Science.gov

Sample records for leukemia nuclear bodies

  1. Nucleus accumbens associated 1 is recruited within the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear body through SUMO modification

    PubMed Central

    Tatemichi, Yoshinori; Shibazaki, Masahiko; Yasuhira, Shinji; Kasai, Shuya; Tada, Hiroshi; Oikawa, Hiroki; Suzuki, Yuji; Takikawa, Yasuhiro; Masuda, Tomoyuki; Maesawa, Chihaya

    2015-01-01

    Nucleus accumbens associated 1 (NACC1) is a cancer-associated BTB/POZ (pox virus and zinc finger/bric-a-brac tramtrack broad complex) gene, and is involved in several cellular functions in neurons, cancer and stem cells. Some of the BTB/POZ proteins associated with cancer biology are SUMOylated, which appears to play an important role in transcription regulation. We show that NACC1 is SUMOylated on a phylogenetically conserved lysine (K167) out of three consensus SUMOylation motif sites. Amino acid substitution in the SIM sequence (SIM/M) within the BTB/POZ domain partially reduced K167 SUMOylation activity of NACC1. Overexpression of GFP-NACC1 fusion protein leads to formation of discrete nuclear foci similar to promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NB), which colocalized with SUMO paralogues (SUMO1/2/3). Both NACC1 nuclear body formation and colocalization with SUMO paralogues were completely suppressed in the GFP-NACC1-SIM/M mutant, whereas they were partially maintained in the NACC1 K167R mutant. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that endogenous and exogenous NACC1 proteins colocalized with endogenous PML protein. A pull-down assay revealed that the consensus motifs of the SUMO acceptor site at K167 and the SIM within the BTB/POZ domain were both necessary for efficient binding to PML protein. Our study demonstrates that NACC1 can be modified by SUMO paralogues, and cooperates with PML protein. PMID:25891951

  2. Trafficking of the Transcription Factor Nrf2 to Promyelocytic Leukemia-Nuclear Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Malloy, Melanie Theodore; McIntosh, Deneshia J.; Walters, Treniqka S.; Flores, Andrea; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Arinze, Ifeanyi J.

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitylation of Nrf2 by the Keap1-Cullin3/RING box1 (Cul3-Rbx1) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex targets Nrf2 for proteasomal degradation in the cytoplasm and is an extensively studied mechanism for regulating the cellular level of Nrf2. Although mechanistic details are lacking, reports abound that Nrf2 can also be degraded in the nucleus. Here, we demonstrate that Nrf2 is a target for sumoylation by both SUMO-1 and SUMO-2. HepG2 cells treated with As2O3, which enhances attachment of SUMO-2/3 to target proteins, increased SUMO-2/3-modification (polysumoylation) of Nrf2. We show that Nrf2 traffics, in part, to promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs). Cell fractions harboring key components of PML-NBs did not contain biologically active Keap1 but contained modified Nrf2 as well as RING finger protein 4 (RNF4), a poly-SUMO-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase. Overexpression of wild-type RNF4, but not the catalytically inactive mutant, decreased the steady-state levels of Nrf2, measured in the PML-NB-enriched cell fraction. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 interfered with this decrease, resulting in elevated levels of polysumoylated Nrf2 that was also ubiquitylated. Wild-type RNF4 accelerated the half-life (t½) of Nrf2, measured in PML-NB-enriched cell fractions. These results suggest that RNF4 mediates polyubiquitylation of polysumoylated Nrf2, leading to its subsequent degradation in PML-NBs. Overall, this work identifies Nrf2 as a target for sumoylation and provides a novel mechanism for its degradation in the nucleus, independent of Keap1. PMID:23543742

  3. Epstein - Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 suppresses reporter activity through modulation of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encoded Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) has been shown to increase the expression of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) and the immunofluorescent intensity of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs). PML NBs have been implicated in the modulation of transcription and the association of reporter plasmids with PML NBs has been implicated in repression of reporter activity. Additionally, repression of various reporters in the presence of LMP1 has been noted. This study demonstrates that LMP1 suppresses expression of reporter activity in a dose responsive manner and corresponds with the LMP1 induced increase in PML NB intensity. Disruption of PML NBs with arsenic trioxide or a PML siRNA restores reporter activity. These data offer an explanation for previously conflicting data on LMP1 signaling and calls attention to the possibility of false-positives and false-negatives when using reporter assays as a research tool in cells expressing LMP1. PMID:21975125

  4. Arsenic mediated disruption of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies induces ganciclovir susceptibility in Epstein-Barr positive epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Mark D.; Block, Gregory J.; Shan, Bin; Esteves, Kyle C.; Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K.; Lasky, Joseph A.

    2011-06-20

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML NBs) have been implicated in host immune response to viral infection. PML NBs are targeted for degradation during reactivation of herpes viruses, suggesting that disruption of PML NB function supports this aspect of the viral life cycle. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) has been shown to suppress EBV reactivation. Our finding that LMP1 induces PML NB immunofluorescence intensity led to the hypothesis that LMP1 may modulate PML NBs as a means of maintaining EBV latency. Increased PML protein and morphometric changes in PML NBs were observed in EBV infected alveolar epithelial cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Treatment with low dose arsenic trioxide disrupted PML NBs, induced expression of EBV lytic proteins, and conferred ganciclovir susceptibility. This study introduces an effective modality to induce susceptibility to ganciclovir in epithelial cells with implications for the treatment of EBV associated pathologies.

  5. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  6. Total body irradiation in chronic myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Advani, S.H.; Dinshaw, K.A.; Nair, C.N.; Ramakrishnan, G.

    1983-04-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI), given as 10 rad daily for five days a week for a total dose of 150 rad has been used in an attempt to control the chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Thirteen patients with CML received fractionated TBI leading to rapid and good control of WBC count without any adverse reaction. The chronic phase of CML could also be controlled with TBI, even in three patients who were resistant to busulfan. Following TBI, WBC count remained under control for a period of 32 weeks as compared to 40 weeks following vusulfan alone. Repeat TBI was also well tolerated with good response. It appears that TBI is an effective and safe therapy for controlling the chronic phase of CML.

  7. JC Virus Inclusions in Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy: Scaffolding Promyelocytic Leukemia Nuclear Bodies Grow With Cell Cycle Transition Through an S-to-G2–Like State in Enlarging Oligodendrocyte Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Takuya; Nagane, Motoo; Higuchi, Kayoko; Abe-Suzuki, Shiho; Kurata, Morito; Kitagawa, Masanobu; Kamma, Hiroshi; Uchihara, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, JC virus–infected oligodendroglia display 2 distinct patterns of intranuclear viral inclusions: full inclusions in which progeny virions are present throughout enlarged nuclei and dot-shaped inclusions in which virions are clustered in subnuclear domains termed “promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies” (PML-NBs). Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies may serve a scaffolding role in viral progeny production. We analyzed the formation process of intranuclear viral inclusions by morphometry and assessed PML-NB alterations in the brains of 2 patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. By immunohistochemistry, proliferating cell nuclear antigen was most frequently detected in smaller nuclei; cyclin A was detected in larger nuclei. This suggests an S-to-G2 cell cycle transition in infected cells associated with nuclear enlargement. Sizes of PML-NBs were variable, but they were usually either small speckles 200 to 400 nm in diameter or distinct spherical shells with a diameter of 1 μm or more. By confocal microscopy, JC virus capsid proteins were associated with both small and large PML-NBs, but disruption of large PML-NBs was observed by ground-state depletion fluorescence nanoscopy. Clusters of progeny virions were also detected by electron microscopy. Our data suggest that, in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, JC virus produces progeny virions in enlarging oligodendrocyte nuclei in association with growing PML-NBs and with cell cycle transition through an S-to-G2-like state. PMID:24709678

  8. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... two are acute, meaning they get worse quickly. chronic lymphocytic leukemia chronic myeloid leukemia acute myeloid leukemia acute lymphocytic leukemia Chronic and Acute Leukemia Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and acute myeloid leukemia are ...

  9. Leukemia among participants in military maneuvers at a nuclear bomb test

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, G.G.; Kelley, D.B.; Heath, C.W.

    1980-10-03

    To test the possibility of a casual relationship between leukemia and exposure to nuclear radiation, the frequency of leukemia in personnel observing the detonation of a nuclear device called ''Smoky'' during August 1957 was determined. Of some 3224 men who witnessed the detonation, nine cases of leukemia were observed. They included four cases of acute myelocytic leukemia, three of chronic myelocytic leukemia, one of hairy cell lymphocyctic leukemia, and one of acute lymphocytic luekemia. These findings represent a significant increase over the expected leukemia incidence of 3.5 cases. Mean film-badge gamma radiation dose for the study group was 466.2 mrem. (17 references, 3 tables)

  10. Role of nuclear bodies in apoptosis signalling.

    PubMed

    Krieghoff-Henning, Eva; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2008-11-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs) are dynamic macromolecular multiprotein complexes that recruit and release a plethora of proteins. A considerable number of PML NB components play vital roles in apoptosis, senescence regulation and tumour suppression. The molecular basis by which PML NBs control these cellular responses is still just beginning to be understood. In addition to PML itself, numerous further tumour suppressors including transcriptional regulator p53, acetyl transferase CBP (CREB binding protein) and protein kinase HIPK2 (homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2) are recruited to PML NBs in response to genotoxic stress or oncogenic transformation and drive the senescence and apoptosis response by regulating p53 activity. Moreover, in response to death-receptor activation, PML NBs may act as nuclear depots that release apoptotic factors, such as the FLASH (FLICE-associated huge) protein, to amplify the death signal. PML NBs are also associated with other nuclear domains including Cajal bodies and nucleoli and share apoptotic regulators with these domains, implying crosstalk between NBs in apoptosis regulation. In conclusion, PML NBs appear to regulate cell death decisions through different, pathway-specific molecular mechanisms. PMID:18680765

  11. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... FR. The acute leukemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: ... Brien S. The chronic leukemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: ...

  12. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-21

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  13. Nuclear body formation and PML body remodeling by the human cytomegalovirus protein UL35

    SciTech Connect

    Salsman, Jayme; Wang Xueqi; Frappier, Lori

    2011-06-05

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL35 gene encodes two proteins, UL35 and UL35a. Expression of UL35 in transfected cells results in the formation of UL35 nuclear bodies that associate with promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein. PML forms the basis for PML nuclear bodies that are important for suppressing viral lytic gene expression. Given the important relationship between PML and viral infection, we have further investigated the association of UL35 with PML bodies. We demonstrate that UL35 bodies form independently of PML and subsequently recruit PML, Sp100 and Daxx. In contrast, UL35a did not form bodies; however, it could bind UL35 and inhibit the formation of UL35 bodies. The HCMV tegument protein pp71 promoted the formation of UL35 bodies and the cytoplasmic localization of UL35a. Similarly, UL35a shifted pp71 to the cytoplasm. These results indicate that the interplay between UL35, UL35a and pp71 affects their subcellular localization and likely their functions throughout infection.

  14. Nucleolus: the fascinating nuclear body

    PubMed Central

    Sirri, Valentina; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Roussel, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    Nucleoli are the prominent contrasted structures of the cell nucleus. In the nucleolus, ribosomal RNAs are synthesized, processed and assembled with ribosomal proteins. RNA polymerase I synthesizes the ribosomal RNAs and this activity is cell cycle regulated. The nucleolus reveals the functional organization of the nucleus in which the compartmentation of the different steps of ribosome biogenesis is observed whereas the nucleolar machineries are in permanent exchange with the nucleoplasm and other nuclear bodies. After mitosis, nucleolar assembly is a time and space regulated process controlled by the cell cycle. In addition, by generating a large volume in the nucleus with apparently no RNA polymerase II activity, the nucleolus creates a domain of retention/sequestration of molecules normally active outside the nucleolus. Viruses interact with the nucleolus and recruit nucleolar proteins to facilitate virus replication. The nucleolus is also a sensor of stress due to the redistribution of the ribosomal proteins in the nucleoplasm by nucleolus disruption. The nucleolus plays several crucial functions in the nucleus: in addition to its function as ribosome factory of the cells it is a multifunctional nuclear domain, and nucleolar activity is linked with several pathologies. Perspectives on the evolution of this research area are proposed. PMID:18046571

  15. TTRAP is a novel PML nuclear bodies-associated protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Guanlan; Pan Yukun; Wang Bingyin; Huang Lu; Tian Ling; Xue Jinglun; Chen Jinzhong Jia, William

    2008-10-24

    PML nuclear body (PML NB) is an important macromolecular nuclear structure that is involved in many essential aspects of cellular function. Tens of proteins have been found in PML NBs, and promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) has been proven to be essential for the formation of this structure. Here, we showed that TRAF and TNF receptor-associated protein (TTRAP) was a novel PML NBs-associated protein. TTRAP colocalized with three important PML NBs-associated proteins, PML, DAXX and Sp100 in the typical fashion of PML NBs. By yeast mating assay, TTRAP was identified to interact with these PML NBs-associated proteins. The transcription and expression of TTRAP could be induced by IFN-{gamma}, representing another common feature of PML NBs-associated proteins. These results would not only be important for understanding PML NBs but also be helpful in studying the TTRAP function in the future.

  16. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  17. Body composition and phase angle in Russian children in remission from acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseytlin, G. Ja; Khomyakova, I. A.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Konovalova, M. V.; Vashura, A. Yu; Tretyak, A. V.; Godina, E. Z.; Rudnev, S. G.

    2010-04-01

    Elevated degree of body fatness and changes in other body composition parameters are known to be common effects of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children. In order to study peculiarities of somatic growth and development in ALL survivors, we describe the results of BIA body composition analysis of 112 boys and 108 girls aged 5-18 years in remission from ALL (remission time range 1-13 years) compared to data from the same number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n=220). Detrimental effect on height in ALL boys was observed, whereas girls experienced additional weight gain compared to healthy subjects. In ALL patients, resistance, body fat, and percent body fat were significantly increased. The reactance, phase angle, absolute and relative values of skeletal muscle and body cell mass were significantly decreased. Principal component analysis revealed an early prevalence of adiposity traits in the somatic growth and development of ALL girls compared to healthy controls.

  18. Leukemia among participants in military maneuvers at a nuclear bomb test. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, G G; Kelley, D B; Heath, C W

    1980-10-01

    Preliminary studies indicate that nine cases of leukemia have occurred among 3,224 men who participated in military maneuvers during the 1957 nuclear test explosion "Smoky." This represents a significant increase over the expected incidence of 3.5 cases. They included four cases of acute myelocytic leukemia, three of chronic myelocytic leukemia, and one each of hairy cell and acute lymphocytic leukemia. At time of diagnosis, patient ages ranged from 21 to 60 years (mean, 41.8 years) and the interval from time of nuclear test to diagnosis from two to 19 years (mean, 14.2 years). Film-badge records, which are available for eight of the nine men, indicated gamma radiation exposure levels ranging from 0 to 2,977 mrem (mean, 1,033 mrem). Mean film-badge gamma dose for the entire Smoky cohort was 466.2 mrem. PMID:6932516

  19. Leukemia among participants in military maneuvers at a nuclear bomb test. [Plumbbob Project

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, G.G.; Kelley, D.B.; Heath, C.W. Jr.

    1980-10-03

    Preliminary studies indicate that nine cases of leukemia have occurred among 3224 men who participated in military maneuvers during the 1957 nuclear test explosion Smoky. This represents a significant increase over the expected incidence of 3.5 cases. They included four cases of acute myelocytic leukemia, three of chronic myelocytic leukemia, and one each of hairy cell and acute lymphocytic leukemia. At time of diagnosis, patient ages ranged from 21 to 60 years (mean, 41.8 years) and the interval from time of nuclear test to diagnosis from two to 19 years (mean, 14.2 years). Film-badge records, which are available for eight of the nine men, indicated gamma radiation exposure levels ranging from 0 to 2977 mrem (mean, 1033 mrem). Mean film-badge gamma dose for the entire Smoky cohort was 466.2 mrem.

  20. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. The Sequence of Cyclophosphamide and Myeloablative Total Body Irradiation in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Holter-Chakrabarty, Jennifer L; Pierson, Namali; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Artz, Andrew S; Baron, Frédéric; Bredeson, Christopher N; Dvorak, Christopher C; Epstein, Robert B; Lazarus, Hillard M; Olsson, Richard F; Selby, George B; Williams, Kirsten M; Cooke, Kenneth R; Pasquini, Marcelo C; McCarthy, Philip L

    2015-07-01

    Limited clinical data are available to assess whether the sequencing of cyclophosphamide (Cy) and total body irradiation (TBI) changes outcomes. We evaluated the sequence in 1769 (CyTBI, n = 948; TBICy, n = 821) recipients of related or unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation who received TBI (1200 to 1500 cGY) for acute leukemia from 2003 to 2010. The 2 cohorts were comparable for median age, performance score, type of leukemia, first complete remission, Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, HLA-matched siblings, stem cell source, antithymocyte globulin use, TBI dose, and type of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. The sequence of TBI did not significantly affect transplantation-related mortality (24% versus 23% at 3 years, P = .67; relative risk, 1.01; P = .91), leukemia relapse (27% versus 29% at 3 years, P = .34; relative risk, .89, P = .18), leukemia-free survival (49% versus 48% at 3 years, P = .27; relative risk, .93; P = .29), chronic GVHD (45% versus 47% at 1 year, P = .39; relative risk, .9; P = .11), or overall survival (53% versus 52% at 3 years, P = .62; relative risk, .96; P = .57) for CyTBI and TBICy, respectively. Corresponding cumulative incidences of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome were 4% and 6% at 100 days (P = .08), respectively. This study demonstrates that the sequence of Cy and TBI does not impact transplantation outcomes and complications in patients with acute leukemia undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation with myeloablative conditioning. PMID:25840335

  2. The Role of Nuclear Bodies in Gene Expression and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Marie; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression. The compartmentalization of cellular processes, such as ribosome biogenesis, RNA processing, cellular response to stress, transcription, modification and assembly of spliceosomal snRNPs, histone gene synthesis and nuclear RNA retention, has significant implications for gene regulation. These functional nuclear domains include the nucleolus, nuclear speckle, nuclear stress body, transcription factory, Cajal body, Gemini of Cajal body, histone locus body and paraspeckle. We herein review the roles of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression and their relation to human health and disease. PMID:24040563

  3. Relativistic nuclear many-body theory

    SciTech Connect

    Serot, B.D. ); Walecka, J.D. . Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility)

    1991-09-11

    Nonrelativistic models of nuclear systems have provided important insight into nuclear physics. In future experiments, nuclear systems will be examined under extreme conditions of density and temperature, and their response will be probed at momentum and energy transfers larger than the nucleon mass. It is therefore essential to develop reliable models that go beyond the traditional nonrelativistic many-body framework. General properties of physics, such as quantum mechanics, Lorentz covariance, and microscopic causality, motivate the use of quantum field theories to describe the interacting, relativistic, nuclear many-body system. Renormalizable models based on hadronic degrees of freedom (quantum hadrodynamics) are presented, and the assumptions underlying this framework are discussed. Some applications and successes of quantum hadrodynamics are described, with an emphasis on the new features arising from relativity. Examples include the nuclear equation of state, the shell model, nucleon-nucleus scattering, and the inclusion of zero-point vacuum corrections. Current issues and problems are also considered, such as the construction of improved approximations, the full role of the quantum vacuum, and the relationship between quantum hadrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics. We also speculate on future developments. 103 refs., 18 figs.

  4. Childhood leukemia and cancers near German nuclear reactors: significance, context, and ramifications of recent studies.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, Rudi H

    2009-01-01

    A government-sponsored study of childhood cancer in the proximity of German nuclear power plants (German acronym KiKK) found that children < 5 years living < 5 km from plant exhaust stacks had twice the risk for contracting leukemia as those residing > 5 km. The researchers concluded that since "this result was not to be expected under current radiation-epidemiological knowledge" and confounders could not be identified, the observed association of leukemia incidence with residential proximity to nuclear plants "remains unexplained." This unjustified conclusion illustrates the dissonance between evidence and assumptions. There exist serious flaws and gaps in the knowledge on which accepted models for population exposure and radiation risk are based. Studies with results contradictory to those of KiKK lack statistical power to invalidate its findings. The KiKK study's ramifications add to the urgency for a public policy debate regarding the health impact of nuclear power generation. PMID:19650588

  5. Few-body models for nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Descouvemont, P.; Baye, D.; Aoyama, S.; Arai, K.

    2014-04-15

    We present applications of microscopic models to nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, and we essentially focus on few-body systems. The calculation of radiative-capture and transfer cross sections is outlined, and we discuss the corresponding reaction rates. Microscopic theories are briefly presented, and we emphasize on the matrix elements of four-body systems. The microscopic extension of the R-matrix theory to nuclear reactions is described. Applications to the {sup 2}H(d, γ){sup 4}He, {sup 2}H(d, p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d, n){sup 3}He reactions are presented. We show the importance of the tensor force to reproduce the low-energy behaviour of the cross sections.

  6. A view of nuclear Polycomb bodies

    PubMed Central

    Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Li, Hua-Bing

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins are concentrated in nuclear foci called PcG bodies. Although the some of these foci are due to the tendency of PcG binding sites in the genome to occur in linear clusters, distant PcG sites can contact one another and in some cases congregate in the same PcG body when they are repressed. Experiments using transgenes containing PcG binding sites reveal that co-localization depends on the presence of insulator elements rather than of Polycomb Response Elements (PREs) and that it can occur also when the transgenes are in the active state. A model is proposed according to which insulator proteins mediate shuttling of PcG target genes between PcG bodies when repressed to transcription factories when transcriptionally active. PMID:22178420

  7. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  8. 21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nuclear whole body counter. 892.1130 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body counter is a device intended to measure the amount of radionuclides in...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear whole body counter. 892.1130 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body counter is a device intended to measure the amount of radionuclides in...

  10. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  11. 21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nuclear whole body counter. 892.1130 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body counter is a device intended to measure the amount of radionuclides in...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nuclear whole body counter. 892.1130 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body counter is a device intended to measure the amount of radionuclides in...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  16. 21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nuclear whole body counter. 892.1130 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body counter is a device intended to measure the amount of radionuclides in...

  17. Identification of RNF168 as a PML nuclear body regulator.

    PubMed

    Shire, Kathy; Wong, Andrew I; Tatham, Michael H; Anderson, Oliver F; Ripsman, David; Gulstene, Stephanie; Moffat, Jason; Hay, Ronald T; Frappier, Lori

    2016-02-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein forms the basis of PML nuclear bodies (PML NBs), which control many important processes. We have screened an shRNA library targeting ubiquitin pathway proteins for effects on PML NBs, and identified RNF8 and RNF168 DNA-damage response proteins as negative regulators of PML NBs. Additional studies confirmed that depletion of either RNF8 or RNF168 increased the levels of PML NBs and proteins, whereas overexpression induced loss of PML NBs. RNF168 partially localized to PML NBs through its UMI/MIU1 ubiquitin-interacting region and associated with NBs formed by any PML isoform. The association of RNF168 with PML NBs resulted in increased ubiquitylation and SUMO2 modification of PML. In addition, RNF168 was found to associate with proteins modified by SUMO2 and/or SUMO3 in a manner dependent on its ubiquitin-binding sequences, suggesting that hybrid SUMO-ubiquitin chains can be bound. In vitro assays confirmed that RNF168, preferentially, binds hybrid SUMO2-K63 ubiquitin chains compared with K63-ubiquitin chains or individual SUMO2. Our study identified previously unrecognized roles for RNF8 and RNF168 in the regulation of PML, and a so far unknown preference of RNF168 for hybrid SUMO-ubiquitin chains. PMID:26675234

  18. Leukemia among nuclear workers with protracted exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, G.S.; Dreyer, N.A. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors conducted an analysis of leukemia mortality and protracted exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation. They used data from seven published epidemiologic studies of nuclear workers that reported individual monitoring information for radiation exposure. They found 83 leukemia deaths among white males from a combined total of more than 1.4 million person-years. They calculated an overall relative risk for leukemia of 1.5, after adjustment for age and calendar time, for workers with cumulative occupational doses of 10 mSv (1 rem) or greater, compared with those with cumulative doses of less than 10 mSv. An adjusted relative risk of 1.8 was observed when individuals with 10-50 mSv (1-5 rem) were compared with those who had cumulative occupational doses of less than 10 mSv. The adjusted relative risk for those with doses greater than 50 mSv relative to those with doses less than 10 mSv was 1.2, although the data were especially sparse in this dose range. These combined data indicate a small elevated risk of leukemia for doses of ionizing radiation under 50 mSv.

  19. Nuclear export signal within CALM is necessary for CALM-AF10-induced leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mai; Yamagata, Kazutsune; Shino, Mika; Aikawa, Yukiko; Akashi, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshio; Kitabayashi, Issay

    2014-01-01

    The CALM–AF10 fusion gene, which results from a t(10;11) translocation, is found in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies. Certain HOXA cluster genes and MEIS1 genes are upregulated in patients and mouse models that express CALM-AF10. Wild-type clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid leukemia protein (CALM) primarily localizes in a diffuse pattern within the cytoplasm, whereas AF10 localizes in the nucleus; however, it is not clear where CALM-AF10 acts to induce leukemia. To investigate the influence of localization on leukemogenesis involving CALM-AF10, we determined the nuclear export signal (NES) within CALM that is necessary and sufficient for cytoplasmic localization of CALM-AF10. Mutations in the NES eliminated the capacity of CALM-AF10 to immortalize murine bone-marrow cells in vitro and to promote development of acute myeloid leukemia in mouse models. Furthermore, a fusion of AF10 with the minimal NES can immortalize bone-marrow cells and induce leukemia in mice. These results suggest that during leukemogenesis, CALM-AF10 plays its critical roles in the cytoplasm. PMID:24397609

  20. A novel fusion between MOZ and the nuclear receptor coactivator TIF2 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Carapeti, M; Aguiar, R C; Goldman, J M; Cross, N C

    1998-05-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities of band 8p11 are associated with a distinct subtype of acute myeloid leukemia with French-American-British M4/5 morphology and prominent erythrophagocytosis by the blast cells. This subtype is usually associated with the t(8;16)(p11;p13), a translocation that has recently been shown to result in a fusion between the MOZ and CBP genes. We have cloned the inv(8)(p11q13), an abnormality associated with the same leukemia phenotype, and found a novel fusion between MOZ and the nuclear receptor transcriptional coactivator TIF2/GRIP-1/NCoA-2. This gene has not previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia or other malignancies. MOZ-TIF2 retains the histone acetyltransferase homology domains of both proteins and also the CBP binding domain of TIF2. We speculate that the apparently identical leukemia cell phenotype observed in cases with the t(8;16) and the inv(8) arises by recruitment of CBP by MOZ-TIF2, resulting in modulation of the transcriptional activity of target genes by a mechanism involving abnormal histone acetylation. PMID:9558366

  1. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... leukemias). The rest of this document focuses on acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults. For information on ALL in ...

  2. Increased cardiometabolic traits in pediatric survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with total body irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chow, Eric J; Simmons, Jill H; Roth, Christian L; Baker, K Scott; Hoffmeister, Paul A; Sanders, Jean E; Friedman, Debra L

    2010-12-01

    Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may face an increased risk of metabolic and cardiovascular late effects. To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for adverse cardiometabolic traits in a contemporary cohort of pediatric ALL survivors, we recruited 48 off-therapy patients in remission treated with conventional chemotherapy and 26 treated with total body irradiation (TBI)-based hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in this cross-sectional pilot study. At a median age of 15 years (range, 8-21 years), HCT survivors were significantly more likely than non-HCT survivors to manifest multiple cardiometabolic traits, including central adiposity, hypertension, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. Overall, 23.1% of HCT survivors met the criteria for metabolic syndrome (≥ 3 traits), compared with 4.2% of non-HCT survivors (P = .02). HCT survivors also had increased C-reactive protein and leptin levels and decreased adiponectin, suggestive of underlying inflammation and increased visceral fat. In multivariate analyses, history of HCT remained associated with ≥ 2 traits (odds ratio [OR]. 5.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54-17.15) as well as with ≥ 3 traits (OR, 16.72; 95% CI, 1.66-168.80). Other risk factors included any cranial radiation exposure and family history of cardiometabolic disease. In summary, pediatric ALL survivors exposed to TBI-based HCT as well as to any cranial radiation may manifest cardiometabolic traits at an early age and should be screened accordingly. PMID:20685399

  3. Increased Body Mass Index during Therapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Significant and Underestimated Complication

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Helen C.; Marsh, Julie A.; Rath, Shoshana R.; Kotecha, Rishi S.; Gottardo, Nicholas G.; Cole, Catherine H.; Choong, Catherine S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective & Design. We undertook a retrospective review of children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and treated with modern COG protocols (n = 80) to determine longitudinal changes in body mass index (BMI) and the prevalence of obesity compared with a healthy reference population. Results. At diagnosis, the majority of patients (77.5%) were in the healthy weight category. During treatment, increases in BMI z-scores were greater for females than males; the prevalence of obesity increased from 10.3% to 44.8% (P < 0.004) for females but remained relatively unchanged for males (9.8% to 13.7%, P = 0.7). Longitudinal analysis using linear mixed-effects identified associations between BMI z-scores and time-dependent interactions with sex (P = 0.0005), disease risk (P < 0.0001), age (P = 0.0001), and BMI z-score (P < 0.0001) at diagnosis and total dose of steroid during maintenance (P = 0.01). Predicted mean BMI z-scores at the end of therapy were greater for females with standard risk ALL irrespective of age at diagnosis and for males younger than 4 years of age at diagnosis with standard risk ALL. Conclusion. Females treated on standard risk protocols and younger males may be at greatest risk of becoming obese during treatment for ALL. These subgroups may benefit from intervention strategies to manage BMI during treatment for ALL. PMID:26101530

  4. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  5. Childhood Leukemia in the Vicinity of the Geesthacht Nuclear Establishments near Hamburg, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Terschueren, Claudia; Richardson, David B.

    2007-01-01

    Background During 1990–1991 a childhood leukemia cluster was observed in the sparsely populated region surrounding two nuclear establishments southeast of Hamburg, Germany. Since then, several new cases have been reported. Recently a possible accidental release of radionuclides in 1986 was hypothesized. Objective The objective of this study was to analyze the childhood leukemia incidence in this area since 1990. Methods All incident cases (< 15 years of age) were ascertained during 1990–2005 within a 5-km radius of the Krümmel nuclear power plant. We derived standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) using county and national leukemia incidence rates as referents. We stratified analyses by calendar period and attained age, and by subdividing the study region into areas north versus south of the Elbe river. Results Fourteen cases were ascertained in the study area, whereas 4.0 were expected based on national referent rates [1990–2005: SIR = 3.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.9–5.9]. The excess was not confined to the early 1990s; for the more recent time period 1999–2005, the SIR is still elevated (SIR = 2.7; 95% CI, 0.9–6.2). SIRs of greatest magnitude were observed for children 0–4 years of age (SIR = 4.9; 95% CI, 2.4–9.0) and for residents south of the Elbe (SIR = 7.5; 95% CI, 2.8–16.4). Conclusions The incidence in this region is significantly higher than the childhood leukemia incidence for Germany as a whole. To date, no unique hazards have been identified in this population. The fact that the elevated rates have persisted in this community for > 15 years warrants further investigation. PMID:17589605

  6. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α enhances apoptosis induced by nuclear factor-κB inhibition in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    DONG, QIAO-MEI; LING, CHUN; CHEN, XUAN; ZHAO, LI

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) results in antitumor activity in leukemia cells, and may be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia. However, a significant limitation of NF-κB inhibition in the treatment of leukemia is the low efficiency of this technique. NF-κB inhibitor treatment induces apoptosis in leukemia cells; however, it additionally causes inflammatory molecules to induce increased sensitivity of healthy hematopoietic cells to cell death signals, therefore limiting its clinical applications. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a key regulator of inflammation, and induces a variety of actions in leukemic and healthy hematopoietic cells. TNF-α induces NF-κB-dependent and -independent survival signals, promoting the proliferation of leukemia cells. However, in healthy hematopoietic cells, TNF-α induces death signaling, an effect which is enhanced by the inhibition of NF-κB. Based on these observations, the present study hypothesized that inhibition of TNF-α signaling may be able to protect healthy hematopoietic cells and other tissue cells, while increasing the anti-leukemia effects of NF-κB inhibition on leukemia cells. The role and underlying molecular mechanisms of TNF-α inhibition in the regulation of NF-κB inhibition-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells was therefore investigated in the present study. The results indicated that inhibition of TNF-α enhanced NF-κB inhibition-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. It was also revealed that protein kinase B was significant in the regulation of TNF-α and NF-κB inhibition-induced apoptosis. During this process, intrinsic apoptotic pathways were activated. A combination of NF-κB and TNF-α inhibition may be a potential specific and effective novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia. PMID:26788210

  7. Expression of Leukemia-Associated Nup98 Fusion Proteins Generates an Aberrant Nuclear Envelope Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Martinelli, Valérie; Nilles, Nadine; Fruhmann, Gernot; Chatel, Guillaume; Juge, Sabine; Sauder, Ursula; Di Giacomo, Danika; Mecucci, Cristina; Schwaller, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the nucleoporin NUP98 have been described in several hematopoietic malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the resulting chimeric proteins, Nup98's N-terminal region is fused to the C-terminal region of about 30 different partners, including homeodomain (HD) transcription factors. While transcriptional targets of distinct Nup98 chimeras related to immortalization are relatively well described, little is known about other potential cellular effects of these fusion proteins. By comparing the sub-nuclear localization of a large number of Nup98 fusions with HD and non-HD partners throughout the cell cycle we found that while all Nup98 chimeras were nuclear during interphase, only Nup98-HD fusion proteins exhibited a characteristic speckled appearance. During mitosis, only Nup98-HD fusions were concentrated on chromosomes. Despite the difference in localization, all tested Nup98 chimera provoked morphological alterations in the nuclear envelope (NE), in particular affecting the nuclear lamina and the lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α). Importantly, such aberrations were not only observed in transiently transfected HeLa cells but also in mouse bone marrow cells immortalized by Nup98 fusions and in cells derived from leukemia patients harboring Nup98 fusions. Our findings unravel Nup98 fusion-associated NE alterations that may contribute to leukemogenesis. PMID:27031510

  8. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  9. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  10. Murine Leukemia Virus Uses NXF1 for Nuclear Export of Spliced and Unspliced Viral Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Toshie; Davila, Jaime I.; Malcolm, Jessica A.; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A.; Tonne, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intron-containing mRNAs are subject to restricted nuclear export in higher eukaryotes. Retroviral replication requires the nucleocytoplasmic transport of both spliced and unspliced RNA transcripts, and RNA export mechanisms of gammaretroviruses are poorly characterized. Here, we report the involvement of the nuclear export receptor NXF1/TAP in the nuclear export of gammaretroviral RNA transcripts. We identified a conserved cis-acting element in the pol gene of gammaretroviruses, including murine leukemia virus (MLV) and xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMRV), named the CAE (cytoplasmic accumulation element). The CAE enhanced the cytoplasmic accumulation of viral RNA transcripts and the expression of viral proteins without significantly affecting the stability, splicing, or translation efficiency of the transcripts. Insertion of the CAE sequence also facilitated Rev-independent HIV Gag expression. We found that the CAE sequence interacted with NXF1, whereas disruption of NXF1 ablated CAE function. Thus, the CAE sequence mediates the cytoplasmic accumulation of gammaretroviral transcripts in an NXF1-dependent manner. Disruption of NXF1 expression impaired cytoplasmic accumulations of both spliced and unspliced RNA transcripts of XMRV and MLV, resulting in their nuclear retention or degradation. Thus, our results demonstrate that gammaretroviruses use NXF1 for the cytoplasmic accumulation of both spliced and nonspliced viral RNA transcripts. IMPORTANCE Murine leukemia virus (MLV) has been studied as one of the classic models of retrovirology. Although unspliced host messenger RNAs are rarely exported from the nucleus, MLV actively exports unspliced viral RNAs to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive studies, how MLV achieves this difficult task has remained a mystery. Here, we have studied the RNA export mechanism of MLV and found that (i) the genome contains a sequence which supports the efficient nuclear export of viral RNAs, (ii) the cellular factor NXF1 is involved in the nuclear export of both spliced and unspliced viral RNAs, and, finally, (iii) depletion of NXF1 results in nuclear retention or degradation of viral RNAs. Our study provides a novel insight into MLV nuclear export. PMID:24478440

  11. Father's occupational exposure to radiation and the raised level of childhood leukemia near the Sellafield Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.J. )

    1991-08-01

    The first indications that childhood leukemia rates may be raised near the Sellafield nuclear plant in West Cumbria, England, came from largely anecdotal evidence in a television program Windscale: The Nuclear Laundry shown during 1983. During subsequent years, various epidemiological studies have investigated the claim in more detail. Geographical analyses of childhood leukemia incidence in the northern region and mortality in England and Wales using routinely available data made the first contribution. As a result, it was confirmed that leukemia rates in the area, particularly the neighboring village of Seascale, were high compared to other districts, although not totally extreme. Cohort studies of children born in Seascale or attending schools in Seascale were carried out to resolve some of the difficulties of interpretation of geographical analysis. Cohort studies indicated that the excess of leukemia was concentrated among children born in Seascale and was not found among those moving in after birth and suggested that any causal factors may be acting before birth or very early in life. A case-control study of leukemia (and lymphoma) among young people in West Cumbria has examined potentially important individual factors in detail. The study demonstrated a relationship between the raised incidence of leukemia in children and father's recorded external radiation dose during work at Sellafield before his child's conception. The association can effectively explain statistically the observed geographical excess.

  12. Comparative Analysis of HIV-1 and Murine Leukemia Virus Three-Dimensional Nuclear Distributions.

    PubMed

    Quercioli, Valentina; Di Primio, Cristina; Casini, Antonio; Mulder, Lubbertus C F; Vranckx, Lenard S; Borrenberghs, Doortje; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger; Cereseto, Anna

    2016-05-15

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy allow three-dimensional analysis of HIV-1 preintegration complexes in the nuclei of infected cells. To extend this investigation to gammaretroviruses, we engineered a fluorescent Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) system consisting of MLV-integrase fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (MLV-IN-EGFP). A comparative analysis of lentiviral (HIV-1) and gammaretroviral (MLV) fluorescent complexes in the nuclei of infected cells revealed their different spatial distributions. This research tool has the potential to achieve new insight into the nuclear biology of these retroviruses. PMID:26962222

  13. Fibroblast growth factor-2 regulates the stability of nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Alexander-Francisco; van Bergeijk, Jeroen; Lorbeer, Christina; Nölle, Anna; Jungnickel, Julia; Grothe, Claudia; Claus, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Nuclear bodies are distinct subnuclear structures. The survival of motoneuron (SMN) gene is mutated or deleted in patients with the neurodegenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The gene product SMN is a marker protein for one class of nuclear bodies denoted as nuclear gems. SMN has also been found in Cajal bodies, which co-localize with gems in many cell types. Interestingly, SMA patients display a reduced number of gems. Little is known about the regulation of nuclear body formation and stabilization. We have previously shown that a nuclear isoform of the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2(23)) binds directly to SMN. In this study, we analyzed the consequences of FGF-2(23) binding to SMN with regard to nuclear body formation. On a molecular level, we showed that FGF-2(23) competed with Gemin2 (a component of the SMN complex that is necessary for gem stabilization) for binding to SMN. Down-regulation of Gemin2 by siRNA caused destabilization of SMN-positive nuclear bodies. This process is reflected in both cellular and in vivo systems by a negative regulatory function of FGF-2 in nuclear body formation: in HEK293 cells, FGF-2(23) decreased the number of SMN-positive nuclear bodies. The same effect could be observed in motoneurons of FGF-2 transgenic mice. This study demonstrates the functional role of a growth factor in the regulation of structural entities of the nucleus. PMID:19617559

  14. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without total body irradiation for pediatric acute leukemia: a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yanshun; Qin, Maoquan; Wang, Bin; Li, Sidan; Zhu, Guanghua; Zhou, Xuan; Yang, Jun; Wang, Kai; Lin, Wei; Zheng, Huyong

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a promising method for therapy of pediatric patients with acute leukemia. However, less availability of matched donors limited its wide application. Recently, haploidentical HSCT has become a great resource. Here, we have retrospectively reported our experience of 20 pediatric patients with acute leukemia who underwent haploidentical HSCT without total body irradiation (TBI) myeloablative regimen in our center from November 2007 to June 2014. All the patients attained successful HSCT engraftment in terms of myeloid and platelet recovery. Thirteen patients developed grade I–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (a-GVHD). The incidence of grade I–II a-GVHD, grade III–IV a-GVHD, and chronic GVHD (c-GVHD) was 45%, 20%, and 25%, respectively. The mean myeloid and platelet recovery time was 13.20±2.41 and 19.10±8.37 days. The median follow-up time was 43.95±29.26 months. During the follow-up, three patients died. The overall survival (OS) rate was 85%. The present study indicated that haploidentical HSCT without TBI myeloablative regimen significantly improved the OS rate of pediatric patients with acute leukemia. PMID:27217774

  15. Leukemia risk associated with chronic external exposure to ionizing radiation in a French cohort of nuclear workers.

    PubMed

    Metz-Flamant, C; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Acker, A; Laurier, D

    2012-11-01

    Leukemia is one of the earliest cancer effects observed after acute exposure to relatively high doses of ionizing radiation. Leukemia mortality after external exposure at low doses and low-dose rates has been investigated at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and Nuclear Fuel Company (AREVA NC) after an additional follow-up of 10 years. The cohort included radiation-monitored workers employed for at least one year during 1950-1994 at CEA or AREVA NC and followed during 1968-2004. Association between external exposure and leukemia mortality was estimated with excess relative risk (ERR) models and time-dependent modifying factors were investigated with time windows. The cohort included 36,769 workers, followed for an average of 28 years, among whom 73 leukemia deaths occurred. Among the workers with a positive recorded dose, the mean cumulative external dose was 21.7 mSv. Results under a 2-year lag assumption suggested that the risk of leukemia (except chronic lymphatic leukemia) increased significantly by 8% per 10 mSv. The magnitude of the association for myeloid leukemia was larger. The higher ERR/Sv for doses received 2-14 years earlier suggest that time since exposure modifies the effect. The ERR/Sv also appeared higher for doses received at exposure rates ≥20 mSv per year. These results are consistent with those found in other studies of nuclear workers. However, confidence intervals are still wide. Further analyses should be conducted in pooled cohorts of nuclear workers. PMID:23050984

  16. SUMO5, a Novel Poly-SUMO Isoform, Regulates PML Nuclear Bodies.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ya-Chen; Lee, Chia-Chin; Yao, Ya-Li; Lai, Chien-Chen; Schmitz, M Lienhard; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are PML-based nuclear structures that regulate various cellular processes. SUMOylation, the process of covalently conjugating small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs), is required for both the formation and the disruption of PML-NBs. However, detailed mechanisms of how SUMOylation regulates these processes remain unknown. Here we report that SUMO5, a novel SUMO variant, mediates the growth and disruption of PML-NBs. PolySUMO5 conjugation of PML at lysine 160 facilitates recruitment of PML-NB components, which enlarges PML-NBs. SUMO5 also increases polySUMO2/3 conjugation of PML, resulting in RNF4-mediated disruption of PML-NBs. The acute promyelocytic leukemia oncoprotein PML-RARα blocks SUMO5 conjugation of PML, causing cytoplasmic displacement of PML and disruption of PML-NBs. Our work not only identifies a new member of the SUMO family but also reveals the mechanistic basis of the PML-NB life cycle in human cells. PMID:27211601

  17. Leukemia Cutis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Angoori G; Danturty, Indira

    2012-01-01

    Leukemia cutis is the infiltration of neoplastic leukocytes or their precursors into the epidermis, the dermis, or the subcutis, resulting in clinically identifiable cutaneous lesions. Leukemia cutis may follow, precede or occur concomitantly with the diagnosis of systemic leukemia. A 50-year-old woman presented with asymptomatic multiple cutaneous nodules all over the body of 4 months duration. Cutaneous examination showed multiple hyperpigmented nodules and plaques involving face, trunk, and extremities. Peripheral smear showed abnormally elevated leucocyte count (TLC-70,000) with abnormal cells: myeloblasts 40%, promyelocytes 8% and myelocytes 39%. Auer rods were present in few myeloblasts. Bone marrow aspiration showed increased cellularity, erythroid hyperplasia with megaloblastic change, increased myeloblasts with maturation arrest. Immunohistochemistry showed strongly positive myeloperoxidase infiltrating cells and negative for CD20 and CD3 consistent with the diagnosis of AML–M 2 with leukemia cutis. This case is reported for its rarity. PMID:23248383

  18. Regulation of neuronal differentiation by proteins associated with nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Förthmann, Benjamin; van Bergeijk, Jeroen; Lee, Yu-Wei; Lübben, Verena; Schill, Yvonne; Brinkmann, Hella; Ratzka, Andreas; Stachowiak, Michal K; Hebert, Michael; Grothe, Claudia; Claus, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear bodies are large sub-nuclear structures composed of RNA and protein molecules. The Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein localizes to Cajal bodies (CBs) and nuclear gems. Diminished cellular concentration of SMN is associated with the neurodegenerative disease Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). How nuclear body architecture and its structural components influence neuronal differentiation remains elusive. In this study, we analyzed the effects of SMN and two of its interaction partners in cellular models of neuronal differentiation. The nuclear 23 kDa isoform of Fibroblast Growth Factor - 2 (FGF-2(23)) is one of these interacting proteins - and was previously observed to influence nuclear bodies by destabilizing nuclear gems and mobilizing SMN from Cajal bodies (CBs). Here we demonstrate that FGF-2(23) blocks SMN-promoted neurite outgrowth, and also show that SMN disrupts FGF-2(23)-dependent transcription. Our results indicate that FGF-2(23) and SMN form an inactive complex that interferes with neuronal differentiation by mutually antagonizing nuclear functions. Coilin is another nuclear SMN binding partner and a marker protein for Cajal bodies (CBs). In addition, coilin is essential for CB function in maturation of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs). The role of coilin outside of Cajal bodies and its putative impacts in tissue differentiation are poorly defined. The present study shows that protein levels of nucleoplasmic coilin outside of CBs decrease during neuronal differentiation. Overexpression of coilin has an inhibitory effect on neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we find that nucleoplasmic coilin inhibits neurite outgrowth independent of SMN binding revealing a new function for coilin in neuronal differentiation. PMID:24358231

  19. Phosphorothioate Antisense Oligonucleotides Induce the Formation of Nuclear Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Peter; Baker, Brenda F.; Bennett, C. Frank; Spector, David L.

    1998-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides are powerful tools for the in vivo regulation of gene expression. We have characterized the intracellular distribution of fluorescently tagged phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (PS-ONs) at high resolution under conditions in which PS-ONs have the potential to display antisense activity. Under these conditions PS-ONs predominantly localized to the cell nucleus where they accumulated in 20–30 bright spherical foci designated phosphorothioate bodies (PS bodies), which were set against a diffuse nucleoplasmic population excluding nucleoli. PS bodies are nuclear structures that formed in cells after PS-ON delivery by transfection agents or microinjection but were observed irrespectively of antisense activity or sequence. Ultrastructurally, PS bodies corresponded to electron-dense structures of 150–300 nm diameter and resembled nuclear bodies that were found with lower frequency in cells lacking PS-ONs. The environment of a living cell was required for the de novo formation of PS bodies, which occurred within minutes after the introduction of PS-ONs. PS bodies were stable entities that underwent noticeable reorganization only during mitosis. Upon exit from mitosis, PS bodies were assembled de novo from diffuse PS-ON pools in the daughter nuclei. In situ fractionation demonstrated an association of PS-ONs with the nuclear matrix. Taken together, our data provide evidence for the formation of a nuclear body in cells after introduction of phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides. PMID:9571236

  20. Nuclear bodies in Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii Mirb.) microspores.

    PubMed

    Niedojadło, Janusz; Dominowska, Katarzyna; Bednarska, Elzbieta

    2008-12-01

    The identification of nucleolar proteins and immunocytochemical localization of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) elements revealed the presence of three types of nuclear bodies in Douglas fir microspore nuclei. One type consists of structures resembling Cajal bodies (CBs) and contains nucleolar proteins as well as snRNPs and U2 snRNA. The second type is bizonal bodies, which are nuclear bodies also linked with the splicing system. The bizonal body comprises two parts: the first contains Sm proteins and stains strongly with silver stain, and the second resembles CBs in terms of the degree of silver staining and molecular composition. Douglas fir is the second species after larch where the presence of bizonal bodies has been demonstrated. Pseudotsuga menziesii Mirb and Larix decidua Mill are species with one of the longest microsporogenesis processes known in plants. The presence of bizonal bodies in both species may be linked to the intensification of the splicing processes in microspores with an exceptionally long cell cycle. The third type of structure is dense bodies, whose morphology and degree of silver staining strongly indicate their functional and spatial relationship to the dense part of bizonal bodies. PMID:18854917

  1. Farnesylpyridinium, an analog of isoprenoid farnesol, induces apoptosis but suppresses apoptotic body formation in human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Masahiro; Nishio, Kyo-ichi; Doe, Matsumi; Usuki, Yoshinosuke; Tanaka, Toshio

    2002-03-13

    1-Farnesylpyridinium (FPy), an analog of isoprenoid farnesol, initially induced morphological changes similar to those of typical apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells but FPy-treated cells were characterized by the absolute absence of final apoptotic events such as fragmentation into apoptotic bodies. FPy-induced cell death was considered to be apoptotic on the basis of the induction of DNA fragmentation and the protection against these events by the coaddition of a pan-caspase inhibitor. The increase in the cytoplasmic cytochrome c level supported the possibility that FPy-treated cells should have the ability to complete the entire apoptotic process ending in cell fragmentation and apoptotic body formation. At concentrations too low to induce apoptosis, FPy could suppress the induction of apoptotic body formation in HL-60 cells by typical inducers of apoptosis such as actinomycin D or anisomycin. FPy exhibited a cytochalasin-like effect on spatial arrangement of actin filament independent of its apoptosis-inducing activity. PMID:11943160

  2. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone marrow, blood, and lymphoid tissue What is chronic lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... cancers start and spread, see What Is Cancer? Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a type of cancer that starts ...

  3. Computational nuclear quantum many-body problem: The UNEDF project

    SciTech Connect

    Fann, George I

    2013-01-01

    The UNEDF project was a large-scale collaborative effort that applied high-performance computing to the nuclear quantum many-body problem. The primary focus of the project was on constructing, validating, and applying an optimized nuclear energy density functional, which entailed a wide range of pioneering developments in microscopic nuclear structure and reactions, algorithms, high-performance computing, and uncertainty quantification. UNEDF demonstrated that close associations among nuclear physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists can lead to novel physics outcomes built on algorithmic innovations and computational developments. This review showcases a wide range of UNEDF science results to illustrate this interplay.

  4. A case-control study of leukemia at a naval nuclear shipyard.

    PubMed

    Stern, F B; Waxweiler, R A; Beaumont, J J; Lee, S T; Rinsky, R A; Zumwalde, R D; Halperin, W E; Bierbaum, P J; Landrigan, P J; Murray, W E

    1986-06-01

    A matched case-control study was conducted of 53 leukemia deaths and of 212 controls within a previously studied cohort of 24,545 on-shore workers employed between January 1, 1952 and August 15, 1977 at the Portsmouth (New Hampshire) Naval Shipyard. The study sought to ascertain a priori whether there was an association between leukemia deaths and occupational exposure to either ionizing radiation or organic solvents. To obtain information on individual exposures, radiation dose histories and detailed work histories by job and shop were evaluated for each subject. No statistically significant associations were found either between ionizing radiation or presumed solvent exposure and myelogenous or lymphatic leukemia. However, when specific job categories and shops were examined without benefit of a priori hypotheses, two occupations, electrician and welder, were found to be associated with leukemia. For electricians, the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio (ORMH) was significantly elevated for all leukemias (ORMH = 3.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.29-6.98), particularly for lymphatic leukemia (ORMH = 6.00, 95% CI = 1.47-24.45). For welders, the odds ratio was not significantly elevated for all leukemias (ORMH = 2.25, 95% CI = 0.92-5.53), but was significantly elevated for myeloid leukemia (ORMH = 3.83, 95% CI = 1.28-11.46). These findings persisted when potential confounders were adjusted by means of a conditional logistic regression model. PMID:3458360

  5. Effect of fractionated versus unfractionated total body irradiation on the growth of the BN acute myelocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Hagenbeek, A.; Martens, A.C.M.

    1981-08-01

    The efficacy of various total body irradiation (TBI) regimens prior to bone marrow transplantation was evaluated in a rat model for acute myelocytic leukemia (Dq = 85.1 cGy gamma ; N = 3.7). Using high dose rate gamma-irradiation (115 cGy/min), fractionated TBI with large total daily doses (400 to 600 cGy), either given as acute doses or as split doses at 8 hr intervals, was most effective. Split doses (2 fractions per day) offered no additional advantage. At the most, a 4 log leukemic cell kill was induced. No lethal toxicity was observed. Nine-hundred cGy flash TBI had a similar anti-tumor effect, but with this regimen almost half of the rats died from radiation-induced toxicity (lungs and gastro-intestinal tract). The results are explained in terms of differences between normal and leukemic cells as regards (a) repair of sublethal damage; and (b) repopulation. Low dose rate continuous gamma-irradiation (0.26 cGy/min) with total doses ranging from 900 to 2000 cGy was also quite effective. Maximally a 4 log cell kill was obtained. With 2000 cGy, 50% of the rats died from the gastro-intestinal tract-syndrome. In addition to the major role played by chemotherapy, TBI is mainly of importance in sterilizing the various sanctuaries in the body which contain leukemic cells anatomically resistant to most cytostatic agents.

  6. Targeting SMN to Cajal bodies and nuclear gems during neuritogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Navascues, Joaquin; Berciano, Maria T.; Tucker, Karen E.

    2006-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth is a central feature of neuronal differentiation. PC12 cells are a good model system for studying the peripheral nervous system and the outgrowth of neurites. In addition to the dramatic changes observed in the cytoplasm, neuronal differentiation is also accompanied by striking changes in nuclear morphology. The large and sustained increase in nuclear transcription during neuronal differentiation requires synthesis of a large number of factors involved in pre-mRNA processing. We show that the number and composition of the nuclear subdomains called Cajal bodies and gems changes during the course of N-ras-induced neuritogenesis in the PC12-derived cell line UR61. The Cajal bodies found in undifferentiated cells are largely devoid of the survival of motor neurons (SMN) protein product. As cells shift to a differentiated state, SMN is not only globally upregulated, but is progressively recruited to Cajal bodies. Additional SMN foci (also known as Gemini bodies, gems) can also be detected. Using dual-immunogold labeling electron microscopy and mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the coilin protein, we show that gems clearly represent a distinct category of nuclear body. PMID:15164213

  7. Nuclear matter equation of state and three-body forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, H. M. M.; Algamoudi, A. M. A.

    2012-04-01

    The energy per particle, symmetry energy, pressure, and free energy are calculated for symmetric nuclear matter using BHF approach with modern nucleon-nucleon CD-Bonn, Nijm1, Argonne v18, and Reid 93 potentials. To obtain saturation in nuclear matter we add three-body interaction terms which are equivalent to a density-dependent two-nucleon interaction a la Skyrme force. Good agreement is obtained in comparison with previous theoretical estimates and experimental data.

  8. In situ SUMOylation analysis reveals a modulatory role of RanBP2 in the nuclear rim and PML bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, Noriko . E-mail: hisa@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Uchimura, Yasuhiro; Tachibana, Taro; Sugahara, Satoko; Saitoh, Hisato; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi . E-mail: mnakao@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-05-01

    SUMO modification plays a critical role in a number of cellular functions including nucleocytoplasmic transport, gene expression, cell cycle and formation of subnuclear structures such as promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies. In order to identify the sites where SUMOylation takes place in the cell, we developed an in situ SUMOylation assay using a semi-intact cell system and subsequently combined it with siRNA-based knockdown of nucleoporin RanBP2, also known as Nup358, which is one of the known SUMO E3 proteins. With the in situ SUMOylation assay, we found that both nuclear rim and PML bodies, besides mitotic apparatuses, are major targets for active SUMOylation. The ability to analyze possible SUMO conjugation sites would be a valuable tool to investigate where SUMO E3-like activities and/or SUMO substrates exist in the cell. Specific knockdown of RanBP2 completely abolished SUMOylation along the nuclear rim and dislocated RanGAP1 from the nuclear pore complexes. Interestingly, the loss of RanBP2 markedly reduced the number of PML bodies, in contrast to other, normal-appearing nuclear compartments including the nuclear lamina, nucleolus and chromatin, suggesting a novel link between RanBP2 and PML bodies. SUMOylation facilitated by RanBP2 at the nuclear rim may be a key step for the formation of a particular subnuclear organization. Our data imply that SUMO E3 proteins like RanBP2 facilitate spatio-temporal SUMOylation for certain nuclear structure and function.

  9. Some highlights in few-body nuclear physics.

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R. J.

    2000-12-07

    During the past five years, there have been tremendous advances in both experiments and theoretical calculations in few-body nuclear systems. Advances in technology have permitted experiments of unprecedented accuracy. Jefferson Laboratory has begun operation and the first round of experimental results have become available. New polarization techniques have been exploited at a number of laboratories, in particular, at Jefferson Lab, IUCF, RIKEN, NIKHEF, Mainz, MIT-Bates and HERMES. Some of these results will be shown here. In addition, there have been tremendous advances in few-body theory. Five modern two-nucleon potentials have which describe the nucleon-nucleon data extremely well have become available. A standard model of nuclear physics based on these two nucleon potentials as well as modern three-nucleon forces has emerged. This standard model has enjoyed tremendous success in the few body systems. Exact three-body calculations have been extended into the continuum in order to take full advantage of scattering data in advancing our understanding of the the few-nucleon system. In addition, the application of chiral symmetry has become an important constraint on nucleon-nucleon as well as three-nucleon forces. As a result of all these efforts, we have seen rapid developments in the three-body force. Despite these advances, there remain some extremely important open issues: (1) What is the role of quarks and gluons in nuclear structure; (2) Can we distinguish meson exchange from quark interchange; (3) Is few-body theory sufficient to describe simultaneously the mass 2, 3 and 4 form factors; (4) What is the isospin and spin dependence of the three-body force; (5) Are there medium modifications for nucleons and mesons in nuclei; (6) Is there an enhancement of antiquarks or pions in nuclei related to the binding; and (7) Are short range correlations observable in nuclei? In this paper the author summarizes the status of our understanding of these issues.

  10. Effects of total body irradiation-based conditioning on allogeneic stem cell transplantation for pediatric acute leukemia: a single-institution study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jongmoo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Lee, Sang-wook; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Su Ssan; Park, Jin-hong; Park, Jaehyeon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of total body irradiation (TBI), as a conditioning regimen prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), in pediatric acute leukemia patients. Materials and Methods From January 2001 to December 2011, 28 patients, aged less than 18 years, were treated with TBI-based conditioning for allo-SCT in our institution. Of the 28 patients, 21 patients were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, 75%) and 7 were diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 25%). TBI was completed 4 days or 1 day before stem cell infusion. Patients underwent radiation therapy with bilateral parallel opposing fields and 6-MV X-rays. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival outcomes. Results The 2-year event-free survival and overall survival rates were 66% and 56%, respectively (71.4% and 60.0% in AML patients vs. 64.3% and 52.4% in ALL patients, respectively). Treatment related mortality rate were 25%. Acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease was a major complication; other complications included endocrine dysfunction and pulmonary complications. Common complications from TBI were nausea (89%) and cataracts (7.1%). Conclusion The efficacy and toxicity data in this study of TBI-based conditioning to pediatric acute leukemia patients were comparable with previous studies. However, clinicians need to focus on the acute and chronic complications related to allo-SCT. PMID:25324992

  11. Few body problems in nuclear and particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Interaction models are developed in nuclear and particle physics, and properties of few body systems are calculated in terms of these models. In nuclear physics, realistic three nucleon interaction (TNI) models are developed and applied to three and four body nuclei. In particle physics, a semi-relativistic quark model is developed and hadron spectra are calculated. First described is the interaction models and their theoretical basis. The NN interaction models are reviewed and then two pion exchange models of TNI are discussed. Additionally, a semi-relativistic quark model is presented based upon flux tubes and the one gluon exchange interaction. The techniques of solving the Schroedinger equation for few body systems are discussed. The variational Monte Carlo method, which is use for these calculations, is presented in some detail, and the Faddeev and GFMC methods are reviewed briefly. Results obtained for simple model interactions are compared with the various methods, and a technique which allows calculations of particle unstable states to be performed is also developed. Finally, the results are compared with experiment. In nuclear physics, the binding energy, rms radii, charge form factors, magnetic moments, and coulomb energy for the ground states of three and four body nuclei are calculated. Results of calculations of scattering states in /sup 4/He are presented. In particle physics, the spectra of baryons made up of up and down quarks, and mesons consisting of both light and heavy quarks are calculated.

  12. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-24

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Childhood leukemia around French nuclear power plants--the Geocap study, 2002-2007.

    PubMed

    Sermage-Faure, Claire; Laurier, Dominique; Goujon-Bellec, Stphanie; Chartier, Michel; Guyot-Goubin, Aurlie; Rudant, Jrmie; Hmon, Denis; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work is to study the risk of childhood acute leukemia (AL) around French nuclear power plants (NPPs). The nationwide Geocap case-control study included the 2,753 cases diagnosed in mainland France over 2002-2007 and 30,000 contemporaneous population controls. The last addresses were geocoded and located around the 19 NPPs. The study used distance to NPPs and a dose-based geographic zoning (DBGZ), based on the estimated dose to bone marrow related to NPP gaseous discharges. An odds ratio (OR) of 1.9 [1.0-3.3], based on 14 cases, was evidenced for children living within 5 km of NPPs compared to those living 20 km or further away, and a very similar association was observed in the concomitant incidence study (standardized incidence ratio (SIR)=1.9 [1.0-3.2]). These results were similar for all the 5-year-age groups. They persisted after stratification for several contextual characteristics of the municipalities of residence. Conversely, using the DBGZ resulted in OR and SIR close to one in all of the dose categories. There was no increase in AL incidence over 1990-2001 and over the entire 1990-2007 period. The results suggest a possible excess risk of AL in the close vicinity of French NPPs in 2002-2007. The absence of any association with the DBGZ may indicate that the association is not explained by NPP gaseous discharges. Overall, the findings call for investigation for potential risk factors related to the vicinity of NPP and collaborative analysis of multisite studies conducted in various countries. PMID:22223329

  14. Relationship between leukemia incidence and residing and/or working near the Pilgrim 1 nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether a strong association between leukemia incidence between 1978 and 1986 and potential for exposure to radiation emitted from the Pilgrim 1 nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts was a spurious finding resulting from either (1) failure to account for temporal variation in the level of radioactivity released from the plant or (2) inattention to certain potentially confounding factors, additional age/sex-matched case-control analyses controlled for the effects of socioeconomic status (SES), work history, and cigarette smoking were performed with data collected in the Southeastern Massachusetts Health Investigation -- a study of leukemia among residents aged 13 and older of 22 southeastern Massachusetts towns. None of the additional analyses, including incorporation of emissions data into the exposure-assessment scheme and crude attempts to control for (1) medical-radiation exposure, (2) potential for exposure to pesticides sprayed on cranberry bogs, or (3) workplace exposure to radiation, chemical solvents, dust, or fumes, altered the finding of a statistically significant dose-response relationship between leukemia incidence and potential for exposure to radioactive emissions. The trend in the association over time was not entirely consistent, however, with the hypothesis that unusually large amounts of radioactivity reportedly released from the plant during the mid-1970s were responsible for the observed effects. Recommendations were made for further study of the Plymouth-area population for studies of this problem elsewhere.

  15. Aberrant nuclear factor-kappa B activity in acute myeloid Leukemia: from molecular pathogenesis to therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Ching, Ying Qing; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2015-01-01

    The overall survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been improved significantly over the last decade. Molecularly targeted agents hold promise to change the therapeutic landscape in AML. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) controls a plethora of biological process through switching on and off its long list of target genes. In AML, constitutive NF-κB has been detected in 40% of cases and its aberrant activity enable leukemia cells to evade apoptosis and stimulate proliferation. These facts suggest that NF-κB signaling pathway plays a fundamental role in the development of AML and it represents an attractive target for the intervention of AML. This review summarizes our current knowledge of NF-κB signaling transduction including canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways. Then we specifically highlight what factors contribute to the aberrant activation of NF-κB activity in AML, followed by an overview of 8 important clinical trials of the first FDA approved proteasome inhibitor, Bortezomib (Velcade®), which is a NF-κB inhibitor too, in combination with other therapeutic agents in patients with AML. Finally, this review discusses the future directions of NF-κB inhibitor in treatment of AML, especially in targeting leukemia stem cells (LSCs). PMID:25823927

  16. RNA transcription modulates phase transition-driven nuclear body assembly.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joel; Weber, Stephanie C; Vaidya, Nilesh; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford P

    2015-09-22

    Nuclear bodies are RNA and protein-rich, membraneless organelles that play important roles in gene regulation. The largest and most well-known nuclear body is the nucleolus, an organelle whose primary function in ribosome biogenesis makes it key for cell growth and size homeostasis. The nucleolus and other nuclear bodies behave like liquid-phase droplets and appear to condense from the nucleoplasm by concentration-dependent phase separation. However, nucleoli actively consume chemical energy, and it is unclear how such nonequilibrium activity might impact classical liquid-liquid phase separation. Here, we combine in vivo and in vitro experiments with theory and simulation to characterize the assembly and disassembly dynamics of nucleoli in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. In addition to classical nucleoli that assemble at the transcriptionally active nucleolar organizing regions, we observe dozens of "extranucleolar droplets" (ENDs) that condense in the nucleoplasm in a transcription-independent manner. We show that growth of nucleoli and ENDs is consistent with a first-order phase transition in which late-stage coarsening dynamics are mediated by Brownian coalescence and, to a lesser degree, Ostwald ripening. By manipulating C. elegans cell size, we change nucleolar component concentration and confirm several key model predictions. Our results show that rRNA transcription and other nonequilibrium biological activity can modulate the effective thermodynamic parameters governing nucleolar and END assembly, but do not appear to fundamentally alter the passive phase separation mechanism. PMID:26351690

  17. RNA transcription modulates phase transition-driven nuclear body assembly

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Joel; Weber, Stephanie C.; Vaidya, Nilesh; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear bodies are RNA and protein-rich, membraneless organelles that play important roles in gene regulation. The largest and most well-known nuclear body is the nucleolus, an organelle whose primary function in ribosome biogenesis makes it key for cell growth and size homeostasis. The nucleolus and other nuclear bodies behave like liquid-phase droplets and appear to condense from the nucleoplasm by concentration-dependent phase separation. However, nucleoli actively consume chemical energy, and it is unclear how such nonequilibrium activity might impact classical liquid–liquid phase separation. Here, we combine in vivo and in vitro experiments with theory and simulation to characterize the assembly and disassembly dynamics of nucleoli in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. In addition to classical nucleoli that assemble at the transcriptionally active nucleolar organizing regions, we observe dozens of “extranucleolar droplets” (ENDs) that condense in the nucleoplasm in a transcription-independent manner. We show that growth of nucleoli and ENDs is consistent with a first-order phase transition in which late-stage coarsening dynamics are mediated by Brownian coalescence and, to a lesser degree, Ostwald ripening. By manipulating C. elegans cell size, we change nucleolar component concentration and confirm several key model predictions. Our results show that rRNA transcription and other nonequilibrium biological activity can modulate the effective thermodynamic parameters governing nucleolar and END assembly, but do not appear to fundamentally alter the passive phase separation mechanism. PMID:26351690

  18. Hepatitis C-associated liver carcinogenesis: Role of PML nuclear bodies

    PubMed Central

    Herzer, Kerstin; Gerken, Guido; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    Successful escape from immune response characterises chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, which results in persistence of infection in about 80% of the patients. The deleterious consequences are cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV accounts the most frequent cause for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver transplantation (LT) in the western world. The underlying molecular mechanisms how HCV promotes tumor development are largely unknown. There is some in vitro and in vivo evidence that HCV interferes with the tumor suppressor PML and may thereby importantly contribute to the HCV-associated pathogenesis with respect to the development of HCC. The tumor suppressor protein “promyelocytic leukemia” (PML) has been implicated in the regulation of important cellular processes like differentiation and apoptosis. In cancer biology, PML and its associated nuclear bodies (NBs) have initially attracted intense interest due to its role in the pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). More recently, loss of PML has been implicated in human cancers of various histologic origins. Moreover, number and intensity of PML-NBs increase in response to interferons (IFNs) and there is evidence that PML-NBs may represent preferential targets in viral infections. Thus, PML could not only play a role in the mechanisms of the antiviral action of IFNs but may also be involved in a direct oncogenic effect of the HCV on hepatocytes. This review aims to summarise current knowledge about HCV-related liver carcinogenesis and to discuss a potential role of the nuclear body protein PML for this this hard-to-treat cancer. PMID:25253937

  19. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  20. Myeloid Cell Nuclear Differentiation Antigen (MNDA) Expression Distinguishes Extramedullary Presentations of Myeloid Leukemia From Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ryan C; Kim, Jinah; Natkunam, Yasodha; Sundram, Uma; Freud, Aharon G; Gammon, Bryan; Cascio, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Myeloid neoplasms constitute one of the most common malignancies in adults. In most cases these proliferations initially manifest in the blood and marrow; however, extramedullary involvement may precede blood or marrow involvement in a subset of cases, making a definitive diagnosis challenging by morphologic and immunohistochemical assessment alone. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare, aggressive entity that frequently presents in extramedullary sites and can show morphologic and immunophenotypic overlap with myeloid neoplasms. Given that BPDCN and myeloid neoplasms may both initially present in extramedullary sites and that novel targeted therapies may be developed that exploit the unique molecular signature of BPDCN, new immunophenotypic markers that can reliably separate myeloid neoplasms from BPDCN are desirable. We evaluated the utility of myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA) expression in a series of extramedullary myeloid leukemias (EMLs) and BPDCN. Forty biopsies containing EML and 19 biopsies containing BPDCN were studied by MNDA immunohistochemistry. The majority of myeloid neoplasms showed nuclear expression of MNDA (65%). In contrast, all cases of BPDCN lacked MNDA expression. These findings show that MNDA is expressed in the majority of EMLs and support the inclusion of MNDA immunohistochemistry in the diagnostic evaluation of blastic hematopoietic infiltrates, particularly when the differential diagnosis is between myeloid leukemia and BPDCN. PMID:26796502

  1. PML-nuclear bodies decrease with age and their stress response is impaired in aged individuals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) have been depicted as structures which are involved in processing cell damages and DNA double-strand break repairs. The study was designed to evaluate differences in patients’ PML-NBs response to stress factors like a cancerous disease and ionizing radiation exposure dependent on age. Methods In order to clarify the role of PML-NBs in the aging process, we examined peripheral blood monocytes of 134 cancer patients and 41 healthy individuals between 22 and 92 years of age, both before and after in vitro irradiation. Additionally, we analyzed the samples of the cancer patients after in vivo irradiation. Cells were immunostained and about 1600 cells per individual were analyzed for the presence of PML- and γH2AX foci. Results The number of existing PML-NBs per nucleus declined with age, while the number of γH2AX foci increased with age. There was a non-significant trend that in vivo irradiation increased the number of PML-NBs in cells of young study participants, while in older individuals PML-NBs tended to decrease. It can be assumed that PML-NBs decrease in number during the process of aging. Conclusion The findings suggest that there is a dysfunctional PML-NBs stress response in aged cells. PMID:24694011

  2. Leukemia in the proximity of a German boiling-water nuclear reactor: evidence of population exposure by chromosome studies and environmental radioactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz-Feuerhake, I; Dannheim, B; Heimers, A; Oberheitmann, B; Schröder, H; Ziggel, H

    1997-01-01

    Exceptional elevation of children's leukemia appearing 5 years after the 1983 startup of the Krümmel nuclear power plant, accompanied by a significant increase of adult leukemia cases, led to investigations of radiation exposures of the population living near the plant. The rate of dicentric chromosomes in peripheral lymphocytes of seven parents of children with leukemia and in 14 other inhabitants near the plant was significantly elevated and indicated ongoing exposures over the years of its operation. These findings led to the hypothesis that chronic reactor leakages had occurred. This assumption is support by identification of artificial radioactivity in air, rainwater, soil and vegetation by the environmental monitoring program at the nuclear power plant. Calculations of the corresponding source terms show that emissions must have been well above authorized annual limits. Bone marrow doses supposedly result primarily through incorporation of bone-seeking beta- and alpha-emitters. PMID:9467072

  3. Treosulfan and Fludarabine Phosphate With or Without Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

  4. Equation of State of Nuclear Matter and the Nuclear Three-Body Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzawa, H.; Oyamatsu, K.; Sumiyoshi, K.; Takano, M.

    2008-04-01

    An equation of state (EOS) for uniform nuclear matter is constructed at zero and finite temperatures with the variational method starting from a realistic nuclear Hamiltonian composed of the AV18 two-body potential and the UIX three-nucleon interaction (TNI). The two-body energy is calculated with a Jastrow wave function, and the TNI energy with the Fermi-gas wave function. In this calculation, the Fujita-Miyazawa (FM) 2π-exchange term of the TNI energy is positive for symmetric nuclear matter. By taking into account the correlation between nucleons perturbatively, the expectation value of the FM term is modified to be negative in the low density region.

  5. Equation of State of Nuclear Matter and the Nuclear Three-Body Force

    SciTech Connect

    Kanzawa, H.; Oyamatsu, K.; Sumiyoshi, K.; Takano, M.

    2008-04-29

    An equation of state (EOS) for uniform nuclear matter is constructed at zero and finite temperatures with the variational method starting from a realistic nuclear Hamiltonian composed of the AV18 two-body potential and the UIX three-nucleon interaction (TNI). The two-body energy is calculated with a Jastrow wave function, and the TNI energy with the Fermi-gas wave function. In this calculation, the Fujita-Miyazawa (FM) 2{pi}-exchange term of the TNI energy is positive for symmetric nuclear matter. By taking into account the correlation between nucleons perturbatively, the expectation value of the FM term is modified to be negative in the low density region.

  6. Lipid droplets go nuclear.

    PubMed

    Farese, Robert V; Walther, Tobias C

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are sometimes found in the nucleus of some cells. In this issue, Ohsaki et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201507122) show that the nuclear membrane, promyelocytic leukemia bodies, and the protein PML-II play a role in nuclear LD formation, suggesting functional relationships between these structures. PMID:26728852

  7. The use of potential of bone marrow allograft and whole-body irradiation in the treatment of leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.D.

    1982-10-15

    A brief history of the clinical application of marrow transplantation based on knowledge gained from ten years work utilizing the dog as an animal model is summarized. The techniques for marrow transplantation, donor selection, and conditioning of the recipient are described. Thirteen of the first 110 endstage leukemic patients who received allogeneic grafts and six of 16 patients who received syngeneic grafts are alive 6-11 years after grafting. Encouraged by the apparent ''cure'' of leukemia in these poor-risk patients, the Seattle transplant group in 1976 decided to give patients transplants earlier in the course of their disease. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in second or subsequent relapse were considered to have a poor prognosis. Twenty-two such patients received transplants, with seven surviving in remission 3-5 years later. Nineteen patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia received transplants in first remission and 11 are living in remission 3.5-5.5 years after grafting. The median survival will not be less than 42 months. The problems associated with graft-versus-host disease and recurrence of leukemia and methods aimed at eliminating these problems are discussed.

  8. Decreased nuclear matrix DNA topoisomerase II in human leukemia cells resistant to VM-26 and m-AMSA

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, D.J. ); Danks, M.K.; Beck, W.T. )

    1990-05-01

    CEM leukemia cells selected for resistance to VM-26 (CEM/VM-1) are cross-resistant to various other DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors but not to Vinca alkaloids. Since DNA topoisomerase II is a major protein of the nuclear matrix, the authors asked if alterations in nuclear matrix topoisomerase II might be important in this form of multidrug resistance. Pretreatment of drug-sensitive CEM cells for 2 h with either 5 {mu}M VM-26 or 3 {mu}M m-AMSA reduced the specific activity of newly replicated DNA on the nuclear matrix by 75 and 50%, respectively, relative to that of the bulk DNA. The decatenating and unknotting activities of DNA topoisomerase II were 6- and 7-fold lower, respectively, in the nuclear matrix preparations from the CEM/VM-1 cells compared to parental CEM cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the amount of immunoreactive topoisomerase II in the nuclear matrices of the CEM/VM-1 cells decreased 3.2-fold relative to that in CEM cells. Increasing the NaCl concentration used in the matrix isolation procedure from 0.2 to 1.8 M resulted in a progressive decrease in the specific activity of topoisomerase II in matrices of CEM/VM-1 but not CEM cells, which suggested that the association of the enzyme with the matrix is altered in the resistant cells. These data support the hypothesis that resistance to VM-26 and m-AMSA is directly related to the decreased activity of nuclear matrix topoisomerase II. In CEM/VM-1 cells the interaction of either VM-26 or m-AMSA with nuclear matrix topoisomerase II is specifically diminished.

  9. Similar Survival for Patients Undergoing Reduced-Intensity Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Versus Myeloablative TBI as Conditioning for Allogeneic Transplant in Acute Leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Mikell, John L.; Waller, Edmund K.; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Rangaraju, Sravanti; Ali, Zahir; Graiser, Michael; Hall, William A.; Langston, Amelia A.; Esiashvili, Natia; Khoury, H. Jean; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the mainstay of treatment for adults with acute leukemia. Total body irradiation (TBI) remains an important part of the conditioning regimen for HCST. For those patients unable to tolerate myeloablative TBI (mTBI), reduced intensity TBI (riTBI) is commonly used. In this study we compared outcomes of patients undergoing mTBI with those of patients undergoing riTBI in our institution. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of all patients with acute leukemia who underwent TBI-based conditioning, using a prospectively acquired database of HSCT patients treated at our institution. Patient data including details of the transplantation procedure, disease status, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), response rates, toxicity, survival time, and time to progression were extracted. Patient outcomes for various radiation therapy regimens were examined. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Between June 1985 and July 2012, 226 patients with acute leukemia underwent TBI as conditioning for HSCT. Of those patients, 180 had full radiation therapy data available; 83 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 94 had acute myelogenous leukemia; 45 patients received riTBI, and 135 received mTBI. Median overall survival (OS) was 13.7 months. Median relapse-free survival (RFS) for all patients was 10.2 months. Controlling for age, sex, KPS, disease status, and diagnosis, there were no significant differences in OS or RFS between patients who underwent riTBI and those who underwent mTBI (P=.402, P=.499, respectively). Median length of hospital stay was shorter for patients who received riTBI than for those who received mTBI (16 days vs 23 days, respectively; P<.001), and intensive care unit admissions were less frequent following riTBI than mTBI (2.22% vs 12.69%, respectively, P=.043). Nonrelapse survival rates were also similar (P=.186). Conclusions: No differences in OS or RFS were seen between all patients undergoing riTBI and those undergoing mTBI, despite older age and potential increased comorbidity of riTBI patients. riTBI regimens were associated with shorter length of hospital stay, fewer intensive care unit admissions, and similar rates of nonrelapse survival, which may reflect reduced toxicity. Prospective trials comparing riTBI and mTBI are warranted.

  10. Visualized kinematics code for two-body nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. J.; Chae, K. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The one or few nucleon transfer reaction has been a great tool for investigating the single-particle properties of a nucleus. Both stable and exotic beams are utilized to study transfer reactions in normal and inverse kinematics, respectively. Because many energy levels of the heavy recoil from the two-body nuclear reaction can be populated by using a single beam energy, identifying each populated state, which is not often trivial owing to high level-density of the nucleus, is essential. For identification of the energy levels, a visualized kinematics code called VISKIN has been developed by utilizing the Java programming language. The development procedure, usage, and application of the VISKIN is reported.

  11. The leukemia associated nuclear corepressor ETO homologue genes MTG16 and MTGR1 are regulated differently in hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MTG16, MTGR1 and ETO are nuclear transcriptional corepressors of the human ETO protein family. MTG16 is implicated in hematopoietic development and in controlling erythropoiesis/megakaryopoiesis. Furthermore, ETO homologue genes are 3'participants in leukemia fusions generated by chromosomal translocations responsible of hematopoietic dysregulation. We tried to identify structural and functional promoter elements of MTG16 and MTGR1 genes in order to find associations between their regulation and hematopoiesis. Results 5' deletion examinations and luciferase reporter gene studies indicated that a 492 bp sequence upstream of the transcription start site is essential for transcriptional activity by the MTG16 promoter. The TATA- and CCAAT-less promoter with a GC box close to the start site showed strong reporter activity when examined in erythroid/megakaryocytic cells. Mutation of an evolutionary conserved GATA -301 consensus binding site repressed promoter function. Furthermore, results from in vitro antibody-enhanced electrophoretic mobility shift assay and in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated binding of GATA-1 to the GATA -301 site. A role of GATA-1 was also supported by transfection of small interfering RNA, which diminished MTG16 expression. Furthermore, expression of the transcription factor HERP2, which represses GATA-1, produced strong inhibition of the MTG16 promoter reporter consistent with a role of GATA-1 in transcriptional activation. The TATA-less and CCAAT-less MTGR1 promoter retained most of the transcriptional activity within a -308 to -207 bp region with a GC-box-rich sequence containing multiple SP1 binding sites reminiscent of a housekeeping gene with constitutive expression. However, mutations of individual SP1 binding sites did not repress promoter function; multiple active SP1 binding sites may be required to safeguard constitutive MTGR1 transcriptional activity. The observed repression of MTG16/MTGR1 promoters by the leukemia associated AML1-ETO fusion gene may have a role in hematopoietic dysfunction of leukemia. Conclusions An evolutionary conserved GATA binding site is critical in transcriptional regulation of the MTG16 promoter. In contrast, the MTGR1 gene depends on a GC-box-rich sequence for transcriptional regulation and possible ubiquitous expression. Our results demonstrate that the ETO homologue promoters are regulated differently consistent with hematopoietic cell-type- specific expression and function. PMID:22443175

  12. Comparison of outcomes of allogeneic transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia with cyclophosphamide in combination with intravenous busulfan, oral busulfan, or total body irradiation.

    PubMed

    Copelan, Edward A; Avalos, Belinda R; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Zhu, Xiaochun; Gale, Robert Peter; Grunwald, Michael R; Hamadani, Mehdi; Hamilton, Betty K; Hale, Gregory A; Marks, David I; Waller, Edmund K; Savani, Bipin N; Costa, Luciano J; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Khoury, H Jean; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kamble, Rammurti T; Schouten, Harry C; Wirk, Baldeep; Litzow, Mark R; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; van Besien, Koen W; Ustun, Celalettin; Bolwell, Brian J; Bredeson, Christopher N; Fasan, Omotayo; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Horowitz, Mary M; Arora, Mukta; Szer, Jeffrey; Loren, Alison W; Alyea, Edwin P; Cortes, Jorge; Maziarz, Richard T; Kalaycio, Matt E; Saber, Wael

    2015-03-01

    Cyclophosphamide (Cy) in combination with busulfan (Bu) or total body irradiation (TBI) is the most commonly used myeloablative conditioning regimen in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We used data from the Center for International Bone Marrow Transplantation Research to compare outcomes in adults who underwent hematopoietic cell transplantation for CML in first chronic phase after myeloablative conditioning with Cy in combination with TBI, oral Bu, or intravenous (i.v.) Bu. Four hundred thirty-eight adults received human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling grafts and 235 received well-matched grafts from unrelated donors (URD) from 2000 through 2006. Important differences existed between the groups in distribution of donor relation, exposure to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and year of transplantation. In multivariate analysis, relapse occurred less frequently among patients receiving i.v. Bu compared with TBI (relative risk [RR], .36; P = .022) or oral Bu (RR, .39; P = .028), but nonrelapse mortality and survival were similar. A significant interaction was detected between donor relation and the main effect in leukemia-free survival (LFS). Among recipients of HLA-identical sibling grafts, but not URD grafts, LFS was better in patients receiving i.v. Bu (RR, .53; P = .025) or oral Bu (RR, .64; P = .017) compared with TBI. In CML in first chronic phase, Cy in combination with i.v. Bu was associated with less relapse than TBI or oral Bu. LFS was better after i.v. or oral Bu compared with TBI. PMID:25528388

  13. Leukemia -- Eosinophilic

    MedlinePlus

    ... your screen to choose another section to continue reading this guide. ‹ Leukemia - Eosinophilic up Leukemia - Eosinophilic - Statistics › f t g e P + H Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Leukemia - Eosinophilic ...

  14. Projection techniques to approach the nuclear many-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of angular-momentum-projection goes beyond quantum-number restoration for symmetry-violated states. The angular-momentum-projection method can be viewed as an efficient way of truncating the shell-model space which is otherwise too large to handle. It defines a transformation from the intrinsic system, where dominant excitation modes in the low-energy region are identified with the concept of spontaneous symmetry breaking, to the laboratory frame with well-organized configuration states according to excitations. An energy-dictated, physically-guided shell-model truncation can then be carried out within the projected space and the Hamiltonian is thereby diagonalized in a compact basis. The present article reviews the theory of angular-momentum-projection applied in the nuclear many-body problem. Angular momentum projection emerges naturally if a deformed state is treated quantum-mechanically. To demonstrate how different physical problems in heavy, deformed nuclei can be efficiently described with different truncation schemes, we introduce the projected shell model and show examples of calculation in a basis with axial symmetry, a basis with triaxiality, and a basis with both quasiparticle and phonon excitations. Technical details of how to calculate the projected matrix elements and how to build a workable model with the projection techniques are given in the appendix.

  15. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, methyl 2,5-dihydromethylcinnimate, induces PML nuclear body formation and apoptosis in tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Komura, Naoyuki; Asakawa, Mayako; Umezawa, Kazuo . E-mail: umezawa@applc.keio.ac.jp; Segawa, Kaoru

    2007-08-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are the nuclear structure consisting of various proteins such as PML, SUMO-1, and p53. PML-NBs are implicated in the regulation of tumor suppression, antiviral responses, and apoptosis. In this study, we searched for bioactive metabolites that would promote the formation of PML-NBs in tumor cells. As a result, methyl 2,5-dihydromethylcinnimate (2,5-MeC), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, enhanced expression and/or stability of PML proteins and induced PML-NB formation in p53 null H1299 cells established from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and wild-type p53-expressing U2OS cells derived from osteosarcoma. Furthermore, it enhanced apoptosis by exogenously expressed wild type p53 and the expression of p53-responsive genes, such as PUMA and p21, in H1299 cells. 2,5-MeC also activated endogenous p53 and induced apoptosis in U2OS cells. The results suggest that 2,5-MeC is likely to be a promising candidate drug for the clinical treatment of terminal cancer-expressing wild-type p53.

  16. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  17. Comparative ultrastructure of CRM1-Nucleolar bodies (CNoBs), Intranucleolar bodies (INBs) and hybrid PML/p62 bodies uncovers new facets of nuclear body dynamic and diversity

    PubMed Central

    Souquere, Sylvie; Weil, Dominique; Pierron, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    In order to gain insights on the nuclear organization in mammalian cells, we characterized ultrastructurally nuclear bodies (NBs) previously described as fluorescent foci. Using high resolution immunoelectron microscopy (I-EM), we provide evidence that CNoBs (CRM1-Nucleolar bodies) and INBs (Intranucleolar bodies) are distinct genuine nucleolar structures in untreated HeLa cells. INBs are fibrillar and concentrate the post-translational modifiers SUMO1 and SUMO-2/3 as strongly as PML bodies. In contrast, the smallest CRM1-labeled CNoBs are vitreous, preferentially located at the periphery of the nucleolus and, intricately linked to the chromatin network. Upon blockage of the CRM1-dependent nuclear export by leptomycin B (LMB), CNoBs disappear while p62/SQSTM1-containing fibrillar nuclear bodies are induced. These p62 bodies are enriched in ubiquitinated proteins. They progressively associate with PML bodies to form hybrid bodies of which PML decorates the periphery while p62/SQSTM1 is centrally-located. Our study is expanding the repertoire of nuclear bodies; revealing a previously unrecognized composite nucleolar landscape and a new mode of interactions between ubiquitous (PML) and stress-induced (p62) nuclear bodies, resulting in the formation of hybrid bodies. PMID:26275159

  18. Nuclear factors that bind to the enhancer region of nondefective Friend murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Manley, N R; O'Connell, M A; Sharp, P A; Hopkins, N

    1989-01-01

    Nondefective Friend murine leukemia virus (MuLV) causes erythroleukemia when injected into newborn NFS mice, while Moloney MuLV causes T-cell lymphoma. Exchange of the Friend virus enhancer region, a sequence of about 180 nucleotides including the direct repeat and a short 3'-adjacent segment, for the corresponding region in Moloney MuLV confers the ability to cause erythroid disease on Moloney MuLV. We have used the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and methylation interference analysis to identify cellular factors which bind to the Friend virus enhancer region and compared these with factors, previously identified, that bind to the Moloney virus direct repeat (N. A. Speck and D. Baltimore, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:1101-1110, 1987). We identified five binding sites for sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins in the Friend virus enhancer region. While some binding sites are present in both the Moloney and Friend virus enhancers, both viruses contain unique sites not present in the other. Although none of the factors identified in this report which bind to these unique sites are present exclusively in T cells or erythroid cells, they bind to three regions of the enhancer shown by genetic analysis to encode disease specificity and thus are candidates to mediate the tissue-specific expression and distinct disease specificities encoded by these virus enhancer elements. Images PMID:2778872

  19. Cell cycle-dependent alteration in NAC1 nuclear body dynamics and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Hung, Shen-Hsiu; Ren, Tina; Shih, Ie-Ming; Tseng, Yiider

    2011-02-01

    NAC1, a BTB/POZ family member, has been suggested to participate in maintaining the stemness of embryonic stem cells and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer. In ovarian cancer, NAC1 upregulation is associated with disease aggressiveness and with the development of chemoresistance. Like other BTB/POZ proteins, NAC1 forms discrete nuclear bodies in non-dividing cells. To investigate the biological role of NAC1 nuclear bodies, we characterized the expression dynamics of NAC1 nuclear bodies during different phases of the cell cycle. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays revealed that NAC1 was rapidly exchanged between the nucleoplasm and NAC1 nuclear bodies in interphase cells. The number of NAC1 bodies significantly increased and their size decreased in the S phase as compared to the G0/G1 and G2 phases. NAC1 nuclear bodies disappeared and NAC1 became diffuse during mitosis. NAC1 nuclear bodies reappeared immediately after completion of mitosis. These results indicate that a cell cycle-dependent regulatory mechanism controls NAC1 body formation in the nucleus and suggest that NAC1 body dynamics are associated with mitosis or cytokinesis.

  20. Detecting body cavity bombs with nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michael London

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a technology with great potential for detecting hidden explosives. Past NQR research has studied the detection of land mines and bombs concealed within luggage and packages. This thesis focuses on an NQR application that has received less attention and little or no publicly available research: detecting body cavity bombs (BCBs). BCBs include explosives that have been ingested, inserted into orifices, or surgically implanted. BCBs present a threat to aviation and secure facilities. They are extremely difficult to detect with the technology currently employed at security checkpoints. To evaluate whether or not NQR can be used to detect BCBs, a computational model is developed to assess how the dielectric properties of biological tissue affect the radio frequency magnetic field employed in NQR (0.5-5MHz). The relative permittivity of some biological tissue is very high (over 1,000 at 1MHz), making it conceivable that there is a significant effect on the electromagnetic field. To study this effect, the low-frequency approximation known as the Darwin model is employed. First, the electromagnetic field of a coil is calculated in free space. Second, a dielectric object or set of objects is introduced, and the free-space electric field is modified to accommodate the dielectric object ensuring that the relevant boundary conditions are obeyed. Finally, the magnetic field associated with the corrected electric field is calculated. This corrected magnetic field is evaluated with an NQR simulation to estimate the impact of dielectric tissue on NQR measurements. The effect of dielectric tissue is shown to be small, thus obviating a potential barrier to BCB detection. The NQR model presented may assist those designing excitation and detection coils for NQR. Some general coil design considerations and strategies are discussed.

  1. CUPLIKE NUCLEI (PROMINENT NUCLEAR INVAGINATIONS) IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA ARE HIGHLY ASSOCIATED WITH FLT3-ITD AND NPM1 MUTATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weina; Konoplev, Sergej; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Koeppen, Hartmut; Leventaki, Vasiliki; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Jones, Dan; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Falini, Brunangelo; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND A small subset of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases has cuplike nuclei. Others have shown that these neoplasms have distinctive clinicopathologic and molecular features. METHODS We searched for AML cases with cuplike nuclei at our institution over a 10-year interval. We used a strict definition for cuplike nuclei, ≥10% blasts with nuclear invaginations ≥25% of the nuclear area. We reviewed relevant data and compared the results with a control group of AML without cuplike nuclei. RESULTS We identified 22 cases of AML with cuplike nuclei, classified as AML without maturation (FAB AML M1). Compared with a control group AML M1cases, AMLs with cuplike nuclei were significantly associated with FLT3-ITD mutations (86 vs. 38%, p=0.002), NPM1 mutations (86 vs. 19%, p<0.0001), both mutations (77% vs. 14%, p<0.0001), normal karyotype (86 vs. 40%, p=0.003), bone marrow blast count (90% vs. 84%, p=0.016), myeloperoxidase positivity (95% vs. 30% blasts, p=0.001), higher D-dimer levels (>5000 vs. 569 ng/mL, p=0.001), and absence of CD7 (91% vs. 52%, p=0.007), CD34 (82% vs. 5%, p<0.0001), and HLA-DR (59% vs. 10%, p=0.001). There were no differences in age, sex, or peripheral blood counts. The positive predictive value of recognizing AML with cuplike nuclei for FLT3-ITD, NPM1, and both mutations was 81%, 86%, and 77%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Cuplike nuclei in AML are highly associated with the presence of NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations and a number of clinicopathologic and immunophenotypic features. The recognition of AML with cuplike nuclei may be helpful in streamlining the workup of these neoplasms. PMID:19672946

  2. Academic difficulties and occupational outcomes of adult survivors of childhood leukemia who have undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and fractionated total body irradiation conditioning.

    PubMed

    Freycon, Fernand; Trombert-Paviot, Béatrice; Casagranda, Léonie; Frappaz, Didier; Mialou, Valérie; Armari-Alla, Corinne; Gomez, Frederic; Faure-Conter, Cécile; Plantaz, Dominique; Berger, Claire

    2014-04-01

    We studied academic and employment outcomes in 59 subjects who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (a-HSCT) with fractionated total body irradiation (fTBI) for childhood leukemia, comparing them with, first, the general French population and, second, findings in 19 who underwent a-HSCT with chemotherapy conditioning. We observed an average academic delay of 0.98 years among the 59 subjects by Year 10 of secondary school (French class Troisième), which was higher than the 0.34-year delay in the normal population (P < .001) but not significantly higher than the delay of 0.68 years in our cohort of 19 subjects who underwent a-HSCT with chemotherapy. The delay was dependent on age at leukemia diagnosis, but not at fTBI. This delay increased to 1.32 years by the final year of secondary school (Year 13, Terminale) for our 59 subjects versus 0.51 years in the normal population (P = .0002), but did not differ significantly from the 1.08-year delay observed in our cohort of 19 subjects. The number of students who received their secondary school diploma (Baccalaureate) was similar to the expected rate in the general French population for girls (observed/expected = 1.02) but significantly decreased for boys (O/E = 0.48; CI: 95%[0.3-0.7]). Compared with 13.8% of the general population, 15.3% of the cancer survivors received no diploma (P = NS). Reported job distribution did not differ significantly between our cohort of childhood cancer survivors and the general population except that more female survivors were employed in intermediate-level professional positions. Academic difficulties after fTBI are common and their early identification will facilitate educational and professional achievement. PMID:24087985

  3. Nuclear Bodies: Random Aggregates of Sticky Proteins or Crucibles of Macromolecular Assembly?

    PubMed Central

    Matera, A. Gregory; Izaguire-Sierra, Mario; Praveen, Kavita; Rajendra, T.K.

    2011-01-01

    The principles of self-assembly and self-organization are major tenets of molecular and cellular biology. Governed by these principles, the eukaryotic nucleus is composed of numerous subdomains and compartments, collectively described as nuclear bodies. Emerging evidence reveals that associations within and between various nuclear bodies and genomic loci are dynamic and can change in response to cellular signals. This review will discuss recent progress in our understanding of how nuclear body components come together, what happens when they form, and what benefit these subcellular structures may provide to the tissues or organisms in which they are found. PMID:19922869

  4. Total body irradiation as preparation for bone marrow transplantation in treatment of acute leukemia and aplastic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Serota, F.T.; Burkey, E.D.; August, C.S.; D'Angio, G.J.

    1983-12-01

    In an attempt to improve survival while minimizing toxicity, many bone marrow transplant centers are now studying the use of cytoreduction regimens with an increased amount of radiation in single-dose or fractionated-exposure schedules for patients with leukemia and aplastic anemia. In order to review the current results, the literature prior to September, 1982 was surveyed and data were tabulated for each transplant center regarding the number of patients receiving transplants, diagnoses, cytoreduction regimen, clinical status, remission duration, relapse rate, causes of death and incidence of interstitial pneumonia. The incidence and severity of cataracts, growth failure, hypothyroidism and second malignant neoplasms were noted, and the data obtained from the literature search were updated and expanded by telephone questionnaire when possible. Marked variation in the technique of tranplantation was found among the participating institutions, making it difficult to determine the contribution of the various TBI doses, dose rates and fractionation schedules to the efficacy and toxicity of the combined regimen. In order to define the risk-benefit ratio of the various TBI regimens more clearly, prospective controlled, randomized studies will be required.

  5. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  6. H-1 Parvovirus-Associated Replication Bodies: a Distinct Virus-Induced Nuclear Structure

    PubMed Central

    Cziepluch, Celina; Lampel, Stefan; Grewenig, Annabel; Grund, Christine; Lichter, Peter; Rommelaere, Jean

    2000-01-01

    We have identified a nuclear structure that is induced after infection with the autonomous parvovirus H-1. Using fluorescence microscopy, we observed that the major nonstructural protein (NS1) of H-1 virus which is essential for viral DNA amplification colocalized with virus-specific DNA sequences and sites of ongoing viral DNA replication in distinct nuclear bodies which we designated H-1 parvovirus-associated replication bodies (H-1 PAR-bodies). In addition, two cellular proteins were shown to accumulate in H1 PAR-bodies: (i) the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) which is essential for chromosomal and parvoviral replication and (ii) the NS1-interacting small glutamine-rich TPR-containing protein (SGT), suggesting a role for the latter in parvoviral replication and/or gene expression. Since many DNA viruses target preexisting nuclear structures, known as PML-bodies, for viral replication and gene expression, we have determined the localization of H-1 PAR- and PML-bodies by double-fluorescence labeling and confocal microscopy and found them to be spatially unrelated. Furthermore, H-1 PAR-bodies did not colocalize with other prominent nuclear structures such as nucleoli, coiled bodies, and speckled domains. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that NS1, as detected by indirect immunogold labeling, was localized in ring-shaped electron-dense nuclear structures corresponding in size and frequency to H-1 PAR-bodies. These structures were also clearly visible without immunogold labeling and could be detected only in infected cells. Our results suggest that H-1 virus does not target known nuclear bodies for DNA replication but rather induces the formation of a novel structure in the nucleus of infected cells. PMID:10775619

  7. RNA-Templated Replication of Hepatitis Delta Virus: Genomic and Antigenomic RNAs Associate with Different Nuclear Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Jia; Macnaughton, Thomas; Gao, Lu; Lai, Michael M. C.

    2006-01-01

    Lacking an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, hepatitis delta virus (HDV), which contains a circular RNA of 1.7 kilobases, is nonetheless able to replicate its RNA by use of cellular transcription machineries. Previously, we have shown that the replications of genomic- and antigenomic-strand HDV RNAs have different sensitivities to α-amanitin, suggesting that these two strands are synthesized in different transcription machineries in the cells, but the nature of these transcription machineries is not clear. In this study, we performed metabolic labeling and immunofluorescence staining of newly synthesized HDV RNA with bromouridine after HDV RNA transfection into hepatocytes and confirmed that HDV RNA synthesis had both α-amanitin-sensitive and -resistant components. The antigenomic RNA labeling was α-amanitin resistant and localized to the nucleolus. The genomic RNA labeling was α-amanitin sensitive and more diffusely localized in the nucleoplasm. Most of the genomic RNA labeling appeared to colocalize with the PML nuclear bodies. Furthermore, promyelocytic leukemia protein, RNA polymerase II (Pol II), and the Pol I-associated transcription factor SL1 could be precipitated together with hepatitis delta antigen, suggesting the association of HDV replication complex with the Pol I and Pol II transcription machineries. This conclusion was further confirmed by an in vitro replication assay. These findings provide additional evidence that HDV RNA synthesis occurs in the Pol I and Pol II transcription machineries, thus extending the capability of the cellular DNA-dependent RNA polymerases to utilizing RNA as templates. PMID:16775335

  8. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukemia (CML) Acute lymphocytic (or lymphoblastic) leukemia (ALL) Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) In acute leukemias, the bone marrow cells ... start in those cells. The main difference between lymphocytic leukemias and lymphomas is ... myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is another chronic leukemia that ...

  9. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax transactivates the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Ressler, S; Morris, G F; Marriott, S J

    1997-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) transforming protein, Tax, is a potent transactivator of both viral and cellular gene expression. The ability of Tax to transform cells is believed to depend on its transactivation of cellular-growth-regulatory genes. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is intimately linked to cell growth and DNA replication and repair. By testing a series of PCNA promoter deletion constructs, we have demonstrated that the PCNA promoter can be transactivated by Tax. The smallest construct that was activated did not include the ATF/CRE binding site at nucleotide -50, and mutations in the ATF/CRE element in the context of a larger promoter were still activated by Tax. In addition, a Tax mutant that is defective for activation of the CRE pathway retained the ability to activate the -397 promoter construct. When a series of linker scanner mutations that span the region from nucleotide -45 to -7 were assayed, mutations in and around a repeat sequence were found to abolish Tax transactivation. Multimerized copies of either half of the repeat were Tax responsive. A single protein complex was shown to bind specifically to the Tax-responsive region, and the binding of this complex was enhanced in the presence of Tax. These results demonstrate that the PCNA promoter contains a Tax-responsive element located between nucleotides -45 and -7 whose sequence is different from those of other, previously identified Tax-responsive elements. The ability of Tax to activate the PCNA promoter may play an important role in cellular transformation by HTLV-1. PMID:8995640

  10. Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of arginine in histone 3 by a nuclear kinase from mouse leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wakim, B T; Aswad, G D

    1994-01-28

    A Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent histone 3 kinase was partially purified from a low salt (150 mM NaCl) nuclear extract of mouse leukemia cells by calmodulin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. In vitro, the kinase activity transferred gamma-phosphate from ATP to histone 3 to form an acid-labile and alkaline-stable linkage. Under the assay conditions 1.8 mol of phosphate are incorporated per mol of histone 3. Upon modification of arginine residues with phenylglyoxal prior to phosphorylation, a considerable decrease in the amount of phosphate transferred to histone 3 was observed. Amino acid analysis revealed that H3 was phosphorylated on arginine residues. To identify the phosphorylated peptide(s), histone 3 was cleaved with cyanogen bromide prior to phosphorylation. The phosphorylated mixture was then separated by gel filtration high-performance liquid chromatography under denaturing conditions. Fragments I (N-terminal 10.3-kDa peptide) and III (C-terminal 1.7-kDa peptide) were both phosphorylated. Amino acid sequencing further revealed that the molar yields of 3 of the 4 arginines present in the phosphorylated cyanogen bromide fragment III were reduced by a factor of about 10 compared with the corresponding arginines from the unphosphorylated fragment. In the case of fragment I, 25 cycles of Edman degradation revealed that the recovery of only arginine 2 was reduced by a factor of 20. The putative phosphorylation sites are arginines 2, 128, 129, and 131. The sequence information offered an indirect evidence that these arginines were the sites of phosphorylation. The kinase described in this report represents a first member of a potentially important new class of kinases which are Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent and which phosphorylate arginine. PMID:8300603

  11. Three-Body Nuclear Systems in Pionless Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanasse, Jared

    2016-03-01

    New perturbative techniques for three-body systems with contact interactions are discussed. Their application to pionless effective field theory (EF{Tnot π }) for nd scattering is shown, and their extension to bound states addressed. With the extension to bound states a leading-order EF{Tnot π } calculation of the triton charge radius and novel treatments of three-body forces are discussed.

  12. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) About PLL and HCL There are other, less common types of leukemia, but they are generally subcategories of one ... both of which are types of chronic B-cell leukemia. B cells are a specific ...

  13. Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance to measure body composition in infants and children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (QMR) is being used in human adults to obtain measures of total body fat (FM) with high precision. The current study assessed a device specially designed to accommodate infants and children between 3 and 50 kg (EchoMRI-AH™). Body composition of 113 infants and...

  14. Survival and Neurocognitive Outcomes After Cranial or Craniospinal Irradiation Plus Total-Body Irradiation Before Stem Cell Transplantation in Pediatric Leukemia Patients With Central Nervous System Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hiniker, Susan M.; Agarwal, Rajni; Modlin, Leslie A.; Gray, Christine C.; Harris, Jeremy P.; Million, Lynn; Kiamanesh, Eileen F.; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival and neurocognitive outcomes in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with central nervous system (CNS) involvement treated according to an institutional protocol with stem cell transplantation (SCT) and a component of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in addition to total-body irradiation (TBI) as preparative regimen. Methods and Materials: Forty-one pediatric ALL patients underwent SCT with TBI and received additional cranial irradiation or CSI because of CNS leukemic involvement. Prospective neurocognitive testing was performed before and after SCT in a subset of patients. Cox regression models were used to determine associations of patient and disease characteristics and treatment methods with outcomes. Results: All patients received a cranial radiation boost; median total cranial dose was 24 Gy. Eighteen patients (44%) received a spinal boost; median total spinal dose for these patients was 18 Gy. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) for all patients was 67%. Those receiving CSI had a trend toward superior DFS compared with those receiving a cranial boost alone (hazard ratio 3.23, P=.14). Patients with isolated CNS disease before SCT had a trend toward superior DFS (hazard ratio 3.64, P=.11, 5-year DFS 74%) compared with those with combined CNS and bone marrow disease (5-year DFS 59%). Neurocognitive testing revealed a mean post-SCT overall intelligence quotient of 103.7 at 4.4 years. Relative deficiencies in processing speed and/or working memory were noted in 6 of 16 tested patients (38%). Pre- and post-SCT neurocognitive testing revealed no significant change in intelligence quotient (mean increase +4.7 points). At a mean of 12.5 years after transplant, 11 of 13 long-term survivors (85%) had completed at least some coursework at a 2- or 4-year college. Conclusion: The addition of CSI to TBI before SCT in pediatric ALL with CNS involvement is effective and well-tolerated. Craniospinal irradiation plus TBI is worthy of further protocol investigation in children with CNS leukemia.

  15. Chromatin insulator bodies are nuclear structures that form in response to osmotic stress and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Schoborg, Todd; Rickels, Ryan; Barrios, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin insulators assist in the formation of higher-order chromatin structures by mediating long-range contacts between distant genomic sites. It has been suggested that insulators accomplish this task by forming dense nuclear foci termed insulator bodies that result from the coalescence of multiple protein-bound insulators. However, these structures remain poorly understood, particularly the mechanisms triggering body formation and their role in nuclear function. In this paper, we show that insulator proteins undergo a dramatic and dynamic spatial reorganization into insulator bodies during osmostress and cell death in a high osmolarity glycerol–p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase–independent manner, leading to a large reduction in DNA-bound insulator proteins that rapidly repopulate chromatin as the bodies disassemble upon return to isotonicity. These bodies occupy distinct nuclear territories and contain a defined structural arrangement of insulator proteins. Our findings suggest insulator bodies are novel nuclear stress foci that can be used as a proxy to monitor the chromatin-bound state of insulator proteins and provide new insights into the effects of osmostress on nuclear and genome organization. PMID:23878275

  16. SUMOylation regulates the nuclear mobility of CREB binding protein and its association with nuclear bodies in live cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Colm M.; Kindle, Karin B.; Collins, Hilary M.; Heery, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The lysine acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP) is required for chromatin modification and transcription at many gene promoters. In fixed cells, a large proportion of CBP colocalises to PML or nuclear bodies. Using live cell imaging, we show here that YFP-tagged CBP expressed in HEK293 cells undergoes gradual accumulation in nuclear bodies, some of which are mobile and migrate towards the nuclear envelope. Deletion of a short lysine-rich domain that contains the major SUMO acceptor sites of CBP abrogated its ability to be SUMO modified, and prevented its association with endogenous SUMO-1/PML speckles in vivo. This SUMO-defective CBP showed enhanced ability to co-activate AML1-mediated transcription. Deletion mapping revealed that the SUMO-modified region was not sufficient for targeting CBP to PML bodies, as C-terminally truncated mutants containing this domain showed a strong reduction in accumulation at PML bodies. Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) experiments revealed that YFP-CBP{Delta}998-1087 had a retarded recovery time in the nucleus, as compared to YFP-CBP. These results indicate that SUMOylation regulates CBP function by influencing its shuttling between nuclear bodies and chromatin microenvironments.

  17. Characterization of a nuclear compartment shared by nuclear bodies applying ectopic protein expression and correlative light and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Karsten; Reichenzeller, Michaela; Goerisch, Sabine M.; Schmidt, Ute; Scheuermann, Markus O.; Herrmann, Harald; Lichter, Peter . E-mail: m.macleod@dkfz.de

    2005-02-01

    To investigate the accessibility of interphase nuclei for nuclear body-sized particles, we analyzed in cultured cells from human origin by correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (EM) the bundle-formation of Xenopus-vimentin targeted to the nucleus via a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Moreover, we investigated the spatial relationship of speckles, Cajal bodies, and crystalline particles formed by Mx1 fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), with respect to these bundle arrays. At 37 deg C, the nucleus-targeted, temperature-sensitive Xenopus vimentin was deposited in focal accumulations. Upon shift to 28 deg C, polymerization was induced and filament arrays became visible. Within 2 h after temperature shift, arrays were found to be composed of filaments loosely embedded in the nucleoplasm. The filaments were restricted to limited areas of the nucleus between focal accumulations. Upon incubation at 28 deg C for several hours, NLS vimentin filaments formed bundles looping throughout the nuclei. Speckles and Cajal bodies frequently localized in direct neighborhood to vimentin bundles. Similarly, small crystalline particles formed by YFP-tagged Mx1 also located next to vimentin bundles. Taking into account that nuclear targeted vimentin locates in the interchromosomal domain (ICD), we conclude that nuclear body-sized particles share a common nuclear space which is controlled by higher order chromatin organization.

  18. Nuclear density functional theory with a semi-contact 3-body interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Denis; Bennaceur, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Theories combining nuclear density functional approach (DFT) and effects beyond the independent particle/quasi-particle limit have attracted much attention recently. In particular, such theories, generically referred as "beyond mean-field" (BMF) seem unavoidable to account for both single-particle effects and complex quantum internal phenomena in nuclear finite many-body nuclear systems. It has been realized recently that BMF theories might lead to specific difficulties when applied within the nuclear DFT context. An example is the appearance of divergences in configuration mixing approaches. A short summary of the difficulties is given here. One source of problem is the use of energy functional of non-integer powers of the density. We show that such dependence can be mimicked by a suitable choice of a three-body interaction. Application on infinite nuclear matter in various spin-isospin channels will be given.

  19. The translation initiation factor 3 subunit eIF3K interacts with PML and associates with PML nuclear bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Salsman, Jayme; Pinder, Jordan; Tse, Brenda; Corkery, Dale; Dellaire, Graham

    2013-10-15

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) is a tumor suppressor protein that regulates a variety of important cellular processes, including gene expression, DNA repair and cell fate decisions. Integral to its function is the ability of PML to form nuclear bodies (NBs) that serve as hubs for the interaction and modification of over 90 cellular proteins. There are seven canonical isoforms of PML, which encode diverse C-termini generated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Recruitment of specific cellular proteins to PML NBs is mediated by protein–protein interactions with individual PML isoforms. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen employing peptide sequences unique to PML isoform I (PML-I), we identified an interaction with the eukaryotic initiation factor 3 subunit K (eIF3K), and in the process identified a novel eIF3K isoform, which we term eIF3K-2. We further demonstrate that eIF3K and PML interact both in vitro via pull-down assays, as well as in vivo within human cells by co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunofluorescence. In addition, eIF3K isoform 2 (eIF3K-2) colocalizes to PML bodies, particularly those enriched in PML-I, while eIF3K isoform 1 associates poorly with PML NBs. Thus, we report eIF3K as the first known subunit of the eIF3 translation pre-initiation complex to interact directly with the PML protein, and provide data implicating alternative splicing of both PML and eIF3K as a possible regulatory mechanism for eIF3K localization at PML NBs. - Highlights: • The PML-I C-terminus, encoded by exon 9, interacts with translation factor eIF3K. • We identify a novel eIF3K isoform that excludes exon 2 (eIF3K-2). • eIF3K-2 preferentially associates with PML bodies enriched in PML-I vs. PML-IV. • Alternative splicing of eIF3K regulates association with PML bodies.

  20. Leukemia -- Eosinophilic

    MedlinePlus

    ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Leukemia - Eosinophilic Overview Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs Diagnosis Stages Treatment Options About Clinical Trials Latest Research Coping with Side Effects Follow-Up Care Survivorship Questions to Ask the ...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear... Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. The microbial pest control agent inclusion bodies of the...

  2. Uncovering many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths by central spin decoherence

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wen-Long; Wolfowicz, Gary; Zhao, Nan; Li, Shu-Shen; Morton, John J.L.; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2014-01-01

    Central spin decoherence caused by nuclear spin baths is often a critical issue in various quantum computing schemes, and it has also been used for sensing single-nuclear spins. Recent theoretical studies suggest that central spin decoherence can act as a probe of many-body physics in spin baths; however, identification and detection of many-body correlations of nuclear spins in nanoscale systems are highly challenging. Here, taking a phosphorus donor electron spin in a 29Si nuclear spin bath as our model system, we discover both theoretically and experimentally that many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths produce identifiable signatures in decoherence of the central spin under multiple-pulse dynamical decoupling control. We demonstrate that under control by an odd or even number of pulses, the central spin decoherence is principally caused by second- or fourth-order nuclear spin correlations, respectively. This study marks an important step toward studying many-body physics using spin qubits. PMID:25205440

  3. Longitudinal Changes in Obesity and Body Mass Index Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Garmey, Edward G.; Liu, Qi; Sklar, Charles A.; Meacham, Lillian R.; Mertens, Ann C.; Stovall, Marilyn A.; Yasui, Yutaka; Robison, Leslie L.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose We examined the rate of increase in the body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) after final height attainment in survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and a noncancer comparison group. Methods Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) is a retrospectively ascertained cohort study that prospectively tracks the health status of adults who were diagnosed with childhood cancer between 1970 and 1986 and a comparison group of siblings. Changes in BMI from baseline enrollment to time of completion of follow-up (mean interval, 7.8 years) were calculated for 1,451 ALL survivors (mean age, 32.3 years at follow-up) and 2,167 siblings of childhood cancer survivors (mean age, 35.9 years). Results The mean BMI of the CCSS sibling comparison group increased with age (women, 0.25 units/yr, 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.28 units; men, 0.23 units/yr, 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.25 units). Compared with CCSS siblings, ALL survivors who were treated with cranial radiation therapy (CRT) had a significantly greater increase in BMI (women, 0.41 units/yr, 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.45 units; men, 0.29 units/yr; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.32 units). The rate of BMI increase was not significantly increased for ALL survivors who were treated with chemotherapy alone. Younger age at CRT exposure significantly modified risk. Conclusion CRT used in the treatment of childhood ALL is associated with a greater rate of increasing BMI, particularly among women treated with CRT during the first decade of life. Health care professionals should be aware of this risk and interventions to reduce or manage weight gain are essential in this high-risk population. PMID:18824710

  4. The SUN Protein Mps3 Is Required for Spindle Pole Body Insertion into the Nuclear Membrane and Nuclear Envelope Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Smoyer, Christine J.; McCroskey, Scott; Miller, Brandon D.; Weaver, Kyle J.; Delventhal, Kym M.; Unruh, Jay; Slaughter, Brian D.; Jaspersen, Sue L.

    2011-01-01

    The budding yeast spindle pole body (SPB) is anchored in the nuclear envelope so that it can simultaneously nucleate both nuclear and cytoplasmic microtubules. During SPB duplication, the newly formed SPB is inserted into the nuclear membrane. The mechanism of SPB insertion is poorly understood but likely involves the action of integral membrane proteins to mediate changes in the nuclear envelope itself, such as fusion of the inner and outer nuclear membranes. Analysis of the functional domains of the budding yeast SUN protein and SPB component Mps3 revealed that most regions are not essential for growth or SPB duplication under wild-type conditions. However, a novel dominant allele in the P-loop region, MPS3-G186K, displays defects in multiple steps in SPB duplication, including SPB insertion, indicating a previously unknown role for Mps3 in this step of SPB assembly. Characterization of the MPS3-G186K mutant by electron microscopy revealed severe over-proliferation of the inner nuclear membrane, which could be rescued by altering the characteristics of the nuclear envelope using both chemical and genetic methods. Lipid profiling revealed that cells lacking MPS3 contain abnormal amounts of certain types of polar and neutral lipids, and deletion or mutation of MPS3 can suppress growth defects associated with inhibition of sterol biosynthesis, suggesting that Mps3 directly affects lipid homeostasis. Therefore, we propose that Mps3 facilitates insertion of SPBs in the nuclear membrane by modulating nuclear envelope composition. PMID:22125491

  5. GATA transcription factors associate with a novel class of nuclear bodies in erythroblasts and megakaryocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Elefanty, A G; Antoniou, M; Custodio, N; Carmo-Fonseca, M; Grosveld, F G

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear distribution of GATA transcription factors in murine haemopoietic cells was examined by indirect immunofluorescence. Specific bright foci of GATA-1 fluorescence were observed in erythroleukaemia cells and primary murine erythroblasts and megakaryocytes, in addition to diffuse nucleoplasmic localization. These foci, which were preferentially found adjacent to nucleoli or at the nuclear periphery, did not represent sites of active transcription or binding of GATA-1 to consensus sites in the beta-globin loci. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated the presence of intensely labelled structures likely to represent the GATA-1 foci seen by immunofluorescence. The GATA-1 nuclear bodies differed from previously described nuclear structures and there was no co-localization with nuclear antigens involved in RNA processing or other ubiquitous (Spl, c-Jun and TBP) or haemopoietic (NF-E2) transcription factors. Interestingly, GATA-2 and GATA-3 proteins also localized to the same nuclear bodies in cell lines co-expressing GATA-1 and -2 or GATA-1 and -3 gene products. This pattern of distribution is, thus far, unique to the GATA transcription factors and suggests a protein-protein interaction with other components of the nuclear bodies via the GATA zinc finger domain. Images PMID:8617207

  6. A quantitative light- and electron-microscopic study of type IV nuclear bodies in crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, A. R.; Payne, C. M.; Nagle, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    Type IV nuclear bodies were found in all renal biopsies obtained from 14 patients with crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN) and in 8 of 43 control patients studied by light and electron microscopy. The mean ratio of Type IV nuclear bodies per 10 tubular cross-sections examined was 0.67 +/- 0.27 for the CGN cases, which was significantly different from 0.09 +/- 0.26 obtained for the controls (P less than 0.05). Type IV nuclear bodies were most commonly seen in the epithelial cells of proximal tubules but were also seen occasionally in interstitial fibroblasts and cells of a collecting duct and a developing crescent. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6259944

  7. Reducible chiral four-body interactions in nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, N.; Milkus, R.

    2016-01-01

    The method of unitary transformations generates five classes of leading-order reducible chiral four-nucleon interactions which involve pion exchanges and a spin-spin contact term. Their first-order contributions to the energy per particle of isospin-symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter are evaluated in detail. For most of the closed four-loop diagrams the occurring integrals over four Fermi spheres can be reduced to easily manageable one- or two-parameter integrals. One finds substantial compensations among the different contributions arising from 2-ring and 1-ring diagrams. Altogether, the net attraction generated by the chiral four-nucleon interaction does not exceed values of -1.3 MeV for densities ρ < 2ρ0.

  8. Genetic contribution to variation in body configuration in Belgian nuclear families: a closer look at body lengths and circumferences.

    PubMed

    Poveda, Alaitz; Jelenkovic, Aline; Susanne, Charles; Rebato, Esther

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the contribution of genetic factors on body configuration related phenotypes. The sample consisted of 119 Belgian nuclear families including 231 males and 229 females. Factor analysis with varimax rotation was carried out to analyse 13 length and circumference measures and the resulting two synthetic traits (LF and CF; linear and circumference factors, respectively) were used as summary variables. Univariate quantitative genetic analysis indicated that variation in anthropometric as well as in synthetic traits was significantly dependent on additive genetic effects, with heritabilities ranging from 0.55 to 0.88. Narrow sense heritability estimates were higher for measurements principally characterizing skeletal mass than in variables that also involve soft-tissues. Sex, age and their interactions explained 11-67% of the total phenotypic variance. This report also examined the covariations between pairs of anthropometric and synthetic traits (length measurements and LF vs. height; circumference measures and CF vs. weight and BMI; LF vs. CF). Significant genetic correlations among all the studied traits (except for middle finger length vs. height) confirmed the influence of pleiotropy on genetic determination of these phenotypes. Bivariate analysis showed that pleiotropic effects had a great influence in determining body traits variation within body length measurements, as well as between body circumferences and weight or BMI. In relation to the two synthetic traits, even the variation of body lengths and circumferences was highly determined by genetic factors, shared genetic influences were unlikely to explain much of the observed variation between LF and CF. The results of the present study allow us to conclude that in this population body configuration related traits are subject to a strong genetic control and that shared genes also contribute to this genetic structure. PMID:20698125

  9. Evolving nuclear many-body forces with the similarity renormalization group

    SciTech Connect

    Jurgenson, E. D.; Navratil, P.; Furnstahl, R. J.

    2011-03-15

    In recent years, the Similarity Renormalization Group has provided a powerful and versatile means to soften interactions for ab initio nuclear calculations. The substantial contribution of both induced and initial three-body forces to the nuclear interaction has required the consistent evolution of free-space Hamiltonians in the three-particle space. We present the most recent progress on this work, extending the calculational capability to the p-shell nuclei and showing that the hierarchy of induced many-body forces is consistent with previous estimates. Calculations over a range of the flow parameter for {sup 6}Li, including fully evolved NN + 3N interactions, show moderate contributions due to induced four-body forces and display the same improved convergence properties as in lighter nuclei. A systematic analysis provides further evidence that the hierarchy of many-body forces is preserved.

  10. Nuclear pairing from bare interaction: Two and three-body chiral forces

    SciTech Connect

    Finelli, Paolo

    2012-10-20

    In a recent paper the {sup 1}S{sub 0} pairing gap in isospin-symmetric nuclear matter and finite nuclei has been investigated starting from the chiral nucleon-nucleon potential at the N{sup 3}LO order in the two-body sector and the N{sup 2}LO order in the three-body sector. To include realistic nuclear forces in RHB (Relativistic Hartree Bolgoliubov) calculations we relied on a separable representation of the pairing interaction. In this paper we would like to show recent results concerning isotonic chains with N= 28,50,82.

  11. Low nuclear body formation and tax SUMOylation do not prevent NF-kappaB promoter activation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Tax protein encoded by Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a powerful activator of the NF-κB pathway, a property critical for HTLV-1-induced immortalization of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Tax permanently stimulates this pathway at a cytoplasmic level by activating the IκB kinase (IKK) complex and at a nuclear level by enhancing the binding of the NF-κB factor RelA to its cognate promoters and by forming nuclear bodies, believed to represent transcriptionally active structures. In previous studies, we reported that Tax ubiquitination and SUMOylation play a critical role in Tax localization and NF-κB activation. Indeed, analysis of lysine Tax mutants fused or not to ubiquitin or SUMO led us to propose a two-step model in which Tax ubiquitination first intervenes to activate IKK while Tax SUMOylation is subsequently required for promoter activation within Tax nuclear bodies. However, recent studies showing that ubiquitin or SUMO can modulate Tax activities in either the nucleus or the cytoplasm and that SUMOylated Tax can serve as substrate for ubiquitination suggested that Tax ubiquitination and SUMOylation may mediate redundant rather than successive functions. Results In this study, we analyzed the properties of a new Tax mutant that is properly ubiquitinated, but defective for both nuclear body formation and SUMOylation. We report that reducing Tax SUMOylation and nuclear body formation do not alter the ability of Tax to activate IKK, induce RelA nuclear translocation, and trigger gene expression from a NF-κB promoter. Importantly, potent NF-κB promoter activation by Tax despite low SUMOylation and nuclear body formation is also observed in T cells, including CD4+ primary T lymphocytes. Moreover, we show that Tax nuclear bodies are hardly observed in HTLV-1-infected T cells. Finally, we provide direct evidence that the degree of NF-κB activation by Tax correlates with the level of Tax ubiquitination, but not SUMOylation. Conclusions These data reveal that the formation of Tax nuclear bodies, previously associated to transcriptional activities in Tax-transfected cells, is dispensable for NF-κB promoter activation, notably in CD4+ T cells. They also provide the first evidence that Tax SUMOylation is not a key determinant for Tax-induced NF-κB activation. PMID:23009398

  12. Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter from realistic many-body approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, A.; Polls, A.; Ramos, A.; Muether, H.

    2008-10-15

    The existence of a liquid-gas phase transition for hot nuclear systems at subsaturation densities is a well-established prediction of finite-temperature nuclear many-body theory. In this paper, we discuss for the first time the properties of such a phase transition for homogeneous nuclear matter within the self-consistent Green's function approach. We find a substantial decrease of the critical temperature with respect to the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation. Even within the same approximation, the use of two different realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions gives rise to large differences in the properties of the critical point.

  13. Incomplete Chromatin Condensation in Enlarged Rat Myelocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trencsenyi, Gyorgy; Nagy, Gabor; Bako, Fruzsina; Kertai, Pal

    2012-01-01

    The distinguishable morphologic features of nuclei of acute myelogenous leukemia cells with enlarged size and finely distributed nuclear chromatin indicate incomplete chromosome condensation that can be related to elevated gene expression. To confirm this, interphase chromosome structures were studied in exponentially growing rat myelomonocytic leukemia 1 cells isolated at the University of Debrecen (My1/De cells). This cell line was established from primary rat leukemia chemically induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene treatment. The enlarged nuclei of My1/De cells allowed improved fluorescent visualization of chromosomal structures. Increased resolution revealed major interphase intermediates consisting of (1) veil-like chromatin, (2) chromatin ribbon, (3) chromatin funnel, (4) chromatin bodies, (5) elongated prechromosomes, (6) seal-ring, spiral shaped, and circular chromosomal subunits, (7) elongated, bent, u- and v-shaped prechromosomes, and (8) metaphase chromosomes. Results confirmed the existence of the chromatin funnel, the first visible interphase chromosome generated by the supercoiling of the chromatin ribbon. Other intermediates not seen previously included the spiral subunits that are involved in the chromonemic folding of metaphase chromosomes. The existence of spiral subunits favors the helical coil model of chromosome condensation. Incomplete chromatin condensation in leukemia cells throughout the cell cycle is an indication of euchromatization contributing to enhanced gene expression and is regarded as a leukemic factor. PMID:21942442

  14. Positronium formation as a three-body reaction. II. The second-order nuclear amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Shojaei, F.; Bolorizadeh, M. A.; Ghanbari-Adivi, E.; Brunger, M. J.

    2009-01-15

    We derive an exact analytic form for the second-order nuclear amplitudes, under the Faddeev three-body approach, which is applicable to the nonrelativistic high energy impact interaction where positronium is formed in the collision of a positron with an atom.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance for measurement of body composition in infants and children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurement of body composition in infants and children is currently challenging. Air Displacement Plethysmography (ADP) has not been validated between ages 6 mo and 6 y and the requirement for stillness of the Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) technique limits its use. Quantitative Nuclear Ma...

  16. Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Adams, Matthew; High, Alec S.; Johnson, Colin A.; Robinson, Philip A.

    2013-02-01

    HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies. -- Highlights: ► We produce and validate new antibody reagents for the ubiquitin-protein ligase HHARI. ► HHARI colocalizes with nuclear bodies including Cajal, PML and SC35 bodies. ► We establish new functions in cell proliferation regulation for HHARI. ► Increased HHARI expression associates with squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation.

  17. Detection of O-propargyl-puromycin with SUMO and ubiquitin by click chemistry at PML-nuclear bodies during abortive proteasome activities.

    PubMed

    Uozumi, Naoki; Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-05-27

    The amino-nucleoside antibiotic, puromycin, acts by covalently linking to elongating polypeptide chains on ribosomes to generate prematurely terminated immature polypeptides. The trafficking of puromycin-conjugated (puromycylated) immature polypeptides within cell has, however, remained elusive. In this study, using O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro), the distribution of puromycylated polypeptides was assessed in HeLa cells by click chemistry. Under standard culture conditions, OP-Puro signals were detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus with the highest concentrations in the nucleolus. Intriguingly, when proteasome activities were aborted using MG132, OP-Puro signals began to accumulate at promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in addition to the nucleolus. We also found promiscuous association of OP-Puro signals with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at PML-NBs, but not at the nucleolus, during abortive proteasome activities. This study reveals a previously unknown distribution of OP-Puro that argues for a nuclear function in regulating immature protein homeostasis. PMID:27125456

  18. Nuclear actin is partially associated with Cajal bodies in human cells in culture and relocates to the nuclear periphery after infection of cells by adenovirus 5

    SciTech Connect

    Gedge, L.J.E.; Morrison, E.E.; Blair, G.E.; Walker, J.H. . E-mail: J.H.Walker@leeds.ac.uk

    2005-02-15

    Cajal bodies are intra-nuclear structures enriched in proteins involved in transcription and mRNA processing. In this study, immunofluorescence microscopy experiments using a highly specific antibody to actin revealed nuclear actin spots that colocalized in part with p80 coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Actin remained associated with Cajal bodies in cells extracted to reveal the nuclear matrix. Adenovirus infection, which is known to disassemble Cajal bodies, resulted in loss of actin from these structures late in infection. In infected cells, nuclear actin was observed to relocate to structures at the periphery of the nucleus, inside the nuclear envelope. Based on these findings, it is suggested that actin may play an important role in the organization or function of the Cajal body.

  19. Nuclear extrusion precedes discharge of genomic DNA fibers during tunicamycin-induced neutrophil extracellular trap-osis (NETosis)-like cell death in cultured human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tomofumi; Saitoh, Noriko; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Yano, Ken-Ichi; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-05-01

    We previously reported that the nucleoside antibiotic tunicamycin (TN), a protein glycosylation inhibitor triggering unfolded protein response (UPR), induced neutrophil extracellular trap-osis (NETosis)-like cellular suicide and, thus, discharged genomic DNA fibers to extracellular spaces in a range of human myeloid cell lines under serum-free conditions. In this study, we further evaluated the effect of TN on human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells using time-lapse microscopy. Our assay revealed a previously unappreciated early event induced by TN-exposure, in which, at 30-60 min after TN addition, the cells extruded their nuclei into the extracellular space, followed by discharge of DNA fibers to form NET-like structures. Intriguingly, neither nuclear extrusion nor DNA discharge was observed when cells were exposed to inducers of UPR, such as brefeldin A, thapsigargin, or dithiothreitol. Our findings revealed novel nuclear dynamics during TN-induced NETosis-like cellular suicide in HL-60 cells and suggested that the toxicological effect of TN on nuclear extrusion and DNA discharge was not a simple UPR. PMID:26888435

  20. Low Dose Total Body Irradiation Combined With Recombinant CD19-Ligand × Soluble TRAIL Fusion Protein is Highly Effective Against Radiation-resistant B-precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mice☆

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M.; Myers, Dorothea E.; Ma, Hong; Rose, Rebecca; Qazi, Sanjive

    2015-01-01

    In high-risk remission B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL) patients, relapse rates have remained high post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) even after the use of very intensive total body irradiation (TBI)-based conditioning regimens, especially in patients with a high “minimal residual disease” (MRD) burden. New agents capable of killing radiation-resistant BPL cells and selectively augmenting their radiation sensitivity are therefore urgently needed. We report preclinical proof-of-principle that the potency of radiation therapy against BPL can be augmented by combining radiation with recombinant human CD19-Ligand × soluble TRAIL (“CD19L–sTRAIL”) fusion protein. CD19L–sTRAIL consistently killed radiation-resistant primary leukemia cells from BPL patients as well as BPL xenograft cells and their leukemia-initiating in vivo clonogenic fraction. Low dose total body irradiation (TBI) combined with CD19L–sTRAIL was highly effective against (1) xenografted CD19+ radiochemotherapy-resistant human BPL in NOD/SCID (NS) mice challenged with an otherwise invariably fatal dose of xenograft cells derived from relapsed BPL patients as well as (2) radiation-resistant advanced stage CD19+ murine BPL with lymphomatous features in CD22ΔE12xBCR-ABL double transgenic mice. We hypothesize that the incorporation of CD19L–sTRAIL into the pre-transplant TBI regimens of patients with very high-risk BPL will improve their survival outcome after HSCT. PMID:26097891

  1. Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Adams, Matthew; High, Alec S; Johnson, Colin A; Robinson, Philip A

    2013-02-01

    HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies. PMID:23059369

  2. Identification of a novel RNA giant nuclear body in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Gan, Xiaoxian; Gan, Yichao; Zheng, Weiwei; Kim, Byung-Wook; Xu, Xiaohua; Lu, Xiaoya; Dong, Qi; Zheng, Shu; Huang, Wendong; Xu, Rongzhen

    2016-01-26

    Constitutive synthesis of oncogenic mRNAs is essential for maintaining the uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. However, little is known about how these mRNAs are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Here, we report the identification of a RNA giant nuclear body (RNA-GNB) that is abundant in cancer cells but rare in normal cells. The RNA-GNB contains a RNA core surrounded by a protein shell. We identify 782 proteins from cancer-associated RNA-GNBs, 40% of which are involved in the nuclear mRNA trafficking. RNA-GNB is required for cell proliferation, and its abundance is positively associated with tumor burden and outcome of therapies. Our findings suggest that the RNA-GNB is a novel nuclear RNA trafficking organelle that may contribute to the nuclear mRNA exporting and proliferation of cancer cells. PMID:26678034

  3. Identification of a novel RNA giant nuclear body in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Xiaoxian; Gan, Yichao; Zheng, Weiwei; Kim, Byung-Wook; Xu, Xiaohua; Lu, Xiaoya; Dong, Qi; Zheng, Shu; Huang, Wendong; Xu, Rongzhen

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive synthesis of oncogenic mRNAs is essential for maintaining the uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. However, little is known about how these mRNAs are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Here, we report the identification of a RNA giant nuclear body (RNA-GNB) that is abundant in cancer cells but rare in normal cells. The RNA-GNB contains a RNA core surrounded by a protein shell. We identify 782 proteins from cancer-associated RNA-GNBs, 40% of which are involved in the nuclear mRNA trafficking. RNA-GNB is required for cell proliferation, and its abundance is positively associated with tumor burden and outcome of therapies. Our findings suggest that the RNA-GNB is a novel nuclear RNA trafficking organelle that may contribute to the nuclear mRNA exporting and proliferation of cancer cells. PMID:26678034

  4. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  5. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Applications of nuclear techniques for in vivo body composition studies at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.; Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Vaswani, A.N.; Wielopolski, L.

    1981-01-01

    A series of technical developments and their clinical applications in various nuclear technologies at Brookhaven National Laboratory is described. These include the development of a portable neutron activation facility for measuring cadmium in vivo in kidney and liver, a technique for the measurement of body iron utilizing nuclear resonant scattering of gamma rays, a non-invasive measure of the skeletal levels of lead by an x-ray fluorescence technique, and the development of a pulsed Van de Graaff generator as a source of pulsed neutrons for the measurement of lung silicon. (ACR)

  7. A cis element required for induction of the interleukin 2 enhancer by human T-cell leukemia virus type I binds a novel Tax-inducible nuclear protein.

    PubMed Central

    Li, M; Siekevitz, M

    1993-01-01

    The 40-kDa nuclear protein Tax encoded by human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) can transcriptionally activate the interleukin 2 (IL-2) enhancer even in the presence of the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A, which inhibits the activation of the IL-2 enhancer by T-cell mitogens. We have identified a Tax-responsive element (TxRE) from -164 to -145 bp in the IL-2 enhancer which is sufficient to confer Tax responsiveness. A 45-kDa nuclear protein (TxRE-binding factor [TxREF]), present in Tax-expressing Jurkat cell lines but not in Jurkat cells without Tax, specifically interacts with the 5' TxRE sequence from -164 to -154. Deletion or mutation of this 5' TxRE sequence removes the binding of TxREF in vitro and dramatically reduces Tax activity in vivo. In addition, this site is responsible for the cyclosporin A-resistant expression of the IL-2 enhancer in the presence of Tax. Although the TxREF binding site contains an NF-kappa B like motif, UV cross-linking studies as well as gel retardation analysis reveal that TxREF is distinct from NF-kappa B. These results demonstrate that TxREF is a novel Tax-inducible DNA-binding protein and that TxRE plays a crucial role in mediating Tax-induced IL-2 gene expression. Images PMID:8413248

  8. Role of ND10 nuclear bodies in the chromatin repression of HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Gu, Haidong; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a neurotropic virus that establishes lifelong latent infection in human ganglion sensory neurons. This unique life cycle necessitates an intimate relation between the host defenses and virus counteractions over the long course of infection. Two important aspects of host anti-viral defense, nuclear substructure restriction and epigenetic chromatin regulation, have been intensively studied in the recent years. Upon viral DNA entering the nucleus, components of discrete nuclear bodies termed nuclear domain 10 (ND10), converge at viral DNA and place restrictions on viral gene expression. Meanwhile the infected cell mobilizes its histones and histone-associated repressors to force the viral DNA into nucleosome-like structures and also represses viral transcription. Both anti-viral strategies are negated by various HSV countermeasures. One HSV gene transactivator, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), is a key player in antagonizing both the ND10 restriction and chromatin repression. On one hand, ICP0 uses its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity to target major ND10 components for proteasome-dependent degradation and thereafter disrupts the ND10 nuclear bodies. On the other hand, ICP0 participates in de-repressing the HSV chromatin by changing histone composition or modification and therefore activates viral transcription. Involvement of a single viral protein in two seemingly different pathways suggests that there is coordination in host anti-viral defense mechanisms and also cooperation in viral counteraction strategies. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the role of chromatin regulation and ND10 dynamics in both lytic and latent HSV infection. We focus on the new observations showing that ND10 nuclear bodies play a critical role in cellular chromatin regulation. We intend to find the connections between the two major anti-viral defense pathways, chromatin remodeling and ND10 structure, in order to achieve a better understanding of how host orchestrates a concerted defense and how HSV adapts with and overcomes the host immunity. PMID:27048561

  9. Nuclear-matter equation of state with consistent two- and three-body perturbative chiral interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coraggio, L.; Holt, J. W.; Itaco, N.; Machleidt, R.; Marcucci, L. E.; Sammarruca, F.

    2014-04-01

    We compute the energy per particle of infinite symmetric nuclear matter from chiral NLO3 (next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order) two-body potentials plus NLO2 three-body forces. The low-energy constants of the chiral three-nucleon force that cannot be constrained by two-body observables are fitted to reproduce the triton binding energy and the H3-He3 Gamow-Teller transition matrix element. In this way, the saturation properties of nuclear matter are reproduced in a parameter-free approach. The equation of state is computed up to third order in many-body perturbation theory, with special emphasis on the role of the third-order particle-hole diagram. The dependence of these results on the cutoff scale and regulator function is studied. We find that the inclusion of three-nucleon forces consistent with the applied two-nucleon interaction leads to a reduced dependence on the choice of the regulator only for lower values of the cutoff.

  10. Molecular basis for the diagnosis and treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Sarah Cristina; Rego, Eduardo Magalhes

    2012-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia is characterized by gene rearrangements that always involve the retinoic acid receptor alpha on chromosome 15. In the majority of patients t(15;17) is detected, which generates the promyelocytic leukemia gene/retinoic acid receptor alpha rearrangement. This rearrangement interacts with several proteins, including the native promyelocytic leukemia gene, thus causing its delocalization from the nuclear bodies, impairing its function. The immunofluorescence staining technique using the anti-PML antibody may be used to provide a rapid diagnosis and to immediately start therapy using all-trans retinoic acid. The experience of the International Consortium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia has demonstrated that early mortality was significantly reduced by adopting the immunofluorescence technique. All-trans retinoic acid combined with chemotherapy is the standard therapy; this promotes complete remission rates greater than 90% and cure rates of nearly 80%. However, early mortality is still an important limitation and hematologists must be aware of the importance of treating newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia as a medical emergency. PMID:23049403

  11. Liposomal Nanoparticles of a Spleen Tyrosine Kinase P-Site Inhibitor Amplify the Potency of Low Dose Total Body Irradiation Against Aggressive B-Precursor Leukemia and Yield Superior Survival Outcomes in Mice☆

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M.; Myers, Dorothea E.; Cheng, Jianjun; Qazi, Sanjive

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to improve the efficacy of radiation therapy against radiation-resistant leukemia. We report that the potency of low dose radiation therapy against B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL) can be markedly enhanced by combining radiation with a liposomal nanoparticle (LNP) formulation of the SYK-P-site inhibitor C61 (“C61-LNP”). C61-LNP plus low dose total body irradiation (TBI) was substantially more effective than TBI alone or C61-LNP alone in improving the event-free survival outcome NOD/SCID mice challenged with an otherwise invariably fatal dose of human ALL xenograft cells derived from relapsed BPL patients. C61-LNP plus low dose TBI also yielded progression-free survival, tumor-free survival and overall survival outcomes in CD22ΔE12 × BCR–ABL double transgenic mice with advanced stage, radiation-resistant BPL with lymphomatous features that were significantly superior to those of mice treated with TBI alone or C61-LNP alone. PMID:26285772

  12. Liposomal Nanoparticles of a Spleen Tyrosine Kinase P-Site Inhibitor Amplify the Potency of Low Dose Total Body Irradiation Against Aggressive B-Precursor Leukemia and Yield Superior Survival Outcomes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Uckun, Fatih M; Myers, Dorothea E; Cheng, Jianjun; Qazi, Sanjive

    2015-06-01

    This study was designed to improve the efficacy of radiation therapy against radiation-resistant leukemia. We report that the potency of low dose radiation therapy against B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL) can be markedly enhanced by combining radiation with a liposomal nanoparticle (LNP) formulation of the SYK-P-site inhibitor C61 ("C61-LNP"). C61-LNP plus low dose total body irradiation (TBI) was substantially more effective than TBI alone or C61-LNP alone in improving the event-free survival outcome NOD/SCID mice challenged with an otherwise invariably fatal dose of human ALL xenograft cells derived from relapsed BPL patients. C61-LNP plus low dose TBI also yielded progression-free survival, tumor-free survival and overall survival outcomes in CD22ΔE12 × BCR-ABL double transgenic mice with advanced stage, radiation-resistant BPL with lymphomatous features that were significantly superior to those of mice treated with TBI alone or C61-LNP alone. PMID:26285772

  13. Critical Nuclear Charge of the Quantum Mechanical Three-Body Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busuttil, Michael; Moini, Amirreza; Drake, Gordon W. F.

    2014-05-01

    The critical nuclear charge (Zc) for a three-body quantum mechanical system consisting of positive and negative charges is the minimum nuclear charge that can keep the system in a bound state. Here we present a study of the critical nuclear charge for two-electron (heliumlike) systems with infinite nuclear mass, and also a range of reduced mass ratio (μ / m) up to 0.5. The results help to resolve a discrepancy in the literature for the infinite mass case, and they are the first to study the dependence on reduced mass ratio. It was found that Zc has a local maximum with μ / m = 0 . 352 5 . The critical charge for the infinite mass case is found to be Zc = 0 . 911 028 224 076 8 (1 0) . This value is more accurate than any previous value in the literature, and agrees with the upper bound Zc = 0 . 911 03 reported by Baker et al.. The critical nuclear charge outside this range [0.5 - 1.0] still needs to be investigated in future works. Research Supported by NSERC and SHARCNET.

  14. Role of fungal dynein in hyphal growth, microtubule organization, spindle pole body motility and nuclear migration.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Turgeon, B G; Yoder, O C; Aist, J R

    1998-06-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a microtubule-associated motor protein with several putative subcellular functions. Sequencing of the gene (DHC1) for cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain of the filamentous ascomycete, Nectria haematococca, revealed a 4,349-codon open reading frame (interrupted by two introns) with four highly conserved P-loop motifs, typical of cytoplasmic dynein heavy chains. The predicted amino acid sequence is 78.0% identical to the cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain of Neurospora crassa, 70.2% identical to that of Aspergillus nidulans and 24.8% identical to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The genomic copy of DHC1 in N. haematococca wild-type strain T213 was disrupted by inserting a selectable marker into the central motor domain. Mutants grew at 33% of the wild-type rate, forming dense compact colonies composed of spiral and highly branched hyphae. Major cytological phenotypes included (1) absence of aster-like arrays of cytoplasmic microtubules focused at the spindle pole bodies of post-mitotic and interphase nuclei, (2) limited post-mitotic nuclear migration, (3) lack of spindle pole body motility at interphase, (4) failure of spindle pole bodies to anchor interphase nuclei, (5) nonuniform distribution of interphase nuclei and (6) small or ephemeral Spitzenkörper at the apices of hyphal tip cells. Microtubule distribution in the apical region of tip cells of the mutant was essentially normal. The nonuniform distribution of nuclei in hyphae resulted primarily from a lack of both post-mitotic nuclear migration and anchoring of interphase nuclei by the spindle pole bodies. The results support the hypothesis that DHC1 is required for the motility and functions of spindle pole bodies, normal secretory vesicle transport to the hyphal apex and normal hyphal tip cell morphogenesis. PMID:9580563

  15. Leukemia revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E P

    1980-01-01

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately.

  16. Chromatin remodeling complexes in the assembly of long noncoding RNA-dependent nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tetsuya; Hirose, Tetsuro

    2015-11-01

    Paraspeckles are subnuclear structures that assemble on nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 (NEAT1) long noncoding (lnc)RNA. Paraspeckle formation requires appropriate NEAT1 biogenesis and subsequent assembly with multiple prion-like domain (PLD) containing RNA-binding proteins. We found that SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes function as paraspeckle components that interact with paraspeckle proteins (PSPs) and NEAT1. SWI/SNF complexes play an essential role in paraspeckle formation that does not require their ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity. Instead, SWI/SNF complexes facilitate organization of the PSP interaction network required for intact paraspeckle assembly. SWI/SNF complexes may collectively bind multiple PSPs to recruit them onto NEAT1. SWI/SNF complexes are also required for Sat III (Satellite III) lncRNA-dependent formation of nuclear stress bodies under heat shock conditions. Organization of the lncRNA-dependent omega speckle in Drosophila also depends on the chromatin remodeling complex. These findings raise the possibility that a common mechanism controls the formation of lncRNA-dependent nuclear body architecture. PMID:26709446

  17. The leukemias: Epidemiologic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Linet, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Particularly geared to physicians and cancer researchers, this study of the epidemiology and etiology of leukemia analyzes the four major leukemia subtypes in terms of genetic and familial determinant factors and examines the incidence, distribution and frequency of reported leukemia clusters. Linet discusses the connection between other types of malignancies, their treatments, and the subsequent development of leukemia and evaluates the impact on leukemia onset of such environmental factors as radiation therapy, drugs, and occupational hazards.

  18. Distinct roles of enhancer nuclear factor 1 (NF1) sites in plasmacytoma and osteopetrosis induction by Akv1-99 murine leukemia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Sorensen, Annette Balle; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Kunder, Sandra; Schmidt, Joerg; Pedersen, Finn Skou . E-mail: fsp@mb.au.dk

    2005-04-10

    Murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) can be lymphomagenic and bone pathogenic. In this work, the possible roles of two distinct proviral enhancer nuclear factor 1 (NF1) binding sites in osteopetrosis and tumor induction by B-lymphomagenic Akv1-99 MLV were investigated. Akv1-99 and mutants either with NF1 site 1, NF1 site 2 or both sites disrupted induced tumors (plasma cell proliferations by histopathology) with remarkably similar incidence and mean latency in inbred NMRI mice. Clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangement detection, by Southern analysis, confirmed approximately half of the tumors induced by each virus to be plasmacytomas while the remaining lacked detectable clonally rearranged Ig genes and were considered polyclonal; a demonstration that enhancer NF1 sites are dispensable for plasmacytoma induction by Akv1-99. In contrast, X-ray analysis revealed significant differences in osteopetrosis induction by the four viruses strongly indicating that NF1 site 2 is critical for viral bone pathogenicity, whereas NF1 site 1 is neutral or moderately inhibitory. In conclusion, enhancer NF1 sites are major determinants of osteopetrosis induction by Akv1-99 without significant influence on viral oncogenicity.

  19. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. An ARGONAUTE4-containing nuclear processing center colocalized with Cajal bodies in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Li, Carey Fei; Pontes, Olga; El-Shami, Mahmoud; Henderson, Ian R; Bernatavichute, Yana V; Chan, Simon W-L; Lagrange, Thierry; Pikaard, Craig S; Jacobsen, Steven E

    2006-07-14

    ARGONAUTE4 (AGO4) and RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV) are required for DNA methylation guided by 24 nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we show that AGO4 localizes to nucleolus-associated bodies along with the Pol IV subunit NRPD1b; the small nuclear RNA (snRNA) binding protein SmD3; and two markers of Cajal bodies, trimethylguanosine-capped snRNAs and the U2 snRNA binding protein U2B''. AGO4 interacts with the C-terminal domain of NRPD1b, and AGO4 protein stability depends on upstream factors that synthesize siRNAs. AGO4 is also found, along with the DNA methyltransferase DRM2, throughout the nucleus at presumed DNA methylation target sites. Cajal bodies are conserved sites for the maturation of ribonucleoprotein complexes. Our results suggest a function for Cajal bodies as a center for the assembly of an AGO4/NRPD1b/siRNA complex, facilitating its function in RNA-directed gene silencing at target loci. PMID:16839879

  1. Conference discussion of the nuclear few-body problem: questions and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Franz Gross; Dieter Drechsel; James L. Friar; Vijay R. Pandharipande; Ingo Sick

    2001-06-01

    During the final session of the conference participants discussed important questions and issues from the current study of the nuclear few body problem. The discussion was preceded by five very short ''mini-summaries'' (limited to about 5 minutes each) presented by each member of the panel. These ''mini-summaries'' are presented in Sec. 1 below, and the questions and discussion is summarized in Sec. 2. The ''mini-summaries'' are presented in Sec. 1 in the order they were given to the conference.

  2. Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 bind to human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 RNA regulatory elements.

    PubMed Central

    Black, A C; Luo, J; Watanabe, C; Chun, S; Bakker, A; Fraser, J K; Morgan, J P; Rosenblatt, J D

    1995-01-01

    Efficient expression of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) and human immunodeficiency virus structural proteins requires Rx and Rev proteins, respectively. Decreased expression of Gag and Env appears to be due, in part, to intragenic RNA sequences, termed cis-acting repressive sequences (CRS), and may be mediated by binding of specific cellular factors. We demonstrated previously that two cellular proteins, p60CRS and p40CRS, interact with HTLV type 2.5' long terminal repeat CRS RNA and that the interaction of both proteins with CRS RNA correlates with function (A. C. Black, C. T. Ruland, J. Luo, A. Bakker, J. K. Fraser, and J. D. Rosenblatt, Virology 200:29-41, 1994). By radioimmunoprecipitation of HeLa nuclear proteins UV cross-linked to CRS RNAs with murine monoclonal antibodies, we now show that p40CRS is heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 and p60CRS is polypyrimidine tract-binding protein or hnRNP I. These immunoprecipitation results were confirmed by an immunobinding assay with hnRNP I and hnRNP AI antibodies and by cross-competition electrophoretic mobility shift experiments. In addition, we mapped a putative hnRNP A1 binding site in U5 RNA and demonstrated that p40CRS (hnRNP A1) binding to that site correlates with CRS function. Since both hnRNP I and hnRNP A1 have been shown to influence splicing and potentially other steps in RNA processing, the binding of both hnRNP I and hnRNP A1 to HTLV RNA regulatory elements may alter retrovirus RNA processing and may be involved in regulation by Rex. PMID:7474099

  3. Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Leukemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Leukemia Print A A A ... Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment en español Leucemia About Leukemia The term leukemia refers to cancers of the ...

  4. Radiogenic leukemia revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Moloney, W.C.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation-induced leukemia is considered to be similar to the de novo disease. However, following an analysis of clinical and hematological findings in leukemia occurring in irradiated cervical cancer patients, adult Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, and spondylitics treated with x-ray, striking differences were noted. Acute leukemias in cervical cancer patients and Japanese survivors were similar in type to acute de novo leukemias in adults. Cell types among spondylitics were very dissimilar; rare forms, eg, acute erythromyelocytic leukemia (AEL) and acute megakaryocytic leukemia, were increased. Pancytopenia occurred in 25 of 35 cases and erythromyelodysplastic disorders were noted in seven of 35 acute cases. The leukemias and myelodysplastic disorders closely resembled those occurring in patients treated with alkylating agents. This similarity suggests a common pathogenesis involving marrow stem cell injury and extra-medullary mediators of hematopoiesis. Investigation of early acute leukemias and myelodysplastic disorders with newer techniques may provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of leukemia in humans.

  5. Nuclear three-body problem in the complex energy plane: Complex-scaling Slater method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruppa, A. T.; Papadimitriou, G.; Nazarewicz, W.; Michel, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The physics of open quantum systems is an interdisciplinary area of research. The nuclear "openness" manifests itself through the presence of the many-body continuum representing various decay, scattering, and reaction channels. As the radioactive nuclear beam experimentation extends the known nuclear landscape toward the particle drip lines, the coupling to the continuum space becomes exceedingly more important. Of particular interest are weakly bound and unbound nuclear states appearing around particle thresholds. Theories of such nuclei must take into account their open quantum nature. Purpose: To describe open quantum systems, we introduce a complex-scaling (CS) approach in the Slater basis. We benchmark it with the complex-energy Gamow shell model (GSM) by studying energies and wave functions of the bound and unbound states of the two-neutron halo nucleus 6He viewed as an α +n+n cluster system. Methods: Both CS and GSM approaches are applied to a translationally invariant Hamiltonian with the two-body interaction approximated by the finite-range central Minnesota force. In the CS approach, we use the Slater basis, which exhibits the correct asymptotic behavior at large distances. To extract particle densities from the back-rotated CS solutions, we apply the Tikhonov regularization procedure, which minimizes the ultraviolet numerical noise. Results: We show that the CS-Slater method is both accurate and efficient. Its equivalence to the GSM approach has been demonstrated numerically for both energies and wave functions of 6He. One important technical aspect of our calculation was to fully retrieve the correct asymptotic behavior of a resonance state from the complex-scaled (square-integrable) wave function. While standard applications of the inverse complex transformation to the complex-rotated solution provide unstable results, the stabilization method fully reproduces the GSM benchmark. We also propose a method to determine the smoothing parameter of the Tikhonov regularization. Conclusions: The combined suite of CS-Slater and GSM techniques has many attractive features when applied to nuclear problems involving weakly bound and unbound states. While both methods can describe energies, total widths, and wave functions of nuclear states, the CS-Slater method—if it can be applied—can provide additional information about partial energy widths associated with individual thresholds.

  6. Nuclear Immunolocalization of Hexamerins in the Fat Body of Metamorphosing Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Martins, Juliana Ramos; Bitondi, Márcia Maria Gentile

    2012-01-01

    Hexamerins are storage proteins with primordial functions in insect metamorphosis. They are actively secreted by the larval fat body and stored in the hemolymph. During metamorphosis, they return to the fat body to be processed. For decades, these proteins were thought to exclusively function as an amino acid source for tissue reconstruction during the non-feeding pupal and pharate adult stages and, in some species, for egg production. Recently, new findings have linked the hexamerins to caste polyphenism and gonad development in social insects. To explore the roles of hexamerins during the honey bee metamorphosis, we used specific antibodies in expression analysis by western blot, in situ immunolocalization by confocal laser-scanning microscopy and in vivo injections to lower their endogenous levels. Our expression analysis highlighted the changing expression patterns in the fat body and hemolymph during development, which is consistent with the temporal dynamics of hexamerin secretion, storage and depletion. Confocal microscopy showed hexamerin expression in the cytoplasm of both types of fat body cells, trophocytes and oenocytes. Notably, hexamerin foci were also found in the nuclei of these cells, thus confirming our western blot analysis of fat body nuclear-enriched fractions. We also observed that the decrease in soluble hexamerins in antibody-treated pharate adults led to a precocious adult ecdysis, perhaps in response to the lack (or decrease) in hexamerin-derived amino acids. Taken together, these findings indicate that hexamerins have other functions in addition to their well-established role as amino acid sources for development. PMID:26466725

  7. Isolation and analysis of nuclear bodies from estrogen-stimulated chick liver

    SciTech Connect

    Brasch, K.; Harrington, S.; Blake, H. )

    1989-06-01

    The target cells of most steroid hormones contain prominent structures termed nuclear bodies (NB). Estrogen (ES) responsive tissues have very distinctive NB, whose development has been associated with both the level of ES receptors and their retention times in nuclei. It has been suggested that these NB may be large-scale ES binding centers at transcriptionally hyperstimulated sites. The authors examined the formation of NB in ES-stimulation rooster liver, after primary induction of vitellogenesis and during subsequent decay of this response. Distinct NB appear 6 h postinduction, initially as compact spheroids with ring-like profiles and later on as more complex morphotypes. This transient pattern is paralleled closely by the ({sup 3}H)ES binding capacity of nuclei in vitro and the calculated number of specific hormone receptors present. There is no direct numerical correspondence, however, between the NB and the ES receptors, either on a one-to-one basis or as some simple ration. Nuclear bodies were isolated following lysis of nuclei by sonication and separation of subfractions on discontinuous sucrose gradients. The resultant NB-enriched fraction consisted primarily of protein, with traces of DNA and RNA. Analysis of proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a complex pattern of polypeptides, some apparently unique and probably NB-derived.

  8. Dynamic localization of tripartite motif-containing 22 in nuclear and nucleolar bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, Gayathri; Sun, Yang; Tan, Si Kee; Lin, Valerie C.L.

    2009-05-01

    Tripartite motif-containing 22 (TRIM22) exhibits antiviral and growth inhibitory properties, but there has been no study on the localization and dynamics of the endogenous TRIM22 protein. We report here that TRIM22 is dramatically induced by progesterone in MDA-MB-231-derived ABC28 cells and T47D cells. This induction was associated with an increase in TRIM22 nuclear bodies (NB), and an even more prominent increase in nucleolar TRIM22 bodies. Distinct endogenous TRIM22 NB were also demonstrated in several other cell lines including MCF7 and HeLa cells. These TRIM22 NB resemble Cajal bodies, co-localized with these structures and co-immunoprecipitated with p80-coilin. However, IFN{gamma}-induced TRIM22 in HeLa and MCF7 cells did not form NB, implying the forms and distribution of TRIM22 are regulated by specific cellular signals. This notion is also supported by the observation that TRIM22 NB undergoes dynamic cell-cycle dependent changes in distribution such that TRIM22 NB started to form in early G0/G1 but became dispersed in the S-phase. In light of its potential antiviral and antitumor properties, the findings here provide an interesting gateway to study the relationship between the different forms and functions of TRIM22.

  9. Influence of nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Inaniwa, T. Kanematsu, N.; Tsuji, H.; Kamada, T.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning, the planar integrated dose (PID) measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling using the stopping power ratio. Since body tissues are chemically different from water, this dose calculation can be subject to errors, particularly due to differences in inelastic nuclear interactions. In recent studies, the authors proposed and validated a PID correction method for these errors. In the present study, the authors used this correction method to assess the influence of these nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in various clinical cases. Methods: Using 10–20 cases each of prostate, head and neck (HN), bone and soft tissue (BS), lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine neoplasms, the authors first used treatment plans for carbon-ion radiotherapy without nuclear interaction correction to derive uncorrected dose distributions. The authors then compared these distributions with recalculated distributions using the nuclear interaction correction (corrected dose distributions). Results: Median (25%/75% quartiles) differences between the target mean uncorrected doses and corrected doses were 0.2% (0.1%/0.2%), 0.0% (0.0%/0.0%), −0.3% (−0.4%/−0.2%), −0.1% (−0.2%/−0.1%), −0.1% (−0.2%/0.0%), −0.4% (−0.5%/−0.1%), and −0.3% (−0.4%/0.0%) for the prostate, HN, BS, lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine cases, respectively. The largest difference of −1.6% in target mean and −2.5% at maximum were observed in a uterine case. Conclusions: For most clinical cases, dose calculation errors due to the water nonequivalence of the tissues in nuclear interactions would be marginal compared to intrinsic uncertainties in treatment planning, patient setup, beam delivery, and clinical response. In some extreme cases, however, these errors can be substantial. Accordingly, this correction method should be routinely applied to treatment planning in clinical practice.

  10. Increased risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease, obstructive bronchiolitis, and alopecia with busulfan versus total body irradiation: long-term results of a randomized trial in allogeneic marrow recipients with leukemia. Nordic Bone Marrow Transplantation Group.

    PubMed

    Ringdén, O; Remberger, M; Ruutu, T; Nikoskelainen, J; Volin, L; Vindeløv, L; Parkkali, T; Lenhoff, S; Sallerfors, B; Mellander, L; Ljungman, P; Jacobsen, N

    1999-04-01

    Leukemic patients receiving marrow from HLA-identical sibling donors were randomized to treatment with either busulfan 16 mg/kg (n = 88) or total body irradiation ([TBI] n = 79) in addition to cyclophosphamide 120 mg/kg. The patients were observed for a period of 5 to 9 years. Busulfan-treated patients had an increased risk of veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver (12% v 1%, P =.01) and hemorrhagic cystitis (32% v 10%, P =.003). Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was similar in the two groups, but the 7-year cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 59% in the busulfan-treated group versus 47% in the TBI group (P =.05). Death from GVHD was more common in the busulfan group (22% v 3%, P <.001). Obstructive bronchiolitis occurred in 26% of the busulfan patients but in only 5% of the TBI patients (P <.01). Complete alopecia developed in 8 busulfan patients and partial alopecia in 17, versus five with partial alopecia in the TBI group (P <.001). Cataracts occurred in 5 busulfan-treated patients and 16 TBI patients (P =.02). The incidence of relapse after 7 years was 29% in both groups. Seven-year transplant-related mortality (TRM) in patients with early disease was 21% in the busulfan group and 12% in the TBI group. In patients with more advanced disease, the corresponding figures were 64% and 22%, respectively (P =.004). Leukemia-free survival (LFS) in patients with early disease was 68% in busulfan-treated patients and 66% in TBI patients. However, 7-year LFS in patients with more advanced disease was 17% in the busulfan group versus 49% in the TBI group (P <.01). In patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in first chronic phase, 7-year LFS was 72% and 83% in the two groups, respectively. PMID:10090927

  11. Nuclear Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein is localized to Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Dury, Alain Y; El Fatimy, Rachid; Tremblay, Sandra; Rose, Timothy M; Côté, Jocelyn; De Koninck, Paul; Khandjian, Edouard W

    2013-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by loss of function of a single gene encoding the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). This RNA-binding protein, widely expressed in mammalian tissues, is particularly abundant in neurons and is a component of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes present within the translational apparatus. The absence of FMRP in neurons is believed to cause translation dysregulation and defects in mRNA transport essential for local protein synthesis and for synaptic development and maturation. A prevalent model posits that FMRP is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that transports its mRNA targets from the nucleus to the translation machinery. However, it is not known which of the multiple FMRP isoforms, resulting from the numerous alternatively spliced FMR1 transcripts variants, would be involved in such a process. Using a new generation of anti-FMRP antibodies and recombinant expression, we show here that the most commonly expressed human FMRP isoforms (ISO1 and 7) do not localize to the nucleus. Instead, specific FMRP isoforms 6 and 12 (ISO6 and 12), containing a novel C-terminal domain, were the only isoforms that localized to the nuclei in cultured human cells. These isoforms localized to specific p80-coilin and SMN positive structures that were identified as Cajal bodies. The Cajal body localization signal was confined to a 17 amino acid stretch in the C-terminus of human ISO6 and is lacking in a mouse Iso6 variant. As FMRP is an RNA-binding protein, its presence in Cajal bodies suggests additional functions in nuclear post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. Supporting this hypothesis, a missense mutation (I304N), known to alter the KH2-mediated RNA binding properties of FMRP, abolishes the localization of human FMRP ISO6 to Cajal bodies. These findings open unexplored avenues in search for new insights into the pathophysiology of Fragile X Syndrome. PMID:24204304

  12. Nuclear Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Is localized to Cajal Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Sandra; Rose, Timothy M.; Côté, Jocelyn; De Koninck, Paul; Khandjian, Edouard W.

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by loss of function of a single gene encoding the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). This RNA-binding protein, widely expressed in mammalian tissues, is particularly abundant in neurons and is a component of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes present within the translational apparatus. The absence of FMRP in neurons is believed to cause translation dysregulation and defects in mRNA transport essential for local protein synthesis and for synaptic development and maturation. A prevalent model posits that FMRP is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that transports its mRNA targets from the nucleus to the translation machinery. However, it is not known which of the multiple FMRP isoforms, resulting from the numerous alternatively spliced FMR1 transcripts variants, would be involved in such a process. Using a new generation of anti-FMRP antibodies and recombinant expression, we show here that the most commonly expressed human FMRP isoforms (ISO1 and 7) do not localize to the nucleus. Instead, specific FMRP isoforms 6 and 12 (ISO6 and 12), containing a novel C-terminal domain, were the only isoforms that localized to the nuclei in cultured human cells. These isoforms localized to specific p80-coilin and SMN positive structures that were identified as Cajal bodies. The Cajal body localization signal was confined to a 17 amino acid stretch in the C-terminus of human ISO6 and is lacking in a mouse Iso6 variant. As FMRP is an RNA-binding protein, its presence in Cajal bodies suggests additional functions in nuclear post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. Supporting this hypothesis, a missense mutation (I304N), known to alter the KH2-mediated RNA binding properties of FMRP, abolishes the localization of human FMRP ISO6 to Cajal bodies. These findings open unexplored avenues in search for new insights into the pathophysiology of Fragile X Syndrome. PMID:24204304

  13. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  14. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Message from Louis J. DeGennaro, PhD President and CEO of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society The Leukemia & Lymphoma ... While it is clear that FCR is the best treatment for CLL patients with del(11q), the ...

  15. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)

    MedlinePlus

    CLL; Leukemia - chronic lymphocytic (CLL) ... Byrd JC, Flynn JM. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  16. B Cell Linker Protein (BLNK) Is a Selective Target of Repression by PAX5-PML Protein in the Differentiation Block That Leads to the Development of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Imoto, Naoto; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Kurahashi, Shingo; Morishita, Takanobu; Kojima, Yuki; Yasuda, Takahiko; Sugimoto, Keiki; Tsuzuki, Shinobu; Naoe, Tomoki; Kiyoi, Hitoshi

    2016-02-26

    PAX5 is a transcription factor that is required for the development and maintenance of B cells. Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) is a tumor suppressor and proapoptotic factor. The fusion gene PAX5-PML has been identified in acute lymphoblastic leukemia with chromosomal translocation t(9;15)(p13;q24). We have reported previously that PAX5-PML dominant-negatively inhibited PAX5 transcriptional activity and impaired PML function by disrupting PML nuclear bodies (NBs). Here we demonstrated the leukemogenicity of PAX5-PML by introducing it into normal mouse pro-B cells. Arrest of differentiation was observed in PAX5-PML-introduced pro-B cells, resulting in the development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia after a long latency in mice. Among the transactivation targets of PAX5, B cell linker protein (BLNK) was repressed selectively in leukemia cells, and enforced BLNK expression abrogated the differentiation block and survival induced by PAX5-PML, indicating the importance of BLNK repression for the formation of preleukemic state. We also showed that PML NBs were intact in leukemia cells and attributed this to the low expression of PAX5-PML, indicating that the disruption of PML NBs was not required for the PAX5-PML-induced onset of leukemia. These results provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of leukemia by PAX5 mutations. PMID:26703467

  17. Tribbles in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kai Ling; Rishi, Loveena; Keeshan, Karen

    2013-05-23

    There is growing research interest in the mammalian Tribbles (Trib) family of serine/threonine pseudokinases and their oncogenic association with acute leukemias. This review is to understand the role of Trib genes in hematopoietic malignancies and their potential as targets for novel therapeutic strategies in acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We discuss the role of Tribs as central signaling mediators in different subtypes of acute leukemia and propose that inhibition of dysregulated Trib signaling may be therapeutically beneficial. PMID:23550039

  18. Telomeric DNA Mediates De Novo PML Body Formation

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Anneke K.; Schimmel, Joost; Wiegant, Joop C.A.G.; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.; Tanke, Hans J.

    2009-01-01

    The cell nucleus harbors a variety of different bodies that vary in number, composition, and size. Although these bodies coordinate important nuclear processes, little is known about how they are formed. Among the most intensively studied bodies in recent years is the PML body. These bodies have been implicated in gene regulation and other cellular processes and are disrupted in cells from patients suffering from acute promyelocytic leukemia. Using live cell imaging microscopy and immunofluorescence, we show in several cell types that PML bodies are formed at telomeric DNA during interphase. Recent studies revealed that both SUMO modification sites and SUMO interaction motifs in the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein are required for PML body formation. We show that SMC5, a component of the SUMO ligase MMS21-containing SMC5/6 complex, localizes temporarily at telomeric DNA during PML body formation, suggesting a possible role for SUMO in the formation of PML bodies at telomeric DNA. Our data identify a novel role of telomeric DNA during PML body formation. PMID:19793919

  19. The spindle pole bodies facilitate nuclear envelope division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liling; Schwartz, Cindi; Magidson, Valentin; Khodjakov, Alexey; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2007-07-01

    Many organisms divide chromosomes within the confines of the nuclear envelope (NE) in a process known as closed mitosis. Thus, they must ensure coordination between segregation of the genetic material and division of the NE itself. Although many years of work have led to a reasonably clear understanding of mitotic spindle function in chromosome segregation, the NE division mechanism remains obscure. Here, we show that fission yeast cells overexpressing the transforming acid coiled coil (TACC)-related protein, Mia1p/Alp7p, failed to separate the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) at the onset of mitosis, but could assemble acentrosomal bipolar and antiparallel spindle structures. Most of these cells arrested in anaphase with fully extended spindles and nonsegregated chromosomes. Spindle poles that lacked the SPBs did not lead the division of the NE during spindle elongation, but deformed it, trapping the chromosomes within. When the SPBs were severed by laser microsurgery in wild-type cells, we observed analogous deformations of the NE by elongating spindle remnants, resulting in NE division failure. Analysis of dis1Delta cells that elongate spindles despite unattached kinetochores indicated that the SPBs were required for maintaining nuclear shape at anaphase onset. Strikingly, when the NE was disassembled by utilizing a temperature-sensitive allele of the Ran GEF, Pim1p, the abnormal spindles induced by Mia1p overexpression were capable of segregating sister chromatids to daughter cells, suggesting that the failure to divide the NE prevents chromosome partitioning. Our results imply that the SPBs preclude deformation of the NE during spindle elongation and thus serve as specialized structures enabling nuclear division during closed mitosis in fission yeast. PMID:17579515

  20. Subthreshold pion production: The effects of three body collisions the Fermi momentum, and the nuclear equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Molitoris, J.; Bonasera, A.; Adorno, A.

    1993-04-01

    The authors study pion production at subthreshold energies in nucleus-collisions using the extended Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov (BNV) model. The extreme sensitivity of the pion yield to the initial momentum space Fermi distribution is demonstrated. The effect of the three body collision term is also shown to be substantial. However, the nuclear equation of state has no significant effect at these energies. Details and implications of the nuclear kinetic equation simulation are discussed.

  1. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with I-131-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M.; Gooley, T. A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, B. M.; Matthews, D. C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, P. J.; Storb, R.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2009-12-24

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

  2. Leukemia risk following radiotherapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.E.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Stovall, M.; Flannery, J.T.; Moloney, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate further the relationship between high-dose radiotherapy and leukemia incidence, a nested case-control study was conducted in a cohort of 22,753 women who were 18-month survivors of invasive breast cancer diagnosed from 1935 to 1972. Women treated for breast cancer after 1973 were excluded to minimize the possible confounding influence of treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. The cases had histologically confirmed leukemia reported to the Connecticut Tumor Registry (CTR) between 1935 and 1984. A total of 48 cases of leukemia following breast cancer were included in the study. Two controls were individually matched to each leukemia case on the basis of age, calendar year when diagnosed with breast cancer, and survival time. Leukemia diagnoses were verified by one hematologist. Radiation dose to active bone marrow was estimated by medical physicists on the basis of the original radiotherapy records of study subjects. Local radiation doses to each of the 16 bone marrow components for each patient were reconstructed; the dose averaged over the entire body was 530 rad (5.3 Gy). Based on this dosage and assuming a linear relationship between dose and affect, a relative risk (RR) in excess of 10 would have been expected. However, there was little evidence that radiotherapy increased the overall risk of leukemia (RR = 1.16; 90% confidence interval (CI), 0.6 to 2.1). The risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, one of the few malignancies without evidence for an association with ionizing radiation, was not significantly increased (RR = 1.8; n = 10); nor was the risk for all other forms of leukemia (RR = 1.0; n = 38). There was no indication that risk varied over categories of radiation dose.

  3. 40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1149 Section 180... Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all...

  4. 40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1149 Section 180... Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1149 Section 180... Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1149 Section 180.1149 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR...

  7. PREFACE: Many-body correlations from dilute to dense nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Urban, Michael; Yamada, Taiichi

    2011-09-01

    The International EFES-IN2P3 conference on "Many body correlations from dilute to dense nuclear systems" was held at the Institut Henri Poincaré (IHP), Paris, France, from 15-18 February 2011, on the occasion of the retirement of our colleague Peter Schuck. Correlations play a decisive role in various many-body systems such as nuclear systems, condensed matter and quantum gases. Important examples include: pairing correlations (Cooper pairs) which give rise to nuclear superfluidity (analogous to superconductivity in condensed matter); particle-hole (RPA) correlations in the description of the ground state beyond mean-field theory; clusters; and α-particle correlations in certain nuclei. Also, the nucleons themselves can be viewed as clusters of three quarks. During the past few years, researchers have started to study how the character of these correlations changes with the variation of the density. For instance, the Cooper pairs in dense matter can transform into a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of true bound states at low density (this is the BCS-BEC crossover studied in ultracold Fermi gases). Similar effects play a role in neutron matter at low density, e.g., in the "neutron skin" of exotic nuclei. The α-cluster correlation becomes particularly important at lower density, such as in the excited states of some nuclei (e.g., the α-condensate-like structure in the Hoyle state of 12C) or in the formation of compact stars. In addition to nuclear physics, topics from astrophysics (neutron stars), condensed matter, and quantum gases were discussed in 48 talks and 19 posters, allowing the almost 90 participants from different communities to exchange their ideas, experiences and methods. The conference dinner took place at the Musée d'Orsay, and all the participants enjoyed the very pleasant atmosphere. One session of the conference was dedicated to the celebration of Peter's retirement. We would like to take this opportunity to wish Peter all the best and we hope that he will continue his scientific work full of creative and original ideas. We would like to thank all those who helped to make the conference a success: Nguyen van Giai, S Fujii, J Margueron, K Hagino, and Y Kanada-En'yo for their help with the organization; the advisory committee for suggesting invited speakers; V Frois for her administrative help; L Petizon for the website; and the director of IPN Orsay, F Azaiez, for his support. We are indebted to IHP for providing the lecture hall free of charge, and we acknowledge the financial support from JSPS through its EFES core-to-core program, from CNRS (IN2P3 and INP), and from LIA France-Japon. Last but not least, we are grateful to all of the participants for making the conference exciting and successful. Takaharu Otsuka, Michael Urban, Taiichi YamadaEditors of the proceedings

  8. Formation of nuclear bodies by the lncRNA Gomafu-associating proteins Celf3 and SF1

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuko; Ishida, Kentaro; Yanaka, Kaori; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Gomafu/MIAT/Rncr2 is a long noncoding RNA that has been proposed to control retinal cell specification, stem cell differentiation and alternative splicing of schizophrenia-related genes. However, how Gomafu controls these biological processes at the molecular level has remained largely unknown. In this study, we identified the RNA-binding protein Celf3 as a novel Gomafu-associating protein. Knockdown of Celf3 led to the down-regulation of Gomafu, and cross-link RNA precipitation analysis confirmed specific binding between Celf3 and Gomafu. In the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2A, Celf3 formed novel nuclear bodies (named CS bodies) that colocalized with SF1, another Gomafu-binding protein. Gomafu, however, was not enriched in the CS bodies; instead, it formed distinct nuclear bodies in separate regions in the nucleus. These observations suggest that Gomafu indirectly modulates the function of the splicing factors SF1 and Celf3 by sequestering these proteins into separate nuclear bodies. PMID:25145264

  9. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Found?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to get started. What Is Leukemia - Acute Lymphocytic (ALL) in Adults? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? What ... acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? Treating Leukemia - Acute Lymphocytic (ALL) in Adults How is acute lymphocytic leukemia treated? ...

  10. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Leukemia--Acute Myeloid (Myelogenous) Download Printable Version [PDF] » View ... the topics below to get started. What Is Leukemia - Acute Myeloid (AML)? What is acute myeloid leukemia? ...

  11. The Role of Three-Nucleon Forces and Many-Body Processes in Nuclear Pairing

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    We present microscopic valence-shell calculations of pairing gaps in the calcium isotopes, focusing on the role of three-nucleon (3N) forces and manybody processes. In most cases, we find a reduction in pairing strength when the leading chiral 3N forces are included, compared to results with lowmomentum two-nucleon (NN) interactions only. This is in agreement with a recent energy density functional study. At the NN level, calculations that include particle particle and hole hole ladder contributions lead to smaller pairing gaps compared with experiment. When particle hole contributions as well as the normal-ordered one- and two-body parts of 3N forces are consistently included to third order, we find reasonable agreement with experimental three-point mass differences. This highlights the important role of 3N forces and manybody processes for pairing in nuclei. Finally, we relate pairing gaps to the evolution of nuclear structure in neutron-rich calcium isotopes and study the predictions for the 2+ excitation energies, in particular for 54Ca.

  12. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  13. Effect of RNAi-induced down regulation of nuclear factor kappa-B p65 on acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells in vitro and vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunmei; Sheng, Guangyao; Lu, Jie; Xie, Lei; Bai, Songting; Wang, Yingchao; Liu, Yufeng

    2012-01-01

    NF-?B p65 is found constitutively active in acute monocytic leukemia, and has been considered an important factor for poor prognosis. Therefore, develop specifically target p65 inhibitors will be substantial interest. Until now, although several p65 inhibitors are currently in preclinical and clinical development, none of them are targeting. In this study, siRNA targeting p65 was introduced into the acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1 and THP-1 xenograft tumors in nude mice, and then, we measured p65 mRNA and protein levels by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting, and levels of related protein cyclin D1, Bc1-2, and SMRT by Western blotting. We also investigated the cell cycle and apoptosis via FCM, and cell proliferation by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay. We found that p65 siRNA could effectively reduce the p65 mRNA and protein expression, arrest cells in G0/G1 phase, inhibit the proliferation and increase the apoptosis of THP-1 cells, and intratumoral injection of p65 siRNA could suppress tumor growth in nude mice. We also found that when down regulation of p65, the expression of cyclin D1 and Bc1-2 decreased, and the expression of SMRT increased in vitro and vivo. All these findings suggest that NF-?B p65 maybe an attractive candidate for the therapeutic targeting of acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:21901538

  14. Clinical significance of the administration of cytarabine or thiotepa in addition to total body irradiation and cyclophosphamide for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Masatsugu; Hagihara, Maki; Kawasaki, Rika; Yamazaki, Etsuko; Koharazawa, Hideyuki; Taguchi, Jun; Tomita, Naoto; Fujimaki, Katsumichi; Sakai, Rika; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Shin; Maruta, Atsuo; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Kanamori, Heiwa

    2015-10-01

    A multicenter retrospective study was performed to determine the significance of adding cytarabine (CA) or thiotepa (TT) in the context of total body irradiation (TBI) and cyclophosphamide (CY). A total of 322 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) were distributed to the following three groups: TBI/CY (n = 75), TBI/CY/CA (n = 77), and TBI/CY/TT (n = 170). In the TBI/CY/TT group, 164 of patients (96 %) received HCT during the previous year (2000-2005). Multivariate analysis revealed that the TBI/CY/TT group demonstrated a trend of poorer survival rate than the TBI/CY group, [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.49, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.99-2.24, P = 0.055] with a higher non-relapse mortality (NRM) (HR = 2.34, 95 % CI 1.35-4.06, P = 0.002) rates, while TBI/CY/CA group demonstrated similar outcomes. Even in the subgroup analyses of disease type or disease risk, the outcomes with intensified conditioning regimens were not superior to those with TBI/CY. In conclusion, although the significant bias has to be carefully considered, the clinical benefit of adding CA or TT to the TBI/CY regimen was not demonstrated. PMID:26173594

  15. Characterization of endogenous human promyelocytic leukemia isoforms.

    PubMed

    Condemine, Wilfried; Takahashi, Yuki; Zhu, Jun; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine; Guegan, Sarah; Janin, Anne; de Thé, Hugues

    2006-06-15

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) has been implicated in a variety of functions, including control of TP53 function and modulation of cellular senescence. Sumolated PML is the organizer of mature PML bodies, recruiting a variety of proteins onto these nuclear domains. The PML gene is predicted to encode a variety of protein isoforms. Overexpression of only one of them, PML-IV, promotes senescence in human diploid fibroblasts, whereas PML-III was proposed to specifically interact with the centrosome. We show that all PML isoform proteins are expressed in cell lines or primary cells. Unexpectedly, we found that PML-III, PML-IV, and PML-V are quantitatively minor isoforms compared with PML-I/II and could not confirm the centrosomal targeting of PML-III. Stable expression of each isoform, in a pml-null background, yields distinct subcellular localization patterns, suggesting that, like in other RBCC/TRIM proteins, the COOH-terminal domains of PML are involved in interactions with specific cellular components. Only the isoform-specific sequences of PML-I and PML-V are highly conserved between man and mouse. That PML-I contains all conserved exons and is more abundantly expressed than PML-IV suggests that it is a critical contributor to PML function(s). PMID:16778193

  16. The Family Leukemia Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Eleanor

    1976-01-01

    An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

  17. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Immunotherapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nirali N.; Dave, Hema; Wayne, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of leukemia in childhood. Despite this, leukemia remains a leading cause of pediatric cancer-related mortality and the prognosis is guarded for individuals with relapsed or refractory disease. Standard therapies are associated with a wide array of acute and long-term toxicities and further treatment intensification may not be tolerable or beneficial. The curative potential of allogeneic stem cell transplantation is due in part to the graft-versus-leukemia effect, which provides evidence for the therapeutic capacity of immune-based therapies. In recent years there have been significant advances in the development and application of immunotherapy in the treatment of leukemias, including the demonstration of activity in chemotherapy-resistant cases. This review summarizes immunotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of pediatric leukemia including current results and future directions. PMID:23847759

  19. Divergence of the isospin-asymmetry expansion of the nuclear equation of state in many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellenhofer, Corbinian; Holt, Jeremy W.; Kaiser, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    The isospin-asymmetry dependence of the nuclear-matter equation of state obtained from microscopic chiral two- and three-body interactions in second-order many-body perturbation theory is examined in detail. The quadratic, quartic, and sextic coefficients in the Maclaurin expansion of the free energy per particle of infinite homogeneous nuclear matter with respect to the isospin asymmetry are extracted numerically using finite differences, and the resulting polynomial isospin-asymmetry parametrizations are compared to the full isospin-asymmetry dependence of the free energy. It is found that in the low-temperature and high-density regime where the radius of convergence of the expansion is generically zero, the inclusion of higher-order terms beyond the leading quadratic approximation leads overall to a significantly poorer description of the isospin-asymmetry dependence. In contrast, at high temperatures and densities well below nuclear saturation density, the interaction contributions to the higher-order coefficients are negligible and the deviations from the quadratic approximation are predominantly from the noninteracting term in the many-body perturbation series. Furthermore, we extract the leading logarithmic term in the isospin-asymmetry expansion of the equation of state at zero temperature from the analysis of linear combinations of finite differences. It is shown that the logarithmic term leads to a considerably improved description of the isospin-asymmetry dependence at zero temperature.

  20. [Nuclear techniques in nutrition: assessment of body fat and intake of human milk in breast-fed infants].

    PubMed

    Pallaro, Anabel; Tarducci, Gabriel

    2014-12-01

    The application of nuclear techniques in the area of nutrition is safe because they use stable isotopes. The deuterium dilution method is used in body composition and human milk intake analysis. It is a reference method for body fat and validates inexpensive tools because of its accuracy, simplicity of application in individuals and population and the background of its usefulness in adults and children as an evaluation tool in clinical and health programs. It is a non-invasive technique as it uses saliva, which facilitates the assessment in pediatric populations. Changes in body fat are associated with non-communicable diseases; moreover, normal weight individuals with high fat deposition were reported. Furthermore, this technique is the only accurate way to determine whether infants are exclusively breast-fed and validate conventional methods based on surveys to mothers. PMID:25362913

  1. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes function in noncoding RNA-dependent assembly of nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tetsuya; Tanigawa, Akie; Naganuma, Takao; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Souquere, Sylvie; Pierron, Gerard; Hirose, Tetsuro

    2015-04-01

    Paraspeckles are subnuclear structures that form around nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 (NEAT1) long noncoding RNA (lncRNA). Recently, paraspeckles were shown to be functional nuclear bodies involved in stress responses and the development of specific organs. Paraspeckle formation is initiated by transcription of the NEAT1 chromosomal locus and proceeds in conjunction with NEAT1 lncRNA biogenesis and a subsequent assembly step involving >40 paraspeckle proteins (PSPs). In this study, subunits of SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin-remodeling complexes were identified as paraspeckle components that interact with PSPs and NEAT1 lncRNA. EM observations revealed that SWI/SNF complexes were enriched in paraspeckle subdomains depleted of chromatin. Knockdown of SWI/SNF components resulted in paraspeckle disintegration, but mutation of the ATPase domain of the catalytic subunit BRG1 did not affect paraspeckle integrity, indicating that the essential role of SWI/SNF complexes in paraspeckle formation does not require their canonical activity. Knockdown of SWI/SNF complexes barely affected the levels of known essential paraspeckle components, but markedly diminished the interactions between essential PSPs, suggesting that SWI/SNF complexes facilitate organization of the PSP interaction network required for intact paraspeckle assembly. The interactions between SWI/SNF components and essential PSPs were maintained in NEAT1-depleted cells, suggesting that SWI/SNF complexes not only facilitate interactions between PSPs, but also recruit PSPs during paraspeckle assembly. SWI/SNF complexes were also required for Satellite III lncRNA-dependent formation of nuclear stress bodies under heat-shock conditions. Our data suggest the existence of a common mechanism underlying the formation of lncRNA-dependent nuclear body architectures in mammalian cells. PMID:25831520

  3. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions acute promyelocytic leukemia acute promyelocytic leukemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Open All Close All Description Acute promyelocytic leukemia is a form of acute myeloid leukemia, a ...

  4. Mitoxantrone resistance in HL-60 leukemia cells: Reduced nuclear topoisomerase II catalytic activity and drug-induced DNA cleavage in association with reduced expression of the topoisomerase II. beta. isoform

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, W.G.; Slade, D.L.; Parr, R.L. ); Drake, F.H. )

    1991-10-15

    Mitoxantrone-resistant variants of the human HL-60 leukemia cell line are cross-resistant to several natural product and synthetic antineoplastic agents. The resistant cells (HL-60/MX2) retain sensitivity to the Vinca alkaloids vincristine and vinblastine, drugs that are typically associated with the classical multidrug resistance phenotype. Mitoxantrone accumulation and retention are equivalent in the sensitive and resistant cell types, suggesting that mitoxantrone resistance inn HL-60/MX2 cells might be associated with an alteration in the type II DNA topoisomerases. The authors discovered that topoisomerase II catalytic activity in 1.0 M NaCl nuclear extracts from the HL-60/MX2 variant was reduced 4- to 5-fold compared to that in the parental HL-60 cells. Studies were designed to minimize the proteolytic degradation of the topoisomerase II enzymes by extraction of whole cells with hot SDS. When nuclear extracts from the two cell types were normalized for equivalent catalytic activity, mitoxantrone inhibited the decatenation of kDNA by these extracts to an equal extent but levels of mitoxantrone-induced cleavage of {sup 32}P-labeled pBR322 DNA by nuclear extracts from HL-60/MX2 cells were 3- to 4-fold lower than in comparable HL-60 extracts. Resistance to the topoisomerase II inhibitor mitoxantrone in HL-60/MX2 is associated with reduced nuclear and whole cell topoisomerase II catalytic activity, immunologically undetectable levels of the 180-kDa topoisomerase II isozyme, and reduced mitoxantrone-induced cleavage of radiolabeled DNA by topoisomerase II in nuclear extracts from these cells.

  5. Cordycepin Regulates GSK-3?/?-Catenin Signaling in Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tzu-An; Tzean, Shean-Shong; Shen, Tang-Long; Liou, Jun-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Background Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are a limitless cell source for the initiation and maintenance of leukemia. Activation of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway is required for the survival and development of LSCs. Therefore, targeting ?-catenin is considered a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia. The goal of this study was to explore whether cordycepin, an active component of the traditional medicine Cordyceps sinensis, regulates ?-catenin expression in leukemia cells. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, we found that cordycepin significantly suppressed cell proliferation in all malignant cancer cells, including U937, K562, A549, HepG2, SK-Hep1 and MCF7 in a dose-dependent manner. However, cordycepin reduced ?-catenin levels in U937, K562 and THP1 leukemia cells and had no effect on other solid cancer cells. In addition, treatment with cordycepin significantly suppressed leukemia colony formation in soft agar assay. Cordycepin enhanced proteasome-dependent degradation and inhibited nuclear translocation of ?-catenin in leukemia cells. Cordycepin-reduced ?-catenin stability was restored by the addition of a pharmacological inhibitor of GSK-3?, indicating that cordycepin-suppressed ?-catenin stability is mediated by the activation of GSK-3?. Furthermore, cordycepin abolished the effect of Wnt3a-induced ?-catenin in leukemia cells. In addition, cordycepin-impaired ?-catenin is regulated by Akt activation but is not significantly influenced by AMPK or mTOR signal pathways. Significance Our findings show for the first time that codycepin selectively reduces ?-catenin stability in leukemia but not in other solid tumor cells. This suppressive effect is mediated by regulating GSK-3?. A synergistic combination of cordycepin with other treatments should be used as a novel strategy to eradicate leukemia via elimination of LSCs. PMID:24086728

  6. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Monoclonal antibody therapy is a type of targeted therapy used to treat hairy cell leukemia. Monoclonal antibody therapy uses antibodies made in the laboratory from ...

  7. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  8. CT findings in leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1984-12-01

    Review of 84 computed tomographic (CT) scans in leukemic patients demonstrate a wide spectrum of abnormalities. Findings caused by leukemia were lymphadenopathy, visceral enlargement, focal defects, and tissue infiltration. Hemorrhage was by far the most common complication and could usually be characterized on the noncontrast CT scan. The distinction between old hematomas, foci of infection, and leukemia infiltration could not be made with certainty without CT-guided aspiration. Unusual instances of sepsis, such as microabscesses of the liver and typhlitis, were seen.

  9. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-16

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  10. Thrombosis and acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Solís, Erick

    2012-04-01

    Thrombosis is a common complication in patients with acute leukemia. While the presence of central venous lines, concomitant steroids, the use of Escherichia coli asparaginase and hereditary thrombophilic abnormalities are known risk factors for thrombosis in children, information on the pathogenesis, risk factors, and clinical outcome of thrombosis in adult patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still scarce. Expert consensus and guidelines regarding leukemia-specific risk factors, thrombosis prevention, and treatment strategies, as well as optimal type of central venous catheter in acute leukemia patients are required. It is likely that each subtype of acute leukemia represents a different setting for the development of thrombosis and the risk of bleeding. This is perhaps due to a combination of different disease-specific pathogenic mechanisms of thrombosis, including the type of chemotherapy protocol chosen, the underlying patients health, associated risk factors, as well as the biology of the disease itself. The risk of thrombosis may also vary according to ethnicity and prevalence of hereditary risk factors for thrombosis; thus, it is advisable for Latin American, Asian, and African countries to report on their specific patient population. PMID:22507812

  11. Leukemias in telephone linemen

    SciTech Connect

    Obrams, G.I.

    1988-01-01

    An epidemiologic case-control study was conducted to assess the risk of leukemia in telephone linemen. Linemen work in close proximity to power distribution lines mounted on poles shared between the electrical utilities and the telephone companies. They are exposed to the associated electromagnetic fields, which have been suggested as a cause of leukemia. All deaths from leukemia that occurred among active or retired telephone company employees between 9175 and 1980 were identified. Study cases included all 222 active or pensioned employees who worked at least two years for AT T, were identified through the AT T mortality data base, died of leukemia other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the six-year period 1975-1980, and did not have another underlying hematologic cancer. Specific cell types of leukemia were identified from death certificates and company medical records. Six hundred and eighty-seven controls were selected from the Bell System Personnel Data Base, matched to the cases by age, sex, company and year of hire.

  12. Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, R.A.; LeBeau, M.M.; Vardiman, J.W.; Rowley, J.D.

    1996-12-01

    One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase 11, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11 q23 or 21 q22. The MLL gene at 11 q23 or the AML1 gene at 21 q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 1 1 q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11 q23 or 21 q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Larson, R A; LeBeau, M M; Vardiman, J W; Rowley, J D

    1996-01-01

    One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogenic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase II, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11q23 or 21q22. The MLL gene at 11q23 or the AML1 gene at 21q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 11q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11q23 or 21q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. PMID:9118910

  14. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Connecting neutron star observations to three-body forces in neutron matter and to the nuclear symmetry energy.

    PubMed

    Steiner, A W; Gandolfi, S

    2012-02-24

    Using a phenomenological form of the equation of state of neutron matter near the saturation density which has been previously demonstrated to be a good characterization of quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we show that currently available neutron star mass and radius measurements provide a significant constraint on the equation of state of neutron matter. At higher densities we model the equation of state by using polytropes and a quark matter model. We show that observations offer an important constraint on the strength of the three-body force in neutron matter, and thus some theoretical models of the three-body force may be ruled out by currently available astrophysical data. In addition, we obtain an estimate of the symmetry energy of nuclear matter and its slope that can be directly compared to the experiment and other theoretical calculations. PMID:22463511

  16. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  17. Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-30

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Body-fixed relativistic molecular Hamiltonian and its application to nuclear spin-rotation tensor: Linear molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Liu, Wenjian

    2013-07-01

    The relativistic molecular Hamiltonian written in the body-fixed frame of reference is the basis for high-precision calculations of spectroscopic parameters involving nuclear vibrations and/or rotations. Such a Hamiltonian that describes electrons fully relativistically and nuclei quasi-relativistically is just developed for semi-rigid nonlinear molecules [Y. Xiao and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134104 (2013)], 10.1063/1.4797496. Yet, the formulation should somewhat be revised for linear molecules thanks to some unusual features arising from the redundancy of the rotation around the molecular axis. Nonetheless, the resulting isomorphic Hamiltonian is rather similar to that for nonlinear molecules. Consequently, the relativistic formulation of nuclear spin-rotation (NSR) tensor for linear molecules is very much the same as that for nonlinear molecules. So is the relativistic mapping between experimental NSR and NMR.

  19. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Body Position in the Transport of Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Homola, J.

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes safety requirements for transport of radioactive waste in Slovakia and the role of regulatory body in the transport licensing and assessment processes. Importance of radioactive waste shipments have been increased since 1999 by starting of NPP A-1 decommissioning and operation of near surface disposal facility. Also some information from history of shipment as well as future activities are given. Legal basis for radioactive waste transport is resulting from IAEA recommendations in this area. Different types of transport equipment were approved by regulatory body for both liquid and solid waste and transportation permits were issued to their shipment. Regulatory body attention during evaluation of transport safety is focused mainly on ability of individual packages to withstand different transport conditions and on safety analyses performed for transport equipment for liquid waste with high frequency of shipments. During past three years no event was occurred in connection with radioactive waste transport in Slovakia.

  1. Anticipation in familial leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, M.; Goode, E. L.; Jarvik, G. P.

    1996-01-01

    Anticipation refers to worsening severity or earlier age at onset with each generation for an inherited disease and primarily has been described for neurodegenerative illnesses resulting from expansion of trinucleotide repeats. We have tested for evidence of anticipation in familial leukemia. Of 49 affected individuals in nine families transmitting autosomal dominant acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the mean age at onset is 57 years in the grandparental generation, 32 years in the parental generation, and 13 years in the youngest generation (P < .001). Of 21 parent-child pairs with AML, 19 show younger ages at onset in the child and demonstrate a mean decline in age at onset of 28 years (P < .001). Of 18 affected individuals from seven pedigrees with autosomal dominant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the mean age at onset in the parental generation is 66 years versus 51 years in the youngest generation (P = .008). Of nine parent-child pairs with CLL, eight show younger ages at onset in the child and reveal a mean decline in age at onset of 21 years (P = .001). Inspection of rare pedigrees transmitting acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple types of leukemia, and lymphoma is also compatible with anticipation. Sampling bias is unlikely to explain these findings. This suggests that dynamic mutation of unstable DNA sequence repeats could be a common mechanism of inherited hematopoietic malignancy with implications for the role of somatic mutation in the more frequent sporadic cases. We speculate on three possible candidate genes for familial leukemia with anticipation: a locus on 21q22.1-22.2, CBL2 on 11q23.3, and CBFB or a nearby gene on 16q22. PMID:8900225

  2. Anticipation in familial leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, M.; Jarvik, G.P.; Goode, E.L.

    1996-11-01

    Anticipation refers to worsening severity or earlier age at onset with each generation for an inherited disease and primarily has been described for neurodegenerative illnesses resulting from expansion of trinucleotide repeats. We have tested for evidence of anticipation in familial leukemia. Of 49 affected individuals in nine families transmitting autosomal dominant acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the mean age at onset is 57 years in the grandparental generation, 32 years in the parental generation, and 13 years in the youngest generation (P < .001). Of 21 parent-child pairs with AML, 19 show younger ages at onset in the child and demonstrate a mean decline in age at onset of 28 years (P < .001). Of 18 affected individuals from seven pedigrees with autosomal dominant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the mean age at onset in the parental generation is 66 years versus 51 years in the youngest generation (P = .008). Of nine parent-child pairs with CLL, eight show younger ages at onset in the child and reveal a mean decline in age at onset of 21 years (P = .001). Inspection of rare pedigrees transmitting acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple types of leukemia, and lymphoma is also compatible with anticipation. Sampling bias is unlikely to explain these findings. This suggests that dynamic mutation of unstable DNA sequence repeats could be a common mechanism of inherited hematopoietic malignancy with implications for the role of somatic mutation in the more frequent sporadic cases. We speculate on three possible candidate genes for familial leukemia with anticipation: a locus on 21q22.1-22.2, CBL2 on 11q23.3, and CBFB or a nearby gene on 16q22. 55 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Nuclear Effects of Supernova-Accelerated Cosmic Rays on Early Solar System Planetary Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, B. S.; The, L.-S.; Johnson, J.

    2008-03-01

    The solar system apparently formed in the neighborhood of massive stars. Supernova explosions of these stars accelerate cosmic rays to 100s of TeVs. These cosmic rays could accelerate the beta decay of certain radioactive species in meteorite parent bodies.

  4. HIV, leukemia, and new horizons in molecular therapy.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, Ben

    2013-08-01

    Cancer and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are both scary things to have in your body, but a new treatment is successfully using the latter against the former. Recent news reports, among others in the New York Times, talked about this new cure for leukemia by using HIV. This mini-review puts this news in perspective and provides a broader view as there appear to be several areas where clinical research on HIV and leukemia seem to connect. The topics covered range from antiviral gene therapy approaches using HIV-based lentiviral vectors to the risk of leukemia induction by these integrating vectors, and from an anti-leukemia transplantation strategy that turned out to provide a functional cure for HIV, to novel vaccination approaches. PMID:24016608

  5. Three Lectures on Random Matrices and the Nuclear Many-body Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Weidenmueller, Hans A.

    2008-11-13

    In the first lecture, I give an overview of the random--matrix approach to the statistical theory of nuclear reactions, with application to recent data on a microwave billiard. In the second lecture, I discuss the preponderance of ground states with spin zero and of states with positive parity. In the third lecture, I discuss constrained ensembles of random matrices.

  6. UNEDF: Advanced Scientific Computing Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Stoitsov, Mario; Nam, Hai Ah; Nazarewicz, Witold; Bulgac, Aurel; Hagen, Gaute; Kortelainen, E. M.; Pei, Junchen; Roche, K. J.; Schunck, N.; Thompson, I.; Vary, J. P.; Wild, S.

    2011-01-01

    The UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quantified uncertainties. This paper illustrates significant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integration of the theoretical approaches, advanced numerical algorithms, and leadership class computational resources.

  7. Three-body Effects for the p(pe^-, ν_e)d Reaction in Nuclear Astrophysics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeong E.; Zubarev, Alexander L.

    1996-05-01

    We have investigated three-body effect for p(pe^-, ν_e)d reaction in nuclear astrophysics. Solutions of three-body equation for the initial pep state show that two-proton dynamics does not depend on the electron degrees of freedom and hence the conventional adiabatic approximation is valid for energy sector (E_ep/E_pp) > 10-3 where E_ep and E_pp are the relative kinetic energies between e and p, and between p and p, respectively. For the energy sector (E_ep/E_pp) ≈ 10-3, an exact solution of the three-body equation is required. For the energy sector (E_ep/E_pp) < 10-3, it is shown that a Gamow-factor cancellation (GFC) can occur between two protons. Our estimate of the GFC effect indicates that the previous conventional estimate of the pep solar neutrino flux may be an underestimate at least by a factor of two. Implications of our results for the solar neutrino problem are described. At lower temperatures, the GFC effect becomes more significant, and p(pe^-, ν_e)d may dominate over p(p,e^+ ν_e)d. The enhancement of the reaction rate for p(pe^-, νe )d at lower temperatures due to the GFC effect may offer possible explanations for some of long-standing anomalies in astrophysical and geophysical problems.

  8. Nuclear translocation of the 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (membrane associated rapid response to steroids) receptor protein and NF{kappa}B in differentiating NB4 leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenqing; Beilhartz, Greg; Roy, Yvette; Richard, Cynthia L.; Curtin, Maureen; Brown, Lauren; Cadieux, Danielle; Coppolino, Marc; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Nemere, Ilka; Meckling, Kelly A.

    2010-04-15

    1,25 Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) primes NB4 promyelocytic leukemia cells to differentiate along the monocyte/macrophage lineage through a non-genomic mechanism. Here we show that NB4 cells express high levels of the recently identified membrane receptor for 1,25D{sub 3}, which is a distinct gene product from the classical nuclear vitamin D receptor. This 57 kDa protein, named 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (Membrane Activated Rapid Response to Steroids)/ERp57/PIA3 appears to associate in a complex with the transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B). In unstimulated cells, 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS can be co-immunoprecipitated with antibodies directed at NF{kappa}B, and NF{kappa}B is co-precipitated when antibodies against 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS or ERp57 are used. Confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation studies demonstrate that both 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS and NF{kappa}B begin translocating to the nucleus within minutes of co-stimulation with 1,25D{sub 3} and phorbol ester. The predominant nuclear localization of both proteins precedes the expression of the monocyte/macrophage phenotype and suggests that this event may be critical to the differentiation pathway. This suggests a role for 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS in the nucleus as a regulator of gene expression. Here it may also regulate the activity of NF{kappa}B and other factors with which it may be interacting.

  9. Obatoclax, Fludarabine, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  10. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  11. Immunohistochemical Detection of NPM1 Mutation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and its Association With Cup-like Nuclear Morphology of Blasts.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Pulkit; Naseem, Shano; Varma, Neelam; Varma, Subhash

    2016-04-01

    Blasts showing cup-like nuclei in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have been identified in patients with nucleophosmin 1 gene (NPM1) mutation, that is, AML with cytoplasmic NPM (NPMc+ AML). We analyzed 100 consecutive cases of AML, and defined the cutoff percentages of cup-like blasts in peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate smears that can predict NPMc+ AML. A lower cutoff level of ≥10% blasts in peripheral blood and ≥9% in bone marrow aspirate gave an excellent specificity for NPMc+ AML and a positive-predictive value of 90.9% and a negative-predictive value of 87.6% for NPMc+ AML. Cup-like nuclei were associated with higher total leukocyte count, higher blasts percentage, AML-M1 subtype, and human leukocyte antigen-DR region negativity. Our results suggest that cup-like nuclei represent an important morphologic clue that can predict NPMc+ AML and guide toward prioritizing the further workup of AML patients. PMID:26200838

  12. Heterochromatin Instability in Cancer: From the Barr Body to Satellites and the Nuclear Periphery

    PubMed Central

    Carone, Dawn M.; Lawrence, Jeanne B.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years it has been recognized that the development of cancer involves a series of not only genetic but epigenetic changes across the genome. At the same time, connections between epigenetic regulation, chromatin packaging, and overall nuclear architecture are increasingly appreciated. The cell-type specific organization of heterochromatin, established upon cell differentiation, is responsible for maintaining much of the genome in a repressed state, within a highly compartmentalized nucleus. This review focuses on recent evidence that in cancer the normal packaging and higher organization of heterochromatin is often compromised. Gross changes in nuclear morphology have long been a criterion for pathologic diagnosis of many cancers, but the specific nuclear components impacted, the mechanisms involved, and the implications for cancer progression have barely begun to emerge. We discuss recent findings regarding distinct heterochromatin types, including the inactive X chromosome, constitutive heterochromatin of peri/centric satellites, and the peripheral heterochromatic compartment (PHC). A theme developed here is that the higher-order organization of satellites and the peripheral heterochromatic compartment may be tightly linked, and that compromise of this organization may promote broad epigenomic imbalance in cancer. Recent studies into the potential role(s) of the breast cancer tumor suppressor, BRCA1, in maintaining heterochromatin will be highlighted. Many questions remain about this new area of cancer epigenetics, which is likely more important in cancer development and progression than widely appreciated. We propose that broad, stochastic compromise in heterochromatin maintenance would create a diversity of expression profiles, and thus a rich opportunity for one or more cells to emerge with a selective growth advantage and potential for neoplasia. PMID:22722067

  13. Optical atomic magnetometer at body temperature for magnetic particle imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nissa C; Yu, Dindi; Yao, Li; Xu, Shoujun

    2010-03-01

    Optical atomic magnetometers are often bulky and operate at elevated temperatures that impose restrictions on studying biological samples. Here we report a miniaturized Cs-based magnetometer, in contrast to conventionally used K- and Rb-based ones, with high sensitivity. The magnetic shield employed is more compact, and the optimal operation temperature of 37 degrees C is lower than previous magnetometers and is suitable for biological research. Applications include scanning magnetic imaging of functionalized magnetic particles and nuclear magnetic resonance of water. We reveal that the stability and sensitivity of the apparatus are not significantly affected by the absence of a laser stabilization device. PMID:20195311

  14. Electron tomography of fiber cell cytoplasm and dense cores of multilamellar bodies from human age-related nuclear cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Costello, M. Joseph; Burette, Alain; Weber, Mariko; Metlapally, Sangeetha; Gilliland, Kurt O.; Fowler, W. Craig; Mohamed, Ashik; Johnsen, Sönke

    2012-01-01

    Human nuclear cataract formation is a multi-factorial disease with contributions to light scattering from many cellular sources that change their scattering properties over decades. The aging process produces aggregation of cytoplasmic crystallin proteins, which alters the protein packing and texture of the cytoplasm. Previous studies of the cytoplasmic texture quantified increases in density fluctuations in protein packing and theoretically predicted the corresponding scattering. Multilamellar bodies (MLBs) are large particles with a core of crystallin cytoplasm that have been suggested to be major sources of scattering in human nuclei. The core has been shown to condense over time such that the refractive index increases compared to the adjacent aged and textured cytoplasm. Electron tomography is used here to visualize the 3D arrangement of protein aggregates in aged and cataractous lens nuclear cytoplasm compared to the dense protein packing in the cores of MLBs. Thin sections, 70 nm thick, were prepared from epoxy-embedded human transparent donor lenses and nuclear cataracts. Tilt series were collected on an FEI T20 transmission electron microscope (TEM) operated at 200 kV using 15 nm gold particles as fiducial markers. Images were aligned and corrected with FEI software and reconstructed with IMOD and other software packages to produce animated tilt series and stereo anaglyphs. The 3D views of protein density showed the relatively uniform packing of proteins in aged transparent lens nuclear cytoplasm and less dense packing of aged cataractous cytoplasm where many low-density regions can be appreciated in the absence of the TEM projection artifacts. In contrast the cores of the MLBs showed a dense packing of protein with minimal density fluctuations. These observations support the conclusion that, during the nuclear cataract formation, alterations in protein packing are extensive and can result in pronounced density fluctuations. Aging causes the MLB cores to become increasingly different in their protein packing from the adjacent cytoplasm. These results support the hypothesis that the MLBs increase their scattering with age and nuclear cataract formation. PMID:22728317

  15. Cancer Statistics: Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 60,140 % of All New Cancer Cases 3.6% Estimated Deaths in 2016 24,400 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 333,975 people living with leukemia in the ...

  16. Yields of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from seismic body and surface waves.

    PubMed

    Sykes, L R; Wiggins, G C

    1986-01-01

    Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 U.S.S.R. underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (m(b)) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The most pronounced cluster consists of six explosions of yield near 500 kilotons. Several of these seem to be tests of warheads for major strategic systems that became operational in the late 1970s. The largest Soviet underground explosion is estimated to have a yield of 3500 +/- 600 kilotons, somewhat smaller than the yield of the largest U.S. underground test. A preliminary estimation of the significance of tectonic release is made by measuring the amplitude of Love waves. The bias in m(b) for Novaya Zemlya relative to the Nevada test site is about 0.35, nearly identical to that of the eastern Kazakhstan test site relative to Nevada. PMID:16593645

  17. Yields of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from seismic body and surface waves

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Lynn R.; Wiggins, Graham C.

    1986-01-01

    Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 U.S.S.R. underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (mb) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The most pronounced cluster consists of six explosions of yield near 500 kilotons. Several of these seem to be tests of warheads for major strategic systems that became operational in the late 1970s. The largest Soviet underground explosion is estimated to have a yield of 3500 ± 600 kilotons, somewhat smaller than the yield of the largest U.S. underground test. A preliminary estimation of the significance of tectonic release is made by measuring the amplitude of Love waves. The bias in mb for Novaya Zemlya relative to the Nevada test site is about 0.35, nearly identical to that of the eastern Kazakhstan test site relative to Nevada. PMID:16593645

  18. Studies of a nuclear matrix protein restricted to normal brain cells and lead-induced intranuclear inclusion bodies of kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, K.; Egle, P.; Redford, K.; Bigbee, J.

    1986-05-01

    A nuclear matrix protein, p32/6.3, with an unusual tissue distribution, has been identified. Protein from 21 tissues was surveyed by immunoprobing Western blots. In normal adult rats p32/6.3 is found only in grey matter from the cerebrum and the cerebellum, occurring in both neurons and astrocytes. Other brain cell types have not been examined. The protein appears to be developmentally regulated. It is detectable in the brain within a few days after birth and reaches adult levels within one to two weeks. Brain p32/6.3 has been found in all animals tested including rat, mouse, dog, cow, pig, chicken and human. This conservation indicates a fundamental role for p32/6.3 in the nucleus of brain cells. Possible functions for p32/6.3 may be indicated by a second novel occurrence. Chronic lead poisoning characteristically induces intranuclear inclusion bodies in the cells lining kidney proximal tubules. p32/6.3 is a major constituent of these inclusion bodies. They are also rich in lead and other metals including calcium, iron, zinc, copper and cadmium. These diverse observations suggest that p32/6.3 may have a role in metal homeostasis in the brain of normal animals.

  19. Leukemia and Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Excessive exposure to benzene has been known for more than a century to damage the bone marrow resulting in decreases in the numbers of circulating blood cells, and ultimately, aplastic anemia. Of more recent vintage has been the appreciation that an alternative outcome of benzene exposure has been the development of one or more types of leukemia. While many investigators agree that the array of toxic metabolites, generated in the liver or in the bone marrow, can lead to traumatic bone marrow injury, the more subtle mechanisms leading to leukemia have yet to be critically dissected. This problem appears to have more general interest because of the recognition that so-called “second cancer” that results from prior treatment with alkylating agents to yield tumor remissions, often results in a type of leukemia reminiscent of benzene-induced leukemia. Furthermore, there is a growing literature attempting to characterize the fine structure of the marrow and the identification of so called “niches” that house a variety of stem cells and other types of cells. Some of these “niches” may harbor cells capable of initiating leukemias. The control of stem cell differentiation and proliferation via both inter- and intra-cellular signaling will ultimately determine the fate of these transformed stem cells. The ability of these cells to avoid checkpoints that would prevent them from contributing to the leukemogenic response is an additional area for study. Much of the study of benzene-induced bone marrow damage has concentrated on determining which of the benzene metabolites lead to leukemogenesis. The emphasis now should be directed to understanding how benzene metabolites alter bone marrow cell biology. PMID:23066403

  20. Role of integrin alpha4 in drug resistance of leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Stephanie; Bnig, Halvard; Kim, Yong-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drug resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a significant problem, resulting in poor responsiveness to first-line treatment or relapse after transient remission. Classical anti-leukemic drugs are non-specific cell cycle poisons; some more modern drugs target oncogenic pathways in leukemia cells, although in ALL these do not play a very significant role. By contrast, the molecular interactions between microenvironment and leukemia cells are often neglected in the design of novel therapies against drug resistant leukemia. It was shown however, that chemotherapy resistance is promoted in part through cell-cell contact of leukemia cells with bone marrow (BM) stromal cells, also called cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Incomplete response to chemotherapy results in persistence of resistant clones with or without detectable minimal residual disease (MRD). Approaches for how to address CAM-DR and MRD remain elusive. Specifically, studies using anti-functional antibodies and genetic models have identified integrin alpha4 as a critical molecule regulating BM homing and active retention of normal and leukemic cells. Pre-clinical evidence has been provided that interference with alpha4-mediated adhesion of ALL cells can sensitize them to chemotherapy and thus facilitate eradication of ALL cells in an MRD setting. To this end, Andreeff and colleagues recently provided evidence of stroma-induced and alpha4-mediated nuclear factor-?B signaling in leukemia cells, disruption of which depletes leukemia cells of strong survival signals. We here review the available evidence supporting the targeting of alpha4 as a novel strategy for treatment of drug resistant leukemia. PMID:24904821

  1. Role of Integrin Alpha4 in Drug Resistance of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shishido, Stephanie; Bönig, Halvard; Kim, Yong-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drug resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a significant problem, resulting in poor responsiveness to first-line treatment or relapse after transient remission. Classical anti-leukemic drugs are non-specific cell cycle poisons; some more modern drugs target oncogenic pathways in leukemia cells, although in ALL these do not play a very significant role. By contrast, the molecular interactions between microenvironment and leukemia cells are often neglected in the design of novel therapies against drug resistant leukemia. It was shown however, that chemotherapy resistance is promoted in part through cell–cell contact of leukemia cells with bone marrow (BM) stromal cells, also called cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Incomplete response to chemotherapy results in persistence of resistant clones with or without detectable minimal residual disease (MRD). Approaches for how to address CAM-DR and MRD remain elusive. Specifically, studies using anti-functional antibodies and genetic models have identified integrin alpha4 as a critical molecule regulating BM homing and active retention of normal and leukemic cells. Pre-clinical evidence has been provided that interference with alpha4-mediated adhesion of ALL cells can sensitize them to chemotherapy and thus facilitate eradication of ALL cells in an MRD setting. To this end, Andreeff and colleagues recently provided evidence of stroma-induced and alpha4-mediated nuclear factor-κB signaling in leukemia cells, disruption of which depletes leukemia cells of strong survival signals. We here review the available evidence supporting the targeting of alpha4 as a novel strategy for treatment of drug resistant leukemia. PMID:24904821

  2. TCP1 complex proteins interact with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and can co-localize in oligonucleotide-induced nuclear bodies in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue-hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Prakash, Thazha P; Crooke, Stanley T

    2014-07-01

    Phosphorothioate (PS) antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have been successfully developed as drugs to reduce the expression of disease-causing genes. PS-ASOs can be designed to induce degradation of complementary RNAs via the RNase H pathway and much is understood about that process. However, interactions of PS-ASOs with other cellular proteins are not well characterized. Here we report that in cells transfected with PS-ASOs, the chaperonin T-complex 1 (TCP1) proteins interact with PS-ASOs and enhance antisense activity. The TCP1-β subunit co-localizes with PS-ASOs in distinct nuclear structures, termed phosphorothioate bodies or PS-bodies. Upon Ras-related nuclear protein (RAN) depletion, cytoplasmic PS-body-like structures were observed and nuclear concentrations of PS-ASOs were reduced, suggesting that TCP1-β can interact with PS-ASOs in the cytoplasm and that the nuclear import of PS-ASOs is at least partially through the RAN-mediated pathway. Upon free uptake, PS-ASOs co-localize with TCP1 proteins in cytoplasmic foci related to endosomes/lysosomes. Together, our results indicate that the TCP1 complex binds oligonucleotides with TCP1-β subunit being a nuclear PS-body component and suggest that the TCP1 complex may facilitate PS-ASO uptake and/or release from the endocytosis pathway. PMID:24861627

  3. Predictions of Leukemia Risks to Astronauts from Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Atwell, W.; Kim, M. Y.; George, K. A.; Ponomarev, A.; Nikjoo, H.; Wilson, J. W.

    2006-01-01

    Leukemias consisting of acute and chronic myeloid leukemia and acute lymphatic lymphomas represent the earliest cancers that appear after radiation exposure, have a high lethality fraction, and make up a significant fraction of the overall fatal cancer risk from radiation for adults. Several considerations impact the recommendation of a preferred model for the estimation of leukemia risks from solar particle events (SPE's): The BEIR VII report recommends several changes to the method of calculation of leukemia risk compared to the methods recommended by the NCRP Report No. 132 including the preference of a mixture model with additive and multiplicative components in BEIR VII compared to the additive transfer model recommended by NCRP Report No. 132. Proton fluences and doses vary considerably across marrow regions because of the characteristic spectra of primary solar protons making the use of an average dose suspect. Previous estimates of bone marrow doses from SPE's have used an average body-shielding distribution for marrow based on the computerized anatomical man model (CAM). We have developed an 82-point body-shielding distribution that faithfully reproduces the mean and variance of SPE doses in the active marrow regions (head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and thighs) allowing for more accurate estimation of linear- and quadratic-dose components of the marrow response. SPE's have differential dose-rates and a pseudo-quadratic dose response term is possible in the peak-flux period of an event. Also, the mechanistic basis for leukemia risk continues to improve allowing for improved strategies in choosing dose-rate modulation factors and radiation quality descriptors. We make comparisons of the various choices of the components in leukemia risk estimates in formulating our preferred model. A major finding is that leukemia could be the dominant risk to astronauts for a major solar particle event.

  4. Hartree-Fock many-body perturbation theory for nuclear ground-states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichai, Alexander; Langhammer, Joachim; Binder, Sven; Roth, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the order-by-order convergence behavior of many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) as a simple and efficient tool to approximate the ground-state energy of closed-shell nuclei. To address the convergence properties directly, we explore perturbative corrections up to 30th order and highlight the role of the partitioning for convergence. The use of a simple Hartree-Fock solution for the unperturbed basis leads to a convergent MBPT series for soft interactions, in contrast to the divergent MBPT series obtained with a harmonic oscillator basis. For larger model spaces and heavier nuclei, where a direct high-order MBPT calculation is not feasible, we perform third-order calculations and compare to advanced ab initio coupled-cluster results for the same interactions and model spaces. We demonstrate that third-order MBPT provides ground-state energies for nuclei up into the tin isotopic chain in excellent agreement with the best available coupled-cluster calculations at a fraction of the computational cost.

  5. The nuclear phenotypic plasticity observed in fish during rRNA regulation entails Cajal bodies dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Marco; Nardocci, Gino; Thiry, Marc; Alvarez, Rodrigo; Reyes, Mauricio; Molina, Alfredo; Vera, M. Ines . E-mail: mvera@unab.cl

    2007-08-17

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are small mobile organelles found throughout the nucleoplasm of animal and plant cells. The dynamics of these organelles involves interactions with the nucleolus. The later has been found to play a substantial role in the compensatory response that evolved in eurythermal fish to adapt to the cyclic seasonal habitat changes, i.e., temperature and photoperiod. Contrary to being constitutive, rRNA synthesis is dramatically regulated between summer and winter, thus affecting ribosomal biogenesis which plays a central role in the acclimatization process. To examine whether CBs, up to now, never described in fish, were also sustaining the phenotypic plasticity observed in nuclei of fish undergoing seasonal acclimatization, we identified these organelles both, by transmission electronic microscopy and immunodetection with the marker protein p80-coilin. We found transcripts in all tissues analyzed. Furthermore we assessed that p80-coilin gene expression was always higher in summer-acclimatized fish when compared to that adapted to the cold season, indicating that p80-coilin expression is modulated upon seasonal acclimatization. Concurrently, CBs were more frequently found in summer-acclimatized carp which suggests that the organization of CBs is involved in adaptive processes and contribute to the phenotypic plasticity of fish cell nuclei observed concomitantly with profound reprogramming of nucleolar components and regulation of ribosomal rRNAs.

  6. Relativistic and Field Theoretic Effects in the Nuclear Many-Body Problem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poorakkiat, Chaisingh

    Field theoretic effects of a nucleon of an oxygen -17 have been studied. A computational scheme involving sigma and omega mesons has been set up. It employs the Furry picture of quantum field theory along with an introduction of vector and scalar Woods-Saxon potentials. Use of an adiabatic switching on an interaction leads to an energy shift in form of a symmetric Gell-Mann and Low formula which contains the S matrix. The S matrix allows an expansion in terms of Feynman diagrams which in turn enables us to write a perturbative series analogous to that in many-body perturbation theory. Retardation effects and the first-order energy correction E_{1} of two valence states, 1d_{5/2} and 2s_{1/2}, have been calculated from the diagrams. The self-energy of the 1s _{1/2} state is investigated along with the use of a renormalization technique. The retardation effects are small in the order of 10 kev while the self-energy and E_{1} corrections are big in the order of 700 and 10 Mev respectively.

  7. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia diagnosed? Certain signs and symptoms can suggest that ... described below. Tests used to diagnose and classify ALL If your doctor thinks you have leukemia, he ...

  8. General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Key Points Hairy cell leukemia is a ...

  9. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Option Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Key Points Hairy cell leukemia is a ...

  10. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. [Infant acute leukemia].

    PubMed

    Brethon, Benoît; Cavé, Hélène; Fahd, Mony; Baruchel, André

    2016-03-01

    If acute leukemia is the most frequent cancer in childhood (33%), it remains a very rare diagnosis in infants less than one year old, e.g. less than 5% of cases. At this age, the frequency of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (almost all of B-lineage) is quite similar to the one of myeloblastic forms (AML). Infant leukemia frequently presents with high hyperleucocytosis, major tumoral burden and numerous extra-hematological features, especially in central nervous system and skin. Whatever the lineage, the leukemic cell is often very immature cytologically and immunologically. Rearrangements of the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene, located on band 11q23, are the hallmark of these immature leukemias and confer a particular resistance to conventional approaches, corticosteroids and chemotherapy. The immaturity of infants less than 1-year-old is associated to a decrease of the tolerable dose-intensity of some drugs (anthracyclines, alkylating agents) or asks questions about some procedures like radiotherapy or high dose conditioning regimen, responsible of inacceptable acute and late toxicities. The high level of severe infectious diseases and other high-grade side effects limits also the capacity to cure these infants. The survival of infants less than 1-year-old with AML is only 50% but similar to older children. On the other hand, survival of those with ALL is the same, then quite limited comparing the 80% survival in children over one year. Allogeneic stem cell transplantations are indicated in high-risk subgroups of infant ALL (age below 6 months, high hyperleucocytosis >300.10(9)/L, MLL-rearrangement, initial poor prednisone response). However, morbidity and mortality remain very important and these approaches cannot be extended to all cases. During the neonatal period, the dismal prognosis linked to the high number of primary failures or very early relapses and uncertainties about the late toxicities question physicians about ethics. It is an emergency to propose different strategies (targeted therapies) to these infants with acute leukemia as conventional trials failed to improve outcome. PMID:26826739

  13. Localization and regulation of PML bodies in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hall, Małgorzata H; Magalska, Adriana; Malinowska, Monika; Ruszczycki, Błażej; Czaban, Iwona; Patel, Satyam; Ambrożek-Latecka, Magdalena; Zołocińska, Ewa; Broszkiewicz, Hanna; Parobczak, Kamil; Nair, Rajeevkumar R; Rylski, Marcin; Pawlak, Robert; Bramham, Clive R; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M

    2016-06-01

    PML is a tumor suppressor protein involved in the pathogenesis of promyelocytic leukemia. In non-neuronal cells, PML is a principal component of characteristic nuclear bodies. In the brain, PML has been implicated in the control of embryonic neurogenesis, and in certain physiological and pathological phenomena in the adult brain. Yet, the cellular and subcellular localization of the PML protein in the brain, including its presence in the nuclear bodies, has not been investigated comprehensively. Because the formation of PML bodies appears to be a key aspect in the function of the PML protein, we investigated the presence of these structures and their anatomical distribution, throughout the adult mouse brain. We found that PML is broadly expressed across the gray matter, with the highest levels in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. In the cerebral cortex PML is present exclusively in neurons, in which it forms well-defined nuclear inclusions containing SUMO-1, SUMO 2/3, but not Daxx. At the ultrastructural level, the appearance of neuronal PML bodies differs from the classic one, i.e., the solitary structure with more or less distinctive capsule. Rather, neuronal PML bodies have the form of small PML protein aggregates located in the close vicinity of chromatin threads. The number, size, and signal intensity of neuronal PML bodies are dynamically influenced by immobilization stress and seizures. Our study indicates that PML bodies are broadly involved in activity-dependent nuclear phenomena in adult neurons. PMID:25956166

  14. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  15. Temsirolimus and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  16. Imatinib Mesylate and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  17. Leukemia and radium groundwater contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, B.L.; Letourneau, E.G.

    1986-06-27

    In the August 2, 1985, issue of JAMMA, Lyman et al claim to have shown an association between leukemia incidence in Florida and radium in groundwater supplies. Although cautious in their conclusions, the authors imply that this excess in leukemia was in fact caused by radiation. The authors believe they have not presented a convincing argument for causation. The radiation doses at these levels of exposure could account for only a tiny fraction of the leukemia excess.

  18. Donor cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Arguelles, Alejandro

    2012-04-01

    Minimal residual disease refers to the tumour cells that are still present in a given patient after completion of a therapeutic scheme. The demonstration and quantification of residual neoplastic cells has a crucial impact in clinical decision making, for it might prompt continuation of treatment, while the absence of such cells might serve as evidence to withdraw therapy. Therefore, both sensitivity and specificity of the methods used to unravel residual neoplastic cells must be highly reliable and robust. Flow cytometry has been widely used for this purpose, and its clinical performance depends mainly on the criteria of interpretation, rather than in the technique by itself; molecular biology techniques have proved to be highly sensitive and specific but unfortunately they cannot be used in all patients or in all types of leukemia. Finally, the development of donor cell leukemia in transplanted patients, might mimic residual disease and add more confusion to an already controversial issue. These topics are discussed in this paper. PMID:22507784

  19. Mast cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Dubreuil, Patrice; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Hermine, Olivier; Damaj, Gandhi

    2013-02-21

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a very rare form of aggressive systemic mastocytosis accounting for < 1% of all mastocytosis. It may appear de novo or secondary to previous mastocytosis and shares more clinicopathologic aspects with systemic mastocytosis than with acute myeloid leukemia. Symptoms of mast cell activation-involvement of the liver, spleen, peritoneum, bones, and marrow-are frequent. Diagnosis is based on the presence of ≥ 20% atypical mast cells in the marrow or ≥ 10% in the blood; however, an aleukemic variant is frequently encountered in which the number of circulating mast cells is < 10%. The common phenotypic features of pathologic mast cells encountered in most forms of mastocytosis are unreliable in MCL. Unexpectedly, non-KIT D816V mutations are frequent and therefore, complete gene sequencing is necessary. Therapy usually fails and the median survival time is < 6 months. The role of combination therapies and bone marrow transplantation needs further investigation. PMID:23243287

  20. Acute Leukemias in Children

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Mohan K. R.

    1979-01-01

    With combination chemotherapy approximately 50% of children with lymphoblastic leukemia survive for five or more years and it is now realistic to hope for a cure. Development of sophisticated cytochemical and immunological techniques have enabled us to recognize the factors that predispose to treatment failures. The survival in acute non-lymphocytic leukemia continues to be poor despite the introduction of several innovative treatment regimens. Current research is focused on the manipulation of the host-tumor immune response to eradicate the disease by treatment modalities such as immunotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. Since the treatment regimens are becoming more complex, the initial diagnosis and treatment is best carried out at centres specialized in the management of childhood malignancies. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:21297755

  1. Leukemia in telephone linemen.

    PubMed

    Matanoski, G M; Elliott, E A; Breysse, P N; Lynberg, M C

    1993-03-15

    This case-control study examines potential associations between telephone linework and the occurrence of leukemia except chronic lymphocytic leukemia in a primarily retired population of American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T) workers. Cases died between 1975 and 1980. Exposure is defined both by job title and, for workers with complete job histories, by a lifetime exposure score based on industrial hygiene personal monitoring measurements of line and nonline jobs. When the time-weighted average mean for each job is accumulated into a lifetime exposure score, workers with scores above the median for the population show an excess of leukemia 2.5 times higher than workers below the median (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-8.6). Those individuals with long duration of employment in jobs with intermittent peak exposures may be at higher risk of leukemia than those with a constant exposure level. Analyses that allow for a latent period suggest the risk is associated with exposures that occurred 10 or more years before death. Workers with peak exposure scores above the median have odds ratios of 2.4 (95% CI 0.7-9.0) and 6.6 (95% CI 0.7-58) for latent periods of 10 and 15 years, respectively. The data suggest an increasing risk with increasing exposure (p for trend = 0.05) when cumulated scores are based on peak exposure scores. Peak exposures tended to occur in cable splicing work and in old telephone switching offices. The numbers in this study are small and observed differences may be due to chance. PMID:8470662

  2. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  3. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Phase 1 Study of Terameprocol (EM-1421) in Patients With Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-20

    Leukemias; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL); Adult T Cell Leukemia (ATL); Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML-BP); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

  5. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. A Newborn with Congenital Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia After In Vitro Fertilization.

    PubMed

    Ergin, Hacer; Özdemir, Özmert M A; Karaca, Abdullah; Türk, Nilay Şen; Düzcan, Füsun; Ergin, Şeniz; Kazancı, Elif; Vergin, Canan; Erbay, Ayşe

    2015-08-01

    Congenital leukemia is a rare disease. The majority of cases of this disease are acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Congenital acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is rare and most often is of B cell lineage. Rarely, some cases have been designated biphenotypic or mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL). Herein, we report a preterm newborn referred to us as a result of the appearance of blue-violaceous dermal nodules on her body at birth. She was a twin and the product of an in vitro fertilization (IVF) pregnancy. Physical examination showed jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, and peripheral facial nerve palsy in addition to dermal nodules. Bone marrow aspiration showed 40% blasts of lymphoid lineage; skin biopsy and its immunohistochemistry revealed myeloblastic infiltration of the dermis. Cytogenetic analysis (46,XX), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, and cranial magnetic resonance were normal. The patient was diagnosed with congenital MPAL, and an association between IVF and congenital leukemia was suggested. PMID:23639745

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPS2 Encodes a Membrane Protein Localized at the Spindle Pole Body and the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Muoz-Centeno, Mara de la Cruz; McBratney, Susan; Monterrosa, Antonio; Byers, Breck; Mann, Carl; Winey, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The MPS2 (monopolar spindle two) gene is one of several genes required for the proper execution of spindle pole body (SPB) duplication in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Winey et al., 1991). We report here that the MPS2 gene encodes an essential 44-kDa protein with two putative coiled-coil regions and a hydrophobic sequence. Although MPS2 is required for normal mitotic growth, some null strains can survive; these survivors exhibit slow growth and abnormal ploidy. The MPS2 protein was tagged with nine copies of the myc epitope, and biochemical fractionation experiments show that it is an integral membrane protein. Visualization of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) Mps2p fusion protein in living cells and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of 9xmyc-Mps2p revealed a perinuclear localization with one or two brighter foci of staining corresponding to the SPB. Additionally, immunoelectron microscopy shows that GFP-Mps2p localizes to the SPB. Our analysis suggests that Mps2p is required as a component of the SPB for insertion of the nascent SPB into the nuclear envelope. PMID:10397772

  8. Body-wave magnitudes of underground nuclear explosions at major test sites derived by the maximum-likelihood method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Sheila; Douglas, Alan; Bowers, David; Selby, Neil

    2013-04-01

    Body-wave magnitudes (mb) of ~600 underground nuclear tests have been derived from station amplitudes collected by the International Seismological Centre (ISC), by a joint inversion for mb and station-specific magnitude corrections (Lilwall 1986). The maximum-likelihood method was used, to reduce the upward bias of network mean magnitudes caused by data censoring for low-magnitude disturbances where stations do not report arrivals that are hidden by the ambient noise at the time. Threshold noise levels at each station were derived from the ISC amplitudes using the method of Kelly and Lacoss (1969). The joint inversion is valid only for sites where enough explosions occurred, and stations with enough arrivals (a minimum of three for both), for a statistical treatment to be valid. It is used on the sites: Kazakhstan and Novaya Zemlya, former Soviet Union; Singer, China; Mururoa and Fangataufa, French Polynesia; and Nevada, USA. At sites where four or more arrivals could be used to derive magnitudes and station terms for twenty-five or more explosions (Nevada, Kazakhstan and Mururoa), the resulting magnitudes and station terms were fixed and a second inversion carried out to derive magnitudes for additional explosions with as few as three arrivals. A further ~90 magnitudes were derived thus, mostly of Nevada explosions.

  9. Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for…

  10. Supportive Care for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Leukapheresis for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Next Topic Stem cell transplant for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Supportive care for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Supportive care for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is aimed at helping with problems related to the cancer and its treatment. For ...

  11. Radiation-induced leukemias in ankylosing spondylitis

    SciTech Connect

    Toolis, F.; Potter, B.; Allan, N.C.; Langlands, A.O.

    1981-10-01

    Three cases of leukemia occurred in patients with ankylosing spondylitis treated by radiotherapy. In each case, the leukemic process exhibited bizarre features suggesting that radiation is likely to induce atypical forms of leukemia possessing unusual attributes not shared by spontaneously developing leukemia. The likely distinctive aspects of radiation-induced leukemia are discussed.

  12. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  13. SJG-136 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  14. Compartmentalization and Functionality of Nuclear Disorder: Intrinsic Disorder and Protein-Protein Interactions in Intra-Nuclear Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanchi; Na, Insung; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus contains a number of membrane-less organelles or intra-nuclear compartments. These compartments are dynamic structures representing liquid-droplet phases which are only slightly denser than the bulk intra-nuclear fluid. They possess different functions, have diverse morphologies, and are typically composed of RNA (or, in some cases, DNA) and proteins. We analyzed 3005 mouse proteins localized in specific intra-nuclear organelles, such as nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinuclear compartment and compared them with ~29,863 non-nuclear proteins from mouse proteome. Our analysis revealed that intrinsic disorder is enriched in the majority of intra-nuclear compartments, except for the nuclear pore and lamina. These compartments are depleted in proteins that lack disordered domains and enriched in proteins that have multiple disordered domains. Moonlighting proteins found in multiple intra-nuclear compartments are more likely to have multiple disordered domains. Protein-protein interaction networks in the intra-nuclear compartments are denser and include more hubs compared to the non-nuclear proteins. Hubs in the intra-nuclear compartments (except for the nuclear pore) are enriched in disorder compared with non-nuclear hubs and non-nuclear proteins. Therefore, our work provides support to the idea of the functional importance of intrinsic disorder in the cell nucleus and shows that many proteins associated with sub-nuclear organelles in nuclei of mouse cells are enriched in disorder. This high level of disorder in the mouse nuclear proteins defines their ability to serve as very promiscuous binders, possessing both large quantities of potential disorder-based interaction sites and the ability of a single such site to be involved in a large number of interactions. PMID:26712748

  15. Bendamustine Plus Alemtuzumab for Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-20

    Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  16. Engagement of the leukocyte-associated Ig-like receptor-1 induces programmed cell death and prevents NF-kappaB nuclear translocation in human myeloid leukemias.

    PubMed

    Poggi, A; Pellegatta, F; Leone, B E; Moretta, L; Zocchi, M R

    2000-10-01

    Leukocyte-associated Ig-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is a surface molecule that functions as an inhibitory receptor on natural killer cells, T lymphocytes and monocytes. Here, we provide evidence that occupancy of LAIR-1 on human myelomonocytic leukemic cell lines inhibits proliferation and leads to programmed cell death (PCD), evaluated by propidium iodide staining and transmission electron microscopy. Interestingly, PCD elicited via LAIR-1 was not blocked by different caspase inhibitors, at variance with apoptosis induced via CD95/Fas, which was prevented by the caspase-1 and caspase-8 specific inhibitors. In addition, we show that the p65 subunit of the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), constitutively expressed in the nucleus of these cell lines, was retained in the cytoplasm upon engagement of LAIR-1. This was evident already 8 h after LAIR-1 occupancy, when apoptosis was not yet detectable by fluorometric or ultrastructural analysis. Moreover, a reduction in inhibitor kappaBalpha phosphorylation was observed after LAIR-1 engagement. As blocking of NF-kappaB activation has been shown to rescue sensitivity to anti-cancer drugs in solid tumors, we suggest that LAIR-1 may represent a possible target for pharmacological approaches aimed to potentiate anti-leukemic therapy. PMID:11069054

  17. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-03

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

  19. Multicomponent analysis of radiolytic products in human body fluids using high field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grootveld, Martin C.; Herz, Herman; Haywood, Rachel; Hawkes, Geoffrey E.; Naughton, Declan; Perera, Anusha; Knappitt, Jacky; Blake, David R.; Claxson, Andrew W. D.

    1994-05-01

    High field proton Hahn spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate radiolytic damage to biomolecules present in intact human body fluids. γ-Radiolysis of healthy or rheumatoid human serum (5.00 kGy) in the presence of atmospheric O 2 gave rise to reproducible elevations in the concentration of NMR-detectable acetate which are predominantly ascribable to the prior oxidation of lactate to pyruvate by hydroxyl radical (·OH) followed by oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate by radiolytically-generated hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) and/or further ·OH radical. Increases in the serum levels of non-protein-bound, low-molecular-mass components such as citrate and glutamine were also observed subsequent to γ-radiolysis, an observation which may reflect their mobilisation from protein binding-sites by ·OH radical, superoxide anion and/or H 2O 2. Moreover, substantial radiolytically-mediated elevations in the concentration of serum formate were also detectable. In addition to the above modifications, γ-radiolysis of inflammatory knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) generated a low-molecular-mass oligosaccharide species derived from the radiolytic fragmentation of hyaluronate. The radiolytically-mediated production of acetate in SF samples was markedly greater than that observed in serum samples, a consequence of the much higher levels of ·OH radical-scavenging lactate present. Indeed, increases in SF acetate concentration were detectable at doses as low as 48 Gy. We conclude that high field proton NMR analysis provides much useful information regarding the relative radioprotectant abilities of endogenous components and the nature, status and levels of radiolytic products generated in intact biofluids. We also suggest that NMR-detectable radiolytic products with associated toxicological properties (e.g. formate) may play a role in contributing to the deleterious effects observed following exposure of living organisms to sources of ionising radiation.

  20. An ARID Domain-Containing Protein within Nuclear Bodies Is Required for Sperm Cell Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Binglian; He, Hui; Zheng, Yanhua; Wu, Wenye; McCormick, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    In plants, each male meiotic product undergoes mitosis, and then one of the resulting cells divides again, yielding a three-celled pollen grain comprised of a vegetative cell and two sperm cells. Several genes have been found to act in this process, and DUO1 (DUO POLLEN 1), a transcription factor, plays a key role in sperm cell formation by activating expression of several germline genes. But how DUO1 itself is activated and how sperm cell formation is initiated remain unknown. To expand our understanding of sperm cell formation, we characterized an ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain)-containing protein, ARID1, that is specifically required for sperm cell formation in Arabidopsis. ARID1 localizes within nuclear bodies that are transiently present in the generative cell from which sperm cells arise, coincident with the timing of DUO1 activation. An arid1 mutant and antisense arid1 plants had an increased incidence of pollen with only a single sperm-like cell and exhibited reduced fertility as well as reduced expression of DUO1. In vitro and in vivo evidence showed that ARID1 binds to the DUO1 promoter. Lastly, we found that ARID1 physically associates with histone deacetylase 8 and that histone acetylation, which in wild type is evident only in sperm, expanded to the vegetative cell nucleus in the arid1 mutant. This study identifies a novel component required for sperm cell formation in plants and uncovers a direct positive regulatory role of ARID1 on DUO1 through association with histone acetylation. PMID:25057814

  1. Marrow transplantation for leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.D.

    1981-07-01

    Marrow transplantation for selected patients with leukemia, as for patients with severe combined immunologic deficiency or severe aplastic anemia, has now become an accepted clinical procedure. For patients with acute leukemia who have relapsed after achieving a remission of chemotherapy, marrow grafting from an identical twin or an HLA-identical sibling has now been demonstrated to produce median remissions as long as or longer than any reported for combination chemotherapy. In contrast to chemotherapy, marrow transplantation offers the possibility of cure for a small but significant fraction of these patients. Marrow transplantation for patients with ANL in first remission has now resulted in median survivals much longer than any reported with chemotherapy. Although it now appears that more than 50% of these patients can be cured with marrow transplantation, a much longer follow-up is indicated since some patients who achieve a complete remission with combination chemotherapy are now living for a long time, and some of these patients (less than 20%) may also be cured. Current intensive research with new modalities such as interferon, Acyclovir, Cyclosporin A, and monoclonal antibodies can reasonably be expected to improve the overall results of marrow transplantation.

  2. Targeted therapy in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Downing, James R

    2008-05-01

    Research conducted over the last two decades has yielded a detailed understanding of the molecular lesions that contribute to the malignant transformation of hematopoietic stem cells and committed progenitors into the various forms of acute and chronic leukemia. Although our understanding of the molecular pathology of leukemia remains incomplete, the information gained to date has had a profound impact on the way these malignancies are both diagnosed and monitored during therapy. More recently, targeted therapies have been developed against some of the identified genetic lesions. These therapies have led to significant improvements in patient outcomes while simultaneously decreasing therapy-related toxicity. With the advent of genome-wide methods to define the total complement of genetic and epigenetic lesions involved in leukemogenesis, new targeted therapies can be anticipated. This review highlights some of the targeted therapies that are presently being used to treat hematopoietic malignancies and describes some of the recent advances that should have a significant impact on the development of future target therapies. PMID:18437169

  3. Management of prolymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dearden, Claire

    2015-12-01

    B-cell (B-PLL) and T-cell (T-PLL) prolymphocytic leukemias are rare, poor-prognosis lymphoid neoplasms with similar presentation characterized by symptomatic splenomegaly and lymphocytosis. They can be distinguished from each other and from other T- and B-cell leukemias by careful evaluation of morphology, immunophenotyping, and molecular genetics. The clinical behavior is typically aggressive, although a subset of patients may have an indolent phase of variable length. First-line therapy for T-PLL is with intravenous alemtuzumab and for B-PLL is with combination purine analog-based chemo-immunotherapy. New B-cell receptor inhibitors, such as ibrutinib and idelalisib, may have a role in the management of B-PLL, especially for the patients harboring abnormalities of TP53. Allogenic stem cell transplantation should still be considered for eligible patients and may be the only current therapy capable of delivering a cure. In the past few years, many of the molecular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis and progression have been revealed and are likely to lead to the development of novel targeted approaches. PMID:26637744

  4. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Implication of the Lymphocyte-Specific Nuclear Body Protein Sp140 in an Innate Response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Navid; Millette, Robert; Platt, Emily J.; Marin, Mariana; Kozak, Susan L.; Bloch, Donald B.; Kabat, David

    2002-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizes an unidentified antiviral pathway that occurs only in nonpermissive (NP) cells. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human lymphocyte cDNA library, we identified several potential Vif partners. One, the nuclear body protein Sp140, was found specifically in all NP cells (n = 12 cell lines tested; P ≤ 0.001), and HIV-1 infection induced its partial dispersal from nuclear bodies into cytosolic colocalization with Vif. Our results implicate Sp140 in a response to HIV-1 that may be related to or coordinated with the pathway that inactivates HIV-1 lacking vif. PMID:12368356

  6. Adiabatic representation in the Coulomb three-body problem in the united-atom limit: Nuclear widths of the energy levels of the muonic molecule ttµ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melezhik, V. S.

    2016-01-01

    We study the asymptotic behavior of the wave function of the system of three Coulomb particles in the united-atom limit in the adiabatic representation of the three-body problem. This result is used to calculate the nuclear widths of muonic-molecule energy levels. We discuss features of the approach with regard to excited states of the muonic molecule ttµ with a nonzero orbital angular momentum.

  7. Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) and Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukopenia” (a below-normal concentration of white cells) • Enlargement of the spleen and/or liver • Feeling of fullness below the ribs due to spleen enlargement. Published as a public service by The Leukemia &  ...

  8. ZNF198, a zinc finger protein rearranged in myeloproliferative disease, localizes to the PML nuclear bodies and interacts with SUMO-1 and PML

    SciTech Connect

    Kunapuli, Padmaja; Kasyapa, Chitta S.; Chin, Suet-Feung . E-mail: John.Cowell@RoswellPark.org

    2006-11-15

    The ZNF198/FGFR1 fusion gene in atypical myeloproliferative disease produces a constitutively active cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase, unlike ZNF198 which is normally a nuclear protein. We have now shown that the ZNF198/FGFR1 fusion kinase interacts with the endogenous ZNF198 protein suggesting that the function of ZNF198 may be compromised in cells expressing it. Little is currently known about the endogenous function of ZNF198 and to investigate this further we performed a yeast two-hybrid analysis and identified SUMO-1 as a binding partner of ZNF198. These observations were confirmed using co-immunoprecipitation which demonstrated that ZNF198 is covalently modified by SUMO-1. Since many of the SUMO-1-modified proteins are targeted to the PML nuclear bodies we used confocal microscopy to show that SUMO-1, PML and ZNF198 colocalize to punctate structures, shown by immunocytochemistry to be PML bodies. Using co-immunoprecipitation we now show that PML and sumoylated ZNF198 can be found in a protein complex in the cell. Mutation of the SUMO-1 binding site in wild-type ZNF198 resulted in loss of distinct PML bodies, reduced PML levels and a more dispersed nuclear localization of the PML protein. In cells expressing ZNF198/FGFR1, which also lack the SUMO-1 binding site, SUMO-1 is preferentially localized in the cytoplasm, which is associated with loss of distinct PML bodies. Recently, arsenic trioxide (ATO) was proposed as an alternative therapy for APL that was resistant to traditional therapy. Treatment of cells expressing ZNF198/FGFR1 with ATO demonstrated reduced autophosphorylation of the ZNF198/FGFR1 protein and induced apoptosis, which is not seen in cells expressing wild-type ZNF198. Overall our results suggest that the sumoylation of ZNF198 is important for PML body formation and that the abrogation of sumoylation of ZNF198 in ZNF198/FGFR1 expressing cells may be an important mechanism in cellular transformation.

  9. Induction of immune resistance against L1210 lymphatic leukemia in mice after chemoradiotherapy of the leukemia and reconstitution with bone marrow purged from the leukemia with mafosfamide

    SciTech Connect

    Skorski, T.; Kawalec, M.

    1988-10-01

    Lymphatic leukemia L1210-bearing semisyngeneic Balb/c x DBA/2Wf F1 (CD2F1) mice were subjected to chemoradiotherapy (2 x 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide i.p. and 1000 cGy of total body irradiation) and reconstitution with 10(7) syngeneic bone marrow cells i.v. The bone marrow obtained from leukemic mice was previously ex vivo purged of the leukemia cells with mafosfamide (ASTA Z7654) and stored in liquid nitrogen. Eight weeks after cytoreductive therapy and bone marrow transplantation we tried to immunize the mice against the lethal dose of the leukemia by i.p. injections of L1210-Maf cells (L1210 cells treated in vitro with mafosfamide for inhibition of their growth). About 75% of such mice were able to reject the subsequent 10(3) L1210 leukemia cell challenge, as compared with 70% of normal immunized mice and 55% of mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells not treated with mafosfamide.

  10. Serum-dependent expression of promyelocytic leukemia protein suppresses propagation of influenza virus

    SciTech Connect

    Iki, Shigeo; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Yokosawa, Noriko; Nagata, Kyosuke; Fujii, Nobuhiro . E-mail: fujii@sapmed.ac.jp

    2005-12-05

    The rate of propagation of influenza virus in human adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells was found to negatively correlate with the concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS) in the culture medium. Virus replicated more rapidly at lower FBS concentrations (0 or 2%) than at higher concentrations (10 or 20%) during an early stage of infection. Basal and interferon (IFN)-induced levels of typical IFN-inducible anti-viral proteins, such as 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, dsRNA-activated protein kinase and MxA, were unaffected by variation in FBS concentrations. But promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) was expressed in a serum-dependent manner. In particular, the 65 to 70 kDa isoform of PML was markedly upregulated following the addition of serum. In contrast, other isoforms were induced by IFN treatment, and weakly induced by FBS concentrations. Immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that PML was mainly formed nuclear bodies in Caco-2 cells at various FBS concentrations, and the levels of the PML-nuclear bodies were upregulated by FBS. Overexpression of PML isoform consisting of 560 or 633 amino acid residues by transfection of expression plasmid results in significantly delayed viral replication rate in Caco-2 cells. On the other hand, downregulation of PML expression by RNAi enhanced viral replication. These results indicate that PML isoforms which are expressed in a serum-dependent manner suppress the propagation of influenza virus at an early stage of infection.

  11. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  13. Cilengitide in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b)

  14. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-25

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Genetic predispositions to childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Stieglitz, Elliot

    2013-01-01

    While the majority of leukemia cases occur in the absence of any known predisposing factor, there are germline mutations that significantly increase the risk of developing hematopoietic malignancies in childhood. In this review article, we describe a number of these mutations and their clinical features. These predispositions can be broadly classified as those leading to bone marrow failure, those involving tumor suppressor genes, DNA repair defects, immunodeficiencies or other congenital syndromes associated with transient myeloid disorders. While leukemia can develop as a secondary event in the aforementioned syndromes, there are also several syndromes that specifically lead to the development of leukemia as their primary phenotype. Many of the genes discussed in this review can also be somatically mutated in other cancers, highlighting the importance of understanding shared alterations and mechanisms underpinning syndromic and sporadic leukemia. PMID:23926459

  18. What Is Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... In this way CMML is more like a myeloproliferative disease ( myelo -- bone marrow, proliferative -- excessive growth). Chronic myeloid leukemia is an example of a myeloproliferative disease where there is an overproduction of white ...

  19. Management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ghia, Paolo; Hallek, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has undergone profound changes that have been driven by an improved understanding of the biology of the disease and the approval of several new drugs. Moreover, many novel drugs are currently under evaluation for rapid approval or have been approved by regulatory agencies, further broadening the available therapeutic armamentarium for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The use of novel biological and genetic parameters combined with a careful clinical evaluation allows us to dissect some of the heterogeneity of the disease and to distinguish patients with a very mild onset and course, who often will not need any treatment, from those with an intermediate prognosis and a third group with a very aggressive course (high-risk leukemia). On this background, it becomes increasingly challenging to select the right treatment strategy. In this paper, we describe our own approach to the management of different patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:24881042

  20. Stages of Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Monoclonal antibody therapy is a type of targeted therapy used to treat hairy cell leukemia. Monoclonal antibody therapy uses antibodies made in the laboratory from ...

  1. Leukemia as a second malignancy.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Uppin MS; Paul TR; Rajappa S; Gayathri K; Jacob R; Uppin SG

    2007-07-01

    To study the occurrence of leukemia as a second malignancy following various primary solid and hematological malignancies. Total 11 cases of leukemia presenting as a second malignancy were studied over a period of 15 years from 1990 to 2005. The primary malignancies included carcinoma breast (4), multiple myeloma (3) and one each of Hodgkin's lymphoma, mediastinal germ cell tumor, papillary carcinoma thyroid and myxopapillary ependymoma. Ten patients had received chemotherapy with combination radiotherapy in six patients. The commonest type of leukemia was AML-M2. The cyogenetic test results were available in three cases. The secondary leukemia showed aggressive behaviour and all patients on follow-up died within a period of one month. The risk benefit ratio of chemotherapy and radiotherapy should be considered before starting the patients on treatment. A high degree of suspicion and follow up with hematological parameters is required for therapy related complications.

  2. How Is Childhood Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in immature forms of cells that make platelets. World Health Organization (WHO) classification of AML The FAB ... phases, but a common system (proposed by the World Health Organization) is described below. If the leukemia ...

  3. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  4. PROGRESS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Kadia, Tapan M.; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady gains in clinical research and a renaissance of genomics in leukemia have led to improved outcomes. The recognition of tremendous heterogeneity in AML has allowed individualized treatments of specific disease entities within the context of patient age, cytogenetics, and mutational analysis. The following is a comprehensive review of the current state of AML therapy and a roadmap of our approach to these distinct disease entities. PMID:25441110

  5. Hairy Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Plenderleith, I. H.

    1970-01-01

    The clinical findings in 12 patients with an unusual type of leukemia have been reviewed. The leukemic cell cannot be identified with any of the normal hematopoietic cells or with any of the lymphomas and may best be referred to by the descriptive term “hairy cell”, which describes its appearance, most clearly seen on phase contrast microscopy. The patients were all males and the major clinical features were enlargement of the liver and spleen, with little lymph node enlargement. Hematologic findings in most patients have been anemia and thrombocytopenia with the characteristic abnormal cells present in the peripheral blood and bone marrow. The disease most often runs an indolent course and has shown little or no response to a variety of forms of treatment. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4939244

  6. [Plasma cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Ravinet, Aurlie; Bay, Jacques Olivier; Tournilhac, Olivier

    2014-11-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare disorder which develops spontaneously (primary PCL) or evolves in patients with multiple myeloma (secondary PCL). It is defined by the presence of 2 10(9)/L peripheral blood plasma cells or plasmacytosis accounting for more than 20 % of the differential white cell count. PCL presents more often extramedullary involvement, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypercalcemia, as well as impaired renal function. Cytogenetic abnormalities and mutations observed in PCL lead to escape from immune surveillance and independence from the bone marrow microenvironment with changes in expression of adhesion molecules or chemokines receptors. The outcome of PCL has improved with combination approaches with novel agents (including bortezomib and immunomodulatory drugs, such as lenalidomide) and with autologous stem cell transplantation. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is currently available for young patients. This article is an overview of this rare and severe disease and the different therapeutics options that are recommended. PMID:25418598

  7. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-07

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Antibody Therapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vedi, Aditi; Ziegler, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing cure rates for pediatric leukemia, relapsed disease still carries a poor prognosis with significant morbidity and mortality. Novel targeted therapies are currently being investigated in an attempt to reduce adverse events and improve survival outcomes. Antibody therapies represent a form of targeted therapy that offers a new treatment paradigm. Monoclonal antibodies are active in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are currently in Phase III trials. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are the next generation of antibodies where a highly potent cytotoxic agent is bound to an antibody by a linker, resulting in selective targeting of leukemia cells. ADCs are currently being tested in clinical trials for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and ALL. Bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) antibodies are a construct whereby each antibody contains two binding sites, with one designed to engage the patient’s own immune system and the other to target malignant cells. BiTE antibodies show great promise as a novel and effective therapy for childhood leukemia. This review will outline recent developments in targeted agents for pediatric leukemia including monoclonal antibodies, ADCs, and BiTE antibodies. PMID:24795859

  9. Molecular diagnosis of lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Goud, Kalal Iravathy; Dayakar, Seetha; Prasad, S V S S; Rao, Koteshwar N; Shaik, Amina; Vanjakshi, S

    2013-01-01

    The mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene at chromosome band 11q23 is commonly involved in reciprocal translocations that is detected in acute leukemia. The MLL gene, commonly known as mixed lineage leukemia or myeloid lymphoid leukemia, has been independently identified and cloned from the 11q23 breakpoint of acute leukemia. We describe a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia whose cells had shown reciprocal translocation between short arm (p21) of chromosome 2 and long arm (q23) of chromosome number 11 [t(2;11) (p21;q23)] by cytogenetic analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) was also performed for reconfirmation with a probe for MLL which showed split signals, hybridizing to both the derivative 2 and 11 chromosomes. Our study confirmed FISH as the most suitable assay for detecting MLL rearrangements because of its sensitivity and speed. It recommended that FISH should be used as complementary to conventional cytogenetic analysis. In conclusion, evaluation of the t(2;11)(p21;q23) was done by molecular clarification and flow cytometry. PMID:24125990

  10. Chemically induced leukemia in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, R H; Seiber, S M

    1981-01-01

    The human population may be exposed to potentially leukemogenic agents, either in the form of drugs and food additives or as environmental contaminants and pollutants. However, in spite of the large number and diversity of these chemicals, only a few have been implicated as human leukemogens. One such agent is benzene, a known bone marrow depressant. A number of case reports have associated chronic exposure to this agent with the development of acute leukemia, as have several epidemiologic surveys. Treatment with various antitumor agents, including procarbazine, melphalan, thio-TEPA, chlorambucil, and cyclophosphamide, has also been associated with the development of acute leukemia. In addition, chloramphenicol and phenylbutazone have been implicated as human leukemogens, but the association between exposure to these two agents and acute leukemia appears at present to be weaker than it is for benzene and antitumor agent exposure. Despite such associations between exposure to chemicals and acute leukemia, several important problems exist with regard to implicating specific agents in the development of this neoplasm in man, including the paucity of animal models for chemically induced leukemia, and the frequent necessity to rely on single case reports or clusters of cases in which chemical exposures are associated with acute leukemia. Future efforts should be directed at performing properly designed and well executed epidemiologic studies, and at developing new in vitro and in vivo models for the study of this neoplasm. PMID:6786872

  11. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Radioimmunoassay for intact Gross mouse leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Yalow, R S; Gross, L

    1976-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for intact Gross leukemia virus has been developed using 125I-labeled Gross virus grown in tissue culture and guinea pig antisera to Gross virus grown either in tissue culture or harvested from leukemic C3H(f) mice. Separation of bound from free labeled virus was effected using the double antibody method. The assay can detect fewer than 10(8) virus particles and has been used to measure the viral content of individual organs from inoculated leukemic C3H(f) mice and from Ak mice with spontaneous leukemia. Organs from noninoculated healthy C3H(f) mice crossreacted poorly in the system, virus generally being detectable only in the thymus and spleen and at low concentration. In some of the inoculated C3H(f) leukemic mice the viral content of as little as 0.5 mul of plasma is measurable. That this assay is for intact virus and not for soluble antigens of the viral envelope was proven by the observation that the immunoreactive material of plasma and extracts from thymus and liver of leukemic mice has a buoyant denisty in sucrose of 1.17-1.18 g/ml, corresponding to that of intact virus grown in tissue culture. With this sensitivity it may now be possible to quantitate viral concentrations in tissue and body fluids from the time of inoculation through the development of obvious pathology. PMID:1066697

  13. Gastric myeloid sarcoma without acute myeloblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Li; Tao, Jin; Li, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Xiao-Liang; Chen, Jian-Ning; Shao, Chun-Kui; Wu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid sarcomas (MS) involve extramedullary blast proliferation from one or more myeloid lineages that replace the original tissue architecture, and these neoplasias are called granulocytic sarcomas, chloromas or extramedullary myeloid tumors. Such tumors develop in lymphoid organs, bones (e.g., skulls and orbits), skin, soft tissue, various mucosae, organs, and the central nervous system. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement is rare, while the occurrence of myeloid sarcomas in patients without leukemia is even rare. Here, we report a case of a 38-year-old man who presented with epigastric pain and progressive jaundice. An upper GI endoscopy had shown extensive multifocal hyperemic fold thickening and the spread of nodular lesions in the body of the stomach. Biopsies from the gastric lesions indicated myeloid sarcoma of the stomach. However, concurrent peripheral blood and bone marrow examinations showed no evidence of acute myeloid leukemia. For diagnosis, the immunohistochemical markers must be checked when evaluating a suspected myeloid sarcoma case. Accurate MS diagnosis determines the appropriate therapy and prognosis. PMID:25717265

  14. cut11+: A Gene Required for Cell Cycle-dependent Spindle Pole Body Anchoring in the Nuclear Envelope and Bipolar Spindle Formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    West, Robert R.; Vaisberg, Elena V.; Ding, Rubai; Nurse, Paul; McIntosh, J. Richard

    1998-01-01

    The “cut” mutants of Schizosaccharomyces pombe are defective in spindle formation and/or chromosome segregation, but they proceed through the cell cycle, resulting in lethality. Analysis of temperature-sensitive alleles of cut11+ suggests that this gene is required for the formation of a functional bipolar spindle. Defective spindle structure was revealed with fluorescent probes for tubulin and DNA. Three-dimensional reconstruction of mutant spindles by serial sectioning and electron microscopy showed that the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) either failed to complete normal duplication or were free floating in the nucleoplasm. Localization of Cut11p tagged with the green fluorescent protein showed punctate nuclear envelope staining throughout the cell cycle and SPBs staining from early prophase to mid anaphase. This SPB localization correlates with the time in the cell cycle when SPBs are inserted into the nuclear envelope. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed the localization of Cut11p to mitotic SPBs and nuclear pore complexes. Cloning and sequencing showed that cut11+ encodes a novel protein with seven putative membrane-spanning domains and homology to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene NDC1. These data suggest that Cut11p associates with nuclear pore complexes and mitotic SPBs as an anchor in the nuclear envelope; this role is essential for mitosis. PMID:9763447

  15. Chromatin redistribution of the DEK oncoprotein represses hTERT transcription in leukemias.

    PubMed

    Karam, Maroun; Thenoz, Morgan; Capraro, Valrie; Robin, Jean-Philippe; Pinatel, Christiane; Lancon, Agns; Galia, Perrine; Sibon, David; Thomas, Xavier; Ducastelle-Lepretre, Sophie; Nicolini, Franck; El-Hamri, Mohamed; Chelghoun, Youcef; Wattel, Eric; Mortreux, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Although numerous factors have been found to modulate hTERT transcription, the mechanism of its repression in certain leukemias remains unknown. We show here that DEK represses hTERT transcription through its enrichment on the hTERT promoter in cells from chronic and acute myeloid leukemias, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but not acute lymphocytic leukemias where hTERT is overexpressed. We isolated DEK from the hTERT promoter incubated with nuclear extracts derived from fresh acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells and from cells expressing Tax, an hTERT repressor encoded by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1. In addition to the recruitment of DEK, the displacement of two potent known hTERT transactivators from the hTERT promoter characterized both AML cells and Tax-expressing cells. Reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays permitted to map the region that supports the repressive effect of DEK on hTERT transcription, which was proportionate to the level of DEK-promoter association but not with the level of DEK expression. Besides hTERT repression, this context of chromatin redistribution of DEK was found to govern about 40% of overall transcriptional modifications, including those of cancer-prone genes. In conclusion, DEK emerges as an hTERT repressor shared by various leukemia subtypes and seems involved in the deregulation of numerous genes associated with leukemogenesis. PMID:24563617

  16. MLL leukemia and future treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Marschalek, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the MLL gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult, and therapy-induced acute leukemias. So far, about 80 different direct MLL fusions and about 120 reciprocal MLL fusions have been characterized at the molecular level. The common theme in these leukemia-associated genetic rearrangements is the genetic disruption of the MLL gene. This leads to MLL-X fusion proteins that still bind to nuclear factors (e.g., MEN1, LEDGF), which in turn allow them to target promoters and cause ectopic gene transcription. In addition, the most frequent MLL fusions (MLL-AF4, MLL-AF9, MLL-AF10, and MLL-ENL) are all recruiting the wild-type AF4 multiprotein complex that contains the target proteins P-TEFb, BRD4, and DOT1L. Vice versa, reciprocal X-MLL fusions exhibit a PHD domain (H3K4me3 reader domain), sequester the histone acetyltransferases CREBBP and MOF1 and bear a histone methyltransferase domain at their very C-terminus (SET domain). Except for AF4-MLL, the functional consequences deriving from reciprocal fusion proteins are not very well understood. However, based on our knowledge about the above-mentioned MLL fusions, it is reasonable to inhibit their oncogenic activity in a targeted fashion. Recent efforts in developing such inhibitors and their mode of action will be critically discussed. PMID:25740345

  17. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-19

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  18. Phase I/II Study of Nilotinib/Ruxolitinb Therapy for TKI Resistant Ph-Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-04

    Chronic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Philadelphia Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Resistant to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy

  19. Leukemia stem cells: the root of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Xu, Rongzhen

    2015-06-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disorder characterized by a chromosome translocation that generates the Bcr-Abl oncogene encoding a constitutive kinase activity. Despite remarkable success in controlling CML at chronic phase by Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), a significant proportion of CML patients treated with TKIs develop drug resistance due to the inability of TKIs to kill leukemia stem cells (LSCs) that are responsible for initiation, drug resistance, and relapse of CML. Therefore, there is an urgent need for more potent and safer therapies against leukemia stem cells for curing CML. A number of LSC-associated targets and corresponding signaling pathways, including CaMKII-γ, a critical molecular switch for co-activating multiple LSC-associated signaling pathways, have been identified over the past decades and various small inhibitors targeting LSC are also under development. Increasing evidence shows that leukemia stem cells are the root of CML and targeting LSC may offer a curable treatment option for CML patients. This review summarizes the molecular biology of LSC and its-associated targets, and the potential clinical application in chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:25749979

  20. [244 patients with hyperleukocytic acute leukemia. Shanghai Leukemia Cooperation Group].

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lin, G; Wang, J

    1997-08-01

    To know the clinical characteristics and the prognostic factors of hyperleukocytic acute leukemia, we reviewed 244 patients with acute leukemia associated with hyperleukocytosis. Restrospective analysis and control study were used. Hyperleukocytosis occured in 8.5% of patients with acute leukemia. Hyperleukocytosis in ALL was more common than that in AML. Among AML with hyperleukocytosis, M5 subtype was the most. Hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, DIC and CNSL were more frequent in hyperleukocytosis group. The complete remission rate was 41.4% for patients with hyperleukocytosis versus 54.2% for patients with non-hyperleukocytosis. The early mortality rate was significantly increased in hyperleukocytic patients (23.8%) as compared to the nonhyperleukocytic group (11.1%). Intracranial hemorrhage was the main cause of early death. The high risk factors of early death were: hemoglobin < or = 40 g/L, blood platelet < or = 30 x 10(9)/L, DIC, infection, CNSL at presentation. Acute leukemia with hyperleukocytosis has poor prognosis. Especially, acute myeloid leukemia with hyperleukocytosis must be taken seriously because of high early mortality rate. PMID:10436959

  1. The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Clavel, Jacqueline; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Petridou, Eleni; Taylor, Malcolm; Schüz, Joachim; Spector, Logan G.; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Sinnett, Daniel; Murphy, Michael; Roman, Eve; Monge, Patricia; Ezzat, Sameera; Mueller, Beth A.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Birch, Jill; Kaatsch, Peter; Koifman, Sergio; Lightfoot, Tracy; Bhatti, Parveen; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rudant, Jérémie; O’Neill, Kate; Miligi, Lucia; Dessypris, Nick; Kang, Alice Y.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children under 15 years of age; 80% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 17% are acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Childhood leukemia shows further diversity based on cytogenetic and molecular characteristics, which may relate to distinct etiologies. Case–control studies conducted worldwide, particularly of ALL, have collected a wealth of data on potential risk factors and in some studies, biospecimens. There is growing evidence for the role of infectious/immunologic factors, fetal growth, and several environmental factors in the etiology of childhood ALL. The risk of childhood leukemia, like other complex diseases, is likely to be influenced both by independent and interactive effects of genes and environmental exposures. While some studies have analyzed the role of genetic variants, few have been sufficiently powered to investigate gene–environment interactions. Objectives The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) was established in 2007 to promote investigations of rarer exposures, gene–environment interactions and subtype-specific associations through the pooling of data from independent studies. Methods By September 2012, CLIC included 22 studies (recruitment period: 1962–present) from 12 countries, totaling approximately 31 000 cases and 50 000 controls. Of these, 19 case–control studies have collected detailed epidemiologic data, and DNA samples have been collected from children and child–parent trios in 15 and 13 of these studies, respectively. Two registry-based studies and one study comprising hospital records routinely obtained at birth and/or diagnosis have limited interview data or biospecimens. Conclusions CLIC provides a unique opportunity to fill gaps in knowledge about the role of environmental and genetic risk factors, critical windows of exposure, the effects of gene–environment interactions and associations among specific leukemia subtypes in different ethnic groups. PMID:23403126

  2. CP-violating effect of the Th nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment: accurate many-body study of ThO.

    PubMed

    Skripnikov, L V; Petrov, A N; Titov, A V; Flambaum, V V

    2014-12-31

    Investigations of CP violation in the hadron sector may be done using measurements in the ThO molecule. Recent measurements in this molecule improved the limit on the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) by an order of magnitude. Another time-reversal (T) and parity (P)-violating effect in 229ThO is induced by the nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment. We perform nuclear and molecular calculations to express this effect in terms of the strength constants of T, P-odd nuclear forces, neutron EDM, QCD vacuum angle θ, quark EDM, and chromo-EDM. PMID:25615324

  3. Cancer Statistics: Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a third party. HPF: SEER Stat Fact Sheets: Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) Expand All Collapse All Lifetime risk estimates are ... 5 Years Or More after Being Diagnosed with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? Relative survival statistics compare the survival of patients ...

  4. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia treated? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? Most types of cancers are assigned numbered ... ALL are now named as follows: B-cell ALL Early pre-B ALL (also called pro-B ...

  5. Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early diagnosis and treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the M3 subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), is important because patients with APL can develop serious blood-clotting or bleeding problems. ...

  6. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  7. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... induction therapy : This is the first phase of treatment. The goal is to kill the leukemia cells in the ... begins after the leukemia is in remission. The goal of post-remission therapy is to kill any remaining leukemia cells that ...

  8. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... induction therapy : This is the first phase of treatment. The goal is to kill the leukemia cells in the ... begins after the leukemia is in remission. The goal of post-remission therapy is to kill any remaining leukemia cells that ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... induction therapy : This is the first phase of treatment. The goal is to kill the leukemia cells in the ... begins after the leukemia is in remission. The goal of post-remission therapy is to kill any remaining leukemia cells that ...

  10. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... induction therapy : This is the first phase of treatment. The goal is to kill the leukemia cells in the ... begins after the leukemia is in remission. The goal of post-remission therapy is to kill any remaining leukemia cells that ...

  11. Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can acute myeloid leukemia be found early? Can acute myeloid leukemia be prevented? It’s not clear what causes most ... 2016 Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Leukemia - Acute Myeloid (AML)? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, ...

  12. Multiple myeloma superimposed on chronic myelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Derghazarian, C.; Whittemore, N. B.

    1974-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman with chronic myelocytic leukemia and multiple myeloma is described. Cases of acute leukemia complicating multiple myeloma have been reported in recent years, but to our knowledge this is the first case where multiple myeloma developed in a patient who had pre-existing chronic myelocytic leukemia. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2p1050-a PMID:4522851

  13. Leukemia -- Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic

    MedlinePlus

    ... your screen to choose another section to continue reading this guide. ‹ Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic up Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic - Statistics › f t g e P + H Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Leukemia - Chronic ...

  14. The European LeukemiaNet: achievements and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hehlmann, Rüdiger; Grimwade, David; Simonsson, Bengt; Apperley, Jane; Baccarani, Michele; Barbui, Tiziano; Barosi, Giovanni; Bassan, Renato; Béné, Marie C.; Berger, Ute; Büchner, Thomas; Burnett, Alan; Cross, Nicolas C.P.; de Witte, Theo J.M.; Döhner, Hartmut; Dombret, Hervé; Einsele, Hermann; Engelich, Georg; Foà, Robin; Fonatsch, Christa; Gökbuget, Nicola; Gluckman, Elaine; Gratwohl, Alois; Guilhot, Francois; Haferlach, Claudia; Haferlach, Thorsten; Hallek, Michael; Hasford, Jörg; Hochhaus, Andreas; Hoelzer, Dieter; Kiladjian, Jean-Jaques; Labar, Boris; Ljungman, Per; Mansmann, Ulrich; Niederwieser, Dietger; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Ribera, José M.; Rieder, Harald; Serve, Hubert; Schrotz-King, Petra; Sanz, Miguel A.; Saußele, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    The only way to cure leukemia is by cooperative research. To optimize research, the European LeukemiaNet integrates 105 national leukemia trial groups and networks, 105 interdisciplinary partner groups and about 1,000 leukemia specialists from 175 institutions. They care for tens of thousands of leukemia patients in 33 countries across Europe. Their ultimate goal is to cure leukemia. Since its inception in 2002, the European LeukemiaNet has steadily expanded and has unified leukemia research across Europe. The European LeukemiaNet grew from two major roots: 1) the German Competence Network on Acute and Chronic Leukemias; and 2) the collaboration of European Investigators on Chronic Myeloid Leukemia. The European LeukemiaNet has improved leukemia research and management across Europe. Its concept has led to funding by the European Commission as a network of excellence. Other sources (European Science Foundation; European LeukemiaNet-Foundation) will take over when the support of the European Commission ends. PMID:21048032

  15. [Chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sadao

    2016-03-01

    Currently, several novel drugs are available for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in Western countries. Of these drugs, those that inhibit the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway are the most promising. Ibrutinib inhibits BTK in the BCR pathway and can be administered orally. The results of several clinical trials suggest that ibrutinib is highly effective against relapsed/resistant (RR) and treatment-naïve CLL. Furthermore, ibrutinib shows equivalent efficacy on CLL with the 17p deletion. Idelalisib, which also blocks the BCR pathway, inhibits PIK3delta and induces CLL cell death. Clinical trials have shown outstanding efficacy of idelalisib against RR-CLL, especially when administered with antiCD20 antibodies. This drug is also effective against CLL with the 17p deletion. ABT-199 is another novel drug; it inhibits BCL2 signaling, not the BCR pathway, and can be administered orally. The efficacy of ABT-199 against RR-CLL has been demonstrated in a number of clinical trials. These drugs have only mild toxicity and can be used for patients in poor general condition. Unfortunately, none of these drugs have yet been approved in Japan. Rapid resolution of the 'drug lag' problem is necessary. PMID:27076234

  16. PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

  17. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Idarubicin and Cytarabine With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  19. Relapse risk after umbilical cord blood transplantation: enhanced graft-versus-leukemia effect in recipients of 2 units

    PubMed Central

    Brunstein, Claudio G.; Barker, Juliet; MacMillan, Margaret L.; DeFor, Todd; McKenna, David H.; Burke, Michael J.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; McGlave, Philip B.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Wagner, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation is potentially curative for acute leukemia. This analysis was performed to identify risk factors associated with leukemia relapse following myeloablative UCB transplantation. Acute leukemia patients (n = 177; 88 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 89 with acute myeloid leukemia) were treated at a single center. Patients received a UCB graft composed of either 1 (47%) or 2 (53%) partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)–matched unit(s). Conditioning was with cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation with or without fludarabine. The incidence of relapse was 26% (95% confidence interval [CI], 19%-33%). In multivariate analysis, relapse was higher in advanced disease patients (≥ third complete remission [CR3]; relative risk [RR], 3.6; P < .01), with a trend toward less relapse in recipients of 2 UCB units (RR = 0.6; P = .07). However, relapse was lower for CR1-2 patients who received 2 UCB units (RR 0.5; P < .03). Leukemia-free survival was 40% (95% CI, 30%-51%) and 51% (95% CI, 41%-62%) for single- and double-unit recipients, respectively (P = .35). Although it is known that transplantation in CR1 and CR2 is associated with less relapse risk, this analysis reveals an enhanced graft-versus-leukemia effect in acute leukemia patients after transplantation with 2 partially HLA-matched UCB units. This trial was registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00309842. PMID:19706886

  20. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  2. Bullous leukemia cutis mimicking facial cellulitis*

    PubMed Central

    Caldato, Luciana de Sales; Britto, Juliana de Sousa; Niero-Melo, Ligia; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2016-01-01

    Bullous leukemia cutis is an uncommon clinical manifestation of cutaneous infiltration by leukemic cells, from B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We present the case of a 67-year-old, female, chronic lymphocytic leukemia patient. She was taking chlorambucil and developed facial edema with erythema and warmth, misjudged as facial cellulitis. Two days later, she developed bullous lesions in the arms, legs, neck and face. The histopathology of facial and bullous lesions confirmed leukemia cutis. All lesions disappeared following the administration of rituximab combined with cycles of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide. Although soft tissue infections are common complications in patients undergoing chemotherapy, leukemia cutis can also resemble cellulitis.

  3. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    McKenney, Anna Sophia; Levine, Ross L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent genome-wide discovery studies have identified a spectrum of mutations in different malignancies and have led to the elucidation of novel pathways that contribute to oncogenic transformation. The discovery of mutations in the genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) has uncovered a critical role for altered metabolism in oncogenesis, and the neomorphic, oncogenic function of IDH mutations affects several epigenetic and gene regulatory pathways. Here we discuss the relevance of IDH mutations to leukemia pathogenesis, therapy, and outcome and how mutations in IDH1 and IDH2 affect the leukemia epigenome, hematopoietic differentiation, and clinical outcome. PMID:23999441

  4. Aberrant Cytokine Signaling in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Van Etten, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities of cytokine and growth factor signaling pathways are characteristic of all forms of leukemia: lymphoid and myeloid, acute and chronic. In normal hematopoietic cells, cytokines provide the stimulus for proliferation, survival, self-renewal, differentiation, and functional activation. In leukemic cells, these pathways are usurped to subserve critical parts of the malignant program. In this review, our current knowledge of leukemic cell cytokine signaling will be summarized, and some speculations on the significance and implications of these insights will be advanced. A better understanding of aberrant cytokine signaling in leukemia should provide additional targets for the rational therapy of these diseases. PMID:17934482

  5. Applying molecular epidemiology in pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Molecular epidemiology is the study of genetic and environmental risk for disease, with much effort centered on cancer. Childhood leukemia occurs in nearly a third of all patients newly diagnosed with pediatric cancer. only a small percentage of these new cases of childhood leukemia are associated with high penetrant hereditary cancer syndromes. Childhood leukemia, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been associated with a dysregulated immune system due to delayed infectious exposure at a young age. Identical twins with childhood leukemia suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia begins in utero and that the concordant presentation is due to a shared preleukemia subclone via placental transfer. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms within candidate genes find that leukemia risk may be attributed to population-based polymorphisms affecting folate metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism, DNA repair, immunity, and B-cell development. More recently, genome-wide association studies for leukemia risk has led investigators to genes associated with B-cell development. When describing leukemia predisposition due to hereditary cancer syndromes, the following 6 categories become apparent on the basis of biology and clinical presentation: (1) genetic instability/DNA repair syndromes, (2) cell cycle/differentiation syndromes, (3) bone marrow failure syndromes, (4) telomere maintenance syndromes, (5) immunodeficiency syndromes, and (6) transcription factor syndromes and pure familial leukemia. understanding the molecular epidemiology of childhood leukemia can affect the treatment and tumor surveillance strategies for these high risk patients and their family members. PMID:25973690

  6. Infection and childhood leukemia: review of evidence

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Raquel da Rocha Paiva; Wnsch, Victor

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze studies that evaluated the role of infections as well as indirect measures of exposure to infection in the risk of childhood leukemia, particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia. METHODS A search in Medline, Lilacs, and SciELO scientific publication databases initially using the descriptors "childhood leukemia" and "infection" and later searching for the words "childhood leukemia" and "maternal infection or disease" or "breastfeeding" or "daycare attendance" or "vaccination" resulted in 62 publications that met the following inclusion criteria: subject aged ? 15 years; specific analysis of cases diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or total leukemia; exposure assessment of mothers' or infants' to infections (or proxy of infection), and risk of leukemia. RESULTS Overall, 23 studies that assessed infections in children support the hypothesis that occurrence of infection during early childhood reduces the risk of leukemia, but there are disagreements within and between studies. The evaluation of exposure to infection by indirect measures showed evidence of reduced risk of leukemia associated mainly with daycare attendance. More than 50.0% of the 16 studies that assessed maternal exposure to infection observed increased risk of leukemia associated with episodes of influenza, pneumonia, chickenpox, herpes zoster, lower genital tract infection, skin disease, sexually transmitted diseases, Epstein-Barr virus, and Helicobacter pylori. CONCLUSIONS Although no specific infectious agent has been identified, scientific evidence suggests that exposure to infections has some effect on childhood leukemia etiology. PMID:24626555

  7. Cellular promyelocytic leukemia protein is an important dengue virus restriction factor.

    PubMed

    Giovannoni, Federico; Damonte, Elsa B; García, Cybele C

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic antiviral defense is based on cellular restriction factors that are constitutively expressed and, thus, active even before a pathogen enters the cell. The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) are discrete nuclear foci that contain several cellular proteins involved in intrinsic antiviral responses against a number of viruses. Accumulating reports have shown the importance of PML as a DNA virus restriction factor and how these pathogens evade this antiviral activity. However, very little information is available regarding the antiviral role of PML against RNA viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) is an RNA emerging mosquito-borne human pathogen affecting millions of individuals each year by causing severe and potentially fatal syndromes. Since no licensed antiviral drug against DENV infection is currently available, it is of great importance to understand the factors mediating intrinsic immunity that may lead to the development of new pharmacological agents that can boost their potency and thereby lead to treatments for this viral disease. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antiviral role of PML in DENV-2 A549 infected cells. PMID:25962098

  8. Cellular Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein Is an Important Dengue Virus Restriction Factor

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, Federico; Damonte, Elsa B.; García, Cybele C.

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic antiviral defense is based on cellular restriction factors that are constitutively expressed and, thus, active even before a pathogen enters the cell. The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) are discrete nuclear foci that contain several cellular proteins involved in intrinsic antiviral responses against a number of viruses. Accumulating reports have shown the importance of PML as a DNA virus restriction factor and how these pathogens evade this antiviral activity. However, very little information is available regarding the antiviral role of PML against RNA viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) is an RNA emerging mosquito-borne human pathogen affecting millions of individuals each year by causing severe and potentially fatal syndromes. Since no licensed antiviral drug against DENV infection is currently available, it is of great importance to understand the factors mediating intrinsic immunity that may lead to the development of new pharmacological agents that can boost their potency and thereby lead to treatments for this viral disease. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antiviral role of PML in DENV-2 A549 infected cells. PMID:25962098

  9. Actin distribution patterns in HL-60 leukemia cells treated with etoposide.

    PubMed

    Grzanka, A

    2001-10-01

    Localization of actin was studied in HL-60 leukemia cells after treatment with the anticancer agent etoposide for 3 days in a range of concentrations (0.02-200 microM). Significant changes in morphology of the cells and F-actin distribution patterns labelled with TRITC-phalloidin occurred only after treatment with 100 and 200 microM etoposide. In comparison with control cells, the number of cells decreased, cells were larger and almost all treated cells had irregular surfaces with lamellipodia. F-actin was distributed in a punctate pattern throughout the cytoplasm after treatment. In some treated cells, fluorescence appeared as a bright haze, whereas in other cells it formed a network. Treated cells also showed bright fluorescence at their periphery. Immunogold labelling of actin was observed in cells whether or not treated with etoposide. Labelling was found in the nucleus and also in the cytoplasm. At the ultrastructural level, cells treated with 100 and 200 microM etoposide showed increased positivity for actin in relation with blebbing, margination of nuclear chromatin and bodies containing recognizable nuclear fragments. These findings indicate that alterations in expression of actin in HL-60 cells after treatment with etoposide is dose-dependent and related with apoptosis. PMID:11700950

  10. Association of leukemia with radium groundwater contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, G.H.; Lyman, C.G.; Johnson, W.

    1985-08-02

    Radiation exposure, including the ingestion of radium, has been causally associated with leukemia in man. Groundwater samples from 27 counties on or near Florida phosphate lands were found to exceed 5 pCi/L total radium in 12.4% of measurements. The incidence of leukemia was greater in those counties with high levels of radium contamination (greater than 10% of the samples contaminated) than in those with low levels of contamination. Rank correlation coefficients of .56 and .45 were observed between the radium contamination level and the incidence of total leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, respectively. The standardized incidence density ratio for those in high-contamination counties was 1.5 for total leukemia and 2.0 for acute myeloid leukemia. Further investigation is necessary, however, before a causal relationship between groundwater radium content and human leukemia can be established.

  11. Vaccines as consolidation therapy for myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Alatrash, Gheath; Molldrem, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-01

    Immunotherapy for myeloid leukemias remains a cornerstone in the management of this highly aggressive group of malignancies. Allogeneic (allo) stem cell transplantation (SCT), which can be curative in acute and chronic myeloid leukemias, exemplifies the success of immunotherapy for cancer management. However, because of its nonspecific immune response against normal tissue, allo-SCT is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, secondary to graft-versus-host disease, which can occur in up to 50% of allo-SCT recipients. Targeted immunotherapy using leukemia vaccines has been heavily investigated, as these vaccines elicit specific immune responses against leukemia cells while sparing normal tissue. Peptide and cellular vaccines have been developed against tumor-specific and leukemia-associated self-antigens. Although not yet considered the standard of care, leukemia vaccines continue to show promising results in the management of the myeloid leukemias. PMID:21322777

  12. Nuclear structure in normal and Bloom syndrome cells

    PubMed Central

    Yankiwski, Victor; Marciniak, Robert A.; Guarente, Leonard; Neff, Norma F.

    2000-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is a rare cancer-predisposing disorder in which the cells of affected persons have a high frequency of somatic mutation and genomic instability. BLM, the protein altered in BS, is a RecQ DNA helicase. This report shows that BLM is found in the nucleus of normal human cells in the nuclear domain 10 or promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies. These structures are punctate depots of proteins disrupted upon viral infection and in certain human malignancies. BLM is found primarily in nuclear domain 10 except during S phase when it colocalizes with the Werner syndrome gene product, WRN, in the nucleolus. BLM colocalizes with a select subset of telomeres in normal cells and with large telomeric clusters seen in simian virus 40-transformed normal fibroblasts. During S phase, BS cells expel micronuclei containing sites of DNA synthesis. BLM is likely to be part of a DNA surveillance mechanism operating during S phase. PMID:10779560

  13. Dissecting the role of aberrant DNA methylation in human leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Amabile, Giovanni; Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Müller, Fabian; Welner, Robert S; Yang, Henry; Ebralidze, Alexander K; Zhang, Hong; Levantini, Elena; Qi, Lihua; Martinelli, Giovanni; Brummelkamp, Thijn; Le Beau, Michelle M; Figueroa, Maria E; Bock, Christoph; Tenen, Daniel G

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the genetic translocation t(9;22)(q34;q11.2) encoding for the BCR-ABL fusion oncogene. However, many molecular mechanisms of the disease progression still remain poorly understood. A growing body of evidence suggests that epigenetic abnormalities are involved in tyrosine kinase resistance in CML, leading to leukemic clone escape and disease propagation. Here we show that, by applying cellular reprogramming to primary CML cells, aberrant DNA methylation contributes to the disease evolution. Importantly, using a BCR-ABL inducible murine model, we demonstrate that a single oncogenic lesion triggers DNA methylation changes which in turn act as a precipitating event in leukemia progression. PMID:25997600

  14. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Localization of nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 3 (NR4A3) in Lewy body disease and multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Kon, Tomoya; Miki, Yasuo; Tanji, Kunikazu; Mori, Fumiaki; Tomiyama, Masahiko; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Utsumi, Jun; Sasaki, Hidenao; Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 3 (NR4A3), also known as neuron-derived orphan receptor-1, is a nuclear receptor which plays key roles in cell cycle, neuronal differentiation, apoptosis and metabolism. These processes may be involved in the pathogenesis of certain neurodegenerative diseases. Previous studies have shown that there are high levels of NR4A3 mRNA in the CNS. Moreover, NR4A2, a transcription factor with homology to NR4A3, has been reported to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. However, it is uncertain whether NR4A3 is also involved in diseases such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, and other neurodegenerative disorders such as tauopathies, TDP-43 proteinopathies and polyglutamine diseases. In the present study we used immunohistochemistry to examine the brain and spinal cord from patients with various neurodegenerative diseases and normal control subjects using two polyclonal anti-NR4A3 antibodies. In controls, the cytoplasm of neurons and glial cells was faintly immunostained with anti-NR4A3 antibodies. In tissues from patients with neurodegenerative diseases, immunoreactivity for NR4A3 was observed in cortical and brainstem-type Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease and in dementia with Lewy bodies, as well as in neuronal and glial cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy. A double-labeled immunofluorescence study showed co-localization of NR4A3 and phosphorylated α-synuclein in these inclusions. Neuronal and glial inclusions in other neurodegenerative disorders were NR4A3 negative. These findings suggest that accumulation of NR4A3 is specific to α-synucleinopathy. PMID:26096603

  18. Phase separation of a Lennard-Jones fluid interacting with a long, condensed polymer chain: implications for the nuclear body formation near chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Inrok; Choi, Saehyun; Jung, YounJoon; Kim, Jun Soo

    2015-08-28

    Phase separation in a biological cell nucleus occurs in a heterogeneous environment filled with a high density of chromatins and thus it is inevitably influenced by interactions with chromatins. As a model system of nuclear body formation in a cell nucleus filled with chromatins, we simulate the phase separation of a low-density Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid interacting with a long, condensed polymer chain. The influence of the density variation of LJ particles above and below the phase boundary and the role of attractive interactions between LJ particles and polymer segments are investigated at a fixed value of strong self-interaction between LJ particles. For a density of LJ particles above the phase boundary, phase separation occurs and a dense domain of LJ particles forms irrespective of interactions with the condensed polymer chain whereas its localization relative to the polymer chain is determined by the LJ-polymer attraction strength. Especially, in the case of moderately weak attractions, the domain forms separately from the polymer chain and subsequently associates with the polymer chain. When the density is below the phase boundary, however, the formation of a dense domain is possible only when the LJ-polymer attraction is strong enough, for which the domain grows in direct contact with the interacting polymer chain. In this work, different growth behaviors of LJ particles result from the differences in the density of LJ particles and in the LJ-polymer interaction, and this work suggests that the distinct formation of activity-dependent and activity-independent nuclear bodies (NBs) in a cell nucleus may originate from the differences in the concentrations of body-specific NB components and in their interaction with chromatins. PMID:26179211

  19. Comparison of Outcomes for Pediatric Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission and Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation With Myeloablative Conditioning Regimens Based on Either Intravenous Busulfan or Total Body Irradiation: A Report From the Japanese Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroyuki; Kato, Motohiro; Kudo, Kazuko; Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Miyamura, Takako; Goto, Hiroaki; Inagaki, Jiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Terui, Kiminori; Ogawa, Atsushi; Kawano, Yoshifumi; Inoue, Masami; Sawada, Akihisa; Kato, Koji; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Yamashita, Takuya; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mainly receive myeloablative conditioning regimens based on busulfan (BU) or total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT); however, the optimal conditioning regimen remains unclear. To identify which of these regimens is better for pediatric patients, we performed a retrospective analysis of nationwide registration data collected in Japan between 2006 and 2011 to assess the outcomes of patients receiving these regimens before a first allo-HCT. Myeloablative conditioning regimens based on i.v. BU (i.v. BU-MAC) (n = 69) or TBI (TBI-MAC) (n = 151) were compared in pediatric AML patients in first or second complete remission (CR1/CR2). The incidences of sinusoid obstruction syndrome, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, and early nonrelapse mortality (NRM) before day 100 were similar for both conditioning groups; however, the incidence of bacterial infection during the acute period was higher in the TBI-MAC group (P = .008). Both groups showed a similar incidence of NRM, and there was no significant difference in the incidence of relapse between the groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed no significant differences in the 2-year relapse-free survival rates for the i.v. BU-MAC and TBI-MAC groups in the CR1/CR2 setting (71% versus 67%, P = .36; hazard ratio, .73; 95% CI, .43 to 1.24, respectively). TBI-MAC was no better than i.v. BU-MAC for pediatric AML patients in remission. Although this retrospective registry-based analysis has several limitations, i.v. BU-MAC warrants further evaluation in a prospective trial. PMID:26271192

  20. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-30

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. The risk of leukemia in Seascale from radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Stather, J W; Dionian, J; Brown, J; Fell, T P; Muirhead, C R

    1988-08-01

    An excess of leukemias in children has been observed between 1950 and 1980 in the village of Seascale (population about 3,000) which is situated approximately 3 km to the south of Sellafield nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in West Cumbria, England. Radiation doses from all the main sources of radiation exposure of the population and risks of radiation-induced leukemia have been calculated for children born and living in Seascale during the period of operation of the plant. For the Seascale study population of 1225 children and young persons, followed to age 20 y, or followed until 1980 for those born after 1960, 0.016 radiation-induced leukemias are predicted from the Sellafield discharges. This corresponds to an average risk to children in the population of about one in 75,000. For the four fatal leukemias observed in the study population (0.5 expected from United Kingdom statistics) to be attributed to the operations at Sellafield, the average risk would have to be increased by a factor of about 250, to one in 300. Although there is some uncertainty about the releases from the plant and concentrations of radionuclides in environmental materials in the Sellafield area, particularly for the early years of its operation, the possibility that the doses calculated and the risk coefficients used for radiation-induced leukemia could be so substantially wrong is very unlikely. The number of radiation-induced leukemias from all radiation sources is calculated to be 0.1, which corresponds to a risk of about one in 12,250 for the average child in the study population. About two-thirds of the risk is from natural radiation, 16% from the Sellafield discharges, and nuclear weapons fallout and medical exposure each contribute about 9%. The models used for calculating radiation doses from intakes of radionuclides were based upon those recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This presented a number of difficulties in the assessment, which included the lack of any generally accepted age-related dosimetric models, particularly for bone-seeking radionuclides; limited information on gut transfer factors for radionuclides incorporated in foodstuffs; and no dosimetric models for the fetus. These and other problems identified in the analysis that require more information are discussed. PMID:3410721

  2. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  3. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stone, Richard M; O'Donnell, Margaret R; Sekeres, Mikkael A

    2004-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have not yet led to major improvements in disease-free and overall survival of adults with this disease. Only about one-third of those between ages 18-60 who are diagnosed with AML can be cured; disease-free survival is rare and current therapy devastating in older adults. In this chapter, challenges in the management of the adult with AML are discussed, including ongoing questions concerning the optimal choice of induction and postremission therapy such as the rationale for and role of allogeneic and autologous stem cell transplantation in a variety of settings, the special considerations pertaining to the older patient, and the development of new, so-called targeted therapies. In Section I, Dr. Richard Stone reviews state-of the-art therapy in AML in the era of change from a morphological to a genetically based classification system. Questions being addressed in ongoing randomized cooperative group trials include anthracycline dose during induction, the efficacy of drug-resistance modulators, and the utility of pro-apoptotic agents such as the anti-bcl-2 antisense oligonucloetide. Developmental therapeutics in AML include drug resistance modulation, anti-angiogenic strategies, immunotherapy, and signal transduction-active agents, particularly the farnesyl transferase inhibitors as well as those molecules that inhibit the FLT3 tyrosine kinase, activated via mutation in 30% of patients. In Section II Dr. Margaret O'Donnell discusses the role of stem cell transplantation in AML. Several advances including expanded donor pools, the movement toward peripheral blood stem cell collection, newer immunosuppressive drugs and antifungals, and particularly the advent of nonmyeloablative transplant have made the allogeneic option more viable. The subset-specific role for high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support and/or for allogeneic transplant in AML patients in first remission is outlined. Although preconceived notions about the role of transplant abound, the clinical data supporting a risk-adapted approach are covered. Finally, guidance concerning the use of nonmyeloablative or reduced-intensity allogeneic transplantation is provided. In Section III Dr. Mikkael Sekeres reviews the approach to the older patient with AML. Unique biological and therapeutic considerations make AML in this age group a vastly different disease than that in younger adults. The outcome data, including the role of specific anthracylines, hematopoietic growth factors, and drug-resistance modulators, are summarized. Communicating with older adults with AML and their families regarding selection of the optimal treatment strategy, often a stark choice between induction chemotherapy and palliative care, is covered. PMID:15561679

  5. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Solubility shift and SUMOylaltion of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein in response to arsenic(III) and fate of the SUMOylated PML

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Seishiro; Tadano, Mihoko; Kobayashi, Yayoi; Udagawa, Osamu; Kato, Ayaka

    2015-09-15

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML), which is a tumor suppressor protein that nevertheless plays an important role in the maintenance of leukemia initiating cells, is known to be biochemically modified by As{sup 3+}. We recently developed a simple method to evaluate the modification of PML by As{sup 3+} resulting in a change in solubility and the covalent binding of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO). Here we semi-quantitatively investigated the SUMOylation of PML using HEK293 cells which were stably transfected with PML-VI (HEK-PML). Western blot analyses indicated that PML became insoluble in cold RadioImmunoPrecipitation Assay (RIPA) lysis buffer and was SUMOylated by both SUMO2/3 and SUMO1 by As{sup 3+}. Surprisingly SUMO1 monomers were completely utilized for the SUMOylation of PML. Antimony (Sb{sup 3+}) but not bismuth (Bi{sup 3+}), Cu{sup 2+}, or Cd{sup 2+} biochemically modified PML similarly. SUMOylated PML decreased after removal of As{sup 3+} from the culture medium. However, unSUMOylated PML was still recovered in the RIPA-insoluble fraction, suggesting that SUMOylation is not requisite for changing the RIPA-soluble PML into the RIPA-insoluble form. Immunofluorescence staining of As{sup 3+}-exposed cells indicated that SUMO2/3 was co-localized with PML in the nuclear bodies. However, some PML protein was present in peri-nuclear regions without SUMO2/3. Functional Really Interesting New Gene (RING)-deleted mutant PML neither formed PML nuclear bodies nor was biochemically modified by As{sup 3+}. Conjugation with intracellular glutathione may explain the accessibility of As{sup 3+} and Sb{sup 3+} to PML in the nuclear region evading chelation and entrapping by cytoplasmic proteins such as metallothioneins. - Highlights: • As{sup 3+} is a carcinogen and also a therapeutic agent for leukemia. • PML becomes insoluble in RIPA and SUMOylated by As{sup 3+}. • Sb{sup 3+} modifies PML similar to As{sup 3+}. • Functional RING motif is necessary for As{sup 3+}-induced PML modification.

  7. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  9. Vosaroxin and Infusional Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Myeloid Sarcoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  10. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-03

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Combination Chemotherapy and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non-T, Non-B Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. 3-AP and Fludarabine in Treating Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Accelerated Phase or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-16

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Primary Myelofibrosis; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  13. UNEDF: Advanced Scienti?c Computing Collaboration Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Hai A.; Stoitsov, M.; Nazarewicz, Witold; Bulgac, Aurel; Hagen, Gaute; Kortelainene, Markus; Maris, P.; Pei, Junchen; Roche, Kenneth J.; Schunck, Nicolas; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James; Wild, Stefan

    2012-11-03

    With diverse scienti?c backgrounds, the UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quanti?ed uncertainties. This paper describes the UNEDF collaboration and identi?es attributes that classify UNEDF as a successful computational collaboration. We illustrate signi?cant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integrative solutions using the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and leadership class computational resources.

  14. Investigation of the bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA in human leukemias and lung cancers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jehoon; Kim, Yonggoo; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Dae Hyun; Shin, Dong Hwan; Yum, Young Na; Oh, Jae Ho; Kim, Sheen Hee; Hwang, Myung Sil; Lim, Chul Joo; Yang, Ki Hwa; Han, Kyungja

    2005-08-01

    The bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leucosis. This study investigated the presence of the BLV in leukemia (179 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 292 acute myeloid leukemia and 46 chronic myelogenous leukemia cases) and 162 lung cancer patients (139 adenocarcinoma, 23 squamous cell carcinoma) to determine if the BLV is a causative organism of leukemia and lung cancer in Koreans. A BLV infection was confirmed in human cells by PCR using a BLV-8 primer combination. All 517 cases of human leukemia and 162 lung cancer were negative for a PCR of the BLV proviral DNA. In conclusion, although meat has been imported from BLV endemic areas, the BLV infection does not appear to be the cause of human leukemia or lung cancer in Koreans. These results can be used as a control for further studies on the BLV in Koreans. PMID:16100451

  15. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphocytic leukemia? What are the key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in the United States for 2016 (including ...

  16. Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for childhood leukemias Prognostic factors in childhood leukemia (ALL or AML) Certain factors that can affect a ... myelogenous leukemia (AML). Prognostic factors for children with ALL Children with ALL are often divided into risk ...

  17. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukemia? What should you ask your doctor about acute lymphocytic leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... answer many of your questions. What kind of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) do I have? Do I have any ...

  18. Treatment of Children with APL (Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... JMML) Treatment of children with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the M3 ... and 6-mercaptopurine) for about a year. Relapsed APL If the leukemia comes back after treatment, most ...

  19. What's New in Adult Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research?

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia stops working What`s New in Leukemia - Acute Lymphocytic (ALL) in Adults Research? What’s new in acute lymphocytic leukemia research and treatment? Other ...

  20. What's New in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for chronic lymphocytic leukemia What`s new in chronic lymphocytic leukemia research and treatment? Many ... person's outlook and whether they will need treatment. New drugs for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Dozens of new ...

  1. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  2. A dynamic model to estimate the activity concentration and whole body dose rate of marine biota as consequences of a nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Keum, Dong-Kwon; Jun, In; Kim, Byeong-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Choi, Yong-Ho

    2015-02-01

    This paper describes a dynamic compartment model (K-BIOTA-DYN-M) to assess the activity concentration and whole body dose rate of marine biota as a result of a nuclear accident. The model considers the transport of radioactivity between the marine biota through the food chain, and applies the first order kinetic model for the sedimentation of radionuclides from seawater onto sediment. A set of ordinary differential equations representing the model are simultaneously solved to calculate the activity concentration of the biota and the sediment, and subsequently the dose rates, given the seawater activity concentration. The model was applied to investigate the long-term effect of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the marine biota using (131)I, (134)Cs, and, (137)Cs activity concentrations of seawater measured for up to about 2.5 years after the accident at two locations in the port of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) which was the most highly contaminated area. The predicted results showed that the accumulated dose for 3 months after the accident was about 4-4.5Gy, indicating the possibility of occurrence of an acute radiation effect in the early phase after the Fukushima accident; however, the total dose rate for most organisms studied was usually below the UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation)'s bench mark level for chronic exposure except for the initial phase of the accident, suggesting a very limited radiological effect on the marine biota at the population level. The predicted Cs sediment activity by the first-order kinetic model for the sedimentation was in a good agreement with the measured activity concentration. By varying the ecological parameter values, the present model was able to predict the very scattered (137)Cs activity concentrations of fishes measured in the port of FDNPS. Conclusively, the present dynamic model can be usefully applied to estimate the activity concentration and whole body dose rate of the marine biota as the consequence of a nuclear accident. PMID:25461520

  3. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  4. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-03

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Diagnosis of Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia in a Patient Previously Treated for Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bozdag, Sinem Civriz; Namdaroglu, Sinem; Kayikci, Omur; Kaygusuz, Gülsah; Demiriz, Itir; Cinarsoy, Murat; Tekgunduz, Emre; Altuntas, Fevzi

    2013-01-01

    Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by the clonal expansion of cytotoxic T or natural killer cells. We report on a patient diagnosed with T-cell LGL leukemia two years after the achievement of hematologic remission for acute myeloblastic leukemia. PMID:24416499

  7. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Eun-Mi; Kittai, Adam; Tabbara, Imad A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common type of leukemia in adults, and while in early, asymptomatic stages treatment is not indicated, the threat to the quality of life and increased mortality of patients posed by more advanced-stage disease necessitate therapeutic intervention. Guidelines of when and how to treat are not well-established because CLL is a disease of the elderly and it is important to balance preservation of functional status and control of the disease. Advances in molecular and genetic profiling has led to the ability to identify sub-groups of patients with CLL whose disease may respond to selected therapy. This review discusses current standard therapies in the major sub-groups of CLL based on age and functional status, in both the front-line and relapsed/refractory settings. It also provides a concise review of novel agents that have shown considerable efficacy in CLL. PMID:26408673

  9. Pre-neurodegeneration of mitral cells in the pcd mutant mouse is associated with DNA damage, transcriptional repression, and reorganization of nuclear speckles and Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Valero, Jorge; Berciano, Maria T; Weruaga, Eduardo; Lafarga, Miguel; Alonso, Jos R

    2006-11-01

    DNA damage and impairment of its repair underlie several neurodegenerative diseases. The Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd) mutation causes the loss of Nna1 expression and is associated with a selective and progressive degeneration of specific neuronal populations, including mitral cells in the olfactory bulb. Using an in situ transcription assay, molecular markers for both nuclear compartments and components of the DNA damage/repair pathway, and ultrastructural analysis, here we demonstrate that the pcd mutation induces the formation of DNA damage/repair foci in mitral cells. Furthermore, this effect is associated with transcriptional inhibition, heterochromatinization, nucleolar segregation and the reorganization of nuclear speckles of splicing factors and Cajal bodies. The most significant cytoplasmic alteration observed was a partial replacement of rough endoplasmic reticulum cisternae by a larger amount of free ribosomes, while other organelles were structurally preserved. The tools employed in this work may be of use for the early detection of predegenerative processes in neurodegenerative disorders and for validating rescue strategies. PMID:16978877

  10. Relationship between electron density and effective densities of body tissues for stopping, scattering, and nuclear interactions of proton and ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Koba, Yusuke

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: In treatment planning of charged-particle radiotherapy, patient heterogeneity is conventionally modeled as variable-density water converted from CT images to best reproduce the stopping power, which may lead to inaccuracies in the handling of multiple scattering and nuclear interactions. Although similar conversions can be defined for these individual interactions, they would be valid only for specific CT systems and would require additional tasks for clinical application. This study aims to improve the practicality of the interaction-specific heterogeneity correction. Methods: The authors calculated the electron densities and effective densities for stopping power, multiple scattering, and nuclear interactions of protons and ions, using the standard elemental-composition data for body tissues to construct the invariant conversion functions. The authors also simulated a proton beam in a lung-like geometry and a carbon-ion beam in a prostate-like geometry to demonstrate the procedure and the effects of the interaction-specific heterogeneity correction. Results: Strong correlations were observed between the electron density and the respective effective densities, with which the authors formulated polyline conversion functions. Their effects amounted to 10% differences in multiple-scattering angle and nuclear interaction mean free path for bones compared to those in the conventional heterogeneity correction. Although their realistic effect on patient dose distributions would be generally small, it could be at the level of a few percent when a carbon-ion beam traverses a large bone. Conclusions: The present conversion functions are invariant and may be incorporated in treatment planning systems with a common function relating CT number to electron density. This will enable improved beam dose calculation while minimizing initial setup and quality management of the user's specific system.

  11. The Spectrum of Recovery From Fracture-Induced Vertebral Deformity in Pediatric Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dal Osto, Leo C; Konji, Victor N; Halton, Jacqueline; Matzinger, Mary Ann; Bassal, Mylène; Rauch, Frank; Ward, Leanne M

    2016-06-01

    Vertebral fractures (VF) are a frequent complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Some children with VF undergo vertebral body reshaping to the point of complete restoration of normal vertebral dimensions. Others are left with permanent vertebral deformity if the degree of reshaping has been incomplete by the time of final adult height attainment. In this report, we describe three children with painful VF at leukemia diagnosis or during chemotherapy. Each patient highlights different clinical trajectories in their recovery from VF and underscores the need for osteoporosis intervention trials with the goal to prevent permanent vertebral deformity in selected patients. PMID:26878592

  12. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, T.W.

    1985-06-01

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury.

  13. [Pathogenesis of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia].

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiromichi

    2015-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is one of the well-characterized subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The essential drugs used in the treatment strategy for APL include all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO), which are both pioneer molecular-targeting agents. They were initially administered to patients based on the therapeutic experience of traditional Chinese medicine, and their marked effectiveness has been demonstrated. Subsequently, the molecular mechanisms of these drugs, as well as the molecular pathogenesis of APL, have been elucidated, whereby the chimeric gene product PML-RAR? induces epigenetic changes and transcription repression. This review summarizes the findings of previous studies related to the in vitro and in vivo function of PML-RAR? and the effects of ATRA and ATO on PML-RAR? and APL cells. These findings are very important, because the concept of epigenetic modulation in oncogenesis and their application as molecular targets in APL therapy have now been accepted in other types of leukemia, as well as for other malignancies. PMID:26524903

  14. Transplantability of human lymphoid cell line, lymphoma, and leukemia in splenectomized and/or irradiated nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, S.; Shimosato, Y.; Kuroki, M.; Sato, Y.; Nakajima, T.

    1980-07-01

    The effects of splenectomy and/or whole-body irradiation of nude mice before xenotransplantation of lymphoid cell lines, lymphoma, and leukemia were studied. Transplantation after whole-body irradiation resulted in the increased ''take'' rate of three cultured cell lines (two of T-cell-derived acute lymphocytic leukemia and one of B-cell derived acute lymphocytic leukemia) and in the tumorous growth of Burkitt-derived Raji and spontaneously transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. With splenectomy plus irradiation as a pretreatment, tumorous growth occurred in four other cell lines which were not transplantable after irradiation only (two cell lines of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cord blood cells and one each of null acute lymphocytic leukemia and nodular lymphoma-derived cell lines). Direct transplantation of leukemia and lymphoma cells into the pretreated mice was successful in 7 of 24 cases (29%). B-cell-derived diffuse large lymphoid lymphoma was transplantable in three of seven cases (43%). However, lymphoma and leukemia of peripheral T-cell origin was difficult to transplant even with pretreatment, and only one pleomorphic T-cell lymphoma grew to a significant size (2 cm). One tumor each of B-cell-derived diffuse large lymphoid and T-cell diffuse lymphoblastic lymphoma became transplantable.

  15. Lenalidomide and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Early-Stage Asymptomatic Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-03

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  16. Selective T-Cell Depletion to Reduce GVHD (Patients) Receiving Stem Cell Tx to Treat Leukemia, Lymphoma or MDS

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-09

    Graft vs Host Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Leukemia; Leukemia, Myeloid; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Chronic; Leukemia, Lymphocytic; Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Mantle-cell; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Hodgkin Disease

  17. 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  18. Cmr1/WDR76 defines a nuclear genotoxic stress body linking genome integrity and protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, Irene; Colding, Camilla; Henriksen, Peter; Beli, Petra; Nakamura, Kyosuke; Offman, Judith; Mathiasen, David P.; Silva, Sonia; Hoffmann, Eva; Groth, Anja; Choudhary, Chunaram; Lisby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication stress is a source of genomic instability. Here we identify changed mutation rate 1 (Cmr1) as a factor involved in the response to DNA replication stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and show that Cmr1—together with Mrc1/Claspin, Pph3, the chaperonin containing TCP1 (CCT) and 25 other proteins—define a novel intranuclear quality control compartment (INQ) that sequesters misfolded, ubiquitylated and sumoylated proteins in response to genotoxic stress. The diversity of proteins that localize to INQ indicates that other biological processes such as cell cycle progression, chromatin and mitotic spindle organization may also be regulated through INQ. Similar to Cmr1, its human orthologue WDR76 responds to proteasome inhibition and DNA damage by relocalizing to nuclear foci and physically associating with CCT, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved biological function. We propose that Cmr1/WDR76 plays a role in the recovery from genotoxic stress through regulation of the turnover of sumoylated and phosphorylated proteins. PMID:25817432

  19. [Leukemia research in Germany: the Competence Network Acute and Chronic Leukemias].

    PubMed

    Kossak-Roth, Ute; Saußele, Susanne; Aul, Carlo; Büchner, Thomas; Döhner, Hartmut; Dugas, Martin; Ehninger, Gerhard; Ganser, Arnold; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Gökbuget, Nicola; Griesshammer, Martin; Hasford, Jörg; Heuser, Michael; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Hochhaus, Andreas; Hoelzer, Dieter; Niederwieser, Dietger; Reiter, Andreas; Röllig, Christoph; Hehlmann, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    The Competence Network "Acute and Chronic Leukemias" was founded in 1997 by the consolidation of the leading leukemia study groups in Germany. Key results are the development of new trials and cooperative studies, the setup of patient registries and biobanking facilities, as well as the improvement of study infrastructure. In 2003, the concept of the competence network contributed to the foundation of the European LeukemiaNet (ELN). Synergy with the ELN resulted in cooperation on a European and international level, standardization of diagnostics and treatment, and recommendations for each leukemia and interdisciplinary specialty. The ultimate goal of the network is the cure of leukemia through cooperative research. PMID:26979719

  20. Pathogenesis and Treatment of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ratner, Lee

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)–induced adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL) was explored using an infectious molecular viral clone and a transgenic mouse model. Activation of nuclear factor-κB by the HTLV transcriptional trans-activator protein Tax was found to be important for lymphocyte immortalization and tumorigenesis. Interferon-γ regulates tumor development owing primarily to angiostatic effects. Translational clinical studies of chemotherapy, interferon-α, and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors have also assisted in identifying the pathogenic features of ATLL. PMID:16106073

  1. Chronic basophilic leukemia: a rare form of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guilin; Woods, Lesley J; Wang, Sa A; Brettler, Doreen; Andersen, Mary; Miron, Patricia M; Pechet, Liberto; Woda, Bruce A; Hao, Suyang

    2009-08-01

    Chronic basophilic leukemia is a rare and poorly characterized entity. Only a limited number of cases have been described. Herein, we report a patient who presented with fatigue, weight loss, leukocytosis, persistent prominent basophilia, and mild eosinophilia. The bone marrow showed features characteristic of a myeloproliferative neoplasm with a marked increase in maturing basophils. The basophils exhibited nuclear hypersegmentation, abnormal granulation, and abnormally low CD38 expression. Conventional karyotyping revealed a t(5;12)(q31;p13). ETV6 but not PDGFRB rearrangement was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization. PMID:19427022

  2. Factors associated with improved outcomes after second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for relapsed pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Menon, Neethu N; Jenkins, Lydia M; Cui, Haiyan; Jenkins, Craig; Anwer, Faiz; Yeager, Andrew M; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    A second allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) is an important therapeutic consideration for patients relapsing after their first. We conducted a retrospective review of 41 pediatric patients with leukemia that underwent a second allo-HCT at our institution. Overall, 53.7 and 43.9 % of patients were alive and disease-free at 1 and 5 years, respectively, after the second allo-HCT. The factors affecting outcome by both univariate and multivariate analysis were interval between transplants and the use of a myeloablative conditioning (MAC) regimen prior to second transplant. Outcomes were inferior in patients who received their second transplant <6 months from their first HCT when compared to patients in whom the interval between HCTs was 6-12 or more than 12 months. Interval between HCTs was also significant when each type of leukemia (acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) n = 21, acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) n = 11, and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) n = 7) was analyzed separately. In univariate analysis, use of the same donor and use of a matched sibling donor resulted in significant improved outcome. There was not a significant association between disease-free survival (DFS) and age, remission status, use of total body irradiation (TBI) before second HCT, or type of leukemia. Second allogeneic HCT can be a curative therapeutic option for leukemia patients relapsing after their first transplant. As more targeted therapies have become available, patients that relapse after first HCT are more likely to achieve remission. Therefore, it is anticipated that there will be more candidates for second HCT with improved performance and remission status, ultimately leading to a better outcome with the second HCT. PMID:26787415

  3. Eltrombopag Olamine in Improving Platelet Recovery in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Cardiac Glycosides Activate the Tumor Suppressor and Viral Restriction Factor Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein (PML)

    PubMed Central

    Milutinovic, Snezana; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Chao, Elizabeth; Dewing, Antimone; Solano, Ricardo; Milan, Loribelle; Barron, Nikki; He, Min; Diaz, Paul W.; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Reed, John C.; Hassig, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides (CGs), inhibitors of Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA), used clinically to treat heart failure, have garnered recent attention as potential anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. A high-throughput phenotypic screen designed to identify modulators of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear body (NB) formation revealed the CG gitoxigenin as a potent activator of PML. We demonstrate that multiple structurally distinct CGs activate the formation of PML NBs and induce PML protein SUMOylation in an NKA-dependent fashion. CG effects on PML occur at the post-transcriptional level, mechanistically distinct from previously described PML activators and are mediated through signaling events downstream of NKA. Curiously, genomic deletion of PML in human cancer cells failed to abrogate the cytotoxic effects of CGs and other apoptotic stimuli such as ceramide and arsenic trioxide that were previously shown to function through PML in mice. These findings suggest that alternative pathways can compensate for PML loss to mediate apoptosis in response to CGs and other apoptotic stimuli. PMID:27031987

  5. Cardiac Glycosides Activate the Tumor Suppressor and Viral Restriction Factor Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein (PML).

    PubMed

    Milutinovic, Snezana; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Chao, Elizabeth; Dewing, Antimone; Solano, Ricardo; Milan, Loribelle; Barron, Nikki; He, Min; Diaz, Paul W; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C; Hassig, Christian A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides (CGs), inhibitors of Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA), used clinically to treat heart failure, have garnered recent attention as potential anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. A high-throughput phenotypic screen designed to identify modulators of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear body (NB) formation revealed the CG gitoxigenin as a potent activator of PML. We demonstrate that multiple structurally distinct CGs activate the formation of PML NBs and induce PML protein SUMOylation in an NKA-dependent fashion. CG effects on PML occur at the post-transcriptional level, mechanistically distinct from previously described PML activators and are mediated through signaling events downstream of NKA. Curiously, genomic deletion of PML in human cancer cells failed to abrogate the cytotoxic effects of CGs and other apoptotic stimuli such as ceramide and arsenic trioxide that were previously shown to function through PML in mice. These findings suggest that alternative pathways can compensate for PML loss to mediate apoptosis in response to CGs and other apoptotic stimuli. PMID:27031987

  6. An antiviral disulfide compound blocks interaction between arenavirus Z protein and cellular promyelocytic leukemia protein

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, C.C.; Topisirovic, I.; Djavani, M.; Borden, K.L.B.; Damonte, E.B.; Salvato, M.S.

    2010-03-19

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) forms nuclear bodies (NB) that can be redistributed by virus infection. In particular, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) influences disruption of PML NB through the interaction of PML with the arenaviral Z protein. In a previous report, we have shown that the disulfide compound NSC20625 has antiviral and virucidal properties against arenaviruses, inducing unfolding and oligomerization of Z without affecting cellular RING-containing proteins such as the PML. Here, we further studied the effect of the zinc-finger-reactive disulfide NSC20625 on PML-Z interaction. In HepG2 cells infected with LCMV or transiently transfected with Z protein constructs, treatment with NSC20625 restored PML distribution from a diffuse-cytoplasmic pattern to punctate, discrete NB which appeared identical to NB found in control, uninfected cells. Similar results were obtained in cells transfected with a construct expressing a Z mutant in zinc-binding site 2 of the RING domain, confirming that this Z-PML interaction requires the integrity of only one zinc-binding site. Altogether, these results show that the compound NSC20625 suppressed Z-mediated PML NB disruption and may be used as a tool for designing novel antiviral strategies against arenavirus infection.

  7. Germline ETV6 Mutations Confer Susceptibility to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lauren; Maria, Ann; Villano, Danylo; Gaddam, Pragna; Wu, Gang; McGee, Rose B.; Quinn, Emily; Inaba, Hiroto; Hartford, Christine; Pui, Ching-hon; Pappo, Alberto; Edmonson, Michael; Zhang, Michael Y.; Stepensky, Polina; Steinherz, Peter; Schrader, Kasmintan; Lincoln, Anne; Bussel, James; Lipkin, Steve M.; Goldgur, Yehuda; Harit, Mira; Stadler, Zsofia K.; Mullighan, Charles; Weintraub, Michael; Shimamura, Akiko; Zhang, Jinghui; Downing, James R.; Nichols, Kim E.; Offit, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations affecting ETV6 often occur in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood malignancy. The genetic factors that predispose to ALL remain poorly understood. Here we identify a novel germline ETV6 p. L349P mutation in a kindred affected by thrombocytopenia and ALL. A second ETV6 p. N385fs mutation was identified in an unrelated kindred characterized by thrombocytopenia, ALL and secondary myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia. Leukemic cells from the proband in the second kindred showed deletion of wild type ETV6 with retention of the ETV6 p. N385fs. Enforced expression of the ETV6 mutants revealed normal transcript and protein levels, but impaired nuclear localization. Accordingly, these mutants exhibited significantly reduced ability to regulate the transcription of ETV6 target genes. Our findings highlight a novel role for ETV6 in leukemia predisposition. PMID:26102509

  8. Clinical significance of microRNAs in chronic and acute human leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Moles, Ramona; Nicot, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) are epigenetic regulators that target specific cellular mRNA to modulate gene expression patterns and cellular signaling pathways. miRNAs are involved in a wide range of biological processes and are frequently deregulated in human cancers. Numerous miRNAs promote tumorigenesis and cancer progression by enhancing tumor growth, angiogenesis, invasion and immune evasion, while others have tumor suppressive effects (Hayes, et al., Trends Mol Med 20(8): 460-9, 2014; Stahlhut and Slack, Genome Med 5 (12): 111, 2013). The expression profile of cancer miRNAs can be used to predict patient prognosis and clinical response to treatment (Bouchie, Nat Biotechnol 31(7): 577, 2013). The majority of miRNAs are intracellular localized, however circulating miRNAs have been detected in various body fluids and represent new biomarkers of solid and hematologic cancers (Fabris and Calin, Mol Oncol 10(3):503-8, 2016; Allegra, et al., Int J Oncol 41(6): 1897-912, 2012). This review describes the clinical relevance of miRNAs, lncRNAs and snoRNAs in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment response in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). PMID:27179712

  9. Dasatinib, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Chronic myeloid leukemia: mechanisms of blastic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Perrotti, Danilo; Jamieson, Catriona; Goldman, John; Skorski, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    The BCR-ABL1 oncoprotein transforms pluripotent HSCs and initiates chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Patients with early phase (also known as chronic phase [CP]) disease usually respond to treatment with ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), although some patients who respond initially later become resistant. In most patients, TKIs reduce the leukemia cell load substantially, but the cells from which the leukemia cells are derived during CP (so-called leukemia stem cells [LSCs]) are intrinsically insensitive to TKIs and survive long term. LSCs or their progeny can acquire additional genetic and/or epigenetic changes that cause the leukemia to transform from CP to a more advanced phase, which has been subclassified as either accelerated phase or blastic phase disease. The latter responds poorly to treatment and is usually fatal. Here, we discuss what is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to blastic transformation of CML and propose some novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:20592475

  11. Tailoring of chronic lymphatic leukemia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Elhefni, Ashraf M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease, with all patients who require therapy destined to relapse and understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has advanced significantly. It is now clear that chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a relatively proliferative disorder that requires the help of its microenvironment to be maintained and to progress. The stimulation of the chronic lymphatic leukemia cell occurs in most, if not all, patients through antigen stimulation via the B cell receptors. In addition, there is now a appreciation of the role of the p53 pathway leading to chemoresistance and the elucidation of the molecular and intracellular signaling mechanisms of disease is just beginning to facilitate the development of several targeted small molecules that promise to revolutionize the treatment of Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:23997983

  12. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  14. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  15. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  16. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  17. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  18. Perspectives on the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wiemels, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children but the causes of the disease in the majority of cases are not known. About 80% are precursor-B cell in origin (CD19+, CD10+), and this immunophenotype has increased in incidence over the past several decades in the Western world. Part of this increase may be due to the introduction of new chemical exposures into the child's environment including parental smoking, pesticides, traffic fumes, paint and household chemicals. However, much of the increase in leukemia rates is likely linked to altered patterns of infection during early childhood development, mirroring causal pathways responsible for a similarly increased incidence of other childhood-diagnosed immune-related illnesses including allergy, asthma, and type 1 diabetes. Factors linked to childhood leukemia that are likely surrogates for immune stimulation include exposure to childcare settings, parity status and birth order, vaccination history, and population mixing. In case-control studies, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is consistently inversely associated with greater exposure to infections, via daycare and later birth order. New evidence suggests also that children who contract leukemia may harbor a congenital defect in immune responder status, as indicated by lower levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 at birth in children who grow up to contract leukemia, as well as higher need for clinical care for infections within the first year of life despite having lower levels of exposure to infections. One manifestation of this phenomenon may be leukemia clusters which tend to appear as a leukemia “outbreak” among populations with low herd immunity to a new infection. Critical answers to the etiology of childhood leukemia will require incorporating new tools into traditional epidemiologic approaches – including the classification of leukemia at a molecular scale, better exposure assessments at all points in a child's life, a comprehensive understanding of genetic risk factors, and an appraisal of the interplay between infectious exposures and the status of immune response in individuals. PMID:22326931

  19. Midostaurin and Azacitidine in Treating Elderly Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-11

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Vorinostat and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  1. Traumatic stress in acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodin, Gary; Yuen, Dora; Mischitelle, Ashley; Minden, Mark D; Brandwein, Joseph; Schimmer, Aaron; Marmar, Charles; Gagliese, Lucia; Lo, Christopher; Rydall, Anne; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acute leukemia is a condition with an acute onset that is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. However, the psychological impact of this life-threatening condition and its intensive treatment has not been systematically examined. In the present study, we investigate the prevalence and correlates of post-traumatic stress symptoms in this population. Methods Patients with acute myeloid, lymphocytic, and promyelocytic leukemia who were newly diagnosed, recently relapsed, or treatment failures were recruited at a comprehensive cancer center in Toronto, Canada. Participants completed the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire, Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, CARES Medical Interaction Subscale, and other psychosocial measures. A multivariate regression analysis was used to assess independent predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Results Of the 205 participants, 58% were male, mean age was 50.1 ± 15.4 years, 86% were recently diagnosed, and 94% were receiving active treatment. The mean Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire score was 30.2 ± 22.5, with 27 of 200 (14%) patients meeting criteria for acute stress disorder and 36 (18%) for subsyndromal acute stress disorder. Post-traumatic stress symptoms were associated with more physical symptoms, physical symptom distress, attachment anxiety, and perceived difficulty communicating with health-care providers, and poorer spiritual well-being (all p <0.05). Conclusions The present study demonstrates that clinically significant symptoms of traumatic stress are common in acute leukemia and are linked to the degree of physical suffering, to satisfaction with relationships with health-care providers, and with individual psychological characteristics. Longitudinal study is needed to determine the natural history, but these findings suggest that intervention may be indicated to alleviate or prevent traumatic stress in this population. PMID:22081505

  2. Cytogenetic, clinical, and cytologic characteristics of radiotherapy-related leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, P.; Pedersen-Bjergaard, J.

    1988-04-01

    From 1978 to 1985, we observed eight cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia or preleukemia, three cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and three cases of chronic myeloid leukemia in patients previously treated exclusively with radiotherapy for other tumor types. The latent period from administration of radiotherapy to development of leukemia varied between 12 and 243 months. Clonal chromosome aberrations reported previously as characteristic of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia following therapy with alkylating agents were observed in three of the eight patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (5q- and -7) and in two of the three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (-7 and 12p-). All three patients with radiotherapy-related chronic myeloid leukemia presented a t(9;22)(q34;q11). The results suggest that cytogenetic characteristics may reflect the etiology in radiation-induced acute leukemias, whereas radiation-related chronic myeloid leukemia does not seem to differ chromosomally from de novo cases of the disease.

  3. Deregulated transcription factors in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shima, Yutaka; Kitabayashi, Issay

    2011-08-01

    Specific chromosomal translocations and other mutations associated with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) often involve transcription factors and transcriptional coactivators. Such target genes include AML1, C/EBPα, RARα, MOZ, p300/CBP, and MLL, all of which are important in the regulation of hematopoiesis. The resultant fusion or mutant proteins deregulate the transcription of the affected genes and disrupt their essential role in hematopoiesis, causing differentiation block and abnormal proliferation and/or survival. This review focuses on such transcription factors and coactivators, and describes their roles in leukemogenesis and hematopoiesis. PMID:21823042

  4. CGH protocols: chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Braggio, Esteban; Fonseca, Rafael; Kay, Neil E

    2013-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful assay to identify copy number abnormalities underlying the pathogenesis of cancer. aCGH has become the gold standard for whole genome copy number analysis in medium and large cohorts in clinical and research laboratories. Identifying the best workflow is critical to achieving the optimal performance for this assay. Here we describe the aCGH protocol used by our group in the study of B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We also describe some initial applications of aCGH in association with clinical outcome for CLL. PMID:23412785

  5. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Adoptive T-cell therapy for Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Garber, Haven R; Mirza, Asma; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Alatrash, Gheath

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is the most robust form of adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) and has been tremendously effective in the treatment of leukemia. It is one of the original forms of cancer immunotherapy and illustrates that lymphocytes can specifically recognize and eliminate aberrant, malignant cells. However, because of the high morbidity and mortality that is associated with alloSCT including graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), refining the anti-leukemia immunity of alloSCT to target distinct antigens that mediate the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect could transform our approach to treating leukemia, and possibly other hematologic malignancies. Over the past few decades, many leukemia antigens have been discovered that can separate malignant cells from normal host cells and render them vulnerable targets. In concert, the field of T-cell engineering has matured to enable transfer of ectopic high-affinity antigen receptors into host or donor cells with greater efficiency and potency. Many preclinical studies have demonstrated that engineered and conventional T-cells can mediate lysis and eradication of leukemia via one or more leukemia antigen targets. This evidence now serves as a foundation for clinical trials that aim to cure leukemia using T-cells. The recent clinical success of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) cells for treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia displays the potential of this new therapeutic modality. In this review, we discuss some of the most promising leukemia antigens and the novel strategies that have been implemented for adoptive cellular immunotherapy of lymphoid and myeloid leukemias. It is important to summarize the data for ACT of leukemia for physicians in-training and in practice and for investigators who work in this and related fields as there are recent discoveries already being translated to the patient setting and numerous accruing clinical trials. We primarily focus on ACT that has been used in the clinical setting or that is currently undergoing preclinical testing with a foreseeable clinical endpoint. PMID:26056592

  7. Arabidopsis AtMORC4 and AtMORC7 Form Nuclear Bodies and Repress a Large Number of Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanlu; Wang, Haifeng; Papikian, Ashot; Pastor, William A.; Moissiard, Guillaume; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    The MORC family of GHKL ATPases are an enigmatic class of proteins with diverse chromatin related functions. In Arabidopsis, AtMORC1, AtMORC2, and AtMORC6 act together in heterodimeric complexes to mediate transcriptional silencing of methylated DNA elements. Here, we studied Arabidopsis AtMORC4 and AtMORC7. We found that, in contrast to AtMORC1,2,6, they act to suppress a wide set of non-methylated protein-coding genes that are enriched for those involved in pathogen response. Furthermore, atmorc4 atmorc7 double mutants show a pathogen response phenotype. We found that AtMORC4 and AtMORC7 form homomeric complexes in vivo and are concentrated in discrete nuclear bodies adjacent to chromocenters. Analysis of an atmorc1,2,4,5,6,7 hextuple mutant demonstrates that transcriptional de-repression is largely uncoupled from changes in DNA methylation in plants devoid of MORC function. However, we also uncover a requirement for MORC in both DNA methylation and silencing at a small but distinct subset of RNA-directed DNA methylation target loci. These regions are characterized by poised transcriptional potential and a low density of sites for symmetric cytosine methylation. These results provide insight into the biological function of MORC proteins in higher eukaryotes. PMID:27171361

  8. Role of the SUMO-interacting motif in HIPK2 targeting to the PML nuclear bodies and regulation of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Ki Sa; Lee, Yun-Ah; Kim, Eui Tae; Lee, Seung-Rock; Ahn, Jin-Hyun; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2011-04-15

    Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is a key regulator of various transcription factors including p53 and CtBP in the DNA damage signaling pathway. PML-nuclear body (NB) is required for HIPK2-mediated p53 phosphorylation at Ser46 and induction of apoptosis. Although PML-NB targeting of HIPK2 has been shown, much is not clear about the molecular mechanism of HIPK2 recruitment to PML-NBs. Here we show that HIPK2 colocalizes specifically with PML-I and PML-IV. Mutational analysis showed that HIPK2 recruitment to PML-IV-NBs is mediated by the SUMO-interaction motifs (SIMs) of both PML-IV and HIPK2. Wild-type HIPK2 associated with SUMO-conjugated PML-IV at a higher affinity than with un-conjugated PML-IV, while the association of a HIPK2 SIM mutant with SUMO-modified PML-IV was impaired. In colony formation assays, HIPK2 strongly suppressed cell proliferation, but HIPK2 SIM mutants did not. In addition, activation and phosphorylation of p53 at the Ser46 residue were impaired by HIPK2 SIM mutants. These results suggest that SIM-mediated HIPK2 targeting to PML-NBs is crucial for HIPK2-mediated p53 activation and induction of apoptosis.

  9. Arabidopsis AtMORC4 and AtMORC7 Form Nuclear Bodies and Repress a Large Number of Protein-Coding Genes.

    PubMed

    Harris, C Jake; Husmann, Dylan; Liu, Wanlu; Kasmi, Farid El; Wang, Haifeng; Papikian, Ashot; Pastor, William A; Moissiard, Guillaume; Vashisht, Ajay A; Dangl, Jeffery L; Wohlschlegel, James A; Jacobsen, Steven E

    2016-05-01

    The MORC family of GHKL ATPases are an enigmatic class of proteins with diverse chromatin related functions. In Arabidopsis, AtMORC1, AtMORC2, and AtMORC6 act together in heterodimeric complexes to mediate transcriptional silencing of methylated DNA elements. Here, we studied Arabidopsis AtMORC4 and AtMORC7. We found that, in contrast to AtMORC1,2,6, they act to suppress a wide set of non-methylated protein-coding genes that are enriched for those involved in pathogen response. Furthermore, atmorc4 atmorc7 double mutants show a pathogen response phenotype. We found that AtMORC4 and AtMORC7 form homomeric complexes in vivo and are concentrated in discrete nuclear bodies adjacent to chromocenters. Analysis of an atmorc1,2,4,5,6,7 hextuple mutant demonstrates that transcriptional de-repression is largely uncoupled from changes in DNA methylation in plants devoid of MORC function. However, we also uncover a requirement for MORC in both DNA methylation and silencing at a small but distinct subset of RNA-directed DNA methylation target loci. These regions are characterized by poised transcriptional potential and a low density of sites for symmetric cytosine methylation. These results provide insight into the biological function of MORC proteins in higher eukaryotes. PMID:27171361

  10. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Risk factors for leukemia in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, David W; Anderson, Theresa E; Issaragrisil, Surapol

    2009-11-01

    A case-control study of adult-onset leukemia was conducted in Bangkok, Thailand to explore the contribution of cellular telephone use and other factors to the etiology of the disease; 180 cases (87 acute myeloblastic leukemia, 40 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 44 chronic myelogenous leukemia, eight chronic lymphocytic leukemia, one unclassified acute leukemia) were compared with 756 age- and sex-matched hospital controls. Data were obtained by interview; odds ratios (ORs) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression. There was no clear association with cellular telephone phone use, but durations were relatively short (median 24-26 months), and there was a suggestion that risk may be increased for those with certain usage practices (ORs, 1.8-3.0 with lower confidence intervals >1.0) and those who used GSM service (OR, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-4.0). Myeloid leukemia (acute and chronic combined) was associated with benzene (OR, 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-11), a nonspecific group of other solvents (2.3; 1.1-4.9), occupational pesticides that were mostly unspecified (3.8; 2.1-7.1), and working with or near powerlines (4.3; 1.3-15). No associations were found for diagnostic X-rays, cigarette smoking, or other occupational exposures. PMID:19294385

  12. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: present status.

    PubMed

    Montserrat, E; Rozman, C

    1995-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the form of leukemia which occurs most frequently in Western countries. Its etiology is unknown, and no relationship with viruses or genes has been demonstrated. Epidemiological data suggest that genetic and ambiental factors might be of some significance. Clinical features of CLL are due to the accumulation of leukemic cells in bone marrow and lymphoid organs as well as the immune disturbances that accompany the disease. The prognosis of patients with CLL varies. Treatment is usually indicated by the risk of the individual patient, which is clearly reflected by the stage of the disease. In the early stage (Binet A, Rai O) it is reasonable to defer therapy until disease progression is observed. By contrast, because their median survival is less than five years, patients with more advanced stages require therapy. For almost 50 years, no major advances in the management of CLL, which has revolved around the use of alkylating agents, have been made. In recent years, the therapeutic approach in patients with CLL has changed as a result of the introduction of combination chemotherapy regimens and, in particular, purine analogues. The latter are already the treatment of choice for patients not responding to standard therapies, and their role as front-line therapy is being investigated. Bone marrow transplants are also being increasingly used. It is to be hoped that in years to come the outcome of patients with CLL will be improved by these advances. PMID:7612488

  13. Immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Dolores A; Hess, Rosemary C; Weiss, Mark A

    2015-08-15

    Despite the remarkable progress made in some leukemias such as CML and CLL, cytotoxic treatment for AML remains essentially unchanged over the last 4 decades. Several lines of evidence, including the graft versus leukemia effect associated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), suggest that immunotherapy is an active modality in AML. Given the lack of progress for chemotherapy in this disease, many novel immunologic treatment approaches have been explored. The goals of non-transplant-based immune approaches have largely consisted of the stimulation or restoration of endogenous immune responses or the targeting of specific tumor antigens by immune cells. These strategies have been associated with less toxicity than allogeneic HSCT but typically have inferior efficacy. Allogeneic HSCT exploits major and minor histocompatibility differences between the donor and recipient in order to recognize and eradicate malignancy. With the recognition that the immune system itself provides a basis for treating AML, immunotherapy continues to be an attractive modality to exploit in the treatment of this disease. PMID:26095886

  14. Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2005-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies have become part of standard cancer treatment. Chimeric and humanized antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumors. Although the humanized anti-CD33 antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with b-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45, and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukemic therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conversely, a-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumor cell kill while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33- calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions in relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. T-cell recognition of peptide antigens presented on the cell surface in combination with major histocompatibility complex antigen provides another potentially promising approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:16091194

  15. Spc98p Directs the Yeast γ-Tubulin Complex into the Nucleus and Is Subject to Cell Cycle-dependent Phosphorylation on the Nuclear Side of the Spindle Pole Body

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Gislene; Knop, Michael; Schiebel, Elmar

    1998-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, microtubules are organized by the spindle pole body (SPB), which is embedded in the nuclear envelope. Microtubule organization requires the γ-tubulin complex containing the γ-tubulin Tub4p, Spc98p, and Spc97p. The Tub4p complex is associated with cytoplasmic and nuclear substructures of the SPB, which organize the cytoplasmic and nuclear microtubules. Here we present evidence that the Tub4p complex assembles in the cytoplasm and then either binds to the cytoplasmic side of the SPB or is imported into the nucleus followed by binding to the nuclear side of the SPB. Nuclear import of the Tub4p complex is mediated by the essential nuclear localization sequence of Spc98p. Our studies also indicate that Spc98p in the Tub4p complex is phosphorylated at the nuclear, but not at the cytoplasmic, side of the SPB. This phosphorylation is cell cycle dependent and occurs after SPB duplication and nucleation of microtubules by the new SPB and therefore may have a role in mitotic spindle function. In addition, activation of the mitotic checkpoint stimulates Spc98p phosphorylation. The kinase Mps1p, which functions in SPB duplication and mitotic checkpoint control, seems to be involved in Spc98p phosphorylation. Our results also suggest that the nuclear and cytoplasmic Tub4p complexes are regulated differently. PMID:9529377

  16. Arsenic trioxide induces apoptosis in NB-4, an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line, through up-regulation of p73 via suppression of nuclear factor kappa B-mediated inhibition of p73 transcription and prevention of NF-kappaB-mediated induction of XIAP, cIAP2, BCL-XL and survivin.

    PubMed

    Momeny, Majid; Zakidizaji, Majid; Ghasemi, Reza; Dehpour, Ahmad R; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Abdolazimi, Yassan; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghaffari, Seyed H

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effects of arsenic trioxide (ATO) on human acute promyelocytic leukemia NB-4 cells. Microculture tetrazolium test, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) cell proliferation assay, caspase 3 activity assay, cell-based nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) phosphorylation measurement by ELISA and real-time RT-PCR were employed to appraise the effects of ATO on metabolic activity, DNA synthesis, induction of programmed cell death and NF-kappaB activation. The suppressive effects of ATO on metabolic potential, cell proliferation and NF-kappaB activation were associated with induction of apoptosis in NB-4 cells. In addition, an expressive enhancement in mRNA levels of p73, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21), tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1), WNK lysine deficient protein kinase 2 (WNK2) and lipocalin 2 coupled with a significant reduction in transcriptional levels of NF-kappaB inhibitor beta (IKK2), Nemo, BCL2-like 1 (BCL-X(L)), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (cIAP2), X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), survivin, Bcl-2, TIP60, ataxia telangiectasia (ATM), SHP-2 and sirtuin (SIRT1) were observed. Altogether, these issues show for the first time that ATO treatment could trammel cell growth and proliferation as well as induces apoptosis in NB-4 cells through induction of transcriptional levels of p73, TP53INP1, WNK2, lipocalin 2 as well as suppression of NF-kappaB-mediated induction of BCL-X(L), cIAP2, XIAP and survivin. Furthermore, the inductionary effects of ATO on transcriptional stimulation of p73 might be through cramping the NF-kappaB module (through suppression of p65 phosphorylation as well as transcriptional hindering of IKK2, ATM and Nemo) along with diminishing the mRNA expression of TIP60, SHP-2 and SIRT1. PMID:19763917

  17. Myelogenous leukemia in a bearded dragon (Acanthodraco vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Tocidlowski, M E; McNamara, P L; Wojcieszyn, J W

    2001-03-01

    A 3-yr-old bearded dragon (Acanthodraco vitticeps) presented with lethargy, a swollen right elbow joint, inability to move its rear limbs normally, and marked leukocytosis. The majority of leukocytes were an abnormal mononuclear lymphoid-type cell with a high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio, a slightly blue cytoplasm, nuclei with coarsely granular chromatin, and some nuclear clefts. Acute leukemia of lymphoid or myeloid origin was tentatively diagnosed. The abnormal mononuclear leukocyte cell population stained positively for the myeloid cytochemical stains: peroxidase, chloroacetate esterase, and L1-calprotectin. The abnormal cell population of the peripheral blood did not stain with the lymphoid cytochemical stains: alpha-naphthyl butyrate esterase, CD3, and CD79a. PMID:12790401

  18. Leukemia studies continue to draw a blank

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, N.

    1996-04-19

    When large numbers of childhood thyroid cancer cases began showing up in the three most heavily contaminated republics about Chernobyl 5 years after the accident, many thought there would be a jump in the incidence of leukemia. Studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors and other radiation accidents have pinpointed leukemia as the key early indicator of the effects of radiation. But so far, thyroid cancer remains an anomaly. Three major international studies have so far failed to detect any measurable increase in leukemia - or any other cancers - in the general population. This paper describes the studies and discusses possible reasons as well as what might happen in the future.

  19. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rosshandler, Yasmin; Shen, Ann Q; Cortes, Jorge; Khoury, Hanna Jean

    2016-05-01

    Omacetaxine mepesuccinate is approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic or accelerated phase resistant to two or more tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This review summarizes the mode of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of omacetaxine mepesuccinate. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate has activity in chronic myeloid leukemia, especially in the chronic phase, regardless of the presence of ABL1 kinase domain mutations. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate has distinct but manageable adverse events profile. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate is a treatment option for a subset of patients with refractory chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:26853281

  20. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-12

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Azacitidine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-06

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. 5-Fluoro-2'-Deoxycytidine and Tetrahydrouridine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. S1312, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-14

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma

  6. Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-04

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  12. Tositumomab and Iodine I 131 Tositumomab in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma in First Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Lymphoid Leukemia in Remission; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  13. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Bioelectrical Impedance Measurement for Predicting Treatment Outcome in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-22

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-15

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. The major immediate-early proteins IE1 and IE2 of human cytomegalovirus colocalize with and disrupt PML-associated nuclear bodies at very early times in infected permissive cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, J H; Hayward, G S

    1997-01-01

    The major immediate-early (MIE) gene products of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are nuclear phosphoproteins that are thought to play key roles in initiating lytic cycle gene regulation pathways. We have examined the intranuclear localization pattern of both the IE1 and IE2 proteins in virus-infected and DNA-transfected cells. When HCMV-infected human diploid fibroblast (HF) cells were stained with specific monoclonal antibodies, IE1 localized as a mixture of nuclear diffuse and punctate patterns at very early times (2 h) but changed to an exclusively nuclear diffuse pattern at later times. In contrast, IE2 was distributed predominantly in nuclear punctate structures continuously from 2 to at least 12 h after infection. These punctate structures resembled the preexisting PML-associated nuclear bodies (ND10 or PML oncogenic domains [PODs]) that are disrupted and dispersed by the IE110 protein as a very early event in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. However, HCMV differed from HSV by leading instead to a change in both the PML and SP100 protein distribution from punctate bodies to uniform diffuse patterns, a process that was complete in 50% of the cells at 2 h and in 90% of the cells by 4 h after infection. Confocal double-label indirect immunofluorescence assay analysis confirmed that both IE1 and IE2 colocalized transiently with PML in punctate bodies at very early times after infection. In transient expression assays, introduction of IE1-encoding plasmid DNA alone into Vero or HF cells produced the typical total redistribution of PML into a uniform nuclear diffuse pattern together with the IE1 protein, whereas introduction of IE2-encoding plasmid DNA alone resulted in stable colocalization of the IE2 protein with PML in the PODs. A truncated mutant form of IE1 gave large nuclear aggregates and failed to redistribute PML, and similarly a deleted mutant form of IE2 failed to colocalize with the punctate PML bodies, confirming the specificity of these effects. Furthermore, both Vero and U373 cell lines constitutively expressing IE1 also showed total PML relocalization together with the IE1 protein into a nuclear diffuse pattern, although a very small percentage of the cells which failed to express IE1 reverted to a punctate PML pattern. Finally, the PML redistribution activity of IE1 and the direct association of IE2 with PML punctate bodies were both confirmed by infection with E1A-negative recombinant adenovirus vectors expressing either IE1 or IE2 alone. These results confirm that transient colocalization with and disruption of PML-associated nuclear bodies by IE1 and continuous targeting to PML-associated nuclear bodies by IE2 are intrinsic properties of these two MIE regulatory proteins, which we suggest may represent critical initial events for efficient lytic cycle infection by HCMV. PMID:9151854

  20. Troxacitabine-based therapy of refractory leukemia.

    PubMed

    Giles, Francis J

    2002-06-01

    Unique among currently approved or in-development nucleoside analogs, troxacitabine (Troxatyl) is an L-nucleoside with significant cytotoxic activity. Its stereochemistry and cellular transport characteristics render it insensitive to some tumor cell mechanisms of resistance to D-nucleosides, such as cytarabine and fludarabine. Troxacitabine's dose-limiting toxicities were mucositis and hand-foot syndrome in patients with refractory leukemia. Three complete and one partial remissions were observed in 30 patients with refractory acute myeloid leukemia on a Phase I study. Significant activity in blastic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia was seen on a Phase II study. Combinations of troxacitabine with ara-C, topotecan and idarubicin are active in patients with refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Phase II studies in patients with refractory lymphoproliferative diseases are ongoing. Troxacitabine merits further study in patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:12113049

  1. Eliminating Hairy Cell Leukemia Minimal Residual Disease

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have disease-related symptoms that require treatment will be randomly assigned to receive cladribine with either concurrent rituximab or rituximab at least 6 months after completing cladribine therapy.

  2. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Lymphoblastic ... and weakness swollen lymph nodes recurrent infections (like bronchitis or tonsillitis) fever easy bruising bone and joint ...

  3. General Information about Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Monoclonal antibody therapy is a type of targeted therapy used to treat hairy cell leukemia. Monoclonal antibody therapy uses antibodies made in the laboratory from ...

  4. Treatment Options for Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Monoclonal antibody therapy is a type of targeted therapy used to treat hairy cell leukemia. Monoclonal antibody therapy uses antibodies made in the laboratory from ...

  5. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  6. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  7. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  8. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  10. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  11. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  13. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    Cancer.gov

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  14. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with chemotherapy to kids with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), a subtype of AML. Arsenic trioxide. This substance ( ... compound) is also used to treat kids with APL. Stem cell transplant (also called bone marrow transplant). ...

  15. Empowering Preadolescent and Adolescent Leukemia Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Kathy

    1988-01-01

    Describes effects of leukemia diagnosis and treatment for preadolescents and adolescents. Discusses strategies for social workers to assist these cancer patients in participating actively in the day-to-day management of their own care. (ABL)

  16. Exosome-mediated microenvironment dysregulation in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bijender; Garcia, Mayra; Murakami, Jodi L; Chen, Ching-Cheng

    2016-03-01

    The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche is composed of a complex set of stromal support cells that maintain HSCs and promote normal hematopoiesis. We now know that molecular changes within the hematopoietic niche contribute to leukemia development. Leukemia cells often reorganize the hematopoietic niche to promote and support their own survival and growth. Here we will summarize recent works that decipher the normal hematopoietic niche cellular components and describe how the leukemia-transformed niche contributes to hematological malignances. Finally, we will discuss recent publications that highlight a possible role for exosomes in the leukemia-induced niche reorganization. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza. PMID:26384870

  17. A fraction of neurofibromin interacts with PML bodies in the nucleus of the CCF astrocytoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Godin, Fabienne; Villette, Sandrine; Vallee, Beatrice; Doudeau, Michel; Morisset-Lopez, Severine; Ardourel, Maryvonne; Hevor, Tobias; Pichon, Chantal; Benedetti, Helene

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We validate the use of specific anti-Nf1 antibodies for immunofluorescence studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detect Nf1 in the cytoplasm and nucleus of CCF cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that Nf1 partially colocalizes with PML nuclear bodies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that there is a direct interaction between a fraction of Nf1 and the PML bodies. -- Abstract: Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a common genetic disease that causes nervous system tumors, and cognitive deficits. It is due to mutations within the NF1 gene, which encodes the Nf1 protein. Nf1 has been shown to be involved in the regulation of Ras, cAMP and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. In this study, using immunofluorescence experiments, we have shown a partial nuclear localization of Nf1 in the astrocytoma cell line: CCF and we have demonstrated that Nf1 partially colocalizes with PML (promyelocytic leukemia) nuclear bodies. A direct interaction between Nf1 and the multiprotein complex has further been demonstrated using 'in situ' proximity ligation assay (PLA).

  18. VIEW OF A BODY COUNTING ROOM IN BUILDING 122. BODY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF A BODY COUNTING ROOM IN BUILDING 122. BODY COUNTING MEASURES RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL IN THE BODY. DESIGNED TO MINIMIZE EXTERNAL SOURCES OF RADIATION, BODY COUNTING ROOMS ARE CONSTRUCTED OF PRE-WORLD WAR II (WWII) STEEL. PRE-WWII STEEL, WHICH HAS NOT BEEN AFFECTED BY NUCLEAR FALLOUT, IS LOWER IS RADIOACTIVITY THAN STEEL CREATED AFTER WWII. (10/25/85) - Rocky Flats Plant, Emergency Medical Services Facility, Southwest corner of Central & Third Avenues, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Secondary leukemia with a translocation (8; 21)

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, S.V.; Murray, J.A.; Bowser-Riley, S.M.

    1988-04-01

    The clinical features and cytogenetic changes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) developing 10 years after radiotherapy and chemotherapy (for osteosarcoma) are described. Features of both de novo AML (FAB M2 morphology, t(8;21), and secondary leukemia (additional cytogenetic changes, resistance to chemotherapy) were present. The importance of differentiation between primary and therapy-linked disease, and the difficulties in making such a distinction, are discussed.

  20. Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Version 2.2013

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Margaret R.; Tallman, Martin S.; Abboud, Camille N.; Altman, Jessica K.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Arber, Daniel A.; Attar, Eyal; Borate, Uma; Coutre, Steven E.; Damon, Lloyd E.; Lancet, Jeffrey; Maness, Lori J.; Marcucci, Guido; Martin, Michael G.; Millenson, Michael M.; Moore, Joseph O.; Ravandi, Farhad; Shami, Paul J.; Smith, B. Douglas; Stone, Richard M.; Strickland, Stephen A.; Wang, Eunice S.; Gregory, Kristina M.; Naganuma, Maoko

    2014-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize several key updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and discuss the clinical evidence that support the recommendations. The updates described in this article focus on the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) section, featuring recommendations for additional induction/consolidation regimens in patients with low- or intermediate-risk APL, and providing guidance on maintenance strategies for APL. PMID:24029121

  1. Epigenetics in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Plass, Christoph; Oakes, Christopher; Blum, William; Marcucci, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a disease characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of clonal neoplastic hematopoietic precursor cells. This leads to the disruption of normal hematopoiesis and bone marrow failure. Major breakthroughs in the past have contributed to our understanding of the genetic failures and the changed biology in AML cells that underlie the initiation and progression of the disease. It is now recognized that not only genetic but also epigenetic alterations are similarly important in this process. Since these alterations do not change the DNA sequences and are pharmacologically reversible, they have been regarded as optimal targets for what is now known as epigenetic therapy. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of normal epigenetic processes, outline our knowledge of epigenetic alterations in AML, and discuss how this information is being used to improve current therapy of this disease. PMID:18692688

  2. Temporal changes in water quality at a childhood leukemia cluster.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Ralph L

    2004-01-01

    Since 1997, 15 cases of acute lymphocytic leukemia and one case of acute myelocytic leukemia have been diagnosed in children and teenagers who live, or have lived, in an area centered on the town of Fallon, Nevada. The expected rate for the population is about one case every five years. In 2001, 99 domestic and municipal wells and one industrial well were sampled in the Fallon area. Twenty-nine of these wells had been sampled previously in 1989. Statistical comparison of concentrations of major ions and trace elements in those 29 wells between 1989 and 2001 using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test indicate water quality did not substantially change over that period; however, short-term changes may have occurred that were not detected. Volatile organic compounds were seldom detected in ground water samples and those that are regulated were consistently found at concentrations less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). The MCL for gross-alpha radioactivity and arsenic, radon, and uranium concentrations were commonly exceeded, and sometimes were greatly exceeded. Statistical comparisons using the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test indicate gross-alpha and -beta radioactivity, arsenic, uranium, and radon concentrations in wells used by families having a child with leukemia did not statistically differ from the remainder of the domestic wells sampled during this investigation. Isotopic measurements indicate the uranium was natural and not the result of a 1963 underground nuclear bomb test near Fallon. In arid and semiarid areas where trace-element concentrations can greatly exceed the MCL, household reverse-osmosis units may not reduce their concentrations to safe levels. In parts of the world where radon concentrations are high, water consumed first thing in the morning may be appreciably more radioactive than water consumed a few minutes later after the pressure tank has been emptied because secular equilibrium between radon and its immediate daughter progeny is attained in pressure tanks overnight. PMID:15161161

  3. Temporal changes in water quality at a childhood leukemia cluster

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1997, 15 cases of acute lymphocytic leukemia and one case of acute myelocytic leukemia have been diagnosed in children and teenagers who live, or have lived, in an area centered on the town of Fallon, Nevada. The expected rate for the population is about one case every five years. In 2001, 99 domestic and municipal wells and one industrial well were sampled in the Fallon area. Twenty-nine of these wells had been sampled previously in 1989. Statistical comparison of concentrations of major ions and trace elements in those 29 wells between 1989 and 2001 using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test indicate water quality did not substantially change over that period; however, short-term changes may have occurred that were not detected. Volatile organic compounds were seldom detected in ground water samples and those that are regulated were consistently found at concentrations less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). The MCL for gross-alpha radioactivity and arsenic, radon, and uranium concentrations were commonly exceeded, and sometimes were greatly exceeded. Statistical comparisons using the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test indicate gross-alpha and -beta radioactivity, arsenic, uranium, and radon concentrations in wells used by families having a child with leukemia did not statistically differ from the remainder of the domestic wells sampled during this investigation. Isotopic measurements indicate the uranium was natural and not the result of a 1963 underground nuclear bomb test near Fallon. In arid and semiarid areas where trace-element concentrations can greatly exceed the MCL, household reverse-osmosis units may not reduce their concentrations to safe levels. In parts of the world where radon concentrations are high, water consumed first thing in the morning may be appreciably more radioactive than water consumed a few minutes later after the pressure tank has been emptied because secular equilibrium between radon and its immediate daughter progeny is attained in pressure tanks overnight.

  4. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With HTLV-Associated T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Chronic Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; Lymphomatous Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Smoldering Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  5. Oblimersen, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Childhood Leukemia--A Look at the Past, the Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findeisen, Regina; Barber, William H.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of childhood leukemia. The causes, the survival period, different types (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia), symptoms, treatment, side effects of treatment (including learning problems), and the expected future direction of

  7. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Childhood Leukemia--A Look at the Past, the Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findeisen, Regina; Barber, William H.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of childhood leukemia. The causes, the survival period, different types (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia), symptoms, treatment, side effects of treatment (including learning problems), and the expected future direction of…

  9. Ofatumumab, Pentostatin, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-30

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  10. Radioimmunotherapy for Treatment of Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Eugène, Thomas; Guérard, François; Gaschet, Joëlle; Bailly, Clément; Mougin, Marie; Bourgeois, Mickaël; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chérel, Michel; Chevallier, Patrice

    2016-03-01

    Acute leukemias are characterized by accumulation of immature cells (blasts) and reduced production of healthy hematopoietic elements. According to the lineage origin, two major leukemias can be distinguished: acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). Although the survival rate for pediatric ALL is close to 90%, half of the young adults with AML or ALL and approximately 90% of older patients with AML or ALL still die of their disease, raising the need for innovative therapeutic approaches. As almost all leukemic blasts express specific surface antigens, targeted immunotherapy appears to be particularly promising. However, published results of immunotherapy alone are generally modest. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) brings additional therapeutic mechanisms using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to tumor antigens, thus adding radiobiological cytotoxicity to immunologic cytotoxicity. Because of the high radiosensitivity of tumor cells and the diffuse widespread nature of the disease, making it rapidly accessible to circulating radiolabeled mAbs, acute leukemias represent relevant indications for RIT. With the development of recombinant and humanized mAbs, innovative radionuclides, and more efficient radiolabeling and pretargeting techniques, RIT has significantly improved over the last 10 years. Different approaches of α and β RIT targeting CD22, CD33, CD45, or CD66 antigens have already been evaluated or are currently being developed in the treatment of acute leukemia. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical studies demonstrating the potential of RIT in treatment of AML and ALL. PMID:26897718

  11. Work-related leukemia: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Leukemia is a complex disease, which only became better understood during the last decades following the development of new laboratory techniques and diagnostic methods. Despite our improved understanding of the physiology of the disease, little is yet known about the causes of leukemia. A variety of potential risk factors have been suggested so far, including personal habits and lifestyle, and a wide range of occupational or environmental exposures. A causal association with leukemia has only been documented to date for ionizing radiation, benzene and treatment with cytostatic drugs, but there is an ongoing scientific debate on the possible association of leukemia with a number of other work-related hazards. In this article, we have reviewed scientific studies, published over the past 5 years, which investigated potential associations between leukemia and exposure to occupational risk factors. The systematic literature review took place via electronic databases, using specific search criteria, and independent reviewers have further filtered the search results to identify the number of articles, presented in our paper. A large number of studies included in the review referred to the effects of ionizing radiation, where new data suggest that the effects of exposure to small doses of ionizing radiation should probably be reevaluated. Some other works appear to substantiate a potential association of the disease with certain pesticides. Further research is also suggested regarding the role of infectious agents or exposure to certain chemicals like formaldehyde or butadiene in the pathogenesis of leukemia. PMID:23697536

  12. Leukemia following radiotherapy for uterine bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Inskip, P.D.; Monson, R.R.; Wagoner, J.K.; Stovall, M.; Davis, F.G.; Kleinerman, R.A.; Boice, J.D. Jr. )

    1990-05-01

    Mortality due to leukemia among 4483 women treated with radiation to control uterine bleeding between 1925 and 1965 was twice as high as expected based on U.S. population rates (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 2.0; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4 to 2.8). Women were followed for an average of 26.4 years. Relative risk was highest 2 to 5 years after treatment (SMR = 8.1) and among women over 55 years at irradiation (SMR = 5.8). The usual method of treatment was intrauterine radium. Average radiation dose to active bone marrow was estimated on the basis of original radiotherapy records (median, 53 cGy). A linear dose-response model provided an adequate fit to the data. The average excess relative risk was 1.9% per cGy (95% CI: 0.8 to 3.2), and the average absolute risk was 2.6 excess leukemia deaths per million women per year per cGy (95% CI: 0.9 to 4.8). Chronic myeloid leukemia predominated during the first 15 years following exposure, whereas acute leukemias and chronic lymphatic leukemia were most common thereafter. The radiation doses experienced during treatment of benign gynecologic disease appear to result in greater leukemia risk per cGy average marrow dose than the considerably higher doses used to treat malignant disease, perhaps because of a decreased likelihood of killing potentially leukemic cells.

  13. Benzene and leukemia: An epidemiologic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rinsky, R.A. )

    1989-07-01

    To assess quantitatively the association between benzene and leukemia, the authors evaluated the rate of mortality experienced by a cohort occupationally exposed to benzene. Using data from historical air sampling surveys, they estimated the daily benzene exposure for each member of the cohort. The expected number of leukemia deaths was calculated and compared to the actual number of leukemia deaths that occurred. The overall standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for leukemia was 337. Person-years at risk within the cohort were stratified by increasing levels of cumulative benzene exposure. The resulting SMRs increased from 109 to 322 to 1,186 and to 6,637 with respective increases in cumulative benzene exposure from less than 40 ppm-years to 40-199, 200-399, and greater than 400. The shape of the exposure-response relation was examined with a case-control analysis. All of the analyses demonstrated that a strongly positive exposure-response relationship exists between benzene and leukemia. Previous attempts to quantify this cohort's risk of developing leukemia were based on surrogates of exposure, such as duration of employment. Using actual air sampling data to estimate individual exposures represents a marked improvement over these previous attempts and emphasizes the importance of conducting industrial hygiene surveys and maintaining historical exposure records.

  14. Inhibition of STAT5: A therapeutic option in BCR-ABL1-driven leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Angelika; Sexl, Veronika; Valent, Peter; Moriggl, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The two transcription factors STAT5A and STAT5B are central signaling molecules in leukemias driven by Abelson fusion tyrosine kinases and they fulfill all criteria of drug targets. STAT5A and STAT5B display unique nuclear shuttling mechanisms and they have a key role in resistance of leukemic cells against treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). Moreover, STAT5A and STAT5B promote survival of leukemic stem cells. We here discuss the possibility of targeting up-stream kinases with TKI, direct STAT5 inhibition via SH2 domain obstruction and blocking nuclear translocation of STAT5. All discussed options will result in a stop of STAT5 transport to the nucleus to block STAT5-mediated transcriptional activity. In summary, recently described shuttling functions of STAT5 are discussed as potentially druggable pathways in leukemias. PMID:25333255

  15. Nuclear translocation of DJ-1 during oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Jeong; Park, Yun-Jong; Hwang, Ih-Yeon; Youdim, Moussa B H; Park, Kang-Sik; Oh, Young J

    2012-08-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in the PARK7/DJ-1 gene cause early onset autosomal-recessive Parkinson disease. DJ-1 has been implicated in protection of neurons from oxidative stress and in regulation of transcriptional activity. However, whether there is a relationship between the subcellular localization of DJ-1 and its function remains unknown. Therefore, we examined the subcellular localization of DJ-1 during dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by various insults. Immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry showed that the nuclear pool of DJ-1 dramatically increased in both MN9D dopaminergic neuronal cells and primary cultures of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons after 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) treatment. This was paralleled by a corresponding decrease in its cytosolic level, indicating drug-induced nuclear translocation of DJ-1. The same phenomenon was detected in other cell death paradigms induced by pro-oxidants including hydrogen peroxide and cupric chloride. Consequently, cotreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine blocked the translocation of DJ-1 into the nucleus. However, mutation at cysteine 106 had no effect on the translocation of DJ-1 into the nucleus, suggesting that reactive oxygen species-mediated downstream signaling and/or modifications other than oxidative modification are involved in its nuclear translocation. Ectopic expression of nucleus localization signal (NLS)-tagged DJ-1 prevented cell death from 6-OHDA. We investigated whether nuclear DJ-1 was involved in transcriptional regulation and found that DJ-1 was localized in promyelocytic leukemia bodies, and this localization increased upon 6-OHDA treatment. We also confirmed that binding of DJ-1 and promyelocytic leukemia bodies indeed increased after 6-OHDA treatment. Consequently, expression levels of acetylated p53 and PUMA were downregulated in cells overexpressing DJ-1 or NLS-tagged DJ-1. Taken together, our data suggest that nuclear translocation of DJ-1 may protect neurons from cell death after oxidative stress. PMID:22683601

  16. PML isoform II plays a critical role in nuclear lipid droplet formation.

    PubMed

    Ohsaki, Yuki; Kawai, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Yukichika; Cheng, Jinglei; Jokitalo, Eija; Fujimoto, Toyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) in the nucleus of hepatocyte-derived cell lines were found to be associated with premyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) and type I nucleoplasmic reticulum (NR) or the extension of the inner nuclear membrane. Knockdown of PML isoform II (PML-II) caused a significant decrease in both nuclear LDs and type I NR, whereas overexpression of PML-II increased both. Notably, these effects were evident only in limited types of cells, in which a moderate number of nuclear LDs exist intrinsically, and PML-II was targeted not only at PML NBs, but also at the nuclear envelope, excluding lamins and SUN proteins. Knockdown of SUN proteins induced a significant increase in the type I NR and nuclear LDs, but these effects were cancelled by simultaneous knockdown of PML-II. Nuclear LDs harbored diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 and CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α and incorporated newly synthesized lipid esters. These results corroborated that PML-II plays a critical role in generating nuclear LDs in specific cell types. PMID:26728854

  17. Body Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayhew, Jerry L.

    1981-01-01

    Body composition refers to the types and amounts of tissues which make up the body. The most acceptable method for assessing body composition is underwater weighing. A subcutaneous skinfold provides a quantitative measurement of fat below the skin. The skinfold technique permits a valid estimate of the body's total fat content. (JN)

  18. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Pravastatin Sodium in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Trebananib With or Without Low-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.