysheva, Zemfira N; Warrington, Ross; Li, Bing; Wei, Shuguang; Xie, Xian-Jin; Roth, Michael G; Yu, Hongtao

    2014-01-01

    The antimitotic anti-cancer drugs, including taxol, perturb spindle dynamics, and induce prolonged, spindle checkpoint-dependent mitotic arrest in cancer cells. These cells then either undergo apoptosis triggered by the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway or exit mitosis without proper cell division in an adaptation pathway. Using a genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen in taxol-treated HeLa cells, we systematically identify components of the mitotic apoptosis and adaptation pathways. We show that the Mad2 inhibitor p31comet actively promotes mitotic adaptation through cyclin B1 degradation and has a minor separate function in suppressing apoptosis. Conversely, the pro-apoptotic Bcl2 family member, Noxa, is a critical initiator of mitotic cell death. Unexpectedly, the upstream components of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway and the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 contribute to mitotic adaption. Our results reveal crosstalk between the apoptosis and adaptation pathways during mitotic arrest. PMID:25024437

  19. Physical and genetic-interaction density reveals functional organization and informs significance cutoffs in genome-wide screens

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, John C.; Pierce, Steven; Rothstein, Rodney; Reid, Robert J. D.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide experiments often measure quantitative differences between treated and untreated cells to identify affected strains. For these studies, statistical models are typically used to determine significance cutoffs. We developed a method termed “CLIK” (Cutoff Linked to Interaction Knowledge) that overlays biological knowledge from the interactome on screen results to derive a cutoff. The method takes advantage of the fact that groups of functionally related interacting genes often respond similarly to experimental conditions and, thus, cluster in a ranked list of screen results. We applied CLIK analysis to five screens of the yeast gene disruption library and found that it defined a significance cutoff that differed from traditional statistics. Importantly, verification experiments revealed that the CLIK cutoff correlated with the position in the rank order where the rate of true positives drops off significantly. In addition, the gene sets defined by CLIK analysis often provide further biological perspectives. For example, applying CLIK analysis retrospectively to a screen for cisplatin sensitivity allowed us to identify the importance of the Hrq1 helicase in DNA crosslink repair. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of CLIK to determine optimal treatment conditions by analyzing genome-wide screens at multiple rapamycin concentrations. We show that CLIK is an extremely useful tool for evaluating screen quality, determining screen cutoffs, and comparing results between screens. Furthermore, because CLIK uses previously annotated interaction data to determine biologically informed cutoffs, it provides additional insights into screen results, which supplement traditional statistical approaches. PMID:23589890

  20. Mechanisms of Cell Cycle Control Revealed by a Systematic and Quantitative Overexpression Screen in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Wei; Li, Zhihua; Zhan, Wenjing; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of cell cycle progression is fundamental to cell health and reproduction, and failures in this process are associated with many human diseases. Much of our knowledge of cell cycle regulators derives from loss-of-function studies. To reveal new cell cycle regulatory genes that are difficult to identify in loss-of-function studies, we performed a near-genome-wide flow cytometry assay of yeast gene overexpression-induced cell cycle delay phenotypes. We identified 108 genes whose overexpression significantly delayed the progression of the yeast cell cycle at a specific stage. Many of the genes are newly implicated in cell cycle progression, for example SKO1, RFA1, and YPR015C. The overexpression of RFA1 or YPR015C delayed the cell cycle at G2/M phases by disrupting spindle attachment to chromosomes and activating the DNA damage checkpoint, respectively. In contrast, overexpression of the transcription factor SKO1 arrests cells at G1 phase by activating the pheromone response pathway, revealing new cross-talk between osmotic sensing and mating. More generally, 92%–94% of the genes exhibit distinct phenotypes when overexpressed as compared to their corresponding deletion mutants, supporting the notion that many genes may gain functions upon overexpression. This work thus implicates new genes in cell cycle progression, complements previous screens, and lays the foundation for future experiments to define more precisely roles for these genes in cell cycle progression. PMID:18617996

  1. Functional Screening of Hydrolytic Activities Reveals an Extremely Thermostable Cellulase from a Deep-Sea Archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Leis, Benedikt; Heinze, Simon; Angelov, Angel; Pham, Vu Thuy Trang; Thürmer, Andrea; Jebbar, Mohamed; Golyshin, Peter N.; Streit, Wolfgang R.; Daniel, Rolf; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Extreme habitats serve as a source of enzymes that are active under extreme conditions and are candidates for industrial applications. In this work, six large-insert mixed genomic libraries were screened for hydrolase activities in a broad temperature range (8–70°C). Among a variety of hydrolytic activities, one fosmid clone, derived from a library of pooled isolates of hyperthermophilic archaea from deep sea vents, displayed hydrolytic activity on carboxymethyl cellulose substrate plates at 70°C but not at lower temperatures. Sequence analysis of the fosmid insert revealed a gene encoding a novel glycoside hydrolase family 12 (GHF12) endo-1,4-?-glucanase, termed Cel12E. The enzyme shares 45% sequence identity with a protein from the archaeon Thermococcus sp. AM4 and displays a unique multidomain architecture. Biochemical characterization of Cel12E revealed a remarkably thermostable protein, which appears to be of archaeal origin. The enzyme displayed maximum activity at 92°C and was active on a variety of linear 1,4-?-glucans like carboxymethyl cellulose, ?-glucan, lichenan, and phosphoric acid swollen cellulose. The protein is able to bind to various insoluble ?-glucans. Product pattern analysis indicated that Cel12E is an endo-cleaving ?-glucanase. Cel12E expands the toolbox of hyperthermostable archaeal cellulases with biotechnological potential. PMID:26191525

  2. Effects of ?-glucan polysaccharide revealed by the dominant lethal assay and micronucleus assays, and reproductive performance of male mice exposed to cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rodrigo Juliano; Pesarini, João Renato; Sparça Salles, Maria José; Nakamura Kanno, Tatiane Yumi; Dos Santos Lourenço, Ana Carolina; da Silva Leite, Véssia; da Silva, Ariane Fernanda; Matiazi, Hevenilton José; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2014-03-01

    ?-glucan is a well-known polysaccharide for its chemopreventive effect. This study aimed to evaluate the chemopreventive ability of ?-glucan in somatic and germ cells through the dominant lethal and micronucleus assays, and its influence on the reproductive performance of male mice exposed to cyclophosphamide. The results indicate that ?-glucan is capable of preventing changes in DNA in both germ cells and somatic ones. Changes in germ cells were evaluated by the dominant lethal assay and showed damage reduction percentages of 46.46% and 43.79% for the doses of 100 and 150 mg/kg. For the somatic changes, evaluated by micronucleus assay in peripheral blood cells in the first week of treatment, damage reduction percentages from 80.63-116.32% were found. In the fifth and sixth weeks, the percentage ranged from 10.20-52.54% and -0.95-62.35%, respectively. Besides the chemopreventive efficiency it appears that the ?-glucan, when combined with cyclophosphamide, is able to improve the reproductive performance of males verified by the significant reduction in rates of post-implantation losses and reabsorption in the mating of nulliparous females with males treated with cyclophosphamide. PMID:24688298

  3. Effects of ?-glucan polysaccharide revealed by the dominant lethal assay and micronucleus assays, and reproductive performance of male mice exposed to cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Rodrigo Juliano; Pesarini, João Renato; Sparça Salles, Maria José; Nakamura Kanno, Tatiane Yumi; dos Santos Lourenço, Ana Carolina; da Silva Leite, Véssia; da Silva, Ariane Fernanda; Matiazi, Hevenilton José; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    ?-glucan is a well-known polysaccharide for its chemopreventive effect. This study aimed to evaluate the chemopreventive ability of ?-glucan in somatic and germ cells through the dominant lethal and micronucleus assays, and its influence on the reproductive performance of male mice exposed to cyclophosphamide. The results indicate that ?-glucan is capable of preventing changes in DNA in both germ cells and somatic ones. Changes in germ cells were evaluated by the dominant lethal assay and showed damage reduction percentages of 46.46% and 43.79% for the doses of 100 and 150 mg/kg. For the somatic changes, evaluated by micronucleus assay in peripheral blood cells in the first week of treatment, damage reduction percentages from 80.63–116.32% were found. In the fifth and sixth weeks, the percentage ranged from 10.20–52.54% and ?0.95–62.35%, respectively. Besides the chemopreventive efficiency it appears that the ?-glucan, when combined with cyclophosphamide, is able to improve the reproductive performance of males verified by the significant reduction in rates of post-implantation losses and reabsorption in the mating of nulliparous females with males treated with cyclophosphamide. PMID:24688298

  4. Elaborate cellulosome architecture of Acetivibrio cellulolyticus revealed by selective screening of cohesin–dockerin interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hamberg, Yuval; Ruimy-Israeli, Vered; Dassa, Bareket; Barak, Yoav; Lamed, Raphael; Cameron, Kate; Fontes, Carlos M.G.A.

    2014-01-01

    Cellulosic waste represents a significant and underutilized carbon source for the biofuel industry. Owing to the recalcitrance of crystalline cellulose to enzymatic degradation, it is necessary to design economical methods of liberating the fermentable sugars required for bioethanol production. One route towards unlocking the potential of cellulosic waste lies in a highly complex class of molecular machines, the cellulosomes. Secreted mainly by anaerobic bacteria, cellulosomes are structurally diverse, cell surface-bound protein assemblies that can contain dozens of catalytic components. The key feature of the cellulosome is its modularity, facilitated by the ultra-high affinity cohesin–dockerin interaction. Due to the enormous number of cohesin and dockerin modules found in a typical cellulolytic organism, a major bottleneck in understanding the biology of cellulosomics is the purification of each cohesin- and dockerin-containing component, prior to analyses of their interaction. As opposed to previous approaches, the present study utilized proteins contained in unpurified whole-cell extracts. This strategy was made possible due to an experimental design that allowed for the relevant proteins to be “purified” via targeted affinity interactions as a function of the binding assay. The approach thus represents a new strategy, appropriate for future medium- to high-throughput screening of whole genomes, to determine the interactions between cohesins and dockerins. We have selected the cellulosome of Acetivibrio cellulolyticus for this work due to its exceptionally complex cellulosome systems and intriguing diversity of its cellulosomal modular components. Containing 41 cohesins and 143 dockerins, A. cellulolyticus has one of the largest number of potential cohesin–dockerin interactions of any organism, and contains unusual and novel cellulosomal features. We have surveyed a representative library of cohesin and dockerin modules spanning the cellulosome’s total cohesin and dockerin sequence diversity, emphasizing the testing of unusual and previously-unknown protein modules. The screen revealed several novel cell-bound cellulosome architectures, thus expanding on those previously known, as well as soluble cellulose systems that are not bound to the bacterial cell surface. This study sets the stage for screening the entire complement of cellulosomal components from A. cellulolyticus and other organisms with large cellulosome systems. The knowledge gained by such efforts brings us closer to understanding the exceptional catalytic abilities of cellulosomes and will allow the use of novel cellulosomal components in artificial assemblies and in enzyme cocktails for sustainable energy-related research programs. PMID:25374780

  5. Mutation screen reveals novel variants and expands the phenotypes associated with DYNC1H1.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Alleene V; Schabhüttl, Maria; Offenbacher, Hans; Synofzik, Matthis; Hauser, Natalie S; Brunner-Krainz, Michaela; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Moore, Steven A; Windhager, Reinhard; Bender, Benjamin; Harms, Matthew; Klebe, Stephan; Young, Peter; Kennerson, Marina; Garcia, Avencia Sanchez Mejias; Gonzalez, Michael A; Züchner, Stephan; Schule, Rebecca; Shy, Michael E; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2015-09-01

    Dynein, cytoplasmic 1, heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1) encodes a necessary subunit of the cytoplasmic dynein complex, which traffics cargo along microtubules. Dominant DYNC1H1 mutations are implicated in neural diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity dominance (SMA-LED), intellectual disability with neuronal migration defects, malformations of cortical development, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 2O. We hypothesized that additional variants could be found in these and novel motoneuron and related diseases. Therefore, we analyzed our database of 1024 whole exome sequencing samples of motoneuron and related diseases for novel single nucleotide variations. We filtered these results for significant variants, which were further screened using segregation analysis in available family members. Analysis revealed six novel, rare, and highly conserved variants. Three of these are likely pathogenic and encompass a broad phenotypic spectrum with distinct disease clusters. Our findings suggest that DYNC1H1 variants can cause not only lower, but also upper motor neuron disease. It thus adds DYNC1H1 to the growing list of spastic paraplegia related genes in microtubule-dependent motor protein pathways. PMID:26100331

  6. High-Resolution CRISPR Screens Reveal Fitness Genes and Genotype-Specific Cancer Liabilities.

    PubMed

    Hart, Traver; Chandrashekhar, Megha; Aregger, Michael; Steinhart, Zachary; Brown, Kevin R; MacLeod, Graham; Mis, Monika; Zimmermann, Michal; Fradet-Turcotte, Amelie; Sun, Song; Mero, Patricia; Dirks, Peter; Sidhu, Sachdev; Roth, Frederick P; Rissland, Olivia S; Durocher, Daniel; Angers, Stephane; Moffat, Jason

    2015-12-01

    The ability to perturb genes in human cells is crucial for elucidating gene function and holds great potential for finding therapeutic targets for diseases such as cancer. To extend the catalog of human core and context-dependent fitness genes, we have developed a high-complexity second-generation genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 gRNA library and applied it to fitness screens in five human cell lines. Using an improved Bayesian analytical approach, we consistently discover 5-fold more fitness genes than were previously observed. We present a list of 1,580 human core fitness genes and describe their general properties. Moreover, we demonstrate that context-dependent fitness genes accurately recapitulate pathway-specific genetic vulnerabilities induced by known oncogenes and reveal cell-type-specific dependencies for specific receptor tyrosine kinases, even in oncogenic KRAS backgrounds. Thus, rigorous identification of human cell line fitness genes using a high-complexity CRISPR-Cas9 library affords a high-resolution view of the genetic vulnerabilities of a cell. PMID:26627737

  7. In Vivo RNAi Screen Reveals Neddylation Genes as Novel Regulators of Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ying; Liu, Min; Ospina, Jason K.; Yang, Shengyuan; Zhu, Alan Jian

    2011-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is highly conserved in all metazoan animals and plays critical roles in many developmental processes. Dysregulation of the Hh signaling cascade has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer. Although key components of the Hh pathway have been identified, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the regulation of individual Hh signaling molecules. Here, we report the identification of novel regulators of the Hh pathway, obtained from an in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila. By selectively targeting critical genes functioning in post-translational modification systems utilizing ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like proteins, we identify two novel genes (dUba3 and dUbc12) that negatively regulate Hh signaling activity. We provide in vivo and in vitro evidence illustrating that dUba3 and dUbc12 are essential components of the neddylation pathway; they function in an enzyme cascade to conjugate the ubiquitin-like NEDD8 modifier to Cullin proteins. Neddylation activates the Cullin-containing ubiquitin ligase complex, which in turn promotes the degradation of Cubitus interruptus (Ci), the downstream transcription factor of the Hh pathway. Our study reveals a conserved molecular mechanism of the neddylation pathway in Drosophila and sheds light on the complex post-translational regulations in Hh signaling. PMID:21931660

  8. MUTANT SCREEN REPORT A Genetic Screen for High Copy Number

    E-print Network

    Sharan, Roded

    MUTANT SCREEN REPORT A Genetic Screen for High Copy Number Suppressors of the Synthetic Lethality a high copy number suppressor screen to search for genes that, when overexpressed, suppress the synthetic

  9. MicroSCALE Screening Reveals Genetic Modifiers of Therapeutic Response in Melanoma

    E-print Network

    Sabatini, David M.

    Cell microarrays are a promising tool for performing large-scale functional genomic screening in mammalian cells at reasonable cost, but owing to technical limitations they have been restricted for use with a narrow range ...

  10. A Tendon Cell Specific RNAi Screen Reveals Novel Candidates Essential for Muscle Tendon Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Prabhat; Malhotra, Vivek; VijayRaghavan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Tendons are fibrous connective tissue which connect muscles to the skeletal elements thus acting as passive transmitters of force during locomotion and provide appropriate body posture. Tendon-derived cues, albeit poorly understood, are necessary for proper muscle guidance and attachment during development. In the present study, we used dorsal longitudinal muscles of Drosophila and their tendon attachment sites to unravel the molecular nature of interactions between muscles and tendons. We performed a genetic screen using RNAi-mediated knockdown in tendon cells to find out molecular players involved in the formation and maintenance of myotendinous junction and found 21 candidates out of 2507 RNAi lines screened. Of these, 19 were novel molecules in context of myotendinous system. Integrin-?PS and Talin, picked as candidates in this screen, are known to play important role in the cell-cell interaction and myotendinous junction formation validating our screen. We have found candidates with enzymatic function, transcription activity, cell adhesion, protein folding and intracellular transport function. Tango1, an ER exit protein involved in collagen secretion was identified as a candidate molecule involved in the formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 knockdown was found to affect development of muscle attachment sites and formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 was also found to be involved in secretion of Viking (Collagen type IV) and BM-40 from hemocytes and fat cells. PMID:26488612

  11. MicroSCALE Screening Reveals Genetic Modifiers of Therapeutic Response in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Kris C.; Konieczkowski, David J.; Johannessen, Cory M.; Boehm, Jesse S.; Tamayo, Pablo; Botvinnik, Olga B.; Mesirov, Jill P.; Hahn, William C.; Root, David E.; Garraway, Levi A.; Sabatini, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Cell microarrays are a promising tool for performing large-scale functional genomic screening in mammalian cells at reasonable cost, but due to technical limitations, have been restricted for use with a narrow range of cell lines and short-term assays. Here, we describe MicroSCALE (Microarrays of Spatially Confined Adhesive Lentiviral Features), a cell microarray-based platform that enables application of this technology to a wide range of cell types and longer term assays. We used MicroSCALE to uncover kinases that when overexpressed partially desensitized B-RAFV600E-mutant melanoma cells to inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) RAF, the MAPKKs MEK1 and 2, mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), or PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase). These screens indicated that cells treated with inhibitors acting through common mechanisms were affected by a similar profile of overexpressed proteins. In contrast, screens involving inhibitors acting through distinct mechanisms yielded unique profiles, a finding that has potential relevance for small molecule target identification and combination drugging studies. Further, by integrating large-scale functional screening results with cancer cell line gene expression and pharmacological sensitivity data, we validated the nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) pathway as a potential mediator of resistance to MAPK pathway inhibitors. The MicroSCALE platform described here may enable new classes of large-scale, resource-efficient screens that were not previously feasible, including those involving combinations of cell lines, perturbations, and assay outputs or those involving limited numbers of cells and limited or expensive reagents. PMID:22589389

  12. Genome-wide enrichment screening reveals multiple targets and resistance genes for triclosan in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yu, Byung Jo; Kim, Jung Ae; Ju, Hyun Mok; Choi, Soo-Kyung; Hwang, Seung Jin; Park, Sungyoo; Kim, Euijoong; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2012-10-01

    Triclosan is a widely used biocide effective against different microorganisms. At bactericidal concentrations, triclosan appears to affect multiple targets, while at bacteriostatic concentrations, triclosan targets FabI. The site-specific antibiotic-like mode-of-action and a widespread use of triclosan in household products claimed to possibly induce cross-resistance to other antibiotics. Thus, we set out to define more systematically the genes conferring resistance to triclosan; A genomic library of Escherichia coli strain W3110 was constructed and enriched in a selective medium containing a lethal concentration of triclosan. The genes enabling growth in the presence of triclosan were identified by using a DNA microarray and confirmed consequently by ASKA clones overexpressing the selected 62 candidate genes. Among these, forty-seven genes were further confirmed to enhance the resistance to triclosan; these genes, including the FabI target, were involved in inner or outer membrane synthesis, cell-surface material synthesis, transcriptional activation, sugar phosphotransferase (PTS) systems, various transporter systems, cell division, and ATPase and reductase/dehydrogenase reactions. In particular, overexpression of pgsA, rcsA, or gapC conferred to E. coli cells a similar level of triclosan resistance induced by fabI overexpression. These results indicate that triclosan may have multiple targets other than well-known FabI and that there are several undefined novel mechanisms for the resistance development to triclosan, thus probably inducing cross antibiotic resistance. PMID:23124746

  13. Phenotypic Screening Reveals Topoisomerase I as a Breast Cancer Stem Cell Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Rothermund, Kristi; Gangadharan, Sajithlal B.; Pommier, Yves; Prochownik, Edward V.; Lazo, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation generally thought to be responsible for cancer initiation and progression. Because CSCs are often rare in the total tumor cell population and differentiate rapidly when grown in culture, it has been challenging to uncover compounds that selectively target CSCs. We previously described CSC-emulating cells derived from breast cancer cell lines that maintained a stable undifferentiated state. We optimized a phenotypic assay with these cells and screened 1,280-bioactive compounds, identifying five that preferentially inhibited CSC-like cell proliferation. Using a compound-guided target identification approach, we found high topoisomerase I (Topo I) expression levels in breast CSC-like cells and primary breast CSCs. Structurally unrelated small molecules targeting Topo I preferentially inhibited CSC-like cells. These results illustrate the substantial power of this CSC phenotypic screening platform and promote Topo I as a potential molecular therapeutic target for therapies aimed at expunging CSCs. PMID:22948175

  14. A Whole Cell Pathway Screen Reveals Seven Novel Chemosensitizers to Combat Chloroquine Resistant Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ch'ng, Jun-Hong; Mok, Sachel; Bozdech, Zbynek; Lear, Martin James; Boudhar, Aicha; Russell, Bruce; Nosten, Francois; Tan, Kevin Shyong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Due to the widespread prevalence of resistant parasites, chloroquine (CQ) was removed from front-line antimalarial chemotherapy in the 1990s despite its initial promise of disease eradication. Since then, resistance-conferring mutations have been identified in transporters such as the PfCRT, that allow for the efflux of CQ from its primary site of action, the parasite digestive vacuole. Chemosensitizing/chemoreversing compounds interfere with the function of these transporters thereby sensitizing parasites to CQ once again. However, compounds identified thus far have disappointing in vivo efficacy and screening for alternative candidates is required to revive this strategy. In this study, we propose a simple and direct means to rapidly screen for such compounds using a fluorescent-tagged CQ molecule. When this screen was applied to a small library, seven novel chemosensitizers (octoclothepin, methiothepin, metergoline, loperamide, chlorprothixene, L-703,606 and mibefradil) were quickly elucidated, including two which showed greater potency than the classical chemosensitizers verapamil and desipramine. PMID:23615863

  15. Visual screening for localized RNAs in yeast revealed novel RNAs at the bud-tip

    SciTech Connect

    Andoh, Tomoko . E-mail: andoh@sci.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Oshiro, Yukiko; Hayashi, Sachiko; Takeo, Hideki; Tani, Tokio

    2006-12-29

    Several RNAs, including rRNAs, snRNAs, snoRNAs, and some mRNAs, are known to be localized at specific sites in a cell. Although methods have been established to visualize RNAs in a living cell, no large-scale visual screening of localized RNAs has been performed. In this study, we constructed a genomic library in which random genomic fragments were inserted downstream of U1A-tag sequences under a GAL1 promoter. In a living yeast cell, transcribed U1A-tagged RNAs were visualized by U1A-GFP that binds the RNA sequence of the U1A-tag. In this screening, many RNAs showed nuclear signals. Since the nuclear signals of some RNAs were not seen when the U1A-tag was connected to the 3' ends of the RNAs, it is suggested that their nuclear signals correspond to nascent transcripts on GAL1 promoter plasmids. Using this screening method, we successfully identified two novel localized mRNAs, CSR2 and DAL81, which showed bud-tip localization.

  16. Live imaging RNAi screen reveals genes essential for meiosis in mammalian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pfender, Sybille; Kuznetsov, Vitaliy; Pasternak, Micha?; Tischer, Thomas; Santhanam, Balaji; Schuh, Melina

    2015-08-13

    During fertilization, an egg and a sperm fuse to form a new embryo. Eggs develop from oocytes in a process called meiosis. Meiosis in human oocytes is highly error-prone, and defective eggs are the leading cause of pregnancy loss and several genetic disorders such as Down's syndrome. Which genes safeguard accurate progression through meiosis is largely unclear. Here we develop high-content phenotypic screening methods for the systematic identification of mammalian meiotic genes. We targeted 774 genes by RNA interference within follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes to block protein expression from an early stage of oocyte development onwards. We then analysed the function of several genes simultaneously by high-resolution imaging of chromosomes and microtubules in live oocytes and scored each oocyte quantitatively for 50 phenotypes, generating a comprehensive resource of meiotic gene function. The screen generated an unprecedented annotated data set of meiotic progression in 2,241 mammalian oocytes, which allowed us to analyse systematically which defects are linked to abnormal chromosome segregation during meiosis, identifying progression into anaphase with misaligned chromosomes as well as defects in spindle organization as risk factors. This study demonstrates how high-content screens can be performed in oocytes, and allows systematic studies of meiosis in mammals. PMID:26147080

  17. Revealing Molecular Mechanisms by Integrating High-Dimensional Functional Screens with Protein Interaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Collinet, Claudio; Galvez, Thierry; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Zerial, Marino; Beyer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Functional genomics screens using multi-parametric assays are powerful approaches for identifying genes involved in particular cellular processes. However, they suffer from problems like noise, and often provide little insight into molecular mechanisms. A bottleneck for addressing these issues is the lack of computational methods for the systematic integration of multi-parametric phenotypic datasets with molecular interactions. Here, we present Integrative Multi Profile Analysis of Cellular Traits (IMPACT). The main goal of IMPACT is to identify the most consistent phenotypic profile among interacting genes. This approach utilizes two types of external information: sets of related genes (IMPACT-sets) and network information (IMPACT-modules). Based on the notion that interacting genes are more likely to be involved in similar functions than non-interacting genes, this data is used as a prior to inform the filtering of phenotypic profiles that are similar among interacting genes. IMPACT-sets selects the most frequent profile among a set of related genes. IMPACT-modules identifies sub-networks containing genes with similar phenotype profiles. The statistical significance of these selections is subsequently quantified via permutations of the data. IMPACT (1) handles multiple profiles per gene, (2) rescues genes with weak phenotypes and (3) accounts for multiple biases e.g. caused by the network topology. Application to a genome-wide RNAi screen on endocytosis showed that IMPACT improved the recovery of known endocytosis-related genes, decreased off-target effects, and detected consistent phenotypes. Those findings were confirmed by rescreening 468 genes. Additionally we validated an unexpected influence of the IGF-receptor on EGF-endocytosis. IMPACT facilitates the selection of high-quality phenotypic profiles using different types of independent information, thereby supporting the molecular interpretation of functional screens. PMID:25188415

  18. Copper Complexation Screen Reveals Compounds with Potent Antibiotic Properties against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Haeili, Mehri; Moore, Casey; Davis, Christopher J. C.; Cochran, James B.; Shah, Santosh; Shrestha, Tej B.; Zhang, Yaofang; Bossmann, Stefan H.; Benjamin, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages take advantage of the antibacterial properties of copper ions in the killing of bacterial intruders. However, despite the importance of copper for innate immune functions, coordinated efforts to exploit copper ions for therapeutic interventions against bacterial infections are not yet in place. Here we report a novel high-throughput screening platform specifically developed for the discovery and characterization of compounds with copper-dependent antibacterial properties toward methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We detail how one of the identified compounds, glyoxal-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (GTSM), exerts its potent strictly copper-dependent antibacterial properties on MRSA. Our data indicate that the activity of the GTSM-copper complex goes beyond the general antibacterial effects of accumulated copper ions and suggest that, in contrast to prevailing opinion, copper complexes can indeed exhibit species- and target-specific activities. Based on experimental evidence, we propose that copper ions impose structural changes upon binding to the otherwise inactive GTSM ligand and transfer antibacterial properties to the chelate. In turn, GTSM determines target specificity and utilizes a redox-sensitive release mechanism through which copper ions are deployed at or in close proximity to a putative target. According to our proof-of-concept screen, copper activation is not a rare event and even extends to already established drugs. Thus, copper-activated compounds could define a novel class of anti-MRSA agents that amplify copper-dependent innate immune functions of the host. To this end, we provide a blueprint for a high-throughput drug screening campaign which considers the antibacterial properties of copper ions at the host-pathogen interface. PMID:24752262

  19. A Genome-Wide Tethering Screen Reveals Novel Potential Post-Transcriptional Regulators in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Erben, Esteban D.; Fadda, Abeer; Lueong, Smiths; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Clayton, Christine

    2014-01-01

    In trypanosomatids, gene expression is regulated mainly by post-transcriptional mechanisms, which affect mRNA processing, translation and degradation. Currently, our understanding of factors that regulate either mRNA stability or translation is rather limited. We know that often, the regulators are proteins that bind to the 3?-untranslated region; they presumably interact with ribonucleases and translation factors. However, very few such proteins have been characterized in any detail. Here we describe a genome-wide screen to find proteins implicated in post-transcriptional regulation in Trypanosoma brucei. We made a library of random genomic fragments in a plasmid that was designed for expression of proteins fused to an RNA-binding domain, the lambda-N peptide. This was transfected into cells expressing mRNAs encoding a positive or negative selectable marker, and bearing the “boxB” lambda-N recognition element in the 3?-untranslated region. The screen identified about 300 proteins that could be implicated in post-transcriptional mRNA regulation. These included known regulators, degradative enzymes and translation factors, many canonical RNA-binding proteins, and proteins that act via multi-protein complexes. However there were also nearly 150 potential regulators with no previously annotated function, or functions unrelated to mRNA metabolism. Almost 50 novel regulators were shown to bind RNA using a targeted proteome array. The screen also provided fine structure mapping of the hit candidates' functional domains. Our findings not only confirm the key role that RNA-binding proteins play in the regulation of gene expression in trypanosomatids, but also suggest new roles for previously uncharacterized proteins. PMID:24945722

  20. A Cell-Based Screen Reveals that the Albendazole Metabolite, Albendazole Sulfone, Targets Wolbachia

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Walter M.; White, Pamela M.; Ruybal, Jordan; Lokey, R. Scott; Debec, Alain; Sullivan, William

    2012-01-01

    Wolbachia endosymbionts carried by filarial nematodes give rise to the neglected diseases African river blindness and lymphatic filariasis afflicting millions worldwide. Here we identify new Wolbachia-disrupting compounds by conducting high-throughput cell-based chemical screens using a Wolbachia-infected, fluorescently labeled Drosophila cell line. This screen yielded several Wolbachia-disrupting compounds including three that resembled Albendazole, a widely used anthelmintic drug that targets nematode microtubules. Follow-up studies demonstrate that a common Albendazole metabolite, Albendazole sulfone, reduces intracellular Wolbachia titer both in Drosophila melanogaster and Brugia malayi, the nematode responsible for lymphatic filariasis. Significantly, Albendazole sulfone does not disrupt Drosophila microtubule organization, suggesting that this compound reduces titer through direct targeting of Wolbachia. Accordingly, both DNA staining and FtsZ immunofluorescence demonstrates that Albendazole sulfone treatment induces Wolbachia elongation, a phenotype indicative of binary fission defects. This suggests that the efficacy of Albendazole in treating filarial nematode-based diseases is attributable to dual targeting of nematode microtubules and their Wolbachia endosymbionts. PMID:23028321

  1. A large-scale screen reveals genes that mediate electrotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Runchi; Zhao, Siwei; Jiang, Xupin; Sun, Yaohui; Zhao, Sanjun; Gao, Jing; Borleis, Jane; Willard, Stacey; Tang, Ming; Cai, Huaqing; Kamimura, Yoichiro; Huang, Yuesheng; Jiang, Jianxin; Huang, Zunxi; Mogilner, Alex; Pan, Tingrui; Devreotes, Peter N; Zhao, Min

    2015-05-26

    Directional cell migration in an electric field, a phenomenon called galvanotaxis or electrotaxis, occurs in many types of cells, and may play an important role in wound healing and development. Small extracellular electric fields can guide the migration of amoeboid cells, and we established a large-scale screening approach to search for mutants with electrotaxis phenotypes from a collection of 563 Dictyostelium discoideum strains with morphological defects. We identified 28 strains that were defective in electrotaxis and 10 strains with a slightly higher directional response. Using plasmid rescue followed by gene disruption, we identified some of the mutated genes, including some previously implicated in chemotaxis. Among these, we studied PiaA, which encodes a critical component of TORC2, a kinase protein complex that transduces changes in motility by activating the kinase PKB (also known as Akt). Furthermore, we found that electrotaxis was decreased in mutants lacking gefA, rasC, rip3, lst8, or pkbR1, genes that encode other components of the TORC2-PKB pathway. Thus, we have developed a high-throughput screening technique that will be a useful tool to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of electrotaxis. PMID:26012633

  2. Novel skin phenotypes revealed by a genome-wide mouse reverse genetic screen

    PubMed Central

    Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Heath, Emma; Smedley, Damian P.; Estabel, Jeanne; Sunter, David; DiTommaso, Tia; White, Jacqueline K.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Smyth, Ian; Steel, Karen P.; Watt, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    Permanent stop-and-shop large-scale mouse mutant resources provide an excellent platform to decipher tissue phenogenomics. Here we analyse skin from 538 knockout mouse mutants generated by the Sanger Institute Mouse Genetics Project. We optimize immunolabelling of tail epidermal wholemounts to allow systematic annotation of hair follicle, sebaceous gland and interfollicular epidermal abnormalities using ontology terms from the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. Of the 50 mutants with an epidermal phenotype, 9 map to human genetic conditions with skin abnormalities. Some mutant genes are expressed in the skin, whereas others are not, indicating systemic effects. One phenotype is affected by diet and several are incompletely penetrant. In-depth analysis of three mutants, Krt76, Myo5a (a model of human Griscelli syndrome) and Mysm1, provides validation of the screen. Our study is the first large-scale genome-wide tissue phenotype screen from the International Knockout Mouse Consortium and provides an open access resource for the scientific community. PMID:24721909

  3. A large scale screen reveals genes that mediate electrotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum**

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Runchi; Zhao, Siwei; Jiang, Xupin; Sun, Yaohui; Zhao, Sanjun; Gao, Jing; Borleis, Jane; Willard, Stacey; Tang, Ming; Cai, Huaqing; Kamimura, Yoichiro; Huang, Yuesheng; Jiang, Jianxin; Huang, Zunxi; Mogilner, Alex; Pan, Tingrui; Devreotes, Peter N; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Directional cell migration in an electric field, a phenomenon called galvanotaxis or electrotaxis, occurs in many types of cells, and may play an important role in wound healing and development. Small extracellular electric fields can guide the migration of amoeboid cells, and here, we established a large-scale screening approach to search for mutants with electrotaxis phenotypes from a collection of 563 Dictyostelium discoideum strains with morphological defects. We identified 28 strains that were defective in electrotaxis and 10 strains with a slightly higher directional response. Using plasmid rescue followed by gene disruption, we identified some of the mutated genes, including some previously implicated in chemotaxis. Amongst these we studied PiaA, which encodes a critical component of TORC2, a kinase protein complex that transduces changes in motility by activating the kinase PKB (also known as Akt). Furthermore, we found that electrotaxis was decreased in mutants lacking gefA, rasC, rip3, lst8 or pkbR1, genes that encode other components of the TORC2-PKB pathway. Thus, we have developed a high-throughput screening technique that will be a useful tool to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of electrotaxis. PMID:26012633

  4. Integrated whole-genome screening for Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence genes using multiple disease models reveals that pathogenicity is host specific

    PubMed Central

    Dubern, Jean-Frédéric; Cigana, Cristina; De Simone, Maura; Lazenby, James; Juhas, Mario; Schwager, Stephan; Bianconi, Irene; Döring, Gerd; Eberl, Leo; Williams, Paul; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Cámara, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a multi-host opportunistic pathogen causing a wide range of diseases because of the armoury of virulence factors it produces, and it is difficult to eradicate because of its intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. Using an integrated whole-genome approach, we searched for P.?aeruginosa virulence genes with multi-host relevance. We constructed a random library of 57 360 Tn5 mutants in P.?aeruginosa?PAO1-L and screened it in vitro for those showing pleiotropic effects in virulence phenotypes (reduced swarming, exo-protease and pyocyanin production). A set of these pleiotropic mutants were assayed for reduced toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster,?Caenorhabditis elegans, human cell lines and mice. Surprisingly, the screening revealed that the virulence of the majority of P.?aeruginosa mutants varied between disease models, suggesting that virulence is dependent on the disease model used and hence the host environment. Genomic analysis revealed that these virulence-related genes encoded proteins from almost all functional classes, which were conserved among P.?aeruginosa strains. Thus, we provide strong evidence that although P.?aeruginosa is capable of infecting a wide range of hosts, many of its virulence determinants are host specific. These findings have important implication when searching for novel anti-virulence targets to develop new treatments against P.?aeruginosa. PMID:25845292

  5. High-Throughput siRNA Screening to Reveal GATA-2 Upstream Transcriptional Mechanisms in Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yo; Fujiwara, Tohru; Ohashi, Keiichi; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Harigae, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells can self-renew and differentiate into all blood cell types. The transcription factor GATA-2 is expressed in both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and is essential for cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Recently, evidence from studies of aplastic anemia, MonoMAC syndrome, and lung cancer has demonstrated a mechanistic link between GATA-2 and human pathophysiology. GATA-2-dependent disease processes have been extensively analyzed; however, the transcriptional mechanisms upstream of GATA-2 remain less understood. Here, we conducted high-throughput small-interfering-RNA (siRNA) library screening and showed that YN-1, a human erythroleukemia cell line, expressed high levels of GATA-2 following the activation of the hematopoietic-specific 1S promoter. As transient luciferase reporter assay in YN-1 cells revealed the highest promoter activity in the 1S promoter fused with GATA-2 intronic enhancer (+9.9 kb/1S); therefore, we established a cell line capable of stably expressing +9.9 kb/1S-Luciferase. Subsequently, we screened 995 transcription factor genes and revealed that CITED2 acts as a GATA-2 activator in human hematopoietic cells. These results provide novel insights into and further identify the regulatory mechanism of GATA-2. PMID:26325290

  6. What RNAi screens in model organisms revealed about microbicidal response in mammals?

    PubMed Central

    Abnave, Prasad; Conti, Filippo; Torre, Cedric; Ghigo, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The strategies evolved by pathogens to infect hosts and the mechanisms used by the host to eliminate intruders are highly complex. Because several biological pathways and processes are conserved across model organisms, these organisms have been used for many years to elucidate and understand the mechanisms of the host-pathogen relationship and particularly to unravel the molecular processes enacted by the host to kill pathogens. The emergence of RNA interference (RNAi) and the ability to apply it toward studies in model organisms have allowed a breakthrough in the elucidation of host-pathogen interactions. The aim of this mini-review is to highlight and describe recent breakthroughs in the field of host-pathogen interactions using RNAi screens of model organisms. We will focus specifically on the model organisms Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Danio rerio. Moreover, a recent study examining the immune system of planarian will be discussed. PMID:25629007

  7. Human genome-wide RNAi screen reveals a role for nuclear pore proteins in poxvirus morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, Gilad; Martin, Scott E.; Myers, Timothy G.; Buehler, Eugen; Szymczyk, Krysia H.; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Moss, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses are considered less dependent on host functions than other DNA viruses because of their cytoplasmic site of replication and large genomes, which encode enzymes for DNA and mRNA synthesis. Nevertheless, RNAi screens with two independent human genome-scale libraries have identified more than 500 candidate genes that significantly inhibited and a similar number that enhanced replication and spread of infectious vaccinia virus (VACV). Translational, ubiquitin-proteosome, and endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi transport functions, known to be important for VACV, were enriched in the siRNA-inhibiting group, and RNA polymerase II and associated functions were enriched in the siRNA-enhancing group. Additional findings, notably the inhibition of VACV spread by siRNAs to several nuclear pore genes, were unanticipated. Knockdown of nucleoporin 62 strongly inhibited viral morphogenesis, with only a modest effect on viral gene expression, recapitulating and providing insight into previous studies with enucleated cells. PMID:23401514

  8. Functional genomic screening reveals asparagine dependence as a metabolic vulnerability in sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hettmer, Simone; Schinzel, Anna C; Tchessalova, Daria; Schneider, Michaela; Parker, Christina L; Bronson, Roderick T; Richards, Nigel Gj; Hahn, William C; Wagers, Amy J

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for sarcomas are often inadequate. This study sought to identify actionable gene targets by selective targeting of the molecular networks that support sarcoma cell proliferation. Silencing of asparagine synthetase (ASNS), an amidotransferase that converts aspartate into asparagine, produced the strongest inhibitory effect on sarcoma growth in a functional genomic screen of mouse sarcomas generated by oncogenic Kras and disruption of Cdkn2a. ASNS silencing in mouse and human sarcoma cell lines reduced the percentage of S phase cells and impeded new polypeptide synthesis. These effects of ASNS silencing were reversed by exogenous supplementation with asparagine. Also, asparagine depletion via the ASNS inhibitor amino sulfoximine 5 (AS5) or asparaginase inhibited mouse and human sarcoma growth in vitro, and genetic silencing of ASNS in mouse sarcoma cells combined with depletion of plasma asparagine inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Asparagine reliance of sarcoma cells may represent a metabolic vulnerability with potential anti-sarcoma therapeutic value. PMID:26499495

  9. High-Copy Overexpression Screening Reveals PDR5 as the Main Doxorubicin Resistance Gene in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Ayse Banu; Koc, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin is one of the most potent anticancer drugs used in the treatment of various cancer types. The efficacy of doxorubicin is influenced by the drug resistance mechanisms and its cytotoxicity. In this study, we performed a high-copy screening analysis to find genes that play a role in doxorubicin resistance and found several genes (CUE5, AKL1, CAN1, YHR177W and PDR5) that provide resistance. Among these genes, overexpression of PDR5 provided a remarkable resistance, and deletion of it significantly rendered the tolerance level for the drug. Q-PCR analyses suggested that transcriptional regulation of these genes was not dependent on doxorubicin treatment. Additionally, we profiled the global expression pattern of cells in response to doxorubicin treatment and highlighted the genes and pathways that are important in doxorubicin tolerance/toxicity. Our results suggest that many efflux pumps and DNA metabolism genes are upregulated by the drug and required for doxorubicin tolerance. PMID:26690737

  10. An ER-Mitochondria Tethering Complex Revealed by a Synthetic Biology Screen

    PubMed Central

    Kornmann, Benoît; Currie, Erin; Collins, Sean R.; Schuldiner, Maya; Nunnari, Jodi; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Walter, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Communication between organelles is an important feature of all eukaryotic cells. To uncover components involved in mitochondria/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) junctions, we screened for mutants that could be complemented by a synthetic protein designed to artificially tether the two organelles. We identified the Mmm1/Mdm10/Mdm12/Mdm34 complex as a molecular tether between ER and mitochondria. The tethering complex was composed of proteins resident of both ER and mitochondria. With the use of genome-wide mapping of genetic interactions, we showed that the components of the tethering complex were functionally connected to phospholipid biosynthesis and calcium-signaling genes. In mutant cells, phospholipid biosynthesis was impaired. The tethering complex localized to discrete foci, suggesting that discrete sites of close apposition between ER and mitochondria facilitate interorganelle calcium and phospholipid exchange. PMID:19556461

  11. Functional genomic screen and network analysis reveal novel modifiers of tauopathy dissociated from tau phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ambegaokar, Surendra S.; Jackson, George R.

    2011-01-01

    A functional genetic screen using loss-of-function and gain-of-function alleles was performed to identify modifiers of tau-induced neurotoxicity using the 2N/4R (full-length) isoform of wild-type human tau expressed in the fly retina. We previously reported eye pigment mutations, which create dysfunctional lysosomes, as potent modifiers; here, we report 37 additional genes identified from ?1900 genes screened, including the kinases shaggy/GSK-3beta, par-1/MARK, CamKI and Mekk1. Tau acts synergistically with Mekk1 and p38 to down-regulate extracellular regulated kinase activity, with a corresponding decrease in AT8 immunoreactivity (pS202/T205), suggesting that tau can participate in signaling pathways to regulate its own kinases. Modifiers showed poor correlation with tau phosphorylation (using the AT8, 12E8 and AT270 epitopes); moreover, tested suppressors of wild-type tau were equally effective in suppressing toxicity of a phosphorylation-resistant S11A tau construct, demonstrating that changes in tau phosphorylation state are not required to suppress or enhance its toxicity. Genes related to autophagy, the cell cycle, RNA-associated proteins and chromatin-binding proteins constitute a large percentage of identified modifiers. Other functional categories identified include mitochondrial proteins, lipid trafficking, Golgi proteins, kinesins and dynein and the Hsp70/Hsp90-organizing protein (Hop). Network analysis uncovered several other genes highly associated with the functional modifiers, including genes related to the PI3K, Notch, BMP/TGF-? and Hedgehog pathways, and nuclear trafficking. Activity of GSK-3? is strongly upregulated due to TDP-43 expression, and reduced GSK-3? dosage is also a common suppressor of A?42 and TDP-43 toxicity. These findings suggest therapeutic targets other than mitigation of tau phosphorylation. PMID:21949350

  12. Genetic Signature of Histiocytic Sarcoma Revealed by a Sleeping Beauty Transposon Genetic Screen in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Been, Raha A.; Linden, Michael A.; Hager, Courtney J.; DeCoursin, Krista J.; Abrahante, Juan E.; Landman, Sean R.; Steinbach, Michael; Sarver, Aaron L.; Largaespada, David A.; Starr, Timothy K.

    2014-01-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma is a rare, aggressive neoplasm that responds poorly to therapy. Histiocytic sarcoma is thought to arise from macrophage precursor cells via genetic changes that are largely undefined. To improve our understanding of the etiology of histiocytic sarcoma we conducted a forward genetic screen in mice using the Sleeping Beauty transposon as a mutagen to identify genetic drivers of histiocytic sarcoma. Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis was targeted to myeloid lineage cells using the Lysozyme2 promoter. Mice with activated Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis had significantly shortened lifespan and the majority of these mice developed tumors resembling human histiocytic sarcoma. Analysis of transposon insertions identified 27 common insertion sites containing 28 candidate cancer genes. Several of these genes are known drivers of hematological neoplasms, like Raf1, Fli1, and Mitf, while others are well-known cancer genes, including Nf1, Myc, Jak2, and Pten. Importantly, several new potential drivers of histiocytic sarcoma were identified and could serve as targets for therapy for histiocytic sarcoma patients. PMID:24827933

  13. Systematic screen with kinases inhibitors reveals kinases play distinct roles in growth of osteoprogenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Ni-Rong; Lu, Meng; Bin, Fan-Wen; Chang, Zhi-Yong; Meng, Jia; Zhou, Li-Wu; Guo, Ting; Zhao, Jian-Ning

    2013-01-01

    Cancer treatment-related bone loss has become growing problematic, especially in breast and prostate cancer treated with hormone/endocrine therapy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, bone loss caused by targeted therapy in cancer patients is largely unknown yet. In present study, a kinase inhibitors screen was applied for MC3T3-E1, a murine osteoprogenitor cell line, and seven kinase inhibitors (GSK1838705A, PF-04691502, Dasatinib, Masitinib, GDC-0941, XL880 and Everolimus) were found to suppress the cell viability with dose- and time-dependent manner. The most interesting is that many kinase inhibitors (such as lapatinib, erlotinib and sunitinib) can promote MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation at 0.01 ?M. 4 out of 7 inhibitors were selected to perform the functional study and found that they lead to cell cycle dysregulation, treatments of PF-04691502 (AKT inhibitor), Dasatinib (Src inhibitor) and Everolimus (mTOR inhibitor) lead to G1 arrest of MC3T3-E1 cells via downregulation of cyclin D1 and p-AKT, whereas XL880 (MET and VEGFR inhibitor) treatment results in increase of sub-G1 and G2/M phase by upregulation of p53 protein. Our work provides important indications for the comprehensive care of cancer patients treated with some targeted drugs. PMID:24133586

  14. Functional genomic screening reveals asparagine dependence as a metabolic vulnerability in sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Hettmer, Simone; Schinzel, Anna C; Tchessalova, Daria; Schneider, Michaela; Parker, Christina L; Bronson, Roderick T; Richards, Nigel GJ; Hahn, William C; Wagers, Amy J

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for sarcomas are often inadequate. This study sought to identify actionable gene targets by selective targeting of the molecular networks that support sarcoma cell proliferation. Silencing of asparagine synthetase (ASNS), an amidotransferase that converts aspartate into asparagine, produced the strongest inhibitory effect on sarcoma growth in a functional genomic screen of mouse sarcomas generated by oncogenic Kras and disruption of Cdkn2a. ASNS silencing in mouse and human sarcoma cell lines reduced the percentage of S phase cells and impeded new polypeptide synthesis. These effects of ASNS silencing were reversed by exogenous supplementation with asparagine. Also, asparagine depletion via the ASNS inhibitor amino sulfoximine 5 (AS5) or asparaginase inhibited mouse and human sarcoma growth in vitro, and genetic silencing of ASNS in mouse sarcoma cells combined with depletion of plasma asparagine inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Asparagine reliance of sarcoma cells may represent a metabolic vulnerability with potential anti-sarcoma therapeutic value. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09436.001 PMID:26499495

  15. Haploid Genetic Screen Reveals a Profound and Direct Dependence on Cholesterol for Hantavirus Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kleinfelter, Lara M.; Jangra, Rohit K.; Jae, Lucas T.; Herbert, Andrew S.; Mittler, Eva; Stiles, Katie M.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Kielian, Margaret; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in the Old World and a highly fatal hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in the New World. No vaccines or antiviral therapies are currently available to prevent or treat hantavirus disease, and gaps in our understanding of how hantaviruses enter cells challenge the search for therapeutics. We performed a haploid genetic screen in human cells to identify host factors required for entry by Andes virus, a highly virulent New World hantavirus. We found that multiple genes involved in cholesterol sensing, regulation, and biosynthesis, including key components of the sterol response element-binding protein (SREBP) pathway, are critical for Andes virus entry. Genetic or pharmacological disruption of the membrane-bound transcription factor peptidase/site-1 protease (MBTPS1/S1P), an SREBP control element, dramatically reduced infection by virulent hantaviruses of both the Old World and New World clades but not by rhabdoviruses or alphaviruses, indicating that this pathway is broadly, but selectively, required by hantaviruses. These results could be fully explained as arising from the modest depletion of cellular membrane cholesterol that accompanied S1P disruption. Mechanistic studies of cells and with protein-free liposomes suggested that high levels of cholesterol are specifically needed for hantavirus membrane fusion. Taken together, our results indicate that the profound dependence on target membrane cholesterol is a fundamental, and unusual, biophysical property of hantavirus glycoprotein-membrane interactions during entry. PMID:26126854

  16. Metagenome-based screening reveals worldwide distribution of LOV-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Gopal P; Losi, Aba; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Metagenomes from various environments were screened for sequences homologous to light, oxygen, voltage (LOV)-domain proteins. LOV domains are flavin binding, blue-light (BL)-sensitive photoreceptors present in 10-15% of deposited prokaryotic genomes. The LOV domain has been selected, since BL is an ever present and sometimes harmful environmental factor for microbial communities. The majority of the metagenome material originated from the Sargasso Sea Project and from open-ocean sampling. In total, more than 40 million open reading frames were investigated for LOV-domain sequences. Most sequences were identified from aquatic material, but they were also found in metagenomes from soil and extreme environments, e.g. hypersaline ponds, acidic mine drainage or wastewater treatment facilities. A total of 578 LOV domains was assigned by three criteria: (1) the highly conserved core region, (2) the presence of minimally 14 essential amino acids and (3) a minimal length of 80 amino acids. More than three quarters of these identified genes showed a sequence divergence of more than 20% from database-deposited LOV domains from known organisms, indicating the large variation of this photoreceptor motif. The broad occurrence of LOV domains in metagenomes emphasizes their important physiological role for light-induced signal transduction, stress adaptation and survival mechanisms. PMID:22044076

  17. Extensive screen for bacterial endosymbionts reveals taxon-specific distribution patterns among bees (Hymenoptera, Anthophila).

    PubMed

    Gerth, Michael; Saeed, Abiya; White, Jennifer A; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts play key roles in arthropod biology, ranging from beneficial mutualists to parasitic sex ratio manipulators. The number of described endosymbiotic bacterial taxa has accumulated continuously in recent years. While the understanding of arthropod-microbe interactions has advanced significantly, especially in model organisms, relatively little is known about symbiont distribution and effects in non-model organisms. As a first step to alleviate this gap in understanding, we performed an endosymbiont survey in bees (Anthophila), an ecologically and economically important group of hymenopterans. To this end, we sampled 170 bee species and screened by PCR for the presence of Wolbachia, Rickettsia, Arsenophonus and Cardinium. Detected strains were then further diagnosed by additional markers. Additionally, we tested if certain ecological traits, bee phylogeny or geographic origin of bees explain endosymbiont distribution. Our results indicate that supergroup A Wolbachia are very common in bees and that their distribution can be significantly correlated to both host ecology and phylogeny, although a distinction of these factors is not possible. Furthermore, bees from the same region (Old World or New World) are more likely to harbour identical Wolbachia strains than expected by chance. Other endosymbionts (Rickettsia, Arsenophonus) were less common, and specific to particular host taxa, suggesting that host phylogeny is a major predictor for endosymbiont distribution in bees. PMID:25914139

  18. An Overexpression Screen of Toxoplasma gondii Rab-GTPases Reveals Distinct Transport Routes to the Micronemes

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Katrin; Kamin, Dirk; Rittweger, Eva; Wilkes, Jonathan; Flammer, Halley; Mahler, Sabine; Heng, Joanne; Tonkin, Christopher J.; Langsley, Gordon; Hell, Stefan W.; Carruthers, Vernon B.; Ferguson, David J. P.; Meissner, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The basic organisation of the endomembrane system is conserved in all eukaryotes and comparative genome analyses provides compelling evidence that the endomembrane system of the last common eukaryotic ancestor (LCEA) is complex with many genes required for regulated traffic being present. Although apicomplexan parasites, causative agents of severe human and animal diseases, appear to have only a basic set of trafficking factors such as Rab-GTPases, they evolved unique secretory organelles (micronemes, rhoptries and dense granules) that are sequentially secreted during invasion of the host cell. In order to define the secretory pathway of apicomplexans, we performed an overexpression screen of Rabs in Toxoplasma gondii and identified Rab5A and Rab5C as important regulators of traffic to micronemes and rhoptries. Intriguingly, we found that not all microneme proteins traffic depends on functional Rab5A and Rab5C, indicating the existence of redundant microneme targeting pathways. Using two-colour super-resolution stimulated emission depletion (STED) we verified distinct localisations of independent microneme proteins and demonstrate that micronemal organelles are organised in distinct subsets or subcompartments. Our results suggest that apicomplexan parasites modify classical regulators of the endocytic system to carryout essential parasite-specific roles in the biogenesis of their unique secretory organelles. PMID:23505371

  19. A Comprehensive Immunoreceptor Phosphotyrosine-based Signaling Network Revealed by Reciprocal Protein-Peptide Array Screening.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huadong; Li, Lei; Voss, Courtney; Wang, Feng; Liu, Juewen; Li, Shawn Shun-Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Cells of the immune system communicate with their environment through immunoreceptors. These receptors often harbor intracellular tyrosine residues, which, when phosphorylated upon receptor activation, serve as docking sites to recruit downstream signaling proteins containing the Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain. A systematic investigation of interactions between the SH2 domain and the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based regulatory motifs (ITRM), including inhibitory (ITIM), activating (ITAM), or switching (ITSM) motifs, is critical for understanding cellular signal transduction and immune function. Using the B cell inhibitory receptor CD22 as an example, we developed an approach that combines reciprocal or bidirectional phosphopeptide and SH2 domain array screens with in-solution binding assays to identify a comprehensive SH2-CD22 interaction network. Extending this approach to 194 human ITRM sequences and 78 SH2 domains led to the identification of a high-confidence immunoreceptor interactome containing 1137 binary interactions. Besides recapitulating many previously reported interactions, our study uncovered numerous novel interactions. The resulting ITRM-SH2 interactome not only helped to fill many gaps in the immune signaling network, it also allowed us to associate different SH2 domains to distinct immune functions. Detailed analysis of the NK cell ITRM-mediated interactions led to the identification of a network nucleated by the Vav3 and Fyn SH2 domains. We showed further that these SH2 domains have distinct functions in cytotoxicity. The bidirectional protein-peptide array approach described herein may be applied to the numerous other peptide-binding modules to identify potential protein-protein interactions in a systematic and reliable manner. PMID:25907764

  20. Systematic screen for mutants resistant to TORC1 inhibition in fission yeast reveals genes involved in cellular ageing and growth

    PubMed Central

    Rallis, Charalampos; López-Maury, Luis; Georgescu, Teodora; Pancaldi, Vera; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    Summary Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1), which controls growth in response to nutrients, promotes ageing in multiple organisms. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe emerges as a valuable genetic model system to study TORC1 function and cellular ageing. Here we exploited the combinatorial action of rapamycin and caffeine, which inhibit fission yeast growth in a TORC1-dependent manner. We screened a deletion library, comprising ?84% of all non-essential fission yeast genes, for drug-resistant mutants. This screen identified 33 genes encoding functions such as transcription, kinases, mitochondrial respiration, biosynthesis, intra-cellular trafficking, and stress response. Among the corresponding mutants, 5 showed shortened and 21 showed increased maximal chronological lifespans; 15 of the latter mutants showed no further lifespan increase with rapamycin and might thus represent key targets downstream of TORC1. We pursued the long-lived sck2 mutant with additional functional analyses, revealing that the Sck2p kinase functions within the TORC1 network and is required for normal cell growth, global protein translation, and ribosomal S6 protein phosphorylation in a nutrient-dependent manner. Notably, slow cell growth was associated with all long-lived mutants while oxidative-stress resistance was not. PMID:24463365

  1. Virtual screening on an ?-helix to ?-strand switchable region of the FGFR2 extracellular domain revealed positive and negative modulators.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Constantino; Corentin, Herbert; Thierry, Vermat; Chantal, Alcouffe; Tanguy, Bozec; David, Sibrac; Jean-Marc, Herbert; Pascual, Ferrara; Françoise, Bono; Edgardo, Ferran

    2014-11-01

    The secondary structure of some protein segments may vary between ?-helix and ?-strand. To predict these switchable segments, we have developed an algorithm, Switch-P, based solely on the protein sequence. This algorithm was used on the extracellular parts of FGF receptors. For FGFR2, it predicted that ?4 and ?5 strands of the third Ig-like domain were highly switchable. These two strands possess a high number of somatic mutations associated with cancer. Analysis of PDB structures of FGF receptors confirmed the switchability prediction for ?5. We thus evaluated if compound-driven ?-helix/?-strand switching of ?5 could modulate FGFR2 signaling. We performed the virtual screening of a library containing 1.4 million of chemical compounds with two models of the third Ig-like domain of FGFR2 showing different secondary structures for ?5, and we selected 32 compounds. Experimental testing using proliferation assays with FGF7-stimulated SNU-16 cells and a FGFR2-dependent Erk1/2 phosphorylation assay with FGFR2-transfected L6 cells, revealed activators and inhibitors of FGFR2. Our method for the identification of switchable proteinic regions, associated with our virtual screening approach, provides an opportunity to discover new generation of drugs with under-explored mechanism of action. PMID:25082719

  2. Quantitative Genome-Wide Genetic Interaction Screens Reveal Global Epistatic Relationships of Protein Complexes in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashwani; Stewart, Geordie; Samanfar, Bahram; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Wagih, Omar; Vlasblom, James; Phanse, Sadhna; Lad, Krunal; Yeou Hsiung Yu, Angela; Graham, Christopher; Jin, Ke; Brown, Eric; Golshani, Ashkan; Kim, Philip; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Greenblatt, Jack; Houry, Walid A.; Parkinson, John; Emili, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale proteomic analyses in Escherichia coli have documented the composition and physical relationships of multiprotein complexes, but not their functional organization into biological pathways and processes. Conversely, genetic interaction (GI) screens can provide insights into the biological role(s) of individual gene and higher order associations. Combining the information from both approaches should elucidate how complexes and pathways intersect functionally at a systems level. However, such integrative analysis has been hindered due to the lack of relevant GI data. Here we present a systematic, unbiased, and quantitative synthetic genetic array screen in E. coli describing the genetic dependencies and functional cross-talk among over 600,000 digenic mutant combinations. Combining this epistasis information with putative functional modules derived from previous proteomic data and genomic context-based methods revealed unexpected associations, including new components required for the biogenesis of iron-sulphur and ribosome integrity, and the interplay between molecular chaperones and proteases. We find that functionally-linked genes co-conserved among ?-proteobacteria are far more likely to have correlated GI profiles than genes with divergent patterns of evolution. Overall, examining bacterial GIs in the context of protein complexes provides avenues for a deeper mechanistic understanding of core microbial systems. PMID:24586182

  3. A quantitative imaging-based screen reveals the exocyst as a network hub connecting endocytosis and exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Mini; Tollis, Sylvain; Nair, Deepak; Mitteau, Romain; Velours, Christophe; Massoni-Laporte, Aurelie; Royou, Anne; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; McCusker, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of endocytosis and exocytosis underlies fundamental biological processes ranging from fertilization to neuronal activity and cellular polarity. However, the mechanisms governing the spatial organization of endocytosis and exocytosis require clarification. Using a quantitative imaging-based screen in budding yeast, we identified 89 mutants displaying defects in the localization of either one or both pathways. High-resolution single-vesicle tracking revealed that the endocytic and exocytic mutants she4? and bud6? alter post-Golgi vesicle dynamics in opposite ways. The endocytic and exocytic pathways display strong interdependence during polarity establishment while being more independent during polarity maintenance. Systems analysis identified the exocyst complex as a key network hub, rich in genetic interactions with endocytic and exocytic components. Exocyst mutants displayed altered endocytic and post-Golgi vesicle dynamics and interspersed endocytic and exocytic domains compared with control cells. These data are consistent with an important role for the exocyst in coordinating endocytosis and exocytosis. PMID:25947137

  4. Screening for hydrolytic enzymes reveals Ayr1p as a novel triacylglycerol lipase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ploier, Birgit; Scharwey, Melanie; Koch, Barbara; Schmidt, Claudia; Schatte, Jessica; Rechberger, Gerald; Kollroser, Manfred; Hermetter, Albin; Daum, Günther

    2013-12-13

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as other eukaryotes, preserves fatty acids and sterols in a biologically inert form, as triacylglycerols and steryl esters. The major triacylglycerol lipases of the yeast S. cerevisiae identified so far are Tgl3p, Tgl4p, and Tgl5p (Athenstaedt, K., and Daum, G. (2003) YMR313c/TGL3 encodes a novel triacylglycerol lipase located in lipid particles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 23317-23323; Athenstaedt, K., and Daum, G. (2005) Tgl4p and Tgl5p, two triacylglycerol lipases of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are localized to lipid particles. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 37301-37309). We observed that upon cultivation on oleic acid, triacylglycerol mobilization did not come to a halt in a yeast strain deficient in all currently known triacylglycerol lipases, indicating the presence of additional not yet characterized lipases/esterases. Functional proteome analysis using lipase and esterase inhibitors revealed a subset of candidate genes for yet unknown hydrolytic enzymes on peroxisomes and lipid droplets. Based on the conserved GXSXG lipase motif, putative functions, and subcellular localizations, a selected number of candidates were characterized by enzyme assays in vitro, gene expression analysis, non-polar lipid analysis, and in vivo triacylglycerol mobilization assays. These investigations led to the identification of Ayr1p as a novel triacylglycerol lipase of yeast lipid droplets and confirmed the hydrolytic potential of the peroxisomal Lpx1p in vivo. Based on these results, we discuss a possible link between lipid storage, lipid mobilization, and peroxisomal utilization of fatty acids as a carbon source. PMID:24187129

  5. A genetic screen for vascular mutants in zebrafish reveals dynamic roles for Vegf/Plcg1 signaling during artery development

    PubMed Central

    Covassin, L. D.; Siekmann, A. F.; Kacergis, M. C.; Laver, E.; Moore, J. C.; Villefranc, J. A.; Weinstein, B. M.; Lawson, N. D.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we describe a forward genetic approach to identify mutations that affect blood vessel development in the zebrafish. By applying a haploid screening strategy in a transgenic background that allows direct visualization of blood vessels, it was possible to identify several classes of mutant vascular phenotypes. Subsequent characterization of mutant lines revealed that defects in Vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf) signaling specifically affected artery development. Comparison of phenotypes associated with different mutations within a functional zebrafish Vegf receptor-2 ortholog (referred to as kdr-like, kdrl) revealed surprisingly varied effects on vascular development. In parallel, we identified an allelic series of mutations in phospholipase c gamma 1 (plcg1). Together with in vivo structure-function analysis, our results suggest a requirement for Plcg1 catalytic activity downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases. We further find that embryos lacking both maternal and zygotic plcg1 display more severe defects in artery differentiation but are otherwise similar to zygotic mutants. Finally, we demonstrate through mosaic analysis that plcg1 functions autonomously in endothelial cells. Together our genetic analyses suggest that Vegf/Plcg1 signaling acts at multiple time points and in different signaling contexts to mediate distinct aspects of artery development. PMID:19269286

  6. A Genome-Wide Screen Reveals that the Vibrio cholerae Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Modulates Virulence Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiyao; Millet, Yves A; Chao, Michael C; Sasabe, Jumpei; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2015-09-01

    Diverse environmental stimuli and a complex network of regulatory factors are known to modulate expression of Vibrio cholerae's principal virulence factors. However, there is relatively little known about how metabolic factors impinge upon the pathogen's well-characterized cascade of transcription factors that induce expression of cholera toxin and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). Here, we used a transposon insertion site (TIS) sequencing-based strategy to identify new factors required for expression of tcpA, which encodes the major subunit of TCP, the organism's chief intestinal colonization factor. Besides identifying most of the genes known to modulate tcpA expression, the screen yielded ptsI and ptsH, which encode the enzyme I (EI) and Hpr components of the V. cholerae phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS). In addition to reduced expression of TcpA, strains lacking EI, Hpr, or the associated EIIA(Glc) protein produced less cholera toxin (CT) and had a diminished capacity to colonize the infant mouse intestine. The PTS modulates virulence gene expression by regulating expression of tcpPH and aphAB, which themselves control expression of toxT, the central activator of virulence gene expression. One mechanism by which PTS promotes virulence gene expression appears to be by modulating the amounts of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP). Our findings reveal that the V. cholerae PTS is an additional modulator of the ToxT regulon and demonstrate the potency of loss-of-function TIS sequencing screens for defining regulatory networks. PMID:26056384

  7. Functional drug screening reveals anticonvulsants as enhancers of mTOR-independent autophagic killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis through inositol depletion

    PubMed Central

    Schiebler, Mark; Brown, Karen; Hegyi, Krisztina; Newton, Sandra M; Renna, Maurizio; Hepburn, Lucy; Klapholz, Catherine; Coulter, Sarah; Obregón-Henao, Andres; Henao Tamayo, Marcela; Basaraba, Randall; Kampmann, Beate; Henry, Katherine M; Burgon, Joseph; Renshaw, Stephen A; Fleming, Angeleen; Kay, Robert R; Anderson, Karen E; Hawkins, Phillip T; Ordway, Diane J; Rubinsztein, David C; Floto, Rodrigo Andres

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) remains a major challenge to global health made worse by the spread of multidrug resistance. We therefore examined whether stimulating intracellular killing of mycobacteria through pharmacological enhancement of macroautophagy might provide a novel therapeutic strategy. Despite the resistance of MTB to killing by basal autophagy, cell-based screening of FDA-approved drugs revealed two anticonvulsants, carbamazepine and valproic acid, that were able to stimulate autophagic killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis within primary human macrophages at concentrations achievable in humans. Using a zebrafish model, we show that carbamazepine can stimulate autophagy in vivo and enhance clearance of M. marinum, while in mice infected with a highly virulent multidrug-resistant MTB strain, carbamazepine treatment reduced bacterial burden, improved lung pathology and stimulated adaptive immunity. We show that carbamazepine induces antimicrobial autophagy through a novel, evolutionarily conserved, mTOR-independent pathway controlled by cellular depletion of myo-inositol. While strain-specific differences in susceptibility to in vivo carbamazepine treatment may exist, autophagy enhancement by repurposed drugs provides an easily implementable potential therapy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant mycobacterial infection. PMID:25535254

  8. Pharmacologic screens reveal metformin that suppresses GRP78-dependent autophagy to enhance the anti-myeloma effect of bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, S; Abdel-Malek, M A Y; Malek, E; Vad, N; Latif, T; Anderson, K C; Driscoll, J J

    2015-01-01

    Although the therapeutic benefit of proteasome inhibition in multiple myeloma remains unchallenged, drug resistance inevitably emerges through mechanisms that remain elusive. Bortezomib provokes unwanted protein accumulation and the endoplasmic reticulum stress to activate the unfolded protein response (UPR) and autophagy as compensatory mechanisms that restore protein homeostasis. High-throughput screens to detect pharmacologics that modulated autophagy to enhance the anti-myeloma effect of bortezomib revealed metformin, a widely used antidiabetic agent with proven efficacy and limited adverse effects. Metformin co-treatment with bortezomib suppressed induction of the critical UPR effector glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) to impair autophagosome formation and enhance apoptosis. Gene expression profiling of newly diagnosed myeloma patient tumors further correlated the hyperexpression of GRP78-encoding HSPA5 with reduced clinical response to bortezomib. The effect of bortezomib was enhanced with metformin co-treatment using myeloma patient tumor cells and the chemoresistant, stem cell-like side population that may contribute to disease recurrence. The relevance of the findings was confirmed in vivo as shown by metformin co-treatment with bortezomib that delayed the growth of myeloma xenotransplants. Taken together, our results suggest that metformin suppresses GRP78, a key driver of bortezomib-induced autophagy, and support the pharmacologic repositioning of metformin to enhance the anti-myeloma benefit of bortezomib. PMID:26108695

  9. A binding hotspot in Trypanosoma cruzi histidyl-tRNA synthetase revealed by fragment-based crystallographic cocktail screens.

    PubMed

    Koh, Cho Yeow; Siddaramaiah, Latha Kallur; Ranade, Ranae M; Nguyen, Jasmine; Jian, Tengyue; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Gillespie, J Robert; Buckner, Frederick S; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Hol, Wim G J

    2015-08-01

    American trypanosomiasis, commonly known as Chagas disease, is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The chronic form of the infection often causes debilitating morbidity and mortality. However, the current treatment for the disease is typically inadequate owing to drug toxicity and poor efficacy, necessitating a continual effort to discover and develop new antiparasitic therapeutic agents. The structure of T. cruzi histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS), a validated drug target, has previously been reported. Based on this structure and those of human cytosolic HisRS, opportunities for the development of specific inhibitors were identified. Here, efforts are reported to identify small molecules that bind to T. cruzi HisRS through fragment-based crystallographic screening in order to arrive at chemical starting points for the development of specific inhibitors. T. cruzi HisRS was soaked into 68 different cocktails from the Medical Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa (MSGPP) fragment library and diffraction data were collected to identify bound fragments after soaking. A total of 15 fragments were identified, all bound to the same site on the protein, revealing a fragment-binding hotspot adjacent to the ATP-binding pocket. On the basis of the initial hits, the design of reactive fragments targeting the hotspot which would be simultaneously covalently linked to a cysteine residue present only in trypanosomatid HisRS was initiated. Inhibition of T. cruzi HisRS was observed with the resultant reactive fragments and the anticipated binding mode was confirmed crystallographically. These results form a platform for the development of future generations of selective inhibitors for trypanosomatid HisRS. PMID:26249349

  10. Antimicrobial, antitumor and brine shrimp lethality assay of Ranunculus arvensis L. extracts.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Muhammad Zeeshan; Ali, Amjad; Saeed, Asma; Saeed, Ahmad; Malik, Salman Akbar

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the antitumor activity, brine shrimp lethality assay, antibacterial and antifungal activity of Methanol Extract (ME), Water Extract (WE), Acetone Extract (AE), Chloroform Extract (CE), Methanol-Water Extract (MWE), Methanol-Acetone Extract (MAE), Methanol-Chloroform Extract (MCE) of Ranunculus arvensis (L.). Antitumor activity was evaluated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens (At10) induced potato disc assay. Cytotoxicity was evaluated with brine shrimp lethality assay. Antibacterial activity was evaluated with six bacterial strains including Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Micrococcus luteus and Streptococcus anginosus and antifungal screening was done against five fungal strains including Aspergillus niger, A. flavus, A. fumigates, Fusarium solani and Mucor species by using disc diffusion method. Best antitumor activity was obtained with ME and WE, having highest IC50 values 20.27 ± 1.62 and 93.01 ± 1.33?g/disc. Brine shrimp lethality assay showed LC50 values of AE, MAE and ME were obtained as 384.66 ± 9.42?g/ml, 724.11 ± 8.01?g/ml and 978.7 ±8.01 ?g/ml respectively. WE of R. arvensis revealed weak antimicrobial result against the tested microorganisms. On the other hand, the antifungal activity of the plant extracts was found to be insignificant. These findings demonstrate that extracts of R. arvensis possesses significant antitumor activity. Further extensive study is necessary to assess the therapeutic potential of the plant. PMID:26004705

  11. Synthetic Lethal Interaction between Oncogenic KRAS Dependency and STK33 Suppression in Human Cancer Cells

    E-print Network

    Scholl, Claudia

    An alternative to therapeutic targeting of oncogenes is to perform “synthetic lethalityscreens for genes that are essential only in the context of specific cancer-causing mutations. We used high-throughput RNA interference ...

  12. Copyright 8 1988 by the Genetics Society of America Unlinked Noncomplementation: Isolationof New Conditional-Lethal

    E-print Network

    Botstein, David

    Conditional-Lethal Mutations in Each of the Tubulin Genesof Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tim Steams and David of Saccharomycescereuziiae that code for proteins that interact with P-tubulin were sought by screening for unlinked

  13. Potential lethal and non-lethal effects of predators on dispersal of spider mites.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Hatsune; Yano, Shuichi

    2014-11-01

    Predators can affect prey dispersal lethally by direct consumption or non-lethally by making prey hesitate to disperse. These lethal and non-lethal effects are detectable only in systems where prey can disperse between multiple patches. However, most studies have drawn their conclusions concerning the ability of predatory mites to suppress spider mites based on observations of their interactions on a single patch or on heavily infested host plants where spider mites could hardly disperse toward intact patches. In these systems, specialist predatory mites that penetrate protective webs produced by spider mites quickly suppress the spider mites, whereas generalist predators that cannot penetrate the webs were ineffective. By using a connected patch system, we revealed that a generalist ant, Pristomyrmex punctatus Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), effectively prevented dispersal of spider mites, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae), by directly consuming dispersing individuals. We also revealed that a generalist predatory mite, Euseius sojaensis Ehara (Acari: Phytoseiidae), prevented between-patch dispersal of T. kanzawai by making them hesitate to disperse. In contrast, a specialist phytoseiid predatory mite, Neoseiulus womersleyi Schicha, allowed spider mites to escape an initial patch, increasing the number of colonized patches within the system. Our results suggest that ants and generalist predatory mites can effectively suppress Tetranychus species under some conditions, and should receive more attention as agents for conservation biological control in agroecosystems. PMID:24867061

  14. Approaches to Identifying Synthetic Lethal Interactions in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jordan M.; Nguyen, Quy H.; Singh, Manpreet; Razorenova, Olga V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeting synthetic lethal interactions is a promising new therapeutic approach to exploit specific changes that occur within cancer cells. Multiple approaches to investigate these interactions have been developed and successfully implemented, including chemical, siRNA, shRNA, and CRISPR library screens. Genome-wide computational approaches, such as DAISY, also have been successful in predicting synthetic lethal interactions from both cancer cell lines and patient samples. Each approach has its advantages and disadvantages that need to be considered depending on the cancer type and its molecular alterations. This review discusses these approaches and examines case studies that highlight their use. PMID:26029013

  15. Proteomic screening of variola virus reveals a unique NF-?B inhibitor that is highly conserved among pathogenic orthopoxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Lanchbury, Jerry S.; Shattuck, Donna; Neff, Chris; Dufford, Max; van Buuren, Nick; Fagan, Katharine; Barry, Michele; Smith, Scott; Damon, Inger; McFadden, Grant

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the binary interactions between viral and host proteins has become a valuable tool for investigating viral tropism and pathogenesis. Here, we present the first systematic protein interaction screening of the unique variola virus proteome by using yeast 2-hybrid screening against a variety of human cDNA libraries. Several protein–protein interactions were identified, including an interaction between variola G1R, an ankryin/F-box containing protein, and human nuclear factor kappa-B1 (NF-?B1)/p105. This represents the first direct interaction between a pathogen-encoded protein and NF-?B1/p105. Orthologs of G1R are present in a variety of pathogenic orthopoxviruses, but not in vaccinia virus, and expression of any one of these viral proteins blocks NF-?B signaling in human cells. Thus, proteomic screening of variola virus has the potential to uncover modulators of the human innate antiviral responses. PMID:19451633

  16. Cell-based screen for altered nuclear phenotypes reveals senescence progression in polyploid cells after Aurora kinase B inhibition

    E-print Network

    Sadaie, Mahito; Dillon, Christian; Narita, Masako; Young, Andrew R. J.; Cairney, Claire J.; Godwin, Lauren S.; Torrance, Christopher J.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Keith, W. Nicol; Narita, Masashi

    2015-07-01

    Compound screening IMR90 cells were plated in a 96-well plate (353948, BD Falcon) at 10,000 cells per well. After 24 hours, the medium was replaced by those containing 3 µM or 5 µM kinase inhibitors (InhibitorSelect kinase inhibitor library including 160...

  17. Identification of genes important for cutaneous function revealed by a large scale reverse genetic screen in the mouse.

    PubMed

    DiTommaso, Tia; Jones, Lynelle K; Cottle, Denny L; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Vancollie, Valerie E; Watt, Fiona M; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P; Sundberg, John P; White, Jacqueline K; Smyth, Ian M

    2014-10-01

    The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP). A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1), while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1). The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation. PMID:25340873

  18. Identification of Genes Important for Cutaneous Function Revealed by a Large Scale Reverse Genetic Screen in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    DiTommaso, Tia; Jones, Lynelle K.; Cottle, Denny L.; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Watt, Fiona M.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P.; Sundberg, John P.; White, Jacqueline K.; Smyth, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP). A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1), while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1). The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation. PMID:25340873

  19. A Genome-Wide siRNA Screen Reveals Positive and Negative Regulators of the NOD2 and NF-?B Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Neil; Burberry, Aaron; Franchi, Luigi; Kim, Yun-Gi; McDonald, Christine; Sartor, Maureen A.; Núñez, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    The cytoplasmic receptor NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2) senses peptidoglycan fragments and triggers host defense pathways that lead to inflammatory immune responses. Dysregulation of NOD2 signaling is associated with inflammatory diseases, such as Crohn’s disease and Blau syndrome. We used a genome-wide, small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to identify regulators of the NOD2 signaling pathway. Several genes associated with Crohn’s disease risk were identified in the screen, supporting a role for NOD2 and nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) pathways in the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease. A comparison of hits from this screen with other “omics” data sets revealed interconnected networks of genes implicated in NF-?B signaling. Secondary assays, including the measurement of interleukin-8 secretion, served to validate many of the regulators. Knockdown of putative regulators in HEK293 cells followed by stimulation with tumor necrosis factor ? revealed that most of the genes identified were general regulators of NF-?B signaling. Overall, the genes identified here provide a resource to facilitate the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate NOD2- and NF-?B–mediated inflammation. PMID:23322906

  20. In vitro Screening of Compounds against Laboratory and Field Isolates of Human Hookworm Reveals Quantitative Differences in Anthelmintic Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Treger, Rebecca S.; Otchere, Joseph; Keil, Martin F.; Quagraine, Josephine E.; Rai, Ganesha; Mott, Bryan T.; Humphries, Debbie L.; Wilson, Michael; Cappello, Michael; Vermeire, Jon J.

    2014-01-01

    A panel of 80 compounds was screened for anthelmintic activity against a laboratory strain of Ancylostoma ceylanicum and field isolates of hookworm obtained from school children in the Kintampo North District of the Brong Ahafo Region of Ghana. Although the laboratory strain of A. ceylanicum was more susceptible to the compounds tested than the field isolates of hookworm, a twofold increase in compound concentration resulted in comparable egg hatch percent inhibition for select compounds. These data provide evidence that the efficacy of anthelmintic compounds may be species-dependent and that field and laboratory strains of hookworm differ in their sensitivities to the anthelmintics tested. These data also suggest that both compound concentration and hookworm species must be considered when screening to identify novel anthelmintic compounds. PMID:24297811

  1. Comparative RNAi Screens in C. elegans and C. briggsae Reveal the Impact of Developmental System Drift on Gene Function

    PubMed Central

    Verster, Adrian J.; Ramani, Arun K.; McKay, Sheldon J.; Fraser, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Although two related species may have extremely similar phenotypes, the genetic networks underpinning this conserved biology may have diverged substantially since they last shared a common ancestor. This is termed Developmental System Drift (DSD) and reflects the plasticity of genetic networks. One consequence of DSD is that some orthologous genes will have evolved different in vivo functions in two such phenotypically similar, related species and will therefore have different loss of function phenotypes. Here we report an RNAi screen in C. elegans and C. briggsae to identify such cases. We screened 1333 genes in both species and identified 91 orthologues that have different RNAi phenotypes. Intriguingly, we find that recently evolved genes of unknown function have the fastest evolving in vivo functions and, in several cases, we identify the molecular events driving these changes. We thus find that DSD has a major impact on the evolution of gene function and we anticipate that the C. briggsae RNAi library reported here will drive future studies on comparative functional genomics screens in these nematodes. PMID:24516395

  2. High-throughput screening of FDA-approved drugs using oxygen biosensor plates reveals secondary mitofunctional effects.

    PubMed

    Sahdeo, Sunil; Tomilov, Alexey; Komachi, Kelly; Iwahashi, Christine; Datta, Sandipan; Hughes, Owen; Hagerman, Paul; Cortopassi, Gino

    2014-07-01

    Repurposing of FDA-approved drugs with effects on mitochondrial function might shorten the critical path to mitochondrial disease drug development. We improved a biosensor-based assay of mitochondrial O2 consumption, and identified mitofunctional defects in cell models of LHON and FXTAS. Using this platform, we screened a 1600-compound library of clinically used drugs. The assay identified drugs known to affect mitochondrial function, such as metformin and decoquinate. We also identified several drugs not previously known to affect mitochondrial respiration including acarbose, metaraminol, gallamine triethiodide, and acamprosate. These previously unknown 'mitoactives' represent novel links to targets for mitochondrial regulation and potentially therapy, for mitochondrial disease. PMID:25034306

  3. High-throughput screening of FDA-approved drugs using oxygen biosensor plates reveals secondary mitofunctional effects

    PubMed Central

    Sahdeo, Sunil; Tomilov, Alexey; Komachi, Kelly; Iwahashi, Christine; Datta, Sandipan; Hughes, Owen; Hagerman, Paul; Cortopassi, Gino

    2014-01-01

    Repurposing of FDA-approved drugs with effects on mitochondrial function might shorten the critical path to mitochondrial disease drug development. We improved a biosensor-based assay of mitochondrial O2 consumption, and identified mitofunctional defects in cell models of LHON and FXTAS. Using this platform, we screened a 1600-compound library of clinically used drugs. The assay identified drugs known to affect mitochondrial function, such as metformin and decoquinate. We also identified several drugs not previously known to affect mitochondrial respiration including acarbose, metaraminol, gallamine triethiodide, and acamprosate. These previously unknown ‘mitoactives’ represent novel links to targets for mitochondrial regulation and potentially therapy, for mitochondrial disease. PMID:25034306

  4. Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals role for multi-pass membrane protein in endosome-to-Golgi retrieval

    E-print Network

    Breusegem, Sophia Y.; Seaman, Matthew N. J.

    2014-01-01

    to the Golgi by retromer for further rounds of hydrolase sorting. We and others have used HeLa cells stably expressing a CD8-CIMPR chimera in combination with immunofluorescence to assay the trafficking routes and protein interaction partners of the CIMPR cargo... , and STX19. To validate the role of these proteins in endosome-to-Golgi retrieval, the anti-CD8 uptake assay was repeated using the trieval Using Anti-CD8 Uptake Assay ghput screening. HeLa cells stably expressing a CD8-CIMPR reporter and the m temperature...

  5. Genome-wide siRNA screen reveals amino acid starvation-induced autophagy requires SCOC and WAC

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, Nicole C; Jefferies, Harold B J; Alemu, Endalkachew A; Saunders, Rebecca E; Howell, Michael; Johansen, Terje; Tooze, Sharon A

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process by which cytoplasmic components are sequestered and transported by autophagosomes to lysosomes for degradation, enabling recycling of these components and providing cells with amino acids during starvation. It is a highly regulated process and its deregulation contributes to multiple diseases. Despite its importance in cell homeostasis, autophagy is not fully understood. To find new proteins that modulate starvation-induced autophagy, we performed a genome-wide siRNA screen in a stable human cell line expressing GFP–LC3, the marker-protein for autophagosomes. Using stringent validation criteria, our screen identified nine novel autophagy regulators. Among the hits required for autophagosome formation are SCOC (short coiled-coil protein), a Golgi protein, which interacts with fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 1 (FEZ1), an ULK1-binding protein. SCOC forms a starvation-sensitive trimeric complex with UVRAG (UV radiation resistance associated gene) and FEZ1 and may regulate ULK1 and Beclin 1 complex activities. A second candidate WAC is required for starvation-induced autophagy but also acts as a potential negative regulator of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The identification of these novel regulatory proteins with diverse functions in autophagy contributes towards a fuller understanding of autophagosome formation. PMID:22354037

  6. A forward genetic screen reveals novel independent regulators of ULBP1, an activating ligand for natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Gowen, Benjamin G; Chim, Bryan; Marceau, Caleb D; Greene, Trever T; Burr, Patrick; Gonzalez, Jeanmarie R; Hesser, Charles R; Dietzen, Peter A; Russell, Teal; Iannello, Alexandre; Coscoy, Laurent; Sentman, Charles L; Carette, Jan E; Muljo, Stefan A; Raulet, David H

    2015-01-01

    Recognition and elimination of tumor cells by the immune system is crucial for limiting tumor growth. Natural killer (NK) cells become activated when the receptor NKG2D is engaged by ligands that are frequently upregulated in primary tumors and on cancer cell lines. However, the molecular mechanisms driving NKG2D ligand expression on tumor cells are not well defined. Using a forward genetic screen in a tumor-derived human cell line, we identified several novel factors supporting expression of the NKG2D ligand ULBP1. Our results show stepwise contributions of independent pathways working at multiple stages of ULBP1 biogenesis. Deeper investigation of selected hits from the screen showed that the transcription factor ATF4 drives ULBP1 gene expression in cancer cell lines, while the RNA-binding protein RBM4 supports ULBP1 expression by suppressing a novel alternatively spliced isoform of ULBP1 mRNA. These findings offer insight into the stress pathways that alert the immune system to danger. PMID:26565589

  7. Genome-wide RNAi screens in human brain tumor isolates reveal a novel viability requirement for PHF5A

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Christopher G.; Bradley, Robert K.; Ding, Yu; Toledo, Chad M.; Herman, Jacob; Skutt-Kakaria, Kyobi; Girard, Emily J.; Davison, Jerry; Berndt, Jason; Corrin, Philip; Hardcastle, Justin; Basom, Ryan; Delrow, Jeffery J.; Webb, Thomas; Pollard, Steven M.; Lee, Jeongwu; Olson, James M.; Paddison, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    To identify key regulators of human brain tumor maintenance and initiation, we performed multiple genome-wide RNAi screens in patient-derived glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) stem cells (GSCs). These screens identified the plant homeodomain (PHD)-finger domain protein PHF5A as differentially required for GSC expansion, as compared with untransformed neural stem cells (NSCs) and fibroblasts. Given PHF5A's known involvement in facilitating interactions between the U2 snRNP complex and ATP-dependent helicases, we examined cancer-specific roles in RNA splicing. We found that in GSCs, but not untransformed controls, PHF5A facilitates recognition of exons with unusual C-rich 3? splice sites in thousands of essential genes. PHF5A knockdown in GSCs, but not untransformed NSCs, astrocytes, or fibroblasts, inhibited splicing of these genes, leading to cell cycle arrest and loss of viability. Notably, pharmacologic inhibition of U2 snRNP activity phenocopied PHF5A knockdown in GSCs and also in NSCs or fibroblasts overexpressing MYC. Furthermore, PHF5A inhibition compromised GSC tumor formation in vivo and inhibited growth of established GBM patient-derived xenograft tumors. Our results demonstrate a novel viability requirement for PHF5A to maintain proper exon recognition in brain tumor-initiating cells and may provide new inroads for novel anti-GBM therapeutic strategies. PMID:23651857

  8. A Genomewide Screen for Tolerance to Cationic Drugs Reveals Genes Important for Potassium Homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ? †

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Lina; Canadell, David; Petrezsélyová, Silvia; Navarrete, Clara; Marešová, Lydie; Peréz-Valle, Jorge; Herrera, Rito; Olier, Iván; Giraldo, Jesús; Sychrová, Hana; Yenush, Lynne; Ramos, José; Ariño, Joaquín

    2011-01-01

    Potassium homeostasis is crucial for living cells. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the uptake of potassium is driven by the electrochemical gradient generated by the Pma1 H+-ATPase, and this process represents a major consumer of the gradient. We considered that any mutation resulting in an alteration of the electrochemical gradient could give rise to anomalous sensitivity to any cationic drug independently of its toxicity mechanism. Here, we describe a genomewide screen for mutants that present altered tolerance to hygromycin B, spermine, and tetramethylammonium. Two hundred twenty-six mutant strains displayed altered tolerance to all three drugs (202 hypersensitive and 24 hypertolerant), and more than 50% presented a strong or moderate growth defect at a limiting potassium concentration (1 mM). Functional groups such as protein kinases and phosphatases, intracellular trafficking, transcription, or cell cycle and DNA processing were enriched. Essentially, our screen has identified a substantial number of genes that were not previously described to play a direct or indirect role in potassium homeostasis. A subset of 27 representative mutants were selected and subjected to diverse biochemical tests that, in some cases, allowed us to postulate the basis for the observed phenotypes. PMID:21724935

  9. Cell-based screen for altered nuclear phenotypes reveals senescence progression in polyploid cells after Aurora kinase B inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Sadaie, Mahito; Dillon, Christian; Narita, Masashi; Young, Andrew R. J.; Cairney, Claire J.; Godwin, Lauren S.; Torrance, Christopher J.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Keith, W. Nicol; Narita, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a widespread stress response and is widely considered to be an alternative cancer therapeutic goal. Unlike apoptosis, senescence is composed of a diverse set of subphenotypes, depending on which of its associated effector programs are engaged. Here we establish a simple and sensitive cell-based prosenescence screen with detailed validation assays. We characterize the screen using a focused tool compound kinase inhibitor library. We identify a series of compounds that induce different types of senescence, including a unique phenotype associated with irregularly shaped nuclei and the progressive accumulation of G1 tetraploidy in human diploid fibroblasts. Downstream analyses show that all of the compounds that induce tetraploid senescence inhibit Aurora kinase B (AURKB). AURKB is the catalytic component of the chromosome passenger complex, which is involved in correct chromosome alignment and segregation, the spindle assembly checkpoint, and cytokinesis. Although aberrant mitosis and senescence have been linked, a specific characterization of AURKB in the context of senescence is still required. This proof-of-principle study suggests that our protocol is capable of amplifying tetraploid senescence, which can be observed in only a small population of oncogenic RAS-induced senescence, and provides additional justification for AURKB as a cancer therapeutic target. PMID:26133385

  10. High-throughput functional screening reveals low frequency of antibiotic resistance genes in DNA recovered from the Upper Mississippi River.

    PubMed

    Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J; Wang, Ping; Phillips, Jane; Cotner, James B; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we determined the frequency of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the Upper Mississippi River using a high-throughput, functional, metagenomic screening procedure. Fosmid libraries containing ?10,000 clones were screened for resistance to ampicillin, cephalothin, kanamycin, and tetracycline. We hypothesized that nutrient concentrations, land cover type, and taxonomic community composition may select for ARGs. Resistance to ampicillin, cephalothin, and kanamycin was low (<1.00%), and no resistance to tetracycline was detected. Ammonium and total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations were correlated with kanamycin and cephalothin resistances (r=0.617 and -0.449, P=0.002 and 0.036, respectively). Cephalothin resistance was also positively correlated with the percentage of forested land cover (r=0.444, P=0.039). Only the candidate division OD1, among 35 phyla identified, was correlated with ampicillin resistance (r=0.456, P=0.033), suggesting that minority members of the community may be responsible for dissemination of ARGs in this ecosystem. Results of this study suggest that ammonium and TDS may be involved in a complex selection process for ARGs. Furthermore, we suggest that minority species, potentially contributed in low numbers from sediment and biofilm reservoirs, may be the primary carriers of ARGs in this riverine system. PMID:26322755

  11. A Zebrafish Drug-Repurposing Screen Reveals sGC-Dependent and sGC-Independent Pro-Inflammatory Activities of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Christine; Reischl, Markus; Shah, Asmi H.; Kronfuss, Eva; Mikut, Ralf; Liebel, Urban; Grabher, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    Tissue injury and infection trigger innate immune responses. However, dysregulation may result in chronic inflammation and is commonly treated with corticosteroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Unfortunately, long-term administration of both therapeutic classes can cause unwanted side effects. To identify alternative immune-modulatory compounds we have previously established a novel screening method using zebrafish larvae. Using this method we here present results of an in vivo high-content drug-repurposing screen, identifying 63 potent anti-inflammatory drugs that are in clinical use for other indications. Our approach reveals a novel pro-inflammatory role of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide affects leukocyte recruitment upon peripheral sensory nervous system or epithelial injury in zebrafish larvae both via soluble guanylate cyclase and in a soluble guanylate cyclase -independent manner through protein S-nitrosylation. Together, we show that our screening method can help to identify novel immune-modulatory activities and provide new mechanistic insights into the regulation of inflammatory processes. PMID:26444552

  12. High-Throughput 3D Screening Reveals Differences in Drug Sensitivities between Culture Models of JIMT1 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Vidal; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kleivi Sahlberg, Kristine; Kallioniemi, Olli; Perälä, Merja

    2013-01-01

    The traditional method for studying cancer in vitro is to grow immortalized cancer cells in two-dimensional monolayers on plastic. However, many cellular features are impaired in these artificial conditions, and large changes in gene expression compared to tumors have been reported. Three-dimensional cell culture models have become increasingly popular and are suggested to be better models than two-dimensional monolayers due to improved cell-to-cell contact and structures that resemble in vivo architecture. The aim of this study was to develop a simple high-throughput three-dimensional drug screening method and to compare drug responses in JIMT1 breast cancer cells when grown in two dimensions, in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced anchorage-independent three-dimensional models, and in Matrigel three-dimensional cell culture models. We screened 102 compounds with multiple concentrations and biological replicates for their effects on cell proliferation. The cells were either treated immediately upon plating, or they were allowed to grow in three-dimensional cultures for 4 days before the drug treatment. Large variations in drug responses were observed between the models indicating that comparisons of culture model-influenced drug sensitivities cannot be made based on the effects of a single drug. However, we show with the 63 most prominent drugs that, in general, JIMT1 cells grown on Matrigel were significantly more sensitive to drugs than cells grown in two-dimensional cultures, while the responses of cells grown in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) resembled those of the two-dimensional cultures. Furthermore, comparing the gene expression profiles of the cell culture models to xenograft tumors indicated that cells cultured in Matrigel and as xenografts most closely resembled each other. In this study, we also suggest that three-dimensional cultures can provide a platform for systematic experimentation of larger compound collections in a high-throughput mode and be used as alternatives to traditional two-dimensional screens for better comparability to the in vivo state. PMID:24194875

  13. A genetic screen for mutations affecting gonad formation in Drosophila reveals a role for the slit/robo pathway

    PubMed Central

    Weyers, Jill J.; Milutinovich, Allison B.; Takeda, Yasuko; Jemc, Jennifer C.; Doren, Mark Van

    2013-01-01

    Organogenesis is a complex process requiring multiple cell types to associate with one another through correct cell contacts and in the correct location to achieve proper organ morphology and function. To better understand the mechanisms underlying gonad formation, we performed a mutagenesis screen in Drosophila and identified twenty-four genes required for gonadogenesis. These genes affect all different aspects of gonad formation and provide a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms that control these processes. We find that gonad formation is regulated by multiple, independent pathways; some of these regulate the key cell adhesion molecule DE-cadherin, while others act through distinct mechanisms. In addition, we discover that the Slit/Roundabout pathway, best known for its role in regulating axonal guidance, is essential for proper gonad formation. Our findings shed light on the complexities of gonadogenesis and the genetic regulation required for proper organ formation. PMID:21377458

  14. Screening Active Compounds from Garcinia Species Native to China Reveals Novel Compounds Targeting the STAT/JAK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linfeng; Lao, Yuanzhi; Zhao, Yanhui; Qin, Jian; Fu, Wenwei; Zhang, Yingjia; Xu, Hongxi

    2015-01-01

    Natural compounds from medicinal plants are important resources for drug development. In a panel of human tumor cells, we screened a library of the natural products from Garcinia species which have anticancer potential to identify new potential therapeutic leads and discovered that caged xanthones were highly effective at suppressing multiple cancer cell lines. Their anticancer activities mainly depended on apoptosis pathways. For compounds in sensitive cancer line, their mechanisms of mode of action were evaluated. 33-Hydroxyepigambogic acid and 35-hydroxyepigambogic acid exhibited about 1??M IC50 values against JAK2/JAK3 kinases and less than 1??M IC50 values against NCI-H1650 cell which autocrined IL-6. Thus these two compounds provided a new antitumor molecular scaffold. Our report describes 33-hydroxyepigambogic acid and 35-hydroxyepigambogic acid that inhibited NCI-H1650 cell growth by suppressing constitutive STAT3 activation via direct inhibition of JAK kinase activity. PMID:26090459

  15. A protein kinase screen of Neurospora crassa mutant strains reveals that the SNF1 protein kinase promotes glycogen synthase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Candido, Thiago De Souza; Gonçalves, Rodrigo Duarte; Felício, Ana Paula; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; De Carvalho, Ana Carolina Gomes Vieira; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2014-12-15

    Glycogen functions as a carbohydrate reserve in a variety of organisms and its metabolism is highly regulated. The activities of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, the rate-limiting enzymes of the synthesis and degradation processes, respectively, are regulated by allosteric modulation and reversible phosphorylation. To identify the protein kinases affecting glycogen metabolism in Neurospora crassa, we performed a screen of 84 serine/threonine kinase knockout strains. We identified multiple kinases that have already been described as controlling glycogen metabolism in different organisms, such as NcSNF1, NcPHO85, NcGSK3, NcPKA, PSK2 homologue and NcATG1. In addition, many hypothetical kinases have been implicated in the control of glycogen metabolism. Two kinases, NcIME-2 and NcNIMA, already functionally characterized but with no functions related to glycogen metabolism regulation, were also identified. Among the kinases identified, it is important to mention the role of NcSNF1. We showed in the present study that this kinase was implicated in glycogen synthase phosphorylation, as demonstrated by the higher levels of glycogen accumulated during growth, along with a higher glycogen synthase (GSN) ±glucose 6-phosphate activity ratio and a lesser set of phosphorylated GSN isoforms in strain Ncsnf1KO, when compared with the wild-type strain. The results led us to conclude that, in N. crassa, this kinase promotes phosphorylation of glycogen synthase either directly or indirectly, which is the opposite of what is described for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The kinases also play a role in gene expression regulation, in that gdn, the gene encoding the debranching enzyme, was down-regulated by the proteins identified in the screen. Some kinases affected growth and development, suggesting a connection linking glycogen metabolism with cell growth and development. PMID:25253091

  16. Defective sister chromatid cohesion is synthetically lethal with impaired APC/C function

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Job; Faramarz, Atiq; Oostra, Anneke B.; de Menezes, Renee X.; van der Meulen, Ida H.; Rooimans, Martin A.; Rockx, Davy A.; Brakenhoff, Ruud H.; van Beusechem, Victor W.; King, Randall W.; de Winter, Johan P.; Wolthuis, Rob M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Warsaw breakage syndrome (WABS) is caused by defective DDX11, a DNA helicase that is essential for chromatid cohesion. Here, a paired genome-wide siRNA screen in patient-derived cell lines reveals that WABS cells do not tolerate partial depletion of individual APC/C subunits or the spindle checkpoint inhibitor p31comet. A combination of reduced cohesion and impaired APC/C function also leads to fatal mitotic arrest in diploid RPE1 cells. Moreover, WABS cell lines, and several cancer cell lines with cohesion defects, display a highly increased response to a new cell-permeable APC/C inhibitor, apcin, but not to the spindle poison paclitaxel. Synthetic lethality of APC/C inhibition and cohesion defects strictly depends on a functional mitotic spindle checkpoint as well as on intact microtubule pulling forces. This indicates that the underlying mechanism involves cohesion fatigue in response to mitotic delay, leading to spindle checkpoint re-activation and lethal mitotic arrest. Our results point to APC/C inhibitors as promising therapeutic agents targeting cohesion-defective cancers. PMID:26423134

  17. 316 .5'/^--^ LETHAL DOSES OF

    E-print Network

    inches long, were placed in each aquarium. The diluent in all cases was tap water of the University=i SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT-FISHERIES Na 316 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF T FISH AND WILDLIFr f #12 A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suomela, Commissioner LETHAL DOSES

  18. Multi-Mycotoxin Screening Reveals the Occurrence of 139 Different Secondary Metabolites in Feed and Feed Ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Elisabeth; Schwab, Christina; Sulyok, Michael; Naehrer, Karin; Krska, Rudolf; Schatzmayr, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    The development of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)/mass spectrometry (MS) methods for the simultaneous detection and quantification of a broad spectrum of mycotoxins has facilitated the screening of a larger number of samples for contamination with a wide array of less well-known “emerging” mycotoxins and other metabolites. In this study, 83 samples of feed and feed raw materials were analysed. All of them were found to contain seven to 69 metabolites. The total number of detected metabolites amounts to 139. Fusarium mycotoxins were most common, but a number of Alternaria toxins also occurred very often. Furthermore, two so-called masked mycotoxins (i.e., mycotoxin conjugates), namely deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (75% positives) and zearalenone-4-sulfate (49% positives), were frequently detected. Although the observed median concentrations of the individual analytes were generally in the low ?g/kg range, evaluating the toxicological potential of a given sample is difficult. Toxicity data on less well-known mycotoxins and other detected metabolites are notoriously scarce, as an overview on the available information on the most commonly detected metabolites shows. Besides, the possible synergistic effects of co-occurring substances have to be considered. PMID:23529186

  19. Validation of FRET Assay for the Screening of Growth Inhibitors of Escherichia coli Reveals Elongasome Assembly Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    van der Ploeg, René; Goudelis, Spyridon Theodoros; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2015-01-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria demands the development of new antibiotics against preferably new targets. The common approach is to test compounds for their ability to kill bacteria or to design molecules that inhibit essential protein activities in vitro. In the first case, the mode of action of the drug is unknown and in the second case, it is not known whether the compound will pass the impermeable barrier of the bacterial envelope. We developed an assay that detects the target of a compound, as well as its ability to pass the membrane(s) simultaneously. The Escherichia coli cytoskeletal protein MreB recruits protein complexes (elongasomes) that are essential for cell envelope growth. An in cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) assay was developed to detect the interaction between MreB molecules and between MreB and the elongasome proteins RodZ, RodA and PBP2. Inhibition of the polymerization of MreB by S-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl) isothiourea (A22) or of the activity of PBP2 by mecilinam resulted in loss or reduction of all measured interactions. This suggests that the interactions between the elongasome proteins are governed by a combination of weak affinities and substrate availability. This validated in cell FRET assay can be used to screen for cell envelope growth inhibitors. PMID:26263980

  20. Screening of a kinase library reveals novel pro-senescence kinases and their common NF-?B-dependent transcriptional program

    PubMed Central

    Ferrand, Mylène; Kirsh, Olivier; Griveau, Audrey; Vindrieux, David; Martin, Nadine; Defossez, Pierre-Antoine; Bernard, David

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence results in proliferation arrest and acquisition of hallmarks such as the Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP). Senescence is involved in regulating numerous physio-pathological responses, including embryonic development, cancer, and several aging-related diseases. Only a few kinases, centered on the RAS signaling pathway, have been identified as inducing premature senescence. About possible other senescence-regulating kinases and signaling pathways, practically little is known. By screening a library of activated kinases, we identified 33 kinases whose constitutive expression decreases cell proliferation and induces expression of senescence markers; p16 and SASP components. Focusing on some kinases showing the strongest pro-senescence effects, we observed that they all induce expression of SASP-component genes through activation of an NF-?B-dependent transcriptional program. Furthermore, inhibition of the p53 or Rb pathway failed to prevent the SASP-inducing effect of pro-senescence kinases. Inhibition of the NF-?B, p53, or Rb pathway proved insufficient to prevent kinase-triggered cell cycle arrest. We have thus identified a repertoire of novel pro-senescence kinases and pathways. These results will open new perspectives in the understanding on the role of cellular senescence in various physio-pathological responses. PMID:26583757

  1. A genome-scale screen reveals context-dependent ovarian cancer sensitivity to miRNA overexpression.

    PubMed

    Shields, Benjamin B; Pecot, Chad V; Gao, Hua; McMillan, Elizabeth; Potts, Malia; Nagel, Christa; Purinton, Scott; Wang, Ying; Ivan, Cristina; Kim, Hyun Seok; Borkowski, Robert J; Khan, Shaheen; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Lea, Jayanthi; Gazdar, Adi; Baggerly, Keith A; Sood, Anil K; White, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale molecular annotation of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) indicates remarkable heterogeneity in the etiology of that disease. This diversity presents a significant obstacle against intervention target discovery. However, inactivation of miRNA biogenesis is commonly associated with advanced disease. Thus, restoration of miRNA activity may represent a common vulnerability among diverse EOC oncogenotypes. To test this, we employed genome-scale, gain-of-function, miRNA mimic toxicity screens in a large, diverse spectrum of EOC cell lines. We found that all cell lines responded to at least some miRNA mimics, but that the nature of the miRNA mimics provoking a response was highly selective within the panel. These selective toxicity profiles were leveraged to define modes of action and molecular response indicators for miRNA mimics with tumor-suppressive characteristics in vivo. A mechanistic principle emerging from this analysis was sensitivity of EOC to miRNA-mediated release of cell fate specification programs, loss of which may be a prerequisite for development of this disease. PMID:26655797

  2. Multistage screening reveals chameleon ligands of the human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase: implications to drug discovery for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    De Schutter, Joris W; Park, Jaeok; Leung, Chun Yuen; Gormley, Patrick; Lin, Yih-Shyan; Hu, Zheping; Berghuis, Albert M; Poirier, Judes; Tsantrizos, Youla S

    2014-07-10

    Human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (hFPPS) is the gate-keeper of mammalian isoprenoids and the key target of bisphosphonate drugs. Bisphosphonates suffer from poor "drug-like" properties and are mainly effective in treating skeletal diseases. Recent investigations have implicated hFPPS in various nonskeletal diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the hFPPS gene and mRNA levels in autopsy-confirmed AD subjects was undertaken, and a genetic link between hFPPS and phosphorylated tau (P-Tau) levels in the human brain was identified. Elevated P-Tau levels are strongly implicated in AD progression. The development of nonbisphosphonate inhibitors can provide molecular tools for validating hFPPS as a therapeutic target for tauopathy-associated neurodegeneration. A multistage screening protocol led to the identification of a new monophosphonate chemotype that bind in an allosteric pocket of hFPPS. Optimization of these compounds could lead to human therapeutics that block tau metabolism and arrest the progression of neurodegeneration. PMID:24911527

  3. A Genetic Screen Based on in Vivo RNA Imaging Reveals Centrosome-Independent Mechanisms for Localizing gurken Transcripts in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Rippei; Wainwright, S. Mark; Liddell, Sophie J.; Pinchin, Sheena M.; Horswell, Stuart; Ish-Horowicz, David

    2014-01-01

    We have screened chromosome arm 3L for ethyl methanesulfonate?induced mutations that disrupt localization of fluorescently labeled gurken (grk) messenger (m)RNA, whose transport along microtubules establishes both major body axes of the developing Drosophila oocyte. Rapid identification of causative mutations by single-nucleotide polymorphism recombinational mapping and whole-genomic sequencing allowed us to define nine complementation groups affecting grk mRNA localization and other aspects of oogenesis, including alleles of elg1, scaf6, quemao, nudE, Tsc2/gigas, rasp, and Chd5/Wrb, and several null alleles of the armitage Piwi-pathway gene. Analysis of a newly induced kinesin light chain allele shows that kinesin motor activity is required for both efficient grk mRNA localization and oocyte centrosome integrity. We also show that initiation of the dorsoanterior localization of grk mRNA precedes centrosome localization, suggesting that microtubule self-organization contributes to breaking axial symmetry to generate a unique dorsoventral axis. PMID:24531791

  4. Mutational screening of the USH2A gene in Spanish USH patients reveals 23 novel pathogenic mutations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Usher Syndrome type II (USH2) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by moderate to severe hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Among the three genes implicated, mutations in the USH2A gene account for 74-90% of the USH2 cases. Methods To identify the genetic cause of the disease and determine the frequency of USH2A mutations in a cohort of 88 unrelated USH Spanish patients, we carried out a mutation screening of the 72 coding exons of this gene by direct sequencing. Moreover, we performed functional minigene studies for those changes that were predicted to affect splicing. Results As a result, a total of 144 DNA sequence variants were identified. Based upon previous studies, allele frequencies, segregation analysis, bioinformatics' predictions and in vitro experiments, 37 variants (23 of them novel) were classified as pathogenic mutations. Conclusions This report provide a wide spectrum of USH2A mutations and clinical features, including atypical Usher syndrome phenotypes resembling Usher syndrome type I. Considering only the patients clearly diagnosed with Usher syndrome type II, and results obtained in this and previous studies, we can state that mutations in USH2A are responsible for 76.1% of USH2 disease in patients of Spanish origin. PMID:22004887

  5. Screening of a kinase library reveals novel pro-senescence kinases and their common NF-?B-dependent transcriptional program.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Mylène; Kirsh, Olivier; Griveau, Audrey; Vindrieux, David; Martin, Nadine; Defossez, Pierre-Antoine; Bernard, David

    2015-11-01

    Cellular senescence results in proliferation arrest and acquisition of hallmarks such as the Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP). Senescence is involved in regulating numerous physio-pathological responses, including embryonic development, cancer, and several aging-related diseases. Only a few kinases, centered on the RAS signaling pathway, have been identified as inducing premature senescence. About possible other senescence-regulating kinases and signaling pathways, practically little is known. By screening a library of activated kinases, we identified 33 kinases whose constitutive expression decreases cell proliferation and induces expression of senescence markers; p16 and SASP components. Focusing on some kinases showing the strongest pro-senescence effects, we observed that they all induce expression of SASP-component genes through activation of an NF-?B-dependent transcriptional program. Furthermore, inhibition of the p53 or Rb pathway failed to prevent the SASP-inducing effect of pro-senescence kinases. Inhibition of the NF-?B, p53, or Rb pathway proved insufficient to prevent kinase-triggered cell cycle arrest. We have thus identified a repertoire of novel pro-senescence kinases and pathways. These results will open new perspectives in the understanding on the role of cellular senescence in various physio-pathological responses. PMID:26583757

  6. A novel mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA{sup Asn} gene associated with a lethal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Coulbault, Laurent; Herlicoviez, Danielle; Chapon, Francoise; Read, Marie-Helene; Penniello, Marie-Jose; Reynier, Pascal; Fayet, Guillemette; Lombes, Anne; Jauzac, Philippe; Allouche, Stephane . E-mail: allouche-s@chu-caen.fr

    2005-04-15

    We describe a lethal mitochondrial disease in a 10-month-old child who presented with encephalomyopathy. Histochemical and electron microscopy examinations of skeletal muscle biopsy revealed abnormal mitochondria associated with a combined deficiency of complexes I and IV. After excluding mitochondrial DNA deletions and depletion, direct sequencing was used to screen for mutation in all transfer RNA (tRNA) genes. A T-to-C substitution at position 5693 in the tRNA{sup Asn} gene was found in blood and muscle. Microdissection of muscle biopsy and its analysis revealed the highest level of this mutation in cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibres. We suggest that this novel mutation would affect the anticodon loop structure of the tRNA{sup Asn} and cause a fatal mitochondrial disease.

  7. Screening the 3{prime} region of the polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) gene reveals six novel mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Peral, B.; San Millan, J.L.; Ong, A.C.M.

    1996-01-01

    Recently, the gene for the most common form of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), PKD1 (polycystic kidney disease 1), has been fully characterized and shown to encode an integral membrane protein, polycystin, involved in cell-cell and/or cell-matrix interactions. Study of the PKD1 gene has been complicated because most of the gene lies in a genomic region reiterated several times elsewhere on the same chromosome, and consequently only seven mutations have been described so far. Here we report a systematic screen covering {approximately}80% of the {approximately}-2.75 kb of translated transcript that is encoded by single-copy DNA. We have identified and characterized six novel mutations that, together with the previously described changes, amount to a detection rate of 10%-15% in the population studied. The newly described mutations are two deletions, an insertion of a T-nucleotide causing a frameshift, two single-base-pair substitutions resulting in premature stop codons, and a G{yields}C transversion that may be a missense mutation. These results have important implications for genetic diagnosis of PKD1 because they indicate that the majority of mutations lie within the duplicated area, which is difficult to study. The regions of polycystin removed in each mutation so far described are assessed for their functional significance; an area disrupted by two new small in-frame changes is highlighted. PKD1 mutations are contrasted with those in the PKD1/TSC2 contiguous-gene syndrome, and the likely mutational mechanism in PKD1 is considered. 36 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Feedback inhibition by thiols outranks glutathione depletion: a luciferase-based screen reveals glutathione-deficient ? -ECS and glutathione synthetase mutants impaired in cadmium-induced sulfate assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, Timothy O.; Sung, Dong-Yul; Akmakjian, Garo; Pham, Allis; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Plants exposed to heavy metals rapidly induce changes in gene expression that activate and enhance detoxification mechanisms, including toxic-metal chelation and the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. However, the mechanisms mediating toxic heavy metal-induced gene expression remain largely unknown. To genetically elucidate cadmium-specific transcriptional responses in Arabidopsis, we designed a genetic screen based on the activation of a cadmium-inducible reporter gene. Microarray studies identified a high-affinity sulfate transporter (SULTR1;2) among the most robust and rapid cadmium-inducible transcripts. The SULTR1;2 promoter (2.2 kb) was fused with the firefly luciferase reporter gene to quantitatively report the transcriptional response of plants exposed to cadmium. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines were ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized, and stable M2 seedlings were screened for an abnormal luciferase response during exposure to cadmium. The screen identified non-allelic mutant lines that fell into one of three categories: (i) super response to cadmium (SRC) mutants; (ii) constitutive response to cadmium (CRC) mutants; or (iii) non-response and reduced response to cadmium (NRC) mutants. Two nrc mutants, nrc1 and nrc2, were mapped, cloned and further characterized. The nrc1 mutation was mapped to the ?-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene and the nrc2 mutation was identified as the first viable recessive mutant allele in the glutathione synthetase gene. Moreover, genetic, HPLC mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis of the nrc1 and nrc2 mutants, revealed that intracellular glutathione depletion alone would be insufficient to induce gene expression of sulfate uptake and assimilation mechanisms. Our results modify the glutathione-depletion driven model for sulfate assimilation gene induction during cadmium stress, and suggest that an enhanced oxidative state and depletion of upstream thiols, in addition to glutathione depletion, are necessary to induce the transcription of sulfate assimilation genes during early cadmium stress. PMID:22283708

  9. A yeast two-hybrid screen reveals a strong interaction between the Legionella chaperonin Hsp60 and the host cell small heat shock protein Hsp10.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K

    2015-06-01

    L. pneumophila is an intracellular bacterium that replicates inside a membrane-bound vacuole called Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV), where it plentifully liberates its HtpB chaperonin. From LCV, HtpB reaches the host cell cytoplasm, where it interacts with SAMDC, a cytoplasmic protein required for synthesis of host polyamines that are important for intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. Additionally, cytoplasmic expression of HtpB in S. cerevisiae induces pseudohyphal growth, and in mammalian cells recruits mitochondria to LCV, and modifies actin microfilaments organization. This led us to hypothesize here that HtpB recruits a protein(s) from eukaryotic cells that is involved in the emergence of the aforementioned phenotypes. To identify this protein, a commercially available HeLa cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid system. Approximately 5×10(6) yeast clones carrying HeLa cDNA library plasmid were screened. Twenty-one positive clones were identified. DNA sequence analysis revealed that all of these positive clones encoded the mammalian small heat shock protein Hsp10. Based on the fact that chaperonions are required to interact with co-chaperonins to function properly in protein folding, we believe that HtpB recruits the host cell Hsp10 to appropriately interact with SAMDC and to induce the multifunction phenotypes deemed important in L. pneumophila pathogenesis. PMID:26132833

  10. Screening of Metagenomic and Genomic Libraries Reveals Three Classes of Bacterial Enzymes That Overcome the Toxicity of Acrylate

    PubMed Central

    Curson, Andrew R. J.; Burns, Oliver J.; Voget, Sonja; Daniel, Rolf; Todd, Jonathan D.; McInnis, Kathryn; Wexler, Margaret; Johnston, Andrew W. B.

    2014-01-01

    Acrylate is produced in significant quantities through the microbial cleavage of the highly abundant marine osmoprotectant dimethylsulfoniopropionate, an important process in the marine sulfur cycle. Acrylate can inhibit bacterial growth, likely through its conversion to the highly toxic molecule acrylyl-CoA. Previous work identified an acrylyl-CoA reductase, encoded by the gene acuI, as being important for conferring on bacteria the ability to grow in the presence of acrylate. However, some bacteria lack acuI, and, conversely, many bacteria that may not encounter acrylate in their regular environments do contain this gene. We therefore sought to identify new genes that might confer tolerance to acrylate. To do this, we used functional screening of metagenomic and genomic libraries to identify novel genes that corrected an E. coli mutant that was defective in acuI, and was therefore hyper-sensitive to acrylate. The metagenomic libraries yielded two types of genes that overcame this toxicity. The majority encoded enzymes resembling AcuI, but with significant sequence divergence among each other and previously ratified AcuI enzymes. One other metagenomic gene, arkA, had very close relatives in Bacillus and related bacteria, and is predicted to encode an enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase, in the same family as FabK, which catalyses the final step in fatty-acid biosynthesis in some pathogenic Firmicute bacteria. A genomic library of Novosphingobium, a metabolically versatile alphaproteobacterium that lacks both acuI and arkA, yielded vutD and vutE, two genes that, together, conferred acrylate resistance. These encode sequential steps in the oxidative catabolism of valine in a pathway in which, significantly, methacrylyl-CoA is a toxic intermediate. These findings expand the range of bacteria for which the acuI gene encodes a functional acrylyl-CoA reductase, and also identify novel enzymes that can similarly function in conferring acrylate resistance, likely, again, through the removal of the toxic product acrylyl-CoA. PMID:24848004

  11. An EST screen from the annelid Pomatoceros lamarckii reveals patterns of gene loss and gain in animals

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Since the drastic reorganisation of the phylogeny of the animal kingdom into three major clades of bilaterians; Ecdysozoa, Lophotrochozoa and Deuterostomia, it became glaringly obvious that the selection of model systems with extensive molecular resources was heavily biased towards only two of these three clades, namely the Ecdysozoa and Deuterostomia. Increasing efforts have been put towards redressing this imbalance in recent years, and one of the principal phyla in the vanguard of this endeavour is the Annelida. Results In the context of this effort we here report our characterisation of an Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) screen in the serpulid annelid, Pomatoceros lamarckii. We have sequenced over 5,000 ESTs which consolidate into over 2,000 sequences (clusters and singletons). These sequences are used to build phylogenetic trees to estimate relative branch lengths amongst different taxa and, by comparison to genomic data from other animals, patterns of gene retention and loss are deduced. Conclusion The molecular phylogenetic trees including the P. lamarckii sequences extend early observations that polychaetes tend to have relatively short branches in such trees, and hence are useful taxa with which to reconstruct gene family evolution. Also, with the availability of lophotrochozoan data such as that of P. lamarckii, it is now possible to make much more accurate reconstructions of the gene complement of the ancestor of the bilaterians than was previously possible from comparisons of ecdysozoan and deuterostome genomes to non-bilaterian outgroups. It is clear that the traditional molecular model systems for protostomes (e.g. Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans), which are restricted to the Ecdysozoa, have undergone extensive gene loss during evolution. These ecdysozoan systems, in terms of gene content, are thus more derived from the bilaterian ancestral condition than lophotrochozoan systems like the polychaetes, and thus cannot be used as good, general representatives of protostome genomes. Currently sequenced insect and nematode genomes are less suitable models for deducing bilaterian ancestral states than lophotrochozoan genomes, despite the array of powerful genetic and mechanistic manipulation techniques in these ecdysozoans. A distinct category of genes that includes those present in non-bilaterians and lophotrochozoans, but which are absent from ecdysozoans and deuterostomes, highlights the need for further lophotrochozoan data to gain a more complete understanding of the gene complement of the bilaterian ancestor. PMID:19781084

  12. Dipoid-Specific Genome Stability Genes of S. cerevisiae: Genomic Screen Reveals Haploidization as an Escape from Persisting DNA Rearrangement Stress

    PubMed Central

    Alabrudzinska, Malgorzata; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining a stable genome is one of the most important tasks of every living cell and the mechanisms ensuring it are similar in all of them. The events leading to changes in DNA sequence (mutations) in diploid cells occur one to two orders of magnitude more frequently than in haploid cells. The majority of those events lead to loss of heterozygosity at the mutagenesis marker, thus diploid-specific genome stability mechanisms can be anticipated. In a new global screen for spontaneous loss of function at heterozygous forward mutagenesis marker locus, employing three different mutagenesis markers, we selected genes whose deletion causes genetic instability in diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. We have found numerous genes connected with DNA replication and repair, remodeling of chromatin, cell cycle control, stress response, and in particular the structural maintenance of chromosome complexes. We have also identified 59 uncharacterized or dubious ORFs, which show the genome instability phenotype when deleted. For one of the strongest mutators revealed in our screen, ctf18?/ctf18? the genome instability manifests as a tendency to lose the whole set of chromosomes. We postulate that this phenomenon might diminish the devastating effects of DNA rearrangements, thereby increasing the cell's chances of surviving stressful conditions. We believe that numerous new genes implicated in genome maintenance, together with newly discovered phenomenon of ploidy reduction, will help revealing novel molecular processes involved in the genome stability of diploid cells. They also provide the clues in the quest for new therapeutic targets to cure human genome instability-related diseases. PMID:21695049

  13. Virtual and In Vitro Screens Reveal a Potential Pharmacophore that Avoids the Fibrillization of A?1–42

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Maricarmen; Correa-Basurto, José; Nicolás-Vázquez, María Inés; Miranda-Ruvalcaba, René; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia Guadalupe; Reséndiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Méndez-Méndez, Juan Vicente; Rosales-Hernández, Martha C.

    2015-01-01

    Among the multiple factors that induce Alzheimer’s disease, aggregation of the amyloid ? peptide (A?) is considered the most important due to the ability of the 42-amino acid A? peptides (A?1–42) to form oligomers and fibrils, which constitute A? pathological aggregates. For this reason, the development of inhibitors of A?1–42 pathological aggregation represents a field of research interest. Several A?1–42 fibrillization inhibitors possess tertiary amine and aromatic moieties. In the present study, we selected 26 compounds containing tertiary amine and aromatic moieties with or without substituents and performed theoretical studies that allowed us to select four compounds according to their free energy values for A?1–42 in ?-helix (A?-?), random coil (A?-RC) and ?-sheet (A?-?) conformations. Docking studies revealed that compound 5 had a higher affinity for A?-? and A?-RC than the other compounds. In vitro, this compound was able to abolish Thioflavin T fluorescence and favored an RC conformation of A?1–42 in circular dichroism studies, resulting in the formation of amorphous aggregates as shown by atomic force microscopy. The results obtained from quantum studies allowed us to identify a possible pharmacophore that can be used to design A?1–42 aggregation inhibitors. In conclusion, compounds with higher affinity for A?-? and A?-RC prevented the formation of oligomeric species. PMID:26172152

  14. Virtual and In Vitro Screens Reveal a Potential Pharmacophore that Avoids the Fibrillization of A?1-42.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Maricarmen; Correa-Basurto, José; Nicolás-Vázquez, María Inés; Miranda-Ruvalcaba, René; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia Guadalupe; Reséndiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Méndez-Méndez, Juan Vicente; Rosales-Hernández, Martha C

    2015-01-01

    Among the multiple factors that induce Alzheimer's disease, aggregation of the amyloid ? peptide (A?) is considered the most important due to the ability of the 42-amino acid A? peptides (A?1-42) to form oligomers and fibrils, which constitute A? pathological aggregates. For this reason, the development of inhibitors of A?1-42 pathological aggregation represents a field of research interest. Several A?1-42 fibrillization inhibitors possess tertiary amine and aromatic moieties. In the present study, we selected 26 compounds containing tertiary amine and aromatic moieties with or without substituents and performed theoretical studies that allowed us to select four compounds according to their free energy values for A?1-42 in ?-helix (A?-?), random coil (A?-RC) and ?-sheet (A?-?) conformations. Docking studies revealed that compound 5 had a higher affinity for A?-? and A?-RC than the other compounds. In vitro, this compound was able to abolish Thioflavin T fluorescence and favored an RC conformation of A?1-42 in circular dichroism studies, resulting in the formation of amorphous aggregates as shown by atomic force microscopy. The results obtained from quantum studies allowed us to identify a possible pharmacophore that can be used to design A?1-42 aggregation inhibitors. In conclusion, compounds with higher affinity for A?-? and A?-RC prevented the formation of oligomeric species. PMID:26172152

  15. Identification of potential synthetic lethal genes to p53 using a computational biology approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Identification of genes that are synthetic lethal to p53 is an important strategy for anticancer therapy as p53 mutations have been reported to occur in more than half of all human cancer cases. Although genome-wide RNAi screening is an effective approach to finding synthetic lethal genes, it is costly and labor-intensive. Methods To illustrate this approach, we identified potentially druggable genes synthetically lethal for p53 using three microarray datasets for gene expression profiles of the NCI-60 cancer cell lines, one next-generation sequencing (RNA-Seq) dataset from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, and one gene expression data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) project. We selected the genes which encoded kinases and had significantly higher expression in the tumors with functional p53 mutations (somatic mutations) than in the tumors without functional p53 mutations as the candidates of druggable synthetic lethal genes for p53. We identified important regulatory networks and functional categories pertinent to these genes, and performed an extensive survey of literature to find experimental evidence that support the synthetic lethality relationships between the genes identified and p53. We also examined the drug sensitivity difference between NCI-60 cell lines with functional p53 mutations and NCI-60 cell lines without functional p53 mutations for the compounds that target the kinases encoded by the genes identified. Results Our results indicated that some of the candidate genes we identified had been experimentally verified to be synthetic lethal for p53 and promising targets for anticancer therapy while some other genes were putative targets for development of cancer therapeutic agents. Conclusions Our study indicated that pre-screening of potential synthetic lethal genes using gene expression profiles is a promising approach for improving the efficiency of synthetic lethal RNAi screening. PMID:24025726

  16. Early events of lethal action by tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Raulston, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The immediate activities of the aminoglycoside antibiotic, tobramycin, were investigated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The influence of carbon growth substate and the antibiotic exposure environment in the magnitude of activity were examined. Lethality by 8 {mu}g/ml tobramycin occurred rapidly (1 to 3 minutes). The release of specific cellular components into the supernatant was associated with lethality. This material was initially detected as an increase in UV-absorbance. Magnesium in the reaction mixture provided protection against lethality and leakage, but did not reverse lethal damage after a 3 minute tobramycin treatment. Also, uptake of {sup 3}H-tobramycin was reduced in the presence of magnesium. Cells grown with glucose as a carbon source were more susceptible than organic acid grown cells as was the rapidity and amount of cell damage. Analyses of the leakage material revealed a 2-fold increase of protein in the supernatant after a 1-3 minute treatment which paralleled lethality. A prominent 29 kDa protein was observed by SDS-PAGE in the released material, which has been identified as the periplasmic enzyme, {beta}-lactamase. The immediate activities of tobramycin did not involve (i) release of overall cell protein, (ii) massive loss of total pool amino acids, (iii) cell lysis, (iv) inhibition of proline uptake, (v) release of lipopolysaccharide, or (vi) leakage of ATP. Electron microscopy showed no apparent damage after a 3 minute exposure. 40% inhibition of protein synthesis had occurred by 3 minutes of exposure, while release of UV-absorbing material and lethality were detectable after only 1 minute. Resistant cystic fibrosis isolates of P. aeruginosa did not leak under the same experimental conditions, but one of two susceptible strains examined did show increased UV-absorbance following treatment.

  17. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M.

    PubMed

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis. PMID:25834405

  18. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis. PMID:25834405

  19. MicroRNA screen of human embryonic stem cell differentiation reveals miR-105 as an enhancer of megakaryopoiesis from adult CD34+ cells.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Viraj; Paluru, Prasuna; Myint, Melissa; French, Deborah L; Gadue, Paul; Diamond, Scott L

    2014-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can control stem cell differentiation by targeting mRNAs. Using 96-well plate electroporation, we screened 466 human miRNA mimics by four-color flow cytometry to explore differentiation of common myeloid progenitors (CMP) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The transfected cells were then cultured in a cytokine cocktail that supported multiple hematopoietic lineages. At 4-5 days post-transfection, flow cytometry of erythroid (CD235(+)CD41(-)), megakaryocyte (CD41(+)CD42(+)), and myeloid (CD18(+)CD235(-)) lineages revealed miR-105 as a novel enhancer of megakaryocyte production during in vitro primitive hematopoiesis. In hESC-derived CMPs, miR-105 caused a sixfold enhancement in megakaryocyte production. miR-513a, miR-571, and miR-195 were found to be less potent megakaryocyte enhancers. We confirmed the relevance of miR-105 in adult megakaryopoiesis by demonstrating increased megakaryocyte yield and megakaryocyte colony forming potential in human adult CD34(+) cells derived from peripheral blood. In addition, adult CD34(+) cells express endogenous miR-105 during megakaryocyte differentiation. siRNA knockdown of the hematopoietic transcription factor c-Myb caused a similar enhancement of megakaryocyte production as miR-105. Finally, a luciferase/c-Myb-3'UTR construct and Western blot analysis demonstrated that the hematopoietic transcription factor c-Myb mRNA was a target of miR-105. We report a novel hESC-based miR screening platform and demonstrate that miR-105 is an enhancer of megakaryopoiesis in both primitive and definitive hematopoiesis. PMID:24446170

  20. Ethical language and decision-making for prenatally diagnosed lethal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Dominic; de Crespigny, Lachlan; Xafis, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Summary In clinical practice, and in the medical literature, severe congenital malformations such as trisomy 18, anencephaly, and renal agenesis are frequently referred to as ‘lethal’ or as ‘incompatible with life’. However, there is no agreement about a definition of lethal malformations, nor which conditions should be included in this category. Review of outcomes for malformations commonly designated ‘lethalreveals that prolonged survival is possible, even if rare. This article analyses the concept of lethal malformations and compares it to the problematic concept of ‘futility’. We recommend avoiding the term ‘lethal’ and suggest that counseling should focus on salient prognostic features instead. For conditions with a high chance of early death or profound impairment in survivors despite treatment, perinatal and neonatal palliative care would be ethical. However, active obstetric and neonatal management, if desired, may also sometimes be appropriate. PMID:25200733

  1. Effective Lethal Mutagenesis of Influenza Virus by Three Nucleoside Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lethal mutagenesis is a broad-spectrum antiviral strategy that exploits the high mutation rate and low mutational tolerance of many RNA viruses. This approach uses mutagenic drugs to increase viral mutation rates and burden viral populations with mutations that reduce the number of infectious progeny. We investigated the effectiveness of lethal mutagenesis as a strategy against influenza virus using three nucleoside analogs, ribavirin, 5-azacytidine, and 5-fluorouracil. All three drugs were active against a panel of seasonal H3N2 and laboratory-adapted H1N1 strains. We found that each drug increased the frequency of mutations in influenza virus populations and decreased the virus' specific infectivity, indicating a mutagenic mode of action. We were able to drive viral populations to extinction by passaging influenza virus in the presence of each drug, indicating that complete lethal mutagenesis of influenza virus populations can be achieved when a sufficient mutational burden is applied. Population-wide resistance to these mutagenic agents did not arise after serial passage of influenza virus populations in sublethal concentrations of drug. Sequencing of these drug-passaged viral populations revealed genome-wide accumulation of mutations at low frequency. The replicative capacity of drug-passaged populations was reduced at higher multiplicities of infection, suggesting the presence of defective interfering particles and a possible barrier to the evolution of resistance. Together, our data suggest that lethal mutagenesis may be a particularly effective therapeutic approach with a high genetic barrier to resistance for influenza virus. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus is an RNA virus that causes significant morbidity and mortality during annual epidemics. Novel therapies for RNA viruses are needed due to the ease with which these viruses evolve resistance to existing therapeutics. Lethal mutagenesis is a broad-spectrum strategy that exploits the high mutation rate and the low mutational tolerance of most RNA viruses. It is thought to possess a higher barrier to resistance than conventional antiviral strategies. We investigated the effectiveness of lethal mutagenesis against influenza virus using three different drugs. We showed that influenza virus was sensitive to lethal mutagenesis by demonstrating that all three drugs induced mutations and led to an increase in the generation of defective viral particles. We also found that it may be difficult for resistance to these drugs to arise at a population-wide level. Our data suggest that lethal mutagenesis may be an attractive anti-influenza strategy that warrants further investigation. PMID:25589650

  2. Gene essentiality and synthetic lethality in haploid human cells.

    PubMed

    Blomen, Vincent A; Májek, Peter; Jae, Lucas T; Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Nieuwenhuis, Joppe; Staring, Jacqueline; Sacco, Roberto; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Olk, Nadine; Stukalov, Alexey; Marceau, Caleb; Janssen, Hans; Carette, Jan E; Bennett, Keiryn L; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Brummelkamp, Thijn R

    2015-11-27

    Although the genes essential for life have been identified in less complex model organisms, their elucidation in human cells has been hindered by technical barriers. We used extensive mutagenesis in haploid human cells to identify approximately 2000 genes required for optimal fitness under culture conditions. To study the principles of genetic interactions in human cells, we created a synthetic lethality network focused on the secretory pathway based exclusively on mutations. This revealed a genetic cross-talk governing Golgi homeostasis, an additional subunit of the human oligosaccharyltransferase complex, and a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase ? adaptor hijacked by viruses. The synthetic lethality map parallels observations made in yeast and projects a route forward to reveal genetic networks in diverse aspects of human cell biology. PMID:26472760

  3. Functional Screening and In Vitro Analysis Reveal Thioesterases with Enhanced Substrate Specificity Profiles That Improve Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) biosynthesis is pertinent to production of biofuels, industrial compounds, and pharmaceuticals from renewable resources. To expand on Escherichia coli SCFA products, we previously implemented a coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent pathway that condenses acetyl-CoA to a diverse group of short-chain fatty acyl-CoAs. To increase product titers and reduce premature pathway termination products, we conducted in vivo and in vitro analyses to understand and improve the specificity of the acyl-CoA thioesterase enzyme, which releases fatty acids from CoA. A total of 62 putative bacterial thioesterases, including 23 from the cow rumen microbiome, were inserted into a pathway that condenses acetyl-CoA to an acyl-CoA molecule derived from exogenously provided propionic or isobutyric acid. Functional screening revealed thioesterases that increase production of saturated (valerate), unsaturated (trans-2-pentenoate), and branched (4-methylvalerate) SCFAs compared to overexpression of E. coli thioesterase tesB or native expression of endogenous thioesterases. To determine if altered thioesterase acyl-CoA substrate specificity caused the increase in product titers, six of the most promising enzymes were analyzed in vitro. Biochemical assays revealed that the most productive thioesterases rely on promiscuous activity but have greater specificity for product-associated acyl-CoAs than for precursor acyl-CoAs. In this study, we introduce novel thioesterases with improved specificity for saturated, branched, and unsaturated short-chain acyl-CoAs, thereby expanding the diversity of potential fatty acid products while increasing titers of current products. The growing uncertainty associated with protein database annotations denotes this study as a model for isolating functional biochemical pathway enzymes in situations where experimental evidence of enzyme function is absent. PMID:24271180

  4. Electroshock weapons can be lethal!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    Electroshock weapons (EWs)-stun guns, tasers, riot shields-are electroconductive devices designed to safely incapacitate healthy men neuromuscularly, so they are called nonlethal or less-lethal. EW firms seeking large nonmilitary markets targeted law enforcement and corrections personnel, who began using EWs in prisons/jails and on public patrol in 1980 in the USA. This shifted the EW-shocked population from healthy soldiers to a heterogeneous mix of both sexes, ages 6-92, in a wide variety of health conditions! An EW operates by disrupting normal physiological processes, producing transient effects in healthy people. But if a person's health is sufficiently compromised, the margin of safety can be lost, resulting in death or permanent health problems. 325 people have died after EW shock since 1980. Did the EW cause these deaths? Evidence indicates that EWs do play a causal role in most such deaths. EWs can be lethal for people in diabetic shock^1 (hypoglycemia), which may be why Robert Dziekanski-a Polish immigrant to Canada-died so quickly after he was tasered at Vancouver Airport: not having eaten for over 10 hours, he likely was severely hypoglycemic. The EW death rate in North America is 30 times higher than need be, because EW users have not been properly trained to use EWs on a heterogeneous population safely! ^1J. Clinical Engineering 30(3):111(2005).

  5. Histopathological effects of anthrax lethal factor on rat liver.

    PubMed

    Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Ozbek, Elvan

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, has become an increasingly important scientific topic due to its potential role in bioterrorism. The lethal toxin (LT) of B. anthracis consists of lethal factor (LF) and a protective antigen (PA). This study investigated whether only lethal factor was efficient as a hepatotoxin in the absence of the PA. To achieve this aim, LF (100 µg/kg body weight, dissolved in sterile distilled water) or distilled water vehicle were intraperitoneally injected once into adult rats. At 24 h post-injection, the hosts were euthanized and their livers removed and tissue samples examined under light and electron microscopes. As a result of LF application, hepatic injury - including cytoplasmic and nuclear damage in hepatocytes, sinusoidal dilatation, and hepatocellular lysis - became apparent. Further, light microscopic analyses of liver sections from the LF-injected rats revealed ballooning degeneration and cytoplasmic loss within hepatocytes, as well as peri-sinusoidal inflammation. Additionally, an increase in the numbers of Kupffer cells was evident. Common vascular injuries were also found in the liver samples; these injuries caused hypoxia and pathological changes. In addition, some cytoplasmic and nuclear changes were detected within the liver ultrastructure. The results of these studies allow one to suggest that LF could be an effective toxicant alone and that PA might act in situ to modify the effect of this agent (or the reverse situation wherein LF modifies effects of PA) such that lethality results. PMID:24344743

  6. Deep recombination centers in C u2ZnSnS e4 revealed by screened-exchange hybrid density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Ye Sheng; Magyari-Köpe, Blanka; Nishi, Yoshio; Bent, Stacey F.; Clemens, Bruce M.

    2015-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the thermodynamic and electronic properties of intrinsic point defects in the solar energy conversion materials C u2ZnSnS e4 and CuInS e2 based on the screened-exchange hybrid density functional theory. A comparison between the defect transition levels for C u2ZnSnS e4 and CuInS e2 reveals that in C u2ZnSnS e4 , the S nCu and S nZn antisite defects can be recombination centers with defect states close to midgap, while the I nCu antisite defect has a shallow defect level in CuInS e2 . The resultant higher Shockley-Read-Hall recombination rate in C u2ZnSnS e4 reduces the steady-state concentration of minority carriers and quasi-Fermi level separation under illumination. This may explain the origin of the low open-circuit voltage values for C u2ZnSnS e4 solar cells compared to CuInS e2 solar cells.

  7. Cultivation-independent screening revealed hot spots of IncP-1, IncP-7 and IncP-9 plasmid occurrence in different environmental habitats.

    PubMed

    Dealtry, Simone; Ding, Guo-Chun; Weichelt, Viola; Dunon, Vincent; Schlüter, Andreas; Martini, María Carla; Del Papa, María Florencia; Lagares, Antonio; Amos, Gregory Charles Auton; Wellington, Elizabeth Margaret Helen; Gaze, William Hugo; Sipkema, Detmer; Sjöling, Sara; Springael, Dirk; Heuer, Holger; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Thomas, Christopher; Smalla, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    IncP-1, IncP-7 and IncP-9 plasmids often carry genes encoding enzymes involved in the degradation of man-made and natural contaminants, thus contributing to bacterial survival in polluted environments. However, the lack of suitable molecular tools often limits the detection of these plasmids in the environment. In this study, PCR followed by Southern blot hybridization detected the presence of plasmid-specific sequences in total community (TC-) DNA or fosmid DNA from samples originating from different environments and geographic regions. A novel primer system targeting IncP-9 plasmids was developed and applied along with established primers for IncP-1 and IncP-7. Screening TC-DNA from biopurification systems (BPS) which are used on farms for the purification of pesticide-contaminated water revealed high abundances of IncP-1 plasmids belonging to different subgroups as well as IncP-7 and IncP-9. The novel IncP-9 primer-system targeting the rep gene of nine IncP-9 subgroups allowed the detection of a high diversity of IncP-9 plasmid specific sequences in environments with different sources of pollution. Thus polluted sites are "hot spots" of plasmids potentially carrying catabolic genes. PMID:24587126

  8. Formation of Hydrogen Sulfide from Cysteine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4742: Genome Wide Screen Reveals a Central Role of the Vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Gal; Cordente, Antonio G.; Curtin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Discoveries on the toxic effects of cysteine accumulation and, particularly, recent findings on the many physiological roles of one of the products of cysteine catabolism, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), are highlighting the importance of this amino acid and sulfur metabolism in a range of cellular activities. It is also highlighting how little we know about this critical part of cellular metabolism. In the work described here, a genome-wide screen using a deletion collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed a surprising set of genes associated with this process. In addition, the yeast vacuole, not previously associated with cysteine catabolism, emerged as an important compartment for cysteine degradation. Most prominent among the vacuole-related mutants were those involved in vacuole acidification; we identified each of the eight subunits of a vacuole acidification sub-complex (V1 of the yeast V-ATPase) as essential for cysteine degradation. Other functions identified included translation, RNA processing, folate-derived one-carbon metabolism, and mitochondrial iron-sulfur homeostasis. This work identified for the first time cellular factors affecting the fundamental process of cysteine catabolism. Results obtained significantly contribute to the understanding of this process and may provide insight into the underlying cause of cysteine accumulation and H2S generation in eukaryotes. PMID:25517415

  9. Cultivation-Independent Screening Revealed Hot Spots of IncP-1, IncP-7 and IncP-9 Plasmid Occurrence in Different Environmental Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Dealtry, Simone; Ding, Guo-Chun; Weichelt, Viola; Dunon, Vincent; Schlüter, Andreas; Martini, María Carla; Papa, María Florencia Del; Lagares, Antonio; Amos, Gregory Charles Auton; Wellington, Elizabeth Margaret Helen; Gaze, William Hugo; Sipkema, Detmer; Sjöling, Sara; Springael, Dirk; Heuer, Holger; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Thomas, Christopher; Smalla, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    IncP-1, IncP-7 and IncP-9 plasmids often carry genes encoding enzymes involved in the degradation of man-made and natural contaminants, thus contributing to bacterial survival in polluted environments. However, the lack of suitable molecular tools often limits the detection of these plasmids in the environment. In this study, PCR followed by Southern blot hybridization detected the presence of plasmid-specific sequences in total community (TC-) DNA or fosmid DNA from samples originating from different environments and geographic regions. A novel primer system targeting IncP-9 plasmids was developed and applied along with established primers for IncP-1 and IncP-7. Screening TC-DNA from biopurification systems (BPS) which are used on farms for the purification of pesticide-contaminated water revealed high abundances of IncP-1 plasmids belonging to different subgroups as well as IncP-7 and IncP-9. The novel IncP-9 primer-system targeting the rep gene of nine IncP-9 subgroups allowed the detection of a high diversity of IncP-9 plasmid specific sequences in environments with different sources of pollution. Thus polluted sites are “hot spots” of plasmids potentially carrying catabolic genes. PMID:24587126

  10. Synthetic dosage lethality in the human metabolic network is highly predictive of tumor growth and

    E-print Network

    Ruppin, Eytan

    to predict gene essentiality in shRNA cancer cell line screens. Moving to clinical tumors, we show that (ii is lethal. SDLs offer a promising way to kill cancer cells by inhibiting the activity of SDL partners) SDLs are significantly underrepresented in tumors. Further- more, breast cancer tumors with SDLs active

  11. Lethal mitochondrial cardiomyopathy in a hypomorphic Med30 mouse mutant is ameliorated by ketogenic diet

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Philippe; Fan, Weiwei; Chen, Yen-Hui; Tobita, Kimimasa; Downes, Michael R.; Wood, Malcolm R.; Sun, Lei; Xia, Yu; Ding, Ning; Spaeth, Jason M.; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Boyer, Thomas G.; Lo, Cecilia Wen Ya; Yen, Jeffrey; Evans, Ronald M.; Beutler, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Deficiencies of subunits of the transcriptional regulatory complex Mediator generally result in embryonic lethality, precluding study of its physiological function. Here we describe a missense mutation in Med30 causing progressive cardiomyopathy in homozygous mice that, although viable during lactation, show precipitous lethality 2–3 wk after weaning. Expression profiling reveals pleiotropic changes in transcription of cardiac genes required for oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial integrity. Weaning mice to a ketogenic diet extends viability to 8.5 wk. Thus, we establish a mechanistic connection between Mediator and induction of a metabolic program for oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation, in which lethal cardiomyopathy is mitigated by dietary intervention. PMID:22106289

  12. Stability and Function of Mammalian Lethal Giant Larvae-1 Oncoprotein Are Regulated by the Scaffolding Protein RanBPM*

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Bharathi; Ramakrishna, Suresh; Kim, Yong-Soo; Kim, Sun-Myoung; Kim, Myung-Sun; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved lethal giant larvae (Lgl) tumor suppressor gene has an essential role in establishing apical-basal cell polarity, cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue organization. However, the precise molecular mechanism by which the Lgl carries out its function remains obscure. In the current study, we have identified Ran-binding protein M (RanBPM) as a novel binding partner of Mgl-1, a mammalian homolog of Drosophila tumor suppressor protein lethal (2) giant larvae (L(2)gl) by yeast two-hybrid screening. RanBPM seems to act as a scaffolding protein with a modulatory function with respect to Mgl-1. The Mgl-1 and RanBPM association was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down experiments. Additionally, expression of RanBPM resulted in inhibition of Mgl-1 degradation, and thereby extended the half-life of Mgl-1. Furthermore, the ability of Mgl-1 activity in cell migration and colony formation assay was enhanced by RanBPM. Taken together, our findings reveal that RanBPM plays a novel role in regulating Mgl-1 stability and contributes to its biological function as a tumor suppressor. PMID:20829363

  13. Alcohol Consumption and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Kenneth E.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Swann, Alan C.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Lee, Roberta K.; Bayer, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a case-control study of the association between nearly lethal suicide attempts and facets of alcohol consumption; namely, drinking frequency, drinking quantity, binge drinking, alcoholism, drinking within 3 hours of suicide attempt, and age began drinking. In bivariate analyses, all measures were associated with nearly lethal suicide…

  14. High-throughput Screening of ToxCast" Phase I Chemicals in an Embryonic Stem Cell Assay Reveals Potential Disruption of a Critical Developmental Signaling Pathway

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about the developmental toxicity of the expansive chemical landscape in existence today. Significant efforts are being made to apply novel methods to predict developmental activity of chemicals utilizing high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (...

  15. Large Scale Screening of Digeneans for Neorickettsia Endosymbionts Using Real-Time PCR Reveals New Neorickettsia Genotypes, Host Associations and Geographic Records

    PubMed Central

    Greiman, Stephen E.; Tkach, Vasyl V.; Pulis, Eric; Fayton, Thomas J.; Curran, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    Digeneans are endoparasitic flatworms with complex life cycles including one or two intermediate hosts (first of which is always a mollusk) and a vertebrate definitive host. Digeneans may harbor intracellular endosymbiotic bacteria belonging to the genus Neorickettsia (order Rickettsiales, family Anaplasmataceae). Some Neorickettsia are able to invade cells of the digenean's vertebrate host and are known to cause diseases of wildlife and humans. In this study we report the results of screening 771 digenean samples for Neorickettsia collected from various vertebrates in terrestrial, freshwater, brackish, and marine habitats in the United States, China and Australia. Neorickettsia were detected using a newly designed real-time PCR protocol targeting a 152 bp fragment of the heat shock protein coding gene, GroEL, and verified with nested PCR and sequencing of a 1371 bp long region of 16S rRNA. Eight isolates of Neorickettsia have been obtained. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that 7 of these isolates, provisionally named Neorickettsia sp. 1–7 (obtained from allocreadiid Crepidostomum affine, haploporids Saccocoelioides beauforti and Saccocoelioides lizae, faustulid Bacciger sprenti, deropegid Deropegus aspina, a lecithodendriid, and a pleurogenid) represent new genotypes and one (obtained from Metagonimoides oregonensis) was identical to a published sequence of Neorickettsia known as SF agent. All digenean species reported in this study represent new host records. Three of the 6 digenean families (Haploporidae, Pleurogenidae, and Faustulidae) are also reported for the first time as hosts of Neorickettsia. We have detected Neorickettsia in digeneans from China and Australia for the first time based on PCR and sequencing evidence. Our findings suggest that further surveys from broader geographic regions and wider selection of digenean taxa are likely to reveal new Neorickettsia lineages as well as new digenean host associations. PMID:24911315

  16. Lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millson, Charles E.; Wilson, Michael; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Thurrell, Wendy; Mlkvy, Peter; Davies, Claire; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with a large number of gastroduodenal disorders. Clearance of the bacteria has been shown to benefit patients with duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers, and certain rare types of gastric tumors. Broad-spectrum antibiotics are the mainstay of current treatment strategies but side-effects, poor compliance, and drug resistance limit their usefulness. We sensitized H. pylori with toluidine blue, haematoporphyrin derivative, aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine, methylene blue or protoporphyrin IX prior to exposure to low-power laser light from either a gallium aluminum arsenide laser or a helium neon gas laser. All 5 sensitizers caused reductions of greater than 1000-fold in the number of viable bacteria. Light alone had no effect and only HpD caused a significant decrease in bacterial numbers without laser light. Next, we sensitized H. mustelae on explanted ferret gastric mucosa (ex vivo) with the same sensitizers and exposed them to light from a copper vapor pumped dye laser tuned appropriately. MB caused significant reductions in bacterial counts. Successful lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter pylori both in vitro and ex vivo raises the possibility of a local method for eradicating the bacteria, especially as the bacteria are only found in those parts of the upper gastrointestinal tract that are accessible to the endoscope.

  17. Lethal Effects of Helianthemum lippii (L.) on Acanthamoeba castellanii Cysts in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Badria, F.A.; Hetta, M.H.; Sarhan, Rania M.; Ezz El-Din, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba spp. commonly cause Acanthamoeba keratitis which is typically associated with the wear of contact lenses. Therefore, finding an economic, efficient, and safe therapy of natural origin is of outmost importance. This study examined the in vitro lethal potential of ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Helianthemum lippii (L.) (sun roses) against Acanthamoeba castellanii cysts isolated from patients with amoebic keratitis. Both extracts proved to be potent as regard to their lethal effects on A. castellanii cysts with comparable results to chlorhexidine. The ethyl acetate was more promising with cumulative lethality. It showed a highly significant lethal percentage along the duration of treatment. The analysis of the more potent ethyl acetate extract revealed the presence of 2.96 mg/100 g of total phenolics, 0.289 mg/100 ml of total flavonoids and 37 mg/100 mg of total tannins which highlighted their phytomedicinal role. PMID:25031463

  18. Crystallographic studies of the Anthrax lethal toxin. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, C.A.

    1996-07-01

    The lethal form of Anthrax results from the inhalation of anthrax spores. Death is primarily due to the effects of the lethal toxin (Protective Antigen (PA) + Lethal Factor) from the causative agent, Bacillus anthracis. All the Anthrax vaccines currently in use or under development contain or produce PA, the major antigenic component of anthrax toxin, and there is a clear need for an improved vaccine for human use. In the previous report we described the first atomic resolution structure of PA, revealing that the molecule is composed largely of beta-sheets organized into four domains. This information can be used in the design. of recombinant PA vaccines. In this report we describe additional features of the full-length PA molecule derived from further crystallographic refinement and careful examination of the structure. We compare two crystal forms of PA grown at different pH values and discuss the functional implications. A complete definition of the function of each domain must await the crystal structure of the PA63 heptamer. We have grown crystals of the heptamer under both detergent and detergent-free conditions, and made substantial progress towards the crystal structure. The mechanism of anthrax intoxication in the light of our results is reviewed.

  19. Enriched Protein Screening of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Secretions Reveals MFAP5 and PENK as Novel IL-10 Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Milwid, Jack M; Elman, Jessica S; Li, Matthew; Shen, Keyue; Manrai, Arjun; Gabow, Aaron; Yarmush, Joshua; Jiao, Yunxin; Fletcher, Anne; Lee, Jungwoo; Cima, Michael J; Yarmush, Martin L; Parekkadan, Biju

    2014-01-01

    The secreted proteins from a cell constitute a natural biologic library that can offer significant insight into human health and disease. Discovering new secreted proteins from cells is bounded by the limitations of traditional separation and detection tools to physically fractionate and analyze samples. Here, we present a new method to systematically identify bioactive cell-secreted proteins that circumvent traditional proteomic methods by first enriching for protein candidates by differential gene expression profiling. The bone marrow stromal cell secretome was analyzed using enriched gene expression datasets in combination with potency assay testing. Four proteins expressed by stromal cells with previously unknown anti-inflammatory properties were identified, two of which provided a significant survival benefit to mice challenged with lethal endotoxic shock. Greater than 85% of secreted factors were recaptured that were otherwise undetected by proteomic methods, and remarkable hit rates of 18% in vitro and 9% in vivo were achieved. PMID:24496384

  20. Screening of selected underutilized wild fruit species in a lowland rainforest ecosystem, southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adekunle, Victor A J; Oyerinde, Olubukola V

    2012-01-01

    Eight indigenous edible fruit species distributed among seven families were harvested from a tropical rainforest ecosystem and screened for their nutritional and anti-nutritional factors. The phenological studies of the fruits revealed that they flower and fruit at different periods and seasons of the year. The results of the phytochemical analysis show that they all contained adequate level of food nutrients required for normal body functioning. The levels of the anti-nutrients obtained are well below the lethal dose. The fruits are potential cheap sources of protein and other essential nutrients that can improve the diets of those facing food crises today. PMID:22794128

  1. High-throughput Screening of ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell (mESC) Assay Reveals Disruption of Potential Toxicity Pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little information is available regarding the potential for many commercial chemicals to induce developmental toxicity. The mESC Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytoxicity (ACDC) assay is a high-throughput screen used to close this data gap. Thus, ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals wer...

  2. Comparative analysis of RNAi screening technologies at genome-scale reveals an inherent processing inefficiency of the plasmid-based shRNA hairpin

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Bhavneet; Shum, David; Djaballah, Hakim

    2014-01-01

    RNAi screening in combination with the genome-sequencing projects would constitute the Holy Grail of modern genetics; enabling discovery and validation towards a better understanding of fundamental biology leading to novel targets to combat disease. Hit discordance at inter-screen level together with the lack of reproducibility is emerging as the technology's main pitfalls. To examine some of the underlining factors leading to such discrepancies, we reasoned that perhaps there is an inherent difference in knockdown efficiency of the various RNAi technologies. For this purpose, we utilized the two most popular ones, chemically synthesized siRNA duplex and plasmid-based shRNA hairpin, in order to perform a head to head comparison. Using a previously developed gain-of-function assay probing modulators of the miRNA biogenesis pathway, we first executed on a siRNA screen against the Silencer Select V4.0 library (AMB) nominating 1,273, followed by an shRNA screen against the TRC1 library (TRC1) nominating 497 gene candidates. We observed a poor overlap of only 29 hits given that there are 15,068 overlapping genes between the two libraries; with DROSHA as the only common hit out of the seven known core miRNA biogenesis genes. Distinct genes interacting with the same biogenesis regulators were observed in both screens, with a dismal cross-network overlap of only 3 genes (DROSHA, TGFBR1, and DIS3). Taken together, our study demonstrates differential knockdown activities between the two technologies, possibly due to the inefficient intracellular processing and potential cell-type specificity determinants in generating intended targeting sequences for the plasmid-based shRNA hairpins; and suggests this observed inefficiency as potential culprit in addressing the lack of reproducibility. PMID:24433414

  3. Preparation and characterization of cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect

    Saebel, Crystal E.; Carbone, Ryan; Dabous, John R.; Lo, Suet Y.; Siemann, Stefan

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor (CoLF) is highly active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoLF can be prepared by bio-assimilation and direct exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lethal factor binds cobalt tightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic spectrum of CoLF reveals penta-coordination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of CoLF with thioglycolic acid follows a 2-step mechanism. -- Abstract: Anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase involved in the cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases near their N-termini. The current report concerns the preparation of cobalt-substituted LF (CoLF) and its characterization by electronic spectroscopy. Two strategies to produce CoLF were explored, including (i) a bio-assimilation approach involving the cultivation of LF-expressing Bacillus megaterium cells in the presence of CoCl{sub 2}, and (ii) direct exchange by treatment of zinc-LF with CoCl{sub 2}. Independent of the method employed, the protein was found to contain one Co{sup 2+} per LF molecule, and was shown to be twice as active as its native zinc counterpart. The electronic spectrum of CoLF suggests the Co{sup 2+} ion to be five-coordinate, an observation similar to that reported for other Co{sup 2+}-substituted gluzincins, but distinct from that documented for the crystal structure of native LF. Furthermore, spectroscopic studies following the exposure of CoLF to thioglycolic acid (TGA) revealed a sequential mechanism of metal removal from LF, which likely involves the formation of an enzyme: Co{sup 2+}:TGA ternary complex prior to demetallation of the active site. CoLF reported herein constitutes the first spectroscopic probe of LF's active site, which may be utilized in future studies to gain further insight into the enzyme's mechanism and inhibitor interactions.

  4. Live deaths online: internet suicide and lethality.

    PubMed

    Klein, Carolina A

    2012-01-01

    The Internet provides an infinite platform for the portrayal of lethal events. Beyond mere display, however, it dispenses information, allows for participation and sharing of content, and constitutes a virtual interactive forum. The Internet may ultimately shape society's approach to perceiving and dealing with death. Thus, psychiatrists may wish to be aware of these matters so that they may be considered in assessments and clinical care. In this article, the author attempts to identify key online locations where lethality is portrayed and how it may affect the individual patient and practitioner and the population at large. PMID:23233475

  5. A fluorescent bimolecular complementation screen reveals MAF1, RNF7 and SETD3 as PCNA-associated proteins in human cells.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Simon E; Hodimont, Elsie; Green, Catherine M

    2015-08-01

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a conserved component of DNA replication factories, and interactions with PCNA mediate the recruitment of many essential DNA replication enzymes to these sites of DNA synthesis. A complete description of the structure and composition of these factories remains elusive, and a better knowledge of them will improve our understanding of how the maintenance of genome and epigenetic stability is achieved. To fully characterize the set of proteins that interact with PCNA we developed a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) screen for PCNA-interactors in human cells. This 2-hybrid type screen for interactors from a human cDNA library is rapid and efficient. The fluorescent read-out for protein interaction enables facile selection of interacting clones, and we combined this with next generation sequencing to identify the cDNAs encoding the interacting proteins. This method was able to reproducibly identify previously characterized PCNA-interactors but importantly also identified RNF7, Maf1 and SetD3 as PCNA-interacting proteins. We validated these interactions by co-immunoprecipitation from human cell extracts and by interaction analyses using recombinant proteins. These results show that the BiFC screen is a valuable method for the identification of protein-protein interactions in living mammalian cells. This approach has potentially wide application as it is high throughput and readily automated. We suggest that, given this interaction with PCNA, Maf1, RNF7, and SetD3 are potentially involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, or associated processes. PMID:26030842

  6. A Buoyancy-Based Screen of Drosophila Larvae for Fat-Storage Mutants Reveals a Role for Sir2 in Coupling Fat Storage to Nutrient Availability

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Tânia; Van Gilst, Marc R.; Hariharan, Iswar K.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity has a strong genetic component, but few of the genes that predispose to obesity are known. Genetic screens in invertebrates have the potential to identify genes and pathways that regulate the levels of stored fat, many of which are likely to be conserved in humans. To facilitate such screens, we have developed a simple buoyancy-based screening method for identifying mutant Drosophila larvae with increased levels of stored fat. Using this approach, we have identified 66 genes that when mutated increase organismal fat levels. Among these was a sirtuin family member, Sir2. Sirtuins regulate the storage and metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids by deacetylating key regulatory proteins. However, since mammalian sirtuins function in many tissues in different ways, it has been difficult to define their role in energy homeostasis accurately under normal feeding conditions. We show that knockdown of Sir2 in the larval fat body results in increased fat levels. Moreover, using genetic mosaics, we demonstrate that Sir2 restricts fat accumulation in individual cells of the fat body in a cell-autonomous manner. Consistent with this function, changes in the expression of metabolic enzymes in Sir2 mutants point to a shift away from catabolism. Surprisingly, although Sir2 is typically upregulated under conditions of starvation, Sir2 mutant larvae survive better than wild type under conditions of amino-acid starvation as long as sugars are provided. Our findings point to a Sir2-mediated pathway that activates a catabolic response to amino-acid starvation irrespective of the sugar content of the diet. PMID:21085633

  7. A genetic screen for modifiers of Drosophila caspase Dcp-1 reveals caspase involvement in autophagy and novel caspase-related genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Caspases are cysteine proteases with essential functions in the apoptotic pathway; their proteolytic activity toward various substrates is associated with the morphological changes of cells. Recent reports have described non-apoptotic functions of caspases, including autophagy. In this report, we searched for novel modifiers of the phenotype of Dcp-1 gain-of-function (GF) animals by screening promoter element- inserted Drosophila melanogaster lines (EP lines). Results We screened ~15,000 EP lines and identified 72 Dcp-1-interacting genes that were classified into 10 groups based on their functions and pathways: 4 apoptosis signaling genes, 10 autophagy genes, 5 insulin/IGF and TOR signaling pathway genes, 6 MAP kinase and JNK signaling pathway genes, 4 ecdysone signaling genes, 6 ubiquitination genes, 11 various developmental signaling genes, 12 transcription factors, 3 translation factors, and 11 other unclassified genes including 5 functionally undefined genes. Among them, insulin/IGF and TOR signaling pathway, MAP kinase and JNK signaling pathway, and ecdysone signaling are known to be involved in autophagy. Together with the identification of autophagy genes, the results of our screen suggest that autophagy counteracts Dcp-1-induced apoptosis. Consistent with this idea, we show that expression of eGFP-Atg5 rescued the eye phenotype caused by Dcp-1 GF. Paradoxically, we found that over-expression of full-length Dcp-1 induced autophagy, as Atg8b-GFP, an indicator of autophagy, was increased in the eye imaginal discs and in the S2 cell line. Taken together, these data suggest that autophagy suppresses Dcp-1-mediated apoptotic cell death, whereas Dcp-1 positively regulates autophagy, possibly through feedback regulation. Conclusions We identified a number of Dcp-1 modifiers that genetically interact with Dcp-1-induced cell death. Our results showing that Dcp-1 and autophagy-related genes influence each other will aid future investigations of the complicated relationships between apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:20100334

  8. Salicylic and jasmonic acid pathways are necessary for defence against Dickeya solani as revealed by a novel method for Blackleg disease screening of in vitro grown potato.

    PubMed

    Burra, D D; Mühlenbock, P; Andreasson, E

    2015-09-01

    Potato is major crop ensuring food security in Europe, and blackleg disease is increasingly causing losses in yield and during storage. Recently, one blackleg pathogen, Dickeya solani has been shown to be spreading in Northern Europe that causes aggressive disease development. Currently, identification of tolerant commercial potato varieties has been unsuccessful; this is confounded by the complicated etiology of the disease and a strong environmental influence on disease development. There is currently a lack of efficient testing systems. Here, we describe a system for quantification of blackleg symptoms on shoots of sterile in vitro potato plants, which saves time and space compared to greenhouse and existing field assays. We found no evidence for differences in infection between the described in vitro-based screening method and existing greenhouse assays. This system facilitates efficient screening of blackleg disease response of potato plants independent of other microorganisms and variable environmental conditions. We therefore used the in vitro screening method to increase understanding of plant mechanisms involved in blackleg disease development by analysing disease response of hormone- related (salicylic and jasmonic acid) transgenic potato plants. We show that both jasmonic (JA) and salicylic (SA) acid pathways regulate tolerance to blackleg disease in potato, a result unlike previous findings in Arabidopsis defence response to necrotrophic bacteria. We confirm this by showing induction of a SA marker, pathogenesis-related protein 1 (StPR1), and a JA marker, lipoxygenase (StLOX), in Dickeya solani infected in vitro potato plants. We also observed that tubers of transgenic potato plants were more susceptible to soft rot compared to wild type, suggesting a role for SA and JA pathways in general tolerance to Dickeya. PMID:25903921

  9. A high-throughput screen for ligand binding reveals the specificities of three amino acid chemoreceptors from Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae.

    PubMed

    McKellar, James L O; Minnell, Jordan J; Gerth, Monica L

    2015-05-01

    Chemoreceptors play a central role in chemotaxis, allowing bacteria to detect chemical gradients and bias their swimming behavior in order to navigate toward favorable environments. The genome of the kiwifruit pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) strain NZ-V13 encodes 43 predicted chemoreceptors, none of which has been characterized. We developed a high-throughput fluorescence-based thermal shift assay for identifying the signal molecules that are recognized by a given chemoreceptor ligand binding domain (LBD). Using this assay, we characterized the ligand binding profiles of three Psa homologs of the P.?aeruginosa?PAO1 amino acid chemoreceptors PctA, PctB and PctC. Each recombinant LBD was screened against 95 potential ligands. The three Psa homologs, named pscA, pscB and pscC (Psa chemoreceptors A, B and C) bound 3, 10 and 3 amino acids respectively. In each case, their binding profiles were distinct from their P.?aeruginosa?PAO1 homologs. Notably, Psa?PscA-LBD only bound the acidic amino acids l-aspartate, d-aspartate and l-glutamate, whereas P.?aeruginosa?PctA-LBD binds all of the l-proteinogenic amino acids except for l-aspartate and l-glutamate. A combination of homology modeling, site-directed mutagenesis and functional screening identified a single amino acid residue in the Psa?PscA-LBD (Ala146) that is critically important for determining its narrow specificity. PMID:25656450

  10. High-throughput screen using a single-cell tyrosine phosphatase assay reveals biologically active inhibitors of tyrosine phosphatase CD45.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Stephanie M; Panchal, Rekha G; Walker, Logan M; Wu, Dennis J; Falk, Matthew D; Mitra, Sayantan; Damle, Sagar S; Ruble, David; Kaltcheva, Teodora; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Bavari, Sina; Barrios, Amy M; Bottini, Nunzio

    2012-08-28

    Many cellular signaling events are regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation and mediated by the opposing actions of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases. Protein tyrosine phosphatases are emerging as drug targets, but poor cell permeability of inhibitors has limited the development of drugs targeting these enzymes [Tautz L, et al. (2006) Expert Opin Ther Targets 10:157-177]. Here we developed a method to monitor tyrosine phosphatase activity at the single-cell level and applied it to the identification of cell-permeable inhibitors. The method takes advantage of the fluorogenic properties of phosphorylated coumaryl amino propionic acid (pCAP), an analog of phosphotyrosine, which can be incorporated into peptides. Once delivered into cells, pCAP peptides were dephosphorylated by protein tyrosine phosphatases, and the resulting cell fluorescence could be monitored by flow cytometry and high-content imaging. The robustness and sensitivity of the assay was validated using peptides preferentially dephosphorylated by CD45 and T-cell tyrosine phosphatase and available inhibitors of these two enzymes. The assay was applied to high-throughput screening for inhibitors of CD45, an important target for autoimmunity and infectious diseases [Hermiston ML, et al. (2003) Annu Rev Immunol 21:107-137]. We identified four CD45 inhibitors that showed activity in T cells and macrophages. These results indicate that our assay can be applied to primary screening for inhibitors of CD45 and of other protein tyrosine phosphatases to increase the yield of biologically active inhibitors. PMID:22891353

  11. Genome-wide microRNA screening reveals that the evolutionary conserved miR-9a regulates body growth by targeting sNPFR1/NPYR.

    PubMed

    Suh, Yoon Seok; Bhat, Shreelatha; Hong, Seung-Hyun; Shin, Minjung; Bahk, Suhyoung; Cho, Kyung Sang; Kim, Seung-Whan; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Young-Joon; Jones, Walton D; Yu, Kweon

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate many physiological processes including body growth. Insulin/IGF signalling is the primary regulator of animal body growth, but the extent to which miRNAs act in insulin-producing cells (IPCs) is unclear. Here we generate a UAS-miRNA library of Drosophila stocks and perform a genetic screen to identify miRNAs whose overexpression in the IPCs inhibits body growth in Drosophila. Through this screen, we identify miR-9a as an evolutionarily conserved regulator of insulin signalling and body growth. IPC-specific miR-9a overexpression reduces insulin signalling and body size. Of the predicted targets of miR-9a, we find that loss of miR-9a enhances the level of sNPFR1. We show via an in vitro binding assay that miR-9a binds to sNPFR1 mRNA in insect cells and to the mammalian orthologue NPY2R in rat insulinoma cells. These findings indicate that the conserved miR-9a regulates body growth by controlling sNPFR1/NPYR-mediated modulation of insulin signalling. PMID:26138755

  12. An RNAi-based screen reveals PLK1, CDK1 and NDC80 as potential therapeutic targets in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Linton, A; Cheng, Y Y; Griggs, K; Kirschner, M B; Gattani, S; Srikaran, S; Chuan-Hao Kao, S; McCaughan, B C; Klebe, S; van Zandwijk, N; Reid, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive tumour originating in the thoracic mesothelium. Prognosis remains poor with 9- to 12-month median survival, and new targets for treatments are desperately needed. Methods: Utilising an RNA interference (RNAi)-based screen of 40 genes overexpressed in tumours, including genes involved in the control of cell cycle, DNA replication and repair, we investigated potential therapeutic targets for MPM. Following in vitro characterisation of the effects of target silencing on MPM cells, candidates were assessed in tumour samples from 154 patients. Results: Gene knockdown in MPM cell lines identified growth inhibition following knockdown of NDC80, CDK1 and PLK1. Target knockdown induced cell-cycle arrest and increased apoptosis. Using small-molecule inhibitors specific for these three proteins also led to growth inhibition of MPM cell lines, and Roscovitine (inhibitor of CDK1) sensitised cells to cisplatin. Protein expression was also measured in tumour samples, with markedly variable levels of CDK1 and PLK1 noted. PLK1 expression in over 10% of cells correlated significantly with a poor prognosis. Conclusion: These results suggest that RNAi-based screening has utility in identifying new targets for MPM, and that inhibition of NDC80, CDK1 and PLK1 may hold promise for treatment of this disease. PMID:24327015

  13. A High-Content Phenotypic Screen Reveals the Disruptive Potency of Quinacrine and 3?,4?-Dichlorobenzamil on the Digestive Vacuole of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yan Quan; Goh, Amanda S. P.; Ch'ng, Jun Hong; Nosten, François H.; Preiser, Peter Rainer; Pervaiz, Shazib; Yadav, Sanjiv Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the etiological agent of malignant malaria and has been shown to exhibit features resembling programmed cell death. This is triggered upon treatment with low micromolar doses of chloroquine or other lysosomotrophic compounds and is associated with leakage of the digestive vacuole contents. In order to exploit this cell death pathway, we developed a high-content screening method to select compounds that can disrupt the parasite vacuole, as measured by the leakage of intravacuolar Ca2+. This assay uses the ImageStream 100, an imaging-capable flow cytometer, to assess the distribution of the fluorescent calcium probe Fluo-4. We obtained two hits from a small library of 25 test compounds, quinacrine and 3?,4?-dichlorobenzamil. The ability of these compounds to permeabilize the digestive vacuole in laboratory strains and clinical isolates was validated by confocal microscopy. The hits could induce programmed cell death features in both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant laboratory strains. Quinacrine was effective at inhibiting field isolates in a 48-h reinvasion assay regardless of artemisinin clearance status. We therefore present as proof of concept a phenotypic screening method with the potential to provide mechanistic insights to the activity of antimalarial drugs. PMID:24217693

  14. Deadly Lessons: Understanding Lethal School Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mark H., Ed.; Petrie, Carol V., Ed.; Braga, Anthony A., Ed.; McLaughlin, Brenda L., Ed.

    This collection of papers is the outcome of the National Academies' effort to glean information from six different case studies of student-perpetrated school shootings. Part 1, "Case Studies of Lethal School Violence," includes: "The Copycat Factor: Mental Illness, Guns, and the Shooting Incident at Heritage High School, Rockdale County, Georgia"…

  15. The evolution of lethal intergroup violence

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Raymond C.

    2005-01-01

    Recent findings and analyses in evolutionary biology, archaeology, and ethnology provide a favorable conjuncture for examining the evolution of lethal intergroup violence among hominids during the 2.9-million-year Paleolithic time span. Here, I seek to identify and investigate the main turning points in this evolutionary trajectory and to delineate the periodization that follows from this inquiry. PMID:16129826

  16. MFR PAPER 1293 Serological Screening of

    E-print Network

    MFR PAPER 1293 Serological Screening of Channel Catfish Virus STEWART McCONNELL and JACK D. AUSTEN ABSTRACT-Disease-free channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, were used to study the pathogenesis of channel catfish virus disease and to determine a median lethal dose for exposed 3D-day-old hatched fry. We were

  17. High Content Image-Based Screening of a Protease Inhibitor Library Reveals Compounds Broadly Active against Rift Valley Fever Virus and Other Highly Pathogenic RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mudhasani, Rajini; Kota, Krishna P.; Retterer, Cary; Tran, Julie P.; Whitehouse, Chris A.; Bavari, Sina

    2014-01-01

    High content image-based screening was developed as an approach to test a protease inhibitor small molecule library for antiviral activity against Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and to determine their mechanism of action. RVFV is the causative agent of severe disease of humans and animals throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Of the 849 compounds screened, 34 compounds exhibited ?50% inhibition against RVFV. All of the hit compounds could be classified into 4 distinct groups based on their unique chemical backbone. Some of the compounds also showed broad antiviral activity against several highly pathogenic RNA viruses including Ebola, Marburg, Venezuela equine encephalitis, and Lassa viruses. Four hit compounds (C795-0925, D011-2120, F694-1532 and G202-0362), which were most active against RVFV and showed broad-spectrum antiviral activity, were selected for further evaluation for their cytotoxicity, dose response profile, and mode of action using classical virological methods and high-content imaging analysis. Time-of-addition assays in RVFV infections suggested that D011-2120 and G202-0362 targeted virus egress, while C795-0925 and F694-1532 inhibited virus replication. We showed that D011-2120 exhibited its antiviral effects by blocking microtubule polymerization, thereby disrupting the Golgi complex and inhibiting viral trafficking to the plasma membrane during virus egress. While G202-0362 also affected virus egress, it appears to do so by a different mechanism, namely by blocking virus budding from the trans Golgi. F694-1532 inhibited viral replication, but also appeared to inhibit overall cellular gene expression. However, G202-0362 and C795-0925 did not alter any of the morphological features that we examined and thus may prove to be good candidates for antiviral drug development. Overall this work demonstrates that high-content image analysis can be used to screen chemical libraries for new antivirals and to determine their mechanism of action and any possible deleterious effects on host cellular biology. PMID:25144302

  18. Structure-Based Systematic Isolation of Conditional-Lethal Mutations in the Single Yeast Calmodulin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohya, Y.; Botstein, D.

    1994-01-01

    Conditional-lethal mutations of the single calmodulin gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been very difficult to isolate by random and systematic methods, despite the fact that deletions cause recessive lethality. We report here the isolation of numerous conditional-lethal mutants that were recovered by systematically altering phenylalanine residues. The phenylalanine residues of calmodulin were implicated in function both by structural studies of calmodulin bound to target peptides and by their extraordinary conservation in evolution. Seven single and 26 multiple Phe -> Ala mutations were constructed. Mutant phenotypes were examined in a haploid cmd1 disrupted strain under three conditions: single copy, low copy, and overexpressed. Whereas all but one of the single mutations caused no obvious phenotype, most of the multiple mutations caused obvious growth phenotypes. Five were lethal, 6 were lethal only in synthetic medium, 13 were temperature-sensitive lethal and 2 had no discernible phenotypic consequences. Overexpression of some of the mutant genes restored the phenotype to nearly wild type. Several temperature-sensitive calmodulin mutations were suppressed by elevated concentration of CaCl(2) in the medium. Mutant calmodulin protein was detected at normal levels in extracts of most of the lethal mutant cells, suggesting that the deleterious phenotypes were due to loss of the calmodulin function and not protein instability. Analysis of diploid strains heterozygous for all combinations of cmd1-ts alleles revealed four intragenic complementation groups. The contributions of individual phe->ala changes to mutant phenotypes support the idea of internal functional redundancy in the symmetrical calmodulin protein molecule. These results suggest that the several phenylalanine residues in calmodulin are required to different extents in different combinations in order to carry out each of the several essential tasks. PMID:7896089

  19. A High-Throughput Fatty Acid Profiling Screen Reveals Novel Variations in Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Related Algae

    PubMed Central

    Pflaster, Erin L.; Schwabe, Michael J.; Becker, Joyanne; Wilkinson, Melissa S.; Parmer, Ashley; Clemente, Thomas E.; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) by gas chromatography (GC) is a common technique for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of acyl lipids. Methods for FAME preparation are typically time-consuming and labor-intensive and require multiple transfers of reagents and products between reaction tubes and autosampler vials. In order to increase throughput and lower the time and materials costs required for FAME preparation prior to GC analysis, we have developed a method in which 10-to-20-mg samples of microbial biomass are transferred to standard GC autosampler vials, transesterified using an emulsion of methanolic trimethylsulfonium hydroxide and hexane, and analyzed directly by GC without further sample handling. This method gives results that are essentially identical to those obtained by the more labor- and material-intensive FAME preparation methods, such as transmethylation with methanolic HCl. We applied this method to the screening of laboratory and environmental isolates of the green alga Chlamydomonas for variations in fatty acid composition. This screening method facilitated two novel discoveries. First, we identified a common laboratory strain of C. reinhardtii, CC-620, completely lacking all ?-3 fatty acids normally found in this organism and showed that this strain contains an inactivating mutation in the CrFAD7 gene, encoding the sole ?-3 desaturase activity in this organism. Second, we showed that some species of Chlamydomonas make ?6-unsaturated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) rather than the ?5 species normally made by the previously characterized laboratory strains of Chlamydomonas, suggesting that there is species-specific variation in the regiospecificity and substrate selectivity of front-end desaturases in this algal genus. PMID:25239975

  20. Drug repurposing screen reveals FDA-approved inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase and isoprenoid synthesis that block Cryptosporidium parvum growth.

    PubMed

    Bessoff, Kovi; Sateriale, Adam; Lee, K Kyungae; Huston, Christopher D

    2013-04-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, a diarrheal disease usually caused by Cryptosporidium parvum or Cryptosporidium hominis in humans, can result in fulminant diarrhea and death in AIDS patients and chronic infection and stunting in children. Nitazoxanide, the current standard of care, has limited efficacy in children and is no more effective than placebo in patients with advanced AIDS. Unfortunately, the lack of financial incentives and the technical difficulties associated with working with Cryptosporidium parasites have crippled efforts to develop effective treatments. In order to address these obstacles, we developed and validated (Z' score = 0.21 to 0.47) a cell-based high-throughput assay and screened a library of drug repurposing candidates (the NIH Clinical Collections), with the hopes of identifying safe, FDA-approved drugs to treat cryptosporidiosis. Our screen yielded 21 compounds with confirmed activity against C. parvum growth at concentrations of <10 ?M, many of which had well-defined mechanisms of action, making them useful tools to study basic biology in addition to being potential therapeutics. Additional work, including structure-activity relationship studies, identified the human 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor itavastatin as a potent inhibitor of C. parvum growth (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)] = 0.62 ?M). Bioinformatic analysis of the Cryptosporidium genomes indicated that the parasites lack all known enzymes required for the synthesis of isoprenoid precursors. Additionally, itavastatin-induced growth inhibition of C. parvum was partially reversed by the addition of exogenous isopentenyl pyrophosphate, suggesting that itavastatin reduces Cryptosporidium growth via on-target inhibition of host HMG-CoA reductase and that the parasite is dependent on the host cell for synthesis of isoprenoid precursors. PMID:23380723

  1. Lethal and potentially lethal lesions induced by radiation--a unified repair model.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B

    1986-05-01

    A model of radiation action is described which unifies several of the major existing concepts which have been applied to cell killing. Called the lethal and potentially lethal (LPL) model, it combines the ideas of lesion interaction, irreparable lesions caused by single tracks, linear lesion fixation, lesion repair via first-order kinetics, and binary misrepair. Two different kinds of lesions are hypothesized: irreparable (lethal) and repairable (potentially lethal) lesions. They are tentatively being identified with DNA double-strand breaks of different severity. Two processes compete for depletion of the potentially lethal lesions: correct repair following first-order kinetics, and misrepair following second-order kinetics. Fixation of these lesions can also occur. The model applies presently only to plateau (stationary)-phase cells. Radiobiological phenomena described include effects of low dose rate, high LET, and repair kinetics as measured with repair inhibitors such as hypertonic solution and beta-arabinofuranosyladenine (beta-araA). One consequence of the model is that repair of sublethal damage and the slow component of the repair of potentially lethal damage are two manifestations of the same repair process. Hypertonic treatment fixes a completely new class of lesions which normally repair correctly. Another consequence of the model is that the initial slope of the survival curve depends on the amount of time available for repair after irradiation. The "dose-rate factor" occurring in several linear-quadratic formulations is shown to emerge when appropriate low-dose and long-repair-time approximations are made. PMID:3704115

  2. Evolution of Chilean colonizing populations of Drosophila subobscura: lethal genes

    E-print Network

    Huey, Raymond B.

    ). For example, the high frequency of lethal genes is likely an indicator of centrality versus marginalityEvolution of Chilean colonizing populations of Drosophila subobscura: lethal genes and chromosomal+Business Media B.V. 2008 Abstract Knowledge of the frequency, distribution, and fate of lethal genes

  3. Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals the E3 SUMO-protein ligase gene SIZ1 as a novel determinant of furfural tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Furfural is a major growth inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates and improving furfural tolerance of microorganisms is critical for rapid and efficient fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, we used the RNAi-Assisted Genome Evolution (RAGE) method to select for furfural resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified a new determinant of furfural tolerance. Results By using a genome-wide RNAi (RNA-interference) screen in S. cerevisiae for genes involved in furfural tolerance, we identified SIZ1, a gene encoding an E3 SUMO-protein ligase. Disruption of SIZ1 gene function by knockdown or deletion conferred significantly higher furfural tolerance compared to other previously reported metabolic engineering strategies in S. cerevisiae. This improved furfural tolerance of siz1? cells is accompanied by rapid furfural reduction to furfuryl alcohol and leads to higher ethanol productivity in the presence of furfural. In addition, the siz1? mutant also exhibited tolerance towards oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress tolerance related proteins may be under the SUMO regulation of SIZ1p and responsible for furfural tolerance. Conclusions Using a genome-wide approach, we identified a novel determinant for furfural tolerance, providing valuable insights into the design of recombinant microbes for efficient lignocellulose fermentation. PMID:24904688

  4. In Vivo Loss of Function Screening Reveals Carbonic Anhydrase IX as a Key Modulator of Tumor Initiating Potential in Primary Pancreatic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Pore, Nabendu; Jalla, Sanjoo; Liu, Zheng; Higgs, Brandon; Sorio, Claudio; Scarpa, Aldo; Hollingsworth, Robert; Tice, David A; Michelotti, Emil

    2015-06-01

    Reprogramming of energy metabolism is one of the emerging hallmarks of cancer. Up-regulation of energy metabolism pathways fuels cell growth and division, a key characteristic of neoplastic disease, and can lead to dependency on specific metabolic pathways. Thus, targeting energy metabolism pathways might offer the opportunity for novel therapeutics. Here, we describe the application of a novel in vivo screening approach for the identification of genes involved in cancer metabolism using a patient-derived pancreatic xenograft model. Lentiviruses expressing short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting 12 different cell surface protein transporters were separately transduced into the primary pancreatic tumor cells. Transduced cells were pooled and implanted into mice. Tumors were harvested at different times, and the frequency of each shRNA was determined as a measure of which ones prevented tumor growth. Several targets including carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), monocarboxylate transporter 4, and anionic amino acid transporter light chain, xc- system (xCT) were identified in these studies and shown to be required for tumor initiation and growth. Interestingly, CAIX was overexpressed in the tumor initiating cell population. CAIX expression alone correlated with a highly tumorigenic subpopulation of cells. Furthermore, CAIX expression was essential for tumor initiation because shRNA knockdown eliminated the ability of cells to grow in vivo. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first parallel in vivo assessment of multiple novel oncology target genes using a patient-derived pancreatic tumor model. PMID:26152355

  5. Genetic Screen Reveals Link between the Maternal Effect Sterile Gene mes-1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced Neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuli; Cao, Xiou; Yan, Dong; Wang, Dayong; Aballay, Alejandro

    2015-12-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that immune responses to microbial infections may contribute to neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of Caenorhabditis elegans causes a number of neural changes that are hallmarks of neurodegeneration. Using an unbiased genetic screen to identify genes involved in the control of P. aeruginosa-induced neurodegeneration, we identified mes-1, which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase-like protein that is required for unequal cell divisions in the early embryonic germ line. We showed that sterile but not fertile mes-1 animals were resistant to neurodegeneration induced by P. aeruginosa infection. Similar results were observed using animals carrying a mutation in the maternal effect gene pgl-1, which is required for postembryonic germ line development, and the germ line-deficient strains glp-1 and glp-4. Additional studies indicated that the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 is required for resistance to P. aeruginosa-induced neurodegeneration in germ line-deficient strains. Thus, our results demonstrate that P. aeruginosa infection results in neurodegeneration phenotypes in C. elegans that are controlled by the germ line in a cell-nonautonomous manner. PMID:26475858

  6. Influence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium ssrB on Colonization of Eastern Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) as Revealed by a Promoter Probe Screen.

    PubMed

    Cox, Clayton E; Wright, Anita C; McClelland, Michael; Teplitski, Max

    2015-01-01

    Although Salmonella has been isolated from 7.4 to 8.6% of domestic raw oysters, representing a significant risk for food-borne illness, little is known about the factors that influence their initial colonization by Salmonella. This study tested the hypothesis that specific regulatory changes enable a portion of the invading Salmonella population to colonize oysters. An in vivo promoter probe library screen identified 19 unique regions as regulated during colonization. The mutants in the nearest corresponding downstream genes were tested for colonization defects in oysters. Only one mutation, in ssrB, resulted in a significantly reduced ability to colonize oysters compared to that of wild-type Salmonella. Because ssrB regulates Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2)-dependent infections in vertebrate macrophages, the possibility that ssrB mediated colonization of oyster hemocytes in a similar manner was examined. However, no difference in hemocyte colonization was observed. The complementary hypothesis that signal exchange between Salmonella and the oyster's native microbial community aids colonization was also tested. Signals that triggered responses in quorum sensing (QS) reporters were shown to be produced by oyster-associated bacteria and present in oyster tissue. However, no evidence for signal exchange was observed in vivo. The sdiA reporter responded to salinity, suggesting that SdiA may also have a role in environmental sensing. Overall, this study suggests the initial colonization of live oysters by Salmonella is controlled by a limited number of regulators, including ssrB. PMID:26497459

  7. Genome-wide RNAi Screen Reveals a New Role of a WNT/CTNNB1 Signaling Pathway as Negative Regulator of Virus-induced Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Fink, Karin; Pham, Tram; Raymond, Valérie-Ann; Audette, Karine; Guenier, Anne-Sophie; Duchaine, Jean; Servant, Marc; Bilodeau, Marc; Cohen, Éric; Grandvaux, Nathalie; Lamarre, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    To identify new regulators of antiviral innate immunity, we completed the first genome-wide gene silencing screen assessing the transcriptional response at the interferon-? (IFNB1) promoter following Sendai virus (SeV) infection. We now report a novel link between WNT signaling pathway and the modulation of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR)-dependent innate immune responses. Here we show that secretion of WNT2B and WNT9B and stabilization of ?-catenin (CTNNB1) upon virus infection negatively regulate expression of representative inducible genes IFNB1, IFIT1 and TNF in a CTNNB1-dependent effector mechanism. The antiviral response is drastically reduced by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) inhibitors but restored in CTNNB1 knockdown cells. The findings confirm a novel regulation of antiviral innate immunity by a canonical-like WNT/CTNNB1 signaling pathway. The study identifies novel avenues for broad-spectrum antiviral targets and preventing immune-mediated diseases upon viral infection. PMID:23785285

  8. A high-throughput chemical screen reveals that harmine-mediated inhibition of DYRK1A increases human pancreatic beta cell replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Alvarez-Perez, Juan-Carlos; Felsenfeld, Dan P; Liu, Hongtao; Sivendran, Sharmila; Bender, Aaron; Kumar, Anil; Sanchez, Roberto; Scott, Donald K; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Stewart, Andrew F

    2015-04-01

    Types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both ultimately result from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Beta cells proliferate in humans during a brief temporal window beginning around the time of birth, with a peak percentage (?2%) engaged in the cell cycle in the first year of life. In embryonic life and after early childhood, beta cell replication is barely detectable. Whereas beta cell expansion seems an obvious therapeutic approach to beta cell deficiency, adult human beta cells have proven recalcitrant to such efforts. Hence, there remains an urgent need for antidiabetic therapeutic agents that can induce regeneration and expansion of adult human beta cells in vivo or ex vivo. Here, using a high-throughput small-molecule screen (HTS), we find that analogs of the small molecule harmine function as a new class of human beta cell mitogenic compounds. We also define dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase-1a (DYRK1A) as the likely target of harmine and the nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors as likely mediators of human beta cell proliferation and differentiation. Using three different mouse and human islet in vivo-based models, we show that harmine is able to induce beta cell proliferation, increase islet mass and improve glycemic control. These observations suggest that harmine analogs may have unique therapeutic promise for human diabetes therapy. Enhancing the potency and beta cell specificity of these compounds are important future challenges. PMID:25751815

  9. Lethal Interpersonal Violence in the Middle Pleistocene

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M.; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin. PMID:26018668

  10. Isotope-Assisted Screening for Iron-Containing Metabolites Reveals a High Degree of Diversity among Known and Unknown Siderophores Produced by Trichoderma spp.

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Sylvia M.; Atanasova, Lea; Neumann, Nora K. N.; Krska, Rudolf; Lemmens, Marc; Druzhinina, Irina S.

    2013-01-01

    Due to low iron availability under environmental conditions, many microorganisms excrete iron-chelating agents (siderophores) to cover their iron demands. A novel screening approach for the detection of siderophores using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry was developed to study the production of extracellular siderophores of 10 wild-type Trichoderma strains. For annotation of siderophores, an in-house library comprising 422 known microbial siderophores was established. After 96 h of cultivation, 18 different iron chelators were detected. Four of those (dimerum acid, fusigen, coprogen, and ferricrocin) were identified by measuring authentic standards. cis-Fusarinine, fusarinine A and B, and des-diserylglycylferrirhodin were annotated based on high-accuracy mass spectral analysis. In total, at least 10 novel iron-containing metabolites of the hydroxamate type were found. On average Trichoderma spp. produced 12 to 14 siderophores, with 6 common to all species tested. The highest number (15) of siderophores was detected for the most common environmental opportunistic and strongly fungicidic species, Trichoderma harzianum, which, however, did not have any unique compounds. The tropical species T. reesei had the most distinctive pattern, producing one unique siderophore (cis-fusarinine) and three others that were present only in T. harzianum and not in other species. The diversity of siderophores did not directly correlate with the antifungal potential of the species tested. Our data suggest that the high diversity of siderophores produced by Trichoderma spp. might be the result of further modifications of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) products and not due to diverse NRPS-encoding genes. PMID:23064341

  11. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Cheltsov, Anton; Sergienko, Eduard; Vasile, Stefan; Golubkov, Vladislav; Aleshin, Alexander E; Levin, Trevor; Traer, Elie; Hann, Byron; Freimuth, Julia; Alexeev, Nikita; Alekseyev, Max A; Budko, Sergey P; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Spellman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR), a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model. PMID:26075913

  12. A genome-wide miRNA screen revealed miR-603 as a MGMT-regulating miRNA in glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kimberly; Steed, Tyler; Nguyen, Thien; Futalan, Diahnn; Akers, Johnny C.; Sarkaria, Jann; Jiang, Tao; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Carter, Bob S.; Chen, Clark C.

    2014-01-01

    MGMT expression is a critical determinant for therapeutic resistance to DNA alkylating agents. We previously demonstrated that MGMT expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-181d and other miRNAs. Here, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Candidate miRNAs were further tested for inverse correlation with MGMT expression in clinical specimens. We identified 15 candidate miRNAs and characterized the top candidate, miR-603. Transfection of miR-603 suppressed MGMT mRNA/protein expression in vitro and in vivo; this effect was reversed by transfection with antimiR-603. miR-603 affinity-precipitated with MGMT mRNA and suppressed luciferase activity in an MGMT-3'UTR-luciferase assay, suggesting direct interaction between miR-603 and MGMT 3'UTR. miR-603 transfection enhanced the temozolomide (TMZ) sensitivity of MGMT-expressing glioblastoma cell lines. Importantly, miR-603 mediated MGMT suppression and TMZ resistance were reversed by expression of an MGMT cDNA. In a collection of 74 clinical glioblastoma specimens, both miR-603 and miR-181d levels inversely correlated with MGMT expression. Moreover, a combined index of the two miRNAs better reflected MGMT expression than each individually. These results suggest that MGMT is co-regulated by independent miRNAs. Characterization of these miRNAs should contribute toward strategies for enhancing the efficacy of DNA alkylating agents. PMID:24994119

  13. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Cheltsov, Anton; Sergienko, Eduard; Vasile, Stefan; Golubkov, Vladislav; Aleshin, Alexander E.; Levin, Trevor; Traer, Elie; Hann, Byron; Freimuth, Julia; Alexeev, Nikita; Alekseyev, Max A.; Budko, Sergey P; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Spellman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR), a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model. PMID:26075913

  14. High-throughput small molecule screening reveals structurally diverse compounds that inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, J C; Carlson, B A; Sofos, J N; Smith, G C; Belk, K E; Nightingale, K K

    2011-12-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 colonizes the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants asymptomatically and may enter the human food supply through fecal contamination. A fraction of individuals infected by E. coli O157:H7 develop hemolytic uremic syndrome, a life-threatening condition. When individuals infected by E. coli O157:H7 are treated with certain antibiotics, an increased incidence of hemolytic uremic syndrome may result. This finding supports the need to identify novel compounds that can either reduce the load of E. coli O157:H7 entering the human food supply or serve as alternative therapeutic treatments for infected individuals. We developed a high-throughput turbidometric assay to identify novel compounds that inhibit E. coli O157:H7 growth. Pin transfers were performed to introduce small molecule libraries into 384-well plates, where each well contained approximately 5.0 log CFU of E. coli O157:H7. Plates were incubated at 37°C for 18 h, and the optical density was measured to determine the effect of each small molecule. A total of 64,562 compounds were screened in duplicate, and 43 unique compounds inhibited E. coli O157:H7 growth. Thirty-eight of the 43 inhibitory compounds belonged to known bioactive libraries, and the other 5 compounds were from commercial libraries derived from splitting and pooling. Inhibitory compounds from known bioactive libraries were most frequently therapeutic antibiotics (n = 34) but also included an antiviral compound, a compound that disrupts the citric acid cycle, and two biguanide compounds, which have been used for various nonclinical applications. We identified two novel compounds (i.e., biguanides) that should be studied further for their ability to reduce pathogen populations in foods. PMID:22186057

  15. A compact, in vivo screen of all 6-mers reveals drivers of tissue-specific expression and guides synthetic regulatory element design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Large-scale annotation efforts have improved our ability to coarsely predict regulatory elements throughout vertebrate genomes. However, it is unclear how complex spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression driven by these elements emerge from the activity of short, transcription factor binding sequences. Results We describe a comprehensive promoter extension assay in which the regulatory potential of all 6 base-pair (bp) sequences was tested in the context of a minimal promoter. To enable this large-scale screen, we developed algorithms that use a reverse-complement aware decomposition of the de Bruijn graph to design a library of DNA oligomers incorporating every 6-bp sequence exactly once. Our library multiplexes all 4,096 unique 6-mers into 184 double-stranded 15-bp oligomers, which is sufficiently compact for in vivo testing. We injected each multiplexed construct into zebrafish embryos and scored GFP expression in 15 tissues at two developmental time points. Twenty-seven constructs produced consistent expression patterns, with the majority doing so in only one tissue. Functional sequences are enriched near biologically relevant genes, match motifs for developmental transcription factors, and are required for enhancer activity. By concatenating tissue-specific functional sequences, we generated completely synthetic enhancers for the notochord, epidermis, spinal cord, forebrain and otic lateral line, and show that short regulatory sequences do not always function modularly. Conclusions This work introduces a unique in vivo catalog of short, functional regulatory sequences and demonstrates several important principles of regulatory element organization. Furthermore, we provide resources for designing compact, reverse-complement aware k-mer libraries. PMID:23867016

  16. A high-throughput kinome screen reveals serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 as a therapeutic target for NF2-deficient meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Roberta L.; James, Marianne F.; DeSouza, Patrick A.; Wagh, Vilas; Zhao, Wen-Ning; Jordan, Justin T.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Plotkin, Scott R.; Gusella, James F.; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Ramesh, Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary intracranial adult tumor. All Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2)-associated meningiomas and ~60% of sporadic meningiomas show loss of NF2 tumor suppressor protein. There are no effective medical therapies for progressive and recurrent meningiomas. Our previous work demonstrated aberrant activation of mTORC1 signaling that led to ongoing clinical trials with rapamycin analogs for NF2 and sporadic meningioma patients. Here we performed a high-throughput kinome screen to identify kinases responsible for mTORC1 pathway activation in NF2-deficient meningioma cells. Among the emerging top candidates were the mTORC2-specific target serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1) and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). In NF2-deficient meningioma cells, inhibition of SGK1 rescues mTORC1 activation, and SGK1 activation is sensitive to dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor AZD2014, but not to rapamycin. PAK1 inhibition also leads to attenuated mTORC1 but not mTORC2 signaling, suggesting that mTORC2/SGK1 and Rac1/PAK1 pathways are independently responsible for mTORC1 activation in NF2-deficient meningiomas. Using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, we generated isogenic human arachnoidal cell lines (ACs), the origin cell type for meningiomas, expressing or lacking NF2. NF2-null CRISPR ACs recapitulate the signaling of NF2-deficient meningioma cells. Interestingly, we observe increased SGK1 transcription and protein expression in NF2-CRISPR ACs and in primary NF2-negative meningioma lines. Moreover, we demonstrate that the dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitor, AZD2014 is superior to rapamycin and PAK inhibitor FRAX597 in blocking proliferation of meningioma cells. Importantly, AZD2014 is currently in use in several clinical trials of cancer. Therefore, we believe that AZD2014 may provide therapeutic advantage over rapalogs for recurrent and progressive meningiomas. PMID:26219339

  17. A cancer screen in zebrafish identifies many ribosomal proteins as haploinsufficient tumor suppressors

    E-print Network

    Lai, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    A collection of over 500 lines of zebrafish (Danio rerio), each heterozygous for a recessive embryonic lethal mutation caused by a retroviral insertion, was screened for lines that displayed early mortality and externally ...

  18. Lethal and Sub-lethal Effects of UVB on Juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Pulmonata)

    PubMed Central

    Ruelas, Debbie S.; Karentz, Deneb; Sullivan, John T.

    2007-01-01

    Although Schistosoma mansoni occurs mainly in the tropics, where intense levels of solar radiation are present, the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light on schistosome transmission is not known. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential effects of UVB (290–320 nm) on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata, the snail intermediate host of S. mansoni. Albino and wild type snails were exposed to doses of UVB from UV-fluorescent lamps, and the following were measured: survival, photoreactivation (light-mediated DNA repair), effects on feeding behavior, and morphological tissue abnormalities. Irradiation with UVB is lethal to B. glabrata in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to white light subsequent to UVB irradiation enhances survival, probably by photoreactivation. The shell offers some, but not complete, protection. Experiments in which UVB transmittance through the shell was blocked with black nail polish suggest that injury to both exposed (headfoot) and shell-enclosed (mantle and visceral mass) tissues contributes to mortality in lethally-irradiated snails. Wild-type (pigmented) snails are less susceptible to lethal effects of UVB than albino snails, and they may be more capable of photoreactivation. UVB exposure inhibits snail feeding behavior, and causes tentacle forks and growths on the headfoot. Thus, UVB may influence the life cycle of S. mansoni by both lethal and sub-lethal damage to the snail intermediate host. However, the ability of snails to photoreactivate may mitigate these effects. PMID:16996081

  19. Effect of N-1/C-8 Ring Fusion and C-7 Ring Structure on Fluoroquinolone Lethality?

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Muhammad; Marks, Kevin R.; Schwanz, Heidi A.; German, Nadezhda; Drlica, Karl; Kerns, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Quinolones rapidly kill bacteria by two mechanisms, one that requires protein synthesis and one that does not. The latter, which is measured as lethal action in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol, is enhanced by N-1 cyclopropyl and C-8 methoxy substituents, as seen with the highly lethal compound PD161144. In some compounds, such as levofloxacin, the N-1 and C-8 substituents are fused. To assess the effect of ring fusion on killing, structural derivatives of levofloxacin and PD161144 differing at C-7 were synthesized and examined with Escherichia coli. A fused-ring derivative of PD161144 exhibited a striking absence of lethal activity in the presence of chloramphenicol. In general, ring fusion had little effect on lethal activity when protein synthesis was allowed, but fusion reduced lethal activity in the absence of protein synthesis to extents that depended on the C-7 ring structure. Additional fused-ring fluoroquinolones, pazufloxacin, marbofloxacin, and rufloxacin, also exhibited reduced activity in the presence of chloramphenicol. Energy minimization modeling revealed that steric interactions of the trans-oriented N-1 cyclopropyl and C-8 methoxy moieties skew the quinolone core, rigidly orient these groups perpendicular to core rings, and restrict the rotational freedom of C-7 rings. These features were not observed with fused-ring derivatives. Remarkably, structural effects on quinolone lethality were not explained by the recently described X-ray crystal structures of fluoroquinolone-topoisomerase IV-DNA complexes, suggesting the existence of an additional drug-binding state. PMID:20855738

  20. A draft genome sequence and functional screen reveals the repertoire of type III secreted proteins of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tabaci 11528

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, David J; Ibanez, Selena Gimenez; MacLean, Daniel; Dangl, Jeffery L; Chang, Jeff H; Rathjen, John P

    2009-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas syringae is a widespread bacterial pathogen that causes disease on a broad range of economically important plant species. Pathogenicity of P. syringae strains is dependent on the type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of up to about thirty virulence 'effector' proteins into the host cytoplasm where they subvert the eukaryotic cell physiology and disrupt host defences. P. syringae pathovar tabaci naturally causes disease on wild tobacco, the model member of the Solanaceae, a family that includes many crop species as well as on soybean. Results We used the 'next-generation' Illumina sequencing platform and the Velvet short-read assembly program to generate a 145X deep 6,077,921 nucleotide draft genome sequence for P. syringae pathovar tabaci strain 11528. From our draft assembly, we predicted 5,300 potential genes encoding proteins of at least 100 amino acids long, of which 303 (5.72%) had no significant sequence similarity to those encoded by the three previously fully sequenced P. syringae genomes. Of the core set of Hrp Outer Proteins that are conserved in three previously fully sequenced P. syringae strains, most were also conserved in strain 11528, including AvrE1, HopAH2, HopAJ2, HopAK1, HopAN1, HopI, HopJ1, HopX1, HrpK1 and HrpW1. However, the hrpZ1 gene is partially deleted and hopAF1 is completely absent in 11528. The draft genome of strain 11528 also encodes close homologues of HopO1, HopT1, HopAH1, HopR1, HopV1, HopAG1, HopAS1, HopAE1, HopAR1, HopF1, and HopW1 and a degenerate HopM1'. Using a functional screen, we confirmed that hopO1, hopT1, hopAH1, hopM1', hopAE1, hopAR1, and hopAI1' are part of the virulence-associated HrpL regulon, though the hopAI1' and hopM1' sequences were degenerate with premature stop codons. We also discovered two additional HrpL-regulated effector candidates and an HrpL-regulated distant homologue of avrPto1. Conclusion The draft genome sequence facilitates the continued development of P. syringae pathovar tabaci on wild tobacco as an attractive model system for studying bacterial disease on plants. The catalogue of effectors sheds further light on the evolution of pathogenicity and host-specificity as well as providing a set of molecular tools for the study of plant defence mechanisms. We also discovered several large genomic regions in Pta 11528 that do not share detectable nucleotide sequence similarity with previously sequenced Pseudomonas genomes. These regions may include horizontally acquired islands that possibly contribute to pathogenicity or epiphytic fitness of Pta 11528. PMID:19703286

  1. New High-Throughput Screening Assay To Reveal Similarities and Differences in Inhibitory Sensitivities of Multidrug ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters?

    PubMed Central

    Kolaczkowski, Marcin; Kolaczkowska, Anna; Motohashi, Noboru; Michalak, Krystyna

    2009-01-01

    Cdr1p is the major ATP-binding cassette multidrug transporter conferring resistance to azoles and other antifungals in Candida albicans. In this study, the identification of new Cdr1p inhibitors by use of a newly developed high-throughput fluorescence-based assay is reported. The assay also allowed monitoring of the activity and inhibition of the related transporters Pdr5p and Snq2p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which made it possible to compare its performance with those of previously established procedures. A high sensitivity, resulting from a wide dynamic range, was achieved upon high-level expression of the Cdr1p, Pdr5p, and Snq2p transporters in an S. cerevisiae strain in which the endogenous interfering activities were further reduced by genetic manipulation. An analysis of a set of therapeutically used and newly synthesized phenothiazine derivatives revealed different pharmacological profiles for Cdr1p, Pdr5p, and Snq2p. All transporters showed similar sensitivities to M961 inhibition. In contrast, Cdr1p was less sensitive to inhibition by fluphenazine, whereas phenothiazine selectively inhibited Snq2p. The inhibition potencies measured by the new assay reflected the ability of the compounds to potentiate the antifungal effect of ketoconazole (KTC), which was detoxified by the overproduced transporters. They also correlated with the 50% inhibitory concentration for inhibition of Pdr5p-mediated transport of rhodamine 6G in isolated plasma membranes. The most active derivative, M961, potentiated the activity of KTC against an azole-resistant CDR1-overexpressing C. albicans isolate. PMID:19188399

  2. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  3. Airport Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2011 Photo courtesy of Dan Paluska/Flickr Denver Airport Security Screening Introduction With air travel regaining popularity and increased secu- rity measures, airport security screening has become an area of interest for ...

  4. Neuroblastoma Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... called diagnostic tests . General Information About Neuroblastoma Cancer Key Points Neuroblastoma is a disease in which malignant ( ... factors for neuroblastoma are not known. Neuroblastoma Screening Key Points Tests are used to screen for different ...

  5. MRSA Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Was this page helpful? Formal name: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus Screening Related tests: Wound Culture At a ... know? How is it used? A methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screen is a test that looks ...

  6. Health Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    Screenings are tests that look for diseases before you have symptoms. Screening tests can find diseases early, when they're easier ... Overweight and obesity Prostate cancer in men Which tests you need depends on your age, your sex, ...

  7. Suicide Intent and Accurate Expectations of Lethality: Predictors of Medical Lethality of Suicide Attempts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gregory K.; Henriques, Gregg R.; Sosdjan, Daniella; Beck, Aaron T.

    2004-01-01

    The degree of intent to commit suicide and the severity of self-injury were examined in individuals (N = 180) who had recently attempted suicide. Although a minimal association was found between the degree of suicide intent and the degree of lethality of the attempt, the accuracy of expectations about the likelihood of dying was found to moderate…

  8. Gonadosomatic mosaicism for lethal mutations in Drosophila lethal mutations disturbing larval development

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A.I.; Sakharova, N.Yu.

    1988-11-01

    Phenogenetic analysis of autonomous lethal mutations obtained by the method of gonadosomatic mosaicism which manifested during larval stages, established that the nuclei of hypodermal cells, salivary glands suprapharyngeal ganglion, pharynx, esophagus, gizzard, and hindgut are the derivatives of the same nucleus (from the first two nuclei of cleavage) as the nuclei of the cells of the imaginal-somatic tissues.

  9. Tityus serrulatus venom - A lethal cocktail.

    PubMed

    Pucca, Manuela Berto; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Pinheiro Junior, Ernesto Lopes; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Amorim, Fernanda Gobbi; Cordeiro, Francielle Almeida; Longhim, Heloisa Tavoni; Cremonez, Caroline Marroni; Oliveira, Guilherme Honda; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2015-12-15

    Tityus serrulatus (Ts) is the main scorpion species of medical importance in Brazil. Ts venom is composed of several compounds such as mucus, inorganic salts, lipids, amines, nucleotides, enzymes, kallikrein inhibitor, natriuretic peptide, proteins with high molecular mass, peptides, free amino acids and neurotoxins. Neurotoxins are considered the most responsible for the envenoming syndrome due to their pharmacological action on ion channels such as voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and potassium (Kv) channels. The major goal of this review is to present important advances in Ts envenoming research, correlating both the crude Ts venom and isolated toxins with alterations observed in all human systems. The most remarkable event lies in the Ts induced massive releasing of neurotransmitters influencing, directly or indirectly, the entire body. Ts venom proved to extremely affect nervous and muscular systems, to modulate the immune system, to induce cardiac disorders, to cause pulmonary edema, to decrease urinary flow and to alter endocrine, exocrine, reproductive, integumentary, skeletal and digestive functions. Therefore, Ts venom possesses toxins affecting all anatomic systems, making it a lethal cocktail. However, its low lethality may be due to the low venom mass injected, to the different venom compositions, the body characteristics and health conditions of the victim and the local of Ts sting. Furthermore, we also described the different treatments employed during envenoming cases. In particular, throughout the review, an effort will be made to provide information from an extensive documented studies concerning Ts venom in vitro, in animals and in humans (a total of 151 references). PMID:26522893

  10. Enhancing CHK1 inhibitor lethality in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yong; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven; Dent, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The present studies were initiated to determine whether inhibitors of MEK1/2 or SRC signaling, respectively, enhance CHK1 inhibitor lethality in primary human glioblastoma cells. Multiple MEK1/2 inhibitors (CI-1040 (PD184352); AZD6244 (ARRY-142886)) interacted with multiple CHK1 inhibitors (UCN-01, AZD7762) to kill multiple primary human glioma cell isolates that have a diverse set of genetic alterations typically found in the disease. Inhibition of SRC family proteins also enhanced CHK1 inhibitor lethality. Combined treatment of glioma cells with (MEK1/2 + CHK1) inhibitors enhanced radiosensitivity. Combined (MEK1/2 + CHK1) inhibitor treatment led to dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 and S6 ribosomal protein, whereas the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 was increased. MEK1/2 + CHK1 inhibitor-stimulated cell death was associated with the cleavage of pro-caspases 3 and 7 as well as the caspase substrate (PARP). We also observed activation of pro-apoptotic BCL-2 effector proteins BAK and BAX and reduced levels of pro-survival BCL-2 family protein BCL-XL. Overexpression of BCL-XL alleviated but did not completely abolish MEK1/2 + CHK1 inhibitor cytotoxicity in GBM cells. These findings argue that multiple inhibitors of the SRC-MEK pathway have the potential to interact with multiple CHK1 inhibitors to kill glioma cells. PMID:22313687

  11. In Silico Screening for Palmitoyl Substrates Reveals a Role for DHHC1/3/10 (zDHHC1/3/11)-mediated Neurochondrin Palmitoylation in Its Targeting to Rab5-positive Endosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Shinichiro; Takahashi, Naoki; Fukata, Yuko; Fukata, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Protein palmitoylation, a common post-translational lipid modification, plays an important role in protein trafficking and functions. Recently developed palmitoyl-proteomic methods identified many novel substrates. However, the whole picture of palmitoyl substrates has not been clarified. Here, we performed global in silico screening using the CSS-Palm 2.0 program, free software for prediction of palmitoylation sites, and selected 17 candidates as novel palmitoyl substrates. Of the 17 candidates, 10 proteins, including 6 synaptic proteins (Syd-1, transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein (TARP) ?-2, TARP ?-8, cornichon-2, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II?, and neurochondrin (Ncdn)/norbin), one focal adhesion protein (zyxin), two ion channels (TRPM8 and TRPC1), and one G-protein-coupled receptor (orexin 2 receptor), were palmitoylated. Using the DHHC palmitoylating enzyme library, we found that all tested substrates were palmitoylated by the Golgi-localized DHHC3/7 subfamily. Ncdn, a regulator for neurite outgrowth and synaptic plasticity, was robustly palmitoylated by the DHHC1/10 (zDHHC1/11; z1/11) subfamily, whose substrate has not yet been reported. As predicted by CSS-Palm 2.0, Cys-3 and Cys-4 are the palmitoylation sites for Ncdn. Ncdn was specifically localized in somato-dendritic regions, not in the axon of rat cultured neurons. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy revealed that Ncdn was localized to Rab5-positive early endosomes in a palmitoylation-dependent manner, where DHHC1/10 (z1/11) were also distributed. Knockdown of DHHC1, -3, or -10 (z11) resulted in the loss of Ncdn from Rab5-positive endosomes. Thus, through in silico screening, we demonstrate that Ncdn and the DHHC1/10 (z1/11) and DHHC3/7 subfamilies are novel palmitoyl substrate-enzyme pairs and that Ncdn palmitoylation plays an essential role in its specific endosomal targeting. PMID:23687301

  12. Mutations synthetically lethal with cep1 target S. cerevisiae kinetochore components.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, R E; Harris, K; Zhang, K

    1998-01-01

    CP1 (encoded by CEP1) is a Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin protein that binds a DNA element conserved in centromeres and in the 5'-flanking DNA of methionine biosynthetic (MET) genes. Strains lacking CP1 are defective in chromosome segregation and MET gene transcription, leading to the hypothesis that CP1 plays a general role in assembling higher order chromatin structures at genomic sites where it is bound. A screen for mutations synthetically lethal with a cep1 null allele yielded five recessive csl (cep1 synthetic lethal) mutations, each defining a unique complementation group. Four of the five mutations synergistically increased the loss rate of marker chromosomes carrying a centromere lacking the CP1 binding site, suggesting that the cep1 synthetic lethality was due to chromosome segregation defects. Three of these four CSL genes were subsequently found to be known or imputed kinetochore genes: CEP3, NDC10, and CSE4. The fourth, CSL4, corresponded to ORF YNL232w on chromosome XIV, and was found to be essential. A human cDNA was identified that encoded a protein homologous to Csl4 and that complemented the csl4-1 mutation. The results are consistent with the view that the major cellular role of CP1 is to safeguard the biochemical integrity of the kinetochore. PMID:9584087

  13. Screens for piwi suppressors in Drosophila identify dosage-dependent regulators of germline stem cell division.

    PubMed Central

    Smulders-Srinivasan, Tora K; Lin, Haifan

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila piwi gene is the founding member of the only known family of genes whose function in stem cell maintenance is highly conserved in both animal and plant kingdoms. piwi mutants fail to maintain germline stem cells in both male and female gonads. The identification of piwi-interacting genes is essential for understanding how stem cell divisions are regulated by piwi-mediated mechanisms. To search for such genes, we screened the Drosophila third chromosome ( approximately 36% of the euchromatic genome) for suppressor mutations of piwi2 and identified six strong and three weak piwi suppressor genes/sequences. These genes/sequences interact negatively with piwi in a dosage-sensitive manner. Two of the strong suppressors represent known genes--serendipity-delta and similar, both encoding transcription factors. These findings reveal that the genetic regulation of germline stem cell division involves dosage-sensitive mechanisms and that such mechanisms exist at the transcriptional level. In addition, we identified three other types of piwi interactors. The first type consists of deficiencies that dominantly interact with piwi2 to cause male sterility, implying that dosage-sensitive regulation also exists in the male germline. The other two types are deficiencies that cause lethality and female-specific lethality in a piwi2 mutant background, revealing the zygotic function of piwi in somatic development. PMID:14704180

  14. Alleged lethal sorcery in East Timor.

    PubMed

    Pollanen, Michael S

    2004-01-01

    A wide range of cultural and social perspectives exists on the concept of sudden and unexpected death. In countries, without a formal system of death investigation, sudden death is shrouded in mysticism often based on traditional belief systems. This cultural perspective on sudden death is often at variance with medical and forensic concepts and may include explanations such as sorcery, magic, and voodoo. In this case report, the postmortem findings in an alleged victim of lethal 'black magic', known as ema halo by the indigenous people of East Timor, is described. The alleged victim died suddenly in front of witnesses. At autopsy, marked dilation of a bicuspid aortic valve with annuloaortic ectasia and a sinus of Valsalva aneurysm was found after exhumation of the body. The findings mitigated the local belief in witchcraft and established a natural manner of death. PMID:14687768

  15. Ants defend aphids against lethal disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Charlotte; Agrawal, Anurag A; Hajek, Ann E

    2010-04-23

    Social insects defend their own colonies and some species also protect their mutualist partners. In mutualisms with aphids, ants typically feed on honeydew produced by aphids and, in turn guard and shelter aphid colonies from insect natural enemies. Here we report that Formica podzolica ants tending milkweed aphids, Aphis asclepiadis, protect aphid colonies from lethal fungal infections caused by an obligate aphid pathogen, Pandora neoaphidis. In field experiments, bodies of fungal-killed aphids were quickly removed from ant-tended aphid colonies. Ant workers were also able to detect infective conidia on the cuticle of living aphids and responded by either removing or grooming these aphids. Our results extend the long-standing view of ants as mutualists and protectors of aphids by demonstrating focused sanitizing and quarantining behaviour that may lead to reduced disease transmission in aphid colonies. PMID:19923138

  16. Genetic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Wylie; Tarini, Beth; Press, Nancy A.; Evans, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Current approaches to genetic screening include newborn screening to identify infants who would benefit from early treatment, reproductive genetic screening to assist reproductive decision making, and family history assessment to identify individuals who would benefit from additional prevention measures. Although the traditional goal of screening is to identify early disease or risk in order to implement preventive therapy, genetic screening has always included an atypical element—information relevant to reproductive decisions. New technologies offer increasingly comprehensive identification of genetic conditions and susceptibilities. Tests based on these technologies are generating a different approach to screening that seeks to inform individuals about all of their genetic traits and susceptibilities for purposes that incorporate rapid diagnosis, family planning, and expediting of research, as well as the traditional screening goal of improving prevention. Use of these tests in population screening will increase the challenges already encountered in genetic screening programs, including false-positive and ambiguous test results, overdiagnosis, and incidental findings. Whether this approach is desirable requires further empiric research, but it also requires careful deliberation on the part of all concerned, including genomic researchers, clinicians, public health officials, health care payers, and especially those who will be the recipients of this novel screening approach. PMID:21709145

  17. Authorized Less Lethal Weapon Systems & Effective Ranges INDIVIDUAL OFFICER

    E-print Network

    Saffman, Mark

    Impact Munitions 1. Less Lethal Extended Range Kinetic Energy Munitions (Beanbag rounds) may be deployed less lethal impact munitions while on-duty after successfully completing training in its use. Authorized Grenadier Munitions 1. CN/CS or OC may be deployed through the use 37/40mm chemical agent delivery

  18. January 5, 2015 Policy on Firearms, Other Lethal Weapons,

    E-print Network

    January 5, 2015 Policy on Firearms, Other Lethal Weapons, Fireworks and Dangerous Objects the possession, use or storage of firearms, other lethal weapons, fireworks, and other dangerous objects.* Fireworks include but are not limited to firecrackers, rockets, roman candles, cherry bombs, toy cannons

  19. Chronic Exposure of Corals to Fine Sediments: Lethal and Sub-Lethal Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Smith, Luke D.; Cooper, Timothy F.; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l?1 TSS (25 mg cm?2 day?1) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l?1 TSS (83 mg cm?2 day?1) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue. PMID:22662225

  20. Synthetic lethality in ATM-deficient RAD50-mutant tumors underlie outlier response to cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Iyer, Gopa; Hohl, Marcel; Asthana, Saurabh; Inagaki, Akiko; Schultz, Nikolaus; Hanrahan, Aphrothiti J.; Scott, Sasinya N.; Brannon, A. Rose; McDermott, Gregory C.; Pirun, Mono; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Kim, Philip; Socci, Nicholas D.; Viale, Agnes; Schwartz, Gary K.; Reuter, Victor; Bochner, Bernard H.; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Berger, Michael F.; Petrini, John H.J.; Solit, David B.; Taylor, Barry S.

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic solid tumors are almost invariably fatal. Patients with disseminated small-cell cancers have a particularly unfavorable prognosis with most succumbing to their disease within two years. Here, we report on the genetic and functional analysis of an outlier curative response of a patient with metastatic small cell cancer to combined checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) inhibition and DNA damaging chemotherapy. Whole-genome sequencing revealed a clonal hemizygous mutation in the Mre11 complex gene RAD50 that attenuated ATM signaling which in the context of Chk1 inhibition contributed, via synthetic lethality, to extreme sensitivity to irinotecan. As Mre11 mutations occur in a diversity of human tumors, the results suggest a tumor-specific combination therapy strategy whereby checkpoint inhibition in combination with DNA damaging chemotherapy is synthetically lethal in tumor but not normal cells with somatic mutations that impair Mre11 complex function. PMID:24934408

  1. The effects of oil sands wastewater on fish resulting from exposure to sub-lethal concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholz, D.A.; Goudey, J.S.; Balch, G.C.; Nelson, L.R.; Gulley, J.; MacKinnon, M.

    1995-12-31

    Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of oil sands wastewater in flow through laboratory experiments as well as to artificial ponds containing sub-lethal concentrations of tailings pond water and fine tails in order to study the viability of the wet landscape remediation option. Large (200--300 g) fish were used for all the exposures in this preliminary study and the following data were collected: blood cell counts, sex hormone concentrations, sexual maturation, stress protein concentrations, PAH-metabolites in bile, condition factors, liver somatic indices, mixed function oxygenase induction, PAHs in muscle, external condition and the condition of internal organs. The data obtained from this study revealed no adverse effects upon fish during extended field exposures. Given similar exposure conditions in the release waters of a wet landscape reclamation, the data suggest that there may be no adverse effects upon fish, however, longer term studies, other indicator organisms and additional chronic tests should be conducted.

  2. Baicalin Inhibits the Lethality of Shiga-Like Toxin 2 in Mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Yutao; Niu, Xiaodi; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Quan; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Xuming

    2015-11-01

    Shiga-like toxins (Stxs), produced by pathogenic Escherichia coli, are a major virulence factor involved in severe diseases in human and animals. These toxins are ribosome-inactivating proteins, and treatment for diseases caused by them is not available. Therefore, there is an urgent need for agents capable of effectively targeting this lethal toxin. In this study, we identified baicalin, a flavonoid compound used in Chinese traditional medicine, as a compound against Shiga-like toxin 2 (Stx2). We found that baicalin significantly improves renal function and reduces Stx2-induced lethality in mice. Further experiments revealed that baicalin induces the formation of oligomers by the toxin by direct binding. We also identified the residues important for such interactions and analyzed their roles in binding baicalin by biophysical and biochemical analyses. Our results establish baicalin as a candidate compound for the development of therapeutics against diseases caused by Stxs. PMID:26349825

  3. A targetable GATA2-IGF2 axis confers aggressiveness in lethal prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Samuel J; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Quinn, S Aidan; Rodriguez-Barrueco, Ruth; Lujambio, Amaia; Williams, Estrelania; Sun, Xiaochen; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Lee, Albert; Readhead, Ben; Chen, Xintong; Galsky, Matthew; Esteve, Berta; Petrylak, Daniel P; Dudley, Joel T; Rabadan, Raul; Silva, Jose M; Hoshida, Yujin; Lowe, Scott W; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2015-02-01

    Elucidating the determinants of aggressiveness in lethal prostate cancer may stimulate therapeutic strategies that improve clinical outcomes. We used experimental models and clinical databases to identify GATA2 as a regulator of chemotherapy resistance and tumorigenicity in this context. Mechanistically, direct upregulation of the growth hormone IGF2 emerged as a mediator of the aggressive properties regulated by GATA2. IGF2 in turn activated IGF1R and INSR as well as a downstream polykinase program. The characterization of this axis prompted a combination strategy whereby dual IGF1R/INSR inhibition restored the efficacy of chemotherapy and improved survival in preclinical models. These studies reveal a GATA2-IGF2 aggressiveness axis in lethal prostate cancer and identify a therapeutic opportunity in this challenging disease. PMID:25670080

  4. A Targetable GATA2-IGF2 Axis Confers Aggressiveness in Lethal Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Samuel J.; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Quinn, S. Aidan; Rodriguez-Barrueco, Ruth; Lujambio, Amaia; Williams, Estrelania; Sun, Xiaochen; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Lee, Albert; Readhead, Ben; Chen, Xintong; Galsky, Matthew; Esteve, Berta; Petrylak, Daniel P.; Dudley, Joel T.; Rabadan, Raul; Silva, Jose M.; Hoshida, Yujin; Lowe, Scott W.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Elucidating the determinants of aggressiveness in lethal prostate cancer may stimulate therapeutic strategies that improve clinical outcomes. We used experimental models and clinical databases to identify GATA2 as a regulator of chemotherapy resistance and tumorigenicity in this context. Mechanistically, direct upregulation of the growth hormone IGF2 emerged as a mediator of the aggressive properties regulated by GATA2. IGF2 in turn activated IGF1R and INSR as well as a downstream polykinase program. The characterization of this axis prompted a combination strategy whereby dual IGF1R/INSR inhibition restored the efficacy of chemotherapy and improved survival in preclinical models. These studies reveal a GATA2-IGF2 aggressiveness axis in lethal prostate cancer and identify a therapeutic opportunity in this challenging disease. PMID:25670080

  5. Synchrotron X-Ray Visualisation of Ice Formation in Insects during Lethal and Non-Lethal Freezing

    E-print Network

    Socha, Jake

    Synchrotron X-Ray Visualisation of Ice Formation in Insects during Lethal and Non-Lethal Freezing, United States of America Abstract Although the biochemical correlates of freeze tolerance in insects-rays to directly visualise real-time ice formation at 3.3 Hz in intact insects. We observed freezing in diapausing

  6. Proteome-Wide Screening Reveals Immunodominance in the CD8 T Cell Response against Classical Swine Fever Virus with Antigen-Specificity Dependent on MHC Class I Haplotype Expression

    PubMed Central

    Franzoni, Giulia; Kurkure, Nitin V.; Essler, Sabine E.; Pedrera, Miriam; Everett, Helen E.; Bodman-Smith, Kikki B.; Crooke, Helen R.; Graham, Simon P.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination with live attenuated classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccines induces a rapid onset of protection which has been associated with virus-specific CD8 T cell IFN-? responses. In this study, we assessed the specificity of this response, by screening a peptide library spanning the CSFV C-strain vaccine polyprotein to identify and characterise CD8 T cell epitopes. Synthetic peptides were pooled to represent each of the 12 CSFV proteins and used to stimulate PBMC from four pigs rendered immune to CSFV by C-strain vaccination and subsequently challenged with the virulent Brescia strain. Significant IFN-? expression by CD8 T cells, assessed by flow cytometry, was induced by peptide pools representing the core, E2, NS2, NS3 and NS5A proteins. Dissection of these antigenic peptide pools indicated that, in each instance, a single discrete antigenic peptide or pair of overlapping peptides was responsible for the IFN-? induction. Screening and titration of antigenic peptides or truncated derivatives identified the following antigenic regions: core241–255 PESRKKLEKALLAWA and NS31902–1912 VEYSFIFLDEY, or minimal length antigenic peptides: E2996–1003 YEPRDSYF, NS21223–1230 STVTGIFL and NS5A3070–3078 RVDNALLKF. The epitopes are highly conserved across CSFV strains and variable sequence divergence was observed with related pestiviruses. Characterisation of epitope-specific CD8 T cells revealed evidence of cytotoxicity, as determined by CD107a mobilisation, and a significant proportion expressed TNF-? in addition to IFN-?. Finally, the variability in the antigen-specificity of these immunodominant CD8 T cell responses was confirmed to be associated with expression of distinct MHC class I haplotypes. Moreover, recognition of NS21223–1230 STVTGIFL and NS31902–1912 VEYSFIFLDEY by a larger group of C-strain vaccinated animals showed that these peptides could be restricted by additional haplotypes. Thus the antigenic regions and epitopes identified represent attractive targets for evaluation of their vaccine potential against CSFV. PMID:24376799

  7. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of MyD88-dependent signaling pathways using a computational screen

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Mark A.; Lee, Michael S.; Kissner, Teri L.; Alam, Shahabuddin; Waugh, David S.; Saikh, Kamal U.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used high-throughput computational screening to discover drug-like inhibitors of the host MyD88 protein-protein signaling interaction implicated in the potentially lethal immune response associated with Staphylococcal enterotoxins. We built a protein-protein dimeric docking model of the Toll-interleukin receptor (TIR)-domain of MyD88 and identified a binding site for docking small molecules. Computational screening of 5 million drug-like compounds led to testing of 30 small molecules; one of these molecules inhibits the TIR-TIR domain interaction and attenuates pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human primary cell cultures. Compounds chemically similar to this hit from the PubChem database were observed to be more potent with improved drug-like properties. Most of these 2nd generation compounds inhibit Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-induced TNF-?, IFN-?, IL-6, and IL-1? production at 2–10??M in human primary cells. Biochemical analysis and a cell-based reporter assay revealed that the most promising compound, T6167923, disrupts MyD88 homodimeric formation, which is critical for its signaling function. Furthermore, we observed that administration of a single dose of T6167923 completely protects mice from lethal SEB-induced toxic shock. In summary, our in silico approach has identified anti-inflammatory inhibitors against in vitro and in vivo toxin exposure with promise to treat other MyD88-related pro-inflammatory diseases. PMID:26381092

  8. Protective Effects of Hong Shan Capsule against Lethal Total-Body Irradiation-Induced Damage in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianzhong; Xu, Jing; Xu, Weiheng; Qi, Yang; Lu, Yiming; Qiu, Lei; Hu, Zhenlin; Chu, Zhiyong; Chai, Yifeng; Zhang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Hong Shan Capsule (HSC), a crude drug of 11 medicinal herbs, was used in clinical practice for the treatment of radiation injuries in China. In this study, we investigated its protection in rats against acute lethal total-body irradiation (TBI). Pre-administration of HSC reduced the radiation sickness characteristics, while increasing the 30-day survival of the irradiated rats. Administration of HSC also reduced the radiation sickness characteristics and increased the 30-day survival of mice after exposure to lethal TBI. Ultrastructural observation illustrated that the pretreatment of rats with HSC significantly attenuated the TBI-induced morphological changes in the different organs of irradiated rats. Gene expression profiles revealed the dramatic effect of HSC on alterations of gene expression caused by lethal TBI. Pretreatment with HSC prevented differential expression of 66% (1398 genes) of 2126 genes differentially expressed in response to TBI. Pathway enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in a total of 32 pathways, such as pathways in cancer and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Our analysis indicated that the pretreatment of rats with HSC modulated these pathways induced by lethal TBI, such as multiple MAPK pathways, suggesting that pretreatment with HSC might provide protective effects on lethal TBI mainly or partially through the modulation of these pathways. Our data suggest that HSC has the potential to be used as an effective therapeutic or radio-protective agent to minimize irradiation damage. PMID:26274957

  9. [Lethal alveolar echinococcosis in a dog: clinical symptoms and pathology].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Anja; Conraths, Franz J; Schneemann, Christiane; Wienrich, Volker; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicate a progressing spread of the fox tapeworm in Germany. Here we report on a case of lethal alveolar echinococcosis in a dog from Brandenburg. The patient was clinically presented with abdominal distension. Ultrasonic examination revealed severe structural alterations of the liver and in a fine needle aspiration cytology larval tape worm fragments were suspected. Explorative laparotomy suggested inoperable lesions and the animal was euthanized with unfavorable prognosis. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic echinococcosis. PCR analysis of the liver identified Echinococcus multilocularis, the so called "small fox tapeworm". The infection, reportable in Germany, is an important zoonotic disease that is transmitted by accidentally ingested tapeworm eggs shed by foxes or dogs. The prevalence between 7.6% and 16.7% in the fox population of Brandenburg is significantly lower than in the endemic regions of South and Southwest Germany, however, it is suspected to increase. This underlines the importance of a regional monitoring in domestic animals living in close contact to humans. In this regard, especially dogs should be taken into consideration as a potential definitive host and source of infection for people. PMID:24199383

  10. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePLUS

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening ... Colon cancer screening can detect polyps and early cancers in the intestines. This type of screening can find problems ...

  11. Rapid, optimized interactomic screening.

    PubMed

    Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Domanski, Michal; Hough, Loren E; Oroskar, Asha A; Oroskar, Anil R; Keegan, Sarah; Dilworth, David J; Molloy, Kelly R; Sherman, Vadim; Aitchison, John D; Fenyö, David; Chait, Brian T; Jensen, Torben Heick; Rout, Michael P; LaCava, John

    2015-06-01

    We must reliably map the interactomes of cellular macromolecular complexes in order to fully explore and understand biological systems. However, there are no methods to accurately predict how to capture a given macromolecular complex with its physiological binding partners. Here, we present a screening method that comprehensively explores the parameters affecting the stability of interactions in affinity-captured complexes, enabling the discovery of physiological binding partners in unparalleled detail. We have implemented this screen on several macromolecular complexes from a variety of organisms, revealing novel profiles for even well-studied proteins. Our approach is robust, economical and automatable, providing inroads to the rigorous, systematic dissection of cellular interactomes. PMID:25938370

  12. Genetic screening

    PubMed Central

    Andermann, Anne; Blancquaert, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide a primer for primary care professionals who are increasingly called upon to discuss the growing number of genetic screening services available and to help patients make informed decisions about whether to participate in genetic screening, how to interpret results, and which interventions are most appropriate. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE As part of a larger research program, a wide literature relating to genetic screening was reviewed. PubMed and Internet searches were conducted using broad search terms. Effort was also made to identify the gray literature. MAIN MESSAGE Genetic screening is a type of public health program that is systematically offered to a specified population of asymptomatic individuals with the aim of providing those identified as high risk with prevention, early treatment, or reproductive options. Ensuring an added benefit from screening, as compared with standard clinical care, and preventing unintended harms, such as undue anxiety or stigmatization, depends on the design and implementation of screening programs, including the recruitment methods, education and counseling provided, timing of screening, predictive value of tests, interventions available, and presence of oversight mechanisms and safeguards. There is therefore growing apprehension that economic interests might lead to a market-driven approach to introducing and expanding screening before program effectiveness, acceptability, and feasibility have been demonstrated. As with any medical intervention, there is a moral imperative for genetic screening to do more good than harm, not only from the perspective of individuals and families, but also for the target population and society as a whole. CONCLUSION Primary care professionals have an important role to play in helping their patients navigate the rapidly changing terrain of genetic screening services by informing them about the benefits and risks of new genetic and genomic technologies and empowering them to make more informed choices. PMID:20393090

  13. SCID mouse model for lethal Q fever.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Masako; Naganawa, Takashi; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Fukushi, Hideto; Masegi, Toshiaki; Hirai, Katsuya

    2003-08-01

    Q fever, a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, has many manifestations in humans. Endocarditis is the most serious complication of Q fever. Animal models are limited to acute pulmonary or hepatic disease and reproductive disorders. An appropriate experimental animal model for Q fever endocarditis does not yet exist. In this study, severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice infected with C. burnetii showed persistent clinical symptoms and died, whereas immunocompetent mice similarly infected became asymptomatic and survived. The SCID mice examined in this study had severe chronic lesions in their primary organs: the heart, lung, spleen, liver, and kidney. The heart lesions of the SCID mice were similar to those in humans with chronic Q fever endocarditis: they had focal calcification and expanded macrophages containing C. burnetii. The 50% lethal dose of C. burnetii in SCID mice was at least 10(8) times less than that in immunocompetent mice. The SCID mouse is highly susceptible to C. burnetii, and the immunodeficiency of the host enhances the severity of Q fever. This animal model could provide a new tool for the study of chronic Q fever and Q fever in immunodeficient hosts. PMID:12874353

  14. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; de Bono, Johann S.; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers. PMID:25232177

  15. Lethal body burdens of polar narcotics: Chlorophenols

    SciTech Connect

    Wezel, A.P. van; Punte, S.S.; Opperhuizen, A.

    1995-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to measure in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) the lethal body burden (LBB) of three chlorophenols that are known as polar narcotic chemicals. The LBBs of the chlorophenols were compared to LBBs of nonpolar narcotic chemicals to consider if the two classes of narcotic chemicals differ on a body burden level. The LBB of the most acidic chlorophenol was measured at two different levels of pH exposure to determine the influence of the degree of ionization on the magnitude of the LBB. Both n-octanol/water partition coefficients and n-hexane/water partition coefficients of the chlorophenols were determined at different pH levels to consider the influence of ionization on the partition coefficient and to determine the importance of a polar group in the organic phase on the partitioning behavior. Partitioning to n-octanol and n-hexane was used as input in a model to simulate the equilibrium partitioning between hydrophobic and nonhydrophobic and target and nontarget compartments in the fish.

  16. "Lethal" Fetal Anomalies and Elective Cesarean.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Mejebi T; White, Amina

    2015-11-01

    Deborah is a thirty-three-year-old who presented to labor and delivery at thirty-seven weeks gestation with complaints of contractions. Upon arrival, she explained that her fetus, Nathan, had been diagnosed with a "lethal" condition by her primary obstetrician. At twenty-two weeks gestation, an amniocentesis confirmed trisomy 13, a chromosomal abnormality leading to miscarriage or stillbirth in nearly one-half of affected pregnancies. During the admission process, Deborah voices the worry that due to Nathan's brain and heart structure, vaginal delivery could be traumatic and cause him to suffer. Deborah wishes for him to have as painless and as dignified a death as possible; cesarean section, she feels, will achieve this. Yet with her history of three prior vaginal deliveries, normally progressing labor, and poor fetal prognosis that is unlikely to improve with cesarean delivery, there is no maternal or fetal indication for a cesarean section. Should the obstetrician proceed with a cesarean delivery despite knowing that it would expose the mother to surgical risks with little or no corresponding fetal or neonatal benefit? PMID:26556142

  17. TORCH screen

    MedlinePLUS

    ... different infections in a newborn. TORCH stands for toxoplasmosis , rubella , cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, and HIV, but it ... used to screen infants for infections such as toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, syphilis and others. These infections ...

  18. Vision Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... office. Some community screenings use this method. Corneal light reflex testing This simple test can be performed ... focuses on a penlight, the position of the light reflection from the front surface (cornea) of the ...

  19. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  20. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference substances. These...numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The calculation of the dominant...implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal selection —(i)...

  1. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference substances. These...numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The calculation of the dominant...implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal selection —(i)...

  2. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference substances. These...numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The calculation of the dominant...implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal selection —(i)...

  3. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference substances. These...numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The calculation of the dominant...implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal selection —(i)...

  4. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference substances. These...numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The calculation of the dominant...implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal selection —(i)...

  5. Phytochemical screening and anticonvulsant studies of ethyl acetate fraction of Globimetula braunii on laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Aliyu, Musa Mumammad; Musa, Abdullahi Isma'il; Kamal, Muhammad Ja'afar; Mohammed, Magaji Garba

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the phytochemical properties and the anticonvulsant potential of the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of ethanol leaf extract of Globimetula braunii, a plant used in ethnomedicine for the treatment of epilepsy. Methods The phytochemical screening was carried out using standard protocol while the anticonvulsant activity was studied using maximal electroshock test in chicks, pentylenetetrazole and 4-aminopyridine-induced seizures in mice. Results The preliminary phytochemical screening carried out on the crude ethanol extract revealed the presence of saponins, carbohydrates, flavonoids, tannins, anthraquinones and steroids. Similarly, tannins, flavonoids and steroids/terpenes were found to be present in the ethyl acetate fraction. In the pharmacological screening, 150 mg/kg of the fraction protected 83.33% of animals against pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure in mice whereas sodium valproate a standard anti-epileptic drug offered 100% protection. In the 4-aminopyridine-induced seizure model, the fraction produced a significant (P<0.05) increase in the mean onset of seizure in unprotected animals. The fraction did not exhibit a significant activity against maximal electroshock convulsion. The median lethal dose of the fraction was found to be 1?261.91 mg/kg. Conclusions These results suggest that the ethyl acetate fraction of Globimetula braunii leaves extract possesses psychoactive compound that may be useful in the management of petit mal epilepsy and lend credence to the ethnomedical use of the plant in the management of epilepsy. PMID:25182552

  6. Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease presenting as hydrops fetalis

    PubMed Central

    BenHamida, Emira; Ayadi, Imene; Ouertani, Ines; Chammem, Maroua; Bezzine, Ahlem; BenTmime, Riadh; Attia, Leila; Mrad, Ridha; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease is very rare and is considered a variant of type 2 Gaucher disease that occurs in the neonatal period. The most distinct features of perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease are non-immune hydrops fetalis. Less common signs of the disease are hepatosplenomegaly, ichthyosis and arthrogryposis. We report a case of Gaucher's disease (type 2) diagnosed in a newborn who presented with Hydrops Fetalis. PMID:26327947

  7. Ligand-induced expansion of the S1' site in the anthrax toxin lethal factor.

    PubMed

    Maize, Kimberly M; Kurbanov, Elbek K; Johnson, Rodney L; Amin, Elizabeth Ambrose; Finzel, Barry C

    2015-12-21

    The Bacillus anthracis lethal factor (LF) is one component of a tripartite exotoxin partly responsible for persistent anthrax cytotoxicity after initial bacterial infection. Inhibitors of the zinc metalloproteinase have been investigated as potential therapeutic agents, but LF is a challenging target because inhibitors lack sufficient selectivity or possess poor pharmaceutical properties. These structural studies reveal an alternate conformation of the enzyme, induced upon binding of specific inhibitors, that opens a previously unobserved deep pocket termed S1'(?) which might afford new opportunities to design selective inhibitors that target this subsite. PMID:26578066

  8. 76 FR 6054 - Use of Less-Than-Lethal Force: Delegation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... proposed on June 25, 2008 (73 FR 39584), regarding the use of ] chemical agents and other less-than-lethal... of Prisons 28 CFR Part 552 RIN 1120-AB46 Use of Less-Than-Lethal Force: Delegation AGENCY: Bureau of... its proposed regulation on the use of chemical agents and other non-lethal (less-than-lethal) force...

  9. Physica A 364 (2006) 557564 Identification of lethal cluster of genes

    E-print Network

    Jeong, Hawoong

    2006-01-01

    Physica A 364 (2006) 557­564 Identification of lethal cluster of genes in the yeast transcription 2005 Available online 8 November 2005 Abstract Identification of essential or lethal genes would be one population of lethal genes, called lethal cluster, through microarray assay. We construct a gene

  10. Screening for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains three sections: Fundamentals of Screening, Screening Tests, and Screening for Specific Cancer Sites. Each section consists of several chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Principles of Screening and of the Evaluation of Screening Programs; Economic Aspects of Screening; Cervical Cytology; Screening Tests for Bladder Cancer; Fecal Occult Blood Testing; Screening for Cancer of the Cervix; Screening for Gastric Cancer; and Screening for Oral Cancer.

  11. TLR signaling controls lethal encephalitis in WNV-infected brain

    PubMed Central

    Sabouri, Amir H.; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; Flynn, Claudia; Berger, Michael; Xiao, Nengming; Fox, Howard S.; Sarvetnick, Nora E.

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are known to be activated in Central Nervous System (CNS) viral infections and are recognized to be a critical component in innate immunity. Several reports state a role for particular TLRs in various CNS viral infections. However, excessive TLR activation was previously reported by us in correlation with a pathogenic, rather than a protective, outcome, in a model of SIV encephalitis. Here we aimed at understanding the impact of TLR-mediated pathways by evaluating the early course of pathogenesis in the total absence of TLR signaling during CNS viral infections. We utilized a mouse model of sublethal West Nile virus (WNV) infection. WNV is an emerging neurotropic flavivirus, and a significant global cause of viral encephalitis. The virus was peripherally injected into animals that simultaneously lacked two key adaptor molecules of TLR signaling, MyD88 and TRIF. On day 2 pi (post infection), MyD88/Trif?/? mice showed an increased susceptibility to WNV infection, and revealed an impairment in innate immune cytokines, when compared to wild type mice (WT). By day 6 pi, there was an increase in viral burden and robust expression of inflammatory cytokines as well as higher cell infiltration into the CNS in MyD88/Trif?/?, when compared to infected WT. A drastic increase in microglia activation, astrogliosis, and inflammatory trafficking were also observed on day 6 pi in MyD88/Trif?/?. Our observations show a protective role for TLR signaling pathways in preventing lethal encephalitis at early stages of WNV infection. PMID:24928618

  12. Determinants of the lethality of climate-related disasters in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM): a cross-country analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrewin, Aisha N.; Rodriguez-Llanes, Jose M.; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2015-07-01

    Floods and storms are climate-related hazards posing high mortality risk to Caribbean Community (CARICOM) nations. However risk factors for their lethality remain untested. We conducted an ecological study investigating risk factors for flood and storm lethality in CARICOM nations for the period 1980-2012. Lethality - deaths versus no deaths per disaster event- was the outcome. We examined biophysical and social vulnerability proxies and a decadal effect as predictors. We developed our regression model via multivariate analysis using a generalized logistic regression model with quasi-binomial distribution; removal of multi-collinear variables and backward elimination. Robustness was checked through subset analysis. We found significant positive associations between lethality, percentage of total land dedicated to agriculture (odds ratio [OR] 1.032; 95% CI: 1.013-1.053) and percentage urban population (OR 1.029, 95% CI 1.003-1.057). Deaths were more likely in the 2000-2012 period versus 1980-1989 (OR 3.708, 95% CI 1.615-8.737). Robustness checks revealed similar coefficients and directions of association. Population health in CARICOM nations is being increasingly impacted by climate-related disasters connected to increasing urbanization and land use patterns. Our findings support the evidence base for setting sustainable development goals (SDG).

  13. Determinants of the lethality of climate-related disasters in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM): a cross-country analysis.

    PubMed

    Andrewin, Aisha N; Rodriguez-Llanes, Jose M; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2015-01-01

    Floods and storms are climate-related hazards posing high mortality risk to Caribbean Community (CARICOM) nations. However risk factors for their lethality remain untested. We conducted an ecological study investigating risk factors for flood and storm lethality in CARICOM nations for the period 1980-2012. Lethality--deaths versus no deaths per disaster event- was the outcome. We examined biophysical and social vulnerability proxies and a decadal effect as predictors. We developed our regression model via multivariate analysis using a generalized logistic regression model with quasi-binomial distribution; removal of multi-collinear variables and backward elimination. Robustness was checked through subset analysis. We found significant positive associations between lethality, percentage of total land dedicated to agriculture (odds ratio [OR] 1.032; 95% CI: 1.013-1.053) and percentage urban population (OR 1.029, 95% CI 1.003-1.057). Deaths were more likely in the 2000-2012 period versus 1980-1989 (OR 3.708, 95% CI 1.615-8.737). Robustness checks revealed similar coefficients and directions of association. Population health in CARICOM nations is being increasingly impacted by climate-related disasters connected to increasing urbanization and land use patterns. Our findings support the evidence base for setting sustainable development goals (SDG). PMID:26153115

  14. Determinants of the lethality of climate-related disasters in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM): a cross-country analysis

    PubMed Central

    Andrewin, Aisha N.; Rodriguez-Llanes, Jose M.; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2015-01-01

    Floods and storms are climate-related hazards posing high mortality risk to Caribbean Community (CARICOM) nations. However risk factors for their lethality remain untested. We conducted an ecological study investigating risk factors for flood and storm lethality in CARICOM nations for the period 1980–2012. Lethality - deaths versus no deaths per disaster event- was the outcome. We examined biophysical and social vulnerability proxies and a decadal effect as predictors. We developed our regression model via multivariate analysis using a generalized logistic regression model with quasi-binomial distribution; removal of multi-collinear variables and backward elimination. Robustness was checked through subset analysis. We found significant positive associations between lethality, percentage of total land dedicated to agriculture (odds ratio [OR] 1.032; 95% CI: 1.013–1.053) and percentage urban population (OR 1.029, 95% CI 1.003–1.057). Deaths were more likely in the 2000–2012 period versus 1980–1989 (OR 3.708, 95% CI 1.615–8.737). Robustness checks revealed similar coefficients and directions of association. Population health in CARICOM nations is being increasingly impacted by climate-related disasters connected to increasing urbanization and land use patterns. Our findings support the evidence base for setting sustainable development goals (SDG). PMID:26153115

  15. Hearing Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Curiskis, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    Hearing levels are threatened by modern life--headsets for music, rock concerts, traffic noises, etc. It is crucial we know our hearing levels so that we can draw attention to potential problems. This exercise requires that students receive a hearing screening for their benefit as well as for making the connection of hearing to listening.

  16. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  17. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light. PMID:25488603

  18. Vision Screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Visi Screen OSS-C, marketed by Vision Research Corporation, incorporates image processing technology originally developed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Its advantage in eye screening is speed. Because it requires no response from a subject, it can be used to detect eye problems in very young children. An electronic flash from a 35 millimeter camera sends light into a child's eyes, which is reflected back to the camera lens. The photorefractor then analyzes the retinal reflexes generated and produces an image of the child's eyes, which enables a trained observer to identify any defects. The device is used by pediatricians, day care centers and civic organizations that concentrate on children with special needs.

  19. Rapid, Optimized Interactomic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Domanski, Michal; Hough, Loren; Oroskar, Asha A.; Oroskar, Anil R.; Keegan, Sarah; Dilworth, David J.; Molloy, Kelly R.; Sherman, Vadim; Aitchison, John D.; Fenyö, David; Chait, Brian T.; Jensen, Torben Heick; Rout, Michael P.; LaCava, John

    2015-01-01

    We must reliably map the interactomes of cellular macromolecular complexes in order to fully explore and understand biological systems. However, there are no methods to accurately predict how to capture a given macromolecular complex with its physiological binding partners. Here, we present a screen that comprehensively explores the parameters affecting the stability of interactions in affinity-captured complexes, enabling the discovery of physiological binding partners and the elucidation of their functional interactions in unparalleled detail. We have implemented this screen on several macromolecular complexes from a variety of organisms, revealing novel profiles even for well-studied proteins. Our approach is robust, economical and automatable, providing an inroad to the rigorous, systematic dissection of cellular interactomes. PMID:25938370

  20. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies a Role for Lin-44/Wnt in C. elegans Embryogenesis

    E-print Network

    Hartin, Samantha N.; Hudson, Martin L.; Yingling, Curtis; Ackley, Brian D.

    2015-05-04

    genes that interacted with ptp-3 or sdn-1. We found that the Wnt ligand, lin-44, was SynLet with sdn-1, but not ptp-3. We used 4-dimensional time-lapse analysis to characterize the interaction between lin-44 and sdn-1. We found evidence that loss of lin...

  1. Quadruple screen test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... screen; Multiple marker screening; AFP plus; Triple screen test; AFP maternal; MSAFP; 4-marker screen ... This test is most often done between the 15th and 22nd weeks of the pregnancy. It is most accurate ...

  2. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment Cervical Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Screening (PDQ®) What is screening? Screening is looking ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Cervical Cancer Key Points Cervical cancer is a disease in ...

  3. Genetic studies: dominant lethal study, sex linked recessive lethal, ames mutagenicity, and heritable translocation test of thermal processed, frozen, electron irradiated, and gamma irradiated chicken. Final report Jun 76-Aug 83

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, D.; Lusskin, R.M.; Thomson, G.M.; Kuzdas, C.D.; Ronning, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    Four samples of chicken meat identified as the frozen control, thermally processed, gamma sterilized (5.9 Mrad), and electron sterilized (5.9 MeV), along with negative and positive controls, were evaluated for genetic activity. The samples were evaluated for ability to induce dominant lethal mutations in spermatid and spermatozoan stages of spermatogenesis in mice fed 35 percent chicken meat. The test meat samples were not observed to have an effect on the incidence of the dominant lethal mutations. However, the positive control failed to give a positive response. The meat samples were investigated for mutagenic activity employing Drosophila melanogaster in the sex linked recessive lethal test. The samples were determined to be nonmutagenic in this test and the positive control gave a significant response. Reduced production of offspring in cultures of Drosophila reared on gamma irradiated chicken which could not be overcome by the addition of vitamins was observed. Pre-incubation tests with and without added mutagens revealed that in no case was a positive result observed in the Ames test from chicken meat without an added mutagen. The manner in which chicken meat was processed had no effect upon the response to the Ames test. A heritable translocation test in mice failed to reveal any cytological evidence of translocation heterozygosity in any of the chicken-containing diets.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type

    MedlinePLUS

    ... bones and other connective tissues that form the body's supportive framework. All of the COL2A1 mutations that have been found to cause platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type occur in a region of the protein called the C-propeptide domain. ...

  5. Populations The Frequency Distribution of Lethal Chromosomes in Finite

    E-print Network

    Nei, Masatoshi

    The statistical techniques for studying the population dynamics of recessive lethal genes were developed mainly of completely recessive genes in which the mean gene frequency decreases as the population size decreases (cf by Wright,'-' who studied the distribution of gene frequencies in populations. In reality, however

  6. The "Lethal Chamber": Further Evidence of the Euthanasia Option.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elks, Martin A.

    1993-01-01

    Historical discussions of the euthanasia or "lethal chamber" option in relation to people with mental retardation are presented. The paper concludes that eugenic beliefs in the primacy of heredity over environment and the positive role of natural selection may have condoned the poor conditions characteristic of large, segregated institutions and…

  7. Conditional lethality strains for the biological control of Anastrepha species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pro-apoptotic cell death genes are promising candidates for biologically-based autocidal control of pest insects as demonstrated by tetracycline (tet)-suppressible systems for conditional embryonic lethality in Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) and the medfly, Ceratitis capitata (Cc). However, for medfly...

  8. Lethal and subletha effects of sponge overgrowth on introduced dreissenid

    E-print Network

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    Lethal and subletha effects of sponge overgrowth on introduced dreissenid s in the Great Lakes - St: Freshwater sponges in the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River system overgrow and kill introduced zebra (Dreissena pulymorpkza) and quagga mussels (DreisLse?aabugerasis) on solid substrates. Sponges overgrow

  9. An overview of the future of non-lethal weapons.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J B

    2001-01-01

    During the past decade, vast changes have occurred in the geopolitical landscape and the nature of the types of conflicts in which technologically developed countries have been involved. While the threat of conventional war remains, forces have been more frequently deployed in situations that require great restraint. Adversaries are often likely to be elusive and commingled with noncombatants. There has been some shift in public opinion away from tolerance of collateral casualties. Therefore there is a need to be able to apply force while limiting casualties. Non-lethal weapons provide part of the solution. Among the changes that will influence the future have been studies by the US and NATO concerning the use of non-lethal weapons, coincidental with increased funding for their development and testing. New concepts and policies have recently been formalized. Surprisingly, the most strident objections to the implementation of non-lethal weapons have come from organizations that are ostensibly designed to protect non-combatants. These arguments are specious and, while technically and academically challenging, actually serve to foster an environment that will result in the deaths of many more innocent civilians. They misconstrue technology with human intent. The reasons for use of force will not abate. Alternatives to bombs, missiles, tanks and artillery must therefore be found. Non-lethal weapons are not a panacea but do offer the best hope of minimizing casualties while allowing nations or alliances the means to use force in protection of national or regional interests. PMID:11578037

  10. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reporting recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos....

  11. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reporting recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos....

  12. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reporting recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos....

  13. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reporting recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos....

  14. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reporting recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos....

  15. Analysis of Ebola Glycoprotein Sequences from Strains of Varying Lethality

    E-print Network

    Analysis of Ebola Glycoprotein Sequences from Strains of Varying Lethality Biochem 218 Spring 2002 Tammy Doukas tdoukas@stanford.edu I. Background and Significance Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a disease in humans, chimpanzees, and monkeys, caused by infection with Ebola virus, and associated with high

  16. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

  17. The Lethal "Femme Fatale" in the Noir Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Traces the lethal seductress through Hollywood's "noir" history from "Double Indemnity" (1944) to "The Last Seduction" (1996). Examines how this figure largely abjures traditional romance and passive domesticity, choosing instead to apply her sexuality to homicidal plots toward greed. Argues that her narrative positioning serves as a barometer of…

  18. Podophyllum hexandrum-Mediated Survival Protection and Restoration of Other Cellular Injuries in Lethally Irradiated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sankhwar, Sanghmitra; Gupta, Manju Lata; Gupta, Vanita; Verma, Savita; Suri, Krishna Avtar; Devi, Memita; Sharma, Punita; Khan, Ehsan Ahmed; Alam, M. Sarwar

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at the development of a safe and effective formulation to counter the effects of lethal irradiation. The sub-fraction (G-001M), prepared from Podophyllum hexandrum has rendered high degree of survival (>90%) at a dose of 6?mg?kg?1 body weight (intramuscular) in lethally irradiated mice. Therapeutic dose of G-001M, at about 20 times lower concentration than its LD100, has revealed a DRF of 1.62. Comet assay studies in peripheral blood leukocytes have reflected that, treatment of G-001M before irradiation has significantly reduced DNA tail length (P < .001) and DNA damage score (P < .001), as compared to radiation-only group. Spleen cell counts in irradiated animals had declined drastically at the very first day of exposure, and the fall continued till the 5th day (P < .001). In the treated irradiated groups, there was a steep reduction in the counts initially, but this phase did not prolong. More than 60% decline in thymocytes of irradiated group animals was registered at 5?h of irradiation when compared with controls, and the fall progressed further downwards with the similar pace till 5th day of exposure (P < .001). At later intervals, thymus was found fully regressed. In G-001M pre-treated irradiated groups also, thymocytes decreased till the 5th day but thereafter rejuvenated and within 30 days of treatment the values were close to normal. Current studies have explicitly indicated that, G-001M in very small doses has not only rendered high survivability in lethally irradiated mice, but also protected their cellular DNA, besides supporting fast replenishment of the immune system. PMID:19553386

  19. Sub-lethal plasma ammonia accumulation and the exercise performance of salmonids.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, D J; Shingles, A; Taylor, E W

    2003-08-01

    The proposal that plasma ammonia accumulation might impair the swimming performance of fish was first made over a decade ago, and has now proven to be the case for a number of salmonid species. The first experimental evidence was indirect, when a negative linear relationship between plasma ammonia concentrations and maximum sustainable swimming speed (U(crit)) was found following the exposure of brown trout (Salmo trutta) to sub-lethal concentrations of copper in soft acidic water. Since then, negative linear relationships between plasma ammonia concentration and U(crit) have been demonstrated following exposure of brown trout, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to elevated water ammonia. For brown trout, the relationships between plasma ammonia and U(crit) were remarkably similar following either exposure to elevated water ammonia or to sub-lethal copper. This indicates that the impairment of swimming performance resulting from exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of heavy metals may be attributable in large part to an accumulation of endogenous ammonia. The negative relationship between plasma ammonia concentration and U(crit) was similar in size-matched rainbow and brown trout but, under similar regimes of ammonia exposure, rainbow trout were able to maintain a significantly lower plasma ammonia concentration, revealing inter-specific differences in ammonia permeability and/or transport. One primary mechanism by which ammonia accumulation may impair exercise performance is a partial depolarisation of membrane potential in tissues such as the brain and white muscle. This may prejudice the co-ordination of swimming movements and reduce or abolish the development of muscle tension, thus, compromising swimming efficiency and performance at the top end of the range. PMID:12890542

  20. Utilising established SDL-screening methods as a tool for the functional genomic characterisation of model and non-model organisms.

    PubMed

    Usher, Jane; Thomas, Graham; Haynes, Ken

    2015-12-01

    The trend for large-scale genetic and phenotypic screens has revealed a wealth of information on biological systems. A major challenge is understanding how genes function and putative roles in networks. The majority of current gene knowledge is garnered from studies utilising the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that synthetic dosage lethal genetic array methodologies can be used to study genetic networks in other yeasts, namely the fungal pathogen Candida glabrata, which has limited forward genetic tools, due to the lack of 'natural' mating. We performed two SDL screens in S. cerevisiae, overexpressing the transcriptional regulator UME6 as bait in the first screen and its C. glabrata ortholog CAGL0F05357g in the second. Analysis revealed that SDL maps share 204 common interactors, with 10 genetic interactions unique to C. glabrata indicating a level of genetic rewiring, indicative of linking genotype to phenotype in fungal pathogens. This was further validated by incorporating our results into the global genetic landscape map of the cell from Costanzo et al. to identify common and novel gene attributes. This data demonstrated the utility large data sets and more robust analysis made possible by interrogating exogenous genes in the context of the eukaryotic global genetic landscape. PMID:26472754

  1. Functional Genomics Analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Iron Responsive Transcription Factor Aft1 Reveals Iron-Independent Functions

    PubMed Central

    Berthelet, Sharon; Usher, Jane; Shulist, Kristian; Hamza, Akil; Maltez, Nancy; Johnston, Anne; Fong, Ying; Harris, Linda J.; Baetz, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor Aft1 is activated in iron-deficient cells to induce the expression of iron regulon genes, which coordinate the increase of iron uptake and remodel cellular metabolism to survive low-iron conditions. In addition, Aft1 has been implicated in numerous cellular processes including cell-cycle progression and chromosome stability; however, it is unclear if all cellular effects of Aft1 are mediated through iron homeostasis. To further investigate the cellular processes affected by Aft1, we identified >70 deletion mutants that are sensitive to perturbations in AFT1 levels using genome-wide synthetic lethal and synthetic dosage lethal screens. Our genetic network reveals that Aft1 affects a diverse range of cellular processes, including the RIM101 pH pathway, cell-wall stability, DNA damage, protein transport, chromosome stability, and mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, only a subset of mutants identified are sensitive to extracellular iron fluctuations or display genetic interactions with mutants of iron regulon genes AFT2 or FET3. We demonstrate that Aft1 works in parallel with the RIM101 pH pathway and the role of Aft1 in DNA damage repair is mediated by iron. In contrast, through both directed studies and microarray transcriptional profiling, we show that the role of Aft1 in chromosome maintenance and benomyl resistance is independent of its iron regulatory role, potentially through a nontranscriptional mechanism. PMID:20439772

  2. A multivariate model of stakeholder preference for lethal cat management.

    PubMed

    Wald, Dara M; Jacobson, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Identifying stakeholder beliefs and attitudes is critical for resolving management conflicts. Debate over outdoor cat management is often described as a conflict between two groups, environmental advocates and animal welfare advocates, but little is known about the variables predicting differences among these critical stakeholder groups. We administered a mail survey to randomly selected stakeholders representing both of these groups (n=1,596) in Florida, where contention over the management of outdoor cats has been widespread. We used a structural equation model to evaluate stakeholder intention to support non-lethal management. The cognitive hierarchy model predicted that values influenced beliefs, which predicted general and specific attitudes, which in turn, influenced behavioral intentions. We posited that specific attitudes would mediate the effect of general attitudes, beliefs, and values on management support. Model fit statistics suggested that the final model fit the data well (CFI=0.94, RMSEA=0.062). The final model explained 74% of the variance in management support, and positive attitudes toward lethal management (humaneness) had the largest direct effect on management support. Specific attitudes toward lethal management and general attitudes toward outdoor cats mediated the relationship between positive (p<0.05) and negative cat-related impact beliefs (p<0.05) and support for management. These results supported the specificity hypothesis and the use of the cognitive hierarchy to assess stakeholder intention to support non-lethal cat management. Our findings suggest that stakeholders can simultaneously perceive both positive and negative beliefs about outdoor cats, which influence attitudes toward and support for non-lethal management. PMID:24736744

  3. A Multivariate Model of Stakeholder Preference for Lethal Cat Management

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Dara M.; Jacobson, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying stakeholder beliefs and attitudes is critical for resolving management conflicts. Debate over outdoor cat management is often described as a conflict between two groups, environmental advocates and animal welfare advocates, but little is known about the variables predicting differences among these critical stakeholder groups. We administered a mail survey to randomly selected stakeholders representing both of these groups (n?=?1,596) in Florida, where contention over the management of outdoor cats has been widespread. We used a structural equation model to evaluate stakeholder intention to support non-lethal management. The cognitive hierarchy model predicted that values influenced beliefs, which predicted general and specific attitudes, which in turn, influenced behavioral intentions. We posited that specific attitudes would mediate the effect of general attitudes, beliefs, and values on management support. Model fit statistics suggested that the final model fit the data well (CFI?=?0.94, RMSEA?=?0.062). The final model explained 74% of the variance in management support, and positive attitudes toward lethal management (humaneness) had the largest direct effect on management support. Specific attitudes toward lethal management and general attitudes toward outdoor cats mediated the relationship between positive (p<0.05) and negative cat-related impact beliefs (p<0.05) and support for management. These results supported the specificity hypothesis and the use of the cognitive hierarchy to assess stakeholder intention to support non-lethal cat management. Our findings suggest that stakeholders can simultaneously perceive both positive and negative beliefs about outdoor cats, which influence attitudes toward and support for non-lethal management. PMID:24736744

  4. Dissociation of lethal toxicity and enzymic activity of notexin from Notechis scutatus scutatus (Australian-tiger-snake) venom by modification of tyrosine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, C C; Chang, L S

    1991-01-01

    Notexin from Notechis scutatus scutatus snake venom was subjected to tyrosine modification with p-nitrobenzenesulphonyl fluoride (NBSF), and four modified derivatives were separated by h.p.l.c. The results of amino acid analysis and sequence determination revealed that only Tyr-7, Tyr-70 and Tyr-77 were modified in notexin. Modification of Tyr-7 resulted in decreases in lethal toxicity and enzymic activity by 70.2% and 22.7% respectively. Conversely, modification of Tyr-77 caused a 1.8-fold increase in enzymic activity, in contrast with the loss of 52.5% of lethality. A drastic decrease in lethal toxicity was observed when both Tyr-7 and Tyr-70 were modified, whereas the enzymic activity decreased by only 35.8%. Likewise, the derivative in which Tyr-7 and Tyr-77 were modified retained 44.4% of enzymic activity, but showed a marked decrease in lethal toxicity. It is obvious that modification of tyrosine residues causes a decrease in lethal toxicity of notexin, which does not directly correlate with the change in enzymic activity. On the other hand, the antigenicity of NBS derivatives remained unchanged. The modified derivatives retained their affinity for Ca2+, indicating that the modified tyrosine residues did not participate in Ca2+ binding. These results indicate that modification of tyrosine residues can differentially influence the enzymic activity and lethal toxicity of notexin, and suggest that notexin might possess two functional sites, one being responsible for the catalytic activity and the other associated with its lethal effect. PMID:1764038

  5. New "lethal highs": a case of a deadly cocktail of GHB and Mephedrone.

    PubMed

    Aromatario, Mariarosaria; Bottoni, Edoardo; Santoni, Mariangela; Ciallella, Costantino

    2012-11-30

    Drug scenes within several countries have changed in recent years to incorporate a range of licit psychoactive products collectively known as "legal highs": these in combination with substances already in use can cause major health problems and even death. Consumption of Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) spread from 1980s to 2000s, when several nations have enacted laws that have made it illegal. Cases of GHB-caused or related deaths are often described in association with alcohol or traditional drugs (heroin, cocaine, amphetamine); few cases of acute lethal toxicity due to Mephedrone have been recently reported; we describe the first case of fatality due to concomitant consumption of GHB and Mephedrone. A 43 years old man died during a drugs-based party: the two substances were not detected at toxicological screening, but were identified by further analysis on the basis of circumstantial data reported by a survivor. Through our work we aim to bring to the attention in the emerging role of new drugs of abuse, and highlight problems in identifying these drugs with immunoassay screening test commonly used. PMID:23088826

  6. Antimicrobial Activity and Brine Shrimp Lethality Bioassay of the Leaves Extract of Dillenia indica Linn.

    PubMed

    Apu, As; Muhit, Ma; Tareq, Sm; Pathan, Ah; Jamaluddin, Atm; Ahmed, M

    2010-01-01

    The crude methanolic extract of Dillenia indica Linn. (Dilleniaceae) leaves has been investigated for the evaluation of antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. Organic solvent (n-hexane, carbon tetrachloride and chloroform) fractions of methanolic extract and methanolic fraction (aqueous) were screened for their antimicrobial activity by disc diffusion method. Besides, the fractions were screened for cytotoxic activity using brine shrimp (Artemia salina) lethality bioassay. Among the four fractions tested, n-hexane, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform fractions showed moderate antibacterial and antifungal activity compared to standard antibiotic, kanamycin. The average zone of inhibition was ranged from 6 to 8 mm at a concentration of 400 µg/disc. But the aqueous fraction was found to be insensitive to microbial growth. Compared to vincristine sulfate (with LC(50) of 0.52 µg/ ml), n-hexane and chloroform fractions demonstrated a significant cytotoxic activity (having LC(50) of 1.94 µg/ml and 2.13 µg/ml, respectively). The LC(50) values of the carbon tetrachloride and aqueous fraction were 4.46 µg/ml and 5.13 µg/ ml, respectively. The study confirms the moderate antimicrobial and potent cytotoxic activities of Dillenia indica leaves extract and therefore demands the isolation of active principles and thorough bioassay. PMID:21331191

  7. Strategy for enhanced transgenic strain development for embryonic conditionnal lethality in Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here the first reproductive sterility system for the tephritid pest, Anastrepha suspensa, is presented, based on lethality primarily in embryos heterozygous for a lethal conditional transgene combination. The tetracycline-suppressible system uses the cellularization-specific A. suspensa serendipity...

  8. 77 FR 6548 - Notice of Availability of Ballistic Survivability, Lethality and Vulnerability Analyses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Notice of Availability of Ballistic Survivability, Lethality and Vulnerability... Laboratory's (ARL's), Survivability, Lethality Analysis Directorate (SLAD) is a leader in...

  9. Erythropoiesis suppression is associated with anthrax lethal toxin-mediated pathogenic progression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Hou; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Chen, Po-Kong; Lin, Yo-Yin; Liao, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Ting-Kai; Chiang, Ya-Wen; Lin, Wen-Bin; Chiang, Chih-Yu; Kau, Jyh-Hwa; Huang, Hsin-Hsien; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Liao, Chi-Yuan; Sun, Der-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Anthrax is a disease caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, which results in high mortality in animals and humans. Although some of the mechanisms are already known such as asphyxia, extensive knowledge of molecular pathogenesis of this disease is deficient and remains to be further investigated. Lethal toxin (LT) is a major virulence factor of B. anthracis and a specific inhibitor/protease of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAPKKs). Anthrax LT causes lethality and induces certain anthrax-like symptoms, such as anemia and hypoxia, in experimental mice. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are the downstream pathways of MAPKKs, and are important for erythropoiesis. This prompted us to hypothesize that anemia and hypoxia may in part be exacerbated by erythropoietic dysfunction. As revealed by colony-forming cell assays in this study, LT challenges significantly reduced mouse erythroid progenitor cells. In addition, in a proteolytic activity-dependent manner, LT suppressed cell survival and differentiation of cord blood CD34(+)-derived erythroblasts in vitro. Suppression of cell numbers and the percentage of erythroblasts in the bone marrow were detected in LT-challenged C57BL/6J mice. In contrast, erythropoiesis was provoked through treatments of erythropoietin, significantly ameliorating the anemia and reducing the mortality of LT-treated mice. These data suggested that suppressed erythropoiesis is part of the pathophysiology of LT-mediated intoxication. Because specific treatments to overcome LT-mediated pathogenesis are still lacking, these efforts may help the development of effective treatments against anthrax. PMID:23977125

  10. Purification and biophysical characterization of the core protease domain of anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gkazonis, Petros V.; Dalkas, Georgios A.; Chasapis, Christos T.; Vlamis-Gardikas, Alexios; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A.

    2010-06-04

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) stands for the major virulence factor of the anthrax disease. It comprises a 90 kDa highly specific metalloprotease, the anthrax lethal factor (LF). LF possesses a catalytic Zn{sup 2+} binding site and is highly specific against MAPK kinases, thus representing the most potent native biomolecule to alter and inactivate MKK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) kinases] signalling pathways. Given the importance of the interaction between LF and substrate for the development of anti-anthrax agents as well as the potential treatment of nascent tumours, the analysis of the structure and dynamic properties of the LF catalytic site are essential to elucidate its enzymatic properties. Here we report the recombinant expression and purification of a C-terminal part of LF (LF{sub 672-776}) that harbours the enzyme's core protease domain. The biophysical characterization and backbone assignments ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) of the polypeptide revealed a stable, well folded structure even in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}, suitable for high resolution structural analysis by NMR.

  11. Identification of a Novel RNA Virus Lethal to Tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Eyngor, Marina; Zamostiano, Rachel; Kembou Tsofack, Japhette Esther; Berkowitz, Asaf; Bercovier, Hillel; Tinman, Simon; Lev, Menachem; Hurvitz, Avshalom; Galeotti, Marco; Eldar, Avi

    2014-01-01

    Tilapines are important for the sustainability of ecological systems and serve as the second most important group of farmed fish worldwide. Significant mortality of wild and cultured tilapia has been observed recently in Israel. The etiological agent of this disease, a novel RNA virus, is described here, and procedures allowing its isolation and detection are revealed. The virus, denominated tilapia lake virus (TiLV), was propagated in primary tilapia brain cells or in an E-11 cell line, and it induced a cytopathic effect at 5 to 10 days postinfection. Electron microscopy revealed enveloped icosahedral particles of 55 to 75 nm. Low-passage TiLV, injected intraperitoneally in tilapia, induced a disease resembling the natural disease, which typically presents with lethargy, ocular alterations, and skin erosions, with >80% mortality. Histological changes included congestion of the internal organs (kidneys and brain) with foci of gliosis and perivascular cuffing of lymphocytes in the brain cortex; ocular inflammation included endophthalmitis and cataractous changes of the lens. The cohabitation of healthy and diseased fish demonstrated that the disease is contagious and that mortalities (80 to 100%) occur within a few days. Fish surviving the initial mortality were immune to further TiLV infections, suggesting the mounting of a protective immune response. Screening cDNA libraries identified a TiLV-specific sequence, allowing the design of a PCR-based diagnostic test. This test enables the specific identification of TiLV in tilapines and should help control the spread of this virus worldwide. PMID:25232154

  12. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... agents or non-lethal weapons. The Warden may authorize the use of chemical agents or non-lethal...

  13. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  14. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  15. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  16. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons. 552.25 Section 552.25 ...Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons. The Warden may authorize the use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons only when the situation is such...

  17. 76 FR 6054 - Use of Less-Than-Lethal Force: Delegation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ...chemical agents or other less-than-lethal weapons may not be delegated below the position...authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical...chemical agents or other less-than-lethal weapons. The revision effectuated by this...

  18. A fragment of anthrax lethal factor delivers proteins to the cytosol without requiring protective antigen

    E-print Network

    Lieberman, Judy

    A fragment of anthrax lethal factor delivers proteins to the cytosol without requiring protective) Anthrax protective antigen (PA) is a 735-aa polypeptide that facili- tates the exit of anthrax lethal. Furthermore, these results enable us to propose a modified molecular mechanism of anthrax lethal toxin

  19. Technical contribution Application of non-lethal stable isotope analysis to assess feeding patterns of juvenile

    E-print Network

    -lethal) could be a substitute for muscle tissue (lethal) in SIA of juvenile pallid sturgeon, and (ii) evaluate = 0.89) but d13 C isotopes were weakly related (r2 = 0.16). Therefore, freezing is recommended the utility of a non-lethal technique to assess time integrated food habits of juvenile pallid sturgeon

  20. Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, James J

    2010-01-01

    Early detection of many disorders, mainly inherited, is feasible with population-wide analysis of newborn dried blood spot samples. Phenylketonuria was the prototype disorder for newborn screening (NBS) and early dietary treatment has resulted in vastly improved outcomes for this disorder. Testing for primary hypothyroidism and cystic fibrosis (CF) was later added to NBS programs following the development of robust immunoassays and molecular testing. Current CF testing usually relies on a combined immunoreactive trypsin/mutation detection strategy. Multiplex testing for approximately 25 inborn errors of metabolism using tandem mass spectrometry is a relatively recent addition to NBS. The simultaneous introduction of many disorders has caused some re-evaluation of the traditional guidelines for NBS, because very rare disorders or disorders without good treatments can be included with minimal effort. NBS tests for many other disorders have been developed, but these are less uniformly applied or are currently considered developmental. This review focuses on Australasian NBS practices. PMID:20498829

  1. Rabbit Model for Superantigen-Mediated Lethal Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Strandberg, Kristi L; Rotschafer, Jessica H; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a highly significant cause of serious human infections in the USA. Many of these illnesses are mediated by interactions between the host immune system and staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs). Several of these severe staphylococcal infections are initiated in the lungs, making this an important site to study. Here, we describe the rabbit model for investigating the role of staphylococcal SAgs in pulmonary-associated lethal infection and intoxication. PMID:26676039

  2. Intact alternation performance in high lethality suicide attempters.

    PubMed

    Keilp, John G; Wyatt, Gwinne; Gorlyn, Marianne; Oquendo, Maria A; Burke, Ainsley K; John Mann, J

    2014-09-30

    Suicide attempters often perform poorly on tasks linked to ventral prefrontal cortical (VPFC) function. Object Alternation (OA) - a VPFC probe - has not been used in these studies. In this study, currently depressed medication-free past suicide attempters whose most severe attempt was of high (n=31) vs. low (n=64) lethality, 114 medication-free depressed non-attempters, and 86 non-patients completed a computerized OA task. Participants also completed comparison tasks assessing the discriminant validity of OA (Wisconsin Card Sort), its concurrent validity relative to tasks associated with past attempt status (computerized Stroop task, Buschke Selective Reminding Test), and its construct validity as a VPFC measure (Go-No Go and Iowa Gambling Task). Against expectations, high lethality suicide attempters - the majority of whom used non-violent methods in their attempts with some planning - outperformed other depressed groups on OA, with no group differences observed on Wisconsin Card Sort. Despite intact performance on OA, past attempters exhibited deficits on the Stroop and Buschke. OA performance was associated with performance on Go-No Go and Iowa Gambling, confirming that OA measures a similar construct. VPFC dysfunction may not be a characteristic of all suicide attempters, especially those who make more carefully planned, non-violent - though potentially lethal - attempts. PMID:24878299

  3. Intact Alternation Performance in High Lethality Suicide Attempters

    PubMed Central

    Keilp, John G.; Wyatt, Gwinne; Gorlyn, Marianne; Oquendo, Maria A.; Burke, Ainsley K.; Mann, J. John

    2015-01-01

    Suicide attempters often perform poorly on tasks linked to ventral prefrontal cortical (VPFC) function. Object alternation (OA) - a VPFC probe – has not been used in these studies. In this study, currently depressed medication-free past suicide attempters whose most severe attempt was of high (n=31) vs. low (n=64) lethality, 114 medication-free depressed non-attempters, and 86 non-patients completed a computerized OA task. Participants also completed comparison tasks assessing the discriminant validity of OA (Wisconsin Card Sort), its concurrent validity relative to tasks associated with past attempt status (computerized Stroop task, Buschke Selective Reminding Test), and its construct validity as a VPFC measure (Go-No Go and Iowa Gambling Task). Against expectations, high lethality suicide attempters – the majority of whom used non-violent methods in their attempts with some planning - outperformed other depressed groups on OA, with no group differences observed on Wisconsin Card Sort. Despite intact performance on OA, past attempters exhibited deficits on the Stroop and Buschke. OA performance was associated with performance on Go-No Go and Iowa Gambling, confirming that OA measures a similar construct. VPFC dysfunction may not be characteristic of all suicide attempters, especially those who make more carefully planned, non-violent - though potentially lethal - attempts. PMID:24878299

  4. Assessing lethal and sub-lethal effects of trichlorfon on different trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Sónia; Oliveira, Rhaul; Pereira, Susana; Musso, Carolina; Domingues, Inês; Bhujel, Ram C; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Nogueira, António J A

    2011-06-01

    Trichlorfon (TCF) is one of the most used veterinary pharmaceuticals not only to fight infestations but also as a preventive measure worldwide. The high concentrations used generate concerns about environmental and human health. In this work we assessed the acute toxicity of this compound to non-target organisms belonging to different trophic levels: Danio rerio (early life stages and adults), Daphnia magna and algae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlorella vulgaris), and studied the potential of the biomarkers cholinesterase (ChE), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and catalase (CAT) to assess sub-lethal effects of trichlorfon in zebrafish and daphnids. The fish embryo test followed the OECD draft guideline FET and was based on the exposure of newly fertilized eggs to 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, 20, 40, 80 and 160 mg/L of TCF for 5 days; the fish acute test followed the OECD guideline 203 and was based on the exposure of adult fish to 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60 and 80 mg/L of TCF for 4 days; Daphnia sp. immobilization assay followed the OECD guideline 202 and was based on the exposure of juvenile daphnids to 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, 1 and 2 ?g/L of TCF for 2 days and the algae growth inhibition assay followed the OECD guideline 201 and was based on the exposure of the two species to 0, 1, 3.2, 10, 32, 100 and 300 mg/L of TCF for 4 days. Biomarker levels were measured after 96 h exposure to TCF in zebrafish early life stages and adults and after 48 h exposure in D. magna. Tested organisms seem to have dissimilar sensitivities towards TCF exposure. D. magna (48 h-LC(50)=0.29 ?g/L) was the most sensitive organism, followed by early life stages and adults of zebrafish (96 h-LC(50)=25.4 and 28.8 mg/L, respectively) and finally by the algae P. subcapitata (96 h-LC(50)=274.5 mg/L) and C. vulgaris (no effect observed). As daphnids are a source of food for organisms of higher trophic levels, the impairment on its population is prone to have consequences in the entire ecosystem. The biomarker activities measured in daphnids and fish seemed to be useful tools in the assessment of trichlorfon effects, especially ChE activity which was the most sensitive biomarker tested for all organisms. Trichlorfon was teratogenic for zebrafish embryos leading to anomalies in the absorption of the yolk sac, spine bending and pericardial oedemas. The present research suggests that further work is urgently needed in order to monitor environmental concentrations of trichlorfon and to test the long term effects of environmentally realistic concentrations of this compound. PMID:21473847

  5. Effect of peripheral lymphoid cells on the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease following allogeneic mouse bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Almaraz, R.; Ballinger, W.; Sachs, D.H.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1983-02-01

    Experiments were performed to study the role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation-induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras. The incidence of GVHD was reduced significantly in BALB/c leads to C57BL/6 radiation chimeras if bone marrow donors were exsanguinated immediately prior to marrow harvest. Chimeras resulting from the injection of bone marrow from bled donors exhibited only donor cells in spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood and normal levels of Thy 1+ and Ia+ cells were found in each of these lymphoid compartments. The addition of as few as 3 X 10(4) peripheral mononuclear cells to the marrow from exsanguinated donors uniformly led to lethal GVHD. /sup 51/Cr-labeled cell traffic studies revealed that prior exsanguination of marrow donors led to about a 70% reduction in the number of circulating mononuclear cells contaminating the bone marrow at the time of marrow harvest. This decrease in contaminating peripheral cells was calculated to be in the appropriate range to account for the decreased GVHD seen when marrow from exsanguinated donors was used. It thus appears that peripheral cells contaminating marrow can be an important factor in causing lethal GVHD in allogeneic radiation chimeras.

  6. Oral Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening (PDQ®) What is screening? ... are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cancer is ...

  7. Health Screenings and Immunizations

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your primary doctor. Blood Tests – A Common Screening Method (Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Click ... tests, see What Are Blood Tests? Other Screening Methods Doctors can't screen for all diseases and ...

  8. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePLUS

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Indirect Coombs Test; Indirect Anti-human Globulin Test; Antibody Screen Formal name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Screen ...

  9. Screen time and children

    MedlinePLUS

    "Screen time" is a term used for activities done in front of a screen, such as watching TV, working on a computer, or playing video games. Screen time is sedentary activity, meaning you are being physically ...

  10. Breast Cancer Screening Methods

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... medlineplus/videos/news/Screening_Methods_123015.html Breast Cancer Screening Methods HealthDay News Video - December 31, 2015 ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Play video: Breast Cancer Screening Methods For closed captioning, click the CC ...

  11. Groundwater Screen

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-11-09

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources and release to percolation ponds. The code calculates the limiting soil concentration or effluent release concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: Contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport inmore »the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. Concentration as a function of time at a user specified receptor point and maximum concentration averaged over the exposure interval are also calculated. In addition, the code calculates transport and impacts of radioactive progeny. Input to GWSCREEN is through one, free format ASCII file. This code was designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data is limited. It was not intended to be a predictive tool.« less

  12. Japanese quail acute exposure to methamidophos: experimental design, lethal, sub-lethal effects and cholinesterase biochemical and histochemical expression.

    PubMed

    Foudoulakis, Manousos; Balaskas, Christos; Csato, Attila; Szentes, Csaba; Arapis, Gerassimos

    2013-04-15

    We exposed the Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) to the organophosphate methamidophos using acute oral test. Mortality and sub-lethal effects were recorded in accordance to internationally accepted protocols. In addition cholinesterases were biochemically estimated in tissues of the quail: brain, liver and plasma. Furthermore, brain, liver and duodenum cryostat sections were processed for cholinesterase histochemistry using various substrates and inhibitors. Mortalities occurred mainly in the first 1-2h following application. Sub-lethal effects, such as ataxia, ruffled feathers, tremor, salivation and reduced or no reaction to external stimuli were observed. Biochemical analysis in the brain, liver and plasma indicates a strong cholinesterase dependent inhibition with respect to mortality and sub-lethal effects of the quail. The histochemical staining also indicated a strong cholinesterase inhibition in the organs examined and the analysis of the stained sections allowed for an estimation and interpretation of the intoxication effects of methamidophos, in combination with tissue morphology visible by Haematoxylin and Eosin staining. We conclude that the use of biochemistry and histochemistry for the biomarker cholinesterase, may constitute a significantly novel approach for understanding the results obtained by the acute oral test employed in order to assess the effects of methamidophos and other chemicals known to inhibit this very important nervous system enzyme. PMID:23146311

  13. Lethal Mutations Flanking the 68c Glue Gene Cluster on Chromosome 3 of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Madeline A.; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    1986-01-01

    We have conducted a genetic analysis of the region flanking the 68C glue gene cluster in Drosophila melanogaster by isolating lethal and semilethal mutations uncovered by deficiencies which span this region. Three different mutagens were used: ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), ethyl nitrosourea (ENU) and diepoxybutane (DEB). In the region from 68A3 to 68C11, 64 lethal, semilethal, and visible mutations were recovered. These include alleles of 13 new lethal complementation groups, as well as new alleles of rotated, low xanthine dehydrogenase, lethal(3)517 and lethal(3)B76. Six new visible mutations from within this region were recovered on the basis of their reduced viability; all proved to be semiviable alleles of lethal complementation groups. No significant differences were observed in the distributions of lethals recovered using the three different mutagens. Each lethal was mapped on the basis of complementation with overlapping deficiencies; mutations that mapped within the same interval were tested for complementation, and the relative order of the lethal groups within each interval was determined by recombination. The cytological distribution of genes within the 68A3-68C11 region is not uniform: the region from 68A2,3 to 68B1,3 (seven to ten polytene chromosome bands) contains at least 13 lethal complementation groups and the mutation low xanthine dehydrogenase; the adjoining region from 68B1,3 to 68C5,6 (six to nine bands) includes the 68C glue gene cluster, but no known lethal or visible complementation groups; and the interval from 68C5,6 to 68C10,11 (three to five bands) contains at least three lethal complementation groups and the visible mutation rotated. The developmental stage at which lethality is observed was determined for a representative allele from each lethal complementation group. PMID:3082712

  14. Species Origin of Genomic Factors in Nicotiana nudicaulis Watson Controlling Hybrid Lethality in Interspecific Hybrids between N. nudicaulis Watson and N. tabacum L

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongshuo; Marubashi, Wataru

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid lethality is expressed at 28°C in the cross Nicotiana nudicaulis×N. tabacum. The S subgenome of N. tabacum has been identified as controlling this hybrid lethality. To clarify the responsible genomic factor(s) of N. nudicaulis, we crossed N. trigonophylla (paternal progenitor of N. nudicaulis) with N. tabacum, because hybrids between N. sylvestris (maternal progenitor of N. nudicaulis) and N. tabacum are viable when grown in a greenhouse. In the cross N. trigonophylla×N. tabacum, approximately 50% of hybrids were vitrified, 20% were viable, and 20% were nonviable at 28°C. To reveal which subgenome of N. tabacum was responsible for these phenotypes, we crossed N. trigonophylla with two progenitors of N. tabacum, N. sylvestris (SS) and N. tomentosiformis (TT). In the cross N. sylvestris×N. trigonophylla, we confirmed that over half of hybrids of N. sylvestris×N. trigonophylla were vitrified, and none of the hybrids of N. trigonophylla×N. tomentosiformis were. The results imply that the S subgenome, encoding a gene or genes inducing hybrid lethality in the cross between N. nudicaulis and N. tabacum, has one or more genomic factors that induce vitrification. Furthermore, in vitrified hybrids of N. trigonophylla×N. tabacum and N. sylvestris×N. trigonophylla, we found that nuclear fragmentation, which progresses during expression of hybrid lethality, was accompanied by vitrification. This observation suggests that vitrification has a relationship to hybrid lethality. Based on these results, we speculate that when N. nudicaulis was formed approximately 5 million years ago, several causative genomic factors determining phenotypes of hybrid seedlings were inherited from N. trigonophylla. Subsequently, genome downsizing and various recombination-based processes took place. Some of the causative genomic factors were lost and some became genomic factor(s) controlling hybrid lethality in extant N. nudicaulis. PMID:24806486

  15. Toxicological screening

    PubMed Central

    Parasuraman, S.

    2011-01-01

    Toxicity testing of new compounds is essential for drug development process. The preclinical toxicity testing on various biological systems reveals the species-, organ- and dose- specific toxic effects of an investigational product. The toxicity of substances can be observed by (a) studying the accidental exposures to a substance (b) in vitro studies using cells/ cell lines (c) in vivo exposure on experimental animals. This review mainly focuses on the various experimental animal models and methods used for toxicity testing of substances. The pre-clinical toxicity testing helps to calculate “No Observed Adverse Effect Level” which is needed to initiate the clinical evaluation of investigational products. PMID:21772764

  16. Genome-Wide siRNA Screen Identifies Complementary Signaling Pathways Involved in Listeria Infection and Reveals Different Actin Nucleation Mechanisms during Listeria Cell Invasion and Actin Comet Tail Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kühbacher, Andreas; Emmenlauer, Mario; Rämo, Pauli; Kafai, Natasha; Dehio, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes enters nonphagocytic cells by a receptor-mediated mechanism that is dependent on a clathrin-based molecular machinery and actin rearrangements. Bacterial intra- and intercellular movements are also actin dependent and rely on the actin nucleating Arp2/3 complex, which is activated by host-derived nucleation-promoting factors downstream of the cell receptor Met during entry and by the bacterial nucleation-promoting factor ActA during comet tail formation. By genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening for host factors involved in bacterial infection, we identified diverse cellular signaling networks and protein complexes that support or limit these processes. In addition, we could precise previously described molecular pathways involved in Listeria invasion. In particular our results show that the requirements for actin nucleators during Listeria entry and actin comet tail formation are different. Knockdown of several actin nucleators, including SPIRE2, reduced bacterial invasion while not affecting the generation of comet tails. Most interestingly, we observed that in contrast to our expectations, not all of the seven subunits of the Arp2/3 complex are required for Listeria entry into cells or actin tail formation and that the subunit requirements for each of these processes differ, highlighting a previously unsuspected versatility in Arp2/3 complex composition and function. PMID:25991686

  17. Two Cases of Lethal Complications Following Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Fine-Needle Biopsy of the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Drinkovic, Ivan; Brkljacic, Boris

    1996-09-15

    Two cases with lethal complications are reported among 1750 ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous fine-needle liver biopsies performed in our department. The first patient had angiosarcoma of the liver which was not suspected after computed tomography (CT) and US studies had been performed. The other patient had hepatocellular carcinoma in advanced hepatic cirrhosis. Death was due to bleeding in both cases. Pre-procedure laboratory tests did not reveal the existence of major bleeding disorders in either case. Normal liver tissue was interposed in the needle track between the liver capsule and the lesions which were targeted.

  18. [A case of lethal interstitial pneumonia after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Keiji; Nagamatsu, Masarou; Takeoka, Yousuke; Kusaba, Takafumi; Shigemasa, Yu; Hatano, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Nobufumi; Ikari, Hideki; Kunizaki, Tadaomi; Ooshima, Kazuhiro; Yonemitsu, Nobuhisa

    2013-11-01

    We report a case of lethal interstitial pneumonia that occurred after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer. A 76-year-old man with no history of interstitial pneumonia received 2 courses of S-1 (100 mg/body) following 1 course of S-1 plus cisplatin( CDDP) from June 2012. He complained of dyspnea on exertion 6 days after completion of the treatment. Chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) revealed diffuse interstitial lesions in bilateral lung fields. Bronchoalveolar lavage( BAL) revealed an increased number of lymphocytes and leukocytes. Transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) revealed interstitial pneumonia with fibrous thickening in the alveolar septum. The drug lymphocyte stimulation test (DLST) was positive for S-1 and negative for CDDP. These results suggested that S-1 had induced interstitial pneumonia. Steroid therapy( 40 mg/day prednisolone following 500 mg methylprednisolone pulse therapy) and an antibiotic agent were administered but were ineffective. He rapidly developed respiratory failure and required tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation on hospital day 24, and died on hospital day 38. PMID:24394095

  19. A Random Screen Using a Novel Reporter Assay System Reveals a Set of Sequences That Are Preferred as the TATA or TATA-Like Elements in the CYC1 Promoter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kiyoshi; Yabe, Makoto; Kasahara, Koji; Kokubo, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the core promoters of class II genes contain either TATA or TATA-like elements to direct accurate transcriptional initiation. Genome-wide analyses show that the consensus sequence of the TATA element is TATAWAWR (8 bp), whereas TATA-like elements carry one or two mismatches to this consensus. The fact that several functionally distinct TATA sequences have been identified indicates that these elements may function, at least to some extent, in a gene-specific manner. The purpose of the present study was to identify functional TATA sequences enriched in one particular core promoter and compare them with the TATA or TATA-like elements that serve as the pre-initiation complex (PIC) assembly sites on the yeast genome. For this purpose, we conducted a randomized screen of the TATA element in the CYC1 promoter by using a novel reporter assay system and identified several hundreds of unique sequences that were tentatively classified into nine groups. The results indicated that the 7 bp TATA element (i.e., TATAWAD) and several sets of TATA-like sequences are preferred specifically by this promoter. Furthermore, we find that the most frequently isolated TATA-like sequence, i.e., TATTTAAA, is actually utilized as a functional core promoter element for the endogenous genes, e.g., ADE5,7 and ADE6. Collectively, these results indicate that the sequence requirements for the functional TATA or TATA-like elements in one particular core promoter are not as stringent. However, the variation of these sequences differs significantly from that of the PIC assembly sites on the genome, presumably depending on promoter structures and reflecting the gene-specific function of these sequences. PMID:26046838

  20. Filgrastim Improves Survival in Lethally Irradiated Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Farese, Ann M.; Cohen, Melanie V.; Katz, Barry P.; Smith, Cassandra P.; Gibbs, Allison; Cohen, Daniel M.; MacVittie, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of individuals exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation is of paramount concern to health professionals and government agencies. We evaluated the efficacy of filgrastim to increase survival of nonhuman primates (NHP) exposed to an approximate mid-lethal dose (LD50/60) (7.50 Gy) of LINAC-derived photon radiation. Prior to total-body irradiation (TBI), nonhuman primates were randomized to either a control (n =22) or filgrastim-treated (n =24) cohorts. Filgrastim (10 ?g/kg/d) was administered beginning 1 day after TBI and continued daily until the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was >1,000/?L for 3 consecutive days. All nonhuman primates received medical management as per protocol. The primary end point was all cause overall mortality over the 60 day in-life study. Secondary end points included mean survival time of decedents and all hematologic-related parameters. Filgrastim significantly (P < 0.004) reduced 60 day overall mortality [20.8% (5/24)] compared to the controls [59.1% (13/22)]. Filgrastim significantly decreased the duration of neutropenia, but did not affect the absolute neutrophil count nadir. Febrile neutropenia (ANC <500/?L and body temperature ?103°F) was experienced by 90.9% (20/22) of controls compared to 79.2% (19/24) of filgrastim-treated animals (P = 0.418). Survival was significantly increased by 38.3% over controls. Filgrastim, administered at this dose and schedule, effectively mitigated the lethality of the hematopoietic subsyndrome of the acute radiation syndrome. PMID:23210705

  1. Lethal and sublethal effects of marine sediment extracts on fish cells and chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolt, Marsha L.; Kocan, Richard M.

    1984-03-01

    The cost of conducting conventional chronic bioassays with every potentially toxic compound found in marine ecosystems is prohibitive; therefore short-term toxicity tests which can be used for rapid screening were developed. The tests employ cultured fish cells to measure lethal, sublethal or genotoxic effects of pure compounds and complex mixtures. The sensitivity of these tests has been proven under laboratory conditions; the following study used two of these tests, the anaphase aberration test and a cytotoxicity assay, under field conditions. Sediment was collected from 97 stations within Puget Sound, Washington. Serial washings of the sediment in methanol and dichloromethane yielded an organic extract which was dried, dissolved in DMSO and incubated as a series of dilutions with rainbow trout gonad (RTG-2) cells. The toxic effects of the extract were measured by examining the rate of cell proliferation and the percentage of damaged anaphase figures. Anaphase figures were considered to be abnormal if they exhibited non-disjunctions, chromosome fragments, or chromosome bridges. A second cell line (bluegill fry, BF-2) was also tested for cell proliferation and was included because, unlike the RTG-2 cell line, it contains little or no mixed function oxygenase activity. Of 97 stations tested, 35 showed no genotoxic activity, 42 showed high genotoxic activity (P?.01) and the remainder were intermediate. Among the toxic sites were several deep water stations adjacent to municipal sewage outfalls and four urban waterways contaminated by industrial and municipal effluents. Extracts from areas that showed genotoxic effects also inhibited cell proliferation and were cytotoxic to RTG-2 cells. Few effects were noted in the MFO deficient BF-2 cells. Short term in vitro tests provide aquatic toxicologists with a versatile and cost effective tool for screening complex environments. Through these tests one can identify compounds or geographic regions that exhibit high cytotoxic or genotoxic potential.

  2. Neonatal Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency: A Lethal Entity.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sushma; Paldiwal, Ashutosh Abhimanyu; Korday, Charusheela Sujit; Jadhav, Shruti Sudhir

    2015-10-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTII) deficiency is a rare disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation with autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Three classic forms of CPT II deficiency have been described namely the lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form and the myopathic form. We present a three-day-old female child, admitted to us for lethargy, icterus, low sugars and convulsions. Persistent non ketotic hypoglycaemia, hyperammonemia, raised liver enzymes with hepatomegaly and cardiomyopathy led to the suspicion of fatty acid oxidation defect. Tandem mass spectrometry helped to clinch the diagnosis of CPT II Deficiency in the present case. PMID:26557586

  3. Neonatal Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency: A Lethal Entity

    PubMed Central

    Paldiwal, Ashutosh Abhimanyu; Korday, Charusheela Sujit; Jadhav, Shruti Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTII) deficiency is a rare disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation with autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Three classic forms of CPT II deficiency have been described namely the lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form and the myopathic form. We present a three-day-old female child, admitted to us for lethargy, icterus, low sugars and convulsions. Persistent non ketotic hypoglycaemia, hyperammonemia, raised liver enzymes with hepatomegaly and cardiomyopathy led to the suspicion of fatty acid oxidation defect. Tandem mass spectrometry helped to clinch the diagnosis of CPT II Deficiency in the present case. PMID:26557586

  4. Anti-bacterial activity and brine shrimp lethality bioassay of methanolic extracts of fourteen different edible vegetables from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, M. Obayed; Haque, Mahmuda; Urmi, Kaniz Fatima; Zulfiker, Abu Hasanat Md.; Anita, Elichea Synthi; Begum, Momtaj; Hamid, Kaiser

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial and cytotoxic activity of fourteen different edible vegetables methanolic extract from Bangladesh. Methods The antibacterial activity was evaluated using disc diffusion assay method against 12 bacteria (both gram positive and gram negative). The plant extracts were also screened for cytotoxic activity using the brine shrimp lethality bioassay method and the lethal concentrations (LC50) were determined at 95% confidence intervals by analyzing the data on a computer loaded with “Finney Programme”. Results All the vegetable extracts showed low to elevated levels of antibacterial activity against most of the tested strains (zone of inhibition=5-28 mm). The most active extract against all bacterial strains was from Xanthium indicum which showed remarkable antibacterial activity having the diameter of growth inhibition zone ranging from 12 to 28 mm followed by Alternanthera sessilis (zone of inhibition=6-21 mm). All extracts exhibited considerable general toxicity towards brine shrimps. The LC50 value of the tested extracts was within the range of 8.447 to 60.323 µg/mL with respect to the positive control (vincristine sulphate) which was 0.91 µg/mL. Among all studied extracts, Xanthium indicum displayed the highest cytotoxic effect with LC50 value of 8.447 µg/mL. Conclusions The results of the present investigation suggest that most of the studied plants are potentially good source of antibacterial and anticancer agents. PMID:23570009

  5. Systems biology-guided identification of synthetic lethal gene pairs and its potential use to discover antibiotic combinations

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Ramy K.; Monk, Jonathan M.; Lewis, Robert M.; In Loh, Suh; Mishra, Arti; Abhay Nagle, Amrita; Satyanarayana, Chitkala; Dhakshinamoorthy, Saravanakumar; Luche, Michele; Kitchen, Douglas B.; Andrews, Kathleen A.; Fong, Nicole L.; Li, Howard J.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Charusanti, Pep

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models of metabolism from bacterial systems biology have proven their utility across multiple fields, for example metabolic engineering, growth phenotype simulation, and biological discovery. The usefulness of the models stems from their ability to compute a link between genotype and phenotype, but their ability to accurately simulate gene-gene interactions has not been investigated extensively. Here we assess how accurately a metabolic model for Escherichia coli computes one particular type of gene-gene interaction, synthetic lethality, and find that the accuracy rate is between 25% and 43%. The most common failure modes were incorrect computation of single gene essentiality and biological information that was missing from the model. Moreover, we performed virtual and biological screening against several synthetic lethal pairs to explore whether two-compound formulations could be found that inhibit the growth of Gram-negative bacteria. One set of molecules was identified that, depending on the concentrations, inhibits E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in an additive or antagonistic manner. These findings pinpoint specific ways in which to improve the predictive ability of metabolic models, and highlight one potential application of systems biology to drug discovery and translational medicine. PMID:26531810

  6. Systems biology-guided identification of synthetic lethal gene pairs and its potential use to discover antibiotic combinations.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Ramy K; Monk, Jonathan M; Lewis, Robert M; In Loh, Suh; Mishra, Arti; Abhay Nagle, Amrita; Satyanarayana, Chitkala; Dhakshinamoorthy, Saravanakumar; Luche, Michele; Kitchen, Douglas B; Andrews, Kathleen A; Fong, Nicole L; Li, Howard J; Palsson, Bernhard O; Charusanti, Pep

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models of metabolism from bacterial systems biology have proven their utility across multiple fields, for example metabolic engineering, growth phenotype simulation, and biological discovery. The usefulness of the models stems from their ability to compute a link between genotype and phenotype, but their ability to accurately simulate gene-gene interactions has not been investigated extensively. Here we assess how accurately a metabolic model for Escherichia coli computes one particular type of gene-gene interaction, synthetic lethality, and find that the accuracy rate is between 25% and 43%. The most common failure modes were incorrect computation of single gene essentiality and biological information that was missing from the model. Moreover, we performed virtual and biological screening against several synthetic lethal pairs to explore whether two-compound formulations could be found that inhibit the growth of Gram-negative bacteria. One set of molecules was identified that, depending on the concentrations, inhibits E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in an additive or antagonistic manner. These findings pinpoint specific ways in which to improve the predictive ability of metabolic models, and highlight one potential application of systems biology to drug discovery and translational medicine. PMID:26531810

  7. Orthogonal Arrays Plans Screening

    E-print Network

    MASCOT NUM Jean-Marc Azaïs Orthogonal Arrays Plans Screening Orthogonal Arrays Plans Screening Surface de réponse : Plans pour l'approximation de codes numériques Jean-Marc AZAÏS Modélisation Aléatoire NUM #12;MASCOT NUM Jean-Marc Azaïs Orthogonal Arrays Plans Screening Orthogonal Arrays Plans Screening

  8. Touch screen have become

    E-print Network

    Wobbrock, Jacob O.

    Typing { l ABSTRACT Touch screen have become screens pales examine typing physical keybo o inform future (Figure 1). O screen keyb rting touch-typ yed a techniqu 33]): we asked 1. Finger (blue ricted typing c te-bas of typing on fla t just in the ph in the ability t ust visually atte ouches occur touch screen ecially from

  9. Suppressor Screens in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2016-01-01

    Genetic screens have proven to be a useful tool in the dissection of biological processes in plants. Specifically, suppressor screens have been widely used to study signal transduction pathways. Here we provide a detailed protocol for ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis used in our suppressor screens in Arabidopsis and discuss the basic principles behind suppressor screen design and downstream analyses. PMID:26577776

  10. Synthetic lethality between CCNE1 amplification and loss of BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Weir, Barbara A.; Au-Yeung, George; Alsop, Kathryn; Mitchell, Gillian; George, Joshy; Davis, Sally; D’Andrea, Alan D.; Simpson, Kaylene; Hahn, William C.; Bowtell, David D. L.

    2013-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSCs) are characterized by a high frequency of TP53 mutations, BRCA1/2 inactivation, homologous recombination dysfunction, and widespread copy number changes. Cyclin E1 (CCNE1) gene amplification has been reported to occur independently of BRCA1/2 mutation, and it is associated with primary treatment failure and reduced patient survival. Insensitivity of CCNE1-amplified tumors to platinum cross-linking agents may be partly because of an intact BRCA1/2 pathway. Both BRCA1/2 dysfunction and CCNE1 amplification are known to promote genomic instability and tumor progression. These events may be mutually exclusive, because either change provides a path to tumor development, with no selective advantage to having both mutations. Using data from a genome-wide shRNA synthetic lethal screen, we show that BRCA1 and members of the ubiquitin pathway are selectively required in cancers that harbor CCNE1 amplification. Furthermore, we show specific sensitivity of CCNE1-amplified tumor cells to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. These findings provide an explanation for the observed mutual exclusivity of CCNE1 amplification and BRCA1/2 loss in HGSC and suggest a unique therapeutic approach for treatment-resistant CCNE1-amplified tumors. PMID:24218601

  11. Screening for celiac disease in Down’s syndrome patients revealed cases of subtotal villous atrophy without typical for celiFac disease HLA-DQ and tissue transglutaminase antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Uibo, Oivi; Teesalu, Kaupo; Metsküla, Kaja; Reimand, Tiia; Saat, Riste; Sillat, Tarvo; Reimand, Koit; Talvik, Tiina; Uibo, Raivo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) as well as CD marker antibodies and susceptibility HLA-DQ haplotypes in 134 karyotyped Down’s syndrome (DS) patients. METHODS: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) and G (IgG) type anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA), IgA type anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies (anti-tTG) with antigen of guinea pig and human source were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and endomysium antibodies (EMA) by indirect immunofluoresence test. HLA-DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201 (DQ2) was revealed by polymerase chain reaction. Celiac disease was diagnosed by revised ESPGHAN criteria. RESULTS: 41?% of DS patients had AGA, 6.0?% IgA anti-tTG with guinea pig antigen, and 3.0 % IgA EMA (all positive for anti-tTG with human tTG). Subtotal villous atrophy was found in 5 out of 9 DS patients who had agreed to small bowel biopsy. One of them had DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201 and anti-tTG and EMA i.e. typical for CD markers (this case also fulfilled the ESPGHAN diagnostic criteria), but other four lacked these markers. Three non-biopsied DS patients had also most probably CD because DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201 and IgA anti-tTG (EMA) were detected. Thus, the prevalence of CD among our DS patients population is 3.0 % (95 % of confidence interval [CI]: 0.1-5.9 %). CONCLUSION: We confirm the increased frequency of CD among DS patients. In addition, we have revealed a subgroup of patients with subtotal villous atrophy but without characteristic for CD immunological and genetic markers. Whether these cases represent CD (with atypical immunopathogenesis) or some other immune enteropathy, requires further investigations. PMID:16552815

  12. Developmental toxicity (dominant lethal mutation) study on agent lewisite. Dominant lethal study of lewisite in male rats. Final report, 15 September 1988-14 June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Bucci, T.J.; Parker, R.M.; Dacre, J.C.; Denny, K.H.

    1993-12-01

    Lewisite (dichloro(2-chlorovinyl)arsine, Agent L) was investigated as part of the US Army Toxicological Program on Chemical Agents. The study was conducted during January - April, 1990. Dosing was performed during 3-12 January, 1990. Twenty male CD rats per dose group were given 1.5, 0.75 or 0.375 mg/kg Lewisite or vehicle control (one ml sesame seed oil) daily by gavage for 5 days. Positive control males were given one ml sesame seed oil by gavage on Day 1-4 and on Day 5 they were given an intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg ethyl methanesulphonate, a known mutagen. Each male was mated to two virgin females (12 weeks of age) per counted and the uteri and contents were examined. Implantation sites were categorized as live/dead fetuses or early/late resorption. No significant differences inreproductive indices were seen between treatment groups and the control group with the exception of the positive control. Males were killed during Week 13 and necropsied. Sperm morphology/modify, testicular histopathologic evaluation and morphometric analysis of seminiferous tubule cross-sections revealed no differences among Lewisite-treated rats and rats given sesame seed oil. There was no indication of a dominant lethal mutagenic or other toxic effect on the male reproductive tract as a result of exposure to Lewisite, under the conditions of this study. The No Observable Adverse Effect Level was the highest dose used, 1.500 mg/kg.

  13. Plasma Screen Floating Mount

    DOEpatents

    Eakle, Robert F. (New Ellenton, SC); Pak, Donald J. (Martine, GA)

    2004-10-26

    A mounting system for a flat display screen, particularly a plasma display screen, suspends the screen separately in each of the x-, y- and z-directions. A series of frames located by linear bearings and isolated by springs and dampers allows separate controlled movement in each axis. The system enables the use of relatively larger display screens in vehicles in which plasma screen are subject to damage from vibration.

  14. Interleukin-1 enhances survival of lethally irradiated mice treated with allogeneic bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheim, J.J.; Neta, R.; Tiberghien, P.; Gress, R.; Kenny, J.J.; Longo, D.L. )

    1989-11-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) enhanced the capacity of allogeneic bone marrow (BM) cells to promote survival of mice given doses of radiation (1,200 to 1,350 cGy) that are significantly higher than those generally used for BM ablation (850 to 950 cGy). Three to five times greater numbers of lethally irradiated (1,200 to 1,350 cGy) C57B1/6 (H-2b) mice given 10(7) T-cell-depleted Balb/c (H-2d) BM cells survived over 6 weeks if also treated with a single intraperitoneal (IP) dose of 10 micrograms IL-1 20 hours before or from 1 to 3 hours after radiation. The spleens of these mice were reconstituted predominantly, but not exclusively, with donor cells (54% to 91%). Histologic examination of the epidermal and gastrointestinal tissues of mice surviving more than 6 weeks did not reveal any evidence of graft-versus-host (GVH) disease; however, since 10% to 43% of the mice died between days 30 and 46, the possibility of a GVH syndrome in these mice cannot be excluded. The spleen cells from irradiated mice given BM transplants and IL-1, which consisted of greater than or equal to 85% donor cells, were able to generate specific T-cell cytotoxic killing of unrelated allogeneic donor cells but were unreactive to target cells bearing either host or donor major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens. Thus, long-term mixed chimeric survivors were tolerant to recipient and donor alloantigens but exhibited immunologic competence. These results show that IL-1 promotes survival of lethally irradiated mice and that allogeneic hematopoietic cells in such animals develop tolerance to host MHC antigens. Although there are many unanswered questions, these data suggest that IL-1 may prove clinically useful in promoting BM engraftment.

  15. Antibiotics induce redox-related physiological alterations as part of their lethality.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Daniel J; Belenky, Peter A; Yang, Jason H; MacDonald, I Cody; Martell, Jeffrey D; Takahashi, Noriko; Chan, Clement T Y; Lobritz, Michael A; Braff, Dana; Schwarz, Eric G; Ye, Jonathan D; Pati, Mekhala; Vercruysse, Maarten; Ralifo, Paul S; Allison, Kyle R; Khalil, Ahmad S; Ting, Alice Y; Walker, Graham C; Collins, James J

    2014-05-20

    Deeper understanding of antibiotic-induced physiological responses is critical to identifying means for enhancing our current antibiotic arsenal. Bactericidal antibiotics with diverse targets have been hypothesized to kill bacteria, in part by inducing production of damaging reactive species. This notion has been supported by many groups but has been challenged recently. Here we robustly test the hypothesis using biochemical, enzymatic, and biophysical assays along with genetic and phenotypic experiments. We first used a novel intracellular H2O2 sensor, together with a chemically diverse panel of fluorescent dyes sensitive to an array of reactive species to demonstrate that antibiotics broadly induce redox stress. Subsequent gene-expression analyses reveal that complex antibiotic-induced oxidative stress responses are distinct from canonical responses generated by supraphysiological levels of H2O2. We next developed a method to quantify cellular respiration dynamically and found that bactericidal antibiotics elevate oxygen consumption, indicating significant alterations to bacterial redox physiology. We further show that overexpression of catalase or DNA mismatch repair enzyme, MutS, and antioxidant pretreatment limit antibiotic lethality, indicating that reactive oxygen species causatively contribute to antibiotic killing. Critically, the killing efficacy of antibiotics was diminished under strict anaerobic conditions but could be enhanced by exposure to molecular oxygen or by the addition of alternative electron acceptors, indicating that environmental factors play a role in killing cells physiologically primed for death. This work provides direct evidence that, downstream of their target-specific interactions, bactericidal antibiotics induce complex redox alterations that contribute to cellular damage and death, thus supporting an evolving, expanded model of antibiotic lethality. PMID:24803433

  16. Antibiotics induce redox-related physiological alterations as part of their lethality

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Daniel J.; Belenky, Peter A.; Yang, Jason H.; MacDonald, I. Cody; Martell, Jeffrey D.; Takahashi, Noriko; Chan, Clement T. Y.; Lobritz, Michael A.; Braff, Dana; Schwarz, Eric G.; Ye, Jonathan D.; Pati, Mekhala; Vercruysse, Maarten; Ralifo, Paul S.; Allison, Kyle R.; Khalil, Ahmad S.; Ting, Alice Y.; Walker, Graham C.; Collins, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Deeper understanding of antibiotic-induced physiological responses is critical to identifying means for enhancing our current antibiotic arsenal. Bactericidal antibiotics with diverse targets have been hypothesized to kill bacteria, in part by inducing production of damaging reactive species. This notion has been supported by many groups but has been challenged recently. Here we robustly test the hypothesis using biochemical, enzymatic, and biophysical assays along with genetic and phenotypic experiments. We first used a novel intracellular H2O2 sensor, together with a chemically diverse panel of fluorescent dyes sensitive to an array of reactive species to demonstrate that antibiotics broadly induce redox stress. Subsequent gene-expression analyses reveal that complex antibiotic-induced oxidative stress responses are distinct from canonical responses generated by supraphysiological levels of H2O2. We next developed a method to quantify cellular respiration dynamically and found that bactericidal antibiotics elevate oxygen consumption, indicating significant alterations to bacterial redox physiology. We further show that overexpression of catalase or DNA mismatch repair enzyme, MutS, and antioxidant pretreatment limit antibiotic lethality, indicating that reactive oxygen species causatively contribute to antibiotic killing. Critically, the killing efficacy of antibiotics was diminished under strict anaerobic conditions but could be enhanced by exposure to molecular oxygen or by the addition of alternative electron acceptors, indicating that environmental factors play a role in killing cells physiologically primed for death. This work provides direct evidence that, downstream of their target-specific interactions, bactericidal antibiotics induce complex redox alterations that contribute to cellular damage and death, thus supporting an evolving, expanded model of antibiotic lethality. PMID:24803433

  17. What Are Reasons for the Large Gender Differences in the Lethality of Suicidal Acts? An Epidemiological Analysis in Four European Countries

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, Katherina; Székely, András; Tóth, Mónika Ditta; Coyne, James; Quintão, Sónia; Arensman, Ella; Coffey, Claire; Maxwell, Margaret; Värnik, Airi; van Audenhove, Chantal; McDaid, David; Sarchiapone, Marco; Schmidtke, Armin; Genz, Axel; Gusmão, Ricardo; Hegerl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Background In Europe, men have lower rates of attempted suicide compared to women and at the same time a higher rate of completed suicides, indicating major gender differences in lethality of suicidal behaviour. The aim of this study was to analyse the extent to which these gender differences in lethality can be explained by factors such as choice of more lethal methods or lethality differences within the same suicide method or age. In addition, we explored gender differences in the intentionality of suicide attempts. Methods and Findings Methods. Design: Epidemiological study using a combination of self-report and official data. Setting: Mental health care services in four European countries: Germany, Hungary, Ireland, and Portugal. Data basis: Completed suicides derived from official statistics for each country (767 acts, 74.4% male) and assessed suicide attempts excluding habitual intentional self-harm (8,175 acts, 43.2% male). Main Outcome Measures and Data Analysis. We collected data on suicidal acts in eight regions of four European countries participating in the EU-funded “OSPI-Europe”-project (www.ospi-europe.com). We calculated method-specific lethality using the number of completed suicides per method * 100 / (number of completed suicides per method + number of attempted suicides per method). We tested gender differences in the distribution of suicidal acts for significance by using the ?2-test for two-by-two tables. We assessed the effect sizes with phi coefficients (?). We identified predictors of lethality with a binary logistic regression analysis. Poisson regression analysis examined the contribution of choice of methods and method-specific lethality to gender differences in the lethality of suicidal acts. Findings Main Results Suicidal acts (fatal and non-fatal) were 3.4 times more lethal in men than in women (lethality 13.91% (regarding 4106 suicidal acts) versus 4.05% (regarding 4836 suicidal acts)), the difference being significant for the methods hanging, jumping, moving objects, sharp objects and poisoning by substances other than drugs. Median age at time of suicidal behaviour (35–44 years) did not differ between males and females. The overall gender difference in lethality of suicidal behaviour was explained by males choosing more lethal suicide methods (odds ratio (OR) = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.65 to 2.50; p < 0.000001) and additionally, but to a lesser degree, by a higher lethality of suicidal acts for males even within the same method (OR = 1.64; 95% CI = 1.32 to 2.02; p = 0.000005). Results of a regression analysis revealed neither age nor country differences were significant predictors for gender differences in the lethality of suicidal acts. The proportion of serious suicide attempts among all non-fatal suicidal acts with known intentionality (NFSAi) was significantly higher in men (57.1%; 1,207 of 2,115 NFSAi) than in women (48.6%; 1,508 of 3,100 NFSAi) (?2 = 35.74; p < 0.000001). Main limitations of the study Due to restrictive data security regulations to ensure anonymity in Ireland, specific ages could not be provided because of the relatively low absolute numbers of suicide in the Irish intervention and control region. Therefore, analyses of the interaction between gender and age could only be conducted for three of the four countries. Attempted suicides were assessed for patients presenting to emergency departments or treated in hospitals. An unknown rate of attempted suicides remained undetected. This may have caused an overestimation of the lethality of certain methods. Moreover, the detection of attempted suicides and the registration of completed suicides might have differed across the four countries. Some suicides might be hidden and misclassified as undetermined deaths. Conclusions Men more often used highly lethal methods in suicidal behaviour, but there was also a higher method-specific lethality which together explained the large gender differences in the lethality of suicidal acts. Gender differences in the lethality of suicidal acts were

  18. Injury risk assessment of non-lethal projectile head impacts.

    PubMed

    Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as "force wall approach" suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the "force wall approach" and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics. PMID:25400712

  19. Suppressive effects of anthrax lethal toxin on megakaryopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Kong; Chang, Hsin-Hou; Lin, Guan-Ling; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Lai, Yi-Ling; Lin, Ting-Kai; Hsieh, Ming-Chun; Kau, Jyh-Hwa; Huang, Hsin-Hsien; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Liao, Chi-Yuan; Sun, Der-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LT) is a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis. LT challenge suppresses platelet counts and platelet function in mice, however, the mechanism responsible for thrombocytopenia remains unclear. LT inhibits cellular mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are vital pathways responsible for cell survival, differentiation, and maturation. One of the MAPKs, the MEK1/2-extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway, is particularly important in megakaryopoiesis. This study evaluates the hypothesis that LT may suppress the progenitor cells of platelets, thereby inducing thrombocytopenic responses. Using cord blood-derived CD34(+) cells and mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells to perform in vitro differentiation, this work shows that LT suppresses megakaryopoiesis by reducing the survival of megakaryocytes. Thrombopoietin treatments can reduce thrombocytopenia, megakaryocytic suppression, and the quick onset of lethality in LT-challenged mice. These results suggest that megakaryocytic suppression is one of the mechanisms by which LT induces thrombocytopenia. These findings may provide new insights for developing feasible approaches against anthrax. PMID:23555687

  20. Equation of state and fragmentation issues in computational lethality analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.G.

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the status of computational analysis of hypervelocity impact lethality in relatively nontechnical terms from the perspective of the author. It is not intended to be a review of the technical literature on the problems of concern. The discussion is focused by concentrating on two phenomenology areas which are of particular concern in computational impact studies. First, the material`s equation of state, specifically the treatment of expanded states of metals undergoing shock vaporization, is discussed. Second, the process of dynamic fragmentation is addressed. In both cases, the context of the discussion deals with inaccuracies and difficulties associated with numerical hypervelocity impact simulations. Laboratory experimental capabilities in hypervelocity impact for impact velocities greater than 10.0 km/s are becoming increasingly viable. This paper also gives recommendations for experimental thrusts which utilize these capabilities that will help to resolve the uncertainties in the numerical lethality studies that are pointed out in the present report.

  1. The discrete character of high-lethality youth violence.

    PubMed

    Zimring, Franklin E

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive lessons about high-lethality adolescent violence from study of the extraordinary increase, and then decrease, in youth homicide arrests over the period 1985-2001 in the United States. This effort continues a long tradition of exploring the possible causes of shifts in homicide rates by examining patterns of violence to see whether there are important changes in types of violence. The first section of the paper discusses two dimensions of criminal youth violence over the whole range of reported offenses. The second section shows that one subset of attacks--firearms cases--accounts for the major changes in youth homicide when it increased from 1985-1993 and during the years of decrease, 1994-2001. A third section explores the linkage between rates of adolescent homicide in various cultures and the relative rate of homicide among all ages. My central conclusion is that high-lethality violence among youth is not representative of the fighting and group assaults that are relatively frequent among adolescents. Instead, the attacks that often lead to death differ with respect to the use of weapons and, to some extent, geography. But there is usually a strong relationship between homicide rates for all ages and youth homicide rates in a particular location. PMID:15817745

  2. Injury Risk Assessment of Non-Lethal Projectile Head Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as “force wall approach” suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the “force wall approach” and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics. PMID:25400712

  3. An outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species.

    PubMed

    Inoshima, Yasuo; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Kasamatsu, Masahiko

    2013-08-30

    An outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis at a Japanese aquarium involved 3 otariids: a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), a South African fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) and a South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens). In a span of about a week in February 2012, 3 otariids showed diarrhea and were acutely low-spirited; subsequently, all three animals died within a period of 3 days. Markedly increased aspartate amino transferase and alanine amino transferase activities were observed. Necrotic hepatitis and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in liver hepatocytes and intestinal epithelial cells were observed in the South American sea lion on histological examination. Otarine adenovirus DNA was detected from the livers of all three animals by polymerase chain reaction and determination of the sequences showed that all were identical. These results suggest that a single otarine adenovirus strain may have been the etiological agent of this outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis among the different otariid species, and it may be a lethal threat to wild and captive otariids. This is the first evidence of an outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species. PMID:23643878

  4. Lethality of a dut (deoxyuridine triphosphatase) mutation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    el-Hajj, H H; Zhang, H; Weiss, B

    1988-01-01

    A chloramphenicol resistance gene was cloned into a plasmid-borne dut gene, producing an insertion mutation that was then transferred to the chromosome by allelic exchange. The mutation could not be acquired by haploid strains through substitutive recombination, even when two flanking markers were simultaneously transduced. The insertion was easily transferred, via generalized transduction, into the chromosomal dut region of strains harboring a lambda dut + transducing phage; however, the resulting dut mutant/lambda dut + merodiploid could not then be cured of the prophage. This apparent lethality of the mutation could not be explained by effects on adjacent genes; the dfp gene retained complementing activity, and a ttk insertion mutant was viable. The dut gene product, deoxyuridine triphosphatase, is known to reduce incorporation of uracil into DNA and to be required in the de novo synthesis of thymidylate. Therefore, an attempt was made to determine whether the dut insertion would be tolerated in strains carrying the following compensatory mutations: dcd (dCTP deaminase) and cdd (deoxycytidine deaminase), which should reduce dUTP formation; ung (uracil-DNA glycosylase), which should reduce fatally excessive excision repair; deoA (thymidine phosphorylase), which should enhance the utilization of exogenous thymidine; and sulA, which should reduce the lethal side effects of SOS regulon induction. These mutations, either alone or in various combinations, did not permit the survival of a haploid dut insertion mutant, suggesting that the dut gene product might have an essential function apart from its deoxyuridine triphosphatase activity. PMID:2830228

  5. Less-lethal munitions as extended-range impact weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbs, Ken

    1997-01-01

    With the proliferation of 'suicide by cop' incidents, the concept of less lethal (LL) impact munitions has definitely caught on. There is much to be said for sterile laboratory testing and wound ballistic studies, but having 'real world' operational data is invaluable. Two years ago, a data base was set up to collect this information. The data base continues to grow with incidents from a cross the country and others pursued internationally. Indications are that LL munitions deliver a similar amount of force as conventional police impact weapons i.e., police batons, PR-24's, nunchakus, etc. One advantage over conventional impact weapons, is that LL munitions can be used at much greater distances from a suspect or crown of rioters. This gave rise to the term: extended range impact weapons. Having the ability to examine numerous cases in which these LL munitions have been successfully used for the resolution of critical incidents, is beneficial in evaluating the application and defending the usage of these force options. This paper examines 187 less lethal shootings and discusses such things as: the distance the munitions were fired, the types of injuries sustained by the targeted suspect, the body area of impact, what, if any weapons the suspect was armed with, and the type of incident requiring police response.

  6. Non-lethal sampling for mercury evaluation in crocodilians.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Wilkinson L; de Oliveira, Robson F; dos Santos-Filho, Manoel; da Silva, Carolina J; Malm, Olaf; Ignácio, Áurea R A; Díez, Sergi

    2015-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that poses potential threats to ecosystems due to its toxicity to humans and wildlife. The development of non-lethal sampling techniques is a critical step for evaluation of Hg in threatened species in tropical floodplain environments, where most of Hg found is the result of land use and gold mining activities, and more methylation sites are available. We evaluated the spatial and seasonal effectiveness of caudal scutes and claws to estimate Hg bioaccumulation in crocodilians (Caiman yacare), in the scarcely documented Pantanal. Hence, we investigated the potential for Hg bioaccumulation in top predators according to its proximity to mining sites, and in water bodies with different hydrological characteristics and connectivity with the main river during two phases of the flood pulse (dry and flood). The highest Hg concentrations were detected in caimans captured close to mining activities, in claws (2176 ng g(-1) ww) and caudal scutes (388 ng g(-1) ww). THg concentration in claws was related to the flood season and its mean concentration was thirteen fold higher than Hg concentration in scutes during whole year. Both tissues were found to be effective as non-lethal sampling techniques for measuring Hg bioaccumulation in reptiles over time. Nevertheless, claw tissue seems to have a more consistent result, since its constitutional chemical characteristics makes it a better indicator of spatial patterns that influence on Hg exposure. PMID:26026900

  7. Mammography screening services: market segments and messages.

    PubMed

    Scammon, D L; Smith, J A; Beard, T

    1991-01-01

    Mammography has become a vital tool for the early detection of breast cancer. Although many organizations and health care facilities are working to educate and motivate women to take advantage of the life saving opportunity that is offered through screening mammography, only twenty percent of women who should be screened actually have the procedure performed. In order to reach women who have not been screened, it is important to learn which factors most strongly motivate those women who do choose to have a mammogram. Depth interviews with 18 women attending a mobile mammography unit were conducted to explore the decision making process of women obtaining mammography screening services and to develop a profile of prevalent emotions, attitudes, and feelings associated with receiving breast cancer screening services. Analysis of the interview transcripts revealed several important themes to which health care professionals can direct marketing and health promotion strategies. PMID:10110432

  8. Mode of action of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A, a lethal control agent of dreissenid mussels (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae).

    PubMed

    Molloy, Daniel P; Mayer, Denise A; Giamberini, Laure; Gaylo, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A (Pf-CL145A) has demonstrated promise as an efficacious and selective agent for the control of macrofouling Dreissena spp. mussels. Herein, we report trials to investigate the mode of action of this biocontrol agent against Dreissena polymorpha, the zebra mussel. Exposure to dead Pf-CL145A cells achieved the same temporal pattern and percentage mussel mortality as did live cells, thereby excluding infection as the possible lethal mode of action. Histological analysis revealed pathologies consistent with the cause of death being intoxicating natural products associated with Pf-CL145A cells. Irrespective of whether the mussels were exposed to live or dead Pf-CL145A cells, examination of tissues from histological sections revealed that: (1) at the end of the 24-h treatment period there was massive hemocyte infiltration into the lumina of both the digestive gland and stomach; and (2) mussel deaths occurred following lysis and necrosis of the digestive gland and sloughing of stomach epithelium. These trials provide strong evidence that the lethal mode of action of Pf-CL145A is intoxication. PMID:23313118

  9. A lethal intracranial Rosai-Dorfman disease of the brainstem diagnosed at autopsy.

    PubMed

    Imada, Hiroki; Sakatani, Takashi; Sawada, Mikio; Matsuura, Tohru; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Nakano, Imaharu

    2015-10-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a benign histiocytic proliferative disorder characterized by the accumulation of histiocytes in lymph nodes and various other organs. RDD seldom involves the central nervous system, and cases of purely intracranial RDD are particularly rare. We report a case of purely intracranial RDD involving the brainstem that was diagnosed at autopsy. A 68-year-old woman visited our hospital because of visual disturbances and loss of energy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an obscure mass in the brainstem. Despite exhaustive work-ups, the etiology of the intracranial mass remained unclear. The patient died of respiratory depression, and an autopsy was performed for pathological investigation. Macroscopically, a pink pale mass 2.5?cm in diameter was found in the brainstem, with no attachment to the dura. Histologically, it was composed of histiocytic cells with incorporation of small lymphocytes (emperipolesis). Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the cells were positive for CD68 and S100 and negative for CD1a, consistent with a diagnosis of RDD. Purely intracranial RDD is extremely rare and considered benign. To date, nine cases (including ours) have been reported. To our knowledge, this is the first case of intracranial RDD with autopsy. Although generally considered benign, RDD involving the brainstem might be lethal. PMID:26184902

  10. Expanded substrate screenings of human and Drosophila type 10 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) reveal multiple specificities in bile acid and steroid hormone metabolism: characterization of multifunctional 3alpha/7alpha/7beta/17beta/20beta/21-HSD.

    PubMed Central

    Shafqat, Naeem; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Filling, Charlotta; Nordling, Erik; Wu, Xiao-Qiu; Björk, Lars; Thyberg, Johan; Mårtensson, Eva; Salim, Samina; Jörnvall, Hans; Oppermann, Udo

    2003-01-01

    17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17beta-HSDs) catalyse the conversion of 17beta-OH (-hydroxy)/17-oxo groups of steroids, and are essential in mammalian hormone physiology. At present, eleven 17beta-HSD isoforms have been defined in mammals, with different tissue-expression and substrate-conversion patterns. We analysed 17beta-HSD type 10 (17beta-HSD10) from humans and Drosophila, the latter known to be essential in development. In addition to the known hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and 3alpha-OH and 17beta-OH activities with sex steroids, we here demonstrate novel activities of 17beta-HSD10. Both species variants oxidize the 20beta-OH and 21-OH groups in C21 steroids, and act as 7beta-OH dehydrogenases of ursodeoxycholic or isoursodeoxycholic acid (also known as 7beta-hydroxylithocholic acid or 7beta-hydroxyisolithocholic acid respectively). Additionally, the human orthologue oxidizes the 7alpha-OH of chenodeoxycholic acid (5beta-cholanic acid, 3alpha,7alpha-diol) and cholic acid (5beta-cholanic acid). These novel substrate specificities are explained by homology models based on the orthologous rat crystal structure, showing a wide hydrophobic cleft, capable of accommodating steroids in different orientations. These properties suggest that the human enzyme is involved in glucocorticoid and gestagen catabolism, and participates in bile acid isomerization. Confocal microscopy and electron microscopy studies reveal that the human form is localized to mitochondria, whereas Drosophila 17beta-HSD10 shows a cytosolic localization pattern, possibly due to an N-terminal sequence difference that in human 17beta-HSD10 constitutes a mitochondrial targeting signal, extending into the Rossmann-fold motif. PMID:12917011

  11. Border Screening for SARS

    PubMed Central

    King, Arlene; de Jong, Dick; Bodie-Collins, Margaret; Squires, Susan G.; Tam, Theresa WS

    2005-01-01

    With the rapid international spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) from March through May 2003, Canada introduced various measures to screen airplane passengers at selected airports for symptoms and signs of SARS. The World Health Organization requested that all affected areas screen departing passengers for SARS symptoms. In spite of intensive screening, no SARS cases were detected. SARS has an extremely low prevalence, and the positive predictive value of screening is essentially zero. Canadian screening results raise questions about the effectiveness of available screening measures for SARS at international borders. PMID:15705315

  12. Revealing Rembrandt

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

  13. Complex physiological traits as biomarkers of the sub-lethal toxicological effects of pollutant exposure in fishes.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, D J; Garofalo, E; Winter, M J; Ceradini, S; Verweij, F; Day, N; Hayes, R; van der Oost, R; Butler, P J; Chipman, J K; Taylor, E W

    2007-11-29

    Complex physiological traits, such as routine aerobic metabolic rate or exercise performance, are indicators of the functional integrity of fish that can reveal sub-lethal toxicological effects of aquatic pollutants. These traits have proved valuable in laboratory investigations of the sub-lethal effects of heavy metals, ammonia and various xenobiotics. It is not known, however, whether they can also function as biomarkers of the complex potential range of effects upon overall functional integrity caused by exposure to mixtures of chemicals in polluted natural environments. The current study used portable swimming respirometers to compare exercise performance and respiratory metabolism of fish exposed in cages for three weeks to either clean or polluted sites on three urban European river systems: the river Lambro, Milan, Italy; the rivers Blythe, Cole and Tame, Birmingham, UK; and the river Amstel, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The UK and Italian rivers were variously polluted with high levels of both bioavailable heavy metals and organics, and the Amstel by mixtures of bioavailable organics at high concentrations. In both the UK and Italy, indigenous chub (Leuciscus cephalus) exposed to clean or polluted sites swam equally well in an initial performance test, but the chub from polluted sites could not repeat this performance after a brief recovery interval. These animals were unable to raise the metabolic rate and allocate oxygen towards exercise in the second trial, an effect confirmed in successive campaigns in Italy. Swimming performance was therefore a biomarker indicator of pollutant exposure in chub exposed at these sites. Exposure to polluted sites on the river Amstel did not affect the repeat swimming performance of cultured cloned carp (Cyprinus carpio), indicating either a species-specific tolerance or relative absence of heavy metals. However, measurements of oxygen uptake during swimming revealed increased rates of routine aerobic metabolism in both chub and carp at polluted sites in all of the rivers studied, indicating a sub-lethal metabolic loading effect. Therefore, the physiological traits of exercise performance and metabolic rate have potential as biomarkers of the overall sub-lethal toxic effects of exposure to complex mixtures of pollutants in rivers, and may also provide insight into why fish do not colonize some polluted environments. PMID:17475615

  14. Lung Cancer Screening with Low Dose CT

    PubMed Central

    Caroline, Chiles

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The announcement of the results of the NLST, showing a 20% reduction in lung-cancer specific mortality with LDCT screening in a high risk population, marked a turning point in lung cancer screening. This was the first time that a randomized controlled trial had shown a mortality reduction with an imaging modality aimed at early detection of lung cancer. Current guidelines endorse LDCT screening for smokers and former smokers ages 55 to 74, with at least a 30 pack year smoking history. Adherence to published algorithms for nodule follow-up is strongly encouraged. Future directions for screening research include risk stratification for selection of the screening population, and improvements in the diagnostic follow-up for indeterminate pulmonary nodules. As with screening for other malignancies, screening for lung cancer with LDCT has revealed that there are indolent lung cancers which may not be fatal. More research is necessary if we are to maximize the risk-benefit ratio in lung cancer screening. PMID:24267709

  15. Radiation-induced mutagenicity and lethality in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Isildar, M.; Bakale, G.

    1983-01-01

    The mutagenic and lethal effects of ionizing radiation on histidine-deficient auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium were studied to improve the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The auxotrophs were divided into two groups - one which is sensitive to base-pair substitutions and another sensitive to frameshifts. These groups were composed of parent-daughter pairs in which the chemical mutagenicity enhancing plasmid, pKM101, is absent in the parent strain and present in the daughter. Co-60 ..gamma..-radiation and 250 kV x-rays were used to irradiate the bacteria. Irradiation of the frameshift - sensitive strains which carry the pKm101 plasmid doubled the absolute number of induced revertants whereas irradiation of the base-pair substitution sensitive strain which also carries the pKm101 plasmid produced nearly no change in the number of induced revertants. A nearly negligible effect on the mutation rate was observed for all parent strains. (ACR)

  16. Predictors of Lethality in Severe Leptospirosis in Urban Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Spichler, Anne S.; Vilaça, Pedro J.; Athanazio, Daniel A.; Albuquerque, Jose O. M.; Buzzar, Marcia; Castro, Bronislawa; Seguro, Antonio; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    To ascertain prognostic factors associated with fatal outcomes in severe leptospirosis, a retrospective case-control study was done using population-based surveillance data. Centralized death certificate reporting of leptospirosis mortality was combined with details of patients’ hospitalizations, which were obtained from hospitals representing all sectors of São Paulo city. Among identified leptospirosis cases, 89 lethal cases and 281 survivor cases were analyzed. Predictors of death included age > 40 years, development of oliguria, platelet count < 70,000/µL, creatinine > 3 mg/dL, and pulmonary involvement. The latter was the strongest risk factor with an estimated odds ratio of 6.0 (95% confidence interval: 3.0–12.0). Serologic findings with highest titer against Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni did not show significant differences between survivors and non-survivors. Lung involvement was an important predictor of death in leptospirosis in São Paulo, of relevance in leptospirosis-endemic regions where this complication is common. PMID:19052303

  17. Aroclor 1254 residues in birds: Lethal levels and loss rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, W.H.; Stickel, L.F.; Dyrland, R.A.; Hughes, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Lethal residues of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined experimentally in four species of wild birds (male common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula ), immature female red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus ), adult male brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater ) and immature female starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)) given dietary dosage of 1,500 ppm of Aroclor 1254) until one-half had died, sacrificing the survivors, chemically analyzing the tissues, and comparing results in dead birds and survivors. For all species, residues of 310 ppm or higher in the brain showed increasing likelihood of death from PCB poisoning. Residues in dead birds did not differ among species except for starlings (Sturnus vulgaris ), which averaged slightly lower than the others. However, the species differed in the length of time to 50% mortality and in the levels of PCBs in brains at sacrifice.

  18. DDE in birds: Lethal residues and loss rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, W.H.; Stickel, L.F.; Dyrland, R.A.; Hughes, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Lethal brain residues of DDE were determined experimentally in four species of wild birds (male common grackels (Quiscalus quiscula ), immature female red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus ), adult male brown-headed cowbirds (Molathrus ater ), and immature female starlings (Sturnus vulgaris ) given dietary dosage of 1,500 ppm DDE until one-half had died, then sacrificing the survivors, chemically analyzing the tissues, and comparing results in dead birds and survivors. In all species, residues of 300 to 400 ppm of DDE in the brain were considered to show increasing likelihood of death from DDE, confirming results of an earlier study with a single species. Body residues (ppm wet weight) were not diagnostic, overlapping grossly in dead birds and survivors, but averaging higher in survivors.

  19. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection and lethal chytridiomycosis in caecilian amphibians (Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Gower, David J; Doherty-Bone, Thomas; Loader, Simon P; Wilkinson, Mark; Kouete, Marcel T; Tapley, Benjamin; Orton, Frances; Daniel, Olivia Z; Wynne, Felicity; Flach, Edmund; Müller, Hendrik; Menegon, Michele; Stephen, Ian; Browne, Robert K; Fisher, Mathew C; Cunningham, Andrew A; Garner, Trenton W J

    2013-06-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is commonly termed the 'amphibian chytrid fungus' but thus far has been documented to be a pathogen of only batrachian amphibians (anurans and caudatans). It is not proven to infect the limbless, generally poorly known, and mostly soil-dwelling caecilians (Gymnophiona). We conducted the largest qPCR survey of Bd in caecilians to date, for more than 200 field-swabbed specimens from five countries in Africa and South America, representing nearly 20 species, 12 genera, and 8 families. Positive results were recovered for 58 specimens from Tanzania and Cameroon (4 families, 6 genera, 6+ species). Quantities of Bd were not exceptionally high, with genomic equivalent (GE) values of 0.052-17.339. In addition, we report the first evidence of lethal chytridiomycosis in caecilians. Mortality in captive (wild-caught, commercial pet trade) Geotrypetes seraphini was associated with GE scores similar to those we detected for field-swabbed, wild animals. PMID:23677560

  20. Launcher barrel for the lethality test system railgun

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, J.R.; Christensen, K.E.; Cummings, C.E.; Calkins, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    A reusable plasma armature railgun barrel design is described. This barrel was designed and is being fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for use in a kinetic energy lethality test system. The performance goals for this barrel are (1) that it be able to withstand the loads generated when accelerating a 30-g projectile to a velocity of 15 km/s without sustaining permanent damage, (2) that it have multiple shot capability, and, (3) that it be capable of being repaired and/or modified. The barrel consists of a multipiece modular core contained in an outer structural shell. The core assembly, composed of rails and insulators, is accessible for repair or replacement. The outer structural shell is designed to allow access to the core and is used to preload the core compressively. The barrel design incorporates various features that will allow the use of stronger and stiffer materials such as structural ceramics and reinforced coppers as they become available.

  1. [Medical aspects of common non-lethal weapons].

    PubMed

    Kunz, Sebastian Niko; Grove, Christina; Monticelli, Fabio

    2014-03-01

    The development and provision of non-lethal weapons (NLW) allow military and law enforcement personnel to exploit gradual engagement in countering potentially hazardous threats. Chemical, kinetic and electrical weapons systems are used to curb violence in civilian crowds. With inappropriate usage, these technologies can cause potentially fatal injuries that are not only of clinical, but also of legal relevance. In this context, the practicing physician is faced with treatment as well as assessment issues of new forms of injuries. In order to assure medical care and to be able to draw competent expert's conclusions, a detailed knowledge of the medical effects of these NLW is necessary. The review at hand presents today's most popular NLW and gives an overview of their possible injury potential and required treatments. PMID:24254129

  2. Video Screen Capture Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  3. Stretching Screens and Imaginations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthwaite, Shelaugh

    1983-01-01

    Secondary students utilize a simplified technique to make silk screen prints, which can be printed onto T-shirts. The only materials needed from art suppliers are a few squeegees and a few yards of polyester screen mesh. (RM)

  4. Preconception Carrier Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fibrosis , fragile X syndrome , sickle cell disease , and Tay–Sachs disease . Who should consider preconception carrier screening? A ... descent (Ashkenazi Jews) should be offered screening for Tay–Sachs disease, Canavan disease, familial dysautonomia, and cystic fibrosis. ...

  5. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Primary Care Practice Published Recommendations Draft Summary Prostate Cancer: Screening Release Date: May 2012 This topic is ... against prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening for prostate cancer. The USPSTF recommends against the service. There is ...

  6. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ... Physicians The full report is titled “Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ...

  7. Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... trials is available from the NCI website . Three tests are used by health care providers to screen for breast cancer: Mammogram Mammography is the most common screening test for breast cancer . A mammogram is an x- ...

  8. International Cancer Screening Network

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Working Together to Evaluate Cancer Screening and Improve Outcomes Internationally About the ICSN Overview Participating Countries Contact

  9. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

  10. Use of a High Throughput Screening Approach Coupled With In Vivo Zebrafish Embryo Screening to Develop Hazard Ranking for Engineered Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    George, Saji; Xia, Tian; Rallo, Robert; Zhao, Yan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Haiyuan; France, Bryan; Schoenfeld, David; Damoiseaux, Robert; Liu, Rong; Lin, Shuo; Bradley, Kenneth A; Cohen, Yoram; Nel, André E

    2014-01-01

    Because of concerns about the safety of a growing number of engineered nanomaterials (ENM), it is necessary to develop high throughput screening and in silico data transformation tools that can speed up in vitro hazard ranking. Here, we report the use of a multi-parametric, automated screening assay that incorporates sub-lethal and lethal cellular injury responses to perform high throughput analysis of a batch of commercial metal/metal oxide nanoparticles (NP) with the inclusion of a quantum dot (QD1). The responses chosen for tracking cellular injury through automated epifluorescence microscopy included ROS production, intracellular calcium flux, mitochondrial depolarization, and plasma membrane permeability. The z-score transformed high volume data set was used to construct heat maps for in vitro hazard ranking as well as showing the similarity patterns of NPs and response parameters through the use of self-organizing maps (SOM). Among the materials analyzed, QD1 and nano-ZnO showed the most prominent lethality, while Pt, Ag, SiO2, Al2O3, and Au triggered sub-lethal effects but without cytotoxicity. In order to compare the in vitro with the in vivo response outcomes in zebrafish embryos, NPs were used to assess their impact on mortality rate, hatching rate, cardiac rate, and morphological defects. While QDs, ZnO, and Ag induced morphological abnormalities or interfered in embryo hatching, Pt and Ag exerted inhibitory effects on cardiac rate. Ag toxicity in zebrafish differed from the in vitro results, which is congruent with this material's designation as extremely dangerous in the environment. Interestingly, while toxicity in the initially selected QD formulation was due to a solvent (toluene), supplementary testing of additional QDs selections yielded in vitro hazard profiling that reflect the release of chalcogenides. In conclusion, the use of a high throughput screening, in silico data handling and zebrafish testing may constitute a paradigm for rapid and integrated ENM toxicological screening. PMID:21323332

  11. Embryonic Lethality Due to Arrested Cardiac Development in Psip1/Hdgfrp2 Double-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Dickson, Amy K.; Engelman, Alan N.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) related protein 2 (HRP2) and lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 are closely related members of the HRP2 protein family. LEDGF/p75 has been implicated in numerous human pathologies including cancer, autoimmunity, and infectious disease. Knockout of the Psip1 gene, which encodes for LEDGF/p75 and the shorter LEDGF/p52 isoform, was previously shown to cause perinatal lethality in mice. The function of HRP2 was by contrast largely unknown. To learn about the role of HRP2 in development, we knocked out the Hdgfrp2 gene, which encodes for HRP2, in both normal and Psip1 knockout mice. Hdgfrp2 knockout mice developed normally and were fertile. By contrast, the double deficient mice died at approximate embryonic day (E) 13.5. Histological examination revealed ventricular septal defect (VSD) associated with E14.5 double knockout embryos. To investigate the underlying molecular mechanism(s), RNA recovered from ventricular tissue was subjected to RNA-sequencing on the Illumina platform. Bioinformatic analysis revealed several genes and biological pathways that were significantly deregulated by the Psip1 knockout and/or Psip1/Hdgfrp2 double knockout. Among the dozen genes known to encode for LEDGF/p75 binding factors, only the expression of Nova1, which encodes an RNA splicing factor, was significantly deregulated by the knockouts. However the expression of other RNA splicing factors, including the LEDGF/p52-interacting protein ASF/SF2, was not significantly altered, indicating that deregulation of global RNA splicing was not a driving factor in the pathology of the VSD. Tumor growth factor (Tgf) ?-signaling, which plays a key role in cardiac morphogenesis during development, was the only pathway significantly deregulated by the double knockout as compared to control and Psip1 knockout samples. We accordingly speculate that deregulated Tgf-? signaling was a contributing factor to the VSD and prenatal lethality of Psip1/Hdgfrp2 double-deficient mice. PMID:26367869

  12. Non-lethal effect of the invasive predator Bythotrephes longimanus on Daphnia mendotae

    E-print Network

    Non-lethal effect of the invasive predator Bythotrephes longimanus on Daphnia mendotae KEVIN L Arbor, MI, U.S.A. SUMMARY 1. We evaluated the antipredator behaviour of Daphnia mendotae to the invasive (referred to as a non-lethal effect of the predator). 2. In a laboratory experiment, Daphnia in the absence

  13. Genetically modified anthrax lethal toxin safely delivers whole HIV protein antigens into the

    E-print Network

    Starnbach, Michael

    . anthracis consists of two bipartite protein exotoxins, lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin. LT is composed of protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor (LF), whereas edema toxin consists of PA and edema factor (EF). None of these three components, PA, LF, and EF, alone is toxic. Once combined, however, edema toxin

  14. BIOASSAY PROTOCOL FOR LETHAL AND SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF FUNGAL PATHOGENS ON CHRYSOPERLA CARNEA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This practice describes procedures for evaluating the lethal and sub-lethal effects of exposure to fungal pathogens on larvae and adults of the predatory insect Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens). his practice was developed and tested with the fungal insect pathogen Beauveria bassiana...

  15. Improving on Army Field Gauze for Lethal Vascular Injuries: Challenges in Dressing Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accounting for half of all deaths, uncontrolled hemorrhage remains the leading cause of death on the battlefield. Gaining hemostatic control of lethal vascular injuries sustained in combat using topical agents remains a challenge. Recent animal testing using a lethal arterial injury model compared a...

  16. A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality

    E-print Network

    Huang, Yanyi

    A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality assisted of interest. The internalization of anthrax toxin is facilitated by a secreted protein Dickkopf-1 (DKK1 of DKK1 in the complex process of anthrax toxin internalization. A nthrax, a lethal infectious disease

  17. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sex-linked recessive lethal test in....5275 Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The sex-linked...

  18. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Sex-linked recessive lethal test in....5275 Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The sex-linked...

  19. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sex-linked recessive lethal test in....5275 Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The sex-linked...

  20. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sex-linked recessive lethal test in....5275 Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The sex-linked...

  1. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sex-linked recessive lethal test in....5275 Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The sex-linked...

  2. Examining the Impact of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Comorbidity on the Medical Lethality of Adolescent "Suicide Attempts"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Manama O'Brien, Kimberly H.; Berzin, Stephanie C.

    2012-01-01

    Specific psychiatric diagnoses and comorbidity patterns were examined to determine if they were related to the medical lethality of "suicide attempts" among adolescents presenting to an urban general hospital (N = 375). Bivariate analysis showed that attempters with substance abuse disorders had higher levels of lethality than attempters without…

  3. Cancer Screening: How Do Screening Tests Become Standard Tests?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer symptoms. There are different kinds of screening tests. Screening tests include the following: Physical exam and ... are linked to some types of cancer. Screening tests have risks. Not all screening tests are helpful ...

  4. Principles of Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Paul F

    2015-10-01

    Cancer screening has long been an important component of the struggle to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality from cancer. Notwithstanding this history, many aspects of cancer screening remain poorly understood. This article presents a summary of basic principles of cancer screening that are relevant for researchers, clinicians, and public health officials alike. PMID:26315516

  5. Examining the Impact of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Comorbidity on the Medical Lethality of Adolescent Suicide Attempts

    PubMed Central

    McManama O'Brien, Kimberly H.; Berzin, Stephanie C.

    2015-01-01

    Specific psychiatric diagnoses and comorbidity patterns were examined to determine if they were related to the medical lethality of suicide attempts among adolescents presenting to an urban general hospital (N = 375). Bivariate analysis showed that attempters with substance abuse disorders had higher levels of lethality than attempters without substance abuse. Regression results indicated having depression comorbid with any other diagnosis was not associated with medical lethality. However, having a substance abuse disorder was associated with higher suicide attempt lethality, highlighting the importance of substance abuse as a risk factor for lethal suicide attempts in adolescents. This finding stimulates critical thinking around the understanding of suicidal behavior in youth and the development and implementation of treatment strategies for suicidal adolescents with substance abuse disorders. PMID:22646667

  6. Screening and preventable illness.

    PubMed

    Byrne, M M; Thompson, P

    2001-11-01

    If an agent does not discount the future at a constant rate, as in some forms of myopia, her optimal strategy is unattainable without some commitment device. We apply this familiar idea to a model of screening and disease prevention, and explore how financial incentives can correct suboptimal health choices. In general, myopia need not imply under-screening. While the optimal intervention for prevention effort is a state-invariant subsidy, the optimal intervention for screening may involve a tax or a subsidy. When screening and prevention are coincident, a simple and practical subsidy equal to one minus the discount factor to both screening and intervention is indicated. PMID:11758049

  7. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment Cervical Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Screening (PDQ®) What is screening? Screening is looking ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Cervical Cancer Key Points Cervical cancer is a disease in ...

  8. Uncommon dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase mutations and toxicity by fluoropyrimidines: a lethal case with a new variant.

    PubMed

    Del Re, Marzia; Quaquarini, Erica; Sottotetti, Federico; Michelucci, Angela; Palumbo, Raffaella; Simi, Paolo; Danesi, Romano; Bernardo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    DPD is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in the metabolism of 5-fluorouracil and its prodrugs, capecitabine and tegafur. Many cases of severe toxicities by fluoropyrimidines are reported in the literature, sometimes with lethal outcome, due to a poor or null metabolizer phenotype. The exon 14-skipping mutation IVS14+1G>A and the c.2846A>T are the most common deficient variants. However, many additional variants of the DPYD gene with unclear functional significance have been reported. We describe a patient with metastatic breast cancer who received capecitabine and trastuzumab at standard doses. Six days after beginning capecitabine, the patient developed fever, leucopenia and neutropenia, mucositis, hand-foot syndrome, multiple organ dysfunction and eventually died. Since the toxicity profile was compatible with capecitabine administration, complete exon sequencing of DPYD was carried out and the patient was found to be compound heterozygous for the rare mutation c.257C>T in exon 4, c.496A>G in exon 6, the new variant c.1850C>T in exon 14 and c.2194G>A in exon 18. Given the marginal role of c.496A>G and c.2194G>A in DPD deficiency, the cause of death was suggested to be dependent on the novel c.1850C>T in combination with c.257C>T. The complexity of DPD pharmacogenetics suggests the need to develop cost-effective screening approaches to identify patients at risk of severe toxicities. PMID:26651493

  9. A nutritional conditional lethal mutant due to pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase deficiency in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chi, Wanhao; Zhang, Li; Du, Wei; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2014-06-01

    The concept of auxotrophic complementation has been proposed as an approach to identify genes in essential metabolic pathways in Drosophila melanogaster. However, it has achieved limited success to date, possibly due to the low probability of finding mutations fit with the chemically defined profile. Instead of using the chemically defined culture media lacking specific nutrients, we used bare minimum culture medium, i.e., 4% sucrose, for adult Drosophila. We identified a nutritional conditional lethal mutant and localized a c.95C > A mutation in the Drosophila pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase gene [dPNPO or sugarlethal (sgll)] using meiotic recombination mapping, deficiency mapping, and whole genome sequencing. PNPO converts dietary vitamin B6 such as pyridoxine to its active form pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP). The missense mutation (sgll(95)) results in the substitution of alanine to aspartate (p.Ala32Asp). The sgll(95) flies survive well on complete medium but all die within 6 d on 4% sucrose only diet, which can be rescued by pyridoxine or PLP supplement, suggesting that the mutation does not cause the complete loss of PNPO activity. The sgll knockdown further confirms its function as the Drosophila PNPO. Because better tools for positional cloning and cheaper whole genome sequencing have made the identification of point mutations much easier than before, alleviating the necessity to pinpoint specific metabolic pathways before gene identification, we propose that nutritional conditional screens based on bare minimum growth media like ours represent promising approaches for discovering important genes and mutations in metabolic pathways, thereby accelerating the establishment of in vivo models that recapitulate human metabolic diseases. PMID:24739647

  10. A Nutritional Conditional Lethal Mutant Due to Pyridoxine 5?-Phosphate Oxidase Deficiency in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Wanhao; Zhang, Li; Du, Wei; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2014-01-01

    The concept of auxotrophic complementation has been proposed as an approach to identify genes in essential metabolic pathways in Drosophila melanogaster. However, it has achieved limited success to date, possibly due to the low probability of finding mutations fit with the chemically defined profile. Instead of using the chemically defined culture media lacking specific nutrients, we used bare minimum culture medium, i.e., 4% sucrose, for adult Drosophila. We identified a nutritional conditional lethal mutant and localized a c.95C > A mutation in the Drosophila pyridoxine 5?-phosphate oxidase gene [dPNPO or sugarlethal (sgll)] using meiotic recombination mapping, deficiency mapping, and whole genome sequencing. PNPO converts dietary vitamin B6 such as pyridoxine to its active form pyridoxal 5?-phosphate (PLP). The missense mutation (sgll95) results in the substitution of alanine to aspartate (p.Ala32Asp). The sgll95 flies survive well on complete medium but all die within 6 d on 4% sucrose only diet, which can be rescued by pyridoxine or PLP supplement, suggesting that the mutation does not cause the complete loss of PNPO activity. The sgll knockdown further confirms its function as the Drosophila PNPO. Because better tools for positional cloning and cheaper whole genome sequencing have made the identification of point mutations much easier than before, alleviating the necessity to pinpoint specific metabolic pathways before gene identification, we propose that nutritional conditional screens based on bare minimum growth media like ours represent promising approaches for discovering important genes and mutations in metabolic pathways, thereby accelerating the establishment of in vivo models that recapitulate human metabolic diseases. PMID:24739647

  11. Pre-participation musculoskeletal and cardiac screening of male athletes in the United arab emirates.

    PubMed

    Alattar, A; Ghani, S; Mahdy, N; Hussain, H; Maffulli, N

    2014-04-01

    This study presents the results of pre-participation musculoskeletal and cardiac screening using the Lausanne recommendations, which include a personal and family history, physical examination and electrocardiography. Cross sectional study using the Lausanne screenings and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) recommendations carried out at Al-Ahli club in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. 230 male athletes participating in organised sports were included. Exclusion criteria were those under 14 or over 35 years old, females and athletes with established cardiovascular disease. Primary outcome are the results of Lausanne screening with outline of the negative, positive and false positive results and number needed to screen. Secondary outcomes include the results of musculoskeletal and neurological screening. A total of 174 (76%) athletes had a negative screening result. Fifty-four athletes (23%) underwent additional testing. Forty-seven athletes (20.4%) had false positive screening results. Seven athletes (3%) had a positive screening result and four athletes (2%) were restricted from sport. The number of athletes needed to screen to detect one lethal cardiovascular condition was 33 athletes. The Lausanne recommendations are well suited for the United Arab Emirates. The number needed to screen to detect one athlete with serious cardiovascular disease is acceptable at 33. PMID:24809035

  12. Reconstructing the Lethal Part of the 1790 Eruption at Kilauea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, D.; Weaver, S. J.; Houghton, B. F.

    2011-12-01

    The most lethal known eruption from a volcano in the United States took place in November 1790 at Kilauea, killing perhaps 400-800 people (estimates range widely) who were crossing the summit on their way to a distant battle site. The eruption culminated ca. 300 years of sporadic explosive activity after the formation of Kilauea Caldera in about 1500. No contemporary account exists of the 1790 activity, but an eruption plume was observed from Kawaihae, 100 km NW of Kilauea, that probably was 10 km or higher. We are attempting to piece together the lethal event from a study of the 1790 and enclosing deposits and by using published accounts, written several decades later, based on interviews with survivors or others with knowledge of the tragedy. Determining what deposits actually formed in November 1790 is crucial. The best tie to that date is a deposit of phreatomagmatic lithic lapilli and ash that occurs SE of the caldera and must have been advected by high-level (>~10 km) westerly winds rather than low-level NE trade winds. It is the only contender for deposits from the high column observed in 1790. Small lapilli from the high column fell onto, and sank deeply into, a 3-5-cm-thick accretionary lapilli layer that was wet and likely no more than a few hours old. The wet ash occurs south of the caldera, where the lithic lapilli fell into it, and is also found west of the caldera in the saddle between Kilauea and Mauna Loa, where the victims were probably walking along a main foot trail still visible today. A lithic pyroclastic surge swept across the saddle, locally scouring away the wet accretionary lapilli layer but generally leaving a deposit <1 to 15 cm thick on the ash and embedding 1-cm lithic lapilli deeply within it. This indicates that the surge also erupted in November 1790, while the underlying ash was still wet. Though scattered ballistic blocks later fell in the area, the surge left the youngest continuous deposit on the west flank of Kilauea. An account written in 1843 by Rev. Sheldon Dibble describes the dead victims as lying on the surface or "sitting upright clasping with dying grasp their wives and children," not buried by ash or battered by falling debris, and "thoroughly scorched" but "in no place deeply burnt." These gruesome details suggest that the surge engulfed the victims, some of whom were clasping one another to keep from being blown away. The surge deposit covers an area of 12-15 sq km on the western flank of Kilauea between the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) and the main highway around the island. The fatalities probably took place in this area, now visited daily by 5000 travelers to Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. Several human footprints, barely discernible through the thin surge deposit, indent the surface of the accretionary lapilli ash near HVO. Do they record someone's last footsteps? We do not yet know when the eruption started or how many units older than the accretionary lapilli ash were also erupted in 1790. But we think we have identified the lethal surge of the eruption, and it is sobering to realize that it overwhelmed the place where this abstract is being written 221 years later.

  13. 9 CFR 430.4 - Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality exposed ready-to-eat products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...PRODUCT § 430.4 Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...ready-to-eat products. (a) Listeria monocytogenes can...

  14. 9 CFR 430.4 - Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality exposed ready-to-eat products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...PRODUCT § 430.4 Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...ready-to-eat products. (a) Listeria monocytogenes can...

  15. 9 CFR 430.4 - Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality exposed ready-to-eat products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...PRODUCT § 430.4 Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...ready-to-eat products. (a) Listeria monocytogenes can...

  16. 9 CFR 430.4 - Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality exposed ready-to-eat products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...PRODUCT § 430.4 Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...ready-to-eat products. (a) Listeria monocytogenes can...

  17. 9 CFR 430.4 - Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality exposed ready-to-eat products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...PRODUCT § 430.4 Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...ready-to-eat products. (a) Listeria monocytogenes can...

  18. Pegfilgrastim Improves Survival of Lethally Irradiated Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Kim G; Farese, Ann M; Blaauw, Erica C; Gibbs, Allison M; Smith, Cassandra P; Katz, Barry P; Tong, Yan; Prado, Karl L; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2015-06-01

    Leukocyte growth factors (LGF), such as filgrastim, pegfilgrastim and sargramostim, have been used to mitigate the hematologic symptoms of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) after radiation accidents. Although these pharmaceuticals are currently approved for treatment of chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, such approval has not been granted for myelosuppression resulting from acute radiation exposure. Regulatory approval of drugs used to treat radiological or nuclear exposure injuries requires their development and testing in accordance with the Animal Efficacy Rule, set forth by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To date, filgrastim is the only LGF that has undergone efficacy assessment conducted under the Animal Efficacy Rule. To confirm the efficacy of another LGF with a shorter dosing regimen compared to filgrastim, we evaluated the use of pegfilgrastim (Neulasta(®)) in a lethal nonhuman primate (NHP) model of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS). Rhesus macaques were exposed to 7.50 Gy total-body irradiation (the LD(50/60)), delivered at 0.80 Gy/min using linear accelerator 6 MV photons. Pegfilgrastim (300 ?g/kg, n = 23) or 5% dextrose in water (n = 23) was administered on day 1 and 8 postirradiation and all animals received medical management. Hematologic and physiologic parameters were evaluated for 60 days postirradiation. The primary, clinically relevant end point was survival to day 60; secondary end points included hematologic-related parameters. Pegfilgrastim significantly (P = 0.0014) increased 60 day survival to 91.3% (21/23) from 47.8% (11/23) in the control. Relative to the controls, pegfilgrastim also significantly: 1. decreased the median duration of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia; 2. improved the median time to recovery of absolute neutrophil count (ANC) ?500/?L, ANC ?1,000/?L and platelet (PLT) count ?20,000/?L; 3. increased the mean ANC at nadir; and 4. decreased the incidence of Gram-negative bacteremia. These data demonstrate that pegfilgrastim is an additional medical countermeasure capable of increasing survival and neutrophil-related parameters when administered in an abbreviated schedule to a NHP model of lethal H-ARS. PMID:26035709

  19. Lethal action of the nitrothiazolyl-salicylamide derivative nitazoxanide via induction of oxidative stress in Leishmania (L.) infantum.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Juliana Tonini; Pinto, Erika Gracielle; Taniwaki, Noemi Nosomi; Galisteo, Andres Jimenez; Tempone, Andre Gustavo

    2013-12-01

    Studying the cellular death pathways in Leishmania is an important aspect of discovering new antileishmanials. While using a drug repositioning approach, the lethal action of the nitrothiazolyl-salicylamide derivative nitazoxanide (NTZ) was investigated against Leishmania (L.) infantum. The in vitro antileishmanial activity and cytotoxicity were assessed using both parasite stages and mammalian NCTC cells, respectively. The lethal action of NTZ was investigated by detecting the phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulation, plasma membrane permeability, mitochondrial membrane potential and ultrastructural modifications by transmission electron microscopy. NTZ's activity against L. infantum was confirmed, producing IC50 values of 42.71?g/mL against promastigotes and 6.78?g/mL against intracellular amastigotes. NTZ rapidly altered the cellular metabolism of promastigotes by depolarising the mitochondrial membrane and up-regulating the reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, the flow cytometry data revealed an intense and time-dependent exposure of PS in promastigotes. When using SYTOX(®) Green as a fluorescent probe, NTZ demonstrated no interference in plasma membrane permeability. The ultrastructural alterations in promastigotes were time-dependent and caused chromatin condensation, plasma membrane blebbing and mitochondrial swelling. These data suggest that NTZ induced oxidative stress in L. (L.) infantum and might be a useful compound for investigating new therapeutic targets. PMID:24071379

  20. Lethal giant larvae 2 regulates development of the ciliated organ Kupffer’s vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Hwee Goon; Schulze, Sabrina K.; Compagnon, Julien; Foley, Fiona C.; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Yost, H. Joseph; Abdelilah-Seyfried, Salim; Amack, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Motile cilia perform crucial functions during embryonic development and throughout adult life. Development of organs containing motile cilia involves regulation of cilia formation (ciliogenesis) and formation of a luminal space (lumenogenesis) in which cilia generate fluid flows. Control of ciliogenesis and lumenogenesis is not yet fully understood, and it remains unclear whether these processes are coupled. In the zebrafish embryo, lethal giant larvae 2 (lgl2) is expressed prominently in ciliated organs. Lgl proteins are involved in establishing cell polarity and have been implicated in vesicle trafficking. Here, we identified a role for Lgl2 in development of ciliated epithelia in Kupffer’s vesicle, which directs left-right asymmetry of the embryo; the otic vesicles, which give rise to the inner ear; and the pronephric ducts of the kidney. Using Kupffer’s vesicle as a model ciliated organ, we found that depletion of Lgl2 disrupted lumen formation and reduced cilia number and length. Immunofluorescence and time-lapse imaging of Kupffer’s vesicle morphogenesis in Lgl2-deficient embryos suggested cell adhesion defects and revealed loss of the adherens junction component E-cadherin at lateral membranes. Genetic interaction experiments indicate that Lgl2 interacts with Rab11a to regulate E-cadherin and mediate lumen formation that is uncoupled from cilia formation. These results uncover new roles and interactions for Lgl2 that are crucial for both lumenogenesis and ciliogenesis and indicate that these processes are genetically separable in zebrafish. PMID:23482490

  1. Baicalin inhibits the lethality of ricin in mice by inducing protein oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Yutao; Niu, Xiaodi; Zhang, Yu; Li, Rui; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Quan; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Xuming

    2015-05-15

    Toxic ribosome-inactivating proteins abolish cell viability by inhibiting protein synthesis. Ricin, a member of these lethal proteins, is a potential bioterrorism agent. Despite the grave challenge posed by these toxins to public health, post-exposure treatment for intoxication caused by these agents currently is unavailable. In this study, we report the identification of baicalin extracted from Chinese herbal medicine as a compound capable of inhibiting the activity of ricin. More importantly, post-exposure treatment with baicalin significantly increased the survival of mice poisoned by ricin. We determined the mechanism of action of baicalin by solving the crystal structure of its complex with the A chain of ricin (RTA) at 2.2 Å resolution, which revealed that baicalin interacts with two RTA molecules at a novel binding site by hydrogen bond networks and electrostatic force interactions, suggesting its role as molecular glue of the RTA. Further biochemical and biophysical analyses validated the amino acids directly involved in binding the inhibitor, which is consistent with the hypothesis that baicalin exerts its inhibitory effects by inducing RTA to form oligomers in solution, a mechanism that is distinctly different from previously reported inhibitors. This work offers promising leads for the development of therapeutics against ricin and probably other ribosome-inactivating proteins. PMID:25847243

  2. Histopathological changes in snail, Pomacea canaliculata, exposed to sub-lethal copper sulfate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Dummee, Vipawee; Tanhan, Phanwimol; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Damrongphol, Praneet; Pokethitiyook, Prayad

    2015-12-01

    The acute toxicity test of Cu including range-finding and definitive test, was performed on golden apple snails, Pomacea canaliculata. The median lethal concentrations (LC50) of Cu at exposure times of 24, 48, 72 and 96h were 330, 223, 177 and 146µg/L, respectively. P. canaliculata were exposed to Cu at 146µg/L for 96h to study bioaccumulation and histopathological alterations in various organs. Snails accumulated elevated levels of Cu in gill, and lesser amounts in the digestive tract, muscle, and digestive gland. Histopathological investigation revealed several alterations in the epithelia of gill, digestive tract (esophagus, intestine, rectum), and digestive gland. The most striking changes were observed in the epithelium of the gill in which there was loss of cilia, an increase in number of mucus cells, and degeneration of columnar cells. Similar changes occurred in digestive tract epithelium. The digestive gland showed moderate alterations, vacuolization and degeneration of cells and an increase in the number of basophilic cells. We concluded that, P. canaliculata has a great potential as a bioindicator for Cu, and a biomarker for monitoring Cu contamination in aquatic environment. PMID:26295753

  3. Cardiomyocyte H9c2 cells present a valuable alternative to fish lethal testing for azoxystrobin.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Elsa T; Pardal, Miguel Â; Laizé, Vincent; Cancela, M Leonor; Oliveira, Paulo J; Serafim, Teresa L

    2015-11-01

    The present study aims at identifying, among six mammalian and fish cell lines, a sensitive cell line whose in vitro median inhibitory concentration (IC50) better matches the in vivo short-term Sparus aurata median lethal concentration (LC50). IC50s and LC50 were assessed after exposure to the widely used fungicide azoxystrobin (AZX). Statistical results were relevant for most cell lines after 48 h of AZX exposure, being H9c2 the most sensitive cells, as well as the ones which provided the best prediction of fish toxicity, with a LC50,96h/IC50,48h = 0.581. H9c2 cell proliferation upon 72 h of AZX exposure revealed a LC50,96h/IC50,72h = 0.998. Therefore, identical absolute sensitivities were attained for both in vitro and in vivo assays. To conclude, the H9c2 cell-based assay is reliable and represents a suitable ethical alternative to conventional fish assays for AZX, and could be used to get valuable insights into the toxic effects of other pesticides. PMID:26319055

  4. Plancitoxins, lethal factors from the crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci, are deoxyribonucleases II.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Kazuo; Midorikawa, Sayaka; Ishida, Masami; Nagashima, Yuji; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2004-10-01

    Two lethal factors (named plancitoxins I and II for major and minor toxins, respectively) with the same LD50 (i.v. injection into mice) of 140 microg/kg were purified from spines of the crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci. Injection of a sublethal dose of plancitoxin I or II into mice remarkably elevated serum levels of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and glutamic pyruvic transaminase, demonstrating that both toxins are potently hepatotoxic. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed that both plancitoxins are composed of two subunits (alpha-subunit of 10 kDa and beta-subunit of 27 kDa) bridged by a disulfide bond. Based on the determined N-terminal amino acid sequences of alpha- and beta-subunits, the full-length cDNA (1820 bp) encoding plancitoxin I was cloned by RT-PCR, 3'-RACE and 5'-RACE. alpha-Subunit (92 amino acid residues) and beta-subunit (240 residues) are coded in this order by the same cDNA. Interestingly, the deduced amino acid sequence of plancitoxin I showed 40-42% homologies with mammalian deoxyribonucleases II (DNases II). In addition, plancitoxin I exhibited DNA degrading activity with an optimum pH of 7.2. Plancitoxin I is the first example of toxic DNases II whose structures have been elucidated. PMID:15450924

  5. Automated Groundwater Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Glenn A.; Collard, Leonard, B.

    2005-10-31

    The Automated Intruder Analysis has been extended to include an Automated Ground Water Screening option. This option screens 825 radionuclides while rigorously applying the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) methodology. An extension to that methodology is presented to give a more realistic screening factor for those radionuclides which have significant daughters. The extension has the promise of reducing the number of radionuclides which must be tracked by the customer. By combining the Automated Intruder Analysis with the Automated Groundwater Screening a consistent set of assumptions and databases is used. A method is proposed to eliminate trigger values by performing rigorous calculation of the screening factor thereby reducing the number of radionuclides sent to further analysis. Using the same problem definitions as in previous groundwater screenings, the automated groundwater screening found one additional nuclide, Ge-68, which failed the screening. It also found that 18 of the 57 radionuclides contained in NCRP Table 3.1 failed the screening. This report describes the automated groundwater screening computer application.

  6. Active versus Passive Screen Time for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetser, Penelope; Johnson, Daniel; Ozdowska, Anne; Wyeth, Peta

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report some initial findings from our investigations into the Australian Government's Longitudinal Study of Australian Children dataset. It is revealed that the majority of Australian children are exceeding the government's Screen Time recommendations and that most of their screen time is spent as TV viewing, as opposed to video…

  7. Connectivity Homology Enables Inter-Species Network Models of Synthetic Lethality.

    PubMed

    Jacunski, Alexandra; Dixon, Scott J; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2015-10-01

    Synthetic lethality is a genetic interaction wherein two otherwise nonessential genes cause cellular inviability when knocked out simultaneously. Drugs can mimic genetic knock-out effects; therefore, our understanding of promiscuous drugs, polypharmacology-related adverse drug reactions, and multi-drug therapies, especially cancer combination therapy, may be informed by a deeper understanding of synthetic lethality. However, the colossal experimental burden in humans necessitates in silico methods to guide the identification of synthetic lethal pairs. Here, we present SINaTRA (Species-INdependent TRAnslation), a network-based methodology that discovers genome-wide synthetic lethality in translation between species. SINaTRA uses connectivity homology, defined as biological connectivity patterns that persist across species, to identify synthetic lethal pairs. Importantly, our approach does not rely on genetic homology or structural and functional similarity, and it significantly outperforms models utilizing these data. We validate SINaTRA by predicting synthetic lethality in S. pombe using S. cerevisiae data, then identify over one million putative human synthetic lethal pairs to guide experimental approaches. We highlight the translational applications of our algorithm for drug discovery by identifying clusters of genes significantly enriched for single- and multi-drug cancer therapies. PMID:26451775

  8. Declines in the Lethality of Suicide Attempts Explain the Decline in Suicide Deaths in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Spittal, Matthew J.; Pirkis, Jane; Miller, Matthew; Studdert, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate the epidemiology of a steep decrease in the incidence of suicide deaths in Australia. Methods National data on suicide deaths and deliberate self-harm for the period 1994–2007 were obtained from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. We calculated attempt and death rates for five major methods and the lethality of these methods. Negative binomial regression was used to estimate the size and significance of method-specific time-trends in attempts and lethality. Results Hanging, motor vehicle exhaust and firearms were the most lethal methods, and together accounted for 72% of all deaths. The lethality of motor vehicle exhaust attempts decreased sharply (RR?=?0.94 per year, 95% CI 0.93–0.95) while the motor vehicle exhaust attempt rate changed little; this combination of motor vehicle exhaust trends explained nearly half of the overall decline in suicide deaths. Hanging lethality also decreased sharply (RR?=?0.96 per year, 95% CI 0.956–0.965) but large increases in hanging attempts negated the effect on death rates. Firearm lethality changed little while attempts decreased. Conclusion Declines in the lethality of suicide attempts–especially attempts by motor vehicle exhaust and hanging–explain the remarkable decline in deaths by suicide in Australia since 1997. PMID:22957084

  9. Connectivity Homology Enables Inter-Species Network Models of Synthetic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Jacunski, Alexandra; Dixon, Scott J.; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic lethality is a genetic interaction wherein two otherwise nonessential genes cause cellular inviability when knocked out simultaneously. Drugs can mimic genetic knock-out effects; therefore, our understanding of promiscuous drugs, polypharmacology-related adverse drug reactions, and multi-drug therapies, especially cancer combination therapy, may be informed by a deeper understanding of synthetic lethality. However, the colossal experimental burden in humans necessitates in silico methods to guide the identification of synthetic lethal pairs. Here, we present SINaTRA (Species-INdependent TRAnslation), a network-based methodology that discovers genome-wide synthetic lethality in translation between species. SINaTRA uses connectivity homology, defined as biological connectivity patterns that persist across species, to identify synthetic lethal pairs. Importantly, our approach does not rely on genetic homology or structural and functional similarity, and it significantly outperforms models utilizing these data. We validate SINaTRA by predicting synthetic lethality in S. pombe using S. cerevisiae data, then identify over one million putative human synthetic lethal pairs to guide experimental approaches. We highlight the translational applications of our algorithm for drug discovery by identifying clusters of genes significantly enriched for single- and multi-drug cancer therapies. PMID:26451775

  10. Gene family encoding the major toxins of lethal Amanita mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Hallen, Heather E; Luo, Hong; Scott-Craig, John S; Walton, Jonathan D

    2007-11-27

    Amatoxins, the lethal constituents of poisonous mushrooms in the genus Amanita, are bicyclic octapeptides. Two genes in A. bisporigera, AMA1 and PHA1, directly encode alpha-amanitin, an amatoxin, and the related bicyclic heptapeptide phallacidin, a phallotoxin, indicating that these compounds are synthesized on ribosomes and not by nonribosomal peptide synthetases. alpha-Amanitin and phallacidin are synthesized as proproteins of 35 and 34 amino acids, respectively, from which they are predicted to be cleaved by a prolyl oligopeptidase. AMA1 and PHA1 are present in other toxic species of Amanita section Phalloidae but are absent from nontoxic species in other sections. The genomes of A. bisporigera and A. phalloides contain multiple sequences related to AMA1 and PHA1. The predicted protein products of this family of genes are characterized by a hypervariable "toxin" region capable of encoding a wide variety of peptides of 7-10 amino acids flanked by conserved sequences. Our results suggest that these fungi have a broad capacity to synthesize cyclic peptides on ribosomes. PMID:18025465

  11. Gene family encoding the major toxins of lethal Amanita mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Hallen, Heather E.; Luo, Hong; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    Amatoxins, the lethal constituents of poisonous mushrooms in the genus Amanita, are bicyclic octapeptides. Two genes in A. bisporigera, AMA1 and PHA1, directly encode ?-amanitin, an amatoxin, and the related bicyclic heptapeptide phallacidin, a phallotoxin, indicating that these compounds are synthesized on ribosomes and not by nonribosomal peptide synthetases. ?-Amanitin and phallacidin are synthesized as proproteins of 35 and 34 amino acids, respectively, from which they are predicted to be cleaved by a prolyl oligopeptidase. AMA1 and PHA1 are present in other toxic species of Amanita section Phalloidae but are absent from nontoxic species in other sections. The genomes of A. bisporigera and A. phalloides contain multiple sequences related to AMA1 and PHA1. The predicted protein products of this family of genes are characterized by a hypervariable “toxin” region capable of encoding a wide variety of peptides of 7–10 amino acids flanked by conserved sequences. Our results suggest that these fungi have a broad capacity to synthesize cyclic peptides on ribosomes. PMID:18025465

  12. Sticky foam as a less-than-lethal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Steven H.

    1997-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in 1994 completed a project funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to determine the applicability of sticky foam for correctional applications. Sticky foam is an extremely tacky, tenacious material used to block, entangle, and impair individuals. The NIJ project developed a gun capable of firing multiple shots of sticky foam, tested the gun and sticky foam effectiveness on SNL volunteers acting out prison and law enforcement scenarios, and had the gun and sticky foam evaluated by correctional representatives. Based on the NIJ project work, SNL supported the Marine Corps Mission, Operation United Shield, with sticky foam guns and supporting equipment to assist in the withdrawal of UN Peacekeepers from Somalia. Prior to the loan of the waste disposal, use limitations, use protocol and precautions, emergency facial clean-up, skin clean-up, gun filling, targeting and firing, and gun cleaning. The Marine Corps successfully used the sticky foam guns as part of that operation. This paper describes these recent developments of sticky foam for non-lethal uses and some of the lessons learned from scenario and application testing.

  13. Evolution of the Drosophila Feminizing Switch Gene Sex-lethal

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Thomas W.; Dorsett, Maia; Sun, Sha; Harrison, Melissa M.; Dines, Jessica; Sefton, Louise; Megna, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the gene Sex-lethal (Sxl) controls all aspects of female development. Since melanogaster males lacking Sxl appear wild type, Sxl would seem to be functionally female specific. Nevertheless, in insects as diverse as honeybees and houseflies, Sxl seems not to determine sex or to be functionally female specific. Here we describe three lines of work that address the questions of how, when, and even whether the ancestor of melanogaster Sxl ever shed its non-female-specific functions. First, to test the hypothesis that the birth of Sxl's closest paralog allowed Sxl to lose essential ancestral non-female-specific functions, we determined the CG3056 null phenotype. That phenotype failed to support this hypothesis. Second, to define when Sxl might have lost ancestral non-female-specific functions, we isolated and characterized Sxl mutations in D. virilis, a species distant from melanogaster and notable for the large amount of Sxl protein expression in males. We found no change in Sxl regulation or functioning in the 40+ MY since these two species diverged. Finally, we discovered conserved non-sex-specific Sxl mRNAs containing a previously unknown, potentially translation-initiating exon, and we identified a conserved open reading frame starting in Sxl male-specific exon 3. We conclude that Drosophila Sxl may appear functionally female specific not because it lost non-female-specific functions, but because those functions are nonessential in the laboratory. The potential evolutionary relevance of these nonessential functions is discussed. PMID:20837995

  14. Lethal Lullabies: A History of Opium Use in Infants.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Poppy extract accompanied the human infant for more than 3 millenia. Motives for its use included excessive crying, suspected pain, and diarrhea. In antiquity, infantile sleeplessness was regarded as a disease. When treatment with opium was recommended by Galen, Rhazes, and Avicenna, baby sedation made its way into early medical treatises and pediatric instructions. Dabbing maternal nipples with bitter substances and drugging the infant with opium were used to hasten weaning. A freerider of gum lancing, opiates joined the treatment of difficult teething in the 17th century. Foundling hospitals and wet-nurses used them extensively. With industrialization, private use was rampant among the working class. In German-speaking countries, poppy extracts were administered in soups and pacifiers. In English-speaking countries, proprietary drugs containing opium were marketed under names such as soothers, nostrums, anodynes, cordials, preservatives, and specifics and sold at the doorstep or in grocery stores. Opium's toxicity for infants was common knowledge; thousands of cases of lethal intoxication had been reported from antiquity. What is remarkable is that the willingness to use it in infants persisted and that physicians continued to prescribe it for babies. Unregulated trade, and even that protected by governments, led to greatly increased private use of opiates during the 19th century. Intoxication became a significant factor in infant mortality. As late as 1912, the International Hague Convention forced governments to implement legislation that effectively curtailed access to opium and broke the dangerous habit of sedating infants. PMID:26163533

  15. Sticky foam as a less-than-lethal technology

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Labs (SNL) in 1994 completed a project funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to determine the applicability of sticky foam for correctional applications. Sticky foam is an extremely tacky, tenacious material used to block, entangle, and impair individuals. The NIJ project developed a gun capable of firing multiple shots of sticky foam, tested the gun and sticky foam effectiveness on SNL volunteers acting out prison and law enforcement scenarios, and had the gun and sticky foam evaluated by correctional representatives. Based on the NIJ project work, SNL supported the Marine Corps Mission, Operation United Shield, with sticky foam guns and supporting equipment to assist in the withdrawal of UN Peacekeepers from Somalia. Prior to the loan of the equipment, the Marines were given training in sticky foam characterization, toxicology, safety issues, cleanup and waste disposal, use limitations, use protocol and precautions, emergency facial clean-up, skin cleanup, gun filling, targeting and firing, and gun cleaning. The Marine Corps successfully used the sticky foam guns as part of that operation. This paper describes these recent developments of sticky foam for non-lethal uses and some of the lessons learned from scenario and application testing.

  16. Potentially-lethal damage and radioprotection in human cells exposed to californium-252

    SciTech Connect

    Schroy, C.B.; Goud, S.N.; Magura, C.; Feola, J.M.; Maruyama, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Cultured human T-1E cells were irradiated with californium-252 neutrons and gamma rays. When 2 mm caffeine was present in the medium for 47 h after irradiation cell survival (assayed by colony formation) was decreased significantly. When 2 m dimethylsulfoxide was present during the irradiations radioprotection was observed using the same assay. The caffeine data indicate that potentially-lethal lesions exist in cells after californium exposure and that these lesions can be made lethal when they would otherwise be repaired. The DMSO data indicate that radioprotection from californium exposure can be achieved and that scanvengable free radicals play an important role in Cf-252 lethality.

  17. Composite scintillator screen

    DOEpatents

    Zeman, Herbert D. (1687 Peach St., Memphis, TN 38112)

    1994-01-01

    A scintillator screen for an X-ray system includes a substrate of low-Z material and bodies of a high-Z material embedded within the substrate. By preselecting the size of the bodies embedded within the substrate, the spacial separation of the bodies and the thickness of the screen, the sensitivity of the screen to X-rays within a predetermined energy range can be predicted.

  18. Combination of hearing screening and genetic screening for deafness-susceptibility genes in newborns.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gen-Dong; Li, Shou-Xia; Chen, Ding-Li; Feng, Hai-Qin; Zhao, Su-Bin; Liu, Yong-Jie; Guo, Li-Li; Yang, Zhi-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Sun, Cai-Xia; Wang, Ze-Hui; Zhang, Wei-Yong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of the results of screening of newborn hearing and the incidence of deafness-susceptibility genes. One thousand newborn babies in the Handan Center Hospital (Handan, China) underwent screening of hearing and deafness-susceptibility genes. The first screening test was carried out using otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Babies with hearing loss who failed to pass the initial screening were scheduled for rescreening at 42 days after birth. Cord blood was used for the screening of deafness-susceptibility genes, namely the GJB2, SLC26A4 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA (MTRNR1) genes. Among the 1,000 neonates that underwent the first hearing screening, 25 exhibited left-sided hearing loss, 21 exhibited right-sided hearing loss and 15 cases had binaural hearing loss. After rescreening 42 days later, only one of the initial 61 cases exhibited hearing loss under OAE testing. The neonatal deafness gene tests showed two cases with 1555A>G mutation and two cases with 1494C>T mutation of the MTRNR1 gene. In the SLC26A4 gene screening, four cases exhibited the heterozygous IVS7-2A>G mutation and one case exhibited heterozygous 1226G>A mutation. In the GJB2 gene screening, two cases exhibited the homozygous 427C>T mutation and 10 exhibited the heterozygous 235delC mutation. The genetic screening revealed 21 newborns with mutations in the three deafness-susceptibility genes. The overall carrier rate was 2.1% (21/1,000). The association of hearing and gene screening may be the promising screening strategy for the diagnosis of hearing loss. PMID:24348793

  19. The effect of peripheral lymphoid cells on the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease following allogeneic mouse bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Almaraz, R.; Ballinger, W.; Sachs, D.H.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1983-02-01

    Experiments were performed to study the role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation-induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras. The incidence of GVHD was reduced significantly in BALB/c leads to C57BL/6 radiation chimeras if bone marrow donors were exsanguinated immediately prior to marrow harvest. Chimeras resulting from the injection of bone marrow from bled donors exhibited only donor cells in spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood and normal levels of Thy 1+ and Ia+ cells were found in each of these lymphoid compartments. The addition of as few as 3 X 10(4) peripheral mononuclear cells to the marrow from exsanguinated donors uniformly led to lethal GVHD. /sup 51/Cr-labeled cell traffic studies revealed that prior exsanguination of marrow donors led to about a 70% reduction in the number of circulating mononuclear cells contaminating the bone marrow at the time of marrow harvest. This decrease in contaminating peripheral cells was calculated to be in the appropriate range to account for the decreased GVHD seen when marrow from exsanguinated donors was used. It thus appears that peripheral cells contaminating marrow can be an important factor in causing lethal GVHD in allogeneic radiation chimeras. These results raise the possibility that the fulminant GVHD seen in human marrow transplantation is in part due to the major contamination of bone marrow with peripheral blood that results from the techniques currently used for human bone marrow harvest.

  20. Peri-implantation lethality in mice carrying megabase-scale deletion on 5qc3.3 is caused by Exoc1 null mutation

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Seiya; Takami, Kohei; Daitoku, Yoko; Tanimoto, Yoko; Dinh, Tra Thi Huong; Mizuno-Iijima, Saori; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Satoru; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Yagami, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    We found a novel spontaneous mouse mutant with depigmentation in the ventral body, which we called White Spotting (WS) mouse. Genetic investigation revealed deletion of a?>?1.2-Mb genomic region containing nine genes (Kit, Kdr, Srd5a3, Tmeme165, Clock, Pdcl2, Nmu, Exoc1, and Cep135). We designated this mutant allele KitWS. Interestingly, homozygous mutants (KitWS/WS) showed a peri-implantation lethal phenotype. Expression analyses of these nine genes in blastocysts suggested that Exoc1 was a prime candidate for this phenotype. We produced Exoc1 knockout mice, and the same peri-implantation lethal phenotype was seen in Exoc1?/? embryos. In addition, the polygenic effect without Exoc1 was investigated in genome-edited KitWE mice carrying the Mb-scale deletion induced by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. As KitWE/WE embryos did not exhibit the abnormal phenotype, which was seen in KitWS/WS. We concluded that peri-implantation lethality in KitWS/WS was caused by a monogenic defect of Exoc1. PMID:26346620

  1. A strong loss-of-function mutation in RAN1 results in constitutive activation of the ethylene response pathway as well as a rosette-lethal phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeste, K. E.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A recessive mutation was identified that constitutively activated the ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis and resulted in a rosette-lethal phenotype. Positional cloning of the gene corresponding to this mutation revealed that it was allelic to responsive to antagonist1 (ran1), a mutation that causes seedlings to respond in a positive manner to what is normally a competitive inhibitor of ethylene binding. In contrast to the previously identified ran1-1 and ran1-2 alleles that are morphologically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, this ran1-3 allele results in a rosette-lethal phenotype. The predicted protein encoded by the RAN1 gene is similar to the Wilson and Menkes disease proteins and yeast Ccc2 protein, which are integral membrane cation-transporting P-type ATPases involved in copper trafficking. Genetic epistasis analysis indicated that RAN1 acts upstream of mutations in the ethylene receptor gene family. However, the rosette-lethal phenotype of ran1-3 was not suppressed by ethylene-insensitive mutants, suggesting that this mutation also affects a non-ethylene-dependent pathway regulating cell expansion. The phenotype of ran1-3 mutants is similar to loss-of-function ethylene receptor mutants, suggesting that RAN1 may be required to form functional ethylene receptors. Furthermore, these results suggest that copper is required not only for ethylene binding but also for the signaling function of the ethylene receptors.

  2. Recombinant raccoon pox vaccine protects mice against lethal plague

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osorio, J.E.; Powell, T.D.; Frank, R.S.; Moss, K.; Haanes, E.J.; Smith, S.R.; Rocke, T.E.; Stinchcomb, D.T.

    2003-01-01

    Using a raccoon poxvirus (RCN) expression system, we have developed new recombinant vaccines that can protect mice against lethal plague infection. We tested the effects of a translation enhancer (EMCV-IRES) in combination with a secretory (tPA) signal or secretory (tPA) and membrane anchoring (CHV-gG) signals on in vitro antigen expression of F1 antigen in tissue culture and the induction of antibody responses and protection against Yersinia pestis challenge in mice. The RCN vector successfully expressed the F1 protein of Y. pestis in vitro. In addition, the level of expression was increased by the insertion of the EMCV-IRES and combinations of this and the secretory signal or secretory and anchoring signals. These recombinant viruses generated protective immune responses that resulted in survival of 80% of vaccinated mice upon challenge with Y. pestis. Of the RCN-based vaccines we tested, the RCN-IRES-tPA-YpF1 recombinant construct was the most efficacious. Mice vaccinated with this construct withstood challenge with as many as 1.5 million colony forming units of Y. pestis (7.7??104LD50). Interestingly, vaccination with F1 fused to the anchoring signal (RCN-IRES-tPA-YpF1-gG) elicited significant anti-F1 antibody titers, but failed to protect mice from plague challenge. Our studies demonstrate, in vitro and in vivo, the potential importance of the EMCV-IRES and secretory signals in vaccine design. These molecular tools provide a new approach for improving the efficacy of vaccines. In addition, these novel recombinant vaccines could have human, veterinary, and wildlife applications in the prevention of plague. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Origin of the lethal gas burst from Lake Monoun, Cameroun

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Devine, J.D.; Tchua, F.M.; Presser, F.M.; Pringle, M.K.W.; Evans, William C.

    1987-01-01

    On 15 August, 1984, a lethal gas burst issued from a submerged 96-m-deep crater in Lake Monoun in Cameroun, western Africa, killing 37 people. The event was associated with a landslide from the eastern crater rim, which slumped into deep water. Waters below 50 m are anoxic, dominated by high Fe2+ (???600 mg/l) and HCO3- (??? 1900 mg/l), anoxic and supersaturated with siderite, which is a major component of the crater floor sediments. The unusually high Fe2+ levels are attributed to reduction of laterite-derived ferric iron gradually brought into the lake as loess and in river input. Sulfur compounds are below detection limits in both water and gas. Gases effervescing from depressurized deep waters are dominantly CO2 with minor CH4, having ??13C of -7.18 and -54.8 per mil, respectively. Bacterial decomposition of organic matter may account for the methane, but 14C of lake water indicates that only 10% of the carbon is modern, giving an apparent age of 18,000 years. The dominant source of carbon is therefore attributed to long-term emission of CO2 as volcanic exhalation from vents within the crater, which led to gradual build-up of HCO3- in the lake. The density stratification of the lake may have been upset by an earthquake and underwater landslide on 15 August, which triggered overturn of the lake and caused nucleation of CO2 in the deep water. The resultant ebullition of CO2 from deep lake waters led to a gas burst at the surface and locally generated a water wave up to 5 m high. People travelling through the gas cloud were asphyxiated, presumably from CO2, and suffered skin discoloration from unidentified components. ?? 1987.

  4. Accuracy of patients' recall of Pap and cholesterol screening.

    PubMed Central

    Newell, S; Girgis, A; Sanson-Fisher, R; Ireland, M

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken in mid-1994 and assessed how accurately patients recall the recency and result of their most recent cholesterol and Papanicolaou (Pap) tests. METHODS: A cross-sectional, door-to-door community survey was used to gather self-report and, subsequently, pathology laboratory data for 195 individuals. RESULTS: In regard to cholesterol screening, 30% of individuals who reported being adequately screened were actually inadequately screened, 45% who reported normal cholesterol levels actually had elevated levels, and 21% of inadequately screened individuals and 56% of individuals with elevated levels were not identified by self-report. In terms of Pap screening, 28% of women who reported being adequately screened were actually inadequately screened, 11% of patients who reported a normal Pap test actually had abnormal or inadequate results, and 55% of inadequately screened individuals and 53% of individuals with abnormal or inadequate results were not identified by self-report. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed self-report to be a less-than-adequate measure of individuals' recall of cholesterol and Pap screening. Relying exclusively on self-report surveys as indicators of screening coverage is likely to result in significant underestimations of the proportion of people who are inadequately screened or whose results indicate a need for intervention. PMID:10983202

  5. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...cover the entire germ cell cycle. The offspring of these females are scored for lethal effects corresponding to the effects on mature sperm, mid or late stage spermatids, early spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia at the time of treatment....

  6. Herpes simplex virus 1 interaction with Toll-like receptor 2 contributes to lethal encephalitis

    E-print Network

    Knipe, David M.

    Herpes simplex virus 1 interaction with Toll-like receptor 2 contributes to lethal encephalitis-1) is the most commonly diagnosed cause of sporadic (nonepidemic) encephalitis in humans. Without hosts, including disseminated infection, pneumonia, and hepatitis, encephalitis is commonly seen

  7. Variability in mutational fitness effects prevents full lethal transitions in large quasispecies populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardanyés, Josep; Simó, Carles; Martínez, Regina; Solé, Ricard V.; Elena, Santiago F.

    2014-04-01

    The distribution of mutational fitness effects (DMFE) is crucial to the evolutionary fate of quasispecies. In this article we analyze the effect of the DMFE on the dynamics of a large quasispecies by means of a phenotypic version of the classic Eigen's model that incorporates beneficial, neutral, deleterious, and lethal mutations. By parameterizing the model with available experimental data on the DMFE of Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Tobacco etch virus (TEV), we found that increasing mutation does not totally push the entire viral quasispecies towards deleterious or lethal regions of the phenotypic sequence space. The probability of finding regions in the parameter space of the general model that results in a quasispecies only composed by lethal phenotypes is extremely small at equilibrium and in transient times. The implications of our findings can be extended to other scenarios, such as lethal mutagenesis or genomically unstable cancer, where increased mutagenesis has been suggested as a potential therapy.

  8. Antibiotics induce redox-related physiological alterations as part of their lethality

    E-print Network

    Collins, James J.

    Antibiotics induce redox-related physiological alterations as part of their lethality Daniel J 30, 2014) Deeper understanding of antibiotic-induced physiological responses is critical to identifying means for enhancing our current antibiotic arsenal. Bactericidal antibiotics with diverse targets

  9. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...entire germ cell cycle. The offspring of these females are scored for lethal effects corresponding to the effects on mature sperm, mid or late stage spermatids, early spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia at the time of treatment. (2) F...

  10. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...entire germ cell cycle. The offspring of these females are scored for lethal effects corresponding to the effects on mature sperm, mid or late stage spermatids, early spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia at the time of treatment. (2) F...

  11. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...entire germ cell cycle. The offspring of these females are scored for lethal effects corresponding to the effects on mature sperm, mid or late stage spermatids, early spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia at the time of treatment. (2) F...

  12. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...entire germ cell cycle. The offspring of these females are scored for lethal effects corresponding to the effects on mature sperm, mid or late stage spermatids, early spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia at the time of treatment. (2) F...

  13. Liver damage by the crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) lethal factor.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, H; Kikuchi, T; Konno, K

    1990-01-01

    Upon autopsy of mice injected with the crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) lethal factor, a change in color of the liver, swelling of the gall bladder and jaundice were observed. After administration of the lethal factor into mice, activities of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), acid phosphatase (ACP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were significantly elevated in serum. Hepatic ALP also increased markedly but hepatic GOT, GPT and ACP showed a tendency to decrease. Activity of hepatic LDH first decreased and then returned to control level. Histopathological studies showed that severe degenerative changes such as enlargement and necrosis of hepatocytes were caused in the mouse liver by the lethal factor. These results strongly suggested that the A. planci lethal factor is a potent hepatotoxin. PMID:2389250

  14. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Screening

    Cancer.gov

    PCRB is interested in research that promotes optimal use of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screenings in populations. Optimal use balances the benefit of screening for people who will get cancer in their lifetime against the harms to those who will not get cancer.

  15. Lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Lynn T; Tanner, Nichole T; Gould, Michael K; Silvestri, Gerard A

    2015-01-01

    The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in adults of age 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and are currently smoking or have quit within the past 15 years. This recommendation is largely based on the findings of the National Lung Screening Trial. Both policy-level and clinical decision-making about LDCT screening must consider the potential benefits of screening (reduced mortality from lung cancer) and possible harms. Effective screening requires an appreciation that screening should be limited to individuals at high risk of death from lung cancer, and that the risk of harm related to false positive findings, overdiagnosis, and unnecessary invasive testing is real. A comprehensive understanding of these aspects of screening will inform appropriate implementation, with the objective that an evidence-based and systematic approach to screening will help to reduce the enormous mortality burden of lung cancer. PMID:25369325

  16. Scoliosis Screening in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Pupil Personnel Services.

    The booklet outlines New York state school policy and procedures for screening students for scoliosis, lateral curvature of the spine. It is explained that screening is designed to discover spinal deformities early enough to prevent surgery. Planning aspects, including organizing a planning team for the school district, are discussed. Among…

  17. Non-Lethal Ionizing Radiation Promotes Aging-Like Phenotypic Changes of Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changshan; Oshima, Motohiko; Sashida, Goro; Tomioka, Takahisa; Hasegawa, Nagisa; Mochizuki-Kashio, Makiko; Nakajima-Takagi, Yaeko; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Imai, Kazue; Nakachi, Kei; Iwama, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Precise understanding of radiation effects is critical to develop new modalities for the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced damage. We previously reported that non-lethal doses of X-ray irradiation induce DNA damage in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reconstituted in NOD/Shi-scid IL2r?null (NOG) immunodeficient mice and severely compromise their repopulating capacity. In this study, we analyzed in detail the functional changes in human HSPCs in NOG mice following non-lethal radiation. We transplanted cord blood CD34+ HSPCs into NOG mice. At 12 weeks post-transplantation, the recipients were irradiated with 0, 0.5, or 1.0 Gy. At 2 weeks post-irradiation, human CD34+ HSPCs recovered from the primary recipient mice were transplanted into secondary recipients. CD34+ HSPCs from irradiated mice showed severely impaired reconstitution capacity in the secondary recipient mice. Of interest, non-lethal radiation compromised contribution of HSPCs to the peripheral blood cells, particularly to CD19+ B lymphocytes, which resulted in myeloid-biased repopulation. Co-culture of limiting numbers of CD34+ HSPCs with stromal cells revealed that the frequency of B cell-producing CD34+ HSPCs at 2 weeks post-irradiation was reduced more than 10-fold. Furthermore, the key B-cell regulator genes such as IL-7R and EBF1 were downregulated in HSPCs upon 0.5 Gy irradiation. Given that compromised repopulating capacity and myeloid-biased differentiation are representative phenotypes of aged HSCs, our findings indicate that non-lethal ionizing radiation is one of the critical external stresses that promote aging of human HSPCs in the bone marrow niche. PMID:26161905

  18. Cocaine toxicity: concurrent influence of dopaminergic, muscarinic and sigma receptors in mediating cocaine-induced lethality.

    PubMed

    Ritz, M C; George, F R

    1997-02-01

    The concurrent influence of dopaminergic, sigma and muscarinic neurotransmitter systems in mediating cocaine-induced lethality is predicted by previous receptor binding results from our laboratories. The present results demonstrate that pharmacological manipulations of these predicted neurotransmitter systems alter the occurrence of cocaine-induced lethality in C57BL/6J mice. The dopamine reuptake inhibitor bupropion increased the number of occurrences of lethality produced by (-) cocaine, while the dopaminergic D1 antagonist SCH 23390, the muscarinic M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and the sigma ligand (+) SKF 10047 all significantly, but only partially, antagonized (-) cocaine-induced lethality. In addition, the protective effects against lethality of the drug combinations SCH 23390 + pirenzepine or SCH 23390 + SKF 10047 were greater than any of these drugs used alone. These results are consistent with those from the previous receptor binding studies, and provide converging supportive evidence that the lethal effects of cocaine depend upon concurrent interactions with dopaminergic, muscarinic M1 and sigma receptor sites. PMID:9085400

  19. Psychological screening program overview.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kathleen M; Huffman, Ann H; Adler, Amy B; Castro, Carl A

    2002-10-01

    This article reviews the literature on health surveillance conducted during military deployments, focusing on models for assessing the impact of operational deployments on peacekeepers. A discussion of the stressors and potential mental health consequences of peacekeeping operations follows with relevant examples of findings from U.S. and international military forces. Psychological screening in different peacekeeping operations conducted in U.S. Army-Europe is reviewed. The review begins with the redeployment screening of military personnel deployed to Bosnia mandated under the Joint Medical Surveillance Program, and continues through the present screening of units deployed to Kosovo. The detailed description of the screening program includes a discussion of procedures and measures and demonstrates the evolution of the program. A summary of key findings from the screening program and a discussion of future research directions are provided. PMID:12392255

  20. Synthetic lethal screening in the mammalian central nervous system identifies Gpx6 as a modulator of Huntington’s disease

    E-print Network

    Kulicke, Ruth

    Huntington’s disease, the most common inherited neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by a dramatic loss of deep-layer cortical and striatal neurons, as well as morbidity in midlife. Human genetic studies led to the ...

  1. Materials Applications for Non-Lethal: Aqueous Foams

    SciTech Connect

    GOOLSBY,TOMMY D.; SCOTT,STEVEN H.

    1999-09-15

    High expansion aqueous foam is an aggregation of bubbles that has the appearance of soap suds and is used to isolate individuals both visually and acoustically. It was developed in the 1920's in England to fight coal mine fires and has been widely used since for fire fighting and dust suppression. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 1970's for nuclear safeguards and security applications. In the mid-1990s, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of high expansion aqueous foam for correctional applications. NIJ funded the project as part of its search for new and better less-than-lethal weapons for responding to violent and dangerous individuals, where other means of force could lead to serious injuries. The phase one objectives of the project were to select a low-to-no toxicity foam concentrate (foaming agent) with physical characteristics suited for use in a single cell or large prison disturbances, and to determine if the selected foam concentrate could serve as a carrier for Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) irritant. The phase two objectives were to conduct an extensive toxicology review of the selected foam concentrate and OC irritant, and to conduct respiration simulation experiments in the selected high expansion aqueous foam. The phase three objectives were to build a prototype individual cell aqueous foam system and to study the feasibility of aqueous foams for large prison facility disturbances. The phase four and five objectives were to use the prototype system to do large scale foam physical characteristics testing of the selected foam concentrate, and to have the prototype single cell system further evaluated by correctional representatives. Prison rather than street scenarios were evaluated as the first and most likely place for using the aqueous foam since prisons have recurrent incidents where officers and inmates might be seriously injured during violent confrontations. The very low density of the high expansion foam also makes it more suitable for indoor use. This paper summarizes the results of the project.

  2. A History of Vision Screening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelboom, Tina M.

    1985-01-01

    The vision screening program has a long and interesting history involving educators, pediatricians, optometrists, and ophthamologists. This historical review of vision screening in the schools includes a discussion of amblyopia and screening of preschool students. (Author/CB)

  3. Prostate Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Mulhem, Elie; Fulbright, Nikolaus; Duncan, Norah

    2015-10-15

    Among American men, prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing has been used to screen for prostate cancer for more than 25 years, the test has low sensitivity and specificity, and there is no clear evidence for determining what threshold warrants prostate biopsy. Only one of five randomized controlled trials of PSA screening showed an effect on prostate cancer-specific mortality, and the absolute reduction in deaths from prostate cancer was one per 781 men screened after 13 years of follow-up. None of the trials showed benefit in all-cause mortality, and screening increased prostate cancer diagnoses by about 60%. Harms of screening include adverse effects from prostate biopsy, overdiagnosis and overtreatment, and anxiety. One-half of screen-detected prostate cancers will not cause symptoms in the patient's lifetime, and 80% to 85% of men who choose observation will not die from prostate cancer within 15 years. Adverse effects of radical prostatectomy include perioperative complications, erectile dysfunction, and urinary incontinence. Radiation therapy can cause acute toxicity leading to urinary urgency, dysuria, diarrhea, and rectal pain; late toxicity includes erectile dysfunction, rectal bleeding, and urethral stricture. Despite variations across guidelines, no organization recommends routine PSA testing, and all endorse some form of shared decision-making before testing. If screening is performed, it should generally be discontinued at 70 years of age. PMID:26554408

  4. Late Multiple Organ Surge in Interferon-Regulated Target Genes Characterizes Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Ferreyra, Gabriela A.; Elinoff, Jason M.; Demirkale, Cumhur Y.; Starost, Matthew F.; Buckley, Marilyn; Munson, Peter J.; Krakauer, Teresa; Danner, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial superantigens are virulence factors that cause toxic shock syndrome. Here, the genome-wide, temporal response of mice to lethal intranasal staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) challenge was investigated in six tissues. Results The earliest responses and largest number of affected genes occurred in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), spleen, and lung tissues with the highest content of both T-cells and monocyte/macrophages, the direct cellular targets of SEB. In contrast, the response of liver, kidney, and heart was delayed and involved fewer genes, but revealed a dominant genetic program that was seen in all 6 tissues. Many of the 85 uniquely annotated transcripts participating in this shared genomic response have not been previously linked to SEB. Nine of the 85 genes were subsequently confirmed by RT-PCR in every tissue/organ at 24 h. These 85 transcripts, up-regulated in all tissues, annotated to the interferon (IFN)/antiviral-response and included genes belonging to the DNA/RNA sensing system, DNA damage repair, the immunoproteasome, and the ER/metabolic stress-response and apoptosis pathways. Overall, this shared program was identified as a type I and II interferon (IFN)-response and the promoters of these genes were highly enriched for IFN regulatory matrices. Several genes whose secreted products induce the IFN pathway were up-regulated at early time points in PBMCs, spleen, and/or lung. Furthermore, IFN regulatory factors including Irf1, Irf7 and Irf8, and Zbp1, a DNA sensor/transcription factor that can directly elicit an IFN innate immune response, participated in this host-wide SEB signature. Conclusion Global gene-expression changes across multiple organs implicated a host-wide IFN-response in SEB-induced death. Therapies aimed at IFN-associated innate immunity may improve outcome in toxic shock syndromes. PMID:24551153

  5. Disruption of the Arnt gene in endothelial cells causes hepatic vascular defects and partial embryonic lethality

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Sun Hee; Shah, Yatrik; Tomita, Shuhei; Morris, H. Douglas; Gavrilova, Oksana; Lambert, Gilles; Ward, Jerrold M.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2006-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) play a critical role in angiogenesis and organogenesis, especially in embryonic liver development. Hypoxia inducible transcription factors (Hif) are a key trigger for hypoxic signals, a primary stimulus for angiogenesis. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (Arnt), also called Hif-1?, serves as an obligate heterodimerization partner for Hif-1? and Hif-2?. Using Cre-Lox technology the mouse Arnt gene, specifically disrupted in endothelial cells. The resulting mice, designated Arnt?EC, developed impaired hepatic vasculature, liver necrosis and cardiac myocyte degenerative lesions at the late embryonic stage (E16.5–18.5) leading to approximately 90% neonatal lethality. Low serum glucose, down-regulation of glucose transporter-1 and glucose 6- phosphatase mRNAs, and hepatic proliferation were observed in Arnt?EC embryos. Magnetic resonance imaging on E16.5 embryonic livers revealed that Arnt?EC mice had significant volume of avascular region. Arnt?EC mice that survived to the adult stage were fertile, showed normal behavioral activity, but had smaller livers with mild portal fibrosis, dilated blood vessels, extra abnormal collagen accumulation and remarkable iron deposition. Arnt?EC mice had reduced adiposity, impaired serum lipid homeostasis, and a higher respiratory exchange ratio, indicating that they utilize relatively more carbohydrates than their ArntF/F counterparts. In conclusion, the endothelial Arnt plays a pivotal role in embryonic liver development. Adult Arnt?EC mice carrying embryonic hepatic defects, developed a possible early stage of cirrhosis with consequences of limited oxygen availability and altered lipid metabolism. PMID:16941684

  6. Analysis of new aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV) isolates suggests evolution of two ALPV species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sijun; Vijayendran, Diveena; Carrillo-Tripp, Jimena; Miller, W Allen; Bonning, Bryony C

    2014-12-01

    Aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV; family Dicistroviridae) was first isolated from the bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi. ALPV-like virus sequences have been reported from many insects and insect predators. We identified a new isolate of ALPV (ALPV-AP) from the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and a new isolate (ALPV-DvV) from western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. ALPV-AP has an ssRNA genome of 9940 nt. Based on phylogenetic analysis, ALPV-AP was closely related to ALPV-AM, an ALPV isolate from honeybees, Apis mellifera, in Spain and Brookings, SD, USA. The distinct evolutionary branches suggested the existence of two lineages of the ALPV virus. One consisted of ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM, whilst all other isolates of ALPV grouped into the other lineage. The similarity of ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM was up to 88?% at the RNA level, compared with 78-79?% between ALPV-AP and other ALPV isolates. The sequence identity of proteins between ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM was 98-99?% for both ORF1 and ORF2, whilst only 85-87?% for ORF1 and 91-92?% for ORF2 between ALPV-AP and other ALPV isolates. Sequencing of RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) products and cDNA clones of the virus genome revealed sequence variation in the 5' UTRs and in ORF1, indicating that ALPV may be under strong selection pressure, which could have important biological implications for ALPV host range and infectivity. Our results indicated that ALPV-like viruses infect insects in the order Coleoptera, in addition to the orders Hemiptera and Hymenoptera, and we propose that ALPV isolates be classified as two separate viral species. PMID:25170050

  7. Interleukin-1 enhances survival of lethally irradiated mice treated with allogeneic bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheim, J.J.; Neta, R.; Tiberghien, P.; Gress, R.; Kenny, J.J.

    1989-11-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) enhanced the capacity of allogeneic bone marrow (BM) cells to promote survival of mice given doses of radiation (1,200 to 1,350 cGy) that are significantly higher than those generally used for BM ablation (850 to 950 cGy). Three to five times greater numbers of lethally irradiated (1,200 to 1,350 cGy) C57B1/6 (H-2b) mice given 10 to the 7th power T-cell-depleted Balb/c (H-2d) BM cells survived over 6 weeks if also treated with a single intraperitoneal (IP) dose of 10 mu sub g IL-1 20 hours before or from 1 to 3 hours after radiation. The spleens of these mice were reconstituted predominantly, but not exclusively, with donor cells (54% to 91%). Histologic examination of the epidermal and gastrointestinal tissues of mice surviving more than 6 weeks did not reveal any evidence of graft-versus-host (GVH) disease; however, since 10% to 43% of the mice died between 30 and 46, the possibility of a GVH syndrome in these mice cannot be excluded. The spleen cells from irradiated mice given BM transplants and IL-1, which consisted of > or = 85% donor cells, were able to generate specific T-cell cytotoxic killing of unrelated allogeneic donor cells but were unreactive to target cells bearing either host or donor major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens. Thus, long-term mixed chimeric survivors were tolerant to recipient and donor alloantigens but exhibited immunologic competence.

  8. 5-Azacytidine Can Induce Lethal Mutagenesis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1? †

    PubMed Central

    Dapp, Michael J.; Clouser, Christine L.; Patterson, Steven; Mansky, Louis M.

    2009-01-01

    Ribonucleosides inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication by mechanisms that have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report the antiviral mechanism for the ribonucleoside analog 5-azacytidine (5-AZC). We hypothesized that the anti-HIV-1 activity of 5-AZC was due to an increase in the HIV-1 mutation rate following its incorporation into viral RNA during transcription. However, we demonstrate that 5-AZC's primary antiviral activity can be attributed to its effect on the early phase of HIV-1 replication. Furthermore, the antiviral activity was associated with an increase in the frequency of viral mutants, suggesting that 5-AZC's primary target is reverse transcription. Sequencing analysis showed an enrichment in G-to-C transversion mutations and further supports the idea that reverse transcription is an antiviral target of 5-AZC. These results indicate that 5-AZC is incorporated into viral DNA following reduction to 5-aza-2?-deoxycytidine. Incorporation into the viral DNA leads to an increase in mutant frequency that is consistent with lethal mutagenesis during reverse transcription as the primary antiviral mechanism of 5-AZC. Antiviral activity and increased mutation frequency were also associated with the late phase of HIV-1 replication; however, 5-AZC's effect on the late phase was less robust. These results reveal that the primary antiviral mechanism of 5-AZC can be attributed to its ability to increase the HIV-1 mutation frequency through viral-DNA incorporation during reverse transcription. Our observations indicate that 5-AZC can affect two steps in HIV-1 replication (i.e., transcription and reverse transcription) but that its primary antiviral activity is due to incorporation during reverse transcription. PMID:19726509

  9. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Deffebach, Mark E; Humphrey, Linda

    2015-10-01

    Screening for lung cancer in high-risk individuals with annual low-dose computed tomography has been shown to reduce lung cancer mortality by 20% and is recommended by multiple health care organizations. Lung cancer screening is not a specific test; it is a process that involves appropriate selection of high-risk individuals, careful interpretation and follow-up of imaging, and annual testing. Screening should be performed in the context of a multidisciplinary program experienced in the diagnosis and management of lung nodules and early-stage lung cancer. PMID:26315517

  10. Characterization of mutations that are synthetic lethal with pol3-13, a mutated allele of DNA polymerase delta in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chanet, Roland; Heude, Martine

    2003-08-01

    The pol3-13 mutation is located in the C-terminal end of POL3, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of polymerase delta, and confers thermosensitivity onto the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain. To get insight about DNA replication control, we performed a genetic screen to identify genes that are synthetic lethal with pol3-13. Mutations in genes encoding the two other subunits of DNA polymerase delta (HYS2, POL32) were identified. Mutations in two recombination genes (RAD50, RAD51) were also identified, confirming that homologous recombination is necessary for pol3-13 mutant strain survival. Other mutations were identified in genes involved in repair and genome stability (MET18/ MMS19), in the control of origin-firing and/or transcription (ABF1, SRB7), in the S/G2 checkpoint (RAD53), in the Ras-cAMP signal transduction pathway (MKS1), in nuclear pore metabolism (SEH1), in protein degradation (DOC1) and in folding (YDJ1). Finally, mutations in three genes of unknown function were isolated (NBP35, DRE2, TAH18). Synthetic lethality between pol3-13 and each of the three mutants pol32, mms19 and doc1 could be suppressed by a rad18 deletion, suggesting an important role of ubiquitination in DNA replication control. We propose that the pol3-13 mutant generates replicative problems that need both homologous recombination and an intact checkpoint machinery to be overcome. PMID:12759774

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis contributes to a skeletal dysplasia resembling platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type, in a novel Col2a1 mutant mouse line.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Makoto; Ichimura, Satoki; Sasaki, Kuniaki; Masuya, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Ikegawa, Shiro; Furuichi, Tatsuya

    2015-12-01

    In humans, mutations in the COL2A1 gene encoding the ?1(II) chain of type II collagen, create many clinical phenotypes collectively termed type II collagenopathies. However, the mechanisms generating this diversity remain to be determined. Here we identified a novel Col2a1 mutant mouse line by screening a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutant mouse library. This mutant possessed a p.Tyr1391Ser missense mutation in the C-propeptide coding region, and this mutation was located in positions corresponding to the human COL2A1 mutation responsible for platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type (PLSD-T). As expected, p.Tyr1391Ser homozygotes exhibited lethal skeletal dysplasias resembling PLSD-T, including extremely short limbs and severe dysplasia of the spine and pelvis. The secretion of the mutant proteins into the extracellular space was disrupted, accompanied by an abnormally expanded endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the up-regulation of ER stress-related genes in chondrocytes. Chondrocyte apoptosis was severely induced in the growth plate of the homozygotes. These findings strongly suggest that ER stress-mediated apoptosis caused by the accumulated mutant proteins in ER contributes to skeletal dysplasia in Co12a1 mutant mice and PLSD-T patients. PMID:26545783

  12. A genomewide overexpression screen identifies genes involved in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway in the human protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Koushik, Amrita B; Welter, Brenda H; Rock, Michelle L; Temesvari, Lesly A

    2014-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that causes amoebic dysentery and liver abscess. E. histolytica relies on motility, phagocytosis, host cell adhesion, and proteolysis of extracellular matrix for virulence. In eukaryotic cells, these processes are mediated in part by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Thus, PI3K may be critical for virulence. We utilized a functional genomics approach to identify genes whose products may operate in the PI3K pathway in E. histolytica. We treated a population of trophozoites that were overexpressing genes from a cDNA library with a near-lethal dose of the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. This screen was based on the rationale that survivors would be overexpressing gene products that directly or indirectly function in the PI3K pathway. We sequenced the overexpressed genes in survivors and identified a cDNA encoding a Rap GTPase, a protein previously shown to participate in the PI3K pathway. This supports the validity of our approach. Genes encoding a coactosin-like protein, EhCoactosin, and a serine-rich E. histolytica protein (SREHP) were also identified. Cells overexpressing EhCoactosin or SREHP were also less sensitive to a second PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. This corroborates the link between these proteins and PI3K. Finally, a mutant cell line with an increased level of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, the product of PI3K activity, exhibited increased expression of SREHP and EhCoactosin. This further supports the functional connection between these proteins and PI3K in E. histolytica. To our knowledge, this is the first forward-genetics screen adapted to reveal genes participating in a signal transduction pathway in this pathogen. PMID:24442890

  13. Development of a Cell-Based Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Reporter for Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, R H; Steenblock, E R; Camarero, J A

    2007-03-22

    We report the construction of a cell-based fluorescent reporter for anthrax lethal factor (LF) protease activity using the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This was accomplished by engineering an Escherichia coli cell line to express a genetically encoded FRET reporter and LF protease. Both proteins were encoded in two different expression plasmids under the control of different tightly controlled inducible promoters. The FRET-based reporter was designed to contain a LF recognition sequence flanked by the FRET pair formed by CyPet and YPet fluorescent proteins. The length of the linker between both fluorescent proteins was optimized using a flexible peptide linker containing several Gly-Gly-Ser repeats. Our results indicate that this FRET-based LF reporter was readily expressed in E. coli cells showing high levels of FRET in vivo in the absence of LF. The FRET signal, however, decreased 5 times after inducing LF expression in the same cell. These results suggest that this cell-based LF FRET reporter may be used to screen genetically encoded libraries in vivo against LF.

  14. Rapid and Precise Engineering of the Caenorhabditis elegans Genome with Lethal Mutation Co-Conversion and Inactivation of NHEJ Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As in other organisms, CRISPR/Cas9 methods provide a powerful approach for genome editing in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Oligonucleotides are excellent repair templates for introducing substitutions and short insertions, as they are cost effective, require no cloning, and appear in other organisms to target changes by homologous recombination at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, I describe a methodology in C. elegans to efficiently knock in epitope tags in 8–9 days, using a temperature-sensitive lethal mutation in the pha-1 gene as a co-conversion marker. I demonstrate that 60mer oligos with 29 bp of homology drive efficient knock-in of point mutations, and that disabling nonhomologous end joining by RNAi inactivation of the cku-80 gene significantly improves knock-in efficiency. Homology arms of 35–80 bp are sufficient for efficient editing and DSBs up to 54 bp away from the insertion site produced knock-ins. These findings will likely be applicable for a range of genome editing approaches in C. elegans, which will improve editing efficiency and minimize screening efforts. PMID:25491644

  15. Screening for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations About the USPSTF Task Force 101 Resources Our Members Our Partners Reports to ... Professionals Recommendations from The Community Preventive Services Task Force on Promoting Cancer Screening Cancer Control P.L. ...

  16. Rapid Lead Screening Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Lab Tests Rapid Lead Screening Test Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... reducing the need for a follow-up visit. Lead Risk Links Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( ...

  17. Screening Tests for Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or colonoscopy) Diabetes screening Gonorrhea test HIV test Syphilis test Get tested for chlamydia yearly through age ... to be tested for HIV. Get tested for syphilis if you are at increased risk or pregnant. ...

  18. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  19. PR and Screen Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittle, Kurt

    1985-01-01

    How an art department can use screen printing to provide useful, creative services to the school and community is described. This helps foster a positive attitude toward art education while teaching students new concepts. (RM)

  20. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Share Compartir You are being redirected to the HPV Cancer Screening page. Please update your bookmarks to ...

  1. Urine drug screen

    MedlinePLUS

    Drug screen -- urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence indicates that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  2. Newborn screening tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 40 disorders. All 50 states screen for congenital hypothyroidism , galactosemia , and phenylketonuria (PKU). In addition to the ... metabolism disorders Biotinidase deficiency Congenital adrenal ... fibrosis Fatty acid metabolism disorders Galactosemia Glucose- ...

  3. Screening Tests and Vaccines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health Skip Navigation Skip top navigation Home A-Z Health Topics ePublications News About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Screening Tests and ...

  4. Cervical Cancer Screening Programs

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Cervical Cancer: Mortality Rates | Organization

  5. What Is Carrier Screening?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your provider can help you figure out which carrier screening to consider. Your insurance may cover the costs of the tests. It is important ... and Health How Genes Work Genes, Lifestyle, & Environment Collecting Family ...

  6. Screening and Risk Factors

    Cancer.gov

    Close Window State Cancer Profiles Quick Reference Guides ? Quick Reference Guides Index Screening and Risk Factors Send to Printer Text description of this image. Site Home Policies Accessibility Viewing Files FOIA Contact Us U.S. Department of Health

  7. Endometrial Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... at an older age. Having the gene for hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC). Being white. Endometrial ... women who have or are at risk for hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer , experts suggest yearly screening ...

  8. Screening for Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be used without permission. Education Mood Disorders Depression Bipolar Disorder Anxiety Screening Center Co-occurring Illnesses/Disorders Related ... wellness for people who live with depression and bipolar disorder. Because DBSA was created for and is led ...

  9. The 'GALS' locomotor screen.

    PubMed

    Doherty, M; Dacre, J; Dieppe, P; Snaith, M

    1992-10-01

    The locomotor system is complex and difficult to examine. A selective clinical process to detect important locomotor abnormalities and functional disability could prove valuable. A screen based on a tested 'minimal' history and examination system is described, together with a simple method of recording. The screen is fast and easy to perform. As well as providing a useful introduction to examination of the locomotor system, the screen includes objective observation of functional movements relevant to activities of daily living. Its inclusion in the undergraduate clerking repertoire could improve junior doctors' awareness and recognition of rheumatic disease and general disability. It could also provide a valuable screening test for use in general practice. PMID:1444632

  10. Screening for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Clinical Guideline Annals of Internal Medicine Screening for Cervical Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement Virginia ... of a high-grade precancerous cervical lesion or cervical cancer, women with in utero exposure to diethylstilbestrol, or ...

  11. Cervical Cancer Screening Programs

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Cervical Cancer (Archived Tables): Home Organization

  12. Model-driven discovery of synergistic inhibitors against E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium targeting a novel synthetic lethal pair, aldA and prpC

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Ramy K.; Khaw, Valerie L.; Monk, Jonathan M.; Brunk, Elizabeth; Lewis, Robert; Loh, Suh I.; Mishra, Arti; Nagle, Amrita A.; Satyanarayana, Chitkala; Dhakshinamoorthy, Saravanakumar; Luche, Michele; Kitchen, Douglas B.; Andrews, Kathleen A.; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Charusanti, Pep

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models of biochemical networks form a cornerstone of bacterial systems biology. Inconsistencies between simulation output and experimental data point to gaps in knowledge about the fundamental biology of the organism. One such inconsistency centers on the gene aldA in Escherichia coli: it is essential in a computational model of E. coli metabolism, but experimentally it is not. Here, we reconcile this disparity by providing evidence that aldA and prpC form a synthetic lethal pair, as the double knockout could only be created through complementation with a plasmid-borne copy of aldA. Moreover, virtual and biological screening against the two proteins led to a set of compounds that inhibited the growth of E. coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium synergistically at 100–200 ?M individual concentrations. These results highlight the power of metabolic models to drive basic biological discovery and their potential use to discover new combination antibiotics. PMID:26441892

  13. 8. DETAIL OF COMPUTER SCREEN AND CONTROL BOARDS: LEFT SCREEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF COMPUTER SCREEN AND CONTROL BOARDS: LEFT SCREEN TRACKS RESIDUAL CHLORINE; INDICATES AMOUNT OF SUNLIGHT WHICH ENABLES OPERATOR TO ESTIMATE NEEDED CHLORINE; CENTER SCREEN SHOWS TURNOUT STRUCTURES; RIGHT SCREEN SHOWS INDICATORS OF ALUMINUM SULFATE TANK FARM. - F. E. Weymouth Filtration Plant, 700 North Moreno Avenue, La Verne, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. Sub-Lethal Effects of Pesticide Residues in Brood Comb on Worker Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Development and Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Judy Y.; Anelli, Carol M.; Sheppard, Walter S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Numerous surveys reveal high levels of pesticide residue contamination in honey bee comb. We conducted studies to examine possible direct and indirect effects of pesticide exposure from contaminated brood comb on developing worker bees and adult worker lifespan. Methodology/Principal Findings Worker bees were reared in brood comb containing high levels of known pesticide residues (treatment) or in relatively uncontaminated brood comb (control). Delayed development was observed in bees reared in treatment combs containing high levels of pesticides particularly in the early stages (day 4 and 8) of worker bee development. Adult longevity was reduced by 4 days in bees exposed to pesticide residues in contaminated brood comb during development. Pesticide residue migration from comb containing high pesticide residues caused contamination of control comb after multiple brood cycles and provided insight on how quickly residues move through wax. Higher brood mortality and delayed adult emergence occurred after multiple brood cycles in contaminated control combs. In contrast, survivability increased in bees reared in treatment comb after multiple brood cycles when pesticide residues had been reduced in treatment combs due to residue migration into uncontaminated control combs, supporting comb replacement efforts. Chemical analysis after the experiment confirmed the migration of pesticide residues from treatment combs into previously uncontaminated control comb. Conclusions/Significance This study is the first to demonstrate sub-lethal effects on worker honey bees from pesticide residue exposure from contaminated brood comb. Sub-lethal effects, including delayed larval development and adult emergence or shortened adult longevity, can have indirect effects on the colony such as premature shifts in hive roles and foraging activity. In addition, longer development time for bees may provide a reproductive advantage for parasitic Varroa destructor mites. The impact of delayed development in bees on Varroa mite fecundity should be examined further. PMID:21373182

  15. Screening of solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    Because solar cells in a production batch are not identical, screening is performed to obtain similar cells for aggregation into arrays. A common technique for screening is based on a single operating point of the I-V characteristic of the cell, usually the maximum power point. As a result, inferior cell matching may occur at the actual operating points. Screening solar cells based on the entire I-V characteristic will inherently result in more similar cells in the array. An array consisting of more similar cells is likely to have better overall characteristics and more predictable performance. Solar cell screening methods and cell ranking are discussed. The concept of a mean cell is defined as a cell 'best' representing all the cells in the production batch. The screening and ranking of all cells are performed with respect to the mean cell. The comparative results of different screening methods are illustrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells of the Space Station Freedom.

  16. Screening of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Because solar cells in a production batch are not identical, screening is performed to obtain similar cells for aggregation into arrays. A common technique for screening is based on a single operating point of the I-V characteristic of the cell, usually the maximum power point. As a result, inferior cell matching may occur at the actual operating points. Screening solar cells based on the entire I-V characteristic will inherently result in more similar cells in the array. An array consisting of more similar cells is likely to have better overall characteristics and more predictable performance. Solar cell screening methods and cell ranking are discussed. The concept of a mean cell is defined as a cell 'best' representing all the cells in the production batch. The screening and ranking of all cells are performed with respect to the mean cell. The comparative results of different screening methods are illustrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells of the Space Station Freedom.

  17. Multi-locus phylogeny of lethal amanitas: Implications for species diversity and historical biogeography

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lethal amanitas (Amanita section Phalloideae) are a group of wild, fatal mushrooms causing many poisoning cases worldwide. However, the diversity and evolutionary history of these lethal mushrooms remain poorly known due to the limited sampling and insufficient gene fragments employed for phylogenetic analyses. In this study, five gene loci (nrLSU, ITS, rpb2, ef1-? and ?-tubulin) with a widely geographic sampling from East and South Asia, Europe, North and Central America, South Africa and Australia were analysed with maximum-likelihood, maximum-parsimony and Bayesian inference methods. Biochemical analyses were also conducted with intention to detect amatoxins and phalloidin in 14 representative samples. Result Lethal amanitas were robustly supported to be a monophyletic group after excluding five species that were provisionally defined as lethal amanitas based on morphological studies. In lethal amanitas, 28 phylogenetic species were recognised by integrating molecular phylogenetic analyses with morphological studies, and 14 of them represented putatively new species. The biochemical analyses indicated a single origin of cyclic peptide toxins (amatoxins and phalloidin) within Amanita and suggested that this kind of toxins seemed to be a synapomorphy of lethal amanitas. Molecular dating through BEAST and biogeographic analyses with LAGRANGE and RASP indicated that lethal amanitas most likely originated in the Palaeotropics with the present crown group dated around 64.92 Mya in the early Paleocene, and the East Asia–eastern North America or Eurasia–North America–Central America disjunct distribution patterns were primarily established during the middle Oligocene to Miocene. Conclusion The cryptic diversity found in this study indicates that the species diversity of lethal amanitas is strongly underestimated under the current taxonomy. The intercontinental sister species or sister groups relationships among East Asia and eastern North America or Eurasia–North America–Central America within lethal amanitas are best explained by the diversification model of Palaeotropical origin, dispersal via the Bering Land Bridge, followed by regional vicariance speciation resulting from climate change during the middle Oligocene to the present. These findings indicate the importance of both dispersal and vicariance in shaping the intercontinental distributions of these ectomycorrhizal fungi. PMID:24950598

  18. Purification and characterization of a lethal factor in venom from the crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci).

    PubMed

    Shiomi, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, H; Kikuchi, T

    1988-01-01

    A lethal factor in venom of the crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) was obtained in an electrophoretically pure state by chromatography on CM-cellulose and Sephadex G-100. The purified lethal factor is a basic (pI 10.6) glycoprotein (carbohydrate content 3.5%). The mol. wt was estimated to be 20,000 by gel filtration or 25,000 by SDS-disc electrophoresis, suggesting that the lethal factor has no subunit structure. Despite its basicity, the lethal factor was richer in acidic amino acids than in basic amino acids. The lethal factor had an LD50 of 0.43 mg/kg (i.p. injection into mice). Hemolytic, edema-forming and capillary permeability-increasing activities, though very weak, were also exhibited by the lethal factor, while hemorrhagic and phospholipase A activities were not present. PMID:3245052

  19. Conditional embryonic lethality to improve the sterile insect technique in Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Schetelig, Marc F; Caceres, Carlos; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Franz, Gerald; Wimmer, Ernst A

    2009-01-01

    Background The sterile insect technique (SIT) is an environment-friendly method used in area-wide pest management of the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann; Diptera: Tephritidae). Ionizing radiation used to generate reproductive sterility in the mass-reared populations before release leads to reduction of competitiveness. Results Here, we present a first alternative reproductive sterility system for medfly based on transgenic embryonic lethality. This system is dependent on newly isolated medfly promoter/enhancer elements of cellularization-specifically-expressed genes. These elements act differently in expression strength and their ability to drive lethal effector gene activation. Moreover, position effects strongly influence the efficiency of the system. Out of 60 combinations of driver and effector construct integrations, several lines resulted in larval and pupal lethality with one line showing complete embryonic lethality. This line was highly competitive to wildtype medfly in laboratory and field cage tests. Conclusion The high competitiveness of the transgenic lines and the achieved 100% embryonic lethality causing reproductive sterility without the need of irradiation can improve the efficacy of operational medfly SIT programs. PMID:19173707

  20. Sex-lethal, master and slave: a hierarchy of germ-line sex determination in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Oliver, B; Kim, Y J; Baker, B S

    1993-11-01

    Female sex determination in the germ line of Drosophila melanogaster is regulated by genes functioning in the soma as well as genes that function within the germ line. Genes known or suspected to be involved in germ-line sex determination in Drosophila melanogaster have been examined to determine if they are required upstream or downstream of Sex-lethal+, a known germ-line sex determination gene. Seven genes required for female-specific splicing of germ-line Sex-lethal+ pre-mRNA are identified. These results together with information about the tissues in which these genes function and whether they control sex determination and viability or just sex determination in the germ line have been used to deduce the genetic hierarchy regulating female germ-line sex determination. This hierarchy includes the somatic sex determination genes transformer+, transformer-2+ and doublesex+ (and by inference Sex-lethal+), which control a somatic signal required for female germ-line sex determination, and the germ-line ovarian tumor genes fused+, ovarian tumor+, ovo+, sans fille+, and Sex-lethal+, which are involved in either the reception or interpretation of this somatic sex determination signal. The fused+, ovarian tumor+, ovo+ and sans fille+ genes function upstream of Sex-lethal+ in the germ line. PMID:8187645

  1. Efficacy of ST-246 versus lethal poxvirus challenge in immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Grosenbach, Douglas W.; Berhanu, Aklile; King, David S.; Mosier, Stacie; Jones, Kevin F.; Jordan, Robert A.; Bolken, Tove’ C.; Hruby, Dennis E.

    2009-01-01

    The threat of smallpox as a bioweapon and the emerging threat of human monkeypox, among other poxviral diseases, highlight the need for effective poxvirus countermeasures. ST-246, which targets the F13L protein in vaccinia virus and its homologs in other orthopoxvirus species, provides full protection from lethal poxviral disease in numerous animal models and seems to be safe in humans. All previous evaluations of ST-246 efficacy have been in immunocompetent animals. However, the risk of severe poxviral disease is greater in immunodeficient hosts. Here we report on the efficacy of ST-246 in preventing or treating lethal poxviral disease in immunodeficient mice. After lethal challenge with the Western Reserve strain of vaccinia, Nude, SCID, and JH knockout mice additionally depleted of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were not fully protected by ST-246, although survival was significantly extended. However, CD4+ T cell deficient, CD8+ T cell deficient, JH knockout, and JH knockout mice also deficient for CD4+ or CD8+ T cells survived lethal challenge when treated with ST-246 starting on the day of challenge. Delaying treatment until 72 h after infection reduced ST-246 efficacy in some models but provided full protection from lethal challenge in most. These findings suggest that ST-246 may be effective in controlling smallpox or other pathogenic orthopoxviruses in some immunodeficient human populations for whom the vaccine is contraindicated. PMID:20080762

  2. Terrorist Attacks Escalate in Frequency and Fatalities Preceding Highly Lethal Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Andy; Sainudiin, Raazesh; Sibley, Chris G.; Schimel, Jeff; Webber, David

    2014-01-01

    Highly lethal terrorist attacks, which we define as those killing 21 or more people, account for 50% of the total number of people killed in all terrorist attacks combined, yet comprise only 3.5% of terrorist attacks. Given the disproportionate influence of these incidents, uncovering systematic patterns in attacks that precede and anticipate these highly lethal attacks may be of value for understanding attacks that exact a heavy toll on life. Here we examined whether the activity of terrorist groups escalates–both in the number of people killed per attack and in the frequency of attacks–leading up to highly lethal attacks. Analyses of terrorist attacks drawn from a state-of-the-art international terrorism database (The Global Terrorism Database) showed evidence for both types of escalation leading up to highly lethal attacks, though complexities to the patterns emerged as well. These patterns of escalation do not emerge among terrorist groups that never commit a highly lethal attack. PMID:24755753

  3. Beliefs and attitudes toward lethal management of deer in Cuyahoga Valley National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, D.C.; Skerl, K.; Shank, E.M.; Lime, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    We used the theory of reasoned action to help understand attitudes and beliefs about lethal management of deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Cuyahoga Valley National Park (CVNP), Ohio. We used a mail-back survey to collect data from Ohio residents in the surrounding 9-county area. Two strata were defined: residents <10 km from CVNP (near n = 369) and residents =10 km from CVNP (far n = 312). Respondents indicated that lethal control of deer was acceptable (near 71%??4.7%, far 62%??5.5%) and taking no action to reduce deer populations was unacceptable (near 75%??4.5%, far 72%??5.1%). Beliefs about outcomes of lethal control and evaluation of those outcomes proved to be strong predictors of the acceptability of lethal control of deer in CVNP. Lethal control was more acceptable if it was done to prevent severe consequences for humans (e.g., spread of disease, car collisions) or the natural environment (e.g., maintain a healthy deer herd) than to prevent negative aesthetic impacts or personal property damage. Results from the study can be used to assist managers at CVNP as they make decisions regarding alternatives for deer management in the park and to inform others managing abundant deer populations of socially relevant impacts of management actions.

  4. Lethal ovitrap deployment for Aedes aegypti control: potential implications for non-target organisms.

    PubMed

    Long, Sharron A; Jacups, Susan P; Ritchie, Scott A

    2015-06-01

    In Australia, dengue control combines source reduction with lethal ovitraps to reduce Aedes aegypti populations during outbreaks. Lethal ovitraps are considered a sustainable and environmentally friendly method of controlling container-inhabiting mosquitoes, however, to-date, this claim has not been quantified. This study assesses the potential impact of lethal ovitraps on non-target organisms when used to control Ae. aegypti in tropical Australia. For retention of specimens, we substituted standard sticky ovitraps for lethal ovitraps. We collected 988 Ae. aegypti and 44,132 non-target specimens over 13 months from 16 sites. Although Ae. aegypti comprised only 2.2% of the total collection, they were were the eighth most dominant taxa collected, on the 93(rd) percentile. Of the non-target organisms, Collembola were the dominant taxa, 44.2%, with 36.8% and 10.5% Diptera and Hymenoptera, respectively. Of the Dipterans, 61% were family Phoridae. Lethal ovitraps were visited by 90 insect or invertebrate families in total. Ovitraps are attractive to Collembola, Phoridae, Sciaridae, Formicidae, and Culicidae, with minimal attraction by Apidae and other commonly monitored non-target organisms. For container-inhabiting mosquitoes, LOs are cost effective operationally, requiring minimal staff resources for placement and retrieval. PMID:26047194

  5. The Unc-22(iv) Region of Caenorhabditis Elegans: Genetic Analysis of Lethal Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Clark, D. V.; Rogalski, T. M.; Donati, L. M.; Baillie, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    The organization of essential genes in the unc-22 region, defined by the deficiency sDf2 on linkage group IV, has been studied. Using the balancer nT1 (IV;V), which suppresses recombination over 49 map units, 294 lethal mutations on LGIV(right) and LGV(left) were recovered using EMS mutagenesis. Twenty-six of these mutations fell into the unc-22 region. Together with previously isolated lethal mutations, there is now a total of 63 lethal mutations which fall into 31 complementation groups. Mutations were positioned on the map using eight overlapping deficiencies in addition to sDf2. The lethal alleles and deficiencies in the unc-22 region were characterized with respect to their terminal phenotypes. Mapping of these lethal mutations shows that sDf2 deletes a minimum of 1.8 map units and a maximum of 2.5 map units. A minimum estimate of essential gene number for the region using a truncated Poisson calculation is 48. The data indicate a minimum estimate of approximately 3500 essential genes in the Caenorhabditis elegans genome. PMID:3396868

  6. More comprehensive discussion of CRC screening associated with higher screening

    PubMed Central

    Mosen, David M.; Feldstein, Adrianne C.; Perrin, Nancy; Rosales, A. Gabriela; Smith, David H.; Liles, Elizabeth G.; Schneider, Jennifer L.; Myers, Ronald E.; Elston-Lafata, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Examine association of comprehensiveness of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening discussion by PCPs with completion of CRC screening. STUDY DESIGN Observational study in Kaiser Permanente Northwest, a group-model health maintenance organization. METHODS 883 participants overdue for CRC screening received an automated telephone call (ATC) between April and June 2009 encouraging CRC screening. Between January and March 2010, participants completed a survey on PCPs’ discussion of CRC screening and patient beliefs regarding screening. Primary outcome measure: receipt of CRC screening (assessed by electronic medical record [EMR], 9 months after ATC). Primary independent variable: comprehensiveness of CRC screening discussion by PCPs (7-item scale). Secondary independent variables: perceived benefits of screening (4-item scale assessing respondents’ agreement with benefits of timely screening) and primary care utilization (EMR; 9 months after ATC). The independent association of variables with CRC screening was assessed with logistic regression. RESULTS Average scores for comprehensiveness of CRC discussion and perceived benefits were 0.4 (range 0–1) and 4.0 (range 1–5), respectively. 28.2% (n=249) completed screening, 84% of whom had survey assessments after their screening date. Of screeners, 95.2% completed the fecal immunochemical test (FIT). More comprehensive discussion of CRC screening was associated with increased screening (OR=1.51, 95% CI = 1.03–2.21). Higher perceived benefits (OR=1.46, 95% CI = 1.13–1.90) and one or more PCP visits (OR= 5.82, 95% CI = 3.87–8.74) were also associated with increased screening. CONCLUSIONS More comprehensive discussion of CRC screening was independently associated with increased CRC screening. Primary care utilization was even more strongly associated with CRC screening, irrespective of discussion of CRC screening. PMID:23725359

  7. Attacks on German public figures, 1968-2004: warning behaviors, potentially lethal and non-lethal acts, psychiatric status, and motivations.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jens; Meloy, J Reid; Guldimann, Angela; Ermer, Anneliese

    2011-01-01

    Fourteen non-terrorist attackers of public figures in Germany between 1968 and 2004 were intensively studied, with a particular focus on warning behaviors, attack behaviors, and the relationship between psychiatric diagnosis, symptoms, and motivations for the assault. A large proportion of the attackers were severely mentally ill, and most likely to be in the potentially lethal rather than the non-lethal group. A new typology of seven warning behaviors was applied to the data, and all were present, most frequently fixation and pathway warning behavior, and least frequently a direct threat. Psychiatric diagnosis could be closely linked to motivation when analyzed at the level of symptom and content of thought, often delusional. Most of the attacks were directed at political figures, and the majority occurred after 1995. PMID:21381093

  8. A Model for the Estimation of Penetrating Wound Lethality Based on Combat Casualty Data

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, William J.; Merkler, Jules; Long, William B.; Dolce, Joseph R.; Champion, Howard R.

    1981-01-01

    The probability that a given combat wound is lethal provides a quantitative basis for the assessment of wounds, comparison of body armors, and estimation of medical workload requirements in various military scenarios. The present paper describes a new lethality model for penetrating injuries. The model employs a new injury classification called PEBL. PEBL codes are constructed by appending additional significant digits to the appropriate codes from the Hospital Adaptation of the International Classification of the World Health Organization (H-ICDA Codes), widely used in both civilian and military hospitals for injury classification. PEBL attains greater specificity by providing for injury size, bone injury characteristics, partial organ damage, and distinguishing peripheral blood vessels and nerves. Probability of lethality estimates were obtained for PEBL codes based on computerized wound data available on 3600 combat casualties.

  9. Lethal infection thresholds of Paenibacillus larvae for honeybee drone and worker larvae (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Behrens, Dieter; Forsgren, Eva; Fries, Ingemar; Moritz, Robin F A

    2010-10-01

    We compared the mortality of honeybee (Apis mellifera) drone and worker larvae from a single queen under controlled in vitro conditions following infection with Paenibacillus larvae, a bacterium causing the brood disease American Foulbrood (AFB). We also determined absolute P. larvae cell numbers and lethal titres in deceased individuals of both sexes up to 8 days post infection using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Our results show that in drones the onset of infection induced mortality is delayed by 1 day, the cumulative mortality is reduced by 10% and P. larvae cell numbers are higher than in worker larvae. Since differences in bacterial cell titres between sexes can be explained by differences in body size, larval size appears to be a key parameter for a lethal threshold in AFB tolerance. Both means and variances for lethal thresholds are similar for drone and worker larvae suggesting that drone resistance phenotypes resemble those of related workers. PMID:20545737

  10. Comparison of the lethal effects of chemical warfare nerve agents across multiple ages.

    PubMed

    Wright, Linnzi K M; Lee, Robyn B; Vincelli, Nicole M; Whalley, Christopher E; Lumley, Lucille A

    2016-01-22

    Children may be inherently more vulnerable than adults to the lethal effects associated with chemical warfare nerve agent (CWNA) exposure because of their closer proximity to the ground, smaller body mass, higher respiratory rate, increased skin permeability and immature metabolic systems. Unfortunately, there have only been a handful of studies on the effects of CWNA in pediatric animal models, and more research is needed to confirm this hypothesis. Using a stagewise, adaptive dose design, we estimated the 24h median lethal dose for subcutaneous exposure to seven CWNA in both male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at six different developmental times. Perinatal (postnatal day [PND] 7, 14 and 21) and adult (PND 70) rats were more susceptible than pubertal (PND 28 and 42) rats to the lethal effects associated with exposure to tabun, sarin, soman and cyclosarin. Age-related differences in susceptibility were not observed in rats exposed to VM, Russian VX or VX. PMID:26621540

  11. Genome-wide mapping of unexplored essential regions in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome: evidence for hidden synthetic lethal combinations in a genetic interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Kaboli, Saeed; Yamakawa, Takuya; Sunada, Keisuke; Takagaki, Tao; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Kaneko, Yoshinobu; Harashima, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Despite systematic approaches to mapping networks of genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, exploration of genetic interactions on a genome-wide scale has been limited. The S. cerevisiae haploid genome has 110 regions that are longer than 10 kb but harbor only non-essential genes. Here, we attempted to delete these regions by PCR-mediated chromosomal deletion technology (PCD), which enables chromosomal segments to be deleted by a one-step transformation. Thirty-three of the 110 regions could be deleted, but the remaining 77 regions could not. To determine whether the 77 undeletable regions are essential, we successfully converted 67 of them to mini-chromosomes marked with URA3 using PCR-mediated chromosome splitting technology and conducted a mitotic loss assay of the mini-chromosomes. Fifty-six of the 67 regions were found to be essential for cell growth, and 49 of these carried co-lethal gene pair(s) that were not previously been detected by synthetic genetic array analysis. This result implies that regions harboring only non-essential genes contain unidentified synthetic lethal combinations at an unexpectedly high frequency, revealing a novel landscape of genetic interactions in the S. cerevisiae genome. Furthermore, this study indicates that segmental deletion might be exploited for not only revealing genome function but also breeding stress-tolerant strains. PMID:25104020

  12. Methylone-induced hyperthermia and lethal toxicity: role of the dopamine and serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    Piao, Ying-Shan; Hall, Frank Scott; Moriya, Yuki; Ito, Miki; Ohara, Arihisa; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L; Uhl, George R; Sora, Ichiro

    2015-06-01

    Methylone (2-methylamino-1-[3,4-methylenedioxy-phenyl]propan-1-one), an amphetamine analog, has emerged as a popular drug of abuse worldwide. Methylone induces hyperthermia, which is thought to contribute toward the lethal consequences of methylone overdose. Methylone has been assumed to induce hyperthermic effects through inhibition of serotonin and/or dopamine transporters (SERT and DAT, respectively). To examine the roles of each of these proteins in methylone-induced toxic effects, we used SERT and DAT knockout (KO) mice and assessed the hyperthermic and lethal effects caused by a single administration of methylone. Methylone produced higher rates of lethal toxicity compared with other amphetamine analogs in wild-type mice. Compared with wild-type mice, lethality was significantly lower in DAT KO mice, but not in SERT KO mice. By contrast, only a slight diminution in the hyperthermic effects of methylone was observed in DAT KO mice, whereas a slight enhancement of these effects was observed in SERT KO mice. Administration of the selective D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 and the D2 receptor antagonist raclopride reduced methylone-induced hyperthermia, but these drugs also had hypothermic effects in saline-treated mice, albeit to a smaller extent than the effects observed in methylone-treated mice. In contradistinction to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, which induces its toxicity through SERT and DAT, these data indicate that DAT, but not SERT, is strongly associated with the lethal toxicity produced by methylone, which did not seem to be dependent on the hyperthermic effects of methylone. DAT is therefore a strong candidate molecule for interventions aimed at preventing acute neurotoxic and lethal effects of methylone. PMID:25794333

  13. Asthma and risk of lethal prostate cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Platz, Elizabeth A; Drake, Charles G; Wilson, Kathryn M; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Kenfield, Stacey A; Mucci, Lorelei A; Stampfer, Meir J; Willett, Walter C; Camargo, Carlos A; Giovannucci, Edward

    2015-08-15

    Inflammation, and more generally, the immune response are thought to influence the development of prostate cancer. To determine the components of the immune response that are potentially contributory, we prospectively evaluated the association of immune-mediated conditions, asthma and hayfever, with lethal prostate cancer risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We included 47,880 men aged 40-75 years with no prior cancer diagnosis. On the baseline questionnaire in 1986, the men reported diagnoses of asthma and hayfever and year of onset. On the follow-up questionnaires, they reported new asthma and prostate cancer diagnoses. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate relative risks (RRs). In total, 9.2% reported ever having been diagnosed with asthma. In all, 25.3% reported a hayfever diagnosis at baseline. During 995,176 person-years of follow-up by 2012, we confirmed 798 lethal prostate cancer cases (diagnosed with distant metastases, progressed to distant metastasis or died of prostate cancer [N = 625]). Ever having a diagnosis of asthma was inversely associated with risk of lethal (RR = 0.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]?= 0.51-1.00) and fatal (RR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.42-0.96) disease. Hayfever with onset in the distant past was possibly weakly positively associated with risk of lethal (RR = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.92-1.33) and fatal (RR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.91-1.37) disease. Men who were ever diagnosed with asthma were less likely to develop lethal and fatal prostate cancer. Our findings may lead to testable hypotheses about specific immune profiles in the etiology of lethal prostate cancer. PMID:25648070

  14. Lethal and Amanitin-Resistance Mutations in the Caenorhabditis Elegans Ama-1 and Ama-2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, T. M.; Bullerjahn, AME.; Riddle, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans resistant to ?-amanitin have been isolated at a frequency of about 1.6 X 10(-6) after EMS mutagenesis of the wild-type strain, N2. Four new dominant resistance mutations have been studied genetically. Three are alleles of a previously identified gene, ama-1 IV, encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The fourth mutation defines a new gene, ama-2 V. Unlike the ama-1 alleles, the ama-2 mutation exhibits a recessive-lethal phenotype. Growth and reproduction of N2 was inhibited at a concentration of 10 ?g/ml amanitin, whereas ama-2/+ animals were inhibited at 100 ?g/ml, and 800 ?g/ml was required to inhibit growth of ama-1/+ larvae. We have also determined that two reference strains used for genetic mapping, dpy-11(e224)V and sma-1(e30)V, are at least four-fold more sensitive to amanitin that the wild-type strain. Using an amanitin-resistant ama-1(m118) or ama-1(m322) strain as a parent, we have isolated amanitin-sensitive mutants that carry recessive-lethal ama-1 alleles. The frequency of EMS-induced lethal ama-1 mutations is approximately 1.7 X 10(-3), 1000-fold higher than the frequency of amanitin-resistance alleles. Nine of the lethal alleles are apparent null mutations, and they exhibit L1-lethal phenotypes at both 20° and 25°. Six alleles result in partial loss of RNA polymerase II function as determined by their sterile phenotypes at 20°. All but one of these latter mutations exhibit a more severe phenotype at 25°C. We have also selected seven EMS-induced revertants of three different ama-1 lethals. These revertants restore dominant resistance to amanitin. The selection for revertants also produced eight new dominant amanitin resistance alleles on the balancer chromosome, nT1. PMID:3197954

  15. Newborn hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Stewart, D L; Pearlman, A

    1994-11-01

    Congenital deafness is a relatively common problem with an incidence of 1/300 to 1/1000. Most states have no mass screening program for hearing loss, but the state of Kentucky compiles a High Risk Registry which is a historical survey of parents relating to risk factors for hearing loss. Unfortunately this survey can miss 50% of those who have a hearing deficit. If not detected prior to discharge, there is often a delay in diagnosis of deafness which prevents early intervention. We report 2 years' experience at Kosair Children's Hospital where 1,987 infants admitted to well baby, intermediate, or intensive care nurseries were screened using the ALGO-1 screener (Natus Medical Inc, Foster City, CA) which is a modified auditory brain stem evoked response (ABR). Our screening of this population led to an 11% incidence of referral for complete audiological evaluation. There were no significant complications. Forty-eight infants were found to have nonspecified, sensorineural, or conductive hearing loss. The positive predictive value of the test was 96%. Therefore, we feel that the use of the modified ABR in the newborn is a timely, cost efficient method of screening for hearing loss and should be used for mass screening of all newborns. PMID:7806952

  16. The lethal and sub-lethal consequences of entomopathogenic nematode infestation and exposure for adult pine weevils, Hylobius abietis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Girling, R D; Ennis, D; Dillon, A B; Griffin, C T

    2010-07-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) frequently kill their host within 1-2 days, and interest in EPN focuses mainly on their lethality. However, insects may take longer to die, or may fail to die despite being infected, but little is known about the effects of EPN infection on insects, other than death. Here we investigate both lethal and sub-lethal effects of infection by two EPN species, Steinernema carpocapsae and Heterorhabditis downesi, on adults of the large pine weevil, Hylobius abietis. Following 12h nematode-weevil contact in peat, S. carpocapsae killed a significantly higher proportion of weevils (87-93%) than H. downesi (43-57%) at all concentrations tested. Less than 10% of weevils were dead within 2 days, and weevils continued to die for up to 10 days after exposure (LT(50) of 3 days or more). In a separate experiment, live weevils dissected 6 days after a 24h exposure to nematodes on filter paper harbored encapsulated and dead nematodes, showing that weevils could defend themselves against infection. Some live weevils also harbored live nematodes 6 days after they had been removed from the nematode infested medium. Feeding by weevils was not affected by infection with, or exposure to, either species of EPN. We discuss these results in relation to the use of EPN in biological control against H. abietis. PMID:20382152

  17. Potentiation by caffeine of potentially lethal fast-neutron damage in cultured human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schroy, C.B.; Furcinitti, P.S.; Todd, P.; Kukulinsky, N.E.

    1980-11-01

    Caffeine was found to potentiate single-dose fast-neutron-induced killing of human T-1 cells when present at 2 mM for 60 hr or more after (and 10 hr before) irradiation. Analyses of survival curves of cells treated with neutrons or X rays with and without caffeine indicate that only the linear, low-dose portion of survival curves is modified. Potentiation of lethality by caffeine is attributed mainly to its effects on single-hit potentially lethal lesions, possibly certain DNA double-strand breaks.

  18. Kinetics of Lethal Adsorption of Colicin E2 by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, R.; Hedges, A. J.

    1967-01-01

    The kinetics of lethal adsorption of colicin E2 by Escherichia coli C6 were studied by means of survivor plots. These were determined by a method which allowed rapid sampling of the reaction mixture and estimation of approximate confidence limits for the plotted data. The results were consistent with the predictions of a hypothetical model that assumed a single-hit mechanism of colicin action upon a bacterial population whose cells varied in their number of specific (lethal) receptors for colicin. The possibility of nonlethal adsorption is discussed. PMID:5340307

  19. Lethal osteochondrodysplasia and de novo autosomal translocation involving the long arm of chromosome 4

    SciTech Connect

    Fryns, J.P.; Legius, E.; Van den Berghe, H.; Moerman, P.; Vandenberghe, K.; Maroteaux, P.

    1994-06-01

    Recently, we diagnosed a de noco t(4q;11q) with apparent breakpoints at 4q23 and 11q13 [karyotype: 46,XX,t(4;11)(q23;q13)] in a first trimester female fetus with a lethal chondrodysplasia. After the observation reported by Urioste et al. (1994) the presena finding of a de novo autosomal translocation with one breakpoint in the proximal part of 4q in another fetus with lethal osteochondrodysplasia may be a further indication toward the possible location of a gene cluster in this autosomal region. 1 ref.

  20. Relative toxicity testing of spacecraft materials. 1: Spacecraft materials. [lethality of pyrolysates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    In chamber thermodegradation procedures were used to access the lethality to rats of the pyrolysis/combustion products of three foams, an adhesive backed metallic tape and RTV silicone rubber adhesive sealant used in spacecraft construction. The role of carbon monoxide in the overall pyrolysate toxicity was also investigated. Post exposure observation of the rats, histological evaluation of selected organs, carbon monoxide concentration in the chamber atmosphere during exposure and the percent carboxyhemoglobin in the animals expiring in the chamber are discussed. Thermogravimetric analysis and dosage response results are given. The lethal effect of the RTV silicon appears to be due to physical obstruction of the respiratory system by particulate matter from pyrolysis.