Science.gov

Sample records for lettuce mosaic virus

  1. The Use of Green Fluorescent Protein-Tagged Recombinant Viruses to Test Lettuce mosaic virus Resistance in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Candresse, T; Le Gall, O; Maisonneuve, B; German-Retana, S; Redondo, E

    2002-02-01

    ABSTRACT Seed certification and the use of cultivars containing one of two, probably allelic, recessive genes, mo1(1) and mo1(2), are the principal control methods for Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV) in lettuce. Although for a few LMV isolates, mo1(2) confers resistance with most isolates, the genes mo1(1) or mo1(2) confer a tolerance, and virus accumulation is readily detected in mo1-carrying plants. This phenotype complicates evaluation of the resistance status, in particular for mo1(1), for which there are no viral strains against which a true resistance is expressed. Two green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged viruses were constructed, derived from a non-resistance breaking isolate (LMV-0) and from a resistance-breaking isolate (LMV-E). An evaluation of 101 cultivars of known status was carried out with these recombinant viruses. Using the LMV-0-derived recombinant, identification of mo1-carrying cultivars was simple because, contrary to its wild-type parent, systemic movement of LMV-0-GFP was abolished in resistant plants. This assay detected four cases of misidentification of resistance status. In all these cases, further tests confirmed that the prior resistance status information was incorrect, so that a 100% correlation was observed between LMV-0-GFP behavior and the mo1 resistance status. Similarly, the LMV-E-derived recombinant allowed the identification of mo1(2) lettuce lines because its systemic movement was restricted in mo1(2) lines but not in susceptible or in mo1(1) lines. The tagged viruses were able to systemically invade another host, pea, irrespective of its resistance status against another member of the genus Potyvirus, Pea seed-borne mosaic virus. The use of these recombinant viruses could therefore greatly facilitate LMV resistance evaluation and speed up lettuce breeding programs. PMID:18943090

  2. MU06-857, a Green Leaf Lettuce Breeding Line with Resistance to Leafminer and Lettuce Mosaic Virus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture announces the release of a breeding line of green leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) with resistance to leafminers (Liriomyza langei Frick) and lettuce mosaic. The line MU06-857 is similar to cultivar ‘Lolla Rossa’ (‘Lollo Ros...

  3. Incidence of Lettuce mosaic virus in lettuce and its detection by polyclonal antibodies produced against recombinant coat protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prachi; Sharma, Susheel; Singh, Jasvir; Saha, Swati; Baranwal, V K

    2016-04-01

    Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus of family Potyviridae, causes mosaic disease in lettuce has recently been identified in India. The virus is seed borne and secondary infection occurs through aphids. To ensure virus freedom in seeds it is important to develop diagnostic tools, for serological methods the production of polyclonal antibodies is a prerequisite. The coat protein (CP) gene of LMV was amplified, cloned and expressed using pET-28a vector in Escherichia coli BL21DE3 competent cells. The LMV CP was expressed as a fusion protein containing a fragment of the E. coli His tag. The LMV CP/His protein reacted positively with a commercial antiserum against LMV in an immunoblot assay. Polyclonal antibodies purified from serum of rabbits immunized with the fusion protein gave positive results when LMV infected lettuce (Lactuca sativa) was tested at 1:1000 dilution in PTA-ELISA. These were used for specific detection of LMV in screening lettuce accessions. The efficacy of the raised polyclonal antiserum was high and it can be utilized in quarantine and clean seed production. PMID:26850143

  4. Key mutations in the cylindrical inclusion involved in lettuce mosaic virus adaptation to eIF4E-mediated resistance in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Sorel, M; Svanella-Dumas, L; Candresse, T; Acelin, G; Pitarch, A; Houvenaghel, M C; German-Retana, S

    2014-09-01

    We previously showed that allelic genes mol¹ and mo1² used to protect lettuce crops against Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV) correspond to mutant alleles of the gene encoding the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E. LMV resistance-breaking determinants map not only to the main potyvirus virulence determinant, a genome-linked viral protein, but also to the C-terminal region of the cylindrical inclusion (CI), with a key role of amino acid at position 621. Here, we show that the propagation of several non-lettuce isolates of LMV in mo1¹ plants is accompanied by a gain of virulence correlated with the presence in the CI C terminus of a serine at position 617 and the accumulation of mutations at positions 602 or 627. Whole-genome sequencing of native and evolved isolates showed that no other mutation could be associated with adaptation to mo1 resistance. Site-directed mutagenesis pinpointed the key role in the virulence of the combination of mutations at positions 602 and 617, in addition to position 621. The impact of these mutations on the fitness of the virus was evaluated, suggesting that the durability of mo1 resistance in the field relies on the fitness cost associated with the resistance-breaking mutations, the nature of the mutations, and their potential antagonistic effects. PMID:25105805

  5. Adaptation of lettuce mosaic virus to Catharanthus roseus involves mutations in the central domain of the VPg.

    PubMed

    Svanella-Dumas, Laurence; Verdin, Eric; Faure, Chantal; German-Retana, Sylvie; Gognalons, Patrick; Danet, Jean Luc; Marais, Armelle; Candresse, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    An isolate of Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV, a Potyvirus) infecting Madagascar periwinckle (Catharanthus roseus) was identified and characterized by Illumina deep sequencing. LMV-Cr has no close affinities to previously sequenced LMV isolates and represents a novel, divergent LMV clade. Inoculation experiments with other representative LMV isolates showed that they are unable to infect C. roseus, which was not known to be a host for LMV. However, three C. roseus variants of one of these isolates, LMV-AF199, could be selected and partially or completely sequenced. These variants are characterized by the accumulation of mutations affecting the C-terminal part of the cylindrical inclusion (CI) helicase and the central part of the VPg. In particular, a serine to proline mutation at amino acid 143 of the VPg was observed in all three independently selected variants and is also present in the LMV-Cr isolate, making it a prime candidate as a host-range determinant. Other mutations at VPg positions 65 and 144 could also contribute to the ability to infect C. roseus. Inoculation experiments involving a recombinant LMV expressing a permissive lettuce eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) suggest that eIF4E does not contribute to the interaction of most LMV isolates with C. roseus. PMID:24400938

  6. Characterisation of lettuce virus X, a new potexvirus infecting lettuce in Iran.

    PubMed

    Dizadji, A; Koohi-Habibi, M; Izadpanah, K; Dietrich, C; Mossahebi, G H; Winter, S

    2008-01-01

    A virus with flexuous rod-shaped particle morphology was found in samples from lettuce during a survey of viruses infecting lettuce in Tehran province in Iran. This virus was subjected to a complete analysis of its biological and molecular features. The entire nucleotide sequence of the virus was determined, revealing a polyadenylated ssRNA genome consisting of 7,212 nucleotides [without poly (A) tail] and possessing an organization typical for potexviruses. Comparative genome analysis showed that the lettuce virus is closely related to Alstroemeria virus X, narcissus mosaic virus and asparagus virus 3. Based on particle morphology, physico-chemical properties and the complete genome sequence, this virus is a member of a new species in the genus Potexvirus, for which the name lettuce virus X (LeVX) is proposed. Biological assays using an infectious cDNA clone and a wild-type isolate of LeVX revealed that the virus, despite reaching high concentrations in all lettuce cultivars tested, does not cause symptoms in lettuce. PMID:18807116

  7. The Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzinski, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Explains how the tobacco mosaic virus can be used to study virology. Presents facts about the virus, procedures to handle the virus in the laboratory, and four laboratory exercises involving the viruses' survival under inactivating conditions, dilution end point, filterability, and microscopy. (MDH)

  8. Biology and Genetics of Lettuce Dieback Disease and Lettuce Necrotic Stunt Virus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lettuce dieback, a new soil-borne disease of lettuce, emerged in the 1990s to cause severe losses for lettuce production in the western United States. The disease is caused by Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) and the recently described tombusvirus, Lettuce necrotic stunt virus (LNSV). The complete ge...

  9. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using proteins crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the unexpected hypothesis that the virus releases its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have fairly flat coats, but in TYNV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early stuties of TYMV, but McPherson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central void on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides linked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the void. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine

  10. Effect of Sugarcane Mosaic caused by Sorghum mosaic virus on sugarcane in Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane mosaic is caused by two viruses, Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCVM) or Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV). In Louisiana, SrMV is the predominant mosaic pathogen affecting sugarcane. In a field experiment established in 2012, plots were planted with seed cane with or without mosaic symptoms. The mosaic...

  11. Dynamics of nonpersistent aphid-borne viruses in lettuce crops covered with UV-absorbing nets.

    PubMed

    Legarrea, S; Betancourt, M; Plaza, M; Fraile, A; García-Arenal, F; Fereres, A

    2012-04-01

    Aphid-transmitted viruses frequently cause severe epidemics in lettuce grown under Mediterranean climates. Spatio-temporal dynamics of aphid-transmitted viruses and its vector were studied on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) grown under tunnels covered by two types of nets: a commercial UV-absorbing net (Bionet) and a Standard net. A group of plants infected by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, family Bromoviridae, genus Cucumovirus) and Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV, family Potyviridae, genus Potyvirus) was transplanted in each plot. The same virus-infected source plants were artificially infested by the aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas). Secondary spread of insects was weekly monitored and plants were sampled for the detection of viruses every two weeks. In 2008, the infection rate of both CMV and LMV were lower under the Bionet than under the Standard cover, probably due to the lower population density and lower dispersal rate achieved by M. euphorbiae. However, during spring of 2009, significant differences in the rate of infection between the two covers were only found for LMV six weeks after transplant. The spatial distribution of the viruses analysed by SADIE methodology was "at random", and it was not associated to the spatial pattern of the vector. The results obtained are discussed analyzing the wide range of interactions that occurred among UV-radiation, host plant, viruses, insect vector and environmental conditions. Our results show that UV-absorbing nets can be recommended as a component of an integrated disease management program to reduce secondary spread of lettuce viruses, although not as a control measure on its own. PMID:22226944

  12. Environmental factors contributing to development of lettuce dieback disease and genomic characterization of lettuce necrotic stunt virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The disease, lettuce dieback, causes severe losses for lettuce production in the western US and is caused by a group of tombusviruses, including both Tomato bushy stunt virus and the newly described lettuce necrotic stunt virus (LNSV). Symptoms include yellowing, necrosis, stunting and death of pla...

  13. Properties of a virus causing mosaic and leaf curl disease of Celosia argentea L. in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Owolabi, T A; Taiwo, M A; Thottappilly, G A; Shoyinka, S A; Proll, E; Rabenstein, F

    1998-06-01

    A sap transmissible virus, causing mosaic and leaf curl disease of Celosia argentea, was isolated at vegetable farms in Amuwo Odofin, Tejuoso, and Abule Ado, Lagos, Nigeria. The virus had a restricted host range confined to a few species of the Amaranthaceae, Chenopodiaceae and Solanaceae families. It failed to infect several other species of the Aizoaceae, Brassicaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae, Malvaceae, Poaceae and Tiliaceae families. The virus was transmitted in a non-persistent manner by Aphis spiraecola and Toxoptera citricidus but not by eight other aphid species tested. There was no evidence of transmission by seeds of C. argentae varieties. The viral coat protein had a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of about 30.2 K. Electron microscopy of purified virus preparations revealed flexuous rod shaped particles of about 750 nm in length. Serological studies were performed using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunosorbent electron microscopy (ISEM) and Western blot analysis. The virus reacted positively with an universal potyvirus group monoclonal antibody (MoAb) and MoAb P-3-3H8 raised against peanut stripe potyvirus. It also reacted with polyclonal antibodies raised against several potyviruses including asparagus virus-1 (AV-1), turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), watermelon mosaic virus (WMV-2), plum pox virus (PPV), soybean mosaic virus (SoyMV), lettuce mosaic virus (LMV), bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and beet mosaic virus (BMV) in at least one of the serological assays used. On the basis of host range, mode of transmission, and available literature data, the celosia virus seems to be different from potyviruses previously reported to infect vegetables in Nigeria. The name celosia mosaic virus (CIMV) has been proposed for this virus. PMID:9842442

  14. Genetic mechanisms of Maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize resistance to viruses has been well-characterized at the genetic level, and loci responsible for resistance to potyviruses including Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), and Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV), have been mapped in several ge...

  15. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  16. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  17. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  18. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  19. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  20. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using protein crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the enexpected hypothesis that the virus release its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have farly flat coats, but in TYMV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early studies of TYMV, but McPhereson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central viod on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides liked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the voild. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine.

  1. Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus (STMV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus (STMV)--one of the smallest viruses known--has been successfully deduced using STMV crystals grown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1992 and 1994. The STMV crystals were up to 30 times the volume of any seen in the laboratory. At the same time they gave the best resolution data ever obtained on any virus crystal. STMV is a small icosahedral plant virus, consisting of a protein shell made up of 60 identical protein subunits of molecular weight 17,500. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that, in contrast to the crystal grown on Earth, the crystals grown under microgravity conditions were viusally perfect, with no striations or clumping of crystals. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction data obtained from the space-grown crystals was of a much higher quality than the best data available at that time from ground-based crystals. This computer model shows the external coating or capsid. STMV is used because it is a simple protein to work with; studies are unrelated to tobacco. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, Univeristy of California at Irvin.

  2. Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Viurus (STMV)--one of the smallest viruses known--has been successfully reduced using STMV crystals grown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1992 and 1994. The STMV crystals were up to 30 times the volume of any seen in the laboratory. At the time they gave the best resolution data ever obtained on any virus crystal. STMV is a small icosahedral plant virus, consisting of a protein shell made up of 60 identical protein subunits of molecular weight 17,500. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that, in contrast to the crystals grown on Earth, the crystals grown under microgravity conditions were visually perfect, with no striations or clumping of crystals. Furthermore, the x-ray diffraction data obtained from the space-grown crystals was of a much higher quality than the best data available at that time from ground-based crystals. This stylized ribbon model shows the protein coat in white and the nucleic acid in yellow. STMV is used because it is a simple protein to work with; studies are unrelated to tobacco. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, University of California at Irvin.

  3. Bean Common Mosaic Virus and Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (Genus Potyvirus; Potyviridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are species within the genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae and cause some of the most economically important diseases of legume crops worldwide. Both viruses occur essentially wherever bean and cowpea (including Phaseolus...

  4. Multiplex Real Time PCR For Detection of Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus and Triticum Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TRIMV) are widespread throughout the southwestern Great Plains states. Using conventional diagnostics such as Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA), these two viruses are commonly found together in infected wheat samples. Methods for m...

  5. Incidence of Wheat streak mosaic virus, Triticum mosaic virus, and Wheat mosaic virus in wheat curl mites recovered from maturing winter wheat spikes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat curl mites (WCM; Aceria tosichella) transmit Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), and Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV) to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains region of the United States. These viruses can be detected in single, double, or triple combinations i...

  6. Genetics of seed transmission Soybean mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is an aphid- and seed-transmitted member of the Potyviridae that infects soybean plants and, in years when virus infections are widespread, can cause significant reductions in the quantity and quality of seed harvested. Because seed-borne infections are the primary sources...

  7. Triticum mosaic virus isolates in the southern Great Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006, a Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV)-resistant wheat variety RonL was found to have mosaic symptoms similar to WSMV. The virus inducing the symptoms was determined to be previously unknown and given the name Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV). Since, TriMV has been found in plant samples isolate...

  8. LETTUCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lettuce is the most important fresh-market vegetable in the U.S. in terms of area, production, and value. It is also a leading vegetable in many countries around the world. Plant breeding has played a critical role in the improvement of yield and quality of lettuce. This book chapter summarizes the ...

  9. Characterization of the Triticum Mosaic Virus Genome and Interactions between Triticum Mosaic Virus and Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) has been determined to be 10,266 nucleotides encoding a large polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids. The proteins of TriMV possess only 33-44% (with NIb protein) and 15-29% (with P1 protein) amino acid identity with the reported members of Pot...

  10. Lettuce infectious yellows virus-encoded P26 induces plasmalemma deposit cytopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Lucy R.; Medina, Vicente; Sudarshana, Mysore R.; Falk, Bryce W.

    2009-05-25

    Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV) encodes a 26 kDa protein (P26) previously shown to associate with plasmalemma deposits (PLDs), unique LIYV-induced cytopathologies located at the plasmalemma over plasmodesmata pit fields in companion cells and phloem parenchyma. To further characterize the relationship of P26 and PLDs, we assessed localization and cytopathology induction of P26 expressed from either LIYV or a heterologous Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) vector using green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions, immunofluorescence microscopy, biochemical fractionation, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM analyses demonstrated that P26 not only associated with, but induced formation of PLDs in the absence of other LIYV proteins. Interestingly, PLDs induced by P26-expressing TMV were no longer confined to phloem cells. Putative P26 orthologs from two other members of the genus Crinivirus which do not induce conspicuous PLDs exhibited fractionation properties similar to LIYV P26 but were not associated with any PLD-like cytopathology.

  11. Infection of Plants by Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry; Maratos, Marina; Farabaugh, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Provides three exercises that introduce high school and college students to a common strain of the tobacco mosaic virus and the study of some basic biological processes. Activities involve inoculation of plants and observing and recording symptom development in infected plants. (DDR)

  12. Tobacco mosaic virus: Proof by synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A linear, non-self-replicating DNA molecule encoding Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was enzymatically synthesized in vitro from DNA templates made from overlapping oligonucleotides. The molecule was a replica of the alphabetic text rendering of the first TMV genome sequence elucidated by Goelet et al. ...

  13. Host Resistance to Mirafiori Lettuce Big-vein Virus and Virus Sequence Diversity in the Western United States.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Big vein is an economically damaging disease of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) caused by the Olpidium brassicae vectored Mirafiori lettuce big-vein virus (MLBVV). Although big vein is a perennial problem in the US, the extent of MLBVV infection and diversity was unknown. Lettuce cultivars partially resist...

  14. Quantification of yield loss caused by Triticum mosaic virus and Wheat streak mosaic virus in winter wheat under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) and Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) infect winter wheat in the Great Plains region of the United States. The two viruses are transmitted by wheat curl mites, which also transmit High Plains virus. In a field study conducted in 2011 and 2012, winter wheat cultivars Mi...

  15. Resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus in wheat lines carrying Wsm1 and Wsm3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are important viruses of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains of United States. In addition to agronomic practices to prevent damage from these viruses, temperature sensitive resistance genes Wsm1, Wsm2 and Wsm3, have bee...

  16. Characterization and epidemiology of outbreaks of Impatiens necrotic spot virus on lettuce in coastal California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beginning in 2006, outbreaks of diseases caused by tospoviruses in lettuce have occurred in California with greater frequency. Lettuce in the coastal region has been affected primarily by Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), though Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was also present. In contrast, TSW...

  17. A 2014 nationwide survey of the distribution of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV) and Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) major viruses in South Korean soybean fields, and changes..

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2014 symptomatic soybean samples were collected throughout Korea, and were tested for the most important soybean viruses found in Korea, namely Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV), and Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV). SYMMV was most commonly detected,...

  18. A 2014 nationwide survey of the distribution of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV) and Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) major viruses in South Korean soybean fields, and changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2014 symptomatic soybean samples were collected throughout Korea, and were tested for the most important soybean viruses found in Korea, namely Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV), and Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV). SYMMV was most commonly detected,...

  19. Immunochromatographic purification of Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Bujarski, J J; Wiatroszak, I

    1981-01-01

    The method of immunoadsorptional purification of Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus has been worked out. Immunosorbents were obtained by coupling the antibody (IgG) fraction isolated from anti-BYMV and anti-pea leaf protein antisera with CNBr-activated 1% agarose beads. Conditions for preparation of immunosorbents, for BYMV adsorption and elution as well as the method of plant protein separation from BYMV were pointed out. The purity of BYMV was checked by double immunodiffusion as well as by SDS-acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Also biological activity was determined. TMV was used as the model virus for further BYMV studies. PMID:7025790

  20. An Experimental Host Range of Triticum Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a newly discovered virus isolated from wheat. This study was conducted to determine an experimental host range for TriMV and identify species that could serve as differential hosts for isolating TriMV from Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV). Plants tested were mechan...

  1. Response of maize (Zea mays L.) lines carrying Wsm1, Wsm2 and Wsm3 to the potyviruses Johnsongrass mosaic virus and Sorghum mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize dwarf mosaic disease is one of the most important viral diseases of maize throughout the world. It is caused by a set of related viruses in the family Potyviridae, genus Potyvirus, including Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV), and S...

  2. Attempts to Improve the Method of Screening Cowpea Germplasm for Resistance to Cucumber Mosaic Virus and Blackeye Cowpea Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of visual symptom screening for cowpea plants in field plots improved screening for Blackeye Cowpea Mosaic Virus (BICMV)-resistance. However, the method failed to improve the speed or accuracy of screening for Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV)-resistance. Plants that displayed few visual virus sympt...

  3. Barley stripe mosaic virus: Structure and relationship to the tobamoviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; Williams, Dewight; Bian, Wen; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Stubbs, Gerald

    2013-09-01

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) is the type member of the genus Hordeivirus, rigid, rod-shaped viruses in the family Virgaviridae. We have used fiber diffraction and cryo-electron microscopy to determine the helical symmetry of BSMV to be 23.2 subunits per turn of the viral helix, and to obtain a low-resolution model of the virus by helical reconstruction methods. Features in the model support a structural relationship between the coat proteins of the hordeiviruses and the tobamoviruses. - Highlights: • We report a low-resolution structure of barley stripe mosaic virus. • Barley stripe mosaic virus has 23.2 subunits per turn of the viral helix. • We compare barley stripe mosaic virus with tobacco mosaic virus.

  4. Genetic diversity of viruses causing mosaic in Louisiana sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mosaic caused by Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) contributed to the near collapse of Louisiana’s sugarcane industry in the early 20th Century. By the 1950s, the cultivation of resistant cultivars eliminated mosaic as a major disease problem; however, new strains arose among previously resistant cultiv...

  5. New Viruses Identified in Fig Trees Exhibiting Fig Mosaic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fig mosaic disease has been known for decades, but the causal agent has been elusive. Here we present data on the incidence of at least four new viruses isolated from fig trees exhibiting mosaic symptoms. One of the viruses is closely related to the recently identified European mountain ash ringspo...

  6. Comparison of barley stripe mosaic virus strains.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Elsayed E; Abdel Aleem, Engy E; Fattouh, Faiza A

    2008-01-01

    BSMV (barley stripe mosaic virus) particles were obtained in a pure state from infected host plant tissues of Hordeum vulgare. The three genomic parities (alpha, beta and gamma) were amplified by PCR using specific primers for each particle; each was cloned. Partial sequence of the alpha, beta and gamma segments was determined for the Egyptian isolate of barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV AE1). Alignment of nucleotide sequences with that of other known strains of the virus, BSMV type strains (CV17, ND18 and China), and the generation of phylogenetic trees was performed. A low level of homology was detected comparing 467 bp of the a and 643 bp of the segments to that of the other strains, and thus BSMV alpha and beta segments were in separate clusters. However, 1154 bp of the gamma segments of BSMV AE1 showed a high level of homology especially to strain BSMV ND18, as they both formed a distinct cluster. Northern blotting of pure BSMV AE1 virus and H. vulgare-infected tissue were compared using an alpha ND18 specific probe. Western blotting using antibodies specific for the coat protein (CP) and the triple gene block 1 (TGB1) protein, which are both encoded by the beta ND18 segment, still indicated a high level of similarity between proteins produced by BSMV ND18 and AE1. We suggest that the BSMV AE1 isolate is a distinct strain of BSMV which reflects the genetic evolutionary divergence among BSMV strains and members of the Hordeivirus group. PMID:18533473

  7. Development of a multiplexed PCR detection method for Barley and Cereal Yellow Dwarf Viruses, Wheat Spindle Streak Virus, Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus and Soil-Borne Wheat Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley and Cereal Yellow Dwarf Viruses (B/CYDVs), Wheat Spindle Streak Mosaic (WSSMV), Soil-Borne Wheat Mosaic (SBWMV) Mosaic Virus and Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus (WSMV) constitute the most economically important group of wheat viruses. In this paper, a multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chai...

  8. Discovery and small RNA profile of Pecan mosaic-associated virus, a novel potyvirus of pecan trees.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiu; Fu, Shuai; Qian, Yajuan; Zhang, Liqin; Xu, Yi; Zhou, Xueping

    2016-01-01

    A novel potyvirus was discovered in pecan (Carya illinoensis) showing leaf mosaic symptom through the use of deep sequencing of small RNAs. The complete genome of this virus was determined to comprise of 9,310 nucleotides (nt), and shared 24.0% to 58.9% nucleotide similarities with that of other Potyviridae viruses. The genome was deduced to encode a single open reading frame (polyprotein) on the plus strand. Phylogenetic analysis based on the whole genome sequence and coat protein amino acid sequence showed that this virus is most closely related to Lettuce mosaic virus. Using electron microscopy, the typical Potyvirus filamentous particles were identified in infected pecan leaves with mosaic symptoms. Our results clearly show that this virus is a new member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae. The virus is tentatively named Pecan mosaic-associated virus (PMaV). Additionally, profiling of the PMaV-derived small RNA (PMaV-sRNA) showed that the most abundant PMaV-sRNAs were 21-nt in length. There are several hotspots for small RNA production along the PMaV genome; two 21-nt PMaV-sRNAs starting at 811 nt and 610 nt of the minus-strand genome were highly repeated. PMID:27226228

  9. Discovery and small RNA profile of Pecan mosaic-associated virus, a novel potyvirus of pecan trees

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiu; Fu, Shuai; Qian, Yajuan; Zhang, Liqin; Xu, Yi; Zhou, Xueping

    2016-01-01

    A novel potyvirus was discovered in pecan (Carya illinoensis) showing leaf mosaic symptom through the use of deep sequencing of small RNAs. The complete genome of this virus was determined to comprise of 9,310 nucleotides (nt), and shared 24.0% to 58.9% nucleotide similarities with that of other Potyviridae viruses. The genome was deduced to encode a single open reading frame (polyprotein) on the plus strand. Phylogenetic analysis based on the whole genome sequence and coat protein amino acid sequence showed that this virus is most closely related to Lettuce mosaic virus. Using electron microscopy, the typical Potyvirus filamentous particles were identified in infected pecan leaves with mosaic symptoms. Our results clearly show that this virus is a new member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae. The virus is tentatively named Pecan mosaic-associated virus (PMaV). Additionally, profiling of the PMaV-derived small RNA (PMaV-sRNA) showed that the most abundant PMaV-sRNAs were 21-nt in length. There are several hotspots for small RNA production along the PMaV genome; two 21-nt PMaV-sRNAs starting at 811 nt and 610 nt of the minus-strand genome were highly repeated. PMID:27226228

  10. Internalization of Sapovirus, a Surrogate for Norovirus, in Romaine Lettuce and the Effect of Lettuce Latex on Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Esseili, Malak A.; Zhang, Zhenwen

    2012-01-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of food-borne outbreaks, including those that involve lettuce. The culturable porcine sapovirus (SaV) was used as a norovirus surrogate to study the persistence and the potential transfer of the virus from roots to leaves and from outer to inner leaves of lettuce plants. Treatment of lettuce with SaV was done through the roots of young plants, the soil, or the outer leaves of mature plants. Sampling of roots, xylem sap, and inner and outer leaves followed by RNA extraction and SaV-specific real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was performed at 2 h and on postinoculation days (PID) 2, 5, 7, 14, and/or 28. When SaV was inoculated through the roots, viral RNA persisted on the roots and in the leaves until PID 28. When the virus was inoculated through the soil, viral RNA was detected on the roots and in the xylem sap until PID 14; viral RNA was detected in the leaves only until PID 2. No infectious virus was detected inside the leaves for either treatment. When SaV was inoculated through the outer leaves, viral RNA persisted on the leaves until PID 14; however, the virus did not transfer to inner leaves. Infectious viral particles on leaves were detected only at 2 h postinoculation. The milky sap (latex) of leaves, but not the roots' xylem sap, significantly decreased virus infectivity when tested in vitro. Collectively, our results showed the transfer of SaV from roots to leaves through the xylem system and the capacity of the sap of lettuce leaves to decrease virus infectivity in leaves. PMID:22752176

  11. Effects of single and double infections of winter wheat by Triticum mosaic virus and Wheat streak mosaic virus on yield determinants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a recently discovered virus infecting wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains region of the United States. It is transmitted by wheat curl mites (Aceria tosichella Keifer) which also transmit Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Wheat mosaic virus. In a gree...

  12. Bean Common Mosaic Virus and Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus: Relationships, Biology, and Prospects for Control.

    PubMed

    Worrall, Elizabeth A; Wamonje, Francis O; Mukeshimana, Gerardine; Harvey, Jagger J W; Carr, John P; Mitter, Neena

    2015-01-01

    The closely related potyviruses Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are major constraints on common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) production. Crop losses caused by BCMV and BCMNV impact severely not only on commercial scale cultivation of this high-value crop but also on production by smallholder farmers in the developing world, where bean serves as a key source of dietary protein and mineral nutrition. In many parts of the world, progress has been made in combating BCMV through breeding bean varieties possessing the I gene, a dominant gene conferring resistance to most BCMV strains. However, in Africa, and in particular in Central and East Africa, BCMNV is endemic and this presents a serious problem for deployment of the I gene because this virus triggers systemic necrosis (black root disease) in plants possessing this resistance gene. Information on these two important viruses is scattered throughout the literature from 1917 onward, and although reviews on resistance to BCMV and BCMNV exist, there is currently no comprehensive review on the biology and taxonomy of BCMV and BCMNV. In this chapter, we discuss the current state of our knowledge of these two potyviruses including fundamental aspects of classification and phylogeny, molecular biology, host interactions, transmission through seed and by aphid vectors, geographic distribution, as well as current and future prospects for the control of these important viruses. PMID:26111585

  13. Sequence diversity of wheat mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Lucy R

    2016-02-01

    Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), transmitted by eriophyid wheat curl mites (Aceria tosichella) is the causal agent of High Plains disease in wheat and maize. WMoV and other members of the genus Emaravirus evaded thorough molecular characterization for many years due to the experimental challenges of mite transmission and manipulating multisegmented negative sense RNA genomes. Recently, the complete genome sequence of a Nebraska isolate of WMoV revealed eight segments, plus a variant sequence of the nucleocapsid protein-encoding segment. Here, near-complete and partial consensus sequences of five more WMoV isolates are reported and compared to the Nebraska isolate: an Ohio maize isolate (GG1), a Kansas barley isolate (KS7), and three Ohio wheat isolates (H1, K1, W1). Results show two distinct groups of WMoV isolates: Ohio wheat isolate RNA segments had 84% or lower nucleotide sequence identity to the NE isolate, whereas GG1 and KS7 had 98% or higher nucleotide sequence identity to the NE isolate. Knowledge of the sequence variability of WMoV isolates is a step toward understanding virus biology, and potentially explaining observed biological variation. PMID:26590326

  14. Occurrance in Korea of three major soybean viruses, Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYCMV), and Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) revealed by a nationwide survey of soybean fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV) and soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) were recently isolated in Korea, and it hasn’t been reported how these two viruses were dispersed in Korea. In 2012, we performed a nationwide survey of subsistence soybean farms in Korea. Leaves that appeared ...

  15. Characterisation and diagnosis of frangipani mosaic virus from India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Alok; Solanki, Vikas; Verma, H N; Mandal, Bikash

    2015-10-01

    Frangipani mosaic virus (FrMV) is known to infect frangipani tree (Plumeria rubra f. acutifolia) in India but the virus has not been characterized at genomic level and diagnosis is not available. In the present study, an isolate of FrMV (FrMV-Ind-1) showing greenish mosaic and vein-banding symptoms in P. rubra f. acutifolia in New Delhi was characterized based on host reactions, serology and genome sequence. The virus isolate induced local symptoms on several new experimental host species: Capsicum annuum (chilli), Nicotiana benthamiana, Solanum lycopersicum and S. melongena. N. benthamiana could be used as an efficient propagation host as it developed systemic mottle mosaic symptoms all round the year. The genome of FrMV-Ind-1 was 6643 (JN555602) nucleotides long with genome organization similar to tobamoviruses. The Indian isolate of FrMV shared a very close genome sequence identity (98.3 %) with the lone isolate of FrMV-P from Australia. FrMV-Ind-1 together with FrMV-P formed a new phylogenetic group i.e. Apocynaceae-infecting tobamovirus. The polyclonal antiserum generated through the purified virus preparation was successfully utilized to detect the virus in field samples of frangipani by ELISA. Of the eight different tobamoviruses tested, FrMV-Ind-1 shared distant serological relationships with only cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, tobacco mosaic virus, bell pepper mottle virus and kyuri green mottle mosaic virus. RT-PCR based on coat protein gene primer successfully detected the virus in frangipani plants. This study is the first comprehensive description of FrMV occurring in India. PMID:26239043

  16. EXPRESSION OF THE MAIZE MOSAIC VIRUS GLYCOPROTEIN IN INSECT CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize mosaic virus (genus Nucleorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae) is transmitted in a persistent-propagative manner by Peregrinus maidis, the corn planthopper. Like other rhabdoviruses, the MMV genome encodes a surface glycoprotein that is likely involved in virus attachment and entry into host ce...

  17. First report of apple mosaic virus in Alaska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple mosaic virus (ApMV, family Bromoviridae, genus Ilarvirus) is one of the oldest and most economically important viruses of apples (Malus x domestica Borkh.). Yield losses may vary from negligible to as high as fifty percent, depending on the affected cultivar. Although ApMV is found worldwide...

  18. Zucchini tigre mosaic virus infection of cucurbits in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zucchini tigre mosaic virus (ZTMV) was identified infecting cucurbits in Florida in 2002 and again in 2015. This is the first report of ZTMV in the U.S. This report provides an overview of this emerging virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants, and research and regulatory scientists....

  19. Transmission of Switchgrass mosaic virus by Graminella aureovitatta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass mosaic virus (SwMV) was identified in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and was proposed as a new marafivirus based on its genome sequence and comparison with its closest relative, Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV), a type member of the genus, Marafivirus. MRFV only infects maize (Zea mays) an...

  20. Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) and Indian cassava mosaic virus transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) adults from colonies reared on cassava or sweet potato plants were studied to determine their ability to transmit Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) (Geminiviridae: Begomovirus) from cassava to cassava. Virus acquisition access (feeding) periods (AAP) of 48 h on ICMV-infec...

  1. Variants of Triticum mosaic virus isolated from wheat in Colorado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a recently discovered virus infecting wheat. We compared the Colorado isolates C10-492 and C11-775 with the 06-123 isolate of TriMV from Kansas (TriMV-K). Comparisons were made using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), infectivity assay, host range, dry weig...

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Tomato Mosaic Virus Isolated from Jasmine in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fillmer, Kornelia; Adkins, Scott; Pongam, Patchara; D'Elia, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Tomato mosaic virus was reported from jasmine in Florida. We present the first complete genome sequence of a tomato mosaic virus isolate from this woody perennial plant in the United States. PMID:26159525

  3. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Watermelon Mosaic Virus Isolated from Watermelon in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rajbanshi, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Watermelon mosaic virus was first reported in 1965 from the Rio Grande Valley, TX. We report here the first complete genome sequence of a watermelon mosaic virus isolate from watermelon collected from the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. PMID:27103724

  4. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Watermelon Mosaic Virus Isolated from Watermelon in the United States.

    PubMed

    Rajbanshi, Naveen; Ali, Akhtar

    2016-01-01

    Watermelon mosaic virus was first reported in 1965 from the Rio Grande Valley, TX. We report here the first complete genome sequence of a watermelon mosaic virus isolate from watermelon collected from the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. PMID:27103724

  5. Expression of tobacco mosaic virus RNA in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Yamaya, J; Yoshioka, M; Meshi, T; Okada, Y; Ohno, T

    1988-03-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is a message-sense, single-stranded RNA virus that infects many Solanaceae plants. A full-length cDNA copy of TMV genomic RNA was constructed and introduced into the genomic DNA of tobacco plants using a disarmed Ti plasmid vector. Transformed plants showed typical symptoms of TMV infection, and their leaves contained infectious TMV particles. This is the first example of the expression of RNA virus genomic RNAs in plants. PMID:2835637

  6. Feline Calicivirus, Murine Norovirus, Porcine Sapovirus, and Tulane Virus Survival on Postharvest Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Esseili, Malak A; Saif, Linda J; Farkas, Tibor; Wang, Qiuhong

    2015-08-01

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is the leading cause of foodborne illnesses, with an increasing number of outbreaks associated with leafy greens. Because HuNoV cannot be routinely cultured, culturable feline calicivirus (FCV), murine norovirus (MNV), porcine sapovirus (SaV), and Tulane virus (TV) have been used as surrogates. These viruses are generated in different cell lines as infected cell lysates, which may differentially affect their stability. Our objective was to uniformly compare the survival of these viruses on postharvest lettuce while evaluating the effects of cell lysates on their survival. Viruses were semipurified from cell lysates by ultrafiltration or ultracentrifugation followed by resuspension in sterile water. Virus survival was examined before and after semipurification: in suspension at room temperature (RT) until day 28 and on lettuce leaves stored at RT for 3 days or at 4°C for 7 and 14 days. In suspension, both methods significantly enhanced the survival of all viruses. On lettuce, the survival of MNV in cell lysates was similar to that in water, under all storage conditions. In contrast, the survival of FCV, SaV, and TV was differentially enhanced, under different storage conditions, by removing cell lysates. Following semipurification, viruses showed similar persistence to each other on lettuce stored under all conditions, with the exception of ultracentrifugation-purified FCV, which showed a higher inactivation rate than MNV at 4°C for 14 days. In conclusion, the presence of cell lysates in viral suspensions underestimated the survivability of these surrogate viruses, while viral semipurification revealed similar survivabilities on postharvest lettuce leaves. PMID:26002891

  7. Feline Calicivirus, Murine Norovirus, Porcine Sapovirus, and Tulane Virus Survival on Postharvest Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Esseili, Malak A.; Saif, Linda J.; Farkas, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is the leading cause of foodborne illnesses, with an increasing number of outbreaks associated with leafy greens. Because HuNoV cannot be routinely cultured, culturable feline calicivirus (FCV), murine norovirus (MNV), porcine sapovirus (SaV), and Tulane virus (TV) have been used as surrogates. These viruses are generated in different cell lines as infected cell lysates, which may differentially affect their stability. Our objective was to uniformly compare the survival of these viruses on postharvest lettuce while evaluating the effects of cell lysates on their survival. Viruses were semipurified from cell lysates by ultrafiltration or ultracentrifugation followed by resuspension in sterile water. Virus survival was examined before and after semipurification: in suspension at room temperature (RT) until day 28 and on lettuce leaves stored at RT for 3 days or at 4°C for 7 and 14 days. In suspension, both methods significantly enhanced the survival of all viruses. On lettuce, the survival of MNV in cell lysates was similar to that in water, under all storage conditions. In contrast, the survival of FCV, SaV, and TV was differentially enhanced, under different storage conditions, by removing cell lysates. Following semipurification, viruses showed similar persistence to each other on lettuce stored under all conditions, with the exception of ultracentrifugation-purified FCV, which showed a higher inactivation rate than MNV at 4°C for 14 days. In conclusion, the presence of cell lysates in viral suspensions underestimated the survivability of these surrogate viruses, while viral semipurification revealed similar survivabilities on postharvest lettuce leaves. PMID:26002891

  8. Cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles target surface vimentin on cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Nicole F; Cho, Choi-Fong; Ablack, Amber; Lewis, John D; Manchester, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Aims Vimentin, a type III intermediate filament, is upregulated during epithelial–mesenchymal transition and tumor progression. Vimentin is surface-expressed on cells involved in inflammation; the function remains unknown. We investigated the expression of surface vimentin on cancer cells and evaluated targeting nanoparticles to tumors exploiting vimentin. Materials & methods Cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles that interact with surface vimentin were used as probes. Tumor homing was tested using the chick chorioallantoic membrane model with human tumor xenografts. Results & discussion Surface vimentin levels varied during cell cycle and among the cell lines tested. Surface vimentin expression correlated with cowpea mosaic virus uptake, underscoring the utility of cowpea mosaic virus to detect invasive cancer cells. Targeting to tumor xenografts was observed; homing was based on the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Our data provide novel insights into the role of surface vimentin in cancer and targeting nanoparticles in vivo. PMID:21385137

  9. Detection of Corchorus golden mosaic virus Associated with Yellow Mosaic Disease of Jute (Corchorus capsularis).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Raju; Palit, Paramita; Paul, Sujay; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Roy, Anirban

    2012-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease, caused by a whitefly transmitted New World Begomovirus, named Corchorus golden mosaic virus (CoGMV), is emerging as a serious biotic constraint for jute fibre production in Asia. For rapid and sensitive diagnosis of the Begomovirus associated with this disease, a non-radiolabelled diagnostic probe, developed against the DNA A component of the east Indian isolate of CoGMV, detected the presence of the virus in infected plants and viruliferous whiteflies following Southern hybridization and nucleic acid spot hybridization tests. Presence of the virus was also confirmed when polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed using virus-specific primers on DNA templates isolated from infected plants and viruliferous whiteflies. PMID:23730007

  10. Metagenomic analysis of viruses associated with field-grown and retail lettuce identifies human and animal viruses.

    PubMed

    Aw, Tiong Gim; Wengert, Samantha; Rose, Joan B

    2016-04-16

    The emergence of culture- and sequence-independent metagenomic methods has not only provided great insight into the microbial community structure in a wide range of clinical and environmental samples but has also proven to be powerful tools for pathogen detection. Recent studies of the food microbiome have revealed the vast genetic diversity of bacteria associated with fresh produce. However, no work has been done to apply metagenomic methods to tackle viruses associated with fresh produce for addressing food safety. Thus, there is a little knowledge about the presence and diversity of viruses associated with fresh produce from farm-to-fork. To address this knowledge gap, we assessed viruses on commercial romaine and iceberg lettuces in fields and a produce distribution center using a shotgun metagenomic sequencing targeting both RNA and DNA viruses. Commercial lettuce harbors an immense assemblage of viruses that infect a wide range of hosts. As expected, plant pathogenic viruses dominated these communities. Sequences of rotaviruses and picobirnaviruses were also identified in both field-harvest and retail lettuce samples, suggesting an emerging foodborne transmission threat that has yet to be fully recognized. The identification of human and animal viruses in lettuce samples in the field emphasizes the importance of preventing viral contamination on leafy greens starting at the field. Although there are still some inherent experimental and bioinformatics challenges in applying viral metagenomic approaches for food safety testing, this work will facilitate further application of this unprecedented deep sequencing method to food samples. PMID:26894328

  11. Wheat streak mosaic virus-Structural parameters for a Potyvirus

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Lauren; Kendall, Amy; Berger, P.H.; Shiel, P.J.; Stubbs, Gerald . E-mail: gerald.stubbs@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-09-15

    Wheat streak mosaic virus is a Tritimovirus, a member of the Potyviridae family, which includes the very large Potyvirus genus. We have examined wheat streak mosaic virus by electron microscopy and fiber diffraction from partially oriented sols, and analyzed the results to estimate the symmetry and structural parameters of the viral helix. The virions have an apparent radius of 63 {+-} 5 A. The viral helix has a pitch of 33.4 A {+-} 0.6 A. There appear to be 6.9 subunits per turn of the helix, although we cannot completely eliminate values of 5.9 or 7.9 for this parameter.

  12. LETTUCE INFECTIOUS YELLOWS VIRUS-ENCODED P26 INDUCES PLASMALEMMA DEPOSIT CYTOPATHOLOGY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV) encodes a 26 kDa protein (P26) previously shown to associate with plasmalemma deposits (PLDs), unique LIYV-induced cytopathologies located at the plasmalemma over plasmodesmata pit fields in companion cells and phloem parenchyma. To further characterize the re...

  13. Development of a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for the detection of Sugarcane mosaic virus and Sorghum mosaic virus in sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed for detecting Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) in sugarcane. Six sets of four primers corresponding to the conserved coat protein gene were designed for each virus and their succ...

  14. Relationship of lychnis ringspot virus to barley stripe mosaic virus and poa semilatent virus.

    PubMed

    Hunter, B G; Smith, J; Fattouh, F; Jackson, A O

    1989-01-01

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV), poa semilatent virus (PSLV), and lychnis ringspot virus (LRSV) have previously been assigned to the hordeivirus group because of similarities in their particle morphology, physicochemical properties and serological analyses. However, the serological relationships of the three viruses have not been determined by direct comparison. The present study evaluated the relatedness of these viruses by Western and dot immunoblotting and by nucleic acid hybridizations. Serological analyses of the coat proteins separated by gel electrophoresis and of intact virus particles bound to nitrocellulose membranes revealed that BSMV and PSLV are distantly related, but that they are more closely related to each other than to LRSV. The genomic RNAs of the viruses failed to cross-hybridize in northern hybridization tests conducted at different temperatures. These comparisons showed that BSMV, PSLV and LRSV are distinct viruses with little nucleotide sequence relatedness. Thus our data provide additional support for their inclusion as separate members of the hordeivirus group. PMID:2722469

  15. Capsicum annum, a new host of watermelon mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Hajizadeh, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Kazhal

    2016-03-01

    The occurrence of Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) in sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) in Kurdistan province, Iran was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and partial characterization of coat protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of WMV infecting C. annuum, adding a new host to list of more than 170 species infected by this virus. PMID:26925452

  16. RNAi mediated, stable resistance to Triticum mosaic virus in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), discovered in 2006, affects wheat production systems in the Great Plains of the United States. There are no available TriMV resistant commercial varieties. RNA interference (RNAi) was evaluated as an alternative strategy to generate resistance to TriMV. An RNAi pANDA...

  17. A DNA polymerase activity is associated with Cauliflower Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed Central

    Menissier, J; Laquel, P; Lebeurier, G; Hirth, L

    1984-01-01

    A DNA polymerase activity is found within the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) particle. Analysis of the reaction product reveals that the linear form of the virion DNA is preferentially labelled. The molecular weight of the DNA polymerase as determined on an "activity gel" is 76 kDa. Images PMID:6514573

  18. New Viruses Found in Fig Exhibiting Mosaic Symptoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mosaic is the most widespread viral disease of fig, affecting the crop wherever it is grown. The causal agent of the disease was poorly characterized, and until recently it was considered a virus-like agent with double membrane bound semispherical bodies transmitted by eriophyid mites. During the mo...

  19. Variability in alternanthera mosaic virus isolates from different hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have determined the complete genome sequences of Alternanthera mosaic virus phlox isolate PA (AltMV-PA) and four infectious clone variants derived from AltMV-SP, as well as partial sequences of other isolates from various types of phlox, and from portulaca, nandina, and cineraria. Phylogenetic co...

  20. A compensating wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium Robertsonian translocation conferring resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), is a potentially devastating disease of common wheat in the Great Plains of North America. So far, two genes conferring resistance to WSMV have been named and used in cultivar improvement. Here we report a new source of resistance that was derived from a wheat-Th. i...

  1. Spiranthes Mosaic Virus 3 and Bidens Mottle Virus,Two Potyviruses Detected in Phlox divaricata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first report of Spiranthes mosaic virus in Florida and the first report of Bidens mottle virus in Phlox divaricata. This report provides an overview of this virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and regulatory scientists....

  2. Role of wheat streak mosaic virus-encoded proteins in disease development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eriophyid mite-transmitted wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are the type species of Tritimovirus and Poacevirus genera, respectively, in the family Potyviridae. TriMV and WSMV exhibit differential symptom phenotypes on wheat: TriMV elicits mild mosaic and mottling ...

  3. First report of Sugarcane mosaic virus infecting Columbus Grass (Sorghum almum) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mosaic symptoms in sorghum can be caused by several potyviruses [family Potyviridae], including Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) and Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV). SrMV and SCMV are responsible for global economic losses in sorghum, maize, and sugarcane. Ten plants of Columbus grass (Sorghum almum) exhib...

  4. Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus infectious clone and manipulation for gene-carrying capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soilborne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) is a bipartite single stranded positive sense RNA virus with rigid-rod shaped virions. Taxonomically the virus is in the family Viragviridae, as are commonly used gene silencing or expression viral vectors, Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) and Barley stripe mosaic viru...

  5. Genome sequence of vanilla distortion mosaic virus infecting Coriandrum sativum.

    PubMed

    Adams, I P; Rai, S; Deka, M; Harju, V; Hodges, T; Hayward, G; Skelton, A; Fox, A; Boonham, N

    2014-12-01

    The 9573-nucleotide genome of a potyvirus was sequenced from a Coriandrum sativum plant from India with viral symptoms. On analysis, this virus was shown to have greater than 85 % nucleotide sequence identity to vanilla distortion mosaic virus (VDMV). Analysis of the putative coat protein sequence confirmed that this virus was in fact VDMV, with greater than 91 % amino acid sequence identity. The genome appears to encode a 3083-amino-acid polyprotein potentially cleaved into the 10 mature proteins expected in potyviruses. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that VDMV is a distinct but ungrouped member of the genus Potyvirus. PMID:25252813

  6. UV light inactivation of hepatitis A virus, Aichi virus, and feline calicivirus on strawberries, green onions, and lettuce.

    PubMed

    Fino, Viviana R; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2008-05-01

    A majority of illnesses caused by foodborne viruses are associated with fresh produce. Fruits and vegetables may be considered high-risk foods, as they are often consumed raw without a specific inactivation step. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate nonthermal treatments for the inactivation of foodborne pathogens. This study investigates the UV inactivation of three viruses: feline calicivirus (a surrogate for norovirus), and two picornaviruses, hepatitis A virus and Aichi virus. Three produce types were selected for their different surface topographies and association with outbreaks. Green onions, lettuce, and strawberries were individually spot inoculated with 10(7) to 10(9) 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of each virus per ml and exposed to UV light at various doses (< or = 240 mW s/cm2), and viruses were eluted using an optimized recovery strategy. Virus infection was quantified by TCID50 in mammalian cell culture and compared with untreated recovered virus. UV light applied to contaminated lettuce resulted in inactivation of 4.5 to 4.6 log TCID50/ml; for contaminated green onions, inactivation ranged from 2.5 to 5.6 log TCID50/ml; and for contaminated strawberries, inactivation ranged from 1.9 to 2.6 log TCID50/ml for the three viruses tested. UV light inactivation on the surface of lettuce is more effective than inactivation on the other two produce items. Consistently, the lowest results were observed in the inactivation of viruses on strawberries. No significant differences (P > 0.05) for virus inactivation were observed among the three doses applied (40, 120, and 240 mW s/cm2) on the produce, with the exception of hepatitis A virus and Aichi virus inactivation on green onions, where inactivation continued at 120 mW s/cm2 (P < 0.05). PMID:18522022

  7. Recombination analysis of Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) in the Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Gell, Gyöngyvér; Sebestyén, Endre; Balázs, Ervin

    2015-02-01

    Recombination among RNA viruses is a natural phenomenon that appears to have played a significant role in the species development and the evolution of many strains. It also has particular significance for the risk assessment of plants which have been genetically modified for disease resistance by incorporating viral sequences into their genomes. However, the exact recombination events taking place in viral genomes are not investigated in detail for many virus groups. In this analysis, different single-stranded positive-sense RNA potyviruses were compared using various in silico recombination detection methods and new recombination events in the Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup were detected. For an extended in silico recombination analysis, two of the analyzed Maize dwarf mosaic virus full-length genomes were sequenced additionally during this work. These results strengthen the evidence that recombination is a major driving force in virus evolution, and the emergence of new virus variants in the SCMV subgroup, paired with mutations, could generate viruses with altered biological properties. The intra- and interspecific homolog recombinations seem to be a general trait in this virus group, causing little or no changes to the amino acid of the progenies. However, we found a few breakpoints between the members of SCMV subgroup and the weed-infecting distant relatives, but only a few methods of the RDP3 package predicted these events with low significance level. PMID:25392089

  8. Diversity and evolutionary history of lettuce necrotic yellows virus in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Colleen M; Chang, Wee-Leong; Khan, Subuhi; Tang, Joe; Elliott, Carol; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2016-02-01

    Lettuce necrotic yellows virus (LNYV) is the type member of the genus Cytorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae, and causes a severe disease of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). This virus has been described as endemic to Australia and New Zealand, with sporadic reports of a similar virus in Europe. Genetic variability studies of plant-infecting rhabdoviruses are scarce. We have extended a previous study on the variability of the LNYV nucleocapsid gene, comparing sequences from isolates sampled from both Australia and New Zealand, as well as analysing symptom expression on Nicotiana glutinosa. Phylogenetic and BEAST analyses confirm separation of LNYV isolates into two subgroups (I and II) and suggest that subgroup I is slightly older than subgroup II. No correlation was observed between isolate subgroup and disease symptoms on N. glutinosa. The origin of LNYV remains unclear; LNYV may have moved between native and weed hosts within Australia or New Zealand before infecting lettuce or may have appeared as a result of at least two incursions, with the first coinciding with the beginning of European agriculture in the region. The apparent extinction of subgroup I in Australia may have been due to less-efficient dispersal than that which has occurred for subgroup II - possibly a consequence of suboptimal interactions with plant and/or insect hosts. Introduction of subgroup II to New Zealand appears to be more recent. More-detailed epidemiological studies using molecular tools are needed to fully understand how LNYV interacts with its hosts and to determine where the virus originated. PMID:26526146

  9. Catharanthus mosaic virus: A potyvirus from a gymnosperm, Welwitschia mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Koh, Shu Hui; Li, Hua; Admiraal, Ryan; Jones, Michael G K; Wylie, Stephen J

    2015-05-01

    A virus from a symptomatic plant of the gymnosperm Welwitschia mirabilis Hook. growing as an ornamental plant in a domestic garden in Western Australia was inoculated to a plant of Nicotiana benthamiana where it established a systemic infection. The complete genome sequence of 9636 nucleotides was determined using high-throughput and Sanger sequencing technologies. The genome sequence shared greatest identity (83% nucleotides and 91% amino acids) with available partial sequences of catharanthus mosaic virus, indicating that the new isolate belonged to that taxon. Analysis of the phylogeny of the complete virus sequence placed it in a monotypic group in the genus Potyvirus. This is the first record of a virus from W. mirabilis, the first complete genome sequence of catharanthus mosaic virus determined, and the first record from Australia. This finding illustrates the risk to natural and managed systems posed by the international trade in live plants and propagules, which enables viruses to establish in new regions and infect new hosts. PMID:25804761

  10. Multiplex PCR for the detection of African cassava mosaic virus and East African cassava mosaic Cameroon virus in cassava.

    PubMed

    Alabi, Olufemi J; Kumar, P Lava; Naidu, Rayapati A

    2008-12-01

    A multiplex PCR was developed for simultaneous detection of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic Cameroon virus (EACMCV) in cassava affected with cassava mosaic disease (CMD). One set of three primers consisting of an upstream primer common for both viruses and two down stream virus-specific primers were designed for simultaneous amplification of 368 base pair (bp) and 650 bp DNA fragments specific to the replicase gene of ACMV and EACMCV, respectively. Similarly, a second set of three primers were designed for simultaneous amplification of 540 bp and 655 bp fragments specific to the coat protein gene of EACMCV and ACMV, respectively. Primers that can amplify a 171 bp fragment of the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase L were included as an internal control in these assays to determine the reliability of multiplex PCR. A simplified, cost-effective and rapid sample preparation method was adapted in place of the conventional plant DNA extraction procedure for multiplex PCR detection of ACMV and EACMCV. The method was validated using CMD-infected cassava samples obtained from farmers' fields in Nigeria. The multiplex PCR is useful for reliable assessment of the prevalence of CMBs in epidemiological studies and for crop improvement and phytosanitary programs in African countries. PMID:18789974

  11. Fixation of Emerging Interviral Recombinants in Cucumber Mosaic Virus Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pita, Justin S.

    2013-01-01

    Interstrain recombinants were observed in the progenies of the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) reassortant L1L2F3 containing RNAs 1 and 2 from LS-CMV and RNA 3 from Fny-CMV. We characterized these recombinants, and we found that their fixation was controlled by the nature of the replicating RNAs 1 and 2. We demonstrate that the 2b gene partially affects this fixation process, but only in the context of homologous RNAs 1 and 2. PMID:23115282

  12. Precise Determination of the Helical Repeat of Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, A.; McDonald, M.; Stubbs, G.

    2009-06-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is widely used as a distance standard in electron microscopy, fiber diffraction, and other imaging techniques. The dimension used as a reference is the pitch of the viral helix, 23 {angstrom}. This distance, however, has never been measured with any great degree of precision. The helical pitch of TMV has been determined to be 22.92 {+-}0.03 {angstrom} by X-ray fiber diffraction methods using highly collimated synchrotron radiation.

  13. Precise determination of the helical repeat of tobacco mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Stubbs, Gerald

    2007-12-05

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is widely used as a distance standard in electron microscopy, fiber diffraction, and other imaging techniques. The dimension used as a reference is the pitch of the viral helix, 23 A. This distance, however, has never been measured with any great degree of precision. The helical pitch of TMV has been determined to be 22.92 {+-} 0.03 A by X-ray fiber diffraction methods using highly collimated synchrotron radiation.

  14. Beijerinck's work on tobacco mosaic virus: historical context and legacy.

    PubMed Central

    Bos, L

    1999-01-01

    Beijerinck's entirely new concept, launched in 1898, of a filterable contagium vivum fluidum which multiplied in close association with the host's metabolism and was distributed in phloem vessels together with plant nutrients, did not match the then prevailing bacteriological germ theory. At the time, tools and concepts to handle such a new kind of agent (the viruses) were non-existent. Beijerinck's novel idea, therefore, did not revolutionize biological science or immediately alter human understanding of contagious diseases. That is how bacteriological dogma persisted, as voiced by Loeffler and Frosch when showing the filterability of an animal virus (1898), and especially by Ivanovsky who had already in 1892 detected filterability of the agent of tobacco mosaic but kept looking for a microbe and finally (1903) claimed its multiplication in an artificial medium. The dogma was also strongly advocated by Roux in 1903 when writing the first review on viruses, which he named 'so-called "invisible" microbes', unwittingly including the agent of bovine pleuropneumonia, only much later proved to be caused by a mycoplasma. In 1904, Baur was the first to advocate strongly the chemical view of viruses. But uncertainty about the true nature of viruses, with their similarities to enzymes and genes, continued until the 1930s when at long last tobacco mosaic virus particles were isolated as an enzyme-like protein (1935), soon to be better characterized as a nucleoprotein (1937). Physicochemical virus studies were a key element in triggering molecular biology which was to provide further means to reveal the true nature of viruses 'at the threshold of life'. Beijerinck's 1898 vision was not appreciated or verified during his lifetime. But Beijerinck already had a clear notion of the mechanism behind the phenomena he observed. Developments in virology and molecular biology since 1935 indicate how close Beijerinck (and even Mayer, Beijerinck's predecessor in research on tobacco

  15. High sequence conservation among cucumber mosaic virus isolates from lily.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y K; Derks, A F; Langeveld, S; Goldbach, R; Prins, M

    2001-08-01

    For classification of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolates from ornamental crops of different geographical areas, these were characterized by comparing the nucleotide sequences of RNAs 4 and the encoded coat proteins. Within the ornamental-infecting CMV viruses both subgroups were represented. CMV isolates of Alstroemeria and crocus were classified as subgroup II isolates, whereas 8 other isolates, from lily, gladiolus, amaranthus, larkspur, and lisianthus, were identified as subgroup I members. In general, nucleotide sequence comparisons correlated well with geographic distribution, with one notable exception: the analyzed nucleotide sequences of 5 lily isolates showed remarkably high homology despite different origins. PMID:11676424

  16. Blueberry mosaic associated virus – A putative, new member of Ophioviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberry mosaic initially was reported more than 50 years ago and is now known from different parts of the world. A new virus, closely associated with the disease has been identified recently. The virus tentatively named as Blueberry mosaic associated virus (BlMaV), is a putative member of the gen...

  17. Triticum Mosaic Virus: A New Virus Isolated From Wheat in Kansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006 a mechanically-transmissible and previously uncharacterized virus was isolated in Kansas from wheat with mosaic symptoms. The physio-chemical properties of the virus were examined by purification on cesium chloride density gradients, electron microscopy, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylalmid...

  18. First report of Alfalfa mosaic virus and Soybean dwarf virus on soybean in North Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) is the major oilseed crop in North Dakota with production concentrated in the eastern half of the state. Only one virus, Soybean mosaic virus, has been reported from soybean in North Dakota. In 2010, 200 soybean fields from 25 counties that have the majority of soybe...

  19. Phosphorylation of alfalfa mosaic virus movement protein in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Suk; Halk, Edward L; Merlo, Donald J; Nelson, Steven E; Loesch-Fries, L Sue

    2014-07-01

    The 32-kDa movement protein, P3, of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is essential for cell-to-cell spread of the virus in plants. P3 shares many properties with other virus movement proteins (MPs); however, it is not known if P3 is posttranslationally modified by phosphorylation, which is important for the function of other MPs. When expressed in Nicotiana tabacum, P3 accumulated primarily in the cell walls of older leaves or in the cytosol of younger leaves. When expressed in Pischia pastoris, P3 accumulated primarily in a soluble form. Metabolic labeling indicated that a portion of P3 was phosphorylated in both tobacco and yeast, suggesting that phosphorylation regulates the function of this protein as it does for other virus MPs. PMID:24435161

  20. Redox-active ferrocene-modified Cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Aljabali, Alaa A A; Barclay, J Elaine; Butt, Julea N; Lomonossoff, George P; Evans, David J

    2010-08-28

    A naturally occurring nanoparticle, the plant virus Cowpea mosaic virus, can be decorated with ferrocene derivatives, of various linker lengths with amine and carboxylate groups, on the external surface using a range of conjugation strategies. The multiple, organometallic, redox-active ferrocene moieties on the outer surface of the virus are electrochemically independent with reduction potentials that span a potential window of 0.16 V that are dependent on the site of modification and the nature of the ferrocene derivative. The number of ferrocenes coupled to each virus ranges from about 100 to 240 depending upon the conjugation site and the linker length and these redox active units can provide multielectron reservoirs. PMID:20623052

  1. Computer analysis between nucleotide and amino acid sequences of bean golden mosaic virus and those of maize streak, wheat dwarf, chloris striate mosaic, and beet curly top viruses.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, M

    1989-01-01

    Bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV) DNA 1 and 2 have little sequence homology with maize streak virus (MSV), wheat dwarf virus (WDV), and chloris striate mosaic virus (CSMV) DNAs. BGMV DNA 1 and beet curly top virus (BCTV) DNA are closely related, whereas BGMV DNA 2 and BCTV DNA are not related. Direct amino acid homologies of predicted proteins between BGMV ORFs and MSV ORFs, WDV ORFs or CSMV ORFs were 40-50%. BGMV 1L1 and BCTV L1, and BGMV IL3 and BCTV L4 were highly conserved. The sequence TAATATTAC was detected in the loops of hairpin structures of 5 gemini-viruses. PMID:2615677

  2. Reactions of some cucurbitaceous species Tozucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV).

    PubMed

    Csorba, R; Kiss, E F; Molnár, L

    2004-01-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is a widespread serious pathogen of cucurbitaceous plants. ZYMV was first detected in Hungary in 1995. Since then it has become one of the most dangerous viruses of the Cucurbitaceae family causing serious epidemics. The virus has many hosts, which - particularly perennial ones - may play important role as virus reservoirs and infection sources in virus epidemiology. On the other hand wild weed species maybe sources of resistance to viruses. Our research was carried out on a total of 15 wild species from 8 genera (Cucumis, Cucurbita, Cyclanthera, Ecballium Momordica, Lagenaria, Zehneria, Bryonia). Test plants were mechanically inoculated with ZYMV. Local and systemic symptoms were determined and 5 weeks after inoculation DAS-ELISA tests were also carried out. Symptomless plants were reinoculated to Cucumis sativus cv. Accordia test plants. On the basis of the results we determined the percentages of infections and so we classified the test-plants into sensitive and resistance categories. On the basis of the results new host plants of ZYMV are the followings: Bryonia dioica, Cyclanthera pedata, Ecballium elaterium, Momordica balsamina, Momordica rostrata, and Zehneria scabra. Among them Momordica balsamina and Ecballium elaterium showed latent to ZYMV. Bryonia alba and Zehneria indica are especially remarkable, because they proved resistant to ZYMV on the basis of symptomatology and serology. Our results might have significant role in the field of research of host range, virus resistance and virus differentiation. PMID:15756830

  3. Investigation of RNA structure in satellite panicum mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, D.L. E-mail: dmakino@berkeley.edu; Day, J. E-mail: jsday@uci.edu; Larson, S.B. E-mail: slarson@uci.edu; McPherson, A. E-mail: amcphers@uci.edu

    2006-08-01

    Three new crystal forms of satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV) were grown and their structures solved from X-ray diffraction data using molecular replacement techniques. The crystals were grown under conditions of pH and ionic strength that were appreciably different then those used for the original structure determination. In rhombohedral crystals grown at pH 8.5 and low ionic strength PEG 3350 solutions, Fourier syntheses revealed segments, ten amino acid residues long, of amino-terminal polypeptides not previously seen, as well as masses of electron density within concavities on the interior of the capsid, which appeared in the neighborhoods of icosahedral five- and threefold axes. The densities were compatible with secondary structural domains of RNA, and they included a segment of double helical RNA of about four to five base pairs oriented, at least approximately, along the fivefold axes. The distribution of RNA observed for SPMV appears to be distinctly different than the encapsidated nucleic acid conformation previously suggested for another satellite virus, satellite tobacco mosaic virus. This study further shows that analysis of viruses in crystals grown under different chemical conditions may reveal additional information regarding the structure of encapsidated RNA.

  4. Structural Lability of Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Semenyuk, Pavel I.; Abashkin, Dmitry A.; Kalinina, Natalya O.; Arutyunyan, Alexsandr M.; Solovyev, Andrey G.; Dobrov, Eugeny N.

    2013-01-01

    Virions of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) were neglected for more than thirty years after their basic properties were determined. In this paper, the physicochemical characteristics of BSMV virions and virion-derived viral capsid protein (CP) were analyzed, namely, the absorption and intrinsic fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism spectra, differential scanning calorimetry curves, and size distributions by dynamic laser light scattering. The structural properties of BSMV virions proved to be intermediate between those of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a well-characterized virus with rigid rod-shaped virions, and flexuous filamentous plant viruses. The BSMV virions were found to be considerably more labile than expected from their rod-like morphology and a distant sequence relation of the BSMV and TMV CPs. The circular dichroism spectra of BSMV CP subunits incorporated into the virions, but not subunits of free CP, demonstrated a significant proportion of beta-structure elements, which were proposed to be localized mostly in the protein regions exposed on the virion outer surface. These beta-structure elements likely formed during virion assembly can comprise the N- and C-terminal protein regions unstructured in the non-virion CP and can mediate inter-subunit interactions. Based on computer-assisted structure modeling, a model for BSMV CP subunit structural fold compliant with the available experimental data was proposed. PMID:23613760

  5. Differentiation of celosia mosaic virus and asparagus virus 1 based on biological properties.

    PubMed

    Owolabi, A T; Proll, E

    2000-01-01

    An attempt was made to distinguish between celosia mosaic virus (CIMV) and asparagus virus 1 (AV-1) based on biological properties, which hitherto was obscured from serological data from previous work. The host range of AV-1 was found to be a subset of that of CIMV and AV-1 was transmitted by the aphid Myzus persicae which, on the other hand, did not transmit CIMV. No evidence of cross-protection was obtained between these two viruses. PMID:11155362

  6. The complete genome sequence of New World jatropha mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Polston, J E; Londoño, M A; Capobianco, H

    2014-11-01

    Full-length sequences of a bipartite begomovirus were obtained from a plant of Jatropha multifida in Florida showing symptoms of foliar mosaic, distortion and necrosis. Sequences of four clones each of a DNA-A and DNA-B were obtained, which showed very low sequence diversity among themselves. The clones were infectious when biolistically inoculated to J. multifida, Phaseolus vulgaris and Nicotiana tabacum, but not to J. curcas. The DNA-A sequences had less than 89 % pairwise identity scores with the DNA-A of other begomoviruses. The DNA-A appeared to be a recombinant in that 18 % of the DNA-A (470 nt) had a pairwise identity score of 91.98 % with RhRGMV, indicating that this portion most likely originated from a virus closely related to RhRGMV. The remaining 82 % of the DNA-A had lower identity scores with TbMoLCV (87.84 %) and RhRGMV (87.46 %), which suggests that this part of the component originated from an undescribed virus. There was no evidence for recombination in the DNA-B. Equivalent sequences of the DNA-A had the highest identity score (94.18 %) with a 533-nt sequence obtained from J. multifida from Puerto Rico in 2001 (GenBank accession no. AF058025). Pairwise comparison, recombination and phylogenetic analysis, and biology suggest that these clones are those of jatropha mosaic virus first reported from Puerto Rico. This is the first report of the complete genome sequence of jatropha mosaic virus. PMID:25091738

  7. Sequence of figwort mosaic virus DNA (caulimovirus group).

    PubMed Central

    Richins, R D; Scholthof, H B; Shepherd, R J

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of an infectious clone of figwort mosaic virus (FMV) was determined using the dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. The double-stranded DNA genome (7743 base pairs) contained eight open reading frames (ORFs), seven of which corresponded approximately in size and location to the ORFs found in the genome of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and carnation etched ring virus (CERV). ORFs I and V of FMV demonstrated the highest degrees of nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology with the equivalent coding regions of CaMV and CERV. Regions II, III and IV showed somewhat less homology with the analogous regions of CaMV and CERV, and ORF VI showed homology with the corresponding gene of CaMV and CERV in only a short segment near the middle of the putative gene product. A 16 nucleotide sequence, complementary to the 3' terminus of methionine initiator tRNA (tRNAimet) and presumed to be the primer binding site for initiation of reverse transcription to produce minus strand DNA, was found in the FMV genome near the discontinuity in the minus strand. Sequences near the three interruptions in the plus strand of FMV DNA bear strong resemblance to similarly located sequences of 3 other caulimoviruses and are inferred to be initiation sites for second strand DNA synthesis. Additional conserved sequences in the small and large intergenic regions are pointed out including a highly conserved 35 bp sequence that occurs in the latter region. PMID:3671088

  8. Sequence of figwort mosaic virus DNA (caulimovirus group).

    PubMed

    Richins, R D; Scholthof, H B; Shepherd, R J

    1987-10-26

    The nucleotide sequence of an infectious clone of figwort mosaic virus (FMV) was determined using the dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. The double-stranded DNA genome (7743 base pairs) contained eight open reading frames (ORFs), seven of which corresponded approximately in size and location to the ORFs found in the genome of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and carnation etched ring virus (CERV). ORFs I and V of FMV demonstrated the highest degrees of nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology with the equivalent coding regions of CaMV and CERV. Regions II, III and IV showed somewhat less homology with the analogous regions of CaMV and CERV, and ORF VI showed homology with the corresponding gene of CaMV and CERV in only a short segment near the middle of the putative gene product. A 16 nucleotide sequence, complementary to the 3' terminus of methionine initiator tRNA (tRNAimet) and presumed to be the primer binding site for initiation of reverse transcription to produce minus strand DNA, was found in the FMV genome near the discontinuity in the minus strand. Sequences near the three interruptions in the plus strand of FMV DNA bear strong resemblance to similarly located sequences of 3 other caulimoviruses and are inferred to be initiation sites for second strand DNA synthesis. Additional conserved sequences in the small and large intergenic regions are pointed out including a highly conserved 35 bp sequence that occurs in the latter region. PMID:3671088

  9. Analysis of figwort mosaic virus (plant pararetrovirus) polyadenylation signal.

    PubMed

    Sanfaçon, H

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) polyadenylation (poly(A)) signal has revealed several striking differences to poly(A) signals from animal genes such as the absence of activating sequences downstream from the cleavage site. Instead, upstream sequences were shown to induce recognition of an AAUAAA sequence. To test whether these features are representative of other plant pararetrovirus poly(A) signals, a characterization of the figwort mosaic virus (FMV) poly(A) signal is presented here. The FMV RNAs were isolated from infected plants and mapped, and the different elements composing the FMV poly(A) signal were identified. Multiple upstream sequences were found to be essential for efficient processing at the FMV poly(A) site and could be replaced by the CaMV upstream elements. The FMV upstream sequences showed homologies to other characterized upstream sequences from CaMV, from animal viruses, and from plant poly(A) signals. Surprisingly, neither the FMV nor the CaMV upstream elements could induce recognition of an AAUAAA sequence present in the FMV poly(A) signal, instead a UAUAAA sequence 55 nucleotides further downstream was utilized. It is proposed that additional features may be required for appropriate cleavage such as the context of the AAUAAA-like sequence or perhaps the cleavage site itself. PMID:8259677

  10. A Foxtail mosaic virus Vector for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yu; Kernodle, Bliss M.; Hill, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purposes of gene expression or VIGS in monocotyledonous plants, and among these, the tripartite viruses Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus have been shown to induce VIGS in maize (Zea mays). We describe here a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a monopartite virus that is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FoMV genome. To demonstrate VIGS applications of this FoMV vector system, four genes, phytoene desaturase (functions in carotenoid biosynthesis), lesion mimic22 (encodes a key enzyme of the porphyrin pathway), iojap (functions in plastid development), and brown midrib3 (caffeic acid O-methyltransferase), were silenced and characterized in the sweet corn line Golden × Bantam. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the FoMV infectious clone establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and green foxtail (Setaria viridis), indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomics studies in maize and other monocots. PMID:27208311

  11. A Foxtail mosaic virus Vector for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yu; Zhang, Chunquan; Kernodle, Bliss M; Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purposes of gene expression or VIGS in monocotyledonous plants, and among these, the tripartite viruses Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus have been shown to induce VIGS in maize (Zea mays). We describe here a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a monopartite virus that is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FoMV genome. To demonstrate VIGS applications of this FoMV vector system, four genes, phytoene desaturase (functions in carotenoid biosynthesis), lesion mimic22 (encodes a key enzyme of the porphyrin pathway), iojap (functions in plastid development), and brown midrib3 (caffeic acid O-methyltransferase), were silenced and characterized in the sweet corn line Golden × Bantam. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the FoMV infectious clone establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and green foxtail (Setaria viridis), indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomics studies in maize and other monocots. PMID:27208311

  12. [Kidney bean "Pervomayskaya" as the indicator plant for tobacco mosaic virus].

    PubMed

    Kraiev, V H

    2005-01-01

    It was shown that garden beans of "Pervomayskaya" variety respond to mechanical inoculation of leaves with tobacco mosaic virus by formation of local lesions, and thus it may be the indicator plant for the virus. PMID:16250238

  13. First Report of Soybean Yellow Mottle Mosaic Virus in Soybean in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV) is a soybean-infecting virus recently described in Korea that initially induces bright yellow mosaic on leaves followed by stunting and reduced growth of older leaves. Nucleotide sequence analysis of genomic RNA of the Korean isolate of SYMMV suggested tha...

  14. Winter wheat cultivars with temperature sensitive resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus do not recover from early season infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), Triticum mosaic virus, and Wheat mosaic virus, all vectored by the wheat curl mite Aceria tosichella Keifer, frequently cause devastating losses to winter wheat production throughout the central and western Great Plains. Resistant 'Mace' and 'RonL' are commercially ...

  15. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are...

  16. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are...

  17. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are...

  18. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are...

  19. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are...

  20. The entry of cucumber mosaic virus into cucumber xylem is facilitated by co-infection with zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Nobuhara, Shinya; Nishimura, Miho; Ryang, Bo-Song; Naoe, Masaki; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Kosaka, Yoshitaka; Ohki, Satoshi T

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the synergistic effects of co-infection by zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on viral distribution in the vascular tissues of cucumber. Immunohistochemical observations indicated that ZYMV was present in both the phloem and xylem tissues. ZYMV-RNA was detected in both the xylem wash and guttation fluid of ZYMV-inoculated cucumber. Steam treatment at a stem internode indicated that ZYMV enters the xylem vessels and moves through them but does not cause systemic infection in the plant. CMV distribution in singly infected cucumbers was restricted to phloem tissue. By contrast, CMV was detected in the xylem tissue of cotyledons in plants co-infected with CMV and ZYMV. Although both ZYMV-RNA and CMV-RNA were detected in the xylem wash and upper internodes of steam-treated, co-infected cucumbers grown at 24 °C, neither virus was detected in the upper leaves using an ELISA assay. Genetically modified CMV harboring the ZYMV HC-Pro gene was distributed in the xylem and phloem tissues of singly inoculated cucumber cotyledons. These results indicate that the ZYMV HC-Pro gene facilitates CMV entry into the xylem vessels of co-infected cucumbers. PMID:27400992

  1. Arabidopsis thaliana is an asymptomatic host of Alfalfa mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Muthukumar; Ibrahim, Amr; Kim, Bong-Suk; Loesch-Fries, L Sue

    2006-11-01

    The susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes to infection by Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) was evaluated. Thirty-nine ecotypes supported both local and systemic infection, 26 ecotypes supported only local infection, and three ecotypes could not be infected. No obvious symptoms characteristic of virus infection developed on the susceptible ecotypes under standard conditions of culture. Parameters of AMV infection were characterized in ecotype Col-0, which supported systemic infection and accumulated higher levels of AMV than the symptomatic host Nicotiana tabacum. The formation of infectious AMV particles in infected Col-0 was confirmed by infectivity assays on a hypersensitive host and by electron microscopy of purified virions. Replication and transcription of AMV was confirmed by de novo synthesis of AMV subgenomic RNA in Col-0 protoplasts transfected with AMV RNA or plasmids harboring AMV cDNAs. PMID:16875753

  2. Analysis of small RNAs derived from Chinese wheat mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Zheng, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Heng-Mu; Liu, Xiao-Ya; Li, Jing; Li, Jun-Min; Chen, Jian-Ping

    2014-11-01

    The virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) of Chinese wheat mosaic virus (CWMV), a member of the genus Furovirus, were characterised from wheat plants by deep sequencing. CWMV vsiRNAs of 21-22 nt in length predominated, suggesting that there might be a conserved mechanism of DCL2 and DCL4 involvement in the biogenesis of vsiRNAs, as well as a common RNA silencing pathway in CWMV-infected wheat plants. The 5'-terminal base of vsiRNAs was biased towards A/U, suggesting that CWMV vsiRNAs might be loaded into diverse AGO-containing RISCs to disturb the gene expression of host plants. Possible targets for some of the vsiRNAs were predicted. PMID:24997977

  3. Evolutionary liberties of the Abutilon mosaic virus cluster.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Alexander; Strohmeier, Stephan; Krenz, Björn; Jeske, Holger

    2015-02-01

    Two new strains of Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV; Geminiviridae) from Germany (Stuttgart) and France (Paris) have been characterized by circomics, direct pyrosequencing of rolling circle amplification (RCA) products, as well as conventional cloning and Sanger sequencing. RCA combined with an analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms confirmed the completeness of the sequence determination and a close relationship of both isolates for DNA A with 99 % nucleotide sequence identity. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction supported their clustering with other AbMV strains in a clade with Middle American begomoviruses, whereas South American begomoviruses that infect Abutilon or Sida micrantha are less closely related. Comparing the coat protein (CP) genes of the AbMV cluster, with those of related Middle and South American begomoviruses revealed a remarkable overrepresentation for non-synonymous nucleotide exchanges for certain amino acid positions in the AbMV cluster. Projection of these positions to a structural model of the African cassava mosaic virus CP yielded a non-random distribution at the periphery and, most importantly, highlighted those amino acids that had been identified in whitefly-transmission experiments before. These results establish the basis for an analysis of the evolutionary liberty of certain amino acid positions of the CP, and their impact on the deciphering of insect transmission determinants is discussed. PMID:25315632

  4. Methods for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Hexaploid Wheat using barley stripe mosaic virus vectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a useful functional genomics tool for rapidly creating gene knockout phenotypes that can be used to infer gene function. Until recently, VIGS has only been possible in dicotyledonous plants. However, the development of vectors based on barley stripe mosaic vi...

  5. CHARACTERIZATION AND PRESENCE OF BEAN COMMON MOSAIC NECROSIS VIRUS IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An outbreak of virus symptoms in the San Juan Valley of the southeastern part of the Dominican Republic during the 1999/2000 dry bean production season was studied. The virus was determined by USDA-ARS at Prosser, WA, to be the NL-8 strain of bean common mosaic necrosis virus. The virus was observed...

  6. Gold nanostructures using tobacco mosaic viruses for optical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Mime; Yamashita, Ichiro; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Shiba, Kiyotaka; Tomita, Satoshi

    2011-05-01

    We have succeeded in aligning gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in three-dimensions using tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in order to realize new optical properties. TMV is a tube-shaped plant virus about 300 nm in length with an outer- and inner-diameter of 18 nm and 4 nm. We genetically fused material-binding peptides that can promote metal crystallization, namely a gold-binding peptide (GBP) and a titanium-binding peptide (TBP), to the outer-surface of TMV. By reducing potassium chloroaurate with sodium borohydride in the presence of the engineered viruses in 5% acetic acid solution, Au NPs were deposited on the outer-surface of the viruses. Using TBP-fused TMV, NPs of 5 nm were obtained, with a standard deviation smaller than those deposited on wild-type TMV. The diameter of the NPs on GBP-fused TMV was 10 nm. These results indicate that genetically-modified TMVs are promising templates for the construction of optical metamaterials.

  7. Polyamine biosynthesis and the replication of turnip yellow mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Balint, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) contains large amounts of nonexchangeable spermidine and induces an accumulation of spermidine in infected Chinese cabbage. By seven days after inoculation, a majority of protoplasts isolated from newly-emerging leaves stain with fluorescent antibody to the virus. These protoplasts contain 1-2 x 10/sup 6/ virions per cell and continue to produce virus in culture for at least 48 hours. (/sup 14/C)-Spermidine (10 ..mu..M) was taken up by these cells in amounts comparable to the original endogenous pool within 24 hours. However, the spermidine content of the cell was only marginally affected, implying considerable regulation of the endogenous pool(s). Putrescine and spermine were major products of the metabolism of exogenous spermidine. Radioactivity from exogenous (/sup 14/C)-spermidine was also readily incorporated into the nucleic acid-containing component of the virus, where it appeared as both spermidine and spermine. Thus, newly-formed virions contained predominantly newly-synthesized spermidine and spermine. However, inhibition of spermidine synthesis by dicyclohexylamine (DCHA) led to incorporation of pre-existing spermidine and increased amounts of spermine into newly-formed virions. The latter results were tested and confirmed in a second cellular system, consisting of health protoplasts infected with TYMC in vitro.

  8. Co-infection and disease severity of Ohio Maize dwarf mosaic virus and Maize chlorotic dwarf virus strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two major maize viruses have been reported in the United States: Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) and Maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV). These viruses co-occur in regions where maize is grown such that co-infections are likely. Co-infection of different strains of MCDV is also observed frequently...

  9. Immunological detection of bean common mosaic virus in French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Verma, Poonam; Gupta, U P

    2010-09-01

    Bean common mosaic potyvirus (BCMV) is an important seed borne pathogen of French bean. Differential inoculation with bean common mosaic virus at cotylodonary trifoliate leaf stage and pre-flowering stage of crop growth revealed that cotyledonary leaf infection favored maximum disease expression. Under immunosorbent electron microscopy (ISEM) the virus particles of filamentous structure having a diameter of 750 nm (l) and 15 nm (w) were observed. These particles gave positive precipitin tests with polyclonal antiserum of Potato virus Y. PMID:23100839

  10. Proton dependence of tobacco mosaic virus dissociation by pressure.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jose L R; Bispo, Jose A C; Landini, Gustavo F; Bonafe, Carlos F S

    2004-09-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is an intensely studied model of viruses. This paper reports an investigation into the dissociation of TMV by pH and pressure up to 220 MPa. The viral solution (0.25 mg/ml) incubated at 277 K showed a significant decrease in light scattering with increasing pH, suggesting dissociation. This observation was confirmed by HPLC gel filtration and electron microscopy. The calculated volume change of dissociation (DeltaV) decreased (absolute value) from -49.7 ml/mol of subunit at pH 3.8 to -21.7 ml/mol of subunit at pH 9.0. The decrease from pH 9.0 to 3.8 caused a stabilization of 14.1 kJ/mol of TMV subunit. The estimated proton release calculated from pressure-induced dissociation curves was 0.584 mol H(+)/mol of TMV subunit. These results suggest that the degree of virus inactivation by pressure and the immunogenicity of the inactivated structures can be optimized by modulating the surrounding pH. PMID:15450375

  11. The RNA of turnip yellow mosaic virus exhibits icosahedral order

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Steven B.; Lucas, Robert W.; Greenwood, Aaron; McPherson, Alexander . E-mail: amcphers@uci.edu

    2005-04-10

    Difference electron density maps, based on structure factor amplitudes and experimental phases from crystals of wild-type turnip yellow mosaic virus and those of empty capsids prepared by freeze-thawing, show a large portion of the encapsidated RNA to have an icosahedral distribution. Four unique segments of base-paired, double-helical RNA, one to two turns in length, lie between 33-A and 101-A radius and are organized about either 2-fold or 5-fold icosahedral axes. In addition, single-stranded loops of RNA invade the pentameric and hexameric capsomeres where they contact the interior capsid surface. The remaining RNA, not seen in electron density maps, must serve as connecting links between these secondary structural elements and is likely icosahedrally disordered. The distribution of RNA observed crystallographically appears to be in agreement with models based on biochemical data and secondary structural analyses.

  12. The nucleotide sequence of cowpea mosaic virus B RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lomonossoff, G.P.; Shanks, M.

    1983-01-01

    The complete sequence of the bottom component RNA (B RNA) of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) has been determined. Restriction enzyme fragments of double-stranded cDNA were cloned in M13 and the sequence of the inserts was determined by a combination of enzymatic and chemical sequencing techniques. Additional sequence information was obtained by primed synthesis on first strand cDNA. The complete sequence deduced is 5889 nucleotides long excluding the 3' poly(A), and contains an open reading frame sufficient to code for a polypeptide of mol. wt. 207 760. The coding region is flanked by a 5' leader sequence of 206 nucleotides and a 3' non-coding region of 82 residues which does not contain a polyadenylation signal. PMID:16453487

  13. Daphne mosaic virus (DapMV), a new potyvirus from Daphne mezereum in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Fránová, J; Petrzik, K; Lesemann, D-E; Navrátil, M

    2006-04-01

    Daphne shrubs with light green rings and mosaic on leaves contained flexuous filamentous virions (696 x 13 nm) and cylindrical inclusions typical of the subdivision III of Edwardson's classification for inclusions induced by members of the family Potyviridae. Decoration tests using antisera to 67 potyviruses revealed distant serological relations among chilli veinal mottle virus, Colombian datura virus, papaya ringspot virus, tobacco vein mottling virus and yam mosaic virus. The 3' terminal region of the virus genome was amplified by RT-PCR using primers specific for cloned and sequenced members of the family Potyviridae. The most similar sequences in the GenBank were those of isolates of wild potato mosaic virus (WPMV) and yam mild mosaic virus (YMMV), originating from Peru and Guadeloupe, respectively. The new sequence had 63.2% and 61.9% nucleotide identity to WPMV and YMMV in the coat protein gene. The results suggest that the Czech isolate from daphne should be regarded as a new member of the genus Potyvirus. The name daphne mosaic virus (DapMV) is suggested for this virus. PMID:16292598

  14. Mosaicism

    MedlinePlus

    ... A diagnosis of mosaicism may cause confusion and uncertainty. A genetic counselor may help answer any questions ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  15. Genetic Composition of Pepino mosaic virus Population in North American Greenhouse Tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is a member of the genus Potexvirus within the family Flexiviridae. Pepino mosaic is an emerging disease in greenhouse tomato in Europe, North America and South America. Previous research in several laboratories suggests that PepMV consists of numerous sequence variants...

  16. First report of tomato mottle mosaic virus infecting tomato in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato mottle mosaic virus was identified in tomato in Florida, the first report of this virus in the U.S. Host range and genetic diversity were characterized. This report provides an overview of this emerging virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and regulatory scien...

  17. Odontonema cuspidatum and Psychotria punctata, two new cucumber mosaic virus hosts identified in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wide host range of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been expanded by the identification of Odontonema cuspidatum (firespike) and Psychotria punctata (dotted wild coffee) as CMV hosts in Florida....

  18. Potentiating Cancer Immunotherapy Using Papaya Mosaic Virus-Derived Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Marie-Ève; Chartrand, Karine; Tarrab, Esther; Savard, Pierre; Leclerc, Denis; Lamarre, Alain

    2016-03-01

    The recent development of novel immunotherapies is revolutionizing cancer treatment. These include, for example, immune checkpoint blockade, immunomodulation, or therapeutic vaccination. Although effective on their own, combining multiple approaches will most likely be required in order to achieve the maximal therapeutic benefit. In this regard, the papaya mosaic virus nanoparticle (PapMV) has shown tremendous potential as (i) an immunostimulatory molecule, (ii) an adjuvant, and (iii) a vaccine platform through its intrinsic capacity to activate the innate immune response in an IFN-α-dependent manner. Here, we demonstrate that intratumor administration of PapMV significantly slows down melanoma progression and prolongs survival. This correlates with enhanced chemokine and pro-inflammatory-cytokine production in the tumor and increased immune-cell infiltration. Proportions of total and tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells dramatically increase following PapMV treatment whereas those of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) concomitantly decrease. Moreover, systemic PapMV administration prevents metastatic tumor-implantation in the lungs. Importantly, PapMV also synergistically improves the therapeutic benefit of dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccination and PD-1 blockade by potentiating antitumor immune responses. This study illustrates the immunostimulatory potential of a plant virus-derived nanoparticle for cancer therapy either alone or in conjunction with other promising immunotherapies in clinical development. PMID:26891174

  19. Foxtail Mosaic Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Monocot Plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Xie, Ke; Jia, Qi; Zhao, Jinping; Chen, Tianyuan; Li, Huangai; Wei, Xiang; Diao, Xianmin; Hong, Yiguo; Liu, Yule

    2016-07-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful technique to study gene function in plants. However, very few VIGS vectors are available for monocot plants. Here we report that Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV) can be engineered as an effective VIGS system to induce efficient silencing of endogenous genes in monocot plants including barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum) and foxtail millet (Setaria italica). This is evidenced by FoMV-based silencing of phytoene desaturase (PDS) and magnesium chelatase in barley, of PDS and Cloroplastos alterados1 in foxtail millet and wheat, and of an additional gene IspH in foxtail millet. Silencing of these genes resulted in photobleached or chlorosis phenotypes in barley, wheat, and foxtail millet. Furthermore, our FoMV-based gene silencing is the first VIGS system reported for foxtail millet, an important C4 model plant. It may provide an efficient toolbox for high-throughput functional genomics in economically important monocot crops. PMID:27225900

  20. Phylogenetic and serological analysis of turnip ringspot virus and radish mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Koloniuk, Igor; Petrzik, Karel

    2012-03-01

    Turnip ringspot virus (TuRSV) has been proposed to be a member of a new species in the genus Comovirus. Its remarkable host-range similarity to radish mosaic virus (RaMV) may have led to its misrecognition in the past. Findings from both sequence analysis and serological tests support the assignment of TuRSV to a new comovirus species. In addition, phylogenetic analysis suggests that the two genome segments of some TuRSV isolates have a heterogeneous origin. PMID:22160585

  1. 2014 nationwide survey revealed Turnip mosaic virus, Radish mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus as the major viruses in Korean Radish Fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Korea, recent climate change has caused increased insect populations and migration from neighboring countries. As insect migration increases newly emerging virus diseases have been reported. In 2014, we performed a nationwide survey in radish fields to investigate the distribution of common virus...

  2. Effects of DICER-like proteins 2, 3 and 4 on cucumber mosaic virus and tobacco mosaic virus infections in salicylic acid-treated plants.

    PubMed

    Lewsey, Mathew G; Carr, John P

    2009-12-01

    Salicylic acid (SA)-mediated resistance and RNA silencing are both important plant antiviral defence mechanisms. To investigate overlap between these resistance phenomena, we examined the ability of mutant Arabidopsis thaliana plants lacking DICER-like (DCL) endoribonucleases 2, 3 and 4 to exhibit SA-induced defence. We found that in dcl2/3/4 triple mutant plants, treatment with exogenous SA stimulated resistance to two positive-sense RNA viruses: cucumber mosaic virus and tobacco mosaic virus. We conclude that DCLs 2, 3 and 4, which are the predominant DCL endoribonucleases involved in silencing of positive-sense RNA viruses, are not required for effective SA-induced resistance to these viruses. However, the findings do not exclude RNA silencing from making a contribution to SA-mediated resistance in wild-type plants. PMID:19710258

  3. Quantification of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV-UG) in single and mixed infected Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Naseem, Saadia; Winter, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The quantity of genomic DNA-A and DNA-B of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus Uganda (Uganda variant, EACMV-UG) was analysed using quantitative PCR to assess virus concentrations in plants from susceptible and tolerant cultivars. The concentrations of genome components in absolute and relative quantification experiments in single and mixed viral infections were determined. Virus concentration was much higher in symptomatic leaf tissues compared to non-symptomatic leaves and corresponded with the severity of disease symptoms. In general, higher titres were recorded for EACMV-UG Ca055 compared to ACMV DRC6. The quantitative assessment also showed that the distribution of both viruses in the moderately resistant cassava cv. TMS 30572 was not different from the highly susceptible cv. TME 117. Natural mixed infections with both viruses gave severe disease symptoms. Relative quantification of virus genomes in mixed infections showed higher concentrations of EACMV-UG DNA-A compared to ACMV DNA-A, but a marked reduction of EACMV-UG DNA-B. The higher concentrations of EACMV-UG DNA-B compared to EACMV DNA-A accumulation in single infections were consistent. Since DNA-B is implicated in virus cell-to-cell spread and systemic movement, the abundance of the EACMV-UG DNA-B may be an important factor driving cassava mosaic disease epidemic. PMID:26456453

  4. Apple latent spherical virus vector as vaccine for the prevention and treatment of mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma plants by bean yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Nozomi; Kon, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Natsuaki, Tomohide; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the protective effects of a viral vector based on an Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) harboring a segment of the Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) genome against mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma plants caused by BYMV infection. In pea plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine and challenge inoculated with BYMV expressing green fluorescence protein, BYMV multiplication occurred in inoculated leaves, but was markedly inhibited in the upper leaves. No mosaic symptoms due to BYMV infection were observed in the challenged plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine. Simultaneous inoculation with the ALSV vaccine and BYMV also prevented mosaic symptoms in broad bean and eustoma plants, and BYMV accumulation was strongly inhibited in the upper leaves of plants treated with the ALSV vaccine. Pea and eustoma plants were pre-inoculated with BYMV followed by inoculation with the ALSV vaccine to investigate the curative effects of the ALSV vaccine. In both plant species, recovery from mosaic symptoms was observed in upper leaves and BYMV accumulation was inhibited in leaves developing post-ALSV vaccination. These results show that ALSV vaccination not only prevents mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma, but that it is also effective in curing these diseases. PMID:25386843

  5. The specific involvement of coat protein in tobacco mosaic virus cross protection.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, J L; Fulton, R W

    1982-05-01

    Nicotiana sylvestris infected by strains of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) causing mosaic can be superinfected in the dark green leaf tissue, but not light green tissue, by necrotizing strains of TMV. The dark green tissue, however, is much less susceptible than healthy tissue, to some extent, even to unrelated viruses. The RNA of necrotizing strains of TMV was relatively more infectious than intact virus on mosaic than on healthy leaves and caused lesions in both light and dark green tissues. The same relationship was found in Nicotiana longiflora and, when the protecting strain in N. sylvestris could be used as a challenge, in Capsicum baccatum. The efficiency of superinfection by RNA was not found with viruses unrelated to TMV. When bentonite at 1 mg/ml, which is known to strip protein from TMV, was included in the inoculum of intact TMV it superinfected in the same manner as RNA. RNA of a necrotizing strain of TMV, encapsidated in brome mosaic virus protein and used as a challenge, superinfected in the same manner as RNA. When encapsidated in common TMV protein, however, it behaved as native virus. Cross protection apparently results from the prevention of uncoating of related challenge virus in light green tissue of N. sylvestris. Locally inoculated N. sylvestris leaves were insusceptible to challenge RNA or intact virus when the protecting virus was increasing. After increase ceased, RNA was more infectious than intact virus. PMID:18635142

  6. Making a Virus Visible: Francis O. Holmes and a biological assay for tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2014-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, viruses had yet to be defined in a material way. Instead, they were known better by what they were not - not bacteria, not culturable, and not visible with a light microscope. As with the ill-defined "gene" of genetics, viruses were microbes whose nature had not been revealed. Some clarity arrived in 1929 when Francis O. Holmes, a scientist at the Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research (Yonkers, NY) reported that Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) could produce local necrotic lesions on tobacco plants and that these lesions were in proportion to dilutions of the inoculum. Holmes' method, the local lesion assay, provided the first evidence that viruses were discrete infectious particles, thus setting the stage for physicochemical studies of plant viruses. In a field where there are few eponymous methods or diseases, Holmes' assay continues to be a useful tool for the study of plant viruses. TMV was a success because the local lesion assay "made the virus visible" and standardized the work of virology towards determining the nature of the virus. PMID:23494396

  7. Unstable infectivity and sedimentable ds-RNA associated with lettuce speckles mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Falk, B W; Morris, T J; Duffus, J E

    1979-07-15

    Infectivity associated with extracts of lettuce speckles mottle virus (LSMV)-infected tissues is unstable and is susceptible to short periods of aging in vitro or low concentrations of RNase. Infected leaves extracted using phenol yielded greater infectivity than comparable tissue extracted with buffer. No typical virus particles were observed in infected tissues or clarified preparations, but 50- to 70-nm spherical membranous particles were observed associated with the tonoplast in vacuoles of infected cells. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of nucleic acids from infected tissue and LSMV-clarified preparations revealed abundant double-stranded RNA (ds-RNA) in both preparations. A species of LSMV-specific single-stranded RNA (ss-RNA) was also present in LSMV bentonite-clarified preparations. Infectivity was associated only with the ss-RNA fraction. Quantitative isolation of ds-RNA from whole tissue and clarified preparations showed the majority of the ds-RNA was recovered from the bentonite-clarified fractions, and this RNA appeared to be associated with a relatively small structure of a low buoyant density. These data suggest that LSMV lacks a functional coat protein and the sedimentable dsRNA fraction from LSMV-infected tissues more likely contains a viral-specific replication site and not true virus particles. PMID:18631594

  8. Cauliflower mosaic virus Transcriptome Reveals a Complex Alternative Splicing Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Clément; Geldreich, Angèle; Ramel, Laëtitia; Ryabova, Lyubov A.; Dimitrova, Maria; Keller, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The plant pararetrovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) uses alternative splic-ing to generate several isoforms from its polycistronic pregenomic 35S RNA. This pro-cess has been shown to be essential for infectivity. Previous works have identified four splice donor sites and a single splice acceptor site in the 35S RNA 5’ region and sug-gested that the main role of CaMV splicing is to downregulate expression of open read-ing frames (ORFs) I and II. In this study, we show that alternative splicing is a conserved process among CaMV isolates. In Cabb B-JI and Cabb-S isolates, splicing frequently leads to different fusion between ORFs, particularly between ORF I and II. The corresponding P1P2 fusion proteins expressed in E. coli interact with viral proteins P2 and P3 in vitro. However, they are detected neither during infection nor upon transient expression in planta, which suggests rapid degradation after synthesis and no important biological role in the CaMV infectious cycle. To gain a better understanding of the functional relevance of 35S RNA alternative splicing in CaMV infectivity, we inactivated the previously described splice sites. All the splicing mutants were as pathogenic as the corresponding wild-type isolate. Through RT-PCR-based analysis we demonstrate that CaMV 35S RNA exhibits a complex splicing pattern, as we identify new splice donor and acceptor sites whose selection leads to more than thirteen 35S RNA isoforms in infected turnip plants. Inactivating splice donor or acceptor sites is not lethal for the virus, since disrupted sites are systematically rescued by the activation of cryptic and/or seldom used splice sites. Taken together, our data depict a conserved, complex and flexible process, involving multiple sites, that ensures splicing of 35S RNA. PMID:26162084

  9. Complete genome sequence of bean rugose mosaic virus, genus Comovirus.

    PubMed

    Picoli, M H S; Garcia, A; Barboza, A A L; de Souto, Eliezer Rodrigues; Almeida, A M R

    2016-06-01

    Since the first report in Costa Rica in 1971, bean rugose mosaic virus (BRMV) has been found in Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala and Brazil. In this study, the complete genome sequence of a soybean isolate of BRMV from Paraná State, Brazil, was determined. The BRMV genome consists of two polyadenylated RNAs. RNA1 is 5909 nucleotides long and encodes a single polypeptide of 1856 amino acids (aa), with an estimated molecular weight of 210 kDa. The RNA1 polyprotein contains the polypeptides for viral replication and proteolytic processing. RNA2 is 3644 nucleotides long and codes for a single polypeptide of 1097 aa, containing the movement and coat proteins. This is the first complete genome sequence of BRMV. When compared with available aa sequences of comoviruses, the highest identities of BRMV coat proteins and proteinase polymerase were 57.5 and 58 %, respectively. These were below the 75 and 80 % identity limits, respectively, established for species demarcation in the genus. This confirms that BRMV is a member of a distinct species in the genus Comovirus. PMID:26973227

  10. Seeing tobacco mosaic virus through direct electron detectors.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Simon A; Bharat, Tanmay A M; Jakobi, Arjen J; Hagen, Wim J H; Sachse, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    With the introduction of direct electron detectors (DED) to the field of electron cryo-microscopy, a wave of atomic-resolution structures has become available. As the new detectors still require comparative characterization, we have used tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as a test specimen to study the quality of 3D image reconstructions from data recorded on the two direct electron detector cameras, K2 Summit and Falcon II. Using DED movie frames, we explored related image-processing aspects and compared the performance of micrograph-based and segment-based motion correction approaches. In addition, we investigated the effect of dose deposition on the atomic-resolution structure of TMV and show that radiation damage affects negative carboxyl chains first in a side-chain specific manner. Finally, using 450,000 asymmetric units and limiting the effects of radiation damage, we determined a high-resolution cryo-EM map at 3.35Å resolution. Here, we provide a comparative case study of highly ordered TMV recorded on different direct electron detectors to establish recording and processing conditions that enable structure determination up to 3.2Å in resolution using cryo-EM. PMID:25528571

  11. Trastuzumab-binding peptide display by Tobacco mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Frolova, Olga Y.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Komarova, Tatiana V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Sheval, Eugene V.; Gleba, Yuri Y.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2010-11-10

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2/neu) is a target for the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Recently, trastuzumab-binding peptides (TBP) of HER2/neu that inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells were identified. We have now studied conditions of efficient assembly in vivo of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based particles displaying TBP on its surface. The system is based on an Agrobacterium-mediated co-delivery of binary vectors encoding TMV RNA and coat protein (CP) with TBP in its C-terminal extension into plant leaves. We show how the fusion of amino acid substituted TBP (sTBP) to CP via a flexible peptide linker can improve the manufacturability of recombinant TMV (rTMV). We also reveal that rTMV particles with exposed sTBP retained trastuzumab-binding capacity but lost an anti-HER2/neu immunogenic scaffold function. Mouse antibodies against rTMV did not recognize HER2/neu on surface of human SK-BR-3 cells.

  12. Seeing tobacco mosaic virus through direct electron detectors

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Simon A.; Bharat, Tanmay A.M.; Jakobi, Arjen J.; Hagen, Wim J.H.; Sachse, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of direct electron detectors (DED) to the field of electron cryo-microscopy, a wave of atomic-resolution structures has become available. As the new detectors still require comparative characterization, we have used tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as a test specimen to study the quality of 3D image reconstructions from data recorded on the two direct electron detector cameras, K2 Summit and Falcon II. Using DED movie frames, we explored related image-processing aspects and compared the performance of micrograph-based and segment-based motion correction approaches. In addition, we investigated the effect of dose deposition on the atomic-resolution structure of TMV and show that radiation damage affects negative carboxyl chains first in a side-chain specific manner. Finally, using 450,000 asymmetric units and limiting the effects of radiation damage, we determined a high-resolution cryo-EM map at 3.35 Å resolution. Here, we provide a comparative case study of highly ordered TMV recorded on different direct electron detectors to establish recording and processing conditions that enable structure determination up to 3.2 Å in resolution using cryo-EM. PMID:25528571

  13. Resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus in Gladiolus plants transformed with either a defective replicase of coat protein subgroup II gene from Cucumber mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic Gladiolus plants that contain either Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup I coat protein, CMV subgroup II coat protein, CMV replicase, a combination of the CMV subgroups I and II coat proteins, or a combination of the CMV subgroup II coat protein and replicase genes were developed. These...

  14. Virus factories of cauliflower mosaic virus are virion reservoirs that engage actively in vector transmission.

    PubMed

    Bak, Aurélie; Gargani, Daniel; Macia, Jean-Luc; Malouvet, Enrick; Vernerey, Marie-Stéphanie; Blanc, Stéphane; Drucker, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) forms two types of inclusion bodies within infected plant cells: numerous virus factories, which are the sites for viral replication and virion assembly, and a single transmission body (TB), which is specialized for virus transmission by aphid vectors. The TB reacts within seconds to aphid feeding on the host plant by total disruption and redistribution of its principal component, the viral transmission helper protein P2, onto microtubules throughout the cell. At the same time, virions also associate with microtubules. This redistribution of P2 and virions facilitates transmission and is reversible; the TB reforms within minutes after vector departure. Although some virions are present in the TB before disruption, their subsequent massive accumulation on the microtubule network suggests that they also are released from virus factories. Using drug treatments, mutant viruses, and exogenous supply of viral components to infected protoplasts, we show that virions can rapidly exit virus factories and, once in the cytoplasm, accumulate together with the helper protein P2 on the microtubule network. Moreover, we show that during reversion of this phenomenon, virions from the microtubule network can either be incorporated into the reverted TB or return to the virus factories. Our results suggest that CaMV factories are dynamic structures that participate in vector transmission by controlled release and uptake of virions during TB reaction. PMID:24006440

  15. A Game-Theoretic Model of Interactions between Hibiscus Latent Singapore Virus and Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Niu, Shengniao; Wong, Sek-Man

    2012-01-01

    Mixed virus infections in plants are common in nature and their interactions affecting host plants would depend mainly on plant species, virus strains, the order of infection and initial amount of inoculum. Hence, the prediction of outcome of virus competition in plants is not easy. In this study, we applied evolutionary game theory to model the interactions between Hibiscus latent Singapore virus (HLSV) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana under co-infection in a plant host. The accumulation of viral RNA was quantified using qPCR at 1, 2 and 8 days post infection (dpi), and two different methods were employed to predict the dominating virus. TMV was predicted to dominate the game in the long run and this prediction was confirmed by both qRT-PCR at 8 dpi and the death of co-infected plants after 15 dpi. In addition, we validated our model by using data reported in the literature. Ten out of fourteen reported co-infection outcomes agreed with our predictions. Explanations were given for the four interactions that did not agree with our model. Hence, it serves as a valuable tool in making long term predictions using short term data obtained in virus co-infections. PMID:22623970

  16. THE PREPARATION AND USE OF TOBACCO MOSAIC VIRUS CONTAINING RADIOACTIVE PHOSPHORUS

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, W. M.

    1942-01-01

    Normal and tobacco mosaic-diseased Turkish tobacco plants were grown in sand for a period of several weeks, during which they were fed daily a complete nutrient solution to which had been added disodium phosphate containing radioactive phosphorus. Determinations were made of the distribution of radioactive phosphorus in different fractions such as the wash from the sand and roots, the press cake obtained on pressing the juice from the plants, the protein and protein-free portions of the supernatant liquids obtained on ultracentrifugation of the juices, and the purified tobacco mosaic virus isolated from the diseased plants. Chemical analyses as well as radiographs of the normal and diseased leaves indicated that they contained the same amount of phosphorus. Approximately 30 per cent of the radioactive phosphorus absorbed by the diseased plants was found to be combined with the purified tobacco mosaic virus that was isolated from these plants. Following the inoculation of purified tobacco mosaic virus possessing high radioactivity to normal Turkish tobacco plants, most of the radioactivity was found to be associated with non-virus components of which about 40 per cent was in the inoculated and 60 per cent in the uninoculated portions of the plants. Although a small amount of radioactive virus was isolated from the uninoculated portions of the plants, it was impossible, because of a number of complicating factors which have been discussed, to draw from the results any reliable conclusions regarding the mode of reproduction of tobacco mosaic virus. PMID:19873320

  17. Molecular evidence for lack of seed transmission of Pea enation mosaic virus in Pisum sativum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) has never been definitively demonstrated to be seed transmitted and as such, has been a point of issue in movement of pea seed to other countries such as Australia and New Zealand. To determine whether the virus is seed-borne and the likelihood that it may be seed tr...

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Tomato-Infecting Tomato Mottle Mosaic Virus in New York

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Zheng, Yi; Li, Rugang; Martin, Gregory B.; Fei, Zhangjun

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of an isolate of tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV) infecting tomatoes in New York was obtained using small RNA (sRNA) deep sequencing. ToMMV_NY-13 shared 99% sequence identity with isolates from Mexico and Florida. Broader distribution of this emerging virus is a cause for concern to the tomato industry. PMID:26701086

  19. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic characterization of tropical soda apple mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple mosaic virus (TSAMV) was first identified in tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum), a noxious weed, in Florida in 2002. This report provides the first full genome sequence of TSAMV. The full genome sequence of this virus will enable research scientists to develop additional spec...

  20. Complete genome sequence of Tomato mosaic virus isolated from jasmine in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) was first identified in jasmine in the U.S. in Florida in 1999. This report provides the first full genome sequence of a ToMV isolate from jasmine. The full genome sequence of this virus will enable research scientists to develop additional specific diagnostic tests for ...

  1. Complete genome sequence of a Tomato mottle mosaic virus isolate from the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV) was first identified in the U.S. in tomatoes in Florida in 2010. This report provides the first full genome sequence of a U.S. ToMMV isolate from 2010. The full genome sequence of this emerging virus will enable research scientists to develop additional specific ...

  2. Economic impact of wheat streak mosaic virus in the Texas High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), vectored by the wheat curl mite Aceria tosichella Keifer, is a major limiting factor in wheat production in the Texas Panhandle. It is the most frequently encountered virus in the region, affecting both shoot and root biomass, and consequently it can drastically red...

  3. Genome sequencing, genetic diversity and field detection of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus using LAMP technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent outbreaks of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus on cucumber, melon and watermelon in Australia, Canada, and the U.S. highlight the importance in implementing a cleaned seed program to manage this seed-borne virus from introduction. Both Canadian and Australian isolates were closely relate...

  4. Identification and Utility of Markers Linked to the Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus Resistance Gene in Watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus Florida stain (ZYMV-FL) is one of the most economically important viruses affecting watermelon in the United States. Inheritance of resistance to ZYMV-FL is conferred by a single recessive gene. Described here is single-reaction, polymerase chain reaction-based marker l...

  5. Identification and Utility of Markers Linked to the Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus Resistance Gene in Watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is one of the most economically important viruses affecting watermelon in the United States. The ZYMV-Florida strain (ZYMV-FL) is considered a major limitation to commercial watermelon production in the entire United States. Experiments with F2 and BC1 plants, d...

  6. Identification of the Wheat Curl Mite as the Vector of Triticum Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a newly discovered virus found infecting wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in Kansas. This study was conducted to determine if the wheat curl mite (WCM, Aceria tosichella Keifer) and the bird cherry oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L. ) could transmit TriMV. Using diffe...

  7. Radial density distribution and symmetry of a Potexvirus, narcissus mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; Bian, Wen; Junn, Justin; McCullough, Ian; Gore, David; Stubbs, Gerald . E-mail: gerald.stubbs@vanderbilt.edu

    2007-01-20

    Narcissus mosaic virus is a Potexvirus, a member of the Flexiviridae family of filamentous plant viruses. Fiber diffraction patterns from oriented sols of narcissus mosaic virus have been used to determine the symmetry and structural parameters of the viral helix. The virions have a radius of 55 {+-} 5 A. The viral helix has a pitch of 34.45 {+-} 0.5 A, with 7.8 subunits per turn of the helix. We conclude that all members of the Potexvirus genus have close to 8 subunits per helical turn.

  8. Systemic transport of Alfalfa mosaic virus can be mediated by the movement proteins of several viruses assigned to five genera of the 30K family.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Thor V M; Peiró, Ana; Pallás, Vicente; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús

    2013-03-01

    We previously showed that the movement protein (MP) gene of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is functionally exchangeable for the cell-to-cell transport of the corresponding genes of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Brome mosaic virus, Prunus necrotic ringspot virus, Cucumber mosaic virus and Cowpea mosaic virus. We have analysed the capacity of the heterologous MPs to systemically transport the corresponding chimeric AMV genome. All MPs were competent in systemic transport but required the fusion at their C terminus of the coat protein-interacting C-terminal 44 aa (A44) of the AMV MP. Except for the TMV MP, the presence of the hybrid virus in upper leaves correlated with the capacity to move locally. These results suggest that all the MPs assigned to the 30K superfamily should be exchangeable not only for local virus movement but also for systemic transport when the A44 fragment is present. PMID:23136366

  9. The "tobacco mosaic virus" 126-kDa protein associated with virus replication and movement suppresses RNA silencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic symptoms induced on "Nicotiana tabacum" cv. Xanthi by "Tobacco mosaic virus" (TMV) are modulated by one or both amino-coterminal viral 126- and 183-kDa proteins, proteins involved in virus replication and cell-to-cell movement. Here we compare the systemic accumulation and gene silencing c...

  10. First Report of Pepino Mosaic Virus Infecting Tomato in Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic has become endemic greenhouse tomato disease in many countries around the world. Its occurrence in Mexico has yet to be determined. In early spring of 2010, symptoms of yellow mosaic, chlorotic patches and fruit marbling were observed in approximately 50% of tomato plants in a commerc...

  11. Simultaneous detection of papaya ringspot virus, papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus, and papaya mosaic virus by multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Huo, P; Shen, W T; Yan, P; Tuo, D C; Li, X Y; Zhou, P

    2015-12-01

    Both the single infection of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) or papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) and double infection of PRSV and PLDMV or PapMV which cause indistinguishable symptoms, threaten the papaya industry in Hainan Island, China. In this study, a multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was developed to detect simultaneously the three viruses based on their distinctive melting temperatures (Tms): 81.0±0.8°C for PRSV, 84.7±0.6°C for PLDMV, and 88.7±0.4°C for PapMV. The multiplex real-time RT-PCR method was specific and sensitive in detecting the three viruses, with a detection limit of 1.0×10(1), 1.0×10(2), and 1.0×10(2) copies for PRSV, PLDMV, and PapMV, respectively. Indeed, the reaction was 100 times more sensitive than the multiplex RT-PCR for PRSV, and 10 times more sensitive than multiplex RT-PCR for PLDMV. Field application of the multiplex real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that some non-symptomatic samples were positive for PLDMV by multiplex real-time RT-PCR but negative by multiplex RT-PCR, whereas some samples were positive for both PRSV and PLDMV by multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay but only positive for PLDMV by multiplex RT-PCR. Therefore, this multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay provides a more rapid, sensitive and reliable method for simultaneous detection of PRSV, PLDMV, PapMV and their mixed infections in papaya. PMID:26666186

  12. Nucleotide sequence of the coat protein genes of alstroemeria mosaic virus and amazon lily mosaic virus, a tentative species of genus potyvirus.

    PubMed

    Fuji, S; Terami, F; Furuya, H; Naito, H; Fukumoto, F

    2004-09-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the 3' terminal region of the genomes of Alstroemeria mosaic virus (AlsMV) and the Amazon lily mosaic virus (ALiMV) have been determined. These sequences contain the complete coding region of the viral coat protein (CP) gene followed by a 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR). AlsMV and ALiMV share 74.9% identity in the amino acid sequence of the CP, and 55.6% identity in the nucleotide sequence of the 3'-UTR. Phylogenetic analysis of these CP genes and 3'-UTRs in relation to those of 79 potyvirus species revealed that AlsMV and ALiMV should be assigned to the Potato virus Y (PVY) subgroup. AlsMV and ALiMV were concluded to have arisen independently within the PVY subgroup. PMID:15593424

  13. Surface mineralization and characterization of tobacco mosaic virus biotemplated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Alexander S.

    The genetically engineered tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has been utilized as a biotemplate in the formation of nanoparticles with the intent of furthering the understanding of the biotemplated nanoparticles formed in the absence of an external reducing agent. Specifically, the work aims to provide better knowledge of the final particle characteristics and how these properties could be altered to better fit the need of functional devices. Three achievements have been accomplished including a method for controlling final particle size, characterizing the resistivity of palladium coated TMV, and the application of TMV as an additive in nanometric calcium carbonate synthesis. Until the last 5 years, formation of metal nanoparticles on the surface of TMV has always occurred with the addition of an external reducing agent. The surface functionalities of genetically engineered TMV allow for the reduction of palladium in the absence of an external reducing agent. This process has been furthered to understand how palladium concentration affects the final coating uniformity and thickness. By confirming an ideal ratio of palladium and TMV concentrations, a uniform coat of palladium is formed around the viral nanorod. Altering the number of palladium coating cycles at these concentrations allows for a controllable average diameter of the final nanorods. The average particle diameter was determined by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis by comparing the experimental results to the model of scattering by an infinitely long cylinder. The SAXS results were confirmed through transmission electron microscopy images of individual Pd-TMV nanorods. Secondly, methodologies to determine the electrical resistivity of the genetically engineered TMV biotemplated palladium nanoparticles were created to provide valuable previously missing information. Two fairly common nanoelectronic characterization techniques were combined to create the novel approach to obtain the desired

  14. Chemical Reactivity of Brome Mosaic Virus Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Running, W. E.; Ni, P.; Kao, C. C.; Reilly, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Viral particles are biological machines that have evolved to package, protect, and deliver the viral genome into the host via regulated conformational changes of virions. We have developed a procedure to modify lysine resides with S-methylthioacetimidate (SMTA) across the pH range from 5.5 to 8.5. Lysine residues that are not completely modified are involved in tertiary or quaternary structural interactions, and their extent of modification can be quantified as a function of pH. This procedure was applied to the pH-dependent structural transitions of Brome Mosaic Virus (BMV). As the reaction pH increases from 5.5 to 8.5, the average number of modified lysine residues in the BMV capsid protein increases from six to twelve, correlating well with the known pH dependent swelling behavior of BMV virions. The extent of reaction of each of the capsid protein’s lysine residues has been quantified at eight pH values using coupled liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Each lysine can be assigned to one of three structural classes identified by inspection of the BMV virion crystal structure. Several lysine residues display reactivity that indicates their involvement in dynamic interactions that are not obvious in the crystal structure. The influence of several capsid protein mutants on the pH-dependent structural transition of BMV has also been investigated. Mutant H75Q exhibits an altered swelling transition accompanying solution pH increases. The H75Q capsids show increased reactivity at lysine residues 64 and 130, residues distal from the dimer interface occupied by H75, across the entire pH range. PMID:22750573

  15. Red clover necrotic mosaic virus: Biophysics and Biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockney, Dustin M.

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) is a highly robust (Tm=60 °C), 36 nm icosahedral plant virus. The capsid of RCNMV is assembled from 180 chemically equivalent coat proteins (CPs). The CPs arrange in a T=3 symmetry, in 1 of 3 conformations forming the asymmetric subunit (ASU). There are two Ca(II) binding sites per CP; the removal of divalent cations causes the CP subunits of the ASU to rotate away from each other forming a ˜13 A channel. These channels lead to the highly organized bipartite genome of RCNMV and can be closed by adding back Ca(II). Titrimetric analysis and tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine the affinity of RCNMV for Ca(II) to be ˜Kd < 300 nM. It has been shown that doxorubicin (Dox) can be infused into the capsid at a mole ratio of ˜1000:1, Dox-to-virus, and unlike other nanoparticles, there is no detectable leakage. The high loading of Dox is most likely due to intercalation into the genome and significant intercalation or exposure to denaturants was observed to cause loss of capsid stability. To better understand the limitations of cargo loading, Dox and other intercalating molecules (rhodamine 800, ethidium bromide, and propidium iodide) were assayed to determine optimum infusion conditions. Dox was observed to have a propensity to aggregate. In order to manage the Dox aggregation, the infusion buffer was changed from 50 mM Tris-HCl/50 mM NaOAc/50 mM EDTA or 200 mM EDTA at pH 8.0 to 5 mM HEPES/5 mM Na4EDTA/10 mM NaCl pH 7.8. The Dox:RCNMV infusion mole ratio was also lowered from 5000:1 to 500:1 and the incubation temperature was changed from 4 °C to 22 °C for <12 hours, opposed to 24 hours. To impart targeting functionality to RCNMV, biomimetic peptides were conjugated to either the surface capsid lysines or cysteines using standard bioconjugation methods. For all of the biomimetic peptides screened, sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC) was used to orthogonally attach the

  16. Genetic engineering and characterization of Cowpea mosaic virus empty virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Frank; Saxena, Pooja; Aljabali, Alaa A A; Saunders, Keith; Evans, David J; Lomonossoff, George P

    2014-01-01

    The development of methods for the production of empty Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) virus-like particles (VLPs) that are devoid of RNA, eVLPs, has renewed promise in CPMV capsid technologies. The recombinant nature of CPMV eVLP production means that the extent and variety of genetic modifications that may be incorporated into the particles is theoretically much greater than those that can be made to infectious CPMV virions due to restrictions on viral propagation of the latter. Free of the infectious agent, the genomic RNA, these particles are now finding potential uses in vaccine development, in vivo imaging, drug delivery, and other nanotechnology applications that make use of internal loading of the empty particles. Here we describe methods for the genetic modification and production of CPMV eVLPs and describe techniques useful for their characterization. PMID:24243247

  17. Detection of Cardamom mosaic virus and Banana bract mosaic virus in cardamom using SYBR Green based reverse transcription-quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Siljo, A; Bhat, A I; Biju, C N

    2014-01-01

    Cardamom being perennial, propagated vegetatively, detecting viruses in planting material is important to check the spread of viruses through infected material. Thus development of effective and sensitive assay for detection of viruses is need of the time. In this view, assay for the detection of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) and Banana bract mosaic virus (BBrMV), infecting cardamom was developed using SYBR Green one step reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The RT-qPCR assay amplified all isolates of CdMV and BBrMV tested but no amplification was obtained with RNA of healthy plants. Recombinant plasmids carrying target virus regions corresponding to both viruses were quantified, serially diluted and used as standards in qPCR to develop standard curve to enable quantification. When tenfold serial dilutions of the total RNAs from infected plants were tested through RT-qPCR, the detection limit of the assay was estimated to be 16 copies for CdMV and 10 copies for BBrMV, which was approximately 1,000-fold higher than the conventional RT-PCR. The RT-qPCR assay was validated by testing field samples collected from different cardamom growing regions of India. This is the first report of RT-qPCR assay for the detection of CdMV and BBrMV in cardamom. PMID:24426323

  18. Antiviral RNA silencing is restricted to the marginal region of the dark green tissue in the mosaic leaves of tomato mosaic virus-infected tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Katsuyuki; Kubota, Kenji; Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Tsuda, Shinya; Meshi, Tetsuo

    2008-04-01

    Mosaic is a common disease symptom caused by virus infection in plants. Mosaic leaves of Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV)-infected tobacco plants consist of yellow-green and dark green tissues that contain large and small numbers of virions, respectively. Although the involvement of RNA silencing in mosaic development has been suggested, its role in the process that results in an uneven distribution of the virus is unknown. Here, we investigated whether and where ToMV-directed RNA silencing was established in tobacco mosaic leaves. When transgenic tobaccos defective in RNA silencing were infected with ToMV, little or no dark green tissue appeared, implying the involvement of RNA silencing in mosaic development. ToMV-related small interfering RNAs were rarely detected in the dark green areas of the first mosaic leaves, and their interior portions were susceptible to infection. Thus, ToMV-directed RNA silencing was not effective there. By visualizing the cells where ToMV-directed RNA silencing was active, it was found that the effective silencing occurs only in the marginal regions of the dark green tissue ( approximately 0.5 mm in width) and along the major veins. Further, the cells in the margins were resistant against recombinant potato virus X carrying a ToMV-derived sequence. These findings demonstrate that RNA silencing against ToMV is established in the cells located at the margins of the dark green areas, restricting the expansion of yellow-green areas, and consequently defines the mosaic pattern. The mechanism of mosaic symptom development is discussed in relation to the systemic spread of the virus and RNA silencing. PMID:18216118

  19. Antiviral RNA Silencing Is Restricted to the Marginal Region of the Dark Green Tissue in the Mosaic Leaves of Tomato Mosaic Virus-Infected Tobacco Plants▿

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Katsuyuki; Kubota, Kenji; Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Tsuda, Shinya; Meshi, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    Mosaic is a common disease symptom caused by virus infection in plants. Mosaic leaves of Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV)-infected tobacco plants consist of yellow-green and dark green tissues that contain large and small numbers of virions, respectively. Although the involvement of RNA silencing in mosaic development has been suggested, its role in the process that results in an uneven distribution of the virus is unknown. Here, we investigated whether and where ToMV-directed RNA silencing was established in tobacco mosaic leaves. When transgenic tobaccos defective in RNA silencing were infected with ToMV, little or no dark green tissue appeared, implying the involvement of RNA silencing in mosaic development. ToMV-related small interfering RNAs were rarely detected in the dark green areas of the first mosaic leaves, and their interior portions were susceptible to infection. Thus, ToMV-directed RNA silencing was not effective there. By visualizing the cells where ToMV-directed RNA silencing was active, it was found that the effective silencing occurs only in the marginal regions of the dark green tissue (∼0.5 mm in width) and along the major veins. Further, the cells in the margins were resistant against recombinant potato virus X carrying a ToMV-derived sequence. These findings demonstrate that RNA silencing against ToMV is established in the cells located at the margins of the dark green areas, restricting the expansion of yellow-green areas, and consequently defines the mosaic pattern. The mechanism of mosaic symptom development is discussed in relation to the systemic spread of the virus and RNA silencing. PMID:18216118

  20. Immunogenic compositions comprising human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mosaic Nef proteins

    DOEpatents

    Korber, Bette T.; Perkins, Simon; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Fischer, William M.; Theiler, James; Letvin, Norman; Haynes, Barton F.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Yusim, Karina; Kuiken, Carla

    2012-02-21

    The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Nef polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  1. Opium poppy mosaic virus, a new umbravirus isolated from Papaver somniferum in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joe; Lebas, Bénédicte; Liefting, Lia; Veerakone, Stella; Wei, Ting; Ward, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    A novel virus, tentatively named "opium poppy mosaic virus" (OPMV), was isolated from Papaver somniferum (opium poppy) with leaf mosaic and mottling symptoms in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2006. The virus was mechanically transmitted to herbaceous plants of several species, in which it induced local and/or systemic symptoms. No virus particles were observed by electron microscopy in the diseased P. somniferum or any of the symptomatic herbaceous plants. The complete genomic sequence of 4230 nucleotides contains four open reading frames (ORF) and is most closely related (59.3 %) to tobacco bushy top virus, a member of the genus Umbravirus. These data suggest that OPMV is a new umbravirus. PMID:26514844

  2. First report of blueberry mosaic disease caused by blueberry mosaic associated virus in Kentucky

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2011, a grower in Casey County Kentucky observed persistent yellow, green, and red mosaic patterns on leaves of highbush blueberry plants. Twenty-three randomly-scattered ‘Bluecrop’ plants out of approximately 1,400 5-year-old plants showed symptoms, with coverage ranging from 5% to 100%. Asympto...

  3. First report of Sorghum mosaic virus causing mosaic in Miscanthus sinesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Miscanthus is being evaluated as a bioenergy feedstock because of its potentially significant biomass production, perennial habit, and lack of major diseases and pests. It is also a valuable parent in the sugarcane breeding program as source of cold tolerance. Mosaic symptoms were observed on a clo...

  4. Generation of transgenic watermelon resistant to Zucchini yellow mosaic virus and Papaya ringspot virus type W.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tsong-Ann; Chiang, Chu-Hui; Wu, Hui-Wen; Li, Chin-Mei; Yang, Ching-Fu; Chen, Jun-Han; Chen, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2011-03-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and Papaya ringspot virus type W (PRSV W) are major limiting factors for production of watermelon worldwide. For the effective control of these two viruses by transgenic resistance, an untranslatable chimeric construct containing truncated ZYMV coat protein (CP) and PRSV W CP genes was transferred to commercial watermelon cultivars by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Using our protocol, a total of 27 putative transgenic lines were obtained from three cultivars of 'Feeling' (23 lines), 'China baby' (3 lines), and 'Quality' (1 line). PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed that the chimeric construct was incorporated into the genomic DNA of the transformants. Greenhouse evaluation of the selected ten transgenic lines of 'Feeling' cultivar revealed that two immune lines conferred complete resistance to ZYMV and PRSV W, from which virus accumulation were not detected by Western blotting 4 weeks after inoculation. The transgenic transcript was not detected, but small interfering RNA (siRNA) was readily detected from the two immune lines and T(1) progeny of line ZW 10 before inoculation, indicating that RNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is the underlying mechanism for the double-virus resistance. The segregation ratio of T(1) progeny of the immune line ZW10 indicated that the single inserted transgene is nuclearly inherited and associated with the phenotype of double-virus resistance as a dominant trait. The transgenic lines derived from the commercial watermelon cultivars have great potential for control of the two important viruses and can be implemented directly without further breeding. PMID:21079966

  5. Association of tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus DNA-B with bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus in okra showing yellow vein mosaic disease symptoms.

    PubMed

    Venkataravanappa, V; Lakshminarayana Reddy, C N; Jalali, S; Krishna Reddy, M

    2015-06-01

    Okra samples showing yellow vein mosaic, vein twisting and bushy appearance were collected from different locations of India during the surveys conducted between years 2005-2009. The dot blot and PCR detection revealed that 75.14% of the samples were associated with monopartite begomovirus and remaining samples with bipartite virus. Whitefly transmission was established for three samples representing widely separated geographical locations which are negative to betasatellites and associated with DNA-B. Genome components of these three representative isolates were cloned and sequenced. The analysis of DNA-A-like sequence revealed that three begomovirus isolates shared more than 93% nucleotide sequence identity with bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus from India (BYVMV), a monopartite begomovirus species that was reported previously as causative agent of bhendi yellow mosaic disease in association of bhendi yellow vein mosaic betasatellite. Further, the DNA-B-like sequences associated with the three virus isolates shared no more than 90% sequence identity with tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV). Analyses of putative iteron-binding sequence required for trans-replication suggests that begomovirus sequences shared compatible rep-binding iterons with DNA-B of ToLCNDV. Our data suggest that the monopartite begomovirus associated with okra yellow vein disease has captured DNA-B of ToLCNDV to infect okra. Widespread distribution of the complex shows the increasing trend of the capturing of DNA-B of ToLCNDV by monopartite begomoviruses in the Indian subcontinent. The recombination analysis showed that the DNA-A might have been derived from the inter-specific recombination of begomoviruses, while DNA-B was derived from the ToLCNDV infecting different hosts. PMID:26104329

  6. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Su-Heon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. ‘Sorok’, ‘Sodam’ and ‘Somyeong’. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1–100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea. PMID:25289004

  7. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Su-Heon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-06-01

    A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. 'Sorok', 'Sodam' and 'Somyeong'. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1-100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea. PMID:25289004

  8. THE Bct-1 LOCUS FOR RESISTANCE TO BEET CURLY TOP VIRUS IS ASSOCIATED WITH QUANTITATIVE RESISTANCE TO BEAN DWARF MOSAIC VIRUS IN COMMON BEAN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host resistance provides effective control of some diseases induced by geminiviruses in common bean. A recessive gene bgm-1 conditions resistance to Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV) and is located on linkage group B3 near the bc-12 gene for resistance to Bean common mosaic virus. The dominan...

  9. Nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic analysis of a new potexvirus: Malva mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Côté, Fabien; Paré, Christine; Majeau, Nathalie; Bolduc, Marilène; Leblanc, Eric; Bergeron, Michel G; Bernardy, Michael G; Leclerc, Denis

    2008-01-01

    A filamentous virus isolated from Malva neglecta Wallr. (common mallow) and propagated in Chenopodium quinoa was grown, cloned and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined (GenBank accession # DQ660333). The genomic RNA is 6858 nt in length and contains five major open reading frames (ORFs). The genomic organization is similar to members and the viral encoded proteins shared homology with the group of the Potexvirus genus in the Flexiviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship with narcissus mosaic virus (NMV), scallion virus X (ScaVX) and, to a lesser extent, to Alstroemeria virus X (AlsVX) and pepino mosaic virus (PepMV). A novel putative pseudoknot structure is predicted in the 3'-UTR of a subgroup of potexviruses, including this newly described virus. The consensus GAAAA sequence is detected at the 5'-end of the genomic RNA and experimental data strongly suggest that this motif could be a distinctive hallmark of this genus. The name Malva mosaic virus is proposed. PMID:18054524

  10. Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus infectious clone and manipulation for gene-carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Jarugula, Sridhar; Charlesworth, Steven R; Qu, Feng; Stewart, Lucy R

    2016-08-01

    A full-length infectious cDNA clone of soil-borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV; genus Furovirus; family Virgaviridae) was developed for agrobacterium delivery. The cloned virus can be agroinfiltrated to Nicotiana benthamiana for subsequent infection of wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.). The utility of the virus as a vector for gene silencing and expression was assessed through sequence insertions in multiple sites of RNA2. Virus-induced photobleaching was observed in N. benthamiana but not in wheat, despite the stability of the inserts. The SBWMV infectious clone can be used for further studies to investigate the biology of SBWMV through mutagenesis. PMID:27236459

  11. Trans complementation of virus-encoded replicase components of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, T; Watanabe, Y; Meshi, T; Okada, Y

    1991-12-01

    We examined whether the 130K and 180K proteins of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), the putative virus-encoded replicase components, produced by a replication-competent TMV mutant could complement a replication-defective mutant in a single cell. The replication-competent mutant (LDCS29) had a deletion in the coat protein gene and the replication-defective mutant (LDR28) had a large deletion in the gene encoding the 130K and 180K proteins. Neither the replication of LDR28 nor the production of the coat protein from LDR28 or LDCS29 was detected when the mutants were inoculated separately into tobacco protoplasts. However, when the two mutants were co-inoculated, the production of the LDR28 genomic RNA and the subgenomic RNA for the coat protein and accumulation of the coat protein were observed. These results show that the virus-encoded replicase components of TMV complemented the replication-defective mutant in trans. PMID:1962439

  12. Intracellular delivery of antibodies by chimeric Sesbania mosaic virus (SeMV) virus like particles

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Ambily; Natraj, Usha; Karande, Anjali A.; Gulati, Ashutosh; Murthy, Mathur R. N.; Murugesan, Sathyabalan; Mukunda, Pavithra; Savithri, Handanahal S.

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of antibodies has not been fully exploited as they fail to cross cell membrane. In this article, we have tested the possibility of using plant virus based nanoparticles for intracellular delivery of antibodies. For this purpose, Sesbania mosaic virus coat protein (CP) was genetically engineered with the B domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) at the βH-βI loop, to generate SeMV loop B (SLB), which self-assembled to virus like particles (VLPs) with 43 times higher affinity towards antibodies. CP and SLB could internalize into various types of mammalian cells and SLB could efficiently deliver three different monoclonal antibodies–D6F10 (targeting abrin), anti-α-tubulin (targeting intracellular tubulin) and Herclon (against HER2 receptor) inside the cells. Such a mode of delivery was much more effective than antibodies alone treatment. These results highlight the potential of SLB as a universal nanocarrier for intracellular delivery of antibodies. PMID:26905902

  13. Triticum Mosaic Virus: Genetic evidence for recent population expansion and balancing selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum Mosaic Virus (TriMV), a mite-transmitted pathogen of wheat, was first discovered in Kansas in 2006, and is a novel species in the family Potyviridae. The P1 and coat protein (CP) coding regions of 14 isolates from Colorado and 18 isolates from Nebraska were amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced...

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Alternanthera mosaic virus, Isolated from Achyranthes bidentata in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yusa, Akira; Nishida, Shuko; Tanno, Kazuyuki; Keima, Takuya; Nijo, Takamichi; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) infecting Achyranthes bidentata was first detected in Asia, and the complete genome sequence (6,604 nucleotides) was determined. Sequence identity analysis and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that this isolate is the most phylogenetically distant AltMV isolate worldwide. PMID:26988034

  15. Complete genome sequence of a novel genotype of squash mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete genome sequence of a novel genotype of Squash mosaic virus (SqMV) infecting squash plants in Spain was obtained using deep sequencing of small ribonucleic acids and assembly. The low nucleotide sequence identities, with 87-88% on RNA1 and 84-86% on RNA2 to known SqMV isolates, suggest a new...

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Ornithogalum Mosaic Virus Infecting Gladiolus spp. in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sang-Yun; Lim, Seungmo; Kim, Hongsup; Yi, Seung-In

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete genome sequence of Ornithogalum mosaic virus (OrMV) isolated from Taean, South Korea, in 2011, which was obtained by next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. The sequence information provided here may serve as a potential reference for other OrMV isolates. PMID:27516509

  17. The complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of Red clover vein mosaic virus (genus Carlavirus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover vein mosaic virus (RCVMV) is a serious pathogen of legume crops including pea, chickpea and lentil. The complete nucleotide sequence was generated from an isolate obtained from chickpea in Washington State. The complete genome of RCVMV consists of 8605 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) ...

  18. Inter- and intramolecular recombinations in the cucumber mosaic virus genome related to adaptation to alstroemeria.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuh-Kun; Goldbach, Rob; Prins, Marcel

    2002-04-01

    In four distinct alstroemeria-infecting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolates, additional sequences of various lengths were present in the 3' nontranslated regions of their RNAs 2 and 3, apparently the result of intra- and intermolecular recombination events. Competition experiments revealed that these recombined RNA 2 and 3 segments increased the biological fitness of CMV in alstroemeria. PMID:11907253

  19. Gladiolus plants transformed with single-chain variable fragment antibodies to Cucumber mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic plants of Gladiolus ‘Peter Pears’ or ‘Jenny Lee’ were developed that contain single-chain variable fragments (scFv) to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup I or II. The CMV subgroup I heavy and light chain scFv fragments were placed under control of either the duplicated CaMV 35S or suga...

  20. First complete genome sequence of an emerging cucumber green mottle mosaic virus isolate in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence (6,423 nt) of an emerging Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolate on cucumber in North America was determined through deep sequencing of sRNA and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. It shares 99% nucleotide sequence identity to the Asian genotype, but only 90% t...

  1. Complete genome sequence of a tomato infecting tomato mottle mosaic virus in New York

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete genome sequence of an emerging isolate of tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV) infecting experimental nicotianan benthamiana plants in up-state New York was obtained using small RNA deep sequencing. ToMMV_NY-13 shared 99% sequence identity to ToMMV isolates from Mexico and Florida. Broader d...

  2. Sources of Resistance to Pepino Mosaic Virus in Solanum habrochaites (Lycopersicon hirsutum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is an emerging disease on greenhouse tomato. A major tomato germplasm core collection was evaluated for its resistance against PepMV. These accessions included 23 Solanum lycopersicum L., 8 S. pimpinellifolium L., 33 S. peruvianum L., 18 S. chilense (Dunal) Reiche, and ...

  3. Mapping Septoria Leaf Blotch and Soil-borne Mosaic Virus Resistance Genes Derived from Aegilops tauschii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Septoria leaf blotch (STB) is a fungal disease of wheat caused by Septoria tritici and is routinely a problem in temperate wheat growing regions. Soil-borne Wheat Mosaic Virus (SBWMV) is a destructive pathogen of wheat that can cause entire crop failure in localized fields. A linkage analysis of a...

  4. Multiple loci condition seed transmission of Soybean mosaic virus in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of soybean plants with Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), which is transmitted by aphids and through seed, can cause significant reductions in seed production and quality. Because seed-borne infections are the primary sources of inoculum for SMV infections in North America, host-plant resistance ...

  5. Study and Characterization of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Head-to-tail Assembly Assisted by Aniline Polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Niu,Z.; Bruckman, M.; Kotakadi, V.; He, J.; Emrick, T.; Russell, T.; Yang, L.; Wang, Q.

    2006-01-01

    One-dimensional composite nanofibres with narrow dispersity, high aspect ratio and high processibility have been fabricated by head-to-tail self-assembly of rod-like tobacco mosaic virus assisted by aniline polymerization, which can promote many potential applications including electronics, optics, sensing and biomedical engineering.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Rehmannia Mosaic Virus Infecting Rehmannia glutinosa in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a South Korean isolate of Rehmannia mosaic virus (ReMV) infecting Rehmannia glutinosa was determined through next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a natural infection of R. glutinosa by ReMV in South Korea. PMID:26823577

  7. First report of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus infecting greenhouse cucumber in Canada

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), in the genus Tobamovirus and family Virgaviridae, is a seed-borne pathogen on cucurbits. In early 2013, serious viral disease outbreaks on greenhouse cucumber crops were experienced by greenhouse vegetable growers in Alberta, Canada. CGMMV was detected i...

  8. Genetic diversity, host range and disease resistance to the emerging Tomato mottle mosaic virus on tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since its first discovery in 2013 in Mexico, Tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV), a new tomato-infecting tobamovirus is now present in a number of countries (i.e., Brazil, China, and Israel) and several states in the U.S. There is little information available on the molecular and biological properti...

  9. Surprising results from a search for effective disinfectants for Tobacco mosaic virus-contaminated tools

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and four other tobamoviruses infected multiple petunia cultivars without producing obvious viral symptoms. A single cutting event on a TMV-infected plant was sufficient for transmission to many plants subsequently cut with the same clippers. A number of 'old standbys' an...

  10. Role of Soybean mosaic virus-encoded proteins in seed and aphid transmission in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is seed and aphid transmitted and can cause significant reductions in yield and seed quality in soybean, Glycine max. The roles in seed and aphid transmission of selected SMV-encoded proteins were investigated by constructing chimeric recombinants between SMV 413 (efficien...

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a South Korean Isolate of Habenaria mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Igori, Davaajargal; Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Baek, Dasom; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-01-01

    Habenaria mosaic virus (HaMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae, was first discovered from Habenaria radiata in Japan. The complete genomic sequence of a South Korean isolate (PA1) of HaMV infecting Plantago asiatica L. was determined with high-throughput RNA sequencing. PMID:27609926

  12. QTL may explain a tolerance response to Pea enation mosaic virus in pea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) is a serious disease of fresh market and dry pea in the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. The dominant En gene confers resistance to PEMV in pea, however, only a limited number of available cultivars contain the gene. While some cultivars have been reported with ...

  13. Chromatin Structure of Wheat Breeding Lines Resistant to Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus (WSMV) is an important disease limiting wheat production, however no WSMV resistance effective above 18°C is present within the primary genetic pool of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In contrast, the wild relative Thinopyrum intermedium (2n=6x=42) shows good resistance to WS...

  14. Physiological responses of hard red winter wheat to infection by wheat streak mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) causes significant yield loss in hard red winter wheat in the U.S. Southern High Plains. Despite the prevalence of this pathogen, little is known about the physiological response of wheat to WSMV infection. A 2-year study was initiated to (i) investigate the effect o...

  15. Identification of novel sources of resistance to Pea enation mosaic virus in chickpea germplasm.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum) can be seriously affected by Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) in the Pacific Northwest of the USA and other areas of the world when viruliferous aphid populations are high. Use of pesticides to manage PEMV vector transmission is ineffective and PEMV-resistant chickpeas hav...

  16. Triticum Mosaic Virus: A Distinct Member of the Family Potyviridae with an Unusually Long Leader Sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), a member in the family Potyviridae, has been determined to be 10,266 nucleotides (nt) excluding the polyadenylated tail at the 3’ end. The genome encodes a large polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids with the ‘hall-mark proteins’ of potyvirus...

  17. Inter- and Intramolecular Recombinations in the Cucumber Mosaic Virus Genome Related to Adaptation to Alstroemeria

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuh-Kun; Goldbach, Rob; Prins, Marcel

    2002-01-01

    In four distinct alstroemeria-infecting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolates, additional sequences of various lengths were present in the 3′ nontranslated regions of their RNAs 2 and 3, apparently the result of intra- and intermolecular recombination events. Competition experiments revealed that these recombined RNA 2 and 3 segments increased the biological fitness of CMV in alstroemeria. PMID:11907253

  18. Complete genome sequence of a divergent strain of Japanese yam mosaic virus from China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel strain of Japanese yam mosaic virus (JYMV-CN) was identified in a yam plant with foliar mottle symptoms in China. The complete genomic sequence of JYMV-CN was determined. Its genomic sequence of 9701 nucleotides encodes a polyprotein of 3247 amino acids. Its organization was virtually identi...

  19. USVL-370, A zucchini yellow mosaic virus resistant watermelon breeding line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the development of a novel watermelon line ‘USVL-370’ [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] containing resistance to the zucchini yellow mosaic virus-Florida strain (ZYMV-FL). This breeding line is homozygous for the recessive eukaryotic elongation factor eIF4E allele associated wit...

  20. Sources of Resistance to Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus in Lagenaria Siceraria Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One hundred ninety United States Plant Introductions (PIs) of bottlegourd, Lagenaria siceraria (Mol.) Standl., were evaluated for their resistance against the Florida strain of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV-FL). Two-week old seedlings were mechanically inoculated on cotyledons and the first tr...

  1. SIMILARITIES IN SEED AND APHID TRANSMISSION OF SOYBEAN MOSAIC VIRUS ISOLATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The strain specificity of transmission of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) through seed and SMV-induced seed-coat mottling were investigated in field experiments. Six soybean plant introductions (PIs) were inoculated with eight SMV isolates. Transmission of SMV through seed ranged from 0% to 42.6% in see...

  2. First Report of Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus in Alaska from Clover (Trifolium spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During mid-June 2008, distinct mosaic leaves were observed on a cluster of white clover, Trifolium repens L., growing at the edge of a lawn in Palmer, Alaska. Virus minipurification from leaves of affected clover and polyacrylamide electrophoresis implicated a ~35 kDa putative coat protein (CP). Sub...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Ornithogalum Mosaic Virus Infecting Gladiolus spp. in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang-Yun; Lim, Seungmo; Kim, Hongsup; Yi, Seung-In; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete genome sequence of Ornithogalum mosaic virus (OrMV) isolated from Taean, South Korea, in 2011, which was obtained by next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. The sequence information provided here may serve as a potential reference for other OrMV isolates. PMID:27516509

  4. Population Structure of Blueberry Mosaic Associated Virus: Evidence of Genetic Exchange in Geographically Distinct Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The population structure of blueberry mosaic associated virus (BlMaV), a putative member of the family Ophioviridae, was examined using 59 isolates collected from North America and Slovenia. The studied isolates displayed low genetic diversity in the movement and nucleoprotein regions and low ratios...

  5. Tomato mosaic virus replication protein suppresses virus-targeted posttranscriptional gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Kenji; Tsuda, Shinya; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo

    2003-10-01

    Posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS), a homology-dependent RNA degradation system, has a role in defending against virus infection in plants, but plant viruses encode a suppressor to combat PTGS. Using transgenic tobacco in which the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) is posttranscriptionally silenced, we investigated a tomato mosaic virus (ToMV)-encoded PTGS suppressor. Infection with wild-type ToMV (L strain) interrupted GFP silencing in tobacco, coincident with visible symptoms, whereas some attenuated strains of ToMV (L(11) and L(11)A strains) failed to suppress GFP silencing. Analyses of recombinant viruses containing the L and L(11)A strains revealed that a single base change in the replicase gene, which causes an amino acid substitution, is responsible for the symptomless and suppressor-defective phenotypes of the attenuated strains. An agroinfiltration assay indicated that the 130K replication protein acts as a PTGS suppressor. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of 21 to 25 nucleotides accumulated during ToMV infection, suggesting that the major target of the ToMV-encoded suppressor is downstream from the production of siRNAs in the PTGS pathway. Analysis with GFP-tagged recombinant viruses revealed that the suppressor inhibits the establishment of the ToMV-targeted PTGS system in the inoculated leaves but does not detectably suppress the activity of the preexisting, sequence-specific PTGS machinery there. Taken together, these results indicate that it is likely that the ToMV-encoded suppressor, the 130K replication protein, blocks the utilization of silencing-associated small RNAs, so that a homology-dependent RNA degradation machinery is not newly formed. PMID:14512550

  6. Mosaic protein and nucleic acid vaccines against hepatitis C virus

    DOEpatents

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette T. M.; Kuiken, Carla L.; Fischer, William M.

    2013-06-11

    The invention relates to immunogenic compositions useful as HCV vaccines. Provided are HCV mosaic polypeptide and nucleic acid compositions which provide higher levels of T-cell epitope coverage while minimizing the occurrence of unnatural and rare epitopes compared to natural HCV polypeptides and consensus HCV sequences.

  7. First report of Potato virus V and Peru tomato mosaic virus on tamarillo (Solanum betaceum) orchards of Ecuador

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Ecuador, tamarillo (Solanum betaceum) represents an important cash crop for hundreds of small farmers. In 2013, leaves from tamarillo plants showing severe virus-like symptoms (mosaic, mottling and leaf deformation) were collected from old orchards in Pichincha and Tungurahua. Double-stranded RN...

  8. Baculovirus expressed virus-like particles of Pea eation mosaic virus vary in size and encapsidate baculovirus mRNAs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV: family Luteoviridae) is transmitted in a persistent, circulative manner by aphids. We inserted cDNAs encoding the structural proteins of PEMV, the coat protein (CP) and coat protein-read through domain (CPRT) into the genome of the baculovirus Autographa californica m...

  9. Identification of distinct functions of Wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein in virion assembly and virus movement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is the type member of Tritimovirus genus of the family Potyviridae. The WSMV coat protein (CP) was subjected to point and deletion mutation analyses. WSMV mutants changing aspartic acid residues at amino acid (aa) positions 289, 290, 326, 333, and 334 to alanine elic...

  10. Studies on the mechanism of assembly of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, T M; Scheele, R B; Adams, M L; Shire, S J; Steckert, J J; Potschka, M

    1980-01-01

    Sedimentation and proton binding studies on the endothermic self-association of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) protein indicate that the so-called "20S" sedimenting protein is an interaction system involving at least the 34-subunit two-turn yield cylindrical disk aggregate and the 49-subunit three-turn helical rod. The pH dependence of this overall equilibrium suggests that disk formation is proton-linked through the binding of protons to the two-turn helix which is not present as significant concentrations near pH 7. There is a temperature-induced intramolecular conformation change in the protein leading to a difference spectrum which is complete in 5 x 10(-6) s at pH 7 and 20 degrees C and is dominated at 300 nm by tryptophan residues. Kinetics measurements of protein polymerization, from 10(-6) to 10(3) s, reveal three relaxation processes at pH 7.0, 20 degrees C, 0.10 M ionic strength K (H) PO4. The fastest relaxation time is a few milliseconds and represents reactions within the 4S protein distribution. The second fastest relaxation is 50-100 x 10(-3) s and represents elementary polymerization steps involved in the formation of the approximately 20 S protein. Analysis of the slowest relaxation, approximately 5 x 10(4) s, suggests that this very slow formation of approximately 20 S protein may be dominated by some first order process in the overall dissociation of approximately 20S protein. Sedimentation measurements of the rate of TMV reconstitution, under the same conditions, show by direct measurements of 4S and approximately 20S incorporation at various 4S to approximately 20S weight ratios that the relative rate of approximately 20S incorporation decreases almost linearly, from 0 to 50% 4S. There appears to be one or more regions of TMV-RNA, approximately 1-1.5 kilobases long, which incorporates approximately 20S protein exclusively. Solutions of approximately 95-100% approximately 20S protein have been prepared for the first time and used for reconstitution

  11. Characterization of a Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) isolate in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Liang; Pennerman, Kayla K; Wang, Hongxing; Yin, Guohua

    2016-03-01

    Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), a causal agent of the destructive sugarcane mosaic disease, has a global presence. An isolate of SrMV infecting a commercially-grown sugarcane plant was recovered from the Hainan province of China. The virions were visualized by an electron microscope, and the coat proteins (CPs) were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry. Discrepancies between the CP predicted and actual amino acid sequences were noted, which confounded the phylogenetic assignment of the isolate. The apparent variations may have physiological effects on the pathogenicity and virulence of SrMV. PMID:26981005

  12. Complete genome sequence of keunjorong mosaic virus, a potyvirus from Cynanchum wilfordii.

    PubMed

    Nam, Moon; Lee, Joo-Hee; Choi, Hong Soo; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Moon, Jae Sun; Lee, Su-Heon

    2013-08-01

    We have determined the complete genome sequence of keunjorong mosaic virus (KjMV). The KjMV genome is composed of 9,611 nucleotides, excluding the 3'-terminal poly(A) tail. It contains two open reading frames (ORFs), with the large one encoding a polyprotein of 3,070 amino acids and the small overlapping ORF encoding a PIPO protein of 81 amino acids. The KjMV genome shared the highest nucleotide sequence identity (57.5  %) with pepper mottle virus and freesia mosaic virus, two members of the genus Potyvirus. Based on the phylogenetic relatedness to known potyviruses, KjMV appears to be a member of a new species in the genus Potyvirus. PMID:23504105

  13. Classification of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) infected watermelon seeds using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoonsoo; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2016-05-01

    The Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus (CGMMV) is a globally distributed plant virus. CGMMV-infected plants exhibit severe mosaic symptoms, discoloration, and deformation. Therefore, rapid and early detection of CGMMV infected seeds is very important for preventing disease damage and yield losses. Raman spectroscopy was investigated in this study as a potential tool for rapid, accurate, and nondestructive detection of infected seeds. Raman spectra of healthy and infected seeds were acquired in the 400 cm-1 to 1800 cm-1 wavenumber range and an algorithm based on partial least-squares discriminant analysis was developed to classify infected and healthy seeds. The classification model's accuracies for calibration and prediction data sets were 100% and 86%, respectively. Results showed that the Raman spectroscopic technique has good potential for nondestructive detection of virus-infected seeds.

  14. Controlled immobilisation of active enzymes on the cowpea mosaic virus capsid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2012-08-01

    Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX) via covalent attachment of modified enzyme carbohydrate to the exterior of the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsid gave high retention of enzymatic activity. The number of enzymes bound per virus was determined to be about eleven for HRP and 2-3 for GOX. This illustrates that relatively large biomacromolecules can be readily coupled to the virus surface using simple conjugation strategies. Virus-biomacromolecule hybrids have great potential for uses in catalysis, diagnostic assays or biosensors.Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX) via covalent attachment of modified enzyme carbohydrate to the exterior of the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsid gave high retention of enzymatic activity. The number of enzymes bound per virus was determined to be about eleven for HRP and 2-3 for GOX. This illustrates that relatively large biomacromolecules can be readily coupled to the virus surface using simple conjugation strategies. Virus-biomacromolecule hybrids have great potential for uses in catalysis, diagnostic assays or biosensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Alternative conjugation strategies, agarose gel electrophoresis of CPMV and CPMV-HRP conjugates, UV-vis spectrum of HRP-ADHCPMV, agarose gel electrophoresis of GOX-ADHCPMV particles and corresponding TEM image, calibration curves for HRP-ADHCPMV and GOX-ADHCPMV, DLS data for GOX-ADHCPMV are made available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31485a

  15. Deep sequencing of dsRNAs recovered from mosaic-diseased pigeonpea reveals the presence of a novel emaravirus: pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus 2.

    PubMed

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Digiaro, Michele; Uppala, Mangala; Sudini, Harikishan

    2015-08-01

    Deep-sequencing analysis of double-stranded RNA extracted from a mosaic-diseased pigeonpea plant (Cajanus cajan L., family Fabaceae) revealed the complete sequence of six emaravirus-like negative-sense RNA segments of 7009, 2229, 1335, 1491, 1833 and 1194 nucleotides in size. In the order from RNA1 to RNA6, these genomic RNAs contained ORFs coding for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, p1 of 266 kDa), the glycoprotein precursor (GP, p2 of 74.5 kDa), the nucleocapsid (NC, p3 of 34.9 kDa), and the putative movement protein (MP, p4 of 40.7 kDa), while p5 (55 kDa) and p6 (27 kDa) had unknown functions. All RNA segments showed distant relationships to viruses of the genus Emaravirus, and in particular to pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus (PPSMV), with which they shared nucleotide sequence identity ranging from 48.5 % (RNA3) to 62.5 % (RNA1). In phylogenetic trees constructed from the sequences of the proteins encoded by RNA1, RNA2 and RNA3 (p1, p2 and p3), this new viral entity showed a consistent grouping with fig mosaic virus (FMV) and rose rosette virus (RRV), which formed a cluster of their own, clearly distinct from PPSMV-1. In experimental greenhouse trials, this novel virus was successfully transmitted to pigeonpea and French bean seedlings by the eriophyid mite Aceria cajani. Preliminary surveys conducted in the Hyderabad region (India) showed that the virus in question is widespread in pigeonpea plants affected by sterility mosaic disease (86.4 %) but is absent in symptomless plants. Based on molecular, biological and epidemiological features, this novel virus is the second emaravirus infecting pigeonpea, for which the provisional name pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus 2 (PPSMV-2) is proposed. PMID:26060057

  16. Crystal Structure and Proteomics Analysis of Empty Virus-like Particles of Cowpea Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Nhung T; Hesketh, Emma L; Saxena, Pooja; Meshcheriakova, Yulia; Ku, You-Chan; Hoang, Linh T; Johnson, John E; Ranson, Neil A; Lomonossoff, George P; Reddy, Vijay S

    2016-04-01

    Empty virus-like particles (eVLPs) of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) are currently being utilized as reagents in various biomedical and nanotechnology applications. Here, we report the crystal structure of CPMV eVLPs determined using X-ray crystallography at 2.3 Å resolution and compare it with previously reported cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) of eVLPs and virion crystal structures. Although the X-ray and cryo-EM structures of eVLPs are mostly similar, there exist significant differences at the C terminus of the small (S) subunit. The intact C terminus of the S subunit plays a critical role in enabling the efficient assembly of CPMV virions and eVLPs, but undergoes proteolysis after particle formation. In addition, we report the results of mass spectrometry-based proteomics analysis of coat protein subunits from CPMV eVLPs and virions that identify the C termini of S subunits undergo proteolytic cleavages at multiple sites instead of a single cleavage site as previously observed. PMID:27021160

  17. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic...

  18. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic...

  2. Pepino mosaic virus genotype shift in North America and rapid genotype identification using loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic, once an emerging disease a decade ago, has become endemic on greenhouse tomatoes worldwide in recent years. Three distinct genotypes of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), including EU, US1 and CH2 have been recognized. Our earlier study in 2006-2007 demonstrated a predominant EU genotype ...

  3. Biological activities of hybrid RNAs generated by 3'-end exchanges between tobacco mosaic and brome mosaic viruses.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, M; Kroner, P; Ahlquist, P; Meshi, T

    1991-07-01

    Sequences within the conserved, aminoacylatable 3' noncoding regions of brome mosaic virus (BMV) genomic RNAs 1, 2, and 3 direct initiation of negative-strand synthesis by BMV polymerase extracts and, like sequences at the structurally divergent but aminoacylatable 3' end of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA, are required in cis for RNA replication in vivo. A series of chimeric RNAs in which selected 3' segments were exchanged between the tyrosine-accepting BMV and histidine-accepting TMV RNAs were constructed and their amplification was examined in protoplasts inoculated with or without other BMV and TMV RNAs. TMV derivatives whose 3' noncoding region was replaced by sequences from BMV RNA3 were independently replication competent when the genes for the TMV 130,000-M(r) and 180,000-M(r) replication factors remained intact. TMV replicase can thus utilize the BMV-derived 3' end, though at lower efficiency than the wild-type (wt) TMV 3' end. Providing functional BMV RNA replicase by coinoculation with BMV genomic RNAs 1 and 2 did not improve the amplification of these hybrid genomic RNAs. By contrast, BMV RNA3 derivatives carrying the 3' noncoding region of TMV were not amplified when coinoculated with wt BMV RNA1 and RNA2, wt TMV RNA, or all three. Thus, BMV replicase appeared to be unable to utilize the TMV 3' end, and there was no evidence of intervirus complementation in the replication of any of the hybrid RNAs. In protoplasts coinoculated with BMV RNA1 and RNA2, the nonamplifiable RNA3 derivatives bearing TMV 3' sequences gave rise to diverse new rearranged or recombined RNA species that were amplifiable. PMID:2041076

  4. Humans Have Antibodies against a Plant Virus: Evidence from Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruolan; Vaishnav, Radhika A.; Roberts, Andrew M.; Friedland, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a widespread plant pathogen, is found in tobacco (including cigarettes and smokeless tobacco) as well as in many other plants. Plant viruses do not replicate or cause infection in humans or other mammals. This study was done to determine whether exposure to tobacco products induces an immune response to TMV in humans. Using a sandwich ELISA assay, we detected serum anti-TMV antibodies (IgG, IgG1, IgG3, IgG4, IgA, and IgM) in all subjects enrolled in the study (20 healthy smokers, 20 smokeless-tobacco users, and 20 non-smokers). Smokers had a higher level of serum anti-TMV IgG antibodies than non-smokers, while the serum level of anti-TMV IgA from smokeless tobacco users was lower than smokers and non-smokers. Using bioinformatics, we also found that the human protein TOMM40L (an outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog – like translocase) contains a strong homology of six contiguous amino acids to the TMV coat protein, and TOMM40L peptide exhibited cross-reactivity with anti-TMV antibodies. People who smoke cigarettes or other tobacco products experience a lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, but the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. Our results showing molecular mimicry between TMV and human TOMM40L raise the question as to whether TMV has a potential role in smokers against Parkinson’s disease development. The potential mechanisms of molecular mimicry between plant viruses and human disease should be further explored. PMID:23573274

  5. The first complete genome sequence of iris severe mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Deng, Congliang; Shang, Qiaoxia; Zhao, Xiaoli; Liu, Xingliang; Zhou, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The first complete genome sequence of ISMV was determined by deep sequencing of a small RNA library constructed from ISMV-infected samples and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR. The ISMV genome consists of 10,403 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and contains a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3316 amino acids. Putative proteolytic cleavage sites were identified by BLAST analysis. The ISMV polyprotein showed highest amino acid sequence identity to that encoded by onion yellow dwarf virus. Phylogenetic analysis of the polyprotein amino acid sequence confirmed that ISMV forms a cluster with shallot yellow stripe virus, Cyrtanthus elatus virus A, narcissus degeneration virus and onion yellow dwarf virus. These results confirm that ISMV is a distinct member of the genus Potyvirus. PMID:26729478

  6. Comparative analysis of chrysanthemum transcriptome in response to three RNA viruses: Cucumber mosaic virus, Tomato spotted wilt virus and Potato virus X.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoseong; Jo, Yeonhwa; Lian, Sen; Jo, Kyoung-Min; Chu, Hyosub; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Kook; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-06-01

    The chrysanthemum is one of popular flowers in the world and a host for several viruses. So far, molecular interaction studies between the chrysanthemum and viruses are limited. In this study, we carried out a transcriptome analysis of chrysanthemum in response to three different viruses including Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Potato virus X (PVX). A chrysanthemum 135K microarray derived from expressed sequence tags was successfully applied for the expression profiles of the chrysanthemum at early stage of virus infection. Finally, we identified a total of 125, 70 and 124 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for CMV, TSWV and PVX, respectively. Many DEGs were virus specific; however, 33 DEGs were commonly regulated by three viruses. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis identified a total of 132 GO terms, and of them, six GO terms related stress response and MCM complex were commonly identified for three viruses. Several genes functioning in stress response such as chitin response and ethylene mediated signaling pathway were up-regulated indicating their involvement in establishment of host immune system. In particular, TSWV infection significantly down-regulated genes related to DNA metabolic process including DNA replication, chromatin organization, histone modification and cytokinesis, and they are mostly targeted to nucleosome and MCM complex. Taken together, our comparative transcriptome analysis revealed several genes related to hormone mediated viral stress response and DNA modification. The identified chrysanthemums genes could be good candidates for further functional study associated with resistant to various plant viruses. PMID:25904110

  7. Complete nucleotide sequence and experimental host range of Okra mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Dirk; Siddiqua, Mahbuba; Ta Hoang, Anh; Engelmann, Jill; Winter, Stephan; Maiss, Edgar

    2008-02-01

    Okra mosaic virus (OkMV) is a tymovirus infecting members of the family Malvaceae. Early infections in okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) lead to yield losses of 12-19.5%. Besides intensive biological characterizations of OkMV only minor molecular data were available. Therefore, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of a Nigerian isolate of OkMV. The complete genomic RNA (gRNA) comprises 6,223 nt and its genome organization showed three major ORFs coding for a putative movement protein (MP) of M r 73.1 kDa, a large replication-associated protein (RP) of M r 202.4 kDa and a coat protein (CP) of M r 19.6 kDa. Prediction of secondary RNA structures showed three hairpin structures with internal loops in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and a 3'-terminal tRNA-like structure (TLS) which comprises the anticodon for valine, typical for a member of the genus Tymovirus. Phylogenetic comparisons based on the RP, MP and CP amino acid sequences showed the close relationship of OkMV not only to other completely sequenced tymoviruses like Kennedya yellow mosaic virus (KYMV), Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) and Erysimum latent virus (ErLV), but also to Calopogonium yellow vein virus (CalYVV), Clitoria yellow vein virus (CYVV) and Desmodium yellow mottle virus (DYMoV). This is the first report of a complete OkMV genome sequence from one of the various OkMV isolates originating from West Africa described so far. Additionally, the experimental host range of OkMV including several Nicotiana species was determined. PMID:18049886

  8. Seed-borne nature of a begomovirus, Mung bean yellow mosaic virus in black gram.

    PubMed

    Kothandaraman, Satya Vijayalakshmi; Devadason, Alice; Ganesan, Malathi Varagur

    2016-02-01

    The yellow mosaic viruses (YMV) infecting legumes are considered to be the most devastating begomoviruses as they incite considerable yield loss. The yellow discoloration of pods and seeds of infected plants and symptom emergence in the very first trifoliate leaf of the plants in the field were suggestive that the virus may be seed borne, which was investigated in the present study. The distribution of the virus in various parts of the seeds of black gram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper) plants naturally infected in the field was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blot analysis, and sequencing. Nucleotide sequencing of the PCR amplicons from the seed parts from groups of ten seeds revealed the presence of mung bean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) in the seed coat, cotyledon, and embryonic axes. The presence of virion particles was confirmed through double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) and immunosorbent electron microscopy (ISEM) even in a single whole seed. In confocal microscopy, positive fluorescent signals were obtained using coat protein gene-specific primers in the embryonic axes. However, in the growth tests performed with the same batch of seeds, there was no symptom development in the seedlings though the virus (both DNA A and B components) was detected in 32 % of tested seedlings. In this study, the MYMV was detected in seed coat, cotyledon, and embryo. This study revealed that the MYMV is a seed-borne virus. PMID:26646557

  9. Expression, purification and molecular modeling of the NIa protease of Cardamom mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jebasingh, T; Pandaranayaka, Eswari P J; Mahalakshmi, A; Kasin Yadunandam, A; Krishnaswamy, S; Usha, R

    2013-01-01

    The NIa protease of Potyviridae is the major viral protease that processes potyviral polyproteins. The NIa protease coding region of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) is amplified from the viral cDNA, cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. NIa protease forms inclusion bodies in E.coli. The inclusion bodies are solubilized with 8 M urea, refolded and purified by Nickel-Nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. Three-dimensional modeling of the CdMV NIa protease is achieved by threading approach using the homologous X-ray crystallographic structure of Tobacco etch mosaic virus NIa protease. The model gave an insight in to the substrate specificities of the NIa proteases and predicted the complementation of nearby residues in the catalytic triad (H42, D74 and C141) mutants in the cis protease activity of CdMV NIa protease. PMID:22888800

  10. Cofolding organizes alfalfa mosaic virus RNA and coat protein for replication.

    PubMed

    Guogas, Laura M; Filman, David J; Hogle, James M; Gehrke, Lee

    2004-12-17

    Alfalfa mosaic virus genomic RNAs are infectious only when the viral coat protein binds to the RNA 3' termini. The crystal structure of an alfalfa mosaic virus RNA-peptide complex reveals that conserved AUGC repeats and Pro-Thr-x-Arg-Ser-x-x-Tyr coat protein amino acids cofold upon interacting. Alternating AUGC residues have opposite orientation, and they base pair in different adjacent duplexes. Localized RNA backbone reversals stabilized by arginine-guanine interactions place the adenosines and guanines in reverse order in the duplex. The results suggest that a uniform, organized 3' conformation, similar to that found on viral RNAs with transfer RNA-like ends, may be essential for replication. PMID:15604410

  11. Biological and molecular characterization of a highly divergent johnsongrass mosaic virus isolate from Pennisetum purpureum.

    PubMed

    Silva, Karina N; Melo, Fernando L; Orílio, Anelise F; Nagata, Tatsuya; Silva, Marilia S; Fernandes, Celso D; Fragoso, Rodrigo R; Dessaune, Suelen N; Resende, Renato O

    2016-07-01

    The complete genome sequence (9,865 nucleotides) of a highly divergent johnsongrass mosaic virus isolate (JGMV-CNPGL) was determined using Illumina sequencing. This isolate infected 10 genotypes of gramineous plants including maize. A comparative analysis of the complete genome showed 80 % nucleotide (nt) sequence identity (86 % amino acid (aa) sequence identity) to a johnsongrass mosaic virus isolate from Australia. The coat protein (CP) identity values, however, were lower than those for the whole genome (78 % and 80 % for nt and aa, respectively) and were close to the species demarcation values (77 % nt and 80 % aa). Unexpectedly, the amino-terminal portion of CP of JGMV-CNPGL showed only 38 % sequence identity to other JGMV isolates. The biological implications of this sequence divergence remain to be elucidated. PMID:27101070

  12. Analysis of barley stripe mosaic virus nucleoprotein complex and triple gene block protein interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) genome contains three movement proteins encoded in an overlapping triple gene block (TGB). The TGB1 (58 kDa), TGB2 (14 kDa), and TGB3 (17 kDa) proteins are each required for cell-to-cell movement of BSMV, and TGB1 binds to ssRNA and dsRNA. We have now isolated a...

  13. Site-selective nucleation and controlled growth of gold nanostructures in tobacco mosaic virus nanotubulars.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Jianting; Wang, Qiangbin

    2015-06-01

    Site-selective biomineralization of Au nanostructures in the interior channel of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) is achieved by mutating threonine 103 in TMV to cysteine (T103C-TMV) to introduce the strong coordination interaction between the arrayed sulfhydryl ligands and gold species. By finely tuning the reaction conditions, Au nanoparticle chains and Au nanorods are successfully and exclusively synthesized inside the T103C-TMV nanotubes. PMID:25612918

  14. Impact of phytopathogen infection and extreme weather stress on internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Ge, Chongtao; Lee, Cheonghoon; Nangle, Ed; Li, Jianrong; Gardner, David; Kleinhenz, Matthew; Lee, Jiyoung

    2014-01-01

    Internalization of human pathogens, common in many types of fresh produce, is a threat to human health since the internalized pathogens cannot be fully inactivated/removed by washing with water or sanitizers. Given that pathogen internalization can be affected by many environmental factors, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of two types of plant stress on the internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in iceberg lettuce during pre-harvest. The stresses were: abiotic (water stress induced by extreme weather events) and biotic (phytopathogen infection by lettuce mosaic virus [LMV]). Lettuce with and without LMV infection were purposefully contaminated with green fluorescence protein-labeled S. Typhimurium on the leaf surfaces. Lettuce was also subjected to water stress conditions (drought and storm) which were simulated by irrigating with different amounts of water. The internalized S. Typhimurium in the different parts of the lettuce were quantified by plate count and real-time quantitative PCR and confirmed with a laser scanning confocal microscope. Salmonella internalization occurred under the conditions outlined above; however internalization levels were not significantly affected by water stress alone. In contrast, the extent of culturable S. Typhimurium internalized in the leafy part of the lettuce decreased when infected with LMV under water stress conditions and contaminated with high levels of S. Typhimurium. On the other hand, LMV-infected lettuce showed a significant increase in the levels of culturable bacteria in the roots. In conclusion, internalization was observed under all experimental conditions when the lettuce surface was contaminated with S. Typhimurium. However, the extent of internalization was only affected by water stress when lettuce was infected with LMV. PMID:24220663

  15. Characteristics of a strong promoter from figwort mosaic virus: comparison with the analogous 35S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus and the regulated mannopine synthase promoter.

    PubMed

    Sanger, M; Daubert, S; Goodman, R M

    1990-03-01

    A segment of DNA from the genome of figwort mosaic virus (FMV) strain M3 possesses promoter activity when tested in electroporated protoplasts from, and transgenic plants of, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc. The 1.1 kb DNA segment, designated the '34S' promoter, is derived from a position on the FMV genome comparable to the position on the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) genome containing the 35S promoter. The 34S and 35S promoters show approximately 63% nucleotide homology in the TATA, CCACT, and -18 to +1 domains, but in sequences further upstream the homology drops below 50%. Promoter activities were estimated using beta-glucuronidase and neomycin phosphotransferase II reporter gene systems. The activity of the 34S promoter segment approximates that of the 35S promoter in both protoplast transient expression assays and in stably transformed tobacco plants. Truncation of 5' sequences from the 34S promoter indicates that promoter strength depends upon DNA sequences located several hundred nucleotides upstream from the TATA box. In leaf tissue the 34S promoter is 20-fold more active than the mannopine synthase (MAS) promoter from Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA. The 34S promoter lacks the root-specific and wound-stimulated expression of the MAS promoter, showing relatively uniform root, stem, leaf, and floral activities. PMID:2102823

  16. The oligomeric Rep protein of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a likely replicative helicase

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Malik, Punjab Singh; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Kaliappan, Kosalai; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Geminiviruses replicate by rolling circle mode of replication (RCR) and the viral Rep protein initiates RCR by the site-specific nicking at a conserved nonamer (TAATATT↓ AC) sequence. The mechanism of subsequent steps of the replication process, e.g. helicase activity to drive fork-elongation, etc. has largely remained obscure. Here we show that Rep of a geminivirus, namely, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), acts as a replicative helicase. The Rep-helicase, requiring ≥6 nt space for its efficient activity, translocates in the 3′→5′ direction, and the presence of forked junction in the substrate does not influence the activity to any great extent. Rep forms a large oligomeric complex and the helicase activity is dependent on the oligomeric conformation (∼24mer). The role of Rep as a replicative helicase has been demonstrated through ex vivo studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in planta analyses in Nicotiana tabacum. We also establish that such helicase activity is not confined to the MYMIV system alone, but is also true with at least two other begomoviruses, viz., Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) and Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV). PMID:17142233

  17. Guanylylation-competent replication proteins of Tomato mosaic virus are disulfide-linked.

    PubMed

    Nishikiori, Masaki; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2012-12-01

    The 130-kDa and 180-kDa replication proteins of Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) covalently bind guanylate and transfer it to the 5' end of RNA to form a cap. We found that guanylylation-competent ToMV replication proteins are in membrane-bound, disulfide-linked complexes. Guanylylation-competent replication proteins of Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus behaved similarly. To investigate the roles of disulfide bonding in the functioning of ToMV replication proteins, each of the 19 cysteine residues in the 130-kDa protein was replaced by a serine residue. Interestingly, three mutant proteins (C179S, C186S and C581S) failed not only to be guanylylated, but also to bind to the replication template and membranes. These mutants could trans-complement viral RNA replication. Considering that ToMV replication proteins recognize the replication templates, bind membranes, and are guanylylated in the cytoplasm that provides a reducing condition, we discuss the roles of cysteine residues and disulfide bonds in ToMV RNA replication. PMID:23062762

  18. Deep sequencing of pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus discloses five RNA segments related to emaraviruses.

    PubMed

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Digiaro, Michele; Uppala, Mangala; Sudini, Harikishan

    2014-08-01

    The sequences of five viral RNA segments of pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus (PPSMV), the agent of sterility mosaic disease (SMD) of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan, Fabaceae), were determined using the deep sequencing technology. Each of the five RNAs encodes a single protein on the negative-sense strand with an open reading frame (ORF) of 6885, 1947, 927, 1086, and 1,422 nts, respectively. In order, from RNA1 to RNA5, these ORFs encode the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (p1, 267.9 kDa), a putative glycoprotein precursor (p2, 74.3 kDa), a putative nucleocapsid protein (p3, 34.6 kDa), a putative movement protein (p4, 40.8 kDa), while p5 (55 kDa) has an unknown function. All RNA segments of PPSMV showed the highest identity with orthologs of fig mosaic virus (FMV) and Rose rosette virus (RRV). In phylogenetic trees constructed with the amino acid sequences of p1, p2 and p3, PPSMV clustered consistently with other emaraviruses, close to clades comprising members of other genera of the family Bunyaviridae. Based on the molecular characteristics unveiled in this study and the morphological and epidemiological features similar to other emaraviruses, PPSMV seems to be the seventh species to join the list of emaraviruses known to date and accordingly, its classification in the genus Emaravirus seems now legitimate. PMID:24685674

  19. Transcriptome Analysis of Nicotiana tabacum Infected by Cucumber mosaic virus during Systemic Symptom Development

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jun; Chen, Ling-Na; Qiu, Yan-Hong; Li, Gui-Fen; Meng, Xiao-Hua; Zhu, Shui-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Virus infection of plants may induce a variety of disease symptoms. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of systemic symptom development in infected plants. Here we performed the first next-generation sequencing study to identify gene expression changes associated with disease development in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc) induced by infection with the M strain of Cucumber mosaic virus (M-CMV). Analysis of the tobacco transcriptome by RNA-Seq identified 95,916 unigenes, 34,408 of which were new transcripts by database searches. Deep sequencing was subsequently used to compare the digital gene expression (DGE) profiles of the healthy plants with the infected plants at six sequential disease development stages, including vein clearing, mosaic, severe chlorosis, partial and complete recovery, and secondary mosaic. Thousands of differentially expressed genes were identified, and KEGG pathway analysis of these genes suggested that many biological processes, such as photosynthesis, pigment metabolism and plant-pathogen interaction, were involved in systemic symptom development. Our systematic analysis provides comprehensive transcriptomic information regarding systemic symptom development in virus-infected plants. This information will help further our understanding of the detailed mechanisms of plant responses to viral infection. PMID:22952684

  20. Coassembly of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Proteins into Nanotubes with Uniform Length and Improved Physical Stability.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kun; Eiben, Sabine; Wang, Qiangbin

    2016-06-01

    Using tobacco mosaic virus coat proteins (TMVcp) from both sources of the plant and bacterial expression systems as building blocks, we demonstrate here a coassembly strategy of TMV nanotubes in the presence of RNA. Specifically, plant-expressed cp (cpp) efficiently dominates the genomic RNA encapsidation to determine the length of assembled TMV nanotubes, whereas the incorporated Escherichia coli-expressed cp (cpec) improves the physical stability of TMV nanotubes by introducing disulfide bonds between the interfaces of subunits. We expect this coassembly strategy can be expanded to other virus nanomaterials to obtain desired properties based on rationally designed protein-RNA and protein-protein interfacial interactions. PMID:27188634

  1. Genetic diversity and molecular evolution of arabis mosaic virus based on the CP gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fangluan; Lin, Wuzhen; Shen, Jianguo; Liao, Furong

    2016-04-01

    Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV) is a virus with a wide host range. In this study, the genetic diversity of ArMV and the molecular mechanisms underlying its evolution were investigated using the coat protein (CP) sequence. Of the 33 ArMV isolates studied, three were found to be recombinants. The other 30 recombination-free ArMV isolates could be separated into two major lineages with a significant F ST value (0.384) and tended to cluster according to their geographical origin. Different evolutionary constraints were detected for the two linages, pointing to a role of natural selection in the differentiation of ArMV. PMID:26758729

  2. Expression and immunological characterization of cardamom mosaic virus coat protein displaying HIV gp41 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Damodharan, Subha; Gujar, Ravindra; Pattabiraman, Sathyamurthy; Nesakumar, Manohar; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Vadakkuppattu, Ramanathan D; Usha, Ramakrishnan

    2013-05-01

    The coat protein of cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus, assembles into virus-like particles when expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. The N and C-termini of the coat protein were engineered with the Kennedy peptide and the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes of gp41 of HIV. The chimeric proteins reacted with sera from HIV positive persons and also stimulated secretion of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these persons. Thus, a system based on the coat protein of CdMV can be used to display HIV-1 antigens. PMID:23668610

  3. Complete genome sequence of yam chlorotic necrotic mosaic virus from Dioscorea parviflora.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengyuan; Peng, Jiejun; Guo, Huachun; Chen, Jianping; Chen, Suiyun; Wang, Jianguang

    2016-06-01

    The complete genome sequence of yam chlorotic necrotic mosaic virus (YCNMV) was determined. It is a monopartite ssRNA 8208 nucleotides in length (excluding the poly(A) tail) and encoding a polyprotein of 2622 amino acids. Sequence analysis showed that the P1 region and some conserved motifs, such as the typical potyvirus aphid-transmission motifs DAG, PTK and KITC, are absent. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete polyprotein sequences of YCNMV and selected members of the family Potyviridae clearly showed that this virus should be assigned to the genus Macluravirus and suggest that YCNMV is a new member of the genus Macluravirus. PMID:26973231

  4. Detection and Identification of Dasheen mosaic virus Infecting Colocasia esculenta in India.

    PubMed

    Babu, Binoy; Hegde, Vinayaka; Makeshkumar, T; Jeeva, M L

    2011-06-01

    Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of the infected leaf samples of Colocasia esculenta plants showing severe whitish feathery symptoms were carried out using Potyvirus group specific primers, resulting in an amplicon of 327 bp, encoding the core region of the coat protein gene. Sequencing and BLAST analysis showed that the virus is distinct, closely related to Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV). Sequence analysis revealed 86 and 96% identity at the nucleotide and amino acid level respectively with the DsMV isolate SY1(accession Number AJ628756). This is the first molecular level characterisation of the DsMV infecting C. esculenta in India. PMID:23637503

  5. Completion of the nucleotide sequence of sunn-hemp mosaic virus: a tobamovirus pathogenic to legumes.

    PubMed

    Silver, S; Quan, S; Deom, C M

    1996-01-01

    Sunn-hemp mosaic virus (SHMV) is a member of the tobamovirus group of plant viruses. The nucleotide sequence of the 5'-untranslated region, the 129 kD protein gene, and a portion of the 186 kD protein gene of SHMV was determined. The 4,683 nucleotides (nts) reported here completes the sequence of the SHMV genome and complements previous work (Meshi, Ohno, and Okada, Nucleic Acids Res. 10, 6111-6117 [1982]; Mol. Gen. Genet. 184, 20-25 [1981]) to provide the first complete nucleotide sequence for a tobamovirus that is pathogenic to leguminous plants. PMID:8938983

  6. Evidence for Possible Flexoelectricity in Tobacco Mosaic Viruses Used as Nanotemplates

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen; Liu, W. L.; Balandin, A. A.

    2006-01-01

    Electromechanical coupling in individual tobacco mosaic viruses has been studied using piezoresponse force microscopy. Possible origins of the observed high resolution contrast, including the topographic crosstalk, difference in the elastic properties, and the intrinsic electromechanical coupling due to the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects are discussed. Using simple estimates, we argue that, due in part to the small size and high symmetry of this particular material system, flexoelectric coupling can dominate the observed electromechanical behavior. The electrical manipulation of the virus particles, essential for nanoelectronic applications for which they are proposed, has also been demonstrated.

  7. Genome organization and host range of a Brazilian isolate of johnsongrass mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Camelo-García, Viviana Marcela; da Silva Andrade, Sónia Cristina; Geering, Andrew D W; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Rezende, Jorge A M

    2016-05-01

    This work reports the complete genome sequence, production of a polyclonal antiserum, and host range of a Brazilian strain of johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV) found infecting Panicum maximum in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The complete genome sequence of this potyvirus, comprising 9874 nucleotides, showed 82 % amino acid sequence identity in the polyprotein to that of an isolate of JGMV from Australia. The experimental host range of this virus included mainly fodder species. Cultivated species such as rice, oats, sugarcane, rye, corn and wheat were not infected, suggesting that current isolates of this potyvirus do not represent a threat to these crops in Brazil. PMID:26869279

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of red clover necrotic mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Stanton L.; Guenther, Richard H.; Sit, Tim L.; Swartz, Paul D.; Meilleur, Flora; Lommel, Steven A.; Rose, Robert B.

    2010-11-12

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) is a species that belongs to the Tombusviridae family of plant viruses with a T = 3 icosahedral capsid. RCNMV virions were purified and were crystallized for X-ray analysis using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Self-rotation functions and systematic absences identified the space group as I23, with two virions in the unit cell. The crystals diffracted to better than 4 {angstrom} resolution but were very radiation-sensitive, causing rapid decay of the high-resolution reflections. The data were processed to 6 {angstrom} in the analysis presented here.

  9. Tobacco mosaic virus 126-kDa protein increases the susceptibility of Nicotiana tabacum to other viruses and its dosage affects virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Harries, Phillip A; Palanichelvam, Karuppaiah; Bhat, Sumana; Nelson, Richard S

    2008-12-01

    The Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) 126-kDa protein is a suppressor of RNA silencing previously shown to delay the silencing of transgenes in Nicotiana tabacum and N. benthamiana. Here, we demonstrate that expression of a 126-kDa protein-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion (126-GFP) in N. tabacum increases susceptibility to a broad assortment of viruses, including Alfalfa mosaic virus, Brome mosaic virus, Tobacco rattle virus (TRV), and Potato virus X. Given its ability to enhance TRV infection in tobacco, we tested the effect of 126-GFP expression on TRV-mediated virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and demonstrate that this protein can enhance silencing phenotypes. To explain these results, we examined the poorly understood effect of suppressor dosage on the VIGS response and demonstrated that enhanced VIGS corresponds to the presence of low levels of suppressor protein. A mutant version of the 126-kDa protein, inhibited in its ability to suppress silencing, had a minimal effect on VIGS, suggesting that the suppressor activity of the 126-kDa protein is indeed responsible for the observed dosage effects. These findings illustrate the sensitivity of host plants to relatively small changes in suppressor dosage and have implications for those interested in enhancing silencing phenotypes in tobacco and other species through VIGS. PMID:18986250

  10. Novel Inter-Subunit Contacts in Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus Revealed by Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Clare, Daniel Kofi; Pechnikova, Eugenia V.; Skurat, Eugene V.; Makarov, Valentin V.; Sokolova, Olga S.; Solovyev, Andrey G.; Orlova, Elena V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV, genus Hordeivirus) is a rod-shaped single-stranded RNA virus similar to viruses of the structurally characterized and well-studied genus Tobamovirus. Here we report the first high-resolution structure of BSMV at 4.1 Å obtained by cryo-electron microscopy. We discovered that BSMV forms two types of virion that differ in the number of coat protein (CP) subunits per turn and interactions between the CP subunits. While BSMV and tobacco mosaic virus CP subunits have a similar fold and interact with RNA using conserved residues, the axial contacts between the CP of these two viral groups are considerably different. BSMV CP subunits lack substantial axial contacts and are held together by a previously unobserved lateral contact formed at the virion surface via an interacting loop, which protrudes from the CP hydrophobic core to the adjacent CP subunit. These data provide an insight into diversity in structural organization of helical viruses. PMID:26278173

  11. Complete genome sequence of pepper yellow mosaic virus, a potyvirus, occurring in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lucinda, N; da Rocha, W B; Inoue-Nagata, A K; Nagata, T

    2012-07-01

    The complete genomic sequence of pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, was determined. The sequence was 9745 nucleotides long, excluding the 3' poly(A) tail. The genome contained a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3085 amino acids, which contained the typically conserved motifs found in members of the genus Potyvirus and an additional P3-PIPO (pretty interesting potyvirus ORF). In a pairwise comparison with other potyvirus sequences, the full genome of PepYMV shared a maximum of 63.84 % nucleotide sequence identity with pepper mottle virus (PepMoV), followed by verbena virus Y (VVY, 62.11 %), potato virus Y (PVY, 62.07 %) and Peru tomato mosaic virus (PTV, 62.00 %). Based upon a phylogenetic analysis, PepYMV was most closely related to PepMoV and PTV, within the PVY subgroup cluster, like most potyviruses isolated in solanaceous hosts in South America. PMID:22527869

  12. Role of microtubules in the intracellular distribution of tobacco mosaic virus movement protein.

    PubMed

    Mas, P; Beachy, R N

    2000-10-24

    Despite its central role in virus infection, little is known about the mechanisms of intracellular trafficking of virus components within infected cells. In this study, we followed the dynamics of tobacco mosaic virus movement protein (MP) distribution in living protoplasts after disruption of microtubules (MTs) by cold treatment and subsequent rewarming to 29 degrees C. At early stages of infection, cold treatment (4 degrees C) caused the accumulation of MP fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) in large virus replication bodies that localized in perinuclear positions, whereas at midstages of infection, the association of MP:GFP with MTs was disrupted. Rewarming the protoplasts to 29 degrees C reestablished the association of MTs with the replication bodies that subsequently spread throughout the cytoplasm and to the periphery of the cell. The role of MTs in the intracellular distribution of the MP also was analyzed by examining the distribution pattern of a nonfunctional mutant of MP (TAD5). Like MP:GFP, TAD5:GFP interacted with the endoplasmic reticulum membranes and colocalized with its viral RNA but did not colocalize with MTs. The involvement of MTs in the intracellular distribution of tobacco mosaic virus MP is discussed. PMID:11050252

  13. Mutation and Recombination Frequencies Reveal a Biological Contrast within Strains of Cucumber Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pita, Justin S.; Morris, Viktoriya

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent in planta studies have shown that strains Fny and LS of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) display differential genetic diversities, Fny and LS having higher and lower mutation frequencies, respectively (J. S. Pita and M. J. Roossinck, J Virol 87:790–797, 2012 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.01891-12). In this article, we show that these virus strains have differential recombination frequencies as well. However, the high-diversity Fny strain is a low-recombination virus, whereas the very-low-diversity LS strain is instead a high-recombination virus. Unlike the mutation frequency that was determined by both RNAs 1 and 2, the control elements of recombination frequency reside predominantly within RNA 2, specifically within the 2a gene. IMPORTANCE Recombination is an important mechanism in virus evolution that can lead to increased or decreased variation and is a major player in virus speciation events that can lead to emerging viruses. Although viral genomes show very frequent evidence of recombination, details of the mechanism involved in these events are still poorly understood. We show here that the reciprocal effects of high mutation frequency and low recombination frequency (and vice versa) involve the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of the virus, and we speculate that these evolutionary events are related to differences in processivity for two strains of the same virus. PMID:25903331

  14. Mosaic Structure Of Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus Genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the results of a simple pairwise scanning analysis designed to identify inter-serotype recombination events applied to genome data from 144 isolates of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) representing all seven serotypes. We identify large numbers of candidate recombinant fragments from a...

  15. Mosaic Structure of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the results of a simple pairwise scanning analysis designed to identify inter-serotype recombination events applied to genome data from 144 isolates of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) representing all seven serotypes. We identify large numbers of candidate recombinant fragments from al...

  16. Nucleotide sequence of the 3'-terminal region of the genome confirms that pea mosaic virus is a strain of bean yellow mosaic potyvirus.

    PubMed

    Xiao, X W; Frenkel, M J; Ward, C W; Shukla, D D

    1994-01-01

    The 1,035 nucleotides at the 3'end of the I strain of pea mosaic potyvirus (PMV-I) genomic RNA, encoding the coat protein, have been cloned and sequenced. A comparison of the derived coat protein sequence with those of the bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) strains, CS, S, D and GDD, indicates that PMV-I is a strain of BYMV. Sequence comparisons and hybridisation studies using the 3'-noncoding region support this classification. The nucleotide and protein sequence data also suggest that PMV-I and BYMV-CS form one subset of BYMV strains while the other three strains form another. PMID:8031241

  17. Detection of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) in pea field in Iran.

    PubMed

    Esfandiari, N; Kohi Habibi, M; Mosahebi, G H; Mozafari, J

    2005-01-01

    During the spring and summer, in 2003-2004, pea viruses were identified in twenty pea fields of Tehran. Some leaf samples were collected randomly from pea fields of Tehran. Samples were tested by Double Antibody Sandwich Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (DAS-ELISA) technique using polyclonal antiserum of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), AS-0001, DSMZ, Braunschweig, Germany). The samples were extracted in 0.1 M Phosphate buffer pH 7 to 7.5 and inoculated on Chenopodium amaranticolor, Chenopodium quina, Phaseolus valgaris, Vicia faba, Vignia unguiculata. Pea cultivars were infected by AMV, causing mild mosaic, translucent veins and a diffuse green-yellow of tender parts and spots may also was involved necrosis of tissue. Infected plants grow slowly and malformed pods produce fewer ovules. In Chenopodium amranticolor, C. quina chlorotic and necrotic flecks, and Vicia faba systemic mosaic had produced. Phaselous vulgaris and Viginia unguiculata are good assay hosts for strains that produce local lesions after 3-5 days in these plants. Back inoculated on Pisum sativum and Vicia faba and tested with DAS-ELISA that had been confirmed the results. This is the first report of AMV on pea from Iran. PMID:16637206

  18. Association study of resistance to soil-borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) in U.S. winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) is one of the most important winter wheat pathogens worldwide. To identify genes for resistance to the virus in U.S. winter wheat, association study was conducted using a selected panel of 205 elite experimental lines and cultivars from U.S. hard and soft winter...

  19. Evaluating the ability of the barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing system to simultaneously silence two wheat genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an important tool for rapid assessment of gene function in plants. The ability of the Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus (BSMV) VIGS system to simultaneously silence two genes was assessed by comparing the extent of down-regulation of the wheat PDS and SGT1 genes afte...

  20. Effect of temperature on wheat streak mosaic virus replication and movement in resistant and susceptible wheat cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is an economically important virus causing annual average yield losses of ~2-3% in winter wheat across the Great Plains. Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors that influences disease development and severity. The objective of this study was t...

  1. Interactions with the actin cytoskeleton are required for cell wall localization of barley stripe mosaic virus TGB proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The host cytoskeleton and membrane system are the main routes by which plant viruses move within or between cells. Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) -induced actin filament thickening was visualized in the cytoskeleton of agroinfiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells expressing DsRed:Talin. ...

  2. EVALUATION OF SOYBEAN CULTIVARS, 'WILLIAMS' ISOGENIC LINES, AND OTHER SELECTED SOYBEAN LINES FOR RESISTANCE TO TWO SOYBEAN MOSAIC VIRUS STRAINS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean cultivars grown in the U.S. have a relatively narrow genetic base. Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is one of the most common soybean viruses worldwide. The resistance/susceptibility of most commercial cultivars to SMV is not known. Commercial and pre-commercial soybean cultivars were screene...

  3. Evaluating the Ability of the Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus-Induced Gene Silencing System to Simultaneously Silence Two Wheat Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an important tool for rapid assessment of gene function in plants. The ability of the Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) VIGS system to simultaneously silence two genes was assessed by comparing the extent of down-regulation of the wheat PDS and SGT1 genes afte...

  4. Developing an Alternanthera mosaic virus vector for efficient clonging of Whitefly cDNA RNAi to screen gene function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV; genus Potexvirus) is distinguished from the type member of the genus, Potato virus X by features of viral movement and variation within triple gene block protein 1 (TGB1). AltMV TGB1 variants TGB1L88 and TGB1P88 confer strong and weak silencing suppression, respect...

  5. 2D exchange 31P NMR spectroscopy of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1995-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) exchange 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to study the slow overall motion of the rod-shaped viruses M13 and tobacco mosaic virus in concentrated gels. Even for short mixing times, observed diagonal spectra differ remarkably from projection spectra and one-dimensional spectra. Our model readily explains this to be a consequence of the T2e anisotropy caused by slow overall rotation of the viruses about their length axis. 2D exchange spectra recorded for 30% (w/w) tobacco mosaic virus with mixing times < 1 s do not show any off-diagonal broadening, indicating that its overall motion occurs in the sub-Hz frequency range. In contrast, the exchange spectra obtained for 30% M13 show significant off-diagonal intensity for mixing times of 0.01 s and higher. A log-gaussian distribution around 25 Hz of overall diffusion coefficients mainly spread between 1 and 10(3) Hz faithfully reproduces the 2D exchange spectra of 30% M13 recorded at various mixing times in a consistent way. A small but notable change in diagonal spectra at increasing mixing time is not well accounted for by our model and is probably caused by 31P spin diffusion. PMID:7756532

  6. Resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus in Gladiolus plants transformed with either a defective replicase or coat protein subgroup II gene from Cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Kathryn; Jordan, Ramon; Guaragna, Mary Ann; Hsu, Hei-Ti; Ueng, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Transgenic Gladiolus plants that contain either Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup I coat protein, CMV subgroup II coat protein, CMV replicase, a combination of the CMV subgroups I and II coat proteins, or a combination of the CMV subgroup II coat protein and replicase genes were developed. These plants were multiplied in vitro and challenged with purified CMV isolated from Gladiolus using a hand-held gene gun. Three out of 19 independently transformed plants expressing the replicase gene under control of the duplicated CaMV 35S promoter were found to be resistant to CMV subgroup I. Three out of 21 independently transformed plants with the CMV subgroup II coat protein gene under control of the Arabidopsis UBQ3 promoter were resistant to CMV subgroup II. Eighteen independently transformed plants with either the CMV subgroup I coat protein or a combination of CMV subgroups I and II coat proteins were challenged and found to be susceptible to both CMV subgroups I or II. Virus resistant plants with the CMV replicase transgene expressed much lower RNA levels than resistant plants expressing the CMV subgroup II coat protein. This work will facilitate the evaluation of virus resistance in transgenic Gladiolus plants to yield improved floral quality and productivity. PMID:20411391

  7. Mutations in the antiviral RNAi defense pathway modify Brome mosaic virus RNA recombinant profiles.

    PubMed

    Dzianott, Aleksandra; Sztuba-Solińska, Joanna; Bujarski, Jozef J

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) mechanism targets viral RNA for degradation. To test whether RNAi gene products contributed to viral RNA recombination, a series of Arabidopsis thaliana RNAi-defective mutants were infected with Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNAs that have been engineered to support crossovers within the RNA3 segment. Single-cross RNA3-RNA1, RNA3-RNA2, and RNA3-RNA3 recombinants accumulated in both the wild-type (wt) and all knock-out lines at comparable frequencies. However, a reduced accumulation of novel 3' mosaic RNA3 recombinants was observed in ago1, dcl2, dcl4, and rdr6 lines but not in wt Col-0 or the dcl3 line. A BMV replicase mutant accumulated a low level of RNA3-RNA1 single-cross recombinants in Col-0 plants while, in a dcl2 dcl4 double mutant, the formation of both RNA3-RNA1 and mosaic recombinants was at a low level. A control infection in the cpr5-2 mutant, a more susceptible BMV Arabidopsis host, generated similar-to-Col-0 profiles of both single-cross and mosaic recombinants, indicating that recombinant profiles were, to some extent, independent of a viral replication rate. Also, the relative growth experiments revealed similar selection pressure for recombinants among the host lines. Thus, the altered recombinant RNA profiles have originated at the level of recombinant formation rather than because of altered selection. In conclusion, the viral replicase and the host RNAi gene products contribute in distinct ways to BMV RNA recombination. Our studies reveal that the antiviral RNAi mechanisms are utilized by plant RNA viruses to increase their variability, reminiscent of phenomena previously demonstrated in fungi. PMID:21936664

  8. Fungal transmission of a potyvirus: uredospores of Puccinia sorghi transmit maize dwarf mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    von Wechmar, M B; Chauhan, R; Knox, E

    1992-01-01

    Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) and maize rust, Puccinia sorghi Schw., occur as natural infections on cultivated maize in South Africa. P. sorghi often occurs as a secondary late infection on maize plants which have already been infected with MDMV earlier in the season, either seed or aphid transmitted. When MDMV isolates from maize plants naturally infected by both virus and fungus were propagated by sap inoculation in plant growth rooms, residual uredospores in the sap gave rise to the development of uredia under conditions of high humidity. When uredospores developing on MDMV-B-infected plants were germinated on virus free maize seedlings, these plants became infected with MDMV-B. Similarly, when uredospores, originating from maize plants infected with MDMV-A, were scattered onto virus free maize seedlings, these plants became infected with MDMV-A. The presence of virus on uredospores in infected plant tissue was visualized by indirect immunofluorescence. Identification of virus infection was by DAS-ELISA and immunoelectro-blotting utilizing strain-specific antisera. Virus transmission occurred between closely situated plants which had no actual contact (unaided transmission). MDMV-B transmission by uredospores, to new maize seedlings, has been maintained for three successive years (1988-1991) in a plant growth room. The MDMV-B isolate remained sap and non-persistently aphid transmissible. PMID:1450745

  9. Incorporation of radiolabeled polyamines and methionine into turnip yellow mosaic virus in protoplasts from infected plants

    SciTech Connect

    Balint, R.; Cohen, S.S.

    1985-07-15

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus contains large amounts of nonexchangeable spermidine and induces an accumulation of spermidine in infected Chinese cabbage. By 7 days after inoculation, a majority of protoplasts isolated from newly emerging leaves stain with fluorescent antibody to the virus. (/sup 14/C)Spermidine (10 microM) was taken up by these cells in amounts comparable to the original endogenous pool within 24 hr. However, after an initial rise, the spermidine content of the cell returned to its original level, implying considerable regulation of the endogenous pool(s). Putrescine and spermine were major products of the metabolism of exogenous spermidine. Radioactivity from exogenous (/sup 14/C)spermidine was also readily incorporated into the ribonucleoprotein component(s) of the virus, where it appeared as both spermidine and spermine. The specific radioactivities of the viral polyamines were approximately twice those of spermidine and spermine extracted from the whole cell. Radioactivity from (2-/sup 14/C)methionine was readily incorporated into the protein, spermidine, and spermine of the virus. Again, the specific activities of these amines were substantially higher in the virus than in the whole cell. Thus, newly formed virus contained predominantly newly synthesized spermidine and spermine. However, inhibition of spermidine synthesis by dicyclohexylamine led to incorporation of preexisting spermidine and increased amounts of spermine into newly formed virus.

  10. Role of brassinosteroid signaling in modulating Tobacco mosaic virus resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Peng, Xing-Ji; Xi, De-Hui; Guo, Hongqing; Yin, Yanhai; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), play essential roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. However, mechanisms by which BRs interfere with plant resistance to virus remain largely unclear. In this study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches in combination with infection experiments to investigate the role of BRs in plant defense against Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Exogenous applied BRs enhanced plant resistance to virus infection, while application of Bikinin (inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3), which activated BR signaling, increased virus susceptibility. Silencing of NbBRI1 and NbBSK1 blocked BR-induced TMV resistance, and silencing of NbBES1/BZR1 blocked Bikinin-reduced TMV resistance. Silencing of NbMEK2, NbSIPK and NbRBOHB all compromised BR-induced virus resistance and defense-associated genes expression. Furthermore, we found MEK2-SIPK cascade activated while BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production, defense gene expression and virus resistance induced by BRs. Thus, our results revealed BR signaling had two opposite effects on viral defense response. On the one hand, BRs enhanced virus resistance through MEK2-SIPK cascade and RBOHB-dependent ROS burst. On the other hand, BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production and acted as an important mediator of the trade-off between growth and immunity in BR signaling. PMID:26838475

  11. Role of brassinosteroid signaling in modulating Tobacco mosaic virus resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Peng, Xing-Ji; Xi, De-Hui; Guo, Hongqing; Yin, Yanhai; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), play essential roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. However, mechanisms by which BRs interfere with plant resistance to virus remain largely unclear. In this study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches in combination with infection experiments to investigate the role of BRs in plant defense against Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Exogenous applied BRs enhanced plant resistance to virus infection, while application of Bikinin (inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3), which activated BR signaling, increased virus susceptibility. Silencing of NbBRI1 and NbBSK1 blocked BR-induced TMV resistance, and silencing of NbBES1/BZR1 blocked Bikinin-reduced TMV resistance. Silencing of NbMEK2, NbSIPK and NbRBOHB all compromised BR-induced virus resistance and defense-associated genes expression. Furthermore, we found MEK2-SIPK cascade activated while BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production, defense gene expression and virus resistance induced by BRs. Thus, our results revealed BR signaling had two opposite effects on viral defense response. On the one hand, BRs enhanced virus resistance through MEK2-SIPK cascade and RBOHB-dependent ROS burst. On the other hand, BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production and acted as an important mediator of the trade-off between growth and immunity in BR signaling. PMID:26838475

  12. Cnidoscolus mosaic leaf deformation virus: a novel begomovirus infecting euphorbiaceous plants in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Melo, Aline M; Silva, Sarah J C; Ramos-Sobrinho, Roberto; Ferro, Mayra M M; Assunção, Iraildes P; Lima, Gaus S A

    2016-09-01

    Begomoviruses have been detected infecting the weed Cnidoscolus urens (family Euphorbiaceae) since 2004, but the viral species to which these viruses belonged was not known. Here, we report for the first time the complete genome sequence of a bipartite begomovirus obtained from C. urens collected in the state of Alagoas, Brazil. This isolate met the criteria to be classified as a member of a new begomovirus species, and the tentative name cnidoscolus mosaic leaf deformation virus (CnMLDV) is proposed. Pairwise sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis showed that the DNA-A genomic component of CnMLDV is most closely related to that of passionfruit severe leaf distortion virus, with 86.3 % nucleotide sequence identity. PMID:27278930

  13. Cymbidium chlorotic mosaic virus, a new sobemovirus isolated from a spring orchid (Cymbidium goeringii) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hideki; Takemoto, Shogo; Maruyama, Kazuyuki; Chiba, Sotaro; Andika, Ida Bagus; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Cymbidium chlorotic mosaic virus (CyCMV), isolated from a spring orchid (Cymbidium goeringii), was characterized molecularly. CyCMV isometric virions comprise a single, positive-strand RNA genome of 4,083 nucleotides and 30-kDa coat protein. The virus genome contains five overlapping open reading frames with a genomic organization similar to that of sobemoviruses. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analysis revealed that CyCMV is most closely related to papaya lethal yellowing virus, a proposed dicot-infecting sobemovirus (58.8 % nucleotide sequence identity), but has a relatively distant relationship to monocot-infecting sobemoviruses, with only modest sequence identities. This suggests that CyCMV is a new monocot-infecting member of the floating genus Sobemovirus. PMID:26025156

  14. Fluorescent Tobacco mosaic virus-Derived Bio-Nanoparticles for Intravital Two-Photon Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Niehl, Annette; Appaix, Florence; Boscá, Sonia; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Nicoud, Jean-François; Bolze, Frédéric; Heinlein, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Multi-photon intravital imaging has become a powerful tool to investigate the healthy and diseased brain vasculature in living animals. Although agents for multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of the microvasculature are available, issues related to stability, bioavailability, toxicity, cost or chemical adaptability remain to be solved. In particular, there is a need for highly fluorescent dyes linked to particles that do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in brain diseases like tumor or stroke to estimate the functional blood supply. Plant virus particles possess a number of distinct advantages over other particles, the most important being the multi-valency of chemically addressable sites on the particle surface. This multi-valency, together with biological compatibility and inert nature, makes plant viruses ideal carriers for in vivo imaging agents. Here, we show that the well-known Tobacco mosaic virus is a suitable nanocarrier for two-photon dyes and for intravital imaging of the mouse brain vasculature. PMID:26793221

  15. Evaluation of the minimal replication time of Cauliflower mosaic virus in different hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Khelifa, Mounia; Masse, Delphine; Blanc, Stephane; Drucker, Martin

    2010-01-20

    Though the duration of a single round of replication is an important biological parameter, it has been determined for only few viruses. Here, this parameter was determined for Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) in transfected protoplasts from different hosts: the highly susceptible Arabidopsis and turnip, and Nicotiana benthamiana, where CaMV accumulates only slowly. Four methods of differing sensitivity were employed: labelling of (1) progeny DNA and (2) capsid protein, (3) immunocapture PCR,, and (4) progeny-specific PCR. The first progeny virus was detected about 21 h after transfection. This value was confirmed by all methods, indicating that our estimate was not biased by the sensitivity of the detection method, and approximated the actual time required for one round of CaMV replication. Unexpectedly, the replication kinetics were similar in the three hosts; suggesting that slow accumulation of CaMV in Nicotiana plants is determined by non-optimal interactions in other steps of the infection cycle.

  16. The interaction between Turnip crinkle virus p38 and Cucumber mosaic virus 2b and its critical domains.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanan; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Feifei; Ren, Han; Zhu, Lin; Xi, Dehui; Lin, Honghui

    2016-08-15

    Cross protection is a common phenomenon among closely related strain viruses in co-infected plants. However, unrelated viruses, Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), also show an antagonistic effect in co-infected Arabidopsis plants. In many cases, viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) have important roles in the interactions between viruses in mixed infections. CMV 2b and TCV p38 are multifunctional proteins and both of them are well characterized VSRs and have important roles in operation synergistic interactions with other viruses. Here, we demonstrated antagonistic effects of TCV toward CMV and showed that RNA silencing-mediated resistance protein, RCY1 and TCV-interacting protein (TIP) of Arabidopsis plants did not affect this antagonism effect. We further showed that TCV p38 and CMV 2b could interact with each other in vivo but not in vitro. Further mutational analysis showed that C-terminal of 2b and middle domains of p38 had more important roles in the interaction between the two viruses. PMID:27288723

  17. Tobacco Mosaic Virus in the Lungs of Mice following Intra-Tracheal Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Balique, Fanny; Colson, Philippe; Barry, Abdoulaye Oury; Nappez, Claude; Ferretti, Audrey; Moussawi, Khatoun Al; Ngounga, Tatsiana; Lepidi, Hubert; Ghigo, Eric; Mege, Jean-Louis; Lecoq, Hervé; Raoult, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Plant viruses are generally considered incapable of infecting vertebrates. Accordingly, they are not considered harmful for humans. However, a few studies questioned the certainty of this paradigm. Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA has been detected in human samples and TMV RNA translation has been described in animal cells. We sought to determine if TMV is detectable, persists, and remains viable in the lung tissues of mice following intratracheal inoculation, and we attempted to inoculate mouse macrophages with TMV. In the animal model, mice were intratracheally inoculated with 1011 viral particles and were sacrificed at different time points. The virus was detected in the mouse lungs using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, real-time RT-PCR and sequencing, and its viability was studied with an infectivity assay on plants. In the cellular model, the culture medium of murine bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) was inoculated with different concentrations of TMV, and the virus was detected with real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. In addition, anti-TMV antibodies were detected in mouse sera with ELISA. We showed that infectious TMV could enter and persist in mouse lungs via the intratracheal route. Over 14 days, the TMV RNA level decreased by 5 log10 copies/ml in the mouse lungs and by 3.5 log10 in macrophages recovered from bronchoalveolar lavage. TMV was localized to lung tissue, and its infectivity was observed on plants until 3 days after inoculation. In addition, anti-TMV antibody seroconversions were observed in the sera from mice 7 days after inoculation. In the cellular model, we observed that TMV persisted over 15 days after inoculation and it was visualized in the cytoplasm of the BMDM. This work shows that a plant virus, Tobacco mosaic virus, could persist and enter in cells in mammals, which raises questions about the potential interactions between TMV and human hosts. PMID:23383021

  18. Monoclonal antibodies produced to bean yellow mosaic virus, clover yellow vein virus, and pea mosaic virus which cross-react among the three viruses.

    PubMed

    Scott, S W; McLaughlin, M R; Ainsworth, A J

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies prepared against individual potyviruses that infect forage legumes cross-reacted among the viruses. The reaction occurs between capsid subunits and presumably involves epitopes located in the trypsin-resistant core of the coat protein. PMID:2480762

  19. An improved cucumber mosaic virus-based vector for efficient decoying of plant microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qiansheng; Tu, Yifei; Carr, John P; Du, Zhiyou

    2015-01-01

    We previously devised a cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-based vector system carrying microRNA target mimic sequences for analysis of microRNA function in Arabidopsis thaliana. We describe an improved version in which target mimic cloning is achieved by annealing two partly-overlapping complementary DNA oligonucleotides for insertion into an infectious clone of CMV RNA3 (LS strain) fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus-derived 35S promoter. LS-CMV variants carrying mimic sequences were generated by co-infiltrating plants with Agrobacterium tumefaciens cells harboring engineered RNA3 with cells carrying RNA1 and RNA2 infectious clones. The utility of using agroinfection to deliver LS-CMV-derived microRNA target mimic sequences was demonstrated using a miR165/166 target mimic and three solanaceous hosts: Nicotiana benthamiana, tobacco (N. tabacum), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). In all three hosts the miR165/166 target mimic induced marked changes in developmental phenotype. Inhibition of miRNA accumulation and increased target mRNA (HD-ZIP III) accumulation was demonstrated in tomato. Thus, a CMV-derived target mimic delivered via agroinfection is a simple, cheap and powerful means of launching virus-based miRNA mimics and is likely to be useful for high-throughput investigation of miRNA function in a wide range of plants. PMID:26278008

  20. The complete genome sequence and genome structure of passion fruit mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Song, Yeon Sook; Ryu, Ki Hyun

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we determined the complete sequence of the genomic RNA of a Florida isolate of maracuja mosaic virus (MarMV-FL) and compared it to that of a Peru isolate of the virus (MarMV-P) and those of other known tobamoviruses. Complete sequence analysis revealed that the isolate should be considered a member of a new species and named passion fruit mosaic virus (PafMV). The genomic RNA of PafMV consists of 6,791 nucleotides and encodes four open reading frames (ORFs) coding for proteins of 125 kDa (1,101 aa), 184 kDa (1,612 aa), 34 kDa (311 aa) and 18 kDa (164 aa) in consecutive order from the 5' to the 3' end. The sequence homologies of the four ORFs of PafMV were from 78.8% to 81.6% to those of MarMV-P at the amino acid level. The sequence homologies of the four ORFs of PafMV ranged from 36.0% to 77.9% and from 21.7% to 81.6% to those of other tobamoviruses, at the nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these PafMV-encoded proteins are closely related to those of MarMV-P. In conclusion, the results indicate that PafMV and MarMV-P belong to different species within the genus Tobamovirus. PMID:21547441

  1. An improved cucumber mosaic virus-based vector for efficient decoying of plant microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Qiansheng; Tu, Yifei; Carr, John P.; Du, Zhiyou

    2015-01-01

    We previously devised a cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-based vector system carrying microRNA target mimic sequences for analysis of microRNA function in Arabidopsis thaliana. We describe an improved version in which target mimic cloning is achieved by annealing two partly-overlapping complementary DNA oligonucleotides for insertion into an infectious clone of CMV RNA3 (LS strain) fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus-derived 35S promoter. LS-CMV variants carrying mimic sequences were generated by co-infiltrating plants with Agrobacterium tumefaciens cells harboring engineered RNA3 with cells carrying RNA1 and RNA2 infectious clones. The utility of using agroinfection to deliver LS-CMV-derived microRNA target mimic sequences was demonstrated using a miR165/166 target mimic and three solanaceous hosts: Nicotiana benthamiana, tobacco (N. tabacum), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). In all three hosts the miR165/166 target mimic induced marked changes in developmental phenotype. Inhibition of miRNA accumulation and increased target mRNA (HD-ZIP III) accumulation was demonstrated in tomato. Thus, a CMV-derived target mimic delivered via agroinfection is a simple, cheap and powerful means of launching virus-based miRNA mimics and is likely to be useful for high-throughput investigation of miRNA function in a wide range of plants. PMID:26278008

  2. Adaptation of Cucumber mosaic virus soybean strains (SSVs) to cultivated and wild soybeans.

    PubMed

    Hong, J S; Masuta, C; Nakano, M; Abe, J; Uyeda, I

    2003-06-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus soybean strains formerly called soybean stunt virus (SSV) were inoculated onto 23 wild soybeans collected from four Asian countries to investigate their infectivity in order to improve understanding of the co-evolution of SSVs and soybean. SSV inoculation resulted in systemic infection in most of the wild soybeans used. However, an SSV strain (SSV-In), which was isolated in Indonesia, did not result in systemic infection of many of the wild soybeans distributed in southern Japan. This exceptional infectivity of SSV-In may be due to its specific adaptation to the local soybean population(s) of Indonesia, which has rarely been affected by gene flows from wild soybean. In the present study, the nucleotide sequences of the 3a and CP genes of SSV were determined, and the data were used to classify seven SSV isolates among known Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) strains. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the seven SSVs formed a distinct cluster separated from the other CMV strains despite their different geographical origins; SSV-In was the most divergent of the seven isolates. Comparison of the rates of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions revealed that the SSV group had evolved faster than subgroup IA. The implications of the findings are discussed in relation to the so-called Red Queen hypothesis. PMID:12835932

  3. Complete nucleotide sequence of a Spanish isolate of alfalfa mosaic virus: evidence for additional genetic variability.

    PubMed

    Parrella, Giuseppe; Acanfora, Nadia; Orílio, Anelise F; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2011-06-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is a plant virus that is distributed worldwide and can induce necrosis and/or yellow mosaic on a large variety of plant species, including commercially important crops. It is the only virus of the genus Alfamovirus in the family Bromoviridae. AMV isolates can be clustered into two genetic groups that correlate with their geographic origin. Here, we report for the first time the complete nucleotide sequence of a Spanish isolate of AMV found infecting Cape honeysuckle (Tecoma capensis) and named Tec-1. The tripartite genome of Tec-1 is composed of 3643 nucleotides (nt) for RNA1, 2594 nt for RNA2 and 2037 nt for RNA3. Comparative sequence analysis of the coat protein gene revealed that the isolate Tec-1 is distantly related to subgroup I of AMV and more closely related to subgroup II, although forming a distinct phylogenetic clade. Therefore, we propose to split subgroup II of AMV into two subgroups, namely IIA, comprising isolates previously included in subgroup II, and IIB, including the novel Spanish isolate Tec-1. PMID:21327783

  4. Sequences enhancing cassava mosaic disease symptoms occur in the cassava genome and are associated with South African cassava mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Maredza, A T; Allie, F; Plata, G; Rey, M E C

    2016-06-01

    Cassava is an important food security crop in Sub-Saharan Africa. Two episomal begomovirus-associated sequences, named Sequences Enhancing Geminivirus Symptoms (SEGS1 and SEGS2), were identified in field cassava affected by the devastating cassava mosaic disease (CMD). The sequences reportedly exacerbated CMD symptoms in the tolerant cassava landrace TME3, and the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana, when biolistically co-inoculated with African cassava mosaic virus-Cameroon (ACMV-CM) or East African cassava mosaic virus-UG2 (EACMV-UG2). Following the identification of small SEGS fragments in the cassava EST database, the intention of this study was to confirm their presence in the genome, and investigate a possible role for these sequences in CMD. We report that multiple copies of varying lengths of both SEGS1 and SEGS2 are widely distributed in the sequenced cassava genome and are present in several other cassava accessions screened by PCR. The endogenous SEGS1 and SEGS2 are in close proximity or overlapping with cassava genes, suggesting a possible role in regulation of specific biological processes. We confirm the expression of SEGS in planta using EST data and RT-PCR. The sequence features of endogenous SEGS (iSEGS) are unique but resemble non-autonomous transposable elements (TEs) such as MITEs and helitrons. Furthermore, many SEGS-associated genes, some involved in virus-host interactions, are differentially expressed in susceptible (T200) and tolerant TME3) cassava landraces infected by South African cassava mosaic virus (SACMV) of susceptible (T200) and tolerant (TME3) cassava landraces. Abundant SEGS-derived small RNAs were also present in mock-inoculated and SACMV-infected T200 and TME3 leaves. Given the known role of TEs and associated genes in gene regulation and plant immune responses, our observations are consistent with a role of these DNA elements in the host's regulatory response to geminiviruses. PMID:25920485

  5. A comparative study of digital RT-PCR and RT-qPCR for quantification of Hepatitis A virus and Norovirus in lettuce and water samples.

    PubMed

    Coudray-Meunier, Coralie; Fraisse, Audrey; Martin-Latil, Sandra; Guillier, Laurent; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick; Perelle, Sylvie

    2015-05-18

    Sensitive and quantitative detection of foodborne enteric viruses is classically achieved by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Recently, digital PCR (dPCR) was described as a novel approach to genome quantification without need for a standard curve. The performance of microfluidic digital RT-PCR (RT-dPCR) was compared to RT-qPCR for detecting the main viruses responsible for foodborne outbreaks (human Noroviruses (NoV) and Hepatitis A virus (HAV)) in spiked lettuce and bottled water. Two process controls (Mengovirus and Murine Norovirus) were used and external amplification controls (EAC) were added to examine inhibition of RT-qPCR and RT-dPCR. For detecting viral RNA and cDNA, the sensitivity of the RT-dPCR assays was either comparable to that of RT-qPCR (RNA of HAV, NoV GI, Mengovirus) or slightly (around 1 log10) decreased (NoV GII and MNV-1 RNA and of HAV, NoV GI, NoV GII cDNA). The number of genomic copies determined by dPCR was always from 0.4 to 1.7 log10 lower than the expected numbers of copies calculated by using the standard qPCR curve. Viral recoveries calculated by RT-dPCR were found to be significantly higher than by RT-qPCR for NoV GI, HAV and Mengovirus in water, and for NoV GII and HAV in lettuce samples. The RT-dPCR assay proved to be more tolerant to inhibitory substances present in lettuce samples. This absolute quantitation approach may be useful to standardize quantification of enteric viruses in bottled water and lettuce samples and may be extended to quantifying other human pathogens in food samples. PMID:25725459

  6. A resistance gene in common bean to Clover yellow vein virus is tightly linked with bc-3 gene which confers resistance to Bean common mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A strain of Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) that causes severe mosaic, top necrosis, stunting, and pod necrosis on infected plants has been plaguing snap bean production in the Great Lakes and Northeastern regions of the US since 2003. In preliminary virus screening experiments to identify resistan...

  7. Deletions in the coat protein cistron of wheat streak mosaic virus induced more severe symptoms than the wild-type virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), an economically important virus in the Great Plains region, is the type member of Tritimovirus genus of the family Potyviridae. The role of coat protein (CP) in WSMV biology was examined by introducing a series of deletions covering SGSGS motifs (aa 36-40, 43-47 an...

  8. Complete genome sequence of nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus reveals its relationship to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ravendra P; Rajakaruna, Punsasi; Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2015-03-01

    Complete genome sequences were obtained from nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus (CaYSV). CaYSV belongs to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses with johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV) as its closest relative. Multiple sequence alignments showed a pattern of amino acid substitutions in the CP sequences, which enabled us to relate these isolates to South East Asian or European isolates. Biological characterization of CaYSV identified Nicotiana benthamiana, Chenopodium quinoa and Phaseolus vulgaris as experimental hosts. Given the popularity and global trade of cannas, a clear picture of the genetic diversity of CaYSV is critical to disease management. PMID:25567205

  9. Influence of High Hydrostatic Pressure on Epitope Mapping of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we investigated the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a model virus in immunology and one of the most studied viruses to date. Exposure to HHP significantly altered the recognition epitopes when compared to sera from mice immunized with native virus. These alterations were studied further by combining HHP with urea or low temperature and then inoculating the altered virions into Balb-C mice. The antibody titers and cross-reactivity of the resulting sera were determined by ELISA. The antigenicity of the viral particles was maintained, as assessed by using polyclonal antibodies against native virus. The antigenicity of canonical epitopes was maintained, although binding intensities varied among the treatments. The patterns of recognition determined by epitope mapping were cross checked with the prediction algorithms for the TMVcp amino acid sequence to infer which alterations had occurred. These findings suggest that different cleavage sites were exposed after the treatments and this was confirmed by epitope mapping using sera from mice immunized with virus previously exposed to HHP. PMID:24605789

  10. First report of Turnip mosaic virus occurrence in cole crops (Brssica spp) from Arunachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raghuveer; Banerjee, Amrita; Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Bhagawati, R; Baruah, Sikimoni; Ngachan, S V

    2015-09-01

    The occurrence of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) in cole crops (Brassica spp) grown in Basar, Arunachal Pradesh, India was confirmed by symptomatology, transmission electron microscopy, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and partial characterization of cytoplasmic inclusion protein and coat protein (CP) domains. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial CP sequences of the new TuMV isolates from Indian mustard (AR-IndM), broad leaved mustard (AR-BrLM) and broccoli (AR-Broc) revealed their closest relationship with members of the World-B genogroup of TuMV. This is the first molecular evidence of TuMV infection in Brassica spp from India. PMID:26396991

  11. Population structure of blueberry mosaic associated virus: Evidence of reassortment in geographically distinct isolates.

    PubMed

    Thekke-Veetil, Thanuja; Polashock, James J; Marn, Mojca V; Plesko, Irena M; Schilder, Annemiek C; Keller, Karen E; Martin, Robert R; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E

    2015-04-01

    The population structure of blueberry mosaic associated virus (BlMaV), a putative member of the family Ophioviridae, was examined using 61 isolates collected from North America and Slovenia. The studied isolates displayed low diversity in the movement and nucleocapsid proteins and low ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions, indicative of strong purifying selection. Phylogenetic analyses revealed grouping primarily based on geography with some isolates deviating from this rule. Phylogenetic incongruence in the two regions, coupled with detection of reassortment events, indicated the possible role of genetic exchange in the evolution of BlMaV. PMID:25733053

  12. Production of enkephalin in tobacco protoplasts using tobacco mosaic virus RNA vector.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, N; Watanabe, Y; Yanagi, H; Meshi, T; Shiba, T; Okada, Y

    1990-08-20

    To examine the validity of the strategy to express a foreign gene as a fusion protein with the coat protein (CP) of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), we have constructed ENK RNA by using an in vitro transcription system of TMV RNA. ENK RNA differs from TMV RNA only in that ENK RNA carries an additional sequence coding for Leu-enkephalin (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu) (Enk) with a preceding in-frame methionine just before the termination codon of CP gene. In protoplasts inoculated with ENK RNA, CP + Enk fusion protein accumulated as the major protein. PMID:2387417

  13. Complete nucleotide sequence of the genomic RNA of tobacco mosaic virus strain Cg.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, T; Komatani, H; Meshi, T; Naito, S; Ishikawa, M; Ohno, T

    1998-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-Cg is a crucifer-infecting tobamovirus that was isolated from field-grown garlic. We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the genomic RNA of TMV-Cg. The genomic RNA of TMV-Cg consists of 6303 nucleotides and encodes four large open reading frames, organized basically in the same way as that of other tobamoviruses. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences are very similar to those of the other crucifer-infecting tobamoviruses that have been sequenced so far. PMID:9608662

  14. A Genetically Modified Tobacco Mosaic Virus that can Produce Gold Nanoparticles from a Metal Salt Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Love, Andrew J.; Makarov, Valentine V.; Sinitsyna, Olga V.; Shaw, Jane; Yaminsky, Igor V.; Kalinina, Natalia O.; Taliansky, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    We genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to surface display a characterized peptide with potent metal ion binding and reducing capacity (MBP TMV), and demonstrate that unlike wild type TMV, this construct can lead to the formation of discrete 10–40 nm gold nanoparticles when mixed with 3 mM potassium tetrachloroaurate. Using a variety of analytical physicochemical approaches it was found that these nanoparticles were crystalline in nature and stable. Given that the MBP TMV can produce metal nanomaterials in the absence of chemical reductants, it may have utility in the green production of metal nanomaterials. PMID:26617624

  15. Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay to Rapidly Detect Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus in Quarantined Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Siwon; Kim, Jin-Ho; Choi, Ji-Young; Jang, Won-Cheoul

    2015-01-01

    We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to rapidly diagnose Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) during quarantine inspections of imported wheat, corn, oats, and millet. The LAMP method was developed as a plant quarantine inspection method for the first time, and its simplicity, quickness, specificity and sensitivity were verified compared to current reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested PCR quarantine methods. We were able to quickly screen for WSMV at quarantine sites with many test samples; thus, this method is expected to contribute to plant quarantine inspections. PMID:26674930

  16. Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay to Rapidly Detect Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus in Quarantined Plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Siwon; Kim, Jin-Ho; Choi, Ji-Young; Jang, Won-Cheoul

    2015-12-01

    We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to rapidly diagnose Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) during quarantine inspections of imported wheat, corn, oats, and millet. The LAMP method was developed as a plant quarantine inspection method for the first time, and its simplicity, quickness, specificity and sensitivity were verified compared to current reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested PCR quarantine methods. We were able to quickly screen for WSMV at quarantine sites with many test samples; thus, this method is expected to contribute to plant quarantine inspections. PMID:26674930

  17. A genetically novel, narrow-host-range isolate of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) from rosemary.

    PubMed

    Tepfer, Mark; Girardot, Gregory; Fénéant, Lucie; Ben Tamarzizt, Hana; Verdin, Eric; Moury, Benoît; Jacquemond, Mireille

    2016-07-01

    An isolate of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), designated CMV-Rom, was isolated from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) plants in several locations near Avignon, France. Laboratory studies showed that, unlike typical CMV isolates, CMV-Rom has a particularly narrow host range. It could be transmitted by aphids Aphis gossypii and Myzus persicae, but with low efficacy compared to a typical CMV isolate. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the CMV-Rom genomic RNAs shows that this isolate does not belong to any of the previously described CMV subgroups, IA, IB, II or III. PMID:27138549

  18. Lettuce chlorosis virus P23 Suppresses RNA Silencing and Induces Local Necrosis with Increased Severity at Raised Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Kenji; Ng, James C K

    2016-06-01

    RNA silencing functions as an antivirus defense strategy in plants, one that plant viruses counter by producing viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs). VSRs have been identified in three members of the genus Crinivirus but they do not all share identical suppression mechanisms. Here, we used Agrobacterium co-infiltration assays to investigate the suppressor activity of proteins encoded by Lettuce chlorosis virus (LCV). Of 7 LCV proteins (1b, P23, HSP70 homolog, P60, CP, CPm, and P27) tested for the suppression of silencing of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in wild-type Nicotiana benthamiana plants, only P23 suppressed the onset of local silencing. Small-interfering (si)RNA accumulation was reduced in leaves co-infiltrated with P23, suggesting that P23 inhibited the accumulation or enhanced the degradation of siRNA. P23 also inhibited the cell-to-cell and systemic movement of RNA silencing in GFP-expressing transgenic N. benthamiana plants. Expression of P23 via agroinfiltration of N. benthamiana leaves induced local necrosis that increased in severity at elevated temperatures, a novelty given that a direct temperature effect on necrosis severity has not been reported for the other crinivirus VSRs. These results further affirm the sophistication of crinivirus VSRs in mediating the evasion of host's antiviral defenses and in symptom modulation. PMID:26828232

  19. Prevalence and genetic diversity of fig mosaic virus isolates infecting fig tree in Iran.

    PubMed

    Danesh-Amuz, S; Rakhshandehroo, F; Rezaee, S

    2014-01-01

    Commercial and outdoor fig orchards in four Iranian provinces were surveyed for the incidence of fig mosaic virus (FMV), fig leaf mottle associated virus 2 (FLMaV-2) and fig mild mottle associated virus (FMMaV) from March 2011 to October 2012. A total of 350 asymptomatic and symptomatic fig samples were collected and tested by dot-immunobinding assay (DIBA) for the fig mosaic disease (FMD) using a polyclonal antiserum. According to DIBA results, FMD was present in 73% of the collected symptomatic samples from all visited regions. Samples with positive reactions in DIBA were then analyzed by RT-PCR using with specific primers. PCR results showed that about 14.8% of the FMD-positive samples from three inspected provinces are infected with at least one virus. FMV was the most widely spread virus (14%) followed by FLMaV-2 (1.5%), whereas FMMaV was not found. Phylogenetic analysis of the glycoprotein nucleotide and amino acid sequences of known FMV isolates showed two independent groups with high bootstrap values, with all Iranian isolates distinctly clustered in group I, subgroup IA beside those reported in Turkey. Nucleotide diversity was high within but low between different selected geographic regions and except for Europe, nucleotide distance within geographic regions was low. Statistical analyses indicated a correlation between the genetic structure of the FMV isolates and the geographical origin of isolation. Our analyses suggested that the FMV population is in a state of increase following a bottleneck or founder event in Iran. PMID:25283859

  20. Biological and Molecular Variability of Alfalfa mosaic virus Affecting Alfalfa Crop in Riyadh Region.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Mohammed A; Amer, Mahmoud A

    2013-12-01

    In 2011-2012, sixty nine samples were collected from alfalfa plants showing viral infection symptoms in Riyadh region. Mechanical inoculation with sap prepared from two collected samples out of twenty five possitive for Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) by ELISA were produced systemic mosaic on Vigna unguiculata and Nicotiana tabacum, local lesion on Chenopodium amaranticolor and C. quinoa. Vicia faba indicator plants that induce mosaic and mottle with AMV-Sagir isolate and no infection with AMV-Wadi aldawasser isolate. Approximately 700-bp was formed by RT-PCR using AMV coat protein specific primer. Samples from infected alfalfa gave positive results, while healthy plant gave negative result using dot blot hybridization assay. The nucleotide sequences of the Saudi isolates were compared with corresponding viral nucleotide sequences reported in GenBank. The obtained results showed that the AMV from Australia, Brazil, Puglia and China had the highest similarity with AMV-Sajer isolate. While, the AMV from Spain and New Zealaland had the lowest similarity with AMV-Sajer and Wadi aldawasser isolates. The data obtained in this study has been deposited in the GenBank under the accession numbers KC434083 and KC434084 for AMV-Sajer and AMV- Wadialdawasser respectively. This is the first report regarding the gnetic make up of AMV in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25288969

  1. Tobacco mosaic virus-directed reprogramming of auxin/indole acetic acid protein transcriptional responses enhances virus phloem loading.

    PubMed

    Collum, Tamara D; Padmanabhan, Meenu S; Hsieh, Yi-Cheng; Culver, James N

    2016-05-10

    Vascular phloem loading has long been recognized as an essential step in the establishment of a systemic virus infection. In this study, an interaction between the replication protein of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and phloem-specific auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) transcriptional regulators was found to modulate virus phloem loading in an age-dependent manner. Promoter expression studies show that in mature tissues TMV 126/183-kDa-interacting Aux/IAAs predominantly express and accumulate within the nuclei of phloem companion cells (CCs). Furthermore, CC Aux/IAA nuclear localization is disrupted upon infection with an interacting virus. In situ analysis of virus spread shows that the inability to disrupt Aux/IAA CC nuclear localization correlates with a reduced ability to load into the vascular tissue. Subsequent systemic movement assays also demonstrate that a virus capable of disrupting Aux/IAA localization is significantly more competitive at moving out of older plant tissues than a noninteracting virus. Similarly, CC expression and overaccumulation of a degradation-resistant Aux/IAA-interacting protein was found to inhibit TMV accumulation and phloem loading selectively in flowering plants. Transcriptional expression studies demonstrate a role for Aux/IAA-interacting proteins in the regulation of salicylic and jasmonic acid host defense responses as well as virus-specific movement factors, including pectin methylesterase, that are involved in regulating plasmodesmata size-exclusion limits and promoting virus cell-to-cell movement. Combined, these findings indicate that TMV directs the reprogramming of auxin-regulated gene expression within the vascular phloem of mature tissues as a means to enhance phloem loading and systemic spread. PMID:27118842

  2. [Morphological features of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the AINTEGUMENTA gene of rape under control of the Dahlia mosaic virus promoter].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Cheremis, A V; Vakhitov, V A

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the AINTEGUMENTA gene of rape under control of the 35S promoter and the promoter of dahlia mosaic virus were obtained. The transgenic plants were characterized by increase in the length of the leaves, flower sizes, stem height, and weight of seeds; at the same time, the degree of increase was greater in the case of use of the dahlia mosaic virus promoter as a regulator of transcription. Ectopic expression of the AINTEGUMENTA gene promoted prolongation of leaf growth, while sizes of epidermal cells of the leaves remained unchanged. PMID:23785848

  3. Partial biological and molecular characterization of a Cucumber mosaic virus isolate naturally infecting Cucumis melo in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rasoulpour, Rasoul; Afsharifar, Alireza; Izadpanah, Keramat

    2016-06-01

    Melon seedlings showing systemic chlorotic spots and mosaic symptoms were collected in central part of Iran, and a virus was isolated from diseased plants by mechanical inoculation. The virus systemically infected the most inoculated test plants by inducing mosaic symptoms, while, in the members of Fabaceae family and Chenopodium quinoa induced local lesions. Agar gel diffusion test using a polyclonal antiserum against a squash Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolate showed the presence of CMV in the mechanically inoculated plants (designated CMV-Me). The virus was purified by polyethylene glycol precipitation and differential centrifugation. A polyclonal antiserum was produced against the virus that reacted specifically with virus antigen in ELISA and agar gel diffusion tests. The virus was molecularly characterized by PCR amplification of the full length of the coat protein gene using cucumovirus genus specific primer pair CPTALL-3/CPTALL-5 and sequence analysis of the resulting product. No RNA satellite was detected using the primer pair CMVsat3H/sat5T7P. Phylogenetic analysis based on the coat protein amino acid sequences showed that CMV-Me belongs to Subgroup IB. These results may be helpful in melon breeding programs, focusing on plant resistance to plant viruses including CMV. PMID:27366772

  4. Characterization of siRNAs derived from cucumber green mottle mosaic virus in infected cucumber plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Deng, Congliang; Shang, Qiaoxia; Zhao, Xiaoli; Liu, Xingliang; Zhou, Qi

    2016-02-01

    Virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), a member of the genus Tobamovirus, were characterised in cucumber plants by deep sequencing. CGMMV vsiRNAs of 21-22 nt in length predominated, suggesting that there might be a conserved mechanism of DCL2 and DCL4 involvement in the biogenesis of vsiRNAs, as well as a common RNA silencing pathway in CGMMV-infected cucumber plants. The 5'-terminal base of vsiRNAs was biased towards C/A/U, suggesting that CGMMV vsiRNAs might be loaded into diverse AGO-containing RISCs to disturb the gene expression of host plants. Possible targets for some of the vsiRNAs were also predicted. PMID:26586331

  5. Genetic bottlenecks during systemic movement of Cucumber mosaic virus vary in different host plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Akhtar; Roossinck, Marilyn J.

    2010-09-01

    Genetic bottlenecks are stochastic events that narrow variation in a population. We compared bottlenecks during the systemic infection of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in four host plants. We mechanically inoculated an artificial population of twelve CMV mutants to young leaves of tomato, pepper, Nicotiana benthamiana, and squash. The inoculated leaves and primary and secondary systemically infected leaves were sampled at 2, 10, and 15 days post-inoculation. All twelve mutants were detected in all of the inoculated leaves. The number of mutants recovered from the systemically infected leaves of all host species was reduced significantly, indicating bottlenecks in systemic movement. The recovery frequencies of a few of the mutants were significantly different in each host probably due to host-specific selective forces. These results have implications for the differences in virus population variation that is seen in different host plants.

  6. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic characterization of tropical soda apple mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Fillmer, Kornelia; Adkins, Scott; Pongam, Patchara; D'Elia, Tom

    2016-08-01

    We report the first complete genome sequence of tropical soda apple mosaic virus (TSAMV), a tobamovirus originally isolated from tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum) collected in Okeechobee, Florida. The complete genome of TSAMV is 6,350 nucleotides long and contains four open reading frames encoding the following proteins: i) 126-kDa methyltransferase/helicase (3354 nt), ii) 183-kDa polymerase (4839 nt), iii) movement protein (771 nt) and iv) coat protein (483 nt). The complete genome sequence of TSAMV shares 80.4 % nucleotide sequence identity with pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and 71.2-74.2 % identity with other tobamoviruses naturally infecting members of the Solanaceae plant family. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of the 126-kDa and 183-kDa proteins and the complete genome sequence place TSAMV in a subcluster with PMMoV within the Solanaceae-infecting subgroup of tobamoviruses. PMID:27169599

  7. Atomic force microscopy investigation of Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus capsid disruption and RNA extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Yu. G.; McPherson, Alexander . E-mail: amcphers@uci.edu

    2006-09-01

    Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus (TYMV) was subjected to a variety of procedures which disrupted the protein capsids and produced exposure of the ssRNA genome. The results of the treatments were visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Both in situ and ex situ freeze-thawing produced RNA emission, though at low efficiency. The RNA lost from such particles was evident, in some cases in the process of exiting the virions. More severe disruption of TYMV and extrusion of intact RNA onto the substrate were produced by drying the virus and rehydrating with neutral buffer. Similar products were also obtained by heating TYMV to 70-75 deg. C and by exposure to alkaline pH. Experiments showed the nucleic acid to have an elaborate secondary structure distributed linearly along its length.

  8. Delay of Disease Development in Transgenic Plants that Express the Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell Abel, Patricia; Nelson, Richard S.; de, Barun; Hoffmann, Nancy; Rogers, Stephen G.; Fraley, Robert T.; Beachy, Roger N.

    1986-05-01

    A chimeric gene containing a cloned cDNA of the coat protein (CP) gene of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was introduced into tobacco cells on a Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens from which tumor inducing genes had been removed. Plants regenerated from transformed cells expressed TMV mRNA and CP as a nuclear trait. Seedlings from self-fertilized transgenic plants were inoculated with TMV and observed for development of disease symptoms. The seedlings that expressed the CP gene were delayed in symptom development and 10 to 60 percent of the transgenic plants failed to develop symptoms for the duration of the experiments. Increasing the concentration of TMV in the inoculum shortened the delay in appearance of symptoms. The results of these experiments indicate that plants can be genetically transformed for resistance to virus disease development.

  9. A model for intracellular movement of Cauliflower mosaic virus: the concept of the mobile virion factory.

    PubMed

    Schoelz, James E; Angel, Carlos A; Nelson, Richard S; Leisner, Scott M

    2016-03-01

    The genomes of many plant viruses have a coding capacity limited to <10 proteins, yet it is becoming increasingly clear that individual plant virus proteins may interact with several targets in the host for establishment of infection. As new functions are uncovered for individual viral proteins, virologists have realized that the apparent simplicity of the virus genome is an illusion that belies the true impact that plant viruses have on host physiology. In this review, we discuss our evolving understanding of the function of the P6 protein of Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), a process that was initiated nearly 35 years ago when the CaMV P6 protein was first described as the 'major inclusion body protein' (IB) present in infected plants. P6 is now referred to in most articles as the transactivator (TAV)/viroplasmin protein, because the first viral function to be characterized for the Caulimovirus P6 protein beyond its role as an inclusion body protein (the viroplasmin) was its role in translational transactivation (the TAV function). This review will discuss the currently accepted functions for P6 and then present the evidence for an entirely new function for P6 in intracellular movement. PMID:26687180

  10. Overlapping open reading frames revealed by complete nucleotide sequencing of turnip yellow mosaic virus genomic RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Morch, M D; Boyer, J C; Haenni, A L

    1988-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) genomic RNA has been determined on a set of overlapping cDNA clones using a sequential sequencing strategy. The RNA is 6318 nucleotides long, excluding the cap structure. The genome organization deduced from the sequence confirms previous results of in vitro translation. A novel open reading frame (ORF) putatively encoding a Pro-rich and very basic 69K (K = kilodalton) protein is detected at the 5' end of the genome. It is initiated at the first AUG codon on the RNA and overlaps the major ORF that encodes the non structural 206K (previously referred to as 195K) protein of TYMV; its function is unknown. Several amino acid consensus sequences already described among plant and animal viruses are also found in the TYMV-encoded polypeptides. A comparison with other viruses whose RNA sequence is known leads to the conclusion that TYMV belongs to the "Sindbis-like" supergroup of viruses and could be related to Semliki forest virus. PMID:3399388

  11. GOLDEN2-LIKE transcription factors coordinate the tolerance to Cucumber mosaic virus in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue-Ying; Li, Peng-Xu; Zou, Li-Juan; Tan, Wen-Rong; Zheng, Ting; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana GOLDEN2-LIKE (GLKs) transcription factors play important roles in regulation of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes, as well as participate in chloroplast development. However, the involvement of GLKs in plants resistance to virus remains largely unknown. Here, the relationship between GLKs and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) stress response was investigated. Our results showed that the Arabidopsis glk1glk2 double-mutant was more susceptible to CMV infection and suffered more serious damages (such as higher oxidative damages, more compromised in PSII photochemistry and more reactive oxygen species accumulation) when compared with the wild-type plants. Interestingly, there was little difference between single mutant (glk1 or glk2) and wild-type plants in response to CMV infection, suggesting GLK1 and GLK2 might function redundant in virus resistance in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, the induction of antioxidant system and defense-associated genes expression in the double mutant were inhibited when compared with single mutant or wild-type plants after CMV infection. Further evidences showed that salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) might be involved in GLKs-mediated virus resistance, as SA or JA level and synthesis-related genes transcription were impaired in glk1glk2 mutant. Taken together, our results indicated that GLKs played a positively role in virus resistance in Arabidopsis. PMID:27346129

  12. Inactivation and purification of cowpea mosaic virus-like particles displaying peptide antigens from Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Jamie P.; Dang, Nghiep; Rasochova, Lada

    2007-01-01

    Chimeric cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles displaying foreign peptide antigens on the particle surface are suitable for development of peptide-based vaccines. However, commonly used PEG precipitation-based purification methods are not sufficient for production of high quality vaccine candidates because they do not allow for separation of chimeric particles from cleaved contaminating species. Moreover, the purified particles remain infectious to plants. To advance the CPMV technology further, it is necessary to develop efficient and scalable purification strategies and preferably eliminate the infectivity of chimeric viruses. CPMV was engineered to display a 25 amino acid peptide derived from the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen on the surface loop of the large coat protein subunit. The engineered virus was propagated in cowpea plants and assembled into chimeric virus particles displaying 60 copies of the peptide on the surface. An effective inactivation method was developed to produce non-infectious chimeric CPMV virus-like particles (VLPs). Uncleaved VLPs were separated from the contaminating cleaved forms by anion exchange chromatography. The yield of purified chimeric VLPs was 0.3 g·kg−1 of leaf tissue. The results demonstrate the ability to generate multi-gram quantities of non-infectious, chimeric CPMV VLPs in plants for use in the development of peptide-based vaccines. PMID:17227681

  13. A coiled-coil interaction mediates cauliflower mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement

    PubMed Central

    Stavolone, Livia; Villani, Maria Elena; Leclerc, Denis; Hohn, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The function of the virion-associated protein (VAP) of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) has long been only poorly understood. VAP is associated with the virion but is dispensable for virus morphogenesis and replication. It mediates virus transmission by aphids through simultaneous interaction with both the aphid transmission factor and the virion. However, although insect transmission is not fundamental to CaMV survival, VAP is indispensable for spreading the virus infection within the host plant. We used a GST pull-down technique to demonstrate that VAP interacts with the viral movement protein through coiled-coil domains and surface plasmon resonance to measure the interaction kinetics. We mapped the movement protein coiled-coil to the C terminus of the protein and proved that it self-assembles as a trimer. Immunogold labeling/electron microscopy revealed that the VAP and viral movement protein colocalize on CaMV particles within plasmodesmata. These results highlight the multifunctional potential of the VAP protein conferred by its efficient coiled-coil interaction system and show a plant virus possessing a surface-exposed protein (VAP) mediating viral entry into host cells. PMID:15837934

  14. A coiled-coil interaction mediates cauliflower mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavolone, Livia; Villani, Maria Elena; Leclerc, Denis; Hohn, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    The function of the virion-associated protein (VAP) of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) has long been only poorly understood. VAP is associated with the virion but is dispensable for virus morphogenesis and replication. It mediates virus transmission by aphids through simultaneous interaction with both the aphid transmission factor and the virion. However, although insect transmission is not fundamental to CaMV survival, VAP is indispensable for spreading the virus infection within the host plant. We used a GST pull-down technique to demonstrate that VAP interacts with the viral movement protein through coiled-coil domains and surface plasmon resonance to measure the interaction kinetics. We mapped the movement protein coiled-coil to the C terminus of the protein and proved that it self-assembles as a trimer. Immunogold labeling/electron microscopy revealed that the VAP and viral movement protein colocalize on CaMV particles within plasmodesmata. These results highlight the multifunctional potential of the VAP protein conferred by its efficient coiled-coil interaction system and show a plant virus possessing a surface-exposed protein (VAP) mediating viral entry into host cells. movement protein | virion-associated protein | Biacore

  15. Single-Molecule FRET Reveals Three Conformations for the TLS Domain of Brome Mosaic Virus Genome.

    PubMed

    Vieweger, Mario; Holmstrom, Erik D; Nesbitt, David J

    2015-12-15

    Metabolite-dependent conformational switching in RNA riboswitches is now widely accepted as a critical regulatory mechanism for gene expression in bacterial systems. More recently, similar gene regulation mechanisms have been found to be important for viral systems as well. One of the most abundant and best-studied systems is the tRNA-like structure (TLS) domain, which has been found to occur in many plant viruses spread across numerous genera. In this work, folding dynamics for the TLS domain of Brome Mosaic Virus have been investigated using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques. In particular, burst fluorescence methods are exploited to observe metal-ion ([M(n+)])-induced folding in freely diffusing RNA constructs resembling the minimal TLS element of brome mosaic virus RNA3. The results of these experiments reveal a complex equilibrium of at least three distinct populations. A stepwise, or consecutive, thermodynamic model for TLS folding is developed, which is in good agreement with the [M(n+)]-dependent evolution of conformational populations and existing structural information in the literature. Specifically, this folding pathway explains the metal-ion dependent formation of a functional TLS domain from unfolded RNAs via two consecutive steps: 1) hybridization of a long-range stem interaction, followed by 2) formation of a 3'-terminal pseudoknot. These two conformational transitions are well described by stepwise dissociation constants for [Mg(2+)] (K1 = 328 ± 30 μM and K2 = 1092 ± 183 μM) and [Na(+)] (K1 = 74 ± 6 mM and K2 = 243 ± 52 mM)-induced folding. The proposed thermodynamic model is further supported by inhibition studies of the long-range stem interaction using a complementary DNA oligomer, which effectively shifts the dynamic equilibrium toward the unfolded conformation. Implications of this multistep conformational folding mechanism are discussed with regard to regulation of virus replication. PMID:26682819

  16. Sequence analysis and genetic diversity of five new Indian isolates of cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Gautam, K K; Raj, S K

    2015-12-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is an important virus since it causes severe losses to many economically important crops worldwide. Five new isolates of CMV were isolated from naturally infected Hippeastrum hybridum, Dahlia pinnata, Hemerocallis fulva, Acorus calamus and Typhonium trilobatum plants, all exhibiting severe leaf mosaic symptoms. For molecular identification and sequence analyses, the complete coat protein (CP) gene of these isolates was amplified by RT-PCR. The resulting amplicons were cloned and sequenced and isolates were designated as HH (KP698590), DP (JF682239), HF (KP698589), AC (KP698588) and TT (JX570732). For study of genetic diversity among these isolates, the sequence data were analysed by BLASTn, multiple alignment and generating phylogenetic trees along with the respective sequences of other CMV isolates available in GenBank Database were done. The isolates under study showed 82-99% sequence diversity among them at nucleotide and amino acid levels; however they showed close relationships with CMV isolates of subgroup IB. In alignment analysis of amino acid sequences of HH and AC isolates, we have found fifteen and twelve unique substitutions, compared to HF, DP and TT isolates, suggesting the cause of high genetic diversity. PMID:26666188

  17. Establishment of an Agrobacterium-mediated Inoculation System for Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Minji; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Song, Dami; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    The infectious full-length cDNA clones of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolates KW and KOM, which were isolated from watermelon and oriental melon, respectively, were constructed under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. We successfully inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana with the cloned CGMMV isolates KW and KOM by Agrobacterium-mediated infiltration. Virulence and symptomatic characteristics of the cloned CGMMV isolates KW and KOM were tested on several indicator plants. No obvious differences between two cloned isolates in disease development were observed on the tested indicator plants. We also determined full genome sequences of the cloned CGMMV isolates KW and KOM. Sequence comparison revealed that only four amino acids (at positions 228, 699, 1212, and 1238 of the replicase protein region) differ between the cloned isolates KW and KOM. A previous study reported that the isolate KOM could not infect Chenopodium amaranticolor, but the cloned KOM induced chlorotic spots on the inoculated leaves. When compared with the previously reported sequence of the original KOM isolate, the cloned KOM contained one amino acid mutation (Ala to Thr) at position 228 of the replicase protein, suggesting that this mutation might be responsible for induction of chlorotic spots on the inoculated leaves of C. amaranticolor. PMID:26674677

  18. Mapping regions of the cauliflower mosaic virus ORF III product required for infectivity.

    PubMed

    Jacquot, E; Geldreich, A; Keller, M; Yot, P

    1998-03-15

    The open reading frame (ORF) III product (PIII) of the pararetrovirus cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) has nucleic acid-binding properties in vitro, but its biological role is not yet determined. ORF III is closely linked to ORF II and overlaps ORF IV out of frame in the CaMV genome. A new CaMV-derived vector (Ca delta) devoid of ORF III and containing unique restriction sites between ORFs II and IV was designed. Introduction of the wild-type CaMV ORF III into Ca delta results in a clone (Ca3) infectious in turnip plants. Truncated or point-mutated versions of ORF III were then inserted into Ca delta and tested in vivo. Inoculation of the different mutants into turnip revealed that the four C-terminal amino acid residues of PIII are dispensable for infectivity as well as an internal domain (amino acids 61 to 80). Taken together the results show that PIII possesses a functional two-domain organization. Moreover, the CaMV PIII function(s) cannot be replaced either by the PIII protein of another caulimovirus, the figwort mosaic virus, or by the P2 protein of the cacao swollen shoot badnavirus, a member of the second plant pararetrovirus group. PMID:9514961

  19. Antiviral activity of Thuja orientalis extracts against watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) on Citrullus lanatus.

    PubMed

    Elbeshehy, Esam K F; Metwali, Ehab M R; Almaghrabi, Omar A

    2015-03-01

    Watermelon mosaic potyvirus (WMV) is considered as an important virus infecting watermelon and causing adverse effects on crop productivity. To overcome this problem one of the main objectives of plant breeders is to make these strains less effective in the ability to infect plants by treatment with plant extracts. Due to the advantages of plant tissue culture, in vitro, in the process of the selection of different cultivars under biotic stress, this study was conducted to achieve this aim by evaluating the effect of three concentrations of Thuja extract on the multiplication of WMV in watermelon by measuring callus fresh weight and soluble proteins (mg g(-1) fresh weight) of healthy and infected hypocotyl explants. Also, WMV was isolated from naturally infected watermelon and characterized as potyvirus by serological and molecular analyses. The isolated virus gave a positive reaction with WMV antiserum compared with other antibodies of CMV, ZYMV and SqMV using DAS-ELISA. RT-PCR, with the specific primer for WMV-cp. gene, yielded 825 base pair DNA fragments. The results that belong to soluble protein analysis indicated that infected hypocotyl explants treated with 6 g L(-1) recorded the highest rate in the number of soluble protein bands compared with the rest of treatments. As a conclusion of these results, we can recommend to apply the Thuja extract at 6 g L(-1) as a optimum dosage to decrease the infection caused by watermelon mosaic potyvirus. PMID:25737655

  20. Inhibitory effect of esterified lactoferin and lactoferrin against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in tobacco seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Hong-Yan; Xia, Xiao-Ming; Li, Peng-peng; Wang, Kai-Yun

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of esterified lactoferrin (ELF) and lactoferrin (LF) against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in tobacco seedlings and the underlying mechanism were investigated. ELF and LF significantly inhibited viral infection and TMV multiplication in tobacco plants. ELF showed a higher inhibition effect against TMV than LF treatment in a dose and time-dependent way. Moreover, ELF induced a higher increase in the levels of transcription of pathogenesis-related (PR) protein genes [acidic PRs (PR-1a, PR-2, PR-3, PR-5) and basic PR-1] and defense-related enzymes [phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5), and 5-epi-aristolochene synthase (EAS, EC 2.5.1.35)] both locally and systemically, in correlation with the induction of resistance against tobacco mosaic virus. Furthermore, ELF also induced accumulation of salicylic acid, SA 2-O-β-D-glucoside and H2O2. These results suggested that ELF and LF could control TMV incidence and the mechanism might attribute to activate the expression of a number of defense genes. PMID:24238292

  1. Prediction of MHC binding peptides and epitopes from alfalfa mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Gomase, Virendra S; Kale, Karbhari V; Chikhale, Nandkishor J; Changbhale, Smruti S

    2007-08-01

    Peptide fragments from alfalfa mosaic virus involved multiple antigenic components directing and empowering the immune system to protect the host from infection. MHC molecules are cell surface proteins, which take active part in host immune reactions and involvement of MHC class-I & II in response to almost all antigens. Coat protein of alfalfa mosaic virus contains 221 aa residues. Analysis found five MHC ligands in coat protein as 64-LSSFNGLGV-72; 86- RILEEDLIY-94; 96-MVFSITPSY-104; 100- ITPSYAGTF-108; 110- LTDDVTTED-118; having rescaled binding affinity and c-terminal cleavage affinity more than 0.5. The predicted binding affinity is normalized by the 1% fractil. The MHC peptide binding is predicted using neural networks trained on c-terminals of known epitopes. In analysis predicted MHC/peptide binding is a log transformed value related to the IC50 values in nM units. Total numbers of peptides found are 213. Predicted MHC binding regions act like red flags for antigen specific and generate immune response against the parent antigen. So a small fragment of antigen can induce immune response against whole antigen. This theme is implemented in designing subunit and synthetic peptide vaccines. The sequence analysis method allows potential drug targets to identify active sites against plant diseases. The method integrates prediction of peptide MHC class I binding; proteosomal c-terminal cleavage and TAP transport efficiency. PMID:17691913

  2. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Amr; Hutchens, Heather M.; Howard Berg, R.; Sue Loesch-Fries, L.

    2012-11-25

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast.

  3. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Amr; Hutchens, Heather M; Berg, R Howard; Loesch-Fries, L Sue

    2012-11-25

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast. PMID:22999257

  4. Colour break in reverse bicolour daffodils is associated with the presence of Narcissus mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Daffodils (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) are one of the world's most popular ornamentals. They also provide a scientific model for studying the carotenoid pigments responsible for their yellow and orange flower colours. In reverse bicolour daffodils, the yellow flower trumpet fades to white with age. The flowers of this type of daffodil are particularly prone to colour break whereby, upon opening, the yellow colour of the perianth is observed to be 'broken' into patches of white. This colour break symptom is characteristic of potyviral infections in other ornamentals such as tulips whose colour break is due to alterations in the presence of anthocyanins. However, reverse bicolour flowers displaying colour break show no other virus-like symptoms such as leaf mottling or plant stunting, leading some to argue that the carotenoid-based colour breaking in reverse bicolour flowers may not be caused by virus infection. Results Although potyviruses have been reported to cause colour break in other flower species, enzyme-linked-immunoassays with an antibody specific to the potyviral family showed that potyviruses were not responsible for the occurrence of colour break in reverse bicolour daffodils. Colour break in this type of daffodil was clearly associated with the presence of large quantities of rod-shaped viral particles of lengths 502-580 nm in tepals. Sap from flowers displaying colour break caused red necrotic lesions on Gomphrena globosa, suggesting the presence of potexvirus. Red necrotic lesions were not observed in this indicator plant when sap from reverse bicolour flowers not showing colour break was used. The reverse transcriptase polymerase reactions using degenerate primers to carla-, potex- and poty-viruses linked viral RNA with colour break and sequencing of the amplified products indicated that the potexvirus Narcissisus mosaic virus was the predominant virus associated with the occurrence of the colour break. Conclusions High viral counts were

  5. The c-terminus of wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein is involved in differential infection of wheat and maize through host-specific long-distance transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multifunctional viral coat proteins (CPs) play important roles in the virus life-cycle. The CP determinants and mechanisms involved in extension of host range of monocot-infecting viruses are poorly understood. The role of the C-terminal region of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) CP in virus transpo...

  6. Satellite tobacco mosaic virus refined to 1.4 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Steven B.; Day, John S.; McPherson, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) is among the smallest viruses, having 60 identical subunits arranged with T = 1 icosahedral symmetry. Its crystal structure was solved at 290 K and was refined using, in part, crystals grown in microgravity. Electron-density maps revealed nearly 57% of the genomic ssRNA. Using six flash-cooled crystals, diffraction data were recorded to 1.4 Å resolution and independent refinements of the STMV model were carried out versus the previous 1.8 Å resolution data representing merged data from 21 crystals (271 689 unique reflections), data consisting of corresponding reflections to 1.8 Å resolution from the cooled crystals and 1.4 Å resolution data from the cooled crystals comprised of 570 721 unique reflections. Models were independently refined with full NCS constraints using the program CNS and in restrained mode using the programs CNS, REFMAC5 and SHELX-97, with the latter two procedures including anisotropic temperature factors. Significant additional structural detail emerged from the analyses, including a unique cation and anion arrangement on fivefold axes and a precise assessment of icosahedral symmetry exactness in the crystal lattice. STMV represents the highest resolution native virus structure currently known by a substantial margin, and it permits the evaluation of a precise atomic model of a spherical virus at near-atomic resolution for the first time. PMID:25195746

  7. Advances in alfalfa mosaic virus-mediated expression of anthrax antigen in planta

    SciTech Connect

    Brodzik, R.; Bandurska, K.; Deka, D.; Golovkin, M.; Koprowski, H. . E-mail: h_koprowski@jefferson.edu

    2005-12-16

    Plant viruses show great potential for production of pharmaceuticals in plants. Such viruses can harbor a small antigenic peptide(s) as a part of their coat proteins (CP) and elicit an antigen-specific immune response. Here, we report the high yield and consistency in production of recombinant alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV) particles for specific presentation of the small loop 15 amino acid epitope from domain-4 of the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA-D4s). The epitope was inserted immediately after the first 25 N-terminal amino acids of AlMV CP to retain genome activation and binding of CP to viral RNAs. Recombinant AlMV particles were efficiently produced in tobacco, easily purified for immunological analysis, and exhibited extended stability and systemic proliferation in planta. Intraperitional injections of mice with recombinant plant virus particles harboring the PA-D4s epitope elicited a distinct immune response. Western blotting and ELISA analysis showed that sera from immunized mice recognized both native PA antigen and the AlMV CP.

  8. Advances in alfalfa mosaic virus-mediated expression of anthrax antigen in planta.

    PubMed

    Brodzik, R; Bandurska, K; Deka, D; Golovkin, M; Koprowski, H

    2005-12-16

    Plant viruses show great potential for production of pharmaceuticals in plants. Such viruses can harbor a small antigenic peptide(s) as a part of their coat proteins (CP) and elicit an antigen-specific immune response. Here, we report the high yield and consistency in production of recombinant alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV) particles for specific presentation of the small loop 15 amino acid epitope from domain-4 of the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA-D4s). The epitope was inserted immediately after the first 25 N-terminal amino acids of AlMV CP to retain genome activation and binding of CP to viral RNAs. Recombinant AlMV particles were efficiently produced in tobacco, easily purified for immunological analysis, and exhibited extended stability and systemic proliferation in planta. Intraperitional injections of mice with recombinant plant virus particles harboring the PA-D4s epitope elicited a distinct immune response. Western blotting and ELISA analysis showed that sera from immunized mice recognized both native PA antigen and the AlMV CP. PMID:16236249

  9. After the double helix: Rosalind Franklin's research on Tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Creager, Angela N H; Morgan, Gregory J

    2008-06-01

    Rosalind Franklin is best known for her informative X-ray diffraction patterns of DNA that provided vital clues for James Watson and Francis Crick's double-stranded helical model. Her scientific career did not end when she left the DNA work at King's College, however. In 1953 Franklin moved to J. D. Bernal's crystallography laboratory at Birkbeck College, where she shifted her focus to the three-dimensional structure of viruses, obtaining diffraction patterns of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) of unprecedented detail and clarity. During the next five years, while making significant headway on the structural determination of TMV, Franklin maintained an active correspondence with both Watson and Crick, who were also studying aspects of virus structure. Developments in TMV research during the 1950s illustrate the connections in the emerging field of molecular biology between structural studies of nucleic acids and of proteins and viruses. They also reveal how the protagonists of the "race for the double helix" continued to interact personally and professionally during the years when Watson and Crick's model for the double-helical structure of DNA was debated and confirmed. PMID:18702397

  10. Comparative molecular epidemiology provides new insights into Zucchini yellow mosaic virus occurrence in France.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, H; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Nozeran, K; Millot, P; Desbiez, C

    2014-06-24

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV, genus Potyvirus) causes important crop losses in cucurbits worldwide. In France, ZYMV epidemics are sporadic but occasionally very severe. This contrasts with Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV, genus Potyvirus) which causes regular and early epidemics. Factors influencing ZYMV epidemiology are still poorly understood. In order to gain new insights on the ecology and epidemiology of this virus, a 5-year multilocation trial was conducted in which ZYMV spread and populations were studied in each of the 20 plot/year combinations and compared with WMV. Search for ZYMV alternative hosts was conducted by testing weeds growing naturally around one plot and also by checking ZYMV natural infections in selected ornamental species. Although similar ZYMV populations were observed occasionally in the same plot in two successive years suggesting the occurrence of overwintering hosts nearby, only two Lamium amplexicaule plants were found to be infected by ZYMV of 3459 weed samples that were tested. The scarcity of ZYMV reservoirs contrasts with the frequent detection of WMV in the same samples. Since ZYMV and WMV have many aphid vectors in common and are transmitted with similar efficiencies, the differences observed in ZYMV and WMV reservoir abundances could be a major explanatory factor for the differences observed in the typology of ZYMV and WMV epidemics in France. Other potential ZYMV alternative hosts have been identified in ornamental species including begonia. Although possible in a few cases, exchanges of populations between different plots located from 500 m to 4 km apart seem uncommon. Therefore, the potential dissemination range of ZYMV by its aphid vectors seems to be rather limited in a fragmented landscape. PMID:24486486

  11. Crystallographic structure of the T=1 particle of brome mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Larson, Steven B; Lucas, Robert W; McPherson, Alexander

    2005-02-25

    T=1 icosahedral particles of amino terminally truncated brome mosaic virus (BMV) protein were created by treatment of the wild-type T=3 virus with 1M CaCl2 and crystallized from sodium malonate. Diffraction data were collected from frozen crystals to beyond 2.9 A resolution and the structure determined by molecular replacement and phase extension. The particles are composed of pentameric capsomeres from the wild-type virions which have reoriented with respect to the original particle pentameric axes by rotations of 37 degrees , and formed tenuous interactions with one another, principally through conformationally altered C-terminal polypeptides. Otherwise, the pentamers are virtually superimposable upon those of the original T=3 BMV particles. The T=1 particles, in the crystals, are not perfect icosahedra, but deviate slightly from exact symmetry, possibly due to packing interactions. This suggests that the T=1 particles are deformable, which is consistent with the loose arrangement of pentamers and latticework of holes that penetrate the surface. Atomic force microscopy showed that the T=3 to T=1 transition could occur by shedding of hexameric capsomeres and restructuring of remaining pentamers accompanied by direct condensation. Knowledge of the structures of the BMV wild-type and T=1 particles now permit us to propose a tentative model for that process. A comparison of the BMV T=1 particles was made with the reassembled T=1 particles produced from the coat protein of trypsin treated alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV), another bromovirus. There is little resemblance between the two particles. The BMV particle, with a maximum diameter of 195 A, is made from distinctive pentameric capsomeres with large holes along the 3-fold axis, while the AlMV particle, of approximate maximum diameter 220 A, has subunits closely packed around the 3-fold axis, large holes along the 5-fold axis, and few contacts within pentamers. In both particles crucial linkages are made about

  12. Early Function of the Abutilon Mosaic Virus AC2 Gene as a Replication Brake

    PubMed Central

    Krenz, Björn; Deuschle, Kathrin; Deigner, Tobias; Unseld, Sigrid; Kepp, Gabi; Wege, Christina; Kleinow, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The C2/AC2 genes of monopartite/bipartite geminiviruses of the genera Begomovirus and Curtovirus encode important pathogenicity factors with multiple functions described so far. A novel function of Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) AC2 as a replication brake is described, utilizing transgenic plants with dimeric inserts of DNA B or with a reporter construct to express green fluorescent protein (GFP). Their replicational release upon AbMV superinfection or the individual and combined expression of epitope-tagged AbMV AC1, AC2, and AC3 was studied. In addition, the effects were compared in the presence and in the absence of an unrelated tombusvirus suppressor of silencing (P19). The results show that AC2 suppresses replication reproducibly in all assays and that AC3 counteracts this effect. Examination of the topoisomer distribution of supercoiled DNA, which indicates changes in the viral minichromosome structure, did not support any influence of AC2 on transcriptional gene silencing and DNA methylation. The geminiviral AC2 protein has been detected here for the first time in plants. The experiments revealed an extremely low level of AC2, which was slightly increased if constructs with an intron and a hemagglutinin (HA) tag in addition to P19 expression were used. AbMV AC2 properties are discussed with reference to those of other geminiviruses with respect to charge, modification, and size in order to delimit possible reasons for the different behaviors. IMPORTANCE The (A)C2 genes encode a key pathogenicity factor of begomoviruses and curtoviruses in the plant virus family Geminiviridae. This factor has been implicated in the resistance breaking observed in agricultural cotton production. AC2 is a multifunctional protein involved in transcriptional control, gene silencing, and regulation of basal biosynthesis. Here, a new function of Abutilon mosaic virus AC2 in replication control is added as a feature of this protein in viral multiplication, providing a novel

  13. A High Throughput Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus Vector for Virus Induced Gene Silencing in Monocots and Dicots

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lijie; Jackson, Andrew O.; Liu, Zhiyong; Han, Chenggui; Yu, Jialin; Li, Dawei

    2011-01-01

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) is a single-stranded RNA virus with three genome components designated alpha, beta, and gamma. BSMV vectors have previously been shown to be efficient virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) vehicles in barley and wheat and have provided important information about host genes functioning during pathogenesis as well as various aspects of genes functioning in development. To permit more effective use of BSMV VIGS for functional genomics experiments, we have developed an Agrobacterium delivery system for BSMV and have coupled this with a ligation independent cloning (LIC) strategy to mediate efficient cloning of host genes. Infiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves provided excellent sources of virus for secondary BSMV infections and VIGS in cereals. The Agro/LIC BSMV VIGS vectors were able to function in high efficiency down regulation of phytoene desaturase (PDS), magnesium chelatase subunit H (ChlH), and plastid transketolase (TK) gene silencing in N. benthamiana and in the monocots, wheat, barley, and the model grass, Brachypodium distachyon. Suppression of an Arabidopsis orthologue cloned from wheat (TaPMR5) also interfered with wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici) infections in a manner similar to that of the A. thaliana PMR5 loss-of-function allele. These results imply that the PMR5 gene has maintained similar functions across monocot and dicot families. Our BSMV VIGS system provides substantial advantages in expense, cloning efficiency, ease of manipulation and ability to apply VIGS for high throughput genomics studies. PMID:22031834

  14. Fabrication and characterization of gold nano-wires templated on virus-like arrays of tobacco mosaic virus coat proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wnęk, M; Górzny, M Ł; Ward, M B; Wälti, C; Davies, A G; Brydson, R; Evans, S D; Stockley, P G

    2016-01-01

    The rod-shaped plant virus tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is widely used as a nano-fabrication template, and chimeric peptide expression on its major coat protein has extended its potential applications. Here we describe a simple bacterial expression system for production and rapid purification of recombinant chimeric TMV coat protein carrying C-terminal peptide tags. These proteins do not bind TMV RNA or form disks at pH 7. However, they retain the ability to self-assemble into virus-like arrays at acidic pH. C-terminal peptide tags in such arrays are exposed on the protein surface, allowing interaction with target species. We have utilized a C-terminal His-tag to create virus coat protein-templated nano-rods able to bind gold nanoparticles uniformly. These can be transformed into gold nano-wires by deposition of additional gold atoms from solution, followed by thermal annealing. The resistivity of a typical annealed wire created by this approach is significantly less than values reported for other nano-wires made using different bio-templates. This expression construct is therefore a useful additional tool for the creation of chimeric TMV-like nano-rods for bio-templating. PMID:23220929

  15. Complete genome sequence of Celery mosaic virus and its relationship to other members of the genus Potyvirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genomic sequence of Celery mosaic virus (CeMV) was determined to be 9999 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3’ poly(A) tail. The genome comprises a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3181 amino acid residues. Its genomic organization is typical of potyviruses, and cont...

  16. Genome-wide association analysis identified SNPs closely linked to a gene resistant to Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) disease is a serious viral disease of winter wheat growing areas worldwide. SBWMV infection can significantly reduce grain yield up to 80%. Developing resistant wheat cultivars is the only feasible strategy to reduce the losses. In this study, wheat Infinium iSe...

  17. Detection of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus-infected watermelon seeds using short wave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cucurbit diseases caused by cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) have led to a serious problem to growers and seed producers because it is difficult to prevent spreading through causal agent of seeds. Conventional detection methods for infected seed such as a biological, serological, and m...

  18. Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), the causal agent of High Plains disease, is present in Ohio wheat fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), the causal agent of High Plains disease in wheat, was found in wheat fields in three western counties in Ohio: Auglaize, Miami, and Paulding. WMoV nucleoprotein sequence was identified from Illumina deep sequencing of RNA collected from symptomatic and asymptomatic wheat s...

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Chinese Yam Necrotic Mosaic Virus from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong-Hwan; Son, Chang-Gi; Kwon, Joong-Bae; Nam, Hyo-Hun; Kim, Yeongtae; Lee, Su-Heon; Zhao, Fumei; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Chinese yam necrotic mosaic virus (ChYNMV) consisting of 8,213 nucleotides containing one open reading frame was determined by the transcriptome data generated from Discorea opposita This is the first report of the complete nucleotide sequence of ChYNMV from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea. PMID:27492000

  20. Genetic diversity and serological specificity of emerging cucumber green mottle mosaic virus and development of a broad spectrum LAMP assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), first described in England, 1935, is a well-known, seed-borne Tobamovirus on cucurbits in Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. The recent outbreaks of CGMMV in Australia and North America (Canada and U.S.) received great concerns from the vegetable seed com...

  1. The P1 cistron of Triticum mosaic virus (genus Poacevirus; family Potyviridae) is a suppressor of RNA silencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is the type species of the genus Poacevirus in the family Potyviridae. The genomic organization of TriMV is similar to that of the members of Potyvirus genus but has only limited sequence identity with other potyviruses. In this study, we screened the genome of TriMV fo...

  2. A conserved locus conditioning Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus resistance on 5DL in common wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) is considered one of the most important diseases in winter wheat regions of the central and southeastern United States. Utilization of resistant cultivars is the only practical and environmentally friendly means of control. To identify QTL for SBWMV resistance, ...

  3. Introgression of chromosome segments from multiple alien species in wheat breeding lines with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyramiding of alien-derived Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) resistance and resistance enhancing genes in wheat is a costeffective and environmentally safe strategy for disease control. PCR-based markers and cytogenetic analysis with genomic in situ hybridisation were applied to identify alien chrom...

  4. Effects of wheat streak mosaic virus on root development and water-use efficiency of hard red winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greenhouse and field studies were conducted to determine the effects of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), a member of the family Potyviridae, on root development and water-use efficiency (WUE) of two hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivars, one susceptible and one resistant to WSMV. In t...

  5. Triticum mosaic virus exhibits limited population variation yet shows evidence of parallel evolution after replicated serial passage in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An infectious cDNA clone of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) (genus Poacevirus; family Potyviridae) was used to establish three independent lineages in wheat to examine intra-host population diversity levels within protein 1 (P1) and coat protein (CP) cistrons over time. Genetic variation was assessed ...

  6. Evidence that QTL may be involved in a tolerance response to Pea enation mosaic virus in pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) is a serious disease of fresh market and dry pea in the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. The En gene confers resistance to PEMV in pea, however a limited number of available cultivars contain the gene, and sources of tolerance have not been reported. In 2007, ad...

  7. Fine mapping of the Bsrl barley stripe mosaic virus resistance gene in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ND18 strain of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) infects several lines of Brachypodium distachyon, a recently developed model system for genomics research in cereals. Among the inbred lines tested, Bd3-1 is highly resistant at 20 to 25 °C, whereas Bd21 is susceptible and infection results in a...

  8. Selective interaction between Chloroplast B ATPase and TGB1 retards severe symptoms caused by Alternanthera mosaic virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The multifunctional triple gene block protein 1 (TGB1) of the Potexvirus Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) has been reported to have silencing suppressor, cell-to-cell movement, and helicase functions. Yeast two hybrid screening using an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library with TGB1 as bait, and co-p...

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Chinese Yam Necrotic Mosaic Virus from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Son, Chang-Gi; Kwon, Joong-Bae; Nam, Hyo-Hun; Kim, Yeongtae; Lee, Su-Heon; Zhao, Fumei; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Chinese yam necrotic mosaic virus (ChYNMV) consisting of 8,213 nucleotides containing one open reading frame was determined by the transcriptome data generated from Discorea opposita. This is the first report of the complete nucleotide sequence of ChYNMV from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea. PMID:27492000

  10. Survey and RT-PCR Based Detection of Cardamom mosaic virus Affecting Small Cardamom in India.

    PubMed

    Biju, C N; Siljo, A; Bhat, A I

    2010-10-01

    Mosaic or marble or katte disease caused by Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) is an important production constraint in all cardamom growing regions of the world. In the present study, 84 cardamom plantations in 44 locations of Karnataka and Kerala were surveyed. The incidence of the disease ranged from 0 to 85%. The incidence was highest in Madikeri (Karnataka) while no incidence was recorded in Peermade (Kerala). In general, incidence and severity of the disease was higher in cardamom plantations of Karnataka. A procedure for total RNA isolation from cardamom and detection of CdMV through reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using primers targeting the conserved region of coat protein was standardized and subsequently validated by testing more than 50 field cardamom samples originating from Karnataka and Kerala states. The method can be used for indexing the planting material and identifying resistant lines/cultivars before either they are further multiplied in large scale or incorporated in breeding. PMID:23637495

  11. Genetic diversity and recombination analysis in the coat protein gene of Banana bract mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, V; Selvarajan, R

    2014-06-01

    Banana bract mosaic virus (BBrMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae, is the causal agent of the bract mosaic disease (BBrMD) that causes serious yield losses in banana and plantain in India and the Philippines. In this study, global genetic diversity and molecular evolution of BBrMV based on the capsid protein (CP) gene were investigated. Multiple alignments of CP gene of 49 BBrMV isolates showed nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) identity of 79-100 and 80-100 %, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that except two Indians isolates (TN14 and TN16), all isolates clustered together. Eleven recombination events were detected using Recombination Detection Program. Codon-based maximum-likelihood methods revealed that most of the codons in the CP gene were under negative or neutral selection except for codons 28, 43, and 92 which were under positive selection. Gene flow between BBrMV populations of banana and cardamom was relatively frequent but not between two different populations of banana infecting isolates identified in this study. This is the first report on genetic diversity, and evolution of BBrMV isolates based on recombination and phylogenetic analysis in India. PMID:24691817

  12. Effects of Abiotic and Biotic Stresses on the Internalization and Dissemination of Human Norovirus Surrogates in Growing Romaine Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    DiCaprio, Erin; Purgianto, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus (NoV) is the major causative agent of fresh-produce-related outbreaks of gastroenteritis; however, the ecology and persistence of human NoV in produce systems are poorly understood. In this study, the effects of abiotic and biotic stresses on the internalization and dissemination of two human NoV surrogates (murine norovirus 1 [MNV-1] and Tulane virus [TV]) in romaine lettuce were determined. To induce abiotic stress, romaine lettuce was grown under drought and flood conditions that mimic extreme weather events, followed by inoculation of soil with MNV-1 or TV. Independently, lettuce plants were infected with lettuce mosaic virus (LMV) to induce biotic stress, followed by inoculation with TV. Plants were grown for 14 days, and viral titers in harvested tissues were determined by plaque assays. It was found that drought stress significantly decreased the rates of both MNV-1 and TV internalization and dissemination. In contrast, neither flood stress nor biotic stress significantly impacted viral internalization or dissemination. Additionally, the rates of TV internalization and dissemination in soil-grown lettuce were significantly higher than those for MNV-1. Collectively, these results demonstrated that (i) human NoV surrogates can be internalized via roots and disseminated to shoots and leaves of romaine lettuce grown in soil, (ii) abiotic stress (drought) but not biotic stress (LMV infection) affects the rates of viral internalization and dissemination, and (iii) the type of virus affects the efficiency of internalization and dissemination. This study also highlights the need to develop effective measures to eliminate internalized viruses in fresh produce. PMID:25956773

  13. Transactivation of dianthin transgene expression by African cassava mosaic virus AC2.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y; Saunders, K; Stanley, J

    1997-02-17

    We have recently described a novel strategy for engineering resistance to African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants using a virus-inducible promoter to control the expression of a plant ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) transgene (Y. Hong et al., Virology 220, 119-127, 1996). Here, we have used a potato virus X (PVX) vector to express the ACMV transactivator protein, AC2, in planta. We confirm that amplification of RIP activity in transgenic plants is mediated by AC2; disruption of AC2 expression by either the introduction of an in-frame stop codon or the deletion of 5'-terminal or 3'-terminal coding sequences reduced RIP expression to the basal level associated with PVX-infected plants. AC2 expression from the PVX vector induced necrosis in nontransformed plants as well as in plants containing the RIP transgene, suggesting that the protein can functionally interact with PVX and/or host factors. The potential of this system to provide a direct and sensitive assay to investigate AC2 function in planta is discussed. PMID:9123846

  14. Identification of distinct steps during tubule formation by the movement protein of Cowpea mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Pouwels, Jeroen; Kornet, Noortje; van Bers, Nikkie; Guighelaar, Teun; van Lent, Jan; Bisseling, Ton; Wellink, Joan

    2003-12-01

    The movement protein (MP) of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) forms tubules through plasmodesmata in infected plants thus enabling virus particles to move from cell to cell. Localization studies of mutant MPs fused to GFP in protoplasts and plants identified several functional domains within the MP that are involved in distinct steps during tubule formation. Coinoculation experiments and the observation that one of the C-terminal deletion mutants accumulated uniformly in the plasma membrane suggest that dimeric or multimeric MP is first targeted to the plasma membrane. At the plasma membrane the MP quickly accumulates in peripheral punctuate spots, from which tubule formation is initiated. One of the mutant MPs formed tubules containing virus particles on protoplasts, but could not support cell-to-cell movement in plants. The observations that this mutant MP accumulated to a higher level in the cell than wt MP and did not accumulate in the cell wall opposite infected cells suggest that breakdown or disassembly of tubules in neighbouring, uninfected cells is required for cell-to-cell movement. PMID:14645930

  15. Mapping the surface-exposed regions of papaya mosaic virus nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rioux, Gervais; Majeau, Nathalie; Leclerc, Denis

    2012-06-01

    In general, the structure of the papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) and other members of the potexviruses is poorly understood. Production of PapMV coat proteins in a bacterial expression system and their self-assembly in vitro into nanoparticles is a very useful tool to study the structure of this virus. Using recombinant PapMV nanoparticles that are similar in shape and appearance to the plant virus, we evaluated surface-exposed regions by two different methods, immunoblot assay and chemical modification with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide or diethyl-pyrocarbonate followed by mass spectrometry. Three regions were targeted by the two techniques. The N- and C-termini were shown to be surfaced exposed as expected. However, the region 125-136 was revealed for the first time as the major surface-exposed region of the nanoparticles. The presence of linear peptides at the surface was finally confirmed using antibodies directed to those peptides. It is likely that region 125-136 plays a key role in the lifecycle of PapMV and other members of the potexvirus group. PMID:22524169

  16. Turnip mosaic virus moves systemically through both phloem and xylem as membrane-associated complexes.

    PubMed

    Wan, Juan; Cabanillas, Daniel Garcia; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    Plant viruses move systemically in plants through the phloem. They move as virions or as ribonucleic protein complexes, although it is not clear what these complexes are made of. The approximately 10-kb RNA genome of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) encodes a membrane protein, known as 6K2, that induces endomembrane rearrangements for the formation of viral replication factories. These factories take the form of vesicles that contain viral RNA (vRNA) and viral replication proteins. In this study, we report the presence of 6K2-tagged vesicles containing vRNA and the vRNA-dependent RNA polymerase in phloem sieve elements and in xylem vessels. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed the presence in the xylem vessels of vRNA-containing vesicles that were associated with viral particles. Stem-girdling experiments, which leave xylem vessels intact but destroy the surrounding tissues, confirmed that TuMV could establish a systemic infection of the plant by going through xylem vessels. Phloem sieve elements and xylem vessels from Potato virus X-infected plants also contained lipid-associated nonencapsidated vRNA, indicating that the presence of membrane-associated ribonucleic protein complexes in the phloem and xylem may not be limited to TuMV. Collectively, these studies indicate that viral replication factories could end up in the phloem and the xylem. PMID:25717035

  17. Turnip mosaic virus Moves Systemically through Both Phloem and Xylem as Membrane-Associated Complexes1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huanquan

    2015-01-01

    Plant viruses move systemically in plants through the phloem. They move as virions or as ribonucleic protein complexes, although it is not clear what these complexes are made of. The approximately 10-kb RNA genome of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) encodes a membrane protein, known as 6K2, that induces endomembrane rearrangements for the formation of viral replication factories. These factories take the form of vesicles that contain viral RNA (vRNA) and viral replication proteins. In this study, we report the presence of 6K2-tagged vesicles containing vRNA and the vRNA-dependent RNA polymerase in phloem sieve elements and in xylem vessels. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed the presence in the xylem vessels of vRNA-containing vesicles that were associated with viral particles. Stem-girdling experiments, which leave xylem vessels intact but destroy the surrounding tissues, confirmed that TuMV could establish a systemic infection of the plant by going through xylem vessels. Phloem sieve elements and xylem vessels from Potato virus X-infected plants also contained lipid-associated nonencapsidated vRNA, indicating that the presence of membrane-associated ribonucleic protein complexes in the phloem and xylem may not be limited to TuMV. Collectively, these studies indicate that viral replication factories could end up in the phloem and the xylem. PMID:25717035

  18. Rapid turnover of intra-host genetic diversity in Zucchini yellow mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Heather E.; Holmes, Edward C.; Stephenson, Andrew G.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic diversity in RNA viruses is shaped by a variety of evolutionary processes, including the bottlenecks that may occur at inter-host transmission. However, how these processes structure genetic variation at the scale of individual hosts is only partly understood. We obtained intra-host sequence data for the coat protein (CP) gene of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) from two horizontally transmitted populations – one via aphid, the other without – and with multiple samples from individual plants. We show that although mutations are generated relatively frequently within infected plants, attaining similar levels of genetic diversity to that seen in some animal RNA viruses (mean intra-sample diversity of 0.02%), most mutations are likely to be transient, deleterious, and purged rapidly. We also observed more population structure in the aphid transmitted viral population, including the same mutations in multiple clones, the presence of a sub-lineage, and evidence for the short-term complementation of defective genomes. PMID:21138748

  19. A Cucumber Mosaic Virus Based Expression System for the Production of Porcine Circovirus Specific Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Gellért, Ákos; Salánki, Katalin; Tombácz, Kata; Tuboly, Tamás; Balázs, Ervin

    2012-01-01

    Potential porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) capsid protein epitopes, suitable for expression on the surface of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) particles were determined by a thorough analysis of the predicted PCV capsid protein structure. The ab initio protein structure prediction was carried out with fold recognition and threading methods. The putative PCV epitopes were selected on the basis of PCV virion models and integrated into the plant virus coat protein, after amino acid position 131. The recombinants were tested for infectivity and stability on different Nicotiana species and stable recombinant virus particles were purified. The particles were tested for their ability to bind to PCV induced porcine antibodies and used for specific antibody induction in mice and pigs. The results showed that PCV epitopes expressed on the CMV surface were recognized by the porcine antibodies and they were also able to induce PCV specific antibody response. Challenge experiment with PCV2 carried out in immunized pigs showed partial protection against the infection. Based on these results it was concluded that specific antiviral vaccine production for the given pathogen was feasible, offering an inexpensive way for the mass production of such vaccines. PMID:23285149

  20. Development of a lateral-flow assay (LFA) for rapid detection of Soybean mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Zhang, Wen-Na; Tian, Jin-Yan; Zhao, Wen-Yang; Chen, Zheng-Qiang; Sun, Li-Hua; Xue, Fan; Liu, Yong; Tan, Xin-Qiu; Wang, Li-Min; Liu, Feng-Quan; Tao, Xiao-Rong

    2016-09-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is the most common virus in soybean and poses a serious threat to crop production and germplasm recession in many countries worldwide. In this study, a highly practical and rapid lateral-flow assay (LFA) was developed for the detection of SMV. The SMV coat protein (CP) was prokaryotically expressed and purified to immunize mice. After generation of hybridoma cell lines, four anti-SMV monoclonal antibodies were selected. The LFA-strip was then assembled using a double-antibody sandwich strategy. When the SMV-infected leaf sample was assayed using the assembled LFA-strip, the positive pink color appeared in the test line within 5-10min. The strip only gave positive results with SMV and not other viruses tested and could be used to detect 800 fold dilutions of infected leaf samples. The LFA could be used to detect SMV in infected leaf tissue as well as soybean seeds. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the development of a LFA for the detection of SMV. The practical, rapid and specific assay that was developed in this study can be widely applied to the diagnosis and surveillance of SMV in the laboratory and the field. PMID:27235541

  1. A complete ancient RNA genome: identification, reconstruction and evolutionary history of archaeological Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Oliver; Clapham, Alan; Rose, Pam; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Jun; Allaby, Robin G

    2014-01-01

    The origins of many plant diseases appear to be recent and associated with the rise of domestication, the spread of agriculture or recent global movements of crops. Distinguishing between these possibilities is problematic because of the difficulty of determining rates of molecular evolution over short time frames. Heterochronous approaches using recent and historical samples show that plant viruses exhibit highly variable and often rapid rates of molecular evolution. The accuracy of estimated evolution rates and age of origin can be greatly improved with the inclusion of older molecular data from archaeological material. Here we present the first reconstruction of an archaeological RNA genome, which is of Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus (BSMV) isolated from barley grain ~750 years of age. Phylogenetic analysis of BSMV that includes this genome indicates the divergence of BSMV and its closest relative prior to this time, most likely around 2000 years ago. However, exclusion of the archaeological data results in an apparently much more recent origin of the virus that postdates even the archaeological sample. We conclude that this viral lineage originated in the Near East or North Africa, and spread to North America and East Asia with their hosts along historical trade routes. PMID:24499968

  2. Visualization of resistance responses in Phaseolus vulgaris using reporter tagged clones of Bean common mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Naderpour, Masoud; Johansen, Ida Elisabeth

    2011-07-01

    Reporter tagged virus clones can provide detailed information on virus-host interactions. In Phaseolus vulgaris (bean), four recessive and one dominant gene are known to control infection by strains of the potyvirus species Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV). To study the interactions between BCMV and bean genotypes with different resistance gene combinations, an infectious clone of the strain RU1 was tagged with the UidA gene encoding β-glucuronidase (GUS). The clone was agroinoculated to bean genotypes with different combinations of the resistance genes bc-u, bc-1, bc-2, bc-3 and I. In situ histochemical GUS assays showed new details of the resistance responses, which were previously analysed by immunological methods and symptom descriptions. In some instances GUS assays suggested that resistance breaking strains appeared at single foci in uninoculated leaves. To allow recovery of resistance breaking strains for further studies, BCMV RU1 was tagged with the sequence encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was visualized directly without destruction of the tissue. In this paper we present details of the construction of the infectious clone and discuss its application in studies of BCMV resistance in bean. PMID:21549773

  3. A cucumber mosaic virus based expression system for the production of porcine circovirus specific vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gellért, Akos; Salánki, Katalin; Tombácz, Kata; Tuboly, Tamás; Balázs, Ervin

    2012-01-01

    Potential porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) capsid protein epitopes, suitable for expression on the surface of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) particles were determined by a thorough analysis of the predicted PCV capsid protein structure. The ab initio protein structure prediction was carried out with fold recognition and threading methods. The putative PCV epitopes were selected on the basis of PCV virion models and integrated into the plant virus coat protein, after amino acid position 131. The recombinants were tested for infectivity and stability on different Nicotiana species and stable recombinant virus particles were purified. The particles were tested for their ability to bind to PCV induced porcine antibodies and used for specific antibody induction in mice and pigs. The results showed that PCV epitopes expressed on the CMV surface were recognized by the porcine antibodies and they were also able to induce PCV specific antibody response. Challenge experiment with PCV2 carried out in immunized pigs showed partial protection against the infection. Based on these results it was concluded that specific antiviral vaccine production for the given pathogen was feasible, offering an inexpensive way for the mass production of such vaccines. PMID:23285149

  4. Teaching light scattering spectroscopy: the dimension and shape of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Santos, N C; Castanho, M A

    1996-01-01

    The tobacco mosaic virus is used as a model molecular assembly to illustrate the basic potentialities of light scattering techniques (both static and dynamic) to undergraduates. The work has two objectives: a pedagogic one (introducing light scattering to undergraduate students) and a scientific one (stabilization of the virus molecular assembly structure by the nucleic acid). Students are first challenged to confirm the stabilization of the cylindrical shape of the virus by the nucleic acid, at pH and ionic strength conditions where the coat proteins alone do not self-assemble. The experimental intramolecular scattering factor is compared with the theoretical ones for several model geometries. The data clearly suggest that the geometry is, in fact, a rod. Comparing the experimental values of gyration radius and hydrodynamic radius with the theoretical expectations further confirms this conclusion. Moreover, the rod structure is maintained over a wider range of pH and ionic strength than that valid for the coat proteins alone. The experimental values of the diffusion coefficient and radius of gyration are compared with the theoretical expectations assuming the dimensions detected by electron microscopy techniques. In fact, both values are in agreement (length approximately 300 nm, radius approximately 20 nm). PMID:8874039

  5. Inheritance of resistance to Pepper yellow mosaic virus in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum.

    PubMed

    Bento, C S; Rodrigues, R; Gonçalves, L S A; Oliveira, H S; Santos, M H; Pontes, M C; Sudré, C P

    2013-01-01

    We investigated inheritance of resistance to Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV) in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum accessions UENF 1616 (susceptible) crossed with UENF 1732 (resistant). Plants from generations P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1:1, and BC1:2 were inoculated and the symptoms were evaluated for 25 days. Subsequently, an area under the disease progress curve was calculated and subjected to generation means analysis. Only the average and epistatic effects were significant. The broad and narrow sense heritability estimates were 35.52 and 21.79%, respectively. The estimate of the minimum number of genes that control resistance was 7, indicating that resistance is polygenic and complex. Thus, methods to produce segregant populations that advocate selection in more advanced generations would be the most appropriate to produce chili pepper cultivars resistant to PepYMV. PMID:23661433

  6. Proteomic analysis of the plasma membrane-movement tubule complex of cowpea mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    den Hollander, Paulus W; de Sousa Geraldino Duarte, Priscilla; Bloksma, Hanke; Boeren, Sjef; van Lent, Jan W M

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus forms tubules constructed from the movement protein (MP) in plasmodesmata (PD) to achieve cell-to-cell movement of its virions. Similar tubules, delineated by the plasma membrane (PM), are formed protruding from the surface of infected protoplasts. These PM-tubule complexes were isolated from protoplasts by immunoprecipitation and analysed for their protein content by tandem mass spectrometry to identify host proteins with affinity for the movement tubule. Seven host proteins were abundantly present in the PM-tubule complex, including molecular chaperonins and an AAA protein. Members of both protein families have been implicated in establishment of systemic infection. The potential role of these proteins in tubule-guided cell-cell transport is discussed. PMID:26780773

  7. Enhanced amplified spontaneous emission using layer-by-layer assembled cowpea mosaic virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Deng, Zhaoqi; Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaojie; Geng, Yanhou; Ma, Dongge; Su, Zhaohui

    2009-01-01

    Layer-by-layer assembly technique was used to construct ultrathin film of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) by electrostatic interactions, and the film was employed as a precursor on which an OF8T2 film was deposited by spin coating. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) was observed and improved for the OF8T2 film. Compared with OF8T2 film on quartz, the introduction of CPMV nanoparticles reduced the threshold and loss, and remarkably increased the net gain. The threshold, loss, and gain reached 0.05 mJ/pulse, 6.9 cm-1, and 82 cm-1, respectively. CPMV nanoparticles may enormously scatter light, resulting in a positive feedback, thus the ASE is easily obtained and improved.

  8. Identification of Novel Inhibitors for Tobacco Mosaic Virus Infection in Solanaceae Plants.

    PubMed

    Prabahar, Archana; Swaminathan, Subashini; Loganathan, Arul; Jegadeesan, Ramalingam

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) infects several crops of economic importance (e.g., tomato) and remains as one of the major concerns to the farmers. TMV enters the host cell and produces the capping enzyme RNA polymerase. The viral genome replicates further to produce multiple mRNAs which encodes several proteins, including the coat protein and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), as well as the movement protein. TMV replicase domain was chosen for the virtual screening studies against small molecules derived from ligand databases such as PubChem and ChemBank. Catalytic sites of the RdRp domain were identified and subjected to docking analysis with screened ligands derived from virtual screening LigandFit. Small molecules that interact with the target molecule at the catalytic domain region amino acids, GDD, were chosen as the best inhibitors for controlling the TMV replicase activity. PMID:26557141

  9. The 'emergence' of turnip mosaic virus was probably a 'gene-for-quasi-gene' event.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Adrian J; Nguyen, Huy Duc; Ohshima, Kazusato

    2015-02-01

    Turnip mosaic potyvirus is a virus of brassicas that emerged from a lineage of monocotyledon-infecting potyviruses about 1000 years ago. In vivo and in silico studies all indicate that sites, primarily in its protein 3 (P3) and cylindrical inclusion protein (CI) genes, but also its small 6 kDa 2 protein (6K2) and genome-linked viral protein (VPg) genes, control host specificity in a dynamic way. It is most likely that non-unique combinations of transient viral genomic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), not all of them non-synonymous, allowed the host switch to occur. These SNPs were probably ephemeral and replaced over time by other combinations as the population subsequently diverged within, and adapted to, the brassica host population. PMID:25559881

  10. The limonoids and their antitobacco mosaic virus (TMV) activities from Munronia unifoliolata Oliv.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yong-hui; Liu, Kai-xing; Zhang, Jian-xin; Mu, Shu-zhen; Hao, Xiao-jiang

    2012-05-01

    Five new limonoids, named munronoids K-O (1-5), together with three known limonoids were isolated from Munronia unifoliola Oliv. These limonoids were involved in the skeletons of evodulone, gedunin, and peieurianin types of limonoids, and their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic data. Compound 5 featuring a γ-lactone ring instead of the β-substituted furan ring was found in the peieurianin type for the first time. The antitobacco mosaic virus (anti-TMV) activities of compounds 1-8 were also evaluated with half-leaf, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blot methods, and limonoids 1, 5, and 8 showed stronger anti-TMV treatment activities than the positive control ningnanmycin. Six compounds (1-5 and 8) exhibited infection inhibition activities against TMV. PMID:22500574

  11. Peptide nanospheres self-assembled from a modified β-annulus peptide of Sesbania mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Yusaku; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2016-11-01

    A novel β-annulus peptide of Sesbania mosaic virus bearing an FKFE sequence at the C terminus was synthesized, and its self-assembling behavior in water was investigated. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy showed that the β-annulus peptide bearing an FKFE sequence self-assembled into approximately 30 nm nanospheres in water at pH 3.8, whereas the β-annulus peptide without the FKFE sequence afforded only irregular aggregates. The peptide nanospheres possessed a definite critical aggregation concentration (CAC = 26 μM), above which the size of nanospheres were nearly unaffected by the peptide concentration. The formation of peptide nanospheres was significantly affected by pH; the peptide did not form any assemblies at pH 2.2, whereas larger aggregates were formed at pH 6.4-11.6. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 470-475, 2016. PMID:26573103

  12. Solid flexible electrochemical supercapacitor using Tobacco mosaic virus nanostructures and ALD ruthenium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnerlich, M.; Pomerantseva, E.; Gregorczyk, K.; Ketchum, D.; Rubloff, G.; Ghodssi, R.

    2013-11-01

    An all-solid electrochemical supercapacitor has been developed using a nanostructured nickel and titanium nitride template that is coated with ruthenium oxide by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The electrode morphology was based on a high surface area biotemplate of genetically modified Tobacco mosaic virus. The biotemplate automatically self-assembles at room temperature in aqueous solution. Nafion® perfluorosulfonate ionomer dispersion was cast on the electrodes and used as a solid proton-conducting electrolyte. A 5.8 F g-1 gravimetric capacity (578 µF cm-2 based on footprint) was achieved in Nafion electrolyte, and the device retained 80% of its capacity after 25 000 cycles. The technology presented here will enable thin, solid, flexible supercapacitors that are compatible with standard microfabrication techniques.

  13. Stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in a suspension of tobacco mosaic virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpova, O. V.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Lednev, V. N.; Mironova, T. V.; Oshurko, V. B.; Pershin, S. M.; Petrova, E. K.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zemskov, K. I.

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of laser pulses with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer and in water has been investigated. Ruby laser pulses of 20 ns duration have been used for excitation. The spectrum of the light passing through the sample was registered with the help of a Fabry–Perot interferometer. In the case of TMV in water we observed in the spectrum only one line of the exciting laser light, but for TMV in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer a second line appeared, corresponding to stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS) on the breathing radial mode of TMV. The frequency shift of the SLFRS by 2 cm‑1 (60 GHz), the conversion efficiency and the threshold are measured for the first time to the best of our knowledge.

  14. Limonoids from Munronia henryi and their anti-tobacco mosaic virus activity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Yuan, Chun-Mao; Di, Ying-Tong; Huang, Tao; Fan, Yi-Min; Ma, Yuan; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-12-01

    Five new compounds (1-5), including three limonoids, one diterpenoid, and one phytosterol, along with four known limonoids (6-9), were isolated from the ethanolic extracts of whole plants of Munronia henryi. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis. In addition, the anti-tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) activities of all the isolated compounds were evaluated by the conventional half-leaf and leaf-disk methods along with Western blot analysis. Most of the tested compounds showed strong antiviral activities, with IC50 values in the range of 14.8-34.0μg/mL, compared with ningnanmycin as a positive control (IC50=44.6μg/mL), and their preliminary structure-activity relationships were also discussed. PMID:26388557

  15. A hydrogen bond study in tobacco mosaic virus using Moessbauer spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Haffner, H; Appel, H; Holmes, K C

    1986-01-01

    The Moessbauer method was applied to obtain information on a suggested hydrogen bond in tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), between the hydroxyl group of Tyr 139 and a carboxyl oxygen of Glu 22 in a neighbouring subunit. Spectra of 129I were taken of 3,5-di-iodo-L-tyrosine as a free amino acid and in situ in TMV. The increase of the pK value of 3,5-di-iodo-L-tyrosine by 0.8 units at position 139 in TMV compared to the free value is a strong argument in favour of the existence of a hydrogen bond via the relevant hydroxyl group. The reported study demonstrates the surprising sensitivity of the observable Moessbauer parameters to details of the electronic configuration in the neighbourhood of the probe nucleus. PMID:3816698

  16. Diterpene alkaloids and diterpenes from Spiraea japonica and their anti-tobacco mosaic virus activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuan; Mao, Xin-Ying; Huang, Lie-Jun; Fan, Yi-Min; Gu, Wei; Yan, Chen; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Yuan, Chun-Mao; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Five new naturally occurring natural products, including two atisine-type diterpene alkaloids (1 and 2), two atisane-type diterpenes (3 and 4), and a new natural product spiramine C2 (5), along with nine known ones (6-14), were isolated from the ethanolic extracts of the whole plant of Spiraea japonica var. acuminata Franch. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis. The anti-tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) activities of all the compounds were evaluated by the conventional half-leaf method. Six compounds (2, 3, 6, 7, 11, and 12) exhibited moderate activities at 100 μg/mL with inhibition rates in the range of 69.4-92.9%, which were higher than that of the positive control, ningnanmycin. Their preliminary structure-activity relationships were also discussed. PMID:26625838

  17. Deletion analysis of the 5' untranslated leader sequence of tobacco mosaic virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, N; Watanabe, Y; Iwasaki, T; Shiba, T; Meshi, T; Okada, Y

    1991-03-01

    To determine the sequences essential for viral multiplication in the 5' untranslated leader sequence of tobacco mosaic virus RNA, mutant TMV-L (a tomato strain) RNAs which carry several deletions in this 71-nucleotide sequence were constructed by an in vitro transcription system and their multiplication was analyzed by introducing mutant RNA into tobacco protoplasts by electroporation. Large deletions of the sequence from nucleotides 9 to 47 or 25 to 71 abolished viral multiplication; when about 10-nucleotide deletions were introduced throughout this 5' leader sequence, only deletion of the sequence from nucleotides 2 to 8 abolished detectable viral multiplication. This mutant RNA, however, directed the synthesis of the 130,000-molecular-weight protein in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate in vitro translation system, and consequently this 5'-proximal portion appears likely to be essential for replication. PMID:1995954

  18. RNA-controlled assembly of tobacco mosaic virus-derived complex structures: from nanoboomerangs to tetrapods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eber, Fabian J.; Eiben, Sabine; Jeske, Holger; Wege, Christina

    2014-11-01

    The in vitro assembly of artificial nanotubular nucleoprotein shapes based on tobacco mosaic virus-(TMV-)-derived building blocks yielded different spatial organizations of viral coat protein subunits on genetically engineered RNA molecules, containing two or multiple TMV origins of assembly (OAs). The growth of kinked nanoboomerangs as well as of branched multipods was determined by the encapsidated RNAs. A largely simultaneous initiation at two origins and subsequent bidirectional tube elongation could be visualized by transmission electron microscopy of intermediates and final products. Collision of the nascent tubes' ends produced angular particles with well-defined arm lengths. RNAs with three to five OAs generated branched multipods with a maximum of four arms. The potential of such an RNA-directed self-assembly of uncommon nanotubular architectures for the fabrication of complex multivalent nanotemplates used in functional hybrid materials is discussed.

  19. Regulation of Brome Mosaic Virus Gene Expression by Restriction of Initiation of Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chroboczek, Jadwiga; Puchkova, Ludmiła; Zagórski, Włodzimierz

    1980-01-01

    The translation of total and individual brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNAs was examined in a wheat germ cell-free system in the presence of various inhibitors. Inhibitors of the initiation of polypeptide synthesis, e.g., potassium ions, 7-methylguanosine 5′ -monophosphate, and aurintricarboxylic acid, were shown not only to inhibit overall BMV protein synthesis but also to change the ratio of BMV polypeptides synthesized. Under conditions restrictive for initiation, the translation of nonstructural BMV genes was suppressed, but coat protein synthesis proceeded at a high rate. A similar discrimination among BMV messengers was exerted by a regulatory protein kinase isolated from wheat germ. These results suggest that the regulation of the expression of BMV genes is based on a difference in the mechanism of formation of initiation complexes for individual BMV messages. Images PMID:16789194

  20. Electroless synthesis of 3 nm wide alloy nanowires inside Tobacco mosaic virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Sinan; Hahn, Kersten; Kopold, Peter; Kadri, Anan; Wege, Christina; Kern, Klaus; Bittner, Alexander M.

    2012-02-01

    We show that 3 nm wide cobalt-iron alloy nanowires can be synthesized by simple wet chemical electroless deposition inside tubular Tobacco mosaic virus particles. The method is based on adsorption of Pd(II) ions, formation of a Pd catalyst, and autocatalytic deposition of the alloy from dissolved metal salts, reduced by a borane compound. Extensive energy-filtering TEM investigations at the nanoscale revealed that the synthesized wires are alloys of Co, Fe, and Ni. We confirmed by high-resolution TEM that our alloy nanowires are at least partially crystalline, which is compatible with typical Co-rich alloys. Ni traces bestow higher stability, presumably against corrosion, as also known from bulk CoFe. Alloy nanowires, as small as the ones presented here, might be used for a variety of applications including high density data storage, imaging, sensing, and even drug delivery.

  1. Production of Recombinant Cholera Toxin B Subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana Using GENEWARE® Tobacco Mosaic Virus Vector.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lauren; Hamorsky, Krystal; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a method to produce a recombinant cholera toxin B subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana plants (CTBp) using the GENEWARE(®) tobacco mosaic virus vector system. Infectious transcripts of the vector RNA are generated in vitro and inoculated on N. benthamiana seedlings. After 11 days, CTBp is extracted in a simple tris buffer at room temperature. No protease inhibitor is required. The leaf homogenate is treated with mild heat and a pH shift to selectively precipitate host-derived proteins. CTBp is purified to >95 % homogeneity by two-step chromatography using immobilized metal affinity and ceramic hydroxyapatite resins. This procedure yields on average 400 mg of low-endotoxin CTBp from 1 kg of fresh leaf material. PMID:26614286

  2. Characterization and genetic diversity of potato yellow mosaic virus from the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Urbino, C; Polston, J E; Patte, C P; Caruana, M-L

    2004-02-01

    The begomovirus Potato yellow mosaic virus (PYMV) is responsible of significant yield losses in tomato in Guadeloupe. Four field isolates from Guadeloupe were analyzed in term of their host range using three inoculation methods (mechanical, grafting and insect vector), sequences analysis of PCR fragments and phylogenetic analysis of an infectious clone, PYMV-[GP]. Capsicum annuum, Datura stramonium, Nicotiana benthamiana, N. tabacum 'Xanthi NC', Petunia hybrida, and Solanum tuberosum were found to be hosts. All isolates from Guadeloupe, Martinique, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic were closely related to PYMV-[GP]. Sequence identity between PYMV-[GP] and PYMV-Ve from Venezuela and PYMTV from Trinidad and Tobago clearly confirmed that it is a new strain of PYMV. PMID:14745605

  3. Effect of interfacial interaction on the cross-sectional morphology of tobacco mosaic virus using GISAXS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeongdu; Lo, Chieh-Tsung; Thiyagarajan, P; Winans, Randall E; Li, Xuefa; Niu, Zhongwei; Wang, Qian

    2007-10-23

    We have investigated the effect of the interfacial interaction on the cross-sectional morphology of the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in solution and on two types of solid substrates, SiOx (polar) on Si(100) and polystyrene film (nonpolar) on Si(100), using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), respectively. Results reveal that the flexible chains at the outer surface of TMV either expand or contract depending on the nature of the substrate. Although the unfavorable interaction between the TMV and the PS causes a minimal effect, the stronger attractive interaction between the outer protein surface of TMV and the SiOx substrate induces pronounced deformation of its cross-sectional morphology. PMID:17894508

  4. Mechanistic study of the hydrothermal reduction of palladium on the Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adigun, Oluwamayowa O.

    Synthesis of nanorods and nanowires is becoming more and more important due to interest in them in a wide range of disciplines. The genetically engineered tobacco mosaic virus (TMV1Cys) provides a template for synthesis of uniform metal nanorods at mild operating conditions and without the use of any expensive technology compared to conventional synthetic methods. The discovery of the hydrothermal synthetic scheme has allowed the production of higher quality nanorods on the TMV template. However, the mechanism for reduction and growth in this process is still not understood. In this paper, the mechanism of synthesis for producing uniform, controllable palladium nanorods via the hydrothermal synthesis is studied using in situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. Reduction and growth mechanisms are analyzed and valuable information about the nature of the process is acquired. Results in this paper serve as an entryway into fundamentally understanding the relationship between the underlying reduction and growth processes governing mineralization on biotemplates.

  5. Paenibacillus lentimorbus Inoculation Enhances Tobacco Growth and Extenuates the Virulence of Cucumber mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Lalit; Raj, Rashmi; Srivastava, Ashish; Gupta, Swati; Mishra, Shashank Kumar; Yadav, Sumit; Singh, Poonam C.; Raj, Shri Krishna; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies with Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488” (hereafter referred as B-30488), a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolated from cow’s milk, revealed its capabilities to improve plant quality under normal and stress conditions. Present study investigates its potential as a biocontrol agent against an economically important virus, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), in Nicotiana tabacum cv. White Burley plants and delineates the physical, biophysical, biochemical and molecular perturbations due to the trilateral interactions of PGPR-host-CMV. Soil inoculation of B-30488 enhanced the plant vigor while significantly decreased the virulence and virus RNA accumulation by ~12 fold (91%) in systemic leaves of CMV infected tobacco plants as compared to the control ones. Histology of these leaves revealed the improved tissue’s health and least aging signs in B-30488 inoculated tobacco plants, with or without CMV infection, and showed lesser intercellular spaces between collenchyma cells, reduced amount of xyloglucans and pectins in connecting primary cells, and higher polyphenol accumulation in hypodermis layer extending to collenchyma cells. B-30488 inoculation has favorably maneuvered the essential biophysical (ion leakage and photosynthetic efficiency) and biochemical (sugar, proline, chlorophyll, malondialdehyde, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase) attributes of tobacco plants to positively regulate and release the virus stress. Moreover, activities of defense related enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase) induced due to CMV-infection were ameliorated with inoculation of B-30488, suggesting systemic induced resistance mediated protection against CMV in tobacco. The quantitative RT-PCR analyses of the genes related to normal plant development, stress and pathogenesis also corroborate well with the biochemical data and revealed the regulation (either up or down) of these genes in favor of plant to

  6. Paenibacillus lentimorbus Inoculation Enhances Tobacco Growth and Extenuates the Virulence of Cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Susheel; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Agrawal, Lalit; Raj, Rashmi; Srivastava, Ashish; Gupta, Swati; Mishra, Shashank Kumar; Yadav, Sumit; Singh, Poonam C; Raj, Shri Krishna; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies with Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488" (hereafter referred as B-30488), a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolated from cow's milk, revealed its capabilities to improve plant quality under normal and stress conditions. Present study investigates its potential as a biocontrol agent against an economically important virus, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), in Nicotiana tabacum cv. White Burley plants and delineates the physical, biophysical, biochemical and molecular perturbations due to the trilateral interactions of PGPR-host-CMV. Soil inoculation of B-30488 enhanced the plant vigor while significantly decreased the virulence and virus RNA accumulation by ~12 fold (91%) in systemic leaves of CMV infected tobacco plants as compared to the control ones. Histology of these leaves revealed the improved tissue's health and least aging signs in B-30488 inoculated tobacco plants, with or without CMV infection, and showed lesser intercellular spaces between collenchyma cells, reduced amount of xyloglucans and pectins in connecting primary cells, and higher polyphenol accumulation in hypodermis layer extending to collenchyma cells. B-30488 inoculation has favorably maneuvered the essential biophysical (ion leakage and photosynthetic efficiency) and biochemical (sugar, proline, chlorophyll, malondialdehyde, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase) attributes of tobacco plants to positively regulate and release the virus stress. Moreover, activities of defense related enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase) induced due to CMV-infection were ameliorated with inoculation of B-30488, suggesting systemic induced resistance mediated protection against CMV in tobacco. The quantitative RT-PCR analyses of the genes related to normal plant development, stress and pathogenesis also corroborate well with the biochemical data and revealed the regulation (either up or down) of these genes in favor of plant to combat

  7. Complete genome sequence of Habenaria mosaic virus, a new potyvirus infecting a terrestrial orchid (Habenaria radiata) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hideki; Maeda, Takanori; Gara, I Wayan; Chiba, Sotaro; Maruyama, Kazuyuki; Tamada, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The complete genomic sequence of Habenaria mosaic virus (HaMV), which infects terrestrial orchids (Habenaria radiata), has been determined. The genome is composed of 9,499 nucleotides excluding the 3'-terminal poly(A) tail, encoding a large polyprotein of 3,054 amino acids with the genomic features typical of a potyvirus. Putative proteolytic cleavage sites were identified by sequence comparison to those of known potyviruses. The HaMV polyprotein showed 58 % amino acid sequence identity to that encoded by the most closely related potyvirus, tobacco vein banding mosaic virus. Phylogenetic analysis of the polyprotein amino acid sequence and its coding sequences confirmed that HaMV formed a cluster with the chilli veinal mottle virus group, most of which infect solanaceous plants. These results suggest that HaMV is a distinct member of the genus Potyvirus. PMID:23857506

  8. Survival and transmission of potato virus Y, pepino mosaic virus, and potato spindle tuber viroid in water.

    PubMed

    Mehle, N; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, I; Prezelj, N; Delic, D; Vidic, U; Ravnikar, M

    2014-02-01

    Hydroponic systems and intensive irrigation are used widely in horticulture and thus have the potential for rapid spread of water-transmissible plant pathogens. Numerous plant viruses have been reported to occur in aqueous environments, although information on their survival and transmission is minimal, due mainly to the lack of effective detection methods and to the complexity of the required transmission experiments. We have assessed the role of water as a source of plant infection using three mechanically transmissible plant pathogens that constitute a serious threat to tomato and potato production: pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), potato virus Y (PVY), and potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd). PepMV remains infectious in water at 20 ± 4°C for up to 3 weeks, PVY (NTN strain) for up to 1 week, and PSTVd for up to 7 weeks. Experiments using a hydroponic system show that PepMV (Ch2 genotype) and PVY (NTN strain) can be released from plant roots into the nutrient solution and can infect healthy plants through their roots, ultimately spreading to the green parts, where they can be detected after a few months. In addition, tubers developed on plants grown in substrate watered with PSTVd-infested water were confirmed to be the source of viroid infection. Our data indicate that although well-known pathways of virus spread are more rapid than water-mediated infection, like insect or mechanical transmission through leaves, water is a route that provides a significant bridge for rapid virus/viroid spread. Consequently, water should be taken into account in future epidemiology and risk assessment studies. PMID:24334672

  9. Amino acid substitutions of cysteine residues near the amino terminus of Wheat streak mosaic virus HC-Pro abolishes virus transmission by the wheat curl mite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amino-terminal half of HC-Pro of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is required for semi-persistent transmission by the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella Keifer). The amino-proximal region of WSMV HC-Pro is cysteine-rich with a zinc finger-like motif. Amino acid substitutions were made in this re...

  10. Substitution of conserved cysteine residues in Wheat streak mosaic virus HC-Pro abolishes virus transmission by the wheat curl mite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Substitutions in the amino-terminal region of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) HC-Pro were evaluated for effects on transmission by the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella Keifer). Alanine substitution at cysteine residues 16, 46 and 49 abolished vector transmission. Although alanine substitution a...

  11. Comparing the regional epidemiology of the cassava mosaic and cassava brown streak virus pandemics in Africa.

    PubMed

    Legg, J P; Jeremiah, S C; Obiero, H M; Maruthi, M N; Ndyetabula, I; Okao-Okuja, G; Bouwmeester, H; Bigirimana, S; Tata-Hangy, W; Gashaka, G; Mkamilo, G; Alicai, T; Lava Kumar, P

    2011-08-01

    The rapid geographical expansion of the cassava mosaic disease (CMD) pandemic, caused by cassava mosaic geminiviruses, has devastated cassava crops in 12 countries of East and Central Africa since the late 1980s. Region-level surveys have revealed a continuing pattern of annual spread westward and southward along a contiguous 'front'. More recently, outbreaks of cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) were reported from Uganda and other parts of East Africa that had been hitherto unaffected by the disease. Recent survey data reveal several significant contrasts between the regional epidemiology of these two pandemics: (i) severe CMD radiates out from an initial centre of origin, whilst CBSD seems to be spreading from independent 'hot-spots'; (ii) the severe CMD pandemic has arisen from recombination and synergy between virus species, whilst the CBSD pandemic seems to be a 'new encounter' situation between host and pathogen; (iii) CMD pandemic spread has been tightly linked with the appearance of super-abundant Bemisia tabaci whitefly vector populations, in contrast to CBSD, where outbreaks have occurred 3-12 years after whitefly population increases; (iv) the CMGs causing CMD are transmitted in a persistent manner, whilst the two cassava brown streak viruses appear to be semi-persistently transmitted; and (v) different patterns of symptom expression mean that phytosanitary measures could be implemented easily for CMD but have limited effectiveness, whereas similar measures are difficult to apply for CBSD but are potentially very effective. An important similarity between the pandemics is that the viruses occurring in pandemic-affected areas are also found elsewhere, indicating that contrary to earlier published conclusions, the viruses per se are unlikely to be the key factors driving the two pandemics. A diagrammatic representation illustrates the temporal relationship between B. tabaci abundance and changing incidences of both CMD and CBSD in the Great Lakes region

  12. Novel roles for well-known players: from tobacco mosaic virus pests to enzymatically active assemblies.

    PubMed

    Koch, Claudia; Eber, Fabian J; Azucena, Carlos; Förste, Alexander; Walheim, Stefan; Schimmel, Thomas; Bittner, Alexander M; Jeske, Holger; Gliemann, Hartmut; Eiben, Sabine; Geiger, Fania C; Wege, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The rod-shaped nanoparticles of the widespread plant pathogen tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) have been a matter of intense debates and cutting-edge research for more than a hundred years. During the late 19th century, their behavior in filtration tests applied to the agent causing the 'plant mosaic disease' eventually led to the discrimination of viruses from bacteria. Thereafter, they promoted the development of biophysical cornerstone techniques such as electron microscopy and ultracentrifugation. Since the 1950s, the robust, helically arranged nucleoprotein complexes consisting of a single RNA and more than 2100 identical coat protein subunits have enabled molecular studies which have pioneered the understanding of viral replication and self-assembly, and elucidated major aspects of virus-host interplay, which can lead to agronomically relevant diseases. However, during the last decades, TMV has acquired a new reputation as a well-defined high-yield nanotemplate with multivalent protein surfaces, allowing for an ordered high-density presentation of multiple active molecules or synthetic compounds. Amino acid side chains exposed on the viral coat may be tailored genetically or biochemically to meet the demands for selective conjugation reactions, or to directly engineer novel functionality on TMV-derived nanosticks. The natural TMV size (length: 300 nm) in combination with functional ligands such as peptides, enzymes, dyes, drugs or inorganic materials is advantageous for applications ranging from biomedical imaging and therapy approaches over surface enlargement of battery electrodes to the immobilization of enzymes. TMV building blocks are also amenable to external control of in vitro assembly and re-organization into technically expedient new shapes or arrays, which bears a unique potential for the development of 'smart' functional 3D structures. Among those, materials designed for enzyme-based biodetection layouts, which are routinely applied, e.g., for

  13. Effects of dicyclohexylamine on polyamine biosynthesis and incorporation into turnip yellow mosaic virus in Chinese cabbage protoplasts infected in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Balint, R.; Cohen, S.S.

    1985-07-15

    The authors have reported that protoplasts from plants infected with turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) continue to produce virus in culture and that newly formed virus particles contained predominantly newly synthesized spermidine and spermine. They now report similar results with healthy protoplasts infected in vitro, in which essentially all of the virus is newly formed. Again, newly synthesized spermidine and spermine were preferentially incorporated into virus. DCHA inhibited spermidine synthesis by 85%, leading in 20 hr to a 60% depletion of the cellular spermidine and a 30% reduction in the amount of spermidine per virion. Spermine synthesis increased, however, producing a 40% increase in cellular spermine and 50-100% increase in the amount of spermine per virion. Thus, in spite of spermidine depletion, the total positive charge contributed by polyamines to the virus was essentially conserved.

  14. Genetic diversity of Pepino mosaic virus in the U.S. and identification of a tomato infecting strain capable of inducing disease on potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growers were once reluctant to remove Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV)-infected tomato plants because its effect on yield was considered mild. Pepino mosaic has now become an endemic disease problem on greenhouse tomatoes in the U. S. Recently, viroids (i.e., Tomato chlorotic dwarf viroid - TCDVd) were...

  15. Pepino mosaic virus genotype shift in North America and development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid genotype identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic, once an emerging disease a decade ago, has become endemic on greenhouse tomatoes worldwide in recent years. Three distinct genotypes of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), including EU, US1 and CH2 have been recognized. Our earlier study conducted in 2006-2007 demonstrated a predominant EU...

  16. The Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV)-encoded P26 is associated with plasmalemma deposits within LIYV-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, V.; Sudarshana, M.R.; Tian, T.; Ralston, K.S.; Yeh, H.-H.; Falk, B.W. . E-mail: bwfalk@ucdavis.edu

    2005-03-15

    Cytological, immunological, and mutagenesis approaches were used to identify the viral factors associated with the formation of plasmalemma deposits (PLDs) in whole plants and protoplasts infected by Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV). Transmission electron microscopy and immunogold labeling using polyclonal antibodies to four of the five LIYV RNA 2-encoded large proteins, capsid protein (CP), minor capsid protein (CPm), HSP70 homolog (HSP70h), and P59, showed specific labeling of LIYV virions or virion aggregates around the vesiculated membranous inclusions, but not PLDs in LIYV-infected Nicotiana benthamiana, Nicotiana clevelandii, Lactuca sativa, and Chenopodium murale plants, and Nicotiana tabacum protoplasts. In contrast, antibodies to the RNA 2-encoded P26 showed specific labeling of PLDs but not virions in both LIYV-infected plants and protoplasts. Virion-like particles (VLPs) were seen in protoplasts infected by all LIYV RNA 2 mutants except for the CP (major capsid protein) mutant. PLDs were more difficult to find in protoplasts, but were seen in protoplasts infected by the CP and CPm mutants, but not in protoplasts infected by the P26, HSP70h, or P59 mutants. Interestingly, although the CPm mutant showed VLPs and PLDs, the PLDs did not show associated virions/virion-like particles as was always observed for PLDs seen in protoplasts infected by wild-type LIYV. Immunoblot analyses performed on purified LIYV virions showed that P26 was not detected with purified virions, but was detected in the cell wall, 1000 g and 30,000 g pellet fractions of LIYV-infected plants. These data suggest that P26 is associated with the LIYV-induced PLDs, and in contrast to the other RNA 2-encoded large proteins, P26 is not a virion protein.

  17. Genetic Structure and Molecular Variability of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolates in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Shahideh; Arevalo, Rafael; Falk, Bryce W.; Groves, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has a worldwide distribution and the widest host range of any known plant virus. From 2000 to 2012, epidemics of CMV severely affected the production of snap bean (Phaseulos vulgaris L.) in the Midwest and Northeastern United States. Virus diversity leading to emergence of new strains is often considered a significant factor in virus epidemics. In addition to epidemics, new disease phenotypes arising from genetic exchanges or mutation can compromise effectiveness of plant disease management strategies. Here, we captured a snapshot of genetic variation of 32 CMV isolates collected from different regions of the U.S including new field as well as historic isolates. Nucleotide diversity (π) was low for U.S. CMV isolates. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that CMV subgroup I is predominant in the US and further showed that the CMV population is a mixture of subgroups IA and IB. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis suggests likely reassortment between subgroups IA and IB within five CMV isolates. Based on phylogenetic and computational analysis, recombination between subgroups I and II as well as IA and IB in RNA 3 was detected. This is the first report of recombination between CMV subgroups I and II. Neutrality tests illustrated that negative selection was the major force operating upon the CMV genome, although some positively selected sites were detected for all encoded proteins. Together, these data suggest that different regions of the CMV genome are under different evolutionary constraints. These results also delineate composition of the CMV population in the US, and further suggest that recombination and reassortment among strain subgroups does occur but at a low frequency, and point towards CMV genomic regions that differ in types of selection pressure. PMID:24801880

  18. In vitro transcripts of wild-type and fluorescent protein-tagged triticum mosaic virus (family potyviridae) are biologically active in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) (genus Poacevirus, family Potyviridae) is a recently described eriophyid mite-transmitted wheat virus. In vitro RNA transcripts generated from full-length cDNA clones of TriMV proved infectious on wheat, and the progeny virus was efficiently transmitted by wheat curl m...

  19. Raspberry Mosaic Disease Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry mosaic disease (RMD) is an overarching term used to describe a range of diseases caused by various combinations of different viruses that are each transmitted by aphids. In the scientific literature RMD has been given various alternative names, including red raspberry mosaic, type b mosaic...

  20. New Strategies and Methods to Study Interactions between Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein and Its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangyang; Chen, Zhuo; Jin, Linhong; Hu, Deyu; Yang, Song

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the targets of anti-viral compounds are hot topics in the field of pesticide research. Various efficient anti-TMV (Tobacco Mosaic Virus) compounds, such as Ningnanmycin (NNM), Antofine (ATF), Dufulin (DFL) and Bingqingxiao (BQX) are available. However, the mechanisms of the action of these compounds on targets remain unclear. To further study the mechanism of the action of the anti-TMV inhibitors, the TMV coat protein (TMV CP) was expressed and self-assembled into four-layer aggregate disks in vitro, which could be reassembled into infectious virus particles with TMV RNA. The interactions between the anti-TMV compounds and the TMV CP disk were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography, isothermal titration calorimetry and native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis methods. The results revealed that assembly of the four-layer aggregate disk was inhibited by NNM; it changed the four-layer aggregate disk into trimers, and affected the regular assembly of TMV CP and TMV RNA. The four-layer aggregate disk of TMV CP was little inhibited by ATF, DFL and BQX. Our results provide original data, as well as new strategies and methods, for research on the mechanism of action of anti-viral drugs. PMID:26927077

  1. Modeling the helicase domain of Brome mosaic virus 1a replicase.

    PubMed

    Garriga, Damià; Dìez, Juana; Oliva, Baldomero

    2004-12-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a representative member of positive-strand RNA viruses. The 1a replicase from BMV is a membrane protein of unknown structure with a methyltransferase N-terminal domain and a putative helicase activity in the C-terminal domain. In order to make a functional prediction of the helicase activity of the BMV 1a C-terminal domain, we have built a model of its structure. The use of fold recognition servers hinted at two different superfamilies of helicases [superfamily 1 (SF1) and superfamily 2 (SF2)] as putative templates for the C-terminal fragment of BMV 1a. A structural model of BMV 1a in SF2 was obtained by means of a fold recognition server (3D-PSSM). On the other hand, we used the helicase motifs described in the literature to construct a model of the structure of the BMV 1a C-terminal domain as a member of the SF1. The biological functionality and statistic potentials were used to discriminate between the two models. The results illustrate that the use of sequence profiles and patterns helps modeling. Accordingly, the C-terminal domain of BMV 1a is a potential member of the SF1 of helicases, and it can be modeled with the structure of a member of the UvrD family of helicases. The helicase mechanism was corroborated by the model and this supports the hypothesis that BMV 1a should have helicase activity. PMID:15597207

  2. In situ vaccination with cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles suppresses metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lizotte, P. H.; Wen, A. M.; Sheen, M. R.; Fields, J.; Rojanasopondist, P.; Steinmetz, N. F.; Fiering, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential to contribute to cancer immunotherapy. The “in situ vaccination” immunotherapy strategy directly manipulates identified tumours to overcome local tumour-mediated immunosuppression and subsequently stimulates systemic anti-tumour immunity to treat metastases. We show that inhalation of self-assembling virus-like nanoparticles from Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV) reduces established B16F10 lung melanoma and simultaneously generates potent systemic anti-tumour immunity against poorly immunogenic B16F10 in the skin. Full efficacy required Il-12, Ifn-γ, adaptive immunity, and neutrophils. Inhaled CPMV nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by and activated neutrophils in the tumour microenvironment as an important part of the anti-tumour immune response. CPMV also exhibited clear treatment efficacy and systemic anti-tumour immunity in ovarian, colon, and breast tumour models in multiple anatomic locations. CPMV nanoparticles are stable, nontoxic, modifiable with drugs and antigens, and their nanomanufacture is highly scalable. These properties, combined with their inherent immunogenicity and demonstrated efficacy against a poorly immunogenic tumour, make CPMV an attractive and novel immunotherapy against metastatic cancer. PMID:26689376

  3. Antiviral activity of tenofovir against Cauliflower mosaic virus and its metabolism in Brassica pekinensis plants.

    PubMed

    Spak, Josef; Votruba, Ivan; Pavingerová, Daniela; Holý, Antonín; Spaková, Vlastimila; Petrzik, Karel

    2011-11-01

    The antiviral effect of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonate tenofovir (R)-PMPA on double-stranded DNA Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) in Brassica pekinensis plants grown in vitro on liquid medium was evaluated. Double antibody sandwich ELISA and PCR were used for relative quantification of viral protein and detecting nucleic acid in plants. (R)-PMPA at concentrations of 25 and 50 mg/l significantly reduced CaMV titers in plants within 6-9 weeks to levels detectable neither by ELISA nor by PCR. Virus-free plants were obtained after 3-month cultivation of meristem tips on semisolid medium containing 50 mg/l (R)-PMPA and their regeneration to whole plants in the greenhouse. Studying the metabolism of (R)-PMPA in B. pekinensis revealed that mono- and diphosphate, structural analogs of NDP and/or NTP, are the only metabolites formed. The data indicate very low substrate activity of the enzymes toward (R)-PMPA as substrate. The extent of phosphorylation in the plant's leaves represents only 4.5% of applied labeled (R)-PMPA. In roots, we detected no radioactive peaks of phosphorylated metabolites of (R)-PMPAp or (R)-PMPApp. PMID:21889541

  4. Hitching a ride on vesicles: cauliflower mosaic virus movement protein trafficking in the endomembrane system.

    PubMed

    Carluccio, Anna Vittoria; Zicca, Stefania; Stavolone, Livia

    2014-03-01

    The transport of a viral genome from cell to cell is enabled by movement proteins (MPs) targeting the cell periphery to mediate the gating of plasmodesmata. Given their essential role in the development of viral infection, understanding the regulation of MPs is of great importance. Here, we show that cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) MP contains three tyrosine-based sorting signals that interact with an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) μA-adaptin subunit. Fluorophore-tagged MP is incorporated into vesicles labeled with the endocytic tracer N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(6-(4-(diethylamino)phenyl)hexatrienyl)pyridinium dibromide. The presence of at least one of the three endocytosis motifs is essential for internalization of the protein from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, for tubule formation, and for CaMV infection. In addition, we show that MP colocalizes in vesicles with the Rab GTPase AtRAB-F2b, which is resident in prevacuolar late endosomal compartments that deliver proteins to the vacuole for degradation. Altogether, these results demonstrate that CaMV MP traffics in the endocytic pathway and that virus viability depends on functional host endomembranes. PMID:24477592

  5. Multiple Cis-acting elements modulate programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting in Pea enation mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Simon, Anne E

    2016-01-29

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is used by many positive-strand RNA viruses for translation of required products. Despite extensive studies, it remains unresolved how cis-elements just downstream of the recoding site promote a precise level of frameshifting. The Umbravirus Pea enation mosaic virus RNA2 expresses its RNA polymerase by -1 PRF of the 5'-proximal ORF (p33). Three hairpins located in the vicinity of the recoding site are phylogenetically conserved among Umbraviruses. The central Recoding Stimulatory Element (RSE), located downstream of the p33 termination codon, is a large hairpin with two asymmetric internal loops. Mutational analyses revealed that sequences throughout the RSE and the RSE lower stem (LS) structure are important for frameshifting. SHAPE probing of mutants indicated the presence of higher order structure, and sequences in the LS may also adapt an alternative conformation. Long-distance pairing between the RSE and a 3' terminal hairpin was less critical when the LS structure was stabilized. A basal level of frameshifting occurring in the absence of the RSE increases to 72% of wild-type when a hairpin upstream of the slippery site is also deleted. These results suggest that suppression of frameshifting may be needed in the absence of an active RSE conformation. PMID:26578603

  6. An atomic model of brome mosaic virus using direct electron detection and real-space optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhao; Hryc, Corey F.; Bammes, Benjamin; Afonine, Pavel V.; Jakana, Joanita; Chen, Dong-Hua; Liu, Xiangan; Baker, Matthew L.; Kao, Cheng; Ludtke, Steven J.; Schmid, Michael F.; Adams, Paul D.; Chiu, Wah

    2014-09-01

    Advances in electron cryo-microscopy have enabled structure determination of macromolecules at near-atomic resolution. However, structure determination, even using de novo methods, remains susceptible to model bias and overfitting. Here we describe a complete workflow for data acquisition, image processing, all-atom modelling and validation of brome mosaic virus, an RNA virus. Data were collected with a direct electron detector in integrating mode and an exposure beyond the traditional radiation damage limit. The final density map has a resolution of 3.8 Å as assessed by two independent data sets and maps. We used the map to derive an all-atom model with a newly implemented real-space optimization protocol. The validity of the model was verified by its match with the density map and a previous model from X-ray crystallography, as well as the internal consistency of models from independent maps. This study demonstrates a practical approach to obtain a rigorously validated atomic resolution electron cryo-microscopy structure.

  7. Tobacco mosaic virus-based protein nanoparticles and nanorods for chemotherapy delivery targeting breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bruckman, Michael A; Czapar, Anna E; VanMeter, Allen; Randolph, Lauren N; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-06-10

    Drug delivery systems are required for drug targeting to avoid adverse effects associated with chemotherapy treatment regimes. Our approach is focused on the study and development of plant virus-based materials as drug delivery systems; specifically, this work focuses on the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Native TMV forms a hollow, high aspect-ratio nanotube measuring 300×18nm with a 4nm-wide central channel. Heat-transformation can be applied to TMV yielding spherical nanoparticles (SNPs) measuring ~50nm in size. While bioconjugate chemistries have been established to modify the TMV rod, such methods have not yet been described for the SNP platform. In this work, we probed the reactivity of SNPs toward bioconjugate reactions targeting lysine, glutamine/aspartic acid, and cysteine residues. We demonstrate functionalization of SNPs using these chemistries yielding efficient payload conjugation. In addition to covalent labeling techniques, we developed encapsulation techniques, where the cargo is loaded into the SNP during heat-transition from rod-to-sphere. Finally, we developed TMV and SNP formulations loaded with the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin, and we demonstrate the application of TMV rods and spheres for chemotherapy delivery targeting breast cancer. PMID:26941034

  8. An atomic model of brome mosaic virus using direct electron detection and real-space optimization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Hryc, Corey F; Bammes, Benjamin; Afonine, Pavel V; Jakana, Joanita; Chen, Dong-Hua; Liu, Xiangan; Baker, Matthew L; Kao, Cheng; Ludtke, Steven J; Schmid, Michael F; Adams, Paul D; Chiu, Wah

    2014-01-01

    Advances in electron cryo-microscopy have enabled structure determination of macromolecules at near-atomic resolution. However, structure determination, even using de novo methods, remains susceptible to model bias and overfitting. Here we describe a complete workflow for data acquisition, image processing, all-atom modelling and validation of brome mosaic virus, an RNA virus. Data were collected with a direct electron detector in integrating mode and an exposure beyond the traditional radiation damage limit. The final density map has a resolution of 3.8 Å as assessed by two independent data sets and maps. We used the map to derive an all-atom model with a newly implemented real-space optimization protocol. The validity of the model was verified by its match with the density map and a previous model from X-ray crystallography, as well as the internal consistency of models from independent maps. This study demonstrates a practical approach to obtain a rigorously validated atomic resolution electron cryo-microscopy structure. PMID:25185801

  9. Tomato genome-wide transcriptional responses to Fusarium wilt and Tomato Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Andolfo, Giuseppe; Ferriello, Francesca; Tardella, Luca; Ferrarini, Alberto; Sigillo, Loredana; Frusciante, Luigi; Ercolano, Maria Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Since gene expression approaches constitute a starting point for investigating plant-pathogen systems, we performed a transcriptional analysis to identify a set of genes of interest in tomato plants infected with F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) and Tomato Mosaic Virus (ToMV). Differentially expressed tomato genes upon inoculation with Fol and ToMV were identified at two days post-inoculation. A large overlap was found in differentially expressed genes throughout the two incompatible interactions. However, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis evidenced specific categories in both interactions. Response to ToMV seems more multifaceted, since more than 70 specific categories were enriched versus the 30 detected in Fol interaction. In particular, the virus stimulated the production of an invertase enzyme that is able to redirect the flux of carbohydrates, whereas Fol induced a homeostatic response to prevent the fungus from killing cells. Genomic mapping of transcripts suggested that specific genomic regions are involved in resistance response to pathogen. Coordinated machinery could play an important role in prompting the response, since 60% of pathogen receptor genes (NB-ARC-LRR, RLP, RLK) were differentially regulated during both interactions. Assessment of genomic gene expression patterns could help in building up models of mediated resistance responses. PMID:24804963

  10. In situ vaccination with cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles suppresses metastatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, P. H.; Wen, A. M.; Sheen, M. R.; Fields, J.; Rojanasopondist, P.; Steinmetz, N. F.; Fiering, S.

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential to contribute to cancer immunotherapy. The ‘in situ vaccination’ immunotherapy strategy directly manipulates identified tumours to overcome local tumour-mediated immunosuppression and subsequently stimulates systemic antitumour immunity to treat metastases. We show that inhalation of self-assembling virus-like nanoparticles from cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) reduces established B16F10 lung melanoma and simultaneously generates potent systemic antitumour immunity against poorly immunogenic B16F10 in the skin. Full efficacy required Il-12, Ifn-γ, adaptive immunity and neutrophils. Inhaled CPMV nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by and activated neutrophils in the tumour microenvironment as an important part of the antitumour immune response. CPMV also exhibited clear treatment efficacy and systemic antitumour immunity in ovarian, colon, and breast tumour models in multiple anatomic locations. CPMV nanoparticles are stable, nontoxic, modifiable with drugs and antigens, and their nanomanufacture is highly scalable. These properties, combined with their inherent immunogenicity and demonstrated efficacy against a poorly immunogenic tumour, make CPMV an attractive and novel immunotherapy against metastatic cancer.

  11. Molecular characterization of Dasheen mosaic virus isolates infecting edible aroids in India.

    PubMed

    Babu, B; Hegde, V

    2014-01-01

    Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV) infecting three major edible aroids namely Amorphophallus paeoniifolius, Colocasia esculenta, and Xanthosoma sagittifolium cultivated in India was characterized. Infected plants showing typical DsMV symptoms were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and an amplification of a 963 bp fragment which encoded the coat protein (CP) gene was obtained. BLAST analysis of the cloned DNA amplicon revealed the identity of the virus to be that of DsMV. Sequence identity matrix of the nucleotide sequences among the three isolates showed that the DsMV isolate infecting A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta shared an identity as high as 93%, while the DsMV isolate from X. sagittifolium shared an identity of only 73% and 76% with the DsMV isolates from A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta, respectively. Comparative analysis of the coat protein of the three DsMV isolates showed the presence of DVG motif (A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta) and DTG motif in X. sagittifolium and several varying potential threonine and asparagine rich N-glycosylation motifs. Single amino acid substitution of the several conserved motifs occurs in all the three DsMV isolates. This is the first characterization of DsMV isolates infecting A. paeoniifolius, C. esculenta, and X. sagittifolium plants in India. PMID:24717027

  12. An atomic model of brome mosaic virus using direct electron detection and real-space optimization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao; Hryc, Corey F.; Bammes, Benjamin; Afonine, Pavel V.; Jakana, Joanita; Chen, Dong-Hua; Liu, Xiangan; Baker, Matthew L.; Kao, Cheng; Ludtke, Steven J.; Schmid, Michael F.; Adams, Paul D.; Chiu, Wah

    2014-01-01

    Advances in electron cryo-microscopy have enabled structure determination of macromolecules at near-atomic resolution. However, structure determination, even using de novo methods, remains susceptible to model bias and overfitting. Here we describe a complete workflow for data acquisition, image processing, all-atom modelling and validation of brome mosaic virus, an RNA virus. Data were collected with a direct electron detector in integrating mode and an exposure beyond the traditional radiation damage limit. The final density map has a resolution of 3.8 Å as assessed by two independent data sets and maps. We used the map to derive an all-atom model with a newly implemented real-space optimization protocol. The validity of the model was verified by its match with the density map and a previous model from X-ray crystallography, as well as the internal consistency of models from independent maps. This study demonstrates a practical approach to obtain a rigorously validated atomic resolution electron cryo-microscopy structure. PMID:25185801

  13. In situ vaccination with cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles suppresses metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lizotte, P H; Wen, A M; Sheen, M R; Fields, J; Rojanasopondist, P; Steinmetz, N F; Fiering, S

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential to contribute to cancer immunotherapy. The 'in situ vaccination' immunotherapy strategy directly manipulates identified tumours to overcome local tumour-mediated immunosuppression and subsequently stimulates systemic antitumour immunity to treat metastases. We show that inhalation of self-assembling virus-like nanoparticles from cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) reduces established B16F10 lung melanoma and simultaneously generates potent systemic antitumour immunity against poorly immunogenic B16F10 in the skin. Full efficacy required Il-12, Ifn-γ, adaptive immunity and neutrophils. Inhaled CPMV nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by and activated neutrophils in the tumour microenvironment as an important part of the antitumour immune response. CPMV also exhibited clear treatment efficacy and systemic antitumour immunity in ovarian, colon, and breast tumour models in multiple anatomic locations. CPMV nanoparticles are stable, nontoxic, modifiable with drugs and antigens, and their nanomanufacture is highly scalable. These properties, combined with their inherent immunogenicity and demonstrated efficacy against a poorly immunogenic tumour, make CPMV an attractive and novel immunotherapy against metastatic cancer. PMID:26689376

  14. Peroxidase is involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, L S A; Rodrigues, R; Diz, M S S; Robaina, R R; do Amaral Júnior, A T; Carvalho, A O; Gomes, V M

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs) are among the defense mechanisms of plants that work as an important barrier to the development of pathogens. These proteins are classified into 17 families according to their amino acid sequences, serology, and/or biological or enzyme activity. The present study aimed to identify PRs associated with the pathosystem of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum: Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV). Forty-five-day-old plants from accession UENF 1624, previously identified as resistant to PepYMV, were inoculated with the virus. Control and infected leaves were collected for analysis after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. The inoculated and control plants were grown in cages covered with anti-aphid screens. Proteins were extracted from leaf tissue and the presence of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, peroxidase, and lipid transport protein was verified. No difference was observed between the protein pattern of control and infected plants when β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, and lipid transport protein were compared. However, increased peroxidase expression was observed in infected plants at 48 and 72 h after inoculation, indicating that this PR is involved in the response of resistance to PepYMV in C. baccatum var. pendulum. PMID:23661464

  15. A naturally occurring deletion mutant of figwort mosaic virus (caulimovirus) is generated by RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, H B; Wu, F C; Richins, R D; Shepherd, R J

    1991-09-01

    A naturally occurring deletion mutant is observed in plants infected with figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus. The encapsidated mutant genome is formed spontaneously in association with two different strains of FMV in four host plant species. The mutant also appears when cloned wild-type viral DNA is used as the inoculum. The deletion mutant alone is not infectious and it appears unable to replicate after its formation, even in the presence of wild-type virus. The gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was inserted at different positions in the deletion mutant genome, and subsequent transient assays showed that gene expression of the mutant occurs despite the deletion. Sequence analyses of the mutant genome revealed a deletion of 1237-bp segment encompassing a major portion of the coat protein gene and the 5' end of the downstream reverse transcriptase gene. This deletion is associated with consensus signals for RNA splicing including the conserved 5' and 3' splice sites plus surrounding sequences, putative branch point(s) for lariat formation, and an extremely high adenosine content (41%) of the removed fragment. This suggests that splicing of the FMV full-length transcript has occurred prior to reverse transcription and this accounts for the presence and accumulation of encapsidated DNAs with the same deletion. PMID:1871973

  16. Splicing of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA is essential for viral infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss-László, Z; Blanc, S; Hohn, T

    1995-01-01

    A splicing event essential for the infectivity of a plant pararetrovirus has been characterized. Transient expression experiments using reporter constructs revealed a splice donor site in the leader sequence of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S RNA and three additional splice donor sites within open reading frame (ORF) I. All four donors use the same splice acceptor within ORF II. Splicing between the leader and ORF II produces an mRNA from which ORF III and, in the presence of the CaMV translational transactivator, ORF IV can be translated efficiently. The other three splicing events produce RNAs encoding ORF I-II in-frame fusions. All four spliced CaMV RNAs were detected in CaMV-infected plants. Virus mutants in which the splice acceptor site in ORF II is inactivated are not infectious, indicating that splicing plays an essential role in the CaMV life cycle. The results presented here suggest a model for viral gene expression in which RNA splicing is required to provide appropriate substrate mRNAs for the specialized translation mechanisms of CaMV. Images PMID:7628455

  17. Genetic variability and evolutionary analyses of the coat protein gene of Tomato mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Rangel, E A; Alfaro-Fernández, A; Font-San-Ambrosio, M I; Luis-Arteaga, M; Rubio, L

    2011-12-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), a member of the genus Tobamovirus, infects several ornamental and horticultural crops worldwide. In this study, the nucleotide sequences of the coat protein gene of worldwide ToMV isolates were analyzed to estimate the genetic structure and diversity of this virus and the involved evolutionary forces. The phylogenetic analysis showed three clades with high bootstrap support: Clade I contained three ToMV isolates from Brazil collected from pepper, Clade II comprised one Brazilian ToMV isolate from pepper, and Clade III was composed of ToMV isolates collected from different plant hosts (pepper, tomato, eggplant, lilac, camellia, dogwood, red spruce, etc.) and water (from melting ice, lakes and streams) from different countries: USA, Brazil, Korea, Germany, Spain, Denmark (Greenland), China, Taiwan, Malaysia, Iran, and Kazakhstan. With the exception of Brazil, nucleotide diversity within and between different geographic regions was very low, although statistical analyses suggested some gene flow between most of these regions. Our analyses also suggested a strong negative selection which could have contributed to the genetic stability of ToMV. PMID:21881940

  18. Foxtail Mosaic Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Monocot Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Xie, Ke; Jia, Qi; Zhao, Jinping; Chen, Tianyuan; Li, Huangai; Wei, Xiang; Diao, Xianmin; Hong, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful technique to study gene function in plants. However, very few VIGS vectors are available for monocot plants. Here we report that Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV) can be engineered as an effective VIGS system to induce efficient silencing of endogenous genes in monocot plants including barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum) and foxtail millet (Setaria italica). This is evidenced by FoMV-based silencing of phytoene desaturase (PDS) and magnesium chelatase in barley, of PDS and Cloroplastos alterados1 in foxtail millet and wheat, and of an additional gene IspH in foxtail millet. Silencing of these genes resulted in photobleached or chlorosis phenotypes in barley, wheat, and foxtail millet. Furthermore, our FoMV-based gene silencing is the first VIGS system reported for foxtail millet, an important C4 model plant. It may provide an efficient toolbox for high-throughput functional genomics in economically important monocot crops. PMID:27225900

  19. Cauliflower mosaic virus produces an aspartic proteinase to cleave its polyproteins.

    PubMed

    Torruella, M; Gordon, K; Hohn, T

    1989-10-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), a plant pararetrovirus, produces polyproteins from its adjacent genes for the coat protein (ORF IV) and for enzymatic functions (ORF V). The N-terminal domain of the latter gene includes a sequence showing homology to the active site of other retroviral and acid proteases. We have now shown that this domain does indeed produce a functional aspartic protease that can process both the polyproteins. Mutations in the putative active site abolished virus infectivity. In transient expression studies in protoplasts, the N-terminal domain of ORF V was able to free active CAT enzyme from a precursor containing an N-terminal fusion of a portion of ORF IV. The junction between the two domains of this artificial polyprotein comprised sequences from the ORF IV product that had previously been shown to include a proteolytic processing site. The protease mutants were not able to free active CAT enzyme from this precursor. Direct analysis of cleavage at the same site in the ORF IV product using proteins expressed in Escherichia coli revealed the expected products. In vitro translation of a synthetic transcript covering ORF V was used to study the autocatalytic cleavage of the ORF product. Pulse-chase experiments showed that the 80 kd initial translation product was processed to yield a N-terminal doublet of polypeptides of 22 and 20 kd apparent mol. wt, which cover the protease domain. The mutants in the active site were not processed. PMID:2684630

  20. Prevalence of Tobacco mosaic virus in Iran and Evolutionary Analyses of the Coat Protein Gene

    PubMed Central

    Alishiri, Athar; Rakhshandehroo, Farshad; Zamanizadeh, Hamid-Reza; Palukaitis, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The incidence and distribution of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and related tobamoviruses was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on 1,926 symptomatic horticultural crops and 107 asymptomatic weed samples collected from 78 highly infected fields in the major horticultural crop-producing areas in 17 provinces throughout Iran. The results were confirmed by host range studies and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The overall incidence of infection by these viruses in symptomatic plants was 11.3%. The coat protein (CP) gene sequences of a number of isolates were determined and disclosed to be a high identity (up to 100%) among the Iranian isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of all known TMV CP genes showed three clades on the basis of nucleotide sequences with all Iranian isolates distinctly clustered in clade II. Analysis using the complete CP amino acid sequence showed one clade with two subgroups, IA and IB, with Iranian isolates in both subgroups. The nucleotide diversity within each sub-group was very low, but higher between the two clades. No correlation was found between genetic distance and geographical origin or host species of isolation. Statistical analyses suggested a negative selection and demonstrated the occurrence of gene flow from the isolates in other clades to the Iranian population. PMID:25288953

  1. 6K2-induced vesicles can move cell to cell during turnip mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Grangeon, Romain; Jiang, Jun; Wan, Juan; Agbeci, Maxime; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    To successfully infect plants, viruses replicate in an initially infected cell and then move to neighboring cells through plasmodesmata (PDs). However, the nature of the viral entity that crosses over the cell barrier into non-infected ones is not clear. The membrane-associated 6K2 protein of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) induces the formation of vesicles involved in the replication and intracellular movement of viral RNA. This study shows that 6K2-induced vesicles trafficked toward the plasma membrane and were associated with plasmodesmata (PD). We demonstrated also that 6K2 moved cell-to-cell into adjoining cells when plants were infected with TuMV. 6K2 was then fused to photo-activable GFP (6K2:PAGFP) to visualize how 6K2 moved intercellularly during TuMV infection. After activation, 6K2:PAGFP-tagged vesicles moved to the cell periphery and across the cell wall into adjacent cells. These vesicles were shown to contain the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and viral RNA. Symplasmic movement of TuMV may thus be achieved in the form of a membrane-associated viral RNA complex induced by 6K2. PMID:24409170

  2. Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy Study on the Mechanism of RNA Disassembly in Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ningning; Chen, Ying; Peng, Bo; Lin, Yuan; Wang, Qian; Su, Zhaohui; Zhang, Wenke; Li, Hongbin; Shen, Jiacong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the disassembly mechanism of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a model system for virus study, during infection, we have used single-molecule force spectroscopy to mimic and follow the process of RNA disassembly from the protein coat of TMV by the replisome (molecular motor) in vivo, under different pH and Ca2+ concentrations. Dynamic force spectroscopy revealed the unbinding free-energy landscapes as that at pH 4.7 the disassembly process is dominated by one free-energy barrier, whereas at pH 7.0 the process is dominated by one barrier and that there exists a second barrier. The additional free-energy barrier at longer distance has been attributed to the hindrance of disordered loops within the inner channel of TMV, and the biological function of those protein loops was discussed. The combination of pH increase and Ca2+ concentration drop could weaken RNA-protein interactions so much that the molecular motor replisome would be able to pull and disassemble the rest of the genetic RNA from the protein coat in vivo. All these facts provide supporting evidence at the single-molecule level, to our knowledge for the first time, for the cotranslational disassembly mechanism during TMV infection under physiological conditions. PMID:24359751

  3. The importance of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein dimers in the initiation of replication.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiwon; Kim, Bong-Suk; Zhao, Xiaoxia; Loesch-Fries, Sue

    2003-01-01

    Deletion and substitution mutations affecting the oligomerization of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) coat protein (CP) were studied in protoplasts to determine their effect on genome activation, an early step in AMV replication. The CP mutants that formed dimers, CPDeltaC9 and CPC-A(R)F, were highly active in initiating replication with 63-84% of wild-type (wt) CP activity. However, all mutants that did not form dimers, CPDeltaC18, CPDeltaC19, CPC-WFP, and CPC-W, were much less active with 19-33% of wt CP activity. The accumulation and solubility of mutant CPs expressed from a virus-based vector in Nicotiana benthamiana were similar to that of wt CP. Analysis of CP-RNA interactions indicated that CP dimers and CP monomers interacted very differently with AMV RNA 3' ends. These results suggest that CP dimers are more efficient for replication than CP monomers because of differences in RNA binding rather than differences in expression and accumulation of the mutant CPs in infected cells. PMID:12504539

  4. Identification, Characterization, and Molecular Detection of Alfalfa mosaic virus in Potato.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Nie, J

    2006-11-01

    ABSTRACT Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) was detected in potato fields in several provinces in Canada and characterized by bioassay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The identity of eight Canadian potato AMV isolates was confirmed by sequence analysis of their coat protein (CP) gene. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis indicated that these eight AMV potato isolates fell into one strain group, whereas a slight difference between Ca175 and the other Canadian AMV isolates was revealed. The Canadian AMV isolates, except Ca175, clustered together among other strains based on alignment of the CP gene sequence. To detect the virus, a pair of primers, AMV-F and AMV-R, specific to the AMV CP gene, was designed based on the nucleotide sequence alignment of known AMV strains. Evaluations showed that RT-PCR using this primer set was specific and sensitive for detecting AMV in potato leaf and tuber samples. AMV RNAs were easily detected in composite samples of 400 to 800 potato leaves or 200 to 400 tubers. Restriction analysis of PCR amplicons with SacI was a simple method for the confirmation of PCR tests. Thus, RT-PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis may be a useful approach for screening potato samples on a large scale for the presence of AMV. PMID:18943961

  5. Properties of African Cassava Mosaic Virus Capsid Protein Expressed in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Hipp, Katharina; Schäfer, Benjamin; Kepp, Gabi; Jeske, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The capsid proteins (CPs) of geminiviruses combine multiple functions for packaging the single-stranded viral genome, insect transmission and shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) CP was expressed in fission yeast, and purified by SDS gel electrophoresis. After tryptic digestion of this protein, mass spectrometry covered 85% of the amino acid sequence and detected three N-terminal phosphorylation sites (threonine 12, serines 25 and 62). Differential centrifugation of cell extracts separated the CP into two fractions, the supernatant and pellet. Upon isopycnic centrifugation of the supernatant, most of the CP accumulated at densities typical for free proteins, whereas the CP in the pellet fraction showed a partial binding to nucleic acids. Size-exclusion chromatography of the supernatant CP indicated high order complexes. In DNA binding assays, supernatant CP accelerated the migration of ssDNA in agarose gels, which is a first hint for particle formation. Correspondingly, CP shifted ssDNA to the expected densities of virus particles upon isopycnic centrifugation. Nevertheless, electron microscopy did not reveal any twin particles, which are characteristic for geminiviruses. PMID:27399762

  6. Properties of African Cassava Mosaic Virus Capsid Protein Expressed in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Katharina; Schäfer, Benjamin; Kepp, Gabi; Jeske, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The capsid proteins (CPs) of geminiviruses combine multiple functions for packaging the single-stranded viral genome, insect transmission and shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) CP was expressed in fission yeast, and purified by SDS gel electrophoresis. After tryptic digestion of this protein, mass spectrometry covered 85% of the amino acid sequence and detected three N-terminal phosphorylation sites (threonine 12, serines 25 and 62). Differential centrifugation of cell extracts separated the CP into two fractions, the supernatant and pellet. Upon isopycnic centrifugation of the supernatant, most of the CP accumulated at densities typical for free proteins, whereas the CP in the pellet fraction showed a partial binding to nucleic acids. Size-exclusion chromatography of the supernatant CP indicated high order complexes. In DNA binding assays, supernatant CP accelerated the migration of ssDNA in agarose gels, which is a first hint for particle formation. Correspondingly, CP shifted ssDNA to the expected densities of virus particles upon isopycnic centrifugation. Nevertheless, electron microscopy did not reveal any twin particles, which are characteristic for geminiviruses. PMID:27399762

  7. Rapid and specific detection of Yam mosaic virus by reverse-transcription recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gonçalo; Bömer, Moritz; Nkere, Chukwuemeka; Kumar, P Lava; Seal, Susan E

    2015-09-15

    Yam mosaic virus (YMV; genus Potyvirus) is considered to cause the most economically important viral disease of yams (Dioscorea spp.) in West Africa which is the dominant region for yam production globally. Yams are a vegetatively propagated crop and the use of virus-free planting material forms an essential component of disease control. Current serological and PCR-based diagnostic methods for YMV are time consuming involving a succession of target detection steps. In this study, a novel assay for specific YMV detection is described that is based on isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-exoRPA). This test has been shown to be reproducible and able to detect as little as 14 pg/μl of purified RNA obtained from an YMV-infected plant, a sensitivity equivalent to that obtained with the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in current general use. The RT-exoRPA assay has, however, several advantages over the RT-PCR; positive samples can be detected in less than 30 min, and amplification only requires a single incubation temperature (optimum 37°C). These features make the RT-exoRPA assay a promising candidate for adapting into a field test format to be used by yam breeding programmes or certification laboratories. PMID:26115609

  8. Multiple Cis-acting elements modulate programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting in Pea enation mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Simon, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is used by many positive-strand RNA viruses for translation of required products. Despite extensive studies, it remains unresolved how cis-elements just downstream of the recoding site promote a precise level of frameshifting. The Umbravirus Pea enation mosaic virus RNA2 expresses its RNA polymerase by -1 PRF of the 5′-proximal ORF (p33). Three hairpins located in the vicinity of the recoding site are phylogenetically conserved among Umbraviruses. The central Recoding Stimulatory Element (RSE), located downstream of the p33 termination codon, is a large hairpin with two asymmetric internal loops. Mutational analyses revealed that sequences throughout the RSE and the RSE lower stem (LS) structure are important for frameshifting. SHAPE probing of mutants indicated the presence of higher order structure, and sequences in the LS may also adapt an alternative conformation. Long-distance pairing between the RSE and a 3′ terminal hairpin was less critical when the LS structure was stabilized. A basal level of frameshifting occurring in the absence of the RSE increases to 72% of wild-type when a hairpin upstream of the slippery site is also deleted. These results suggest that suppression of frameshifting may be needed in the absence of an active RSE conformation. PMID:26578603

  9. Novel roles for well-known players: from tobacco mosaic virus pests to enzymatically active assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Claudia; Eber, Fabian J; Azucena, Carlos; Förste, Alexander; Walheim, Stefan; Schimmel, Thomas; Bittner, Alexander M; Jeske, Holger; Gliemann, Hartmut; Eiben, Sabine; Geiger, Fania C

    2016-01-01

    Summary The rod-shaped nanoparticles of the widespread plant pathogen tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) have been a matter of intense debates and cutting-edge research for more than a hundred years. During the late 19th century, their behavior in filtration tests applied to the agent causing the 'plant mosaic disease' eventually led to the discrimination of viruses from bacteria. Thereafter, they promoted the development of biophysical cornerstone techniques such as electron microscopy and ultracentrifugation. Since the 1950s, the robust, helically arranged nucleoprotein complexes consisting of a single RNA and more than 2100 identical coat protein subunits have enabled molecular studies which have pioneered the understanding of viral replication and self-assembly, and elucidated major aspects of virus–host interplay, which can lead to agronomically relevant diseases. However, during the last decades, TMV has acquired a new reputation as a well-defined high-yield nanotemplate with multivalent protein surfaces, allowing for an ordered high-density presentation of multiple active molecules or synthetic compounds. Amino acid side chains exposed on the viral coat may be tailored genetically or biochemically to meet the demands for selective conjugation reactions, or to directly engineer novel functionality on TMV-derived nanosticks. The natural TMV size (length: 300 nm) in combination with functional ligands such as peptides, enzymes, dyes, drugs or inorganic materials is advantageous for applications ranging from biomedical imaging and therapy approaches over surface enlargement of battery electrodes to the immobilization of enzymes. TMV building blocks are also amenable to external control of in vitro assembly and re-organization into technically expedient new shapes or arrays, which bears a unique potential for the development of 'smart' functional 3D structures. Among those, materials designed for enzyme-based biodetection layouts, which are routinely applied, e.g., for

  10. Plants expressing tomato golden mosaic virus AL2 or beet curly top virus L2 transgenes show enhanced susceptibility to infection by DNA and RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Sunter, G; Sunter, J L; Bisaro, D M

    2001-06-20

    The AL2 gene of the geminivirus tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV) encodes a transcriptional activator protein (TrAP) that is required for efficient expression of the viral coat protein (CP) and BR1 gene promoters. In contrast, L2, the positional homolog of AL2 in the related beet curly top virus (BCTV), is not required for CP expression, raising questions about the functional relationship between the AL2 and L2 gene products. In this study, transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum var. Samsun plants expressing a truncated AL2 gene (AL2(1-100), lacking the activation domain) or full-length L2 were prepared. These transgenic plants showed a novel enhanced susceptibility (ES) phenotype following inoculation with TGMV, BCTV, or tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), an unrelated RNA virus. ES is characterized by a reduction in the mean latent period (from 1 to 9 days) and by a decrease in the inoculum concentration required to infect transgenic plants (ID50 reduced 6- to 60-fold). However, ES does not result in an enhancement of disease symptoms, and viral nucleic acids do not accumulate to substantially greater levels in infected transgenic plants. That both viral transgenes condition ES suggests that their products share the ability to suppress a host stress or defense response that acts against DNA and RNA viruses. The data further indicate that the transcriptional activation activity of AL2 protein is not required for suppression. The nature of the response targeted by the AL2 and L2 gene products is discussed. PMID:11414806

  11. Occurrence of Squash yellow mild mottle virus and Pepper golden mosaic virus in Potential New Hosts in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ruth M.; Moreira, Lisela; Rojas, María R.; Gilbertson, Robert L.; Hernández, Eduardo; Mora, Floribeth; Ramírez, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Leaf samples of Solanum lycopersicum, Capsicum annuum, Cucurbita moschata, Cucurbita pepo, Sechium edule and Erythrina spp. were collected. All samples were positive for begomoviruses using polymerase chain reaction and degenerate primers. A sequence of ∼1,100 bp was obtained from the genomic component DNA-A of 14 samples. In addition, one sequence of ∼580 bp corresponding to the coat protein (AV1) was obtained from a chayote (S. edule) leaf sample. The presence of Squash yellow mild mottle virus (SYMMoV) and Pepper golden mosaic virus (PepGMV) were confirmed. The host range reported for SYMMoV includes species of the Cucurbitaceae, Caricaceae and Fabaceae families. This report extends the host range of SYMMoV to include the Solanaceae family, and extends the host range of PepGMV to include C. moschata, C. pepo and the Fabaceae Erythrina spp. This is the first report of a begomovirus (PepGMV) infecting chayote in the Western Hemisphere. PMID:25288955

  12. Cassava vein mosaic virus (CsVMV), type species for a new genus of plant double stranded DNA viruses?

    PubMed

    de Kochko, A; Verdaguer, B; Taylor, N; Carcamo, R; Beachy, R N; Fauquet, C

    1998-01-01

    The complete sequence of 8159 nucleotides of the double stranded DNA genome of cassava vein mosaic virus (CsVMV) was determined (# U59751) and revealed a significant difference in genome organization when compared with a previous report (# U20341). When transferred to cassava plants by microbombardment, the full length CsVMV clone was infectious, confirming the genome organization here described. Sequence comparisons between CsVMV and members of the genera Caulimovirus and Badnavirus revealed high homologies between consensus sequences of several proteins that are indispensable for virus replication, including a potential transactivator factor not reported previously. The presence of a sequence complementary to a plant Met tRNA confirms that CsVMV is a plant pararetrovirus and is most closely related to members of the genus Caulimovirus as previously assessed. However, differences in genome organization, number and size of the ORFs, in addition to sequence comparisons with other plant pararetroviruses, shows that either the genetic variability of caulimoviruses is much greater than previously thought, or that CsVMV is the unique representative of a new genus within the Caulimoviridae family. On the basis of this study, it is proposed to upgrade the floating genus Caulimovirus to the family level and to divide the Caulimoviridae family into at least three genera with CsVMV being the type member of a new genus. PMID:9645200

  13. Nucleocapsid Protein from Fig Mosaic Virus Forms Cytoplasmic Agglomerates That Are Hauled by Endoplasmic Reticulum Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. IMPORTANCE Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly

  14. Mutational bias of Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus in the context of host anti-viral gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinmin; Pallett, Denise; Jiang, Hui; Hou, Yong; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Plant Dicer-like (DCL) enzymes exhibit a GC-preference during anti-viral post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), delivering an evolutionary selection pressure resulting in plant viruses with GC-poor genomes. However, some viruses, e.g. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus (TYMV, genus Tymovirus) have GC-rich genomes, raising the question as to whether or not DCL derived selection pressure affects these viruses. In this study we analyzed the virus-derived small interfering RNAs from TYMV-infected leaves of Brassica juncea showed that the TYMV population accumulated a mutational bias with AU replacing GC (GC-AU), demonstrating PTGS pressure. Interestingly, at the highly polymorphic sites the GC-AU bias was no longer observed. This suggests the presence of an unknown mechanism preventing mutational drift of the viral population and maintaining viral genome stability, despite the host PTGS pressure. PMID:26379088

  15. Mutational analysis of the pseudoknot region in the 3' noncoding region of tobacco mosaic virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, N; Watanabe, Y; Meshi, T; Okada, Y

    1990-08-01

    The approximately 200-nucleotide-long 3'-terminal noncoding region of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA contains a tRNA-like structure and, in its immediate upstream region, three consecutive pseudoknots, each of which is composed of two double-helical segments. To elucidate the biological functions of the pseudoknot region, we constructed several deletion mutant TMV-L (a tomato strain) RNAs by using an in vitro transcription system and tested their ability to multiply in both tobacco plants and protoplasts. When deletions were introduced just downstream of the termination codon of the coat protein gene in the 5'-to-3' direction progressively, five of six double-helical segments were dispensable for viral multiplication, indicating that the pseudoknot structures are not essential for multiplication. However, extension of the deletion into the central pseudoknot region resulted in reduction in viral multiplication, accompanied by loss of development of mosaic symptoms on systemic tobacco plants. Cessation of multiplication was observed when the sequence involved in formation of double-helical segment I just upstream of the tRNA-like structure was deleted irrespective of the start point and extent of deletion. Point mutations that destabilized double-helical segment I resulted in a loss or great reduction of viral multiplication, whereas the double mutants in which the double helix was restored by additional compensating base substitutions restored multiplication to nearly the wild-type level. Thus, double-helical segment I just upstream of the tRNA-like structure is a structural feature essential for viral multiplication. PMID:2370679

  16. Structure and Dynamics of the tRNA-like Structure Domain of Brome Mosaic Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweger, Mario; Nesbitt, David

    2014-03-01

    Conformational switching is widely accepted as regulatory mechanism in gene expression in bacterial systems. More recently, similar regulation mechanisms are emerging for viral systems. One of the most abundant and best studied systems is the tRNA-like structure domain that is found in a number of plant viruses across eight genera. In this work, the folding dynamics of the tRNA-like structure domain of Brome Mosaic Virus are investigated using single-molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer techniques. In particular, Burst fluorescence is applied to observe metal-ion induced folding in freely diffusing RNA constructs resembling the 3'-terminal 169nt of BMV RNA3. Histograms of EFRET probabilities reveal a complex equilibrium of three distinct populations. A step-wise kinetic model for TLS folding is developed in accord with the evolution of conformational populations and structural information in the literature. In this mechanism, formation of functional TLS domains from unfolded RNAs requires two consecutive steps; 1) hybridization of a long-range stem interaction followed by 2) formation of a 3' pseudoknot. This three-state equilibrium is well described by step-wise dissociation constants K1(328(30) μM) and K2(1092(183) μM) for [Mg2+] and K1(74(6) mM) and K2(243(52) mM) for [Na+]-induced folding. The kinetic model is validated by oligo competition with the STEM interaction. Implications of this conformational folding mechanism are discussed in regards to regulation of virus replication.

  17. Genetic Diversity and Evolution of Satellite RNAs Associated with the Bamboo Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ing-Nang; Hu, Chung-Chi; Lee, Ching-Wei; Yen, Sih-Min; Yeh, Wen-Bing; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Lin, Na-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Satellite RNAs (satRNAs) are subviral agents that depend on cognate helper viruses for genome replication and encapsidation. Their negative impacts on helper viruses have been exploited to control plant viral diseases. SatBaMV is a commonly found satRNA associated with Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) that infects diverse bamboo species in the field. To investigate the genetic diversity and evolution of satRNAs, we examined seven satBaMV populations derived from five bamboo species and cultivars from Taiwan, China, and India and one from the greenhouse. We found 3 distinct clades among the seven populations. Clade I is consisted of all satBaMV isolates, except for those from Dendrocalamus latiflorus in Taiwan and Bambusa vulgaris in India, which belong to Clades II and III, respectively. Interestingly, nucleotide diversity was lower for Clade I than II and III. However, the nucleotide diversity did not seem to depend on bamboo species or geographic location. Our population genetic analyses revealed the presence of excessive low-frequency polymorphic sites, which suggests that the satBaMV population was under purifying selection and/or population expansion. Further analysis of P20, the only satBaMV gene that encodes a non-structural protein involved in the long-distance movement of satBaMV, showed evidence of purifying selection. Taken together, our results suggest that purifying selection against defective P20 protein is responsible at least in part for the evolution of the satBaMV genome. PMID:25275532

  18. The Temporal Evolution and Global Spread of Cauliflower mosaic virus, a Plant Pararetrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Simon Y. W.; Duchêne, Sebastián; Korkmaz, Savas; Katis, Nikolaos; Takahashi, Hideki; Gibbs, Adrian J.; Ohshima, Kazusato

    2014-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a plant pararetrovirus with a double-stranded DNA genome. It is the type member of the genus Caulimovirus in the family Caulimoviridae. CaMV is transmitted by sap inoculation and in nature by aphids in a semi-persistent manner. To investigate the patterns and timescale of CaMV migration and evolution, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 67 isolates of CaMV collected mostly in Greece, Iran, Turkey, and Japan together with nine published sequences. We identified the open-reading frames (ORFs) in the genomes and inferred their phylogeny. After removing recombinant sequences, we estimated the substitution rates, divergence times, and phylogeographic patterns of the virus populations. We found that recombination has been a common feature of CaMV evolution, and that ORFs I–V have a different evolutionary history from ORF VI. The ORFs have evolved at rates between 1.71 and 5.81×10−4 substitutions/site/year, similar to those of viruses with RNA or ssDNA genomes. We found four geographically confined lineages. CaMV probably spread from a single population to other parts of the world around 400–500 years ago, and is now widely distributed among Eurasian countries. Our results revealed evidence of frequent gene flow between populations in Turkey and those of its neighboring countries, with similar patterns observed for Japan and the USA. Our study represents the first report on the spatial and temporal spread of a plant pararetrovirus. PMID:24465629

  19. The temporal evolution and global spread of Cauliflower mosaic virus, a plant pararetrovirus.

    PubMed

    Yasaka, Ryosuke; Nguyen, Huy D; Ho, Simon Y W; Duchêne, Sebastián; Korkmaz, Savas; Katis, Nikolaos; Takahashi, Hideki; Gibbs, Adrian J; Ohshima, Kazusato

    2014-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a plant pararetrovirus with a double-stranded DNA genome. It is the type member of the genus Caulimovirus in the family Caulimoviridae. CaMV is transmitted by sap inoculation and in nature by aphids in a semi-persistent manner. To investigate the patterns and timescale of CaMV migration and evolution, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 67 isolates of CaMV collected mostly in Greece, Iran, Turkey, and Japan together with nine published sequences. We identified the open-reading frames (ORFs) in the genomes and inferred their phylogeny. After removing recombinant sequences, we estimated the substitution rates, divergence times, and phylogeographic patterns of the virus populations. We found that recombination has been a common feature of CaMV evolution, and that ORFs I-V have a different evolutionary history from ORF VI. The ORFs have evolved at rates between 1.71 and 5.81×10(-4) substitutions/site/year, similar to those of viruses with RNA or ssDNA genomes. We found four geographically confined lineages. CaMV probably spread from a single population to other parts of the world around 400-500 years ago, and is now widely distributed among Eurasian countries. Our results revealed evidence of frequent gene flow between populations in Turkey and those of its neighboring countries, with similar patterns observed for Japan and the USA. Our study represents the first report on the spatial and temporal spread of a plant pararetrovirus. PMID:24465629

  20. Studies on Dulcamara mottle virus Infectious Clone and Chimeric Genomes with Turnip yellow mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Tymovirus consists of viruses with positive sense, single-stranded capped RNA genomes that encode three open reading frames and terminate in a tRNA-like structure. An unpublished report of DuMV 3’ UTR indicated that DuMV seemed to terminate in an A-tail, the first such report for a tymovir...

  1. Absence of interaction of genomic components and complementation between Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus isolates in cowpea.

    PubMed

    Surendranath, B; Usharani, K S; Nagma, A; Victoria, A K; Malathi, V G

    2005-09-01

    Agroinoculations were performed with DNA A and DNA B components of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) isolates differing in their infectivity on cowpea. Exchange of genomic components of the MYMIV isolates occurred in all the leguminous species but not in cowpea. Extremely low viral DNA accumulation and atypical leaf curl symptoms produced by reassortants in cowpea suggest barriers both for replication and systemic movement despite genetic similarity. PMID:15931466

  2. The 5' untranslated region of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 1 is involved in negative-strand RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Vlot, A Corina; Bol, John F

    2003-10-01

    The three genomic RNAs of alfalfa mosaic virus each contain a unique 5' untranslated region (5' UTR). Replacement of the 5' UTR of RNA 1 by that of RNA 2 or 3 yielded infectious replicons. The sequence of a putative 5' stem-loop structure in RNA 1 was found to be required for negative-strand RNA synthesis. A similar putative 5' stem-loop structure is present in RNA 2 but not in RNA 3. PMID:14512577

  3. Coevolution and hierarchical interactions of Tomato mosaic virus and the resistance gene Tm-1.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Mawatari, Natsuki; Miyashita, Shuhei; Kishino, Hirohisa; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    During antagonistic coevolution between viruses and their hosts, viruses have a major advantage by evolving more rapidly. Nevertheless, viruses and their hosts coexist and have coevolved, although the processes remain largely unknown. We previously identified Tm-1 that confers resistance to Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), and revealed that it encodes a protein that binds ToMV replication proteins and inhibits RNA replication. Tm-1 was introgressed from a wild tomato species Solanum habrochaites into the cultivated tomato species Solanum lycopersicum. In this study, we analyzed Tm-1 alleles in S. habrochaites. Although most part of this gene was under purifying selection, a cluster of nonsynonymous substitutions in a small region important for inhibitory activity was identified, suggesting that the region is under positive selection. We then examined the resistance of S. habrochaites plants to ToMV. Approximately 60% of 149 individuals from 24 accessions were resistant to ToMV, while the others accumulated detectable levels of coat protein after inoculation. Unexpectedly, many S. habrochaites plants were observed in which even multiplication of the Tm-1-resistance-breaking ToMV mutant LT1 was inhibited. An amino acid change in the positively selected region of the Tm-1 protein was responsible for the inhibition of LT1 multiplication. This amino acid change allowed Tm-1 to bind LT1 replication proteins without losing the ability to bind replication proteins of wild-type ToMV. The antiviral spectra and biochemical properties suggest that Tm-1 has evolved by changing the strengths of its inhibitory activity rather than diversifying the recognition spectra. In the LT1-resistant S. habrochaites plants inoculated with LT1, mutant viruses emerged whose multiplication was not inhibited by the Tm-1 allele that confers resistance to LT1. However, the resistance-breaking mutants were less competitive than the parental strains in the absence of Tm-1. Based on these results, we

  4. Coevolution and Hierarchical Interactions of Tomato mosaic virus and the Resistance Gene Tm-1

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Mawatari, Natsuki; Miyashita, Shuhei; Kishino, Hirohisa; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    During antagonistic coevolution between viruses and their hosts, viruses have a major advantage by evolving more rapidly. Nevertheless, viruses and their hosts coexist and have coevolved, although the processes remain largely unknown. We previously identified Tm-1 that confers resistance to Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), and revealed that it encodes a protein that binds ToMV replication proteins and inhibits RNA replication. Tm-1 was introgressed from a wild tomato species Solanum habrochaites into the cultivated tomato species Solanum lycopersicum. In this study, we analyzed Tm-1 alleles in S. habrochaites. Although most part of this gene was under purifying selection, a cluster of nonsynonymous substitutions in a small region important for inhibitory activity was identified, suggesting that the region is under positive selection. We then examined the resistance of S. habrochaites plants to ToMV. Approximately 60% of 149 individuals from 24 accessions were resistant to ToMV, while the others accumulated detectable levels of coat protein after inoculation. Unexpectedly, many S. habrochaites plants were observed in which even multiplication of the Tm-1-resistance-breaking ToMV mutant LT1 was inhibited. An amino acid change in the positively selected region of the Tm-1 protein was responsible for the inhibition of LT1 multiplication. This amino acid change allowed Tm-1 to bind LT1 replication proteins without losing the ability to bind replication proteins of wild-type ToMV. The antiviral spectra and biochemical properties suggest that Tm-1 has evolved by changing the strengths of its inhibitory activity rather than diversifying the recognition spectra. In the LT1-resistant S. habrochaites plants inoculated with LT1, mutant viruses emerged whose multiplication was not inhibited by the Tm-1 allele that confers resistance to LT1. However, the resistance-breaking mutants were less competitive than the parental strains in the absence of Tm-1. Based on these results, we

  5. Serological and Molecular Studies of a Novel Virus Isolate Causing Yellow Mosaic of Patchouli [Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth

    PubMed Central

    Zaim, Mohammad; Ali, Ashif; Joseph, Jomon; Khan, Feroz

    2013-01-01

    Here we have identified and characterized a devastating virus capable of inducing yellow mosaic on the leaves of Patchouli [Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth]. The diagnostic tools used were host range, transmission studies, cytopathology, electron microscopy, serology and partial coat protein (CP) gene sequencing. Evidence from biological, serological and sequence data suggested that the causal virus belonged to genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae. The isolate, designated as Patchouli Yellow Mosaic Virus (PaYMV), was transmitted through grafting, sap and the insect Myzus persicae (Sulz.). Flexuous rod shaped particles with a mean length of 800 nm were consistently observed in leaf-dip preparations from natural as well as alternate hosts, and in purified preparation. Cytoplasmic cylindrical inclusions, pinwheels and laminar aggregates were observed in ultra-thin sections of infected patchouli leaves. The purified capsid protein has a relative mass of 43 kDa. Polyclonal antibodies were raised in rabbits against the coat protein separated on SDS – PAGE; which were used in ELISA and western blotting. Using specific antibodies in ELISA, PaYMV was frequently detected at patchouli plantations at Lucknow and Bengaluru. Potyvirus-specific degenerate primer pair (U335 and D335) had consistently amplified partial CP gene from crude preparations of infected tissues by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Comparison of the PCR product sequence (290 bp) with the corresponding regions of established potyviruses showed 78–82% and 91–95% sequence similarity at the nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively. The results clearly established that the virus under study has close homology with watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) in the coat protein region and therefore could share a common ancestor family. Further studies are required to authenticate the identity of PaYMV as a distinct virus or as an isolate of WMV. PMID:24386278

  6. Serological and molecular studies of a novel virus isolate causing yellow mosaic of Patchouli [Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth].

    PubMed

    Zaim, Mohammad; Ali, Ashif; Joseph, Jomon; Khan, Feroz

    2013-01-01

    Here we have identified and characterized a devastating virus capable of inducing yellow mosaic on the leaves of Patchouli [Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth]. The diagnostic tools used were host range, transmission studies, cytopathology, electron microscopy, serology and partial coat protein (CP) gene sequencing. Evidence from biological, serological and sequence data suggested that the causal virus belonged to genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae. The isolate, designated as Patchouli Yellow Mosaic Virus (PaYMV), was transmitted through grafting, sap and the insect Myzus persicae (Sulz.). Flexuous rod shaped particles with a mean length of 800 nm were consistently observed in leaf-dip preparations from natural as well as alternate hosts, and in purified preparation. Cytoplasmic cylindrical inclusions, pinwheels and laminar aggregates were observed in ultra-thin sections of infected patchouli leaves. The purified capsid protein has a relative mass of 43 kDa. Polyclonal antibodies were raised in rabbits against the coat protein separated on SDS - PAGE; which were used in ELISA and western blotting. Using specific antibodies in ELISA, PaYMV was frequently detected at patchouli plantations at Lucknow and Bengaluru. Potyvirus-specific degenerate primer pair (U335 and D335) had consistently amplified partial CP gene from crude preparations of infected tissues by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Comparison of the PCR product sequence (290 bp) with the corresponding regions of established potyviruses showed 78-82% and 91-95% sequence similarity at the nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively. The results clearly established that the virus under study has close homology with watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) in the coat protein region and therefore could share a common ancestor family. Further studies are required to authenticate the identity of PaYMV as a distinct virus or as an isolate of WMV. PMID:24386278

  7. The Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti Plasmid Virulence Gene virE2 Reduces Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus Infection in Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana Plants.

    PubMed

    Resmi, Thulasi Raveendrannair; Hohn, Thomas; Hohn, Barbara; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-05-01

    Cassava mosaic disease is a major constraint to cassava cultivation worldwide. In India, the disease is caused by Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV). The Agrobacterium Ti plasmid virulence gene virE2, encoding a nuclear-localized, single-stranded DNA binding protein, was introduced into Nicotiana benthamiana to develop tolerance against SLCMV. Leaf discs of transgenic N. benthamiana plants, harboring the virE2 gene, complemented a virE2 mutation in A. tumefaciens and produced tumours. Three tested virE2 transgenic plants displayed reduction in disease symptoms upon agroinoculation with SLCMV DNA A and DNA B partial dimers. A pronounced reduction in viral DNA accumulation was observed in all three virE2 transgenic plants. Thus, virE2 is an effective candidate gene to develop tolerance against the cassava mosaic disease and possibly other DNA virus diseases. PMID:26008704

  8. The Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti Plasmid Virulence Gene virE2 Reduces Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus Infection in Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana Plants

    PubMed Central

    Resmi, Thulasi Raveendrannair; Hohn, Thomas; Hohn, Barbara; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-01-01

    Cassava mosaic disease is a major constraint to cassava cultivation worldwide. In India, the disease is caused by Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV). The Agrobacterium Ti plasmid virulence gene virE2, encoding a nuclear-localized, single-stranded DNA binding protein, was introduced into Nicotiana benthamiana to develop tolerance against SLCMV. Leaf discs of transgenic N. benthamiana plants, harboring the virE2 gene, complemented a virE2 mutation in A. tumefaciens and produced tumours. Three tested virE2 transgenic plants displayed reduction in disease symptoms upon agroinoculation with SLCMV DNA A and DNA B partial dimers. A pronounced reduction in viral DNA accumulation was observed in all three virE2 transgenic plants. Thus, virE2 is an effective candidate gene to develop tolerance against the cassava mosaic disease and possibly other DNA virus diseases. PMID:26008704

  9. Evaluation of the tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) diversity panel for response to the NL 3 strain of Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (BCMNV) and for biological nitrogen fixation with Bradyrhizobium strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aphid-transmitted Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (BCMNV) and Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) are potyviruses that are seed transmitted in tepary bean. Developing resistance to these viruses will be critical for expanding production in areas where they are endemic. Biological nitrogen fixation (BN...

  10. Replication of chimeric tobacco mosaic viruses which carry heterologous combinations of replicase genes and 3' noncoding regions.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, M; Meshi, T; Watanabe, Y; Okada, Y

    1988-05-01

    Three tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-L (tomato strain)-derived chimeras, designated OL1, LG11, or LK31, were constructed by replacing the 3' noncoding region with the corresponding sequence of TMV-OM (common strain), cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), or TMV-Cc (cowpea strain), respectively. The genomic RNAs of TMV-L, -OM, and CGMMV carry histidine-accepting tRNA-like structures at their 3' termini, while the genome of TMV-Cc accepts valine. The three chimeric viruses were able to multiply in both tobacco protoplasts and plants. Multiplication of OL1 in protoplasts was similar to that of the parental strain, L, but in the cases of LG11 and LK31 multiplication was decreased. Sequence analyses of progeny RNAs revealed that viruses with chimeric sequences propagated. These data suggested that TMV-L replicase recognizes the 3' terminal structures of TMV-OM, CGMMV, and TMV-Cc and can initiate minus-strand RNA synthesis. The relationship between the virus-coded component(s) of TMV replicase and the 3' terminal region may not be so stringent. PMID:2452515

  11. Roles and Programming of Arabidopsis ARGONAUTE Proteins during Turnip Mosaic Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ruiz, Hernan; Carbonell, Alberto; Hoyer, J. Steen; Fahlgren, Noah; Gilbert, Kerrigan B.; Takeda, Atsushi; Giampetruzzi, Annalisa; Garcia Ruiz, Mayra T.; McGinn, Michaela G.; Lowery, Nicholas; Martinez Baladejo, Maria T.; Carrington, James C.

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, ARGONAUTE proteins (AGOs) associate with microRNAs (miRNAs), short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), and other classes of small RNAs to regulate target RNA or target loci. Viral infection in plants induces a potent and highly specific antiviral RNA silencing response characterized by the formation of virus-derived siRNAs. Arabidopsis thaliana has ten AGO genes of which AGO1, AGO2, and AGO7 have been shown to play roles in antiviral defense. A genetic analysis was used to identify and characterize the roles of AGO proteins in antiviral defense against Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) in Arabidopsis. AGO1, AGO2 and AGO10 promoted anti-TuMV defense in a modular way in various organs, with AGO2 providing a prominent antiviral role in leaves. AGO5, AGO7 and AGO10 had minor effects in leaves. AGO1 and AGO10 had overlapping antiviral functions in inflorescence tissues after systemic movement of the virus, although the roles of AGO1 and AGO10 accounted for only a minor amount of the overall antiviral activity. By combining AGO protein immunoprecipitation with high-throughput sequencing of associated small RNAs, AGO2, AGO10, and to a lesser extent AGO1 were shown to associate with siRNAs derived from silencing suppressor (HC-Pro)-deficient TuMV-AS9, but not with siRNAs derived from wild-type TuMV. Co-immunoprecipitation and small RNA sequencing revealed that viral siRNAs broadly associated with wild-type HC-Pro during TuMV infection. These results support the hypothesis that suppression of antiviral silencing during TuMV infection, at least in part, occurs through sequestration of virus-derived siRNAs away from antiviral AGO proteins by HC-Pro. These findings indicate that distinct AGO proteins function as antiviral modules, and provide a molecular explanation for the silencing suppressor activity of HC-Pro. PMID:25806948

  12. Contribution of host intracellular transport machineries to intercellular movement of turnip mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Agbeci, Maxime; Grangeon, Romain; Nelson, Richard S; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of different host cell transport systems in the intercellular movement of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) was investigated. To discriminate between primary infections and secondary infections associated with the virus intercellular movement, a gene cassette expressing GFP-HDEL was inserted adjacent to a TuMV infectious cassette expressing 6K₂:mCherry, both within the T-DNA borders of the binary vector pCambia. In this system, both gene cassettes were delivered to the same cell by a single binary vector and primary infection foci emitted green and red fluorescence while secondarily infected cells emitted only red fluorescence. Intercellular movement was measured at 72 hours post infiltration and was estimated to proceed at an average rate of one cell being infected every three hours over an observation period of 17 hours. To determine if the secretory pathway were important for TuMV intercellular movement, chemical and protein inhibitors that blocked both early and late secretory pathways were used. Treatment with Brefeldin A or Concanamycin A or expression of ARF1 or RAB-E1d dominant negative mutants, all of which inhibit pre- or post-Golgi transport, reduced intercellular movement by the virus. These treatments, however, did not inhibit virus replication in primary infected cells. Pharmacological interference assays using Tyrphostin A23 or Wortmannin showed that endocytosis was not important for TuMV intercellular movement. Lack of co-localization by endocytosed FM4-64 and Ara7 (AtRabF2b) with TuMV-induced 6K₂-tagged vesicles further supported this conclusion. Microfilament depolymerizing drugs and silencing expression of myosin XI-2 gene, but not myosin VIII genes, also inhibited TuMV intercellular movement. Expression of dominant negative myosin mutants confirmed the role played by myosin XI-2 as well as by myosin XI-K in TuMV intercellular movement. Using this dual gene cassette expression system and transport inhibitors, components of the

  13. Simultaneous analysis of the bidirectional African cassava mosaic virus promoter activity using two different luciferase genes.

    PubMed

    Frey, P M; Schärer-Hernández, N G; Fütterer, J; Potrykus, I; Puonti-Kaerlas, J

    2001-03-01

    The expression of geminivirus genes is controlled by bidirectional promoters which are located in the large intergenic region of the circular DNA genomes and specifically regulated by virus encoded proteins. In order to study the simultaneous regulation of both orientations of the DNA A and DNA B promoters of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV), they were cloned between two different luciferase genes with the firefly luciferase gene in complementary-sense and the Renilla luciferase gene in virion-sense orientation. The regulation of the ACMV promoters by proteins encoded by the complete DNA A, as well as by the individually expressed transactivator (TrAP) or replication-associated (Rep) proteins was assessed in tobacco and cassava protoplasts using dual luciferase assays. In addition, the regulation of the DNA A promoter integrated into tobacco genome was also assessed. The results show that TrAP activates virion-sense expression strongly both in cassava and tobacco protoplasts, but not in transgenic tobacco plants. In contrast to this, DNA A encoded proteins activate virion-sense expression both in protoplasts and in transgenic plants. At the same time they reduce the expression of the complementary-sense Rep gene on DNA A but activate the expression of the complementary-sense movement protein (MPB) gene on DNA B. The degree of MBP activation is higher in cassava than in tobacco protoplasts, indicating that the plant host also influences the promoter strength. Transient transformation experiments using linearized DNA indicate that the different regulation of the ACMV DNA A promoter in protoplasts and transgenic plants could be due to different DNA curvature in free plasmids and in genes integrated in plant genomic DNA. PMID:11324760

  14. Biological and molecular variation of Iranian Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) isolates.

    PubMed

    Farzadfar, Shirin; Pourrahim, Reza

    2013-10-01

    Seventeen provinces of Iran were surveyed during 2003-2012 to find Brassicaceae hosts of Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV). A total 397 samples were collected from plants with virus-like symptoms. Among those tested by ELISA, 255 samples (67.2 %) were found to be infected with CaMV. Mechanical transmission tests showed that the Iranian isolates have similar biological properties on a number of Brassica and Raphanus plant species and cultivars tested. However, the isolates varied in the severity of symptoms they induced and in the capacity to infect B. oleracea var. capitata, on the basis of which they were grouped into two distinct biotypes L/MMo (latent/mild mottle) and severe (S) infection. The molecular diversity of natural population of CaMV were investigated based on the complete sequences of OFR 6 of 36 Iranian isolates collected from different geographically distant regions in Iran alongside the sequences of 14 previously reported isolates. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Iranian CaMV isolates belong to two groups (GI and GII). Most of the Iranian isolates fell into GI with other exotic isolates; however, the isolates from North-East Iran with Xinjiang from China fell into GII. The phylogenetic group GII (the North-East Iranian isolates) closely corresponded to the S biological group however other Iranian isolates corresponded to the L/MMo biological group. The within-population diversity was lower than the between population diversity suggesting the contribution of a founder effect on diversification of CaMV isolates. The Iranian isolates were differentiated from other exotic CaMV isolates and clustered into two RFLP groups using Hpy99I which closely corresponded to the biological and phylogenetic groups. This study showed the evolutionary process in CaMV isolates is shaped by a combination of host range differentiation and nucleotide substitution using the approach of population genetics. PMID:23828619

  15. Molecular Variability and Distribution of Sugarcane Mosaic Virus in Shanxi, China

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Penghui; An, Tianci; Cui, Aimin; An, Derong

    2016-01-01

    Background Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) is responsible for large-scale economic losses in the global production of sugarcane, maize, sorghum, and some other graminaceous species. To understand the evolutionary mechanism of SCMV populations, this virus was studied in Shanxi, China. A total of 86 maize leaf samples (41 samples in 2012 and 45 samples in 2013) were collected from 4 regions of Shanxi. Results Double-antibody sandwich (DAS)-ELISA and RT-PCR showed 59 samples (30 samples in 2012 and 29 samples in 2013) to be positive for SCMV, from which 10 new isolates of SCMV were isolated and sequenced. The complete genomes of these isolates are 9610 nt long, including the 5′ and 3′ non-coding regions, and encode a 3063-amino acid polyprotein. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that 24 SCMV isolates could be divided on the basis of the whole genome into 2 divergent evolutionary groups, which were associated with the host species. Among the populations, 15 potential recombination events were identified. The selection pressure on the genes of these SCMV isolates was also calculated. The results confirmed that all the genes were under negative selection. Conclusions Negative selection and recombination appear to be important evolutionary factors shaping the genetic structure of these SCMV isolates. SCMV is distributed widely in China and exists as numerous strains with distinct genetic diversity. Our findings will provide a foundation for evaluating the epidemiological characteristics of SCMV in China and will be useful in designing long-term, sustainable management strategies for SCMV. PMID:26987060

  16. An efficient Foxtail mosaic virus vector system with reduced environmental risk

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant viral vectors offer high-yield expression of pharmaceutical and commercially important proteins with a minimum of cost and preparation time. The use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens has been introduced to deliver the viral vector as a transgene to each plant cell via a simple, nonsterile infiltration technique called "agroinoculation". With agroinoculation, a full length, systemically moving virus is no longer necessary for excellent protein yield, since the viral transgene is transcribed and replicates in every infiltrated cell. Viral genes may therefore be deleted to decrease the potential for accidental spread and persistence of the viral vector in the environment. Results In this study, both the coat protein (CP) and triple gene block (TGB) genetic segments were eliminated from Foxtail mosaic virus to create the "FECT" vector series, comprising a deletion of 29% of the genome. This viral vector is highly crippled and expresses little or no marker gene within the inoculated leaf. However, when co-agroinoculated with a silencing suppressor (p19 or HcPro), FECT expressed GFP at 40% total soluble protein in the tobacco host, Nicotiana benthamiana. The modified FoMV vector retained the full-length replicase ORF, the TGB1 subgenomic RNA leader sequence and either 0, 22 or 40 bases of TGB1 ORF (in vectors FECT0, FECT22 and FECT40, respectively). As well as N. benthamiana, infection of legumes was demonstrated. Despite many attempts, expression of GFP via syringe agroinoculation of various grass species was very low, reflecting the low Agrobacterium-mediated transformation rate of monocots. Conclusions The FECT/40 vector expresses foreign genes at a very high level, and yet has a greatly reduced biohazard potential. It can form no virions and can effectively replicate only in a plant with suppressed silencing. PMID:21162736

  17. Role of Transcription Factor HAT1 in Modulating Arabidopsis thaliana Response to Cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Zou, Li-Juan; Deng, Xing-Guang; Han, Xue-Ying; Tan, Wen-Rong; Zhu, Li-Jun; Xi, De-Hui; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana homeodomain-leucine zipper protein 1 (HAT1) belongs to the homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) family class II that plays important roles in plant growth and development as a transcription factor. To elucidate further the role of HD-Zip II transcription factors in plant defense, the A. thaliana hat1, hat1hat3 and hat1hat2hat3 mutants and HAT1 overexpression plants (HAT1OX) were challenged with Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). HAT1OX displayed more susceptibility, while loss-of-function mutants of HAT1 exhibited less susceptibility to CMV infection. HAT1 and its close homologs HAT2 and HAT3 function redundantly, as the triple mutant hat1hat2hat3 displayed increased virus resistance compared with the hat1 and hat1hat3 mutants. Furthermore, the induction of the antioxidant system (the activities and expression of enzymatic antioxidants) and the expression of defense-associated genes were down-regulated in HAT1OX but up-regulated in hat1hat2hat3 when compared with Col-0 after CMV infection. Further evidence showed that the involvement of HAT1 in the anti-CMV defense response might be dependent on salicylic acid (SA) but not jasmonic acid (JA). The SA level or expression of SA synthesis-related genes was decreased in HAT1OX but increased in hat1hat2hat3 compared with Col-0 after CMV infection, but there were little difference in JA level or JA synthesis-related gene expression among HAT1OX or defective plants. In addition, HAT1 expression is dependent on SA accumulation. Taken together, our study indicated that HAT1 negatively regulates plant defense responses to CMV. PMID:27328697

  18. Genetic and histological studies on the delayed systemic movement of Tobacco Mosaic Virus in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Carolina; González-Cruz, Javiera; Jauregui, Francisca; Medina, Consuelo; Mancilla, Pablo; Matus, José Tomás; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2008-01-01

    Background Viral infections and their spread throughout a plant require numerous interactions between the host and the virus. While new functions of viral proteins involved in these processes have been revealed, current knowledge of host factors involved in the spread of a viral infection is still insufficient. In Arabidopsis thaliana, different ecotypes present varying susceptibilities to Tobacco mosaic virus strain U1 (TMV-U1). The rate of TMV-U1 systemic movement is delayed in ecotype Col-0 when compared with other 13 ecotypes. We followed viral movement through vascular tissue in Col-0 plants by electronic microscopy studies. In addition, the delay in systemic movement of TMV-U1 was genetically studied. Results TMV-U1 reaches apical leaves only after 18 days post rosette inoculation (dpi) in Col-0, whereas it is detected at 9 dpi in the Uk-4 ecotype. Genetic crosses between Col-0 and Uk-4 ecotypes, followed by analysis of viral movement in F1 and F2 populations, revealed that this delayed movement correlates with a recessive, monogenic and nuclear locus. The use of selected polymorphic markers showed that this locus, denoted DSTM1 (Delayed Systemic Tobamovirus Movement 1), is positioned on the large arm of chromosome II. Electron microscopy studies following the virion's route in stems of Col-0 infected plants showed the presence of curved structures, instead of the typical rigid rods of TMV-U1. This was not observed in the case of TMV-U1 infection in Uk-4, where the observed virions have the typical rigid rod morphology. Conclusion The presence of defectively assembled virions observed by electron microscopy in vascular tissue of Col-0 infected plants correlates with a recessive delayed systemic movement trait of TMV-U1 in this ecotype. PMID:18817581

  19. Emergence of distinct brome mosaic virus recombinants is determined by the polarity of the inoculum RNA.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sun-Jung; Rao, A L N

    2012-05-01

    Despite overwhelming interest in the impact exerted by recombination during evolution of RNA viruses, the relative contribution of the polarity of inoculum templates remains poorly understood. Here, by agroinfiltrating Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, we show that brome mosaic virus (BMV) replicase is competent to initiate positive-strand [(+)-strand] synthesis on an ectopically expressed RNA3 negative strand [(-) strand] and faithfully complete the replication cycle. Consequently, we sought to examine the role of RNA polarity in BMV recombination by expressing a series of replication-defective mutants of BMV RNA3 in (+) or (-) polarity. Temporal analysis of progeny sequences revealed that the genetic makeup of the primary recombinant pool is determined by the polarity of the inoculum template. When the polarity of the inoculum template was (+), the recombinant pool that accumulated during early phases of replication was a mixture of nonhomologous recombinants. These are longer than the inoculum template length, and a nascent 3' untranslated region (UTR) of wild-type (WT) RNA1 or RNA2 was added to the input mutant RNA3 3' UTR due to end-to-end template switching by BMV replicase during (-)-strand synthesis. In contrast, when the polarity of the inoculum was (-), the progeny contained a pool of native-length homologous recombinants generated by template switching of BMV replicase with a nascent UTR from WT RNA1 or RNA2 during (+)-strand synthesis. Repair of a point mutation caused by polymerase error occurred only when the polarity of the inoculum template was (+). These results contribute to the explanation of the functional role of RNA polarity in recombination mediated by copy choice mechanisms. PMID:22357282

  20. Complete nucleotide sequence of Alfalfa mosaic virus isolated from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Trucco, Verónica; de Breuil, Soledad; Bejerman, Nicolás; Lenardon, Sergio; Giolitti, Fabián

    2014-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) isolate infecting alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina, AMV-Arg, was determined. The virus genome has the typical organization described for AMV, and comprises 3,643, 2,593, and 2,038 nucleotides for RNA1, 2 and 3, respectively. The whole genome sequence and each encoding region were compared with those of other four isolates that have been completely sequenced from China, Italy, Spain and USA. The nucleotide identity percentages ranged from 95.9 to 99.1 % for the three RNAs and from 93.7 to 99 % for the protein 1 (P1), protein 2 (P2), movement protein and coat protein (CP) encoding regions, whereas the amino acid identity percentages of these proteins ranged from 93.4 to 99.5 %, the lowest value corresponding to P2. CP sequences of AMV-Arg were compared with those of other 25 available isolates, and the phylogenetic analysis based on the CP gene was carried out. The highest percentage of nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene was 98.3 % with a Chinese isolate and 98.6 % at the amino acid level with four isolates, two from Italy, one from Brazil and the remaining one from China. The phylogenetic analysis showed that AMV-Arg is closely related to subgroup I of AMV isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a complete nucleotide sequence of AMV from South America and the first worldwide report of complete nucleotide sequence of AMV isolated from alfalfa as natural host. PMID:24510307

  1. Evaluation of the conformational switch model for alfalfa mosaic virus RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Jessica E; Rocheleau, Gail; Kelley-Clarke, Brenna; Gehrke, Lee

    2005-05-01

    Key elements of the conformational switch model describing regulation of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) replication (R. C. Olsthoorn, S. Mertens, F. T. Brederode, and J. F. Bol, EMBO J. 18:4856-4864, 1999) have been tested using biochemical assays and functional studies in nontransgenic protoplasts. Although comparative sequence analysis suggests that the 3' untranslated regions of AMV and ilarvirus RNAs have the potential to fold into pseudoknots, we were unable to confirm that a proposed pseudoknot forms or has a functional role in regulating coat protein-RNA binding or viral RNA replication. Published work has suggested that the pseudoknot is part of a tRNA-like structure (TLS); however, we argue that the canonical sequence and functional features that define the TLS are absent. We suggest here that the absence of the TLS correlates directly with the distinctive requirement for coat protein to activate replication in these viruses. Experimental data are evidence that elevated magnesium concentrations proposed to stabilize the pseudoknot structure do not block coat protein binding. Additionally, covarying nucleotide changes proposed to reestablish pseudoknot pairings do not rescue replication. Furthermore, as described in the accompanying paper (L. M. Guogas, S. M. Laforest, and L. Gehrke, J. Virol. 79:5752-5761, 2005), coat protein is not, by definition, inhibitory to minus-strand RNA synthesis. Rather, the activation of viral RNA replication by coat protein is shown to be concentration dependent. We describe the 3' organization model as an alternate model of AMV replication that offers an improved fit to the available data. PMID:15827189

  2. Virus-Specific Read-Through Codon Preference Affects Infectivity of Chimeric Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Viruses Displaying a Dengue Virus Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Pak-Guan; Ooi, Aik-Seng; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Othman, Rofina Yasmin

    2009-01-01

    A Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) was used to present a truncated dengue virus type 2 envelope (E) protein binding region from amino acids 379 to 423 (EB4). The EB4 gene was inserted at the terminal end of the CGMMV coat protein (CP) open reading frame (ORF). Read-through sequences of TMV or CGMMV, CAA-UAG-CAA-UUA, or AAA-UAG-CAA-UUA were, respectively, inserted in between the CP and the EB4 genes. The chimeric clones, pRT, pRG, and pCG+FSRTRE, were transcribed into full-length capped recombinant CGMMV transcripts. Only constructs with the wild-type CGMMV read-through sequence yielded infectious viruses following infection of host plant, muskmelon (Cucumis melo) leaves. The ratio of modified to unmodified CP for the read-through expression clone developed was also found to be approximately 1:1, higher than what has been previously reported. It was also observed that infectivity was not affected by differences in pI between the chimera and its wild counterpart. Analysis of recombinant viruses after 21-days-postinculation (dpi) revealed that deletions occurred resulting in partial reversions of the viral population to near wild type and suggesting that this would be the limiting harvest period for obtaining true to type recombinants with this construct. PMID:19325913

  3. Occurrence and molecular characterization of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus in cucurbit crops of KPK, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asad; Hussain, Adil; Ahmad, Musharaf

    2014-01-01

    Field survey of the cucurbit crops revealed a high incidence of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province (KPK), Pakistan. Among the seven districts surveyed, average percent incidence of CGMMV was recorded up to 58.1% in district Nowshera, followed by 51.1% in district Charsada, 40.5% in district Swabi and 37.3% in district Mardan. In Swat and Dir districts average incidence CGMMV was recorded upto 31.2% and 29.4%, respectively. Among the different crops highest incidence in plain areas of KPK was recorded in bottle gourd (59.3%) followed by 56.3% in Squash, 54.5% in Pumpkin, 45.5% in Melon, 41.7% in Cucumber and 29.9% in Sponge gourd. In Northern hilly areas highest incidence of CGMMV (52.9%) was observed in pumpkin, followed by 49.6% in bottle gourd, 47.3% in squash, 45.1% in Melon 42.3% in cucumber and 41.6% in sponge gourd. Little variability was observed in the coat protein amino acid sequence identities of CGMMV Pakistan isolate, when compared with other reported isolates. PMID:25763028

  4. Differentially expressed genes of Chenopodium amaranticolor in response to cymbidium mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Min; Baek, Eseul; Ryu, Ki Hyun; Choi, Sun Hee

    2016-09-01

    Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV)-induced expressed sequence tag (EST) clones from Chenopodium amaranticolor were identified. CymMV was mechanically inoculated onto C. amaranticolor, and local lesion symptoms were observed. Inoculated leaves were collected on serial days post inoculation (dpi) to identify activated or suppressed genes. mRNA isolation and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) were then performed to identify differentially expressed genes related to the local lesion response. Fifty-three ESTs, including genes related to defense and stress responses (e.g., lipoxygenase, jasmonate-induced protein, and heat shock protein), were generated. In addition, a large proportion of the ESTs were found to be involved in photosynthesis, as determined by their functional categories. Expression levels of several EST genes were observed using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and the evaluated genes showed varying levels of expression during the experimental period. In this study, differentially expressed sequences via SSH were identified from CymMV-infected C. amaranticolor, and profiling and annotation were carried out to determine the expression pattern of CymMV and its interaction with C. amaranticolor. PMID:27364083

  5. PCNA interacts with Indian mung bean yellow mosaic virus rep and downregulates Rep activity.

    PubMed

    Bagewadi, Basavaraj; Chen, Shoajiang; Lal, Sunil K; Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Mukherjee, Sunil K

    2004-11-01

    Proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a conserved plant protein as well as an important replication factor, is induced in response to geminivirus infection in the resting cells of the phloem tissues. The biochemical role of PCNA in rolling circle replication (RCR) of geminivirus DNA has not been explored in detail. The initiation of RCR of the bipartite genome of a geminivirus, Indian mung bean yellow mosaic virus (IMYMV), is mainly controlled by viral protein Rep (or AL1 or AC1). The role of host PCNA in RCR of IMYMV was revealed by studying the physical and functional interactions between recombinant PCNA and recombinant IMYMV Rep. Pea nuclear PCNA as well as recombinant pea PCNA showed binding to recombinant Rep in experiments involving both affinity chromatography and yeast two-hybrid approaches. The contacting amino acid residues of PCNA seemed to be present throughout a wide region of the trimeric protein, while those of Rep appeared to be localized only in the middle part of the protein. The site-specific nicking-closing activity and the ATPase function of IMYMV Rep were impaired by PCNA. These observations lead to interesting speculations about the control of viral RCR and dynamic profiles of protein-protein interactions at the RCR origin of the geminiviruses. PMID:15479830

  6. Transient viscoelasticity study of tobacco mosaic virus/Ba2+ superlattice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we reported a new method to synthesize the rod-like tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) superlattice. To explore its potentials in nanolattice templating and tissue scaffolding, this work focused the viscoelasticity of the superlattice with a novel transient method via atomic force microscopy (AFM). For measuring viscoelasticity, in contrast to previous methods that assessed the oscillating response, the method proposed in this work enabled us to determine the transient response (creep or relaxation) of micro/nanobiomaterials. The mathematical model and numerical process were elaborated to extract the viscoelastic properties from the indentation data. The adhesion between the AFM tip and the sample was included in the indentation model. Through the functional equation method, the elastic solution for the indentation model was extended to the viscoelastic solution so that the time dependent force vs. displacement relation could be attained. To simplify the solving of the differential equation, a standard solid model was modified to obtain the elastic and viscoelastic components of the sample. The viscoelastic responses with different mechanical stimuli and the dynamic properties were also investigated. PMID:24994956

  7. Assembly of tobacco mosaic virus into fibrous and macroscopic bundled arrays mediated by surface aniline polymerization.

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Z.; Bruckman, M.; Li, S.; Lee, A.; Lee, B.; Pingali, S.-V.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Wang, Q.; Univ. of South Carolina

    2007-06-05

    One-dimensional (1D) polyaniline/tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) composite nanofibers and macroscopic bundles of such fibers were generated via a self-assembly process of TMV assisted by in-situ polymerization of polyaniline on the surface of TMV. At near-neutral reaction pH, branched polyaniline formed on the surface of TMV preventing lateral association. Therefore, long 1D nanofibers were observed with high aspect ratios and excellent processibility. At a lower pH, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed that initially long nanofibers were formed which resulted in bundled structures upon long-time reaction, presumably mediated by the hydrophobic interaction because of the polyaniline on the surface of TMV. In-situ time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering study of TMV at different reaction conditions supported this mechanism. This novel strategy to assemble TMV into 1D and 3D supramolecular composites could be utilized in the fabrication of advanced materials for potential applications including electronics, optics, sensing, and biomedical engineering.

  8. Nanomechanical characterization of rod-like superlattice assembled from tobacco mosaic viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoran; Wang, Xinnan; Li, Tao; Lee, Byeongdu

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and TMV-derived materials have demonstrated their great potential in biomedical applications, where the mechanical properties are determining factors for their proper functionalities and structural integrity. Recently, it has been found that a superlattice structure can be formed by two-dimensional hexagonal packing TMV self-assembly in Barium ions solution. In parallel to the exploration of possible applications of TMV superlattice, the mechanical properties were characterized by the atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation. The elastic modulus of 2.14 GPa was obtained by application of the extended Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model with the force vs sample deformation data. The adhesion force was taken into consideration, and an easy-to-implement approach of using the extended JKR model was proposed by processing both the theoretical model and the experimental data. Finite element analysis was conducted to evaluate the reinforcing effect of the like-charge forces between the TMVs and the mechanical properties of the TMV superlattice. Using the Halpin-Tsai model, the transverse elastic modulus of the superlattice sample varied within 2.00-4.38 GPa, depending on the indentation locations. Attraction-repulsion equilibrium was found to maintain the packing of TMVs. This provides useful information to address the sources of the attraction and repulsion forces to control the TMV assembly.

  9. Trypsin inhibitors from Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum leaves involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Moulin, M M; Rodrigues, R; Ribeiro, S F F; Gonçalves, L S A; Bento, C S; Sudré, C P; Vasconcelos, I M; Gomes, V M

    2014-01-01

    Several plant organs contain proteinase inhibitors, which are produced during normal plant development or are induced upon pathogen attack to suppress the enzymatic activity of phytopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we examined the presence of proteinase inhibitors, specifically trypsin inhibitors, in the leaf extract of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum inoculated with PepYMV (Pepper yellow mosaic virus). Leaf extract from plants with the accession number UENF 1624, which is resistant to PepYMV, was collected at 7 different times (0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, and 144 h). Seedlings inoculated with PepYMV and control seedlings were grown in a growth chamber. Protein extract from leaf samples was partially purified by reversed-phase chromatography using a C2/C18 column. Residual trypsin activity was assayed to detect inhibitors followed by Tricine-SDS-PAGE analysis to determine the N-terminal peptide sequence. Based on trypsin inhibitor assays, trypsin inhibitors are likely constitutively synthesized in C. baccatum var. pendulum leaf tissue. These inhibitors are likely a defense mechanism for the C. baccatum var. pendulum- PepYMV pathosystem. PMID:25501145

  10. Antiviral Activity and Mechanism of Action of Novel Thiourea Containing Chiral Phosphonate on Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Huitao; Song, Baoan; Bhadury, Pinaki S.; Jin, Linhong; Hu, Deyu; Yang, Song

    2011-01-01

    Using half-leaf method O,O′-diisopropyl (3-(L-1-(benzylamino)-1-oxo-3- phenylpropan-2-yl)thioureido)(phenyl)methyl phosphonate (2009104) was studied for its activity on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). It showed good curative activity in vivo and the curative activity at 500 μg/mL was found to be 53.3%. In vivo treatment with the control agent Ningnanmycin at 500 μg/mL resulted in 51.2% inhibition and curative inhibition rates respectively. Dot-ELISA test was employed to verify the efficacy of activity of compound 200910 for anti-TMV activity. The mechanism of action of compound 2009104 to resist TMV was also studied. The results showed that the resistance enzymes PAL, POD, SOD activity and chlorophyll content after TMV inoculation K326 (Nicotiana tabacum K326) of tobacco plants followed by treatment with compound 2009104 were significantly enhanced. The study of the effect of compound 2009104 on TMV capsid protein (CP) showed that it inhibited the polymerization process of TMV-CP in vitro. PMID:21845094

  11. Antiviral activity and mechanism of action of novel thiourea containing chiral phosphonate on tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huitao; Song, Baoan; Bhadury, Pinaki S; Jin, Linhong; Hu, Deyu; Yang, Song

    2011-01-01

    Using half-leaf method O,O'-diisopropyl (3-(L-1-(benzylamino)-1-oxo-3- phenylpropan-2-yl)thioureido)(phenyl)methyl phosphonate (2009104) was studied for its activity on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). It showed good curative activity in vivo and the curative activity at 500 μg/mL was found to be 53.3%. In vivo treatment with the control agent Ningnanmycin at 500 μg/mL resulted in 51.2% inhibition and curative inhibition rates respectively. Dot-ELISA test was employed to verify the efficacy of activity of compound 200910 for anti-TMV activity. The mechanism of action of compound 2009104 to resist TMV was also studied. The results showed that the resistance enzymes PAL, POD, SOD activity and chlorophyll content after TMV inoculation K(326) (Nicotiana tabacum K(326)) of tobacco plants followed by treatment with compound 2009104 were significantly enhanced. The study of the effect of compound 2009104 on TMV capsid protein (CP) showed that it inhibited the polymerization process of TMV-CP in vitro. PMID:21845094

  12. Genome analysis and characterization of a tobacco mosaic virus isolate infecting balsam (Impatiens balsamina).

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung-Kook; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Chung, Bong-Nam

    2009-01-01

    The complete RNA genomic sequence of a tobacco mosaic virus isolate infecting Impatiens balsamina, designated as TMV-IM, has been determined. The genomic sequence and the predicted gene products of TMV-IM were similar to those of other members of the genus Tobamovirus. The CP ORF of TMV-IM showed sequence identities of 95.0-99.5% with the corresponding ORFs of other TMV strains. Full-length cDNA of TMV-IM was amplified by RT-PCR with a 5'-end primer harboring a T7 promoter sequence and a 3'-end TMV-specific primer. Subsequently, the full-length cDNA was cloned into plasmid vectors. Capped transcripts synthesized from the cDNA clone were highly infectious and caused characteristic symptoms in balsam plants, similar to wild-type TMV-IM and TMV-U1. These results provide definitive evidence for the natural occurrence of TMV in balsam. PMID:19381775

  13. Measuring Surface Diffusion of Organic Glasses Using Tobacco Mosaic Virus as Probe Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Potter, Richard; Fakhraai, Zahra

    Recent studies have shown that diffusion on the surface of organic glasses can be many orders of magnitude faster than bulk diffusion, with lower activation barrier. Developing new probes that can readily measure the diffusion at the surface of an organic glass can help study the effect of chemical structure and molecule's size on the enhanced surface diffusion. In this study, surface diffusion coefficient of molecular glass (TPD) is measured using tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as probe particles. TMV is placed on the surface of bulk TPD films. The evolution of the meniscus formed around TMV, driven by curvature gradient, is probed at various temperatures. TMV has a well-defined cylindrical shape, with a large aspect ratio (18 nm wide, 300 nm long). As such, the shape of the meniscus around the center of TMV is semi-one dimensional. Based on the self-similarity nature of surface diffusion flow in one dimension, the surface diffusion coefficient and its temperature dependence are measured. It is found that the surface diffusion is greatly enhanced and has weak temperature dependence compared to bulk counterpart, consistent with previous studies, showing that TMV probes serve as an efficient method of measuring surface diffusion. NSF-CAREER DMR-1350044.

  14. Transient viscoelasticity study of tobacco mosaic virus/Ba(2+) superlattice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoran; Wang, Xinnan; Li, Tao; Lee, Byeongdu

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we reported a new method to synthesize the rod-like tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) superlattice. To explore its potentials in nanolattice templating and tissue scaffolding, this work focused the viscoelasticity of the superlattice with a novel transient method via atomic force microscopy (AFM). For measuring viscoelasticity, in contrast to previous methods that assessed the oscillating response, the method proposed in this work enabled us to determine the transient response (creep or relaxation) of micro/nanobiomaterials. The mathematical model and numerical process were elaborated to extract the viscoelastic properties from the indentation data. The adhesion between the AFM tip and the sample was included in the indentation model. Through the functional equation method, the elastic solution for the indentation model was extended to the viscoelastic solution so that the time dependent force vs. displacement relation could be attained. To simplify the solving of the differential equation, a standard solid model was modified to obtain the elastic and viscoelastic components of the sample. The viscoelastic responses with different mechanical stimuli and the dynamic properties were also investigated. PMID:24994956

  15. Occurrence and molecular characterization of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus in cucurbit crops of KPK, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asad; Hussain, Adil; Ahmad, Musharaf

    2014-01-01

    Field survey of the cucurbit crops revealed a high incidence of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province (KPK), Pakistan. Among the seven districts surveyed, average percent incidence of CGMMV was recorded up to 58.1% in district Nowshera, followed by 51.1% in district Charsada, 40.5% in district Swabi and 37.3% in district Mardan. In Swat and Dir districts average incidence CGMMV was recorded upto 31.2% and 29.4%, respectively. Among the different crops highest incidence in plain areas of KPK was recorded in bottle gourd (59.3%) followed by 56.3% in Squash, 54.5% in Pumpkin, 45.5% in Melon, 41.7% in Cucumber and 29.9% in Sponge gourd. In Northern hilly areas highest incidence of CGMMV (52.9%) was observed in pumpkin, followed by 49.6% in bottle gourd, 47.3% in squash, 45.1% in Melon 42.3% in cucumber and 41.6% in sponge gourd. Little variability was observed in the coat protein amino acid sequence identities of CGMMV Pakistan isolate, when compared with other reported isolates. PMID:25763028

  16. Tobacco Mosaic Virus as a New Carrier for Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaojun; Nguyen, Huong Giang; Chowdhury, Sudipa; Bentley, Philip; Bruckman, Michael A.; Miermont, Adeline; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are being actively studied as targets for anti-tumor vaccine development. One serious challenge was the low immunogenecity of these antigens. Herein, we report the results on using the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) capsid as a promising carrier of a weakly immunogenic TACA, the monomeric Tn antigen. The copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction was highly efficient in covalently linking Tn onto the TMV capsid without resorting to a large excess of the Tn antigen. The location of Tn attachment turned out to be important. Tn introduced at the N terminus of TMV was immunosilent, while that attached to tyrosine 139 elicited strong immune responses. Both Tn specific IgG and IgM antibodies were generated as determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and a glycan microarray screening study. The production of high titers of IgG antibodies suggested that the TMV platform contained the requisite epitopes for helper T cells and was able to induce antibody isotype switching. The antibodies exhibited strong reactivities towards Tn antigen displayed in its native environment, i.e., cancer cell surface, thus highlighting the potential of TMV as a promising TACA carrier. PMID:22812480

  17. Evaluation of Mungbean Genotypes Based on Yield Stability and Reaction to Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alam, AKM Mahbubul; Somta, Prakit; Jompuk, Choosak; Chatwachirawong, Prasert; Srinives, Peerasak

    2014-01-01

    This work was conducted to identify mungbean genotypes showing yield stability and resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) disease. Sixteen genotypes were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with two replications for two years (2011 and 2012) at three locations (Gazipur, Ishurdi and Madaripur) of the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute. An analysis of variance exhibited significant effects of genotype (G), environment (E), and genotype × environment (G×E) on grain yield. Among eight agronomic characters, the principal component 1 (PC1) was always higher than the PC2. Considering G×E interaction, BM6 was the best genotype at all three locations in both years. Based on grain yield and stability performance, BM6 ranked first while the worst performing genotypes were BM1 and G10. Based on discrimination and representation, Gazipur was identified as an ideal environment for these mungbeans. Relationship between soil-plant analysis developments (SPAD) value was positive with yield but negative with MYMV severity. BM6, G1 and G2 were considered as promising sources of resistance for low disease score and stable response across the environments. The environment proved to have an influence on MYMV infection under natural infestation. A positive correlation was observed between disease score and the temperature under natural growing condition. PMID:25289012

  18. DNA forms indicate rolling circle and recombination-dependent replication of Abutilon mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Holger; Lütgemeier, Martin; Preiß, Werner

    2001-01-01

    Geminiviruses have spread worldwide and have become increasingly important in crop plants during recent decades. Recombination among geminiviruses was one major source of new variants. Geminiviruses replicate via rolling circles, confirmed here by electron microscopic visualization and two-dimensional gel analysis of Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) DNA. However, only a minority of DNA intermediates are consistent with this model. The majority are compatible with recombination-dependent replication (RDR). During development of naturally infected leaves, viral intermediates compatible with both models appeared simultaneously, whereas agro-infection of leaf discs with AbMV led to an early appearance of RDR forms but no RCR intermediates. Inactivation of viral genes ac2 and ac3 delayed replication, but produced the same DNA types as after wild-type infection, indicating that these genes were not essential for RDR in leaf discs. In conclusion, host factors alone or in combination with the viral AC1 protein are necessary and sufficient for the production of RDR intermediates. The consequences of an inherent geminiviral recombination activity for the use of pathogen-derived resistance traits are discussed. PMID:11689455

  19. Isolation and characterization of a tobacco mosaic virus-inducible myb oncogene homolog from tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yinong; Klessig, Daniel F.

    1996-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays an important role in signaling the activation of plant defense responses against pathogen attack including induction of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. To gain further insight into the SA-mediated signal transduction pathway, we have isolated and characterized a tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-inducible myb oncogene homolog (myb1) from tobacco. The myb1 gene was induced upon TMV infection during both the hypersensitive response and development of systemic acquired resistance in the resistant tobacco cultivar following the rise of endogenous SA, but was not activated in the susceptible cultivar that fails to accumulate SA. The myb1 gene was also induced by incompatible bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae during the hypersensitive response. Exogenous SA treatment rapidly (within 15 min) activated the expression of myb1 in both resistant and susceptible tobacco cultivars with the subsequent induction of PR genes occurring several hours later. Biologically active analogs of SA and 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (a synthetic functional analog of SA), which induce PR genes and enhanced resistance, also activated the myb1 gene. In contrast, biologically inactive analogs were poor inducers of myb1 gene expression. Furthermore, the recombinant Myb1 protein was shown to specifically bind to a Myb-binding consensus sequence found in the promoter of the PR-1a gene. Taken together, these results suggest that the tobacco myb1 gene encodes a signaling component downstream of SA that may participate in transcriptional activation of PR genes and plant disease resistance. PMID:8962166

  20. Properties of the coat protein of a new tobacco mosaic virus coat protein ts-mutant.

    PubMed

    Dobrov, E N; Abu-Eid, M M; Solovyev, A G; Kust, S V; Novikov, V K

    1997-01-01

    Amino acid substitutions in a majority of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) coat protein (CP) ts-mutants have previously been mapped to the same region of the CP molecule tertiary structure, located at a distance of about 70 A from TMV virion axis. In the present work some properties of a new TMV CP ts-mutant ts21-66 (two substitutions I21=>T and D66=>G, both in the 70-A region) were studied. Thermal inactivation characteristics, sedimentation properties, circular dichroism spectra, and modification by a lysine-specific reagent, trinitrobenzensulfonic acid, of ts21-66 CP were compared with those of wild-type (U1) TMV CP. It is concluded that the 70-A region represents the most labile portion of the TMV CP molecule. Partial disordering of this region in the mutant CP at permissive temperatures leads to loss of the capacity to form two-layer aggregates of the cylindrical type, while further disordering induced by mild heating results also in the loss of the ability to form ordered helical aggregates. PMID:9055205