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1

A Bayesian Network Model of Proteins' Association with Promyelocytic Leukemia (PML) Nuclear Bodies  

E-print Network

A Bayesian Network Model of Proteins' Association with Promyelocytic Leukemia (PML) Nuclear Bodies the complement of proteins associated with these intra-nuclear bodies, we construct a Bayesian network model that nuclear organization brings has the potential to explain the function of aggregates of proteins and RNA

Dellaire, Graham

2

Promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear body proteins: herpesvirus enemies, accomplices, or both?  

PubMed Central

The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein gathers other cellular proteins, such as Daxx and Sp100, to form subnuclear structures termed PML-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) or ND10 domains. Many infecting viral genomes localize to PML-NBs, leading to speculation that these structures may represent the most efficient subnuclear location for viral replication. Conversely, many viral proteins modify or disrupt PML-NBs, suggesting that viral replication may be more efficient in the absence of these structures. Thus, a debate remains as to whether PML-NBs inhibit or enhance viral replication. Here we review and discuss recent data indicating that for herpesviruses, PML-NB proteins inhibit viral replication in cell types where productive, lytic replication occurs, while at the same time may enhance the establishment of lifelong latent infections in other cell types. PMID:19763230

Saffert, Ryan T; Kalejta, Robert F

2009-01-01

3

Dynamics of Telomeres and Promyelocytic Leukemia Nuclear Bodies in a Telomerase-negative Human Cell Line  

PubMed Central

Telomerase-negative tumor cells maintain their telomeres via an alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanism. This process involves the association of telomeres with promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs). Here, the mobility of both telomeres and PML-NBs as well as their interactions were studied in human U2OS osteosarcoma cells, in which the ALT pathway is active. A U2OS cell line was constructed that had lac operator repeats stably integrated adjacent to the telomeres of chromosomes 6q, 11p, and 12q. By fluorescence microscopy of autofluorescent LacI repressor bound to the lacO arrays the telomere mobility during interphase was traced and correlated with the telomere repeat length. A confined diffusion model was derived that describes telomere dynamics in the nucleus on the time scale from seconds to hours. Two telomere groups were identified that differed with respect to the nuclear space accessible to them. Furthermore, translocations of PML-NBs relative to telomeres and their complexes with telomeres were evaluated. Based on these studies, a model is proposed in which the shortening of telomeres results in an increased mobility that could facilitate the formation of complexes between telomeres and PML-NBs. PMID:19211845

Jegou, Thibaud; Chung, Inn; Heuvelman, Gerrit; Wachsmuth, Malte; Görisch, Sabine M.; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Boukamp, Petra; Lichter, Peter

2009-01-01

4

Association of hepatitis B virus polymerase with promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies mediated by the S100 family protein p11.  

PubMed

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase (Pol) interacts with cellular chaperone proteins and thereby performs multiple functions necessary for viral replication. Yeast two-hybrid analysis was applied to identify additional cellular targets required for HBV Pol function. HBV Pol interacted with S100A10 (p11), a Ca(2+)-modulated protein previously shown to bind to annexin II. The interaction between HBV Pol and p11 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation of the two proteins synthesized either in vitro or in transfected cells and by inhibition of the DNA polymerase activity of HBV Pol by p11. Immunofluorescence analysis of transfected human cell lines revealed that, although most HBV Pol and p11 was restricted to the cytoplasm, a small proportion of each protein colocalized as nuclear speckles; HBV Pol was not detected in the nucleus in the absence of p11. The HBV Pol-p11 nuclear speckles coincided with nuclear bodies containing the promyelocytic leukemia protein PML. Furthermore, the association of HBV Pol-p11 with PML was increased by exposure of cells to EGTA and inhibited by valinomycin. These results suggest a role for p11 in modulation of HBV Pol function and implicate PML nuclear bodies and intracellular Ca(2+) in viral replication. PMID:12767936

Choi, Juhyun; Chang, Jin-Sook; Song, Min-Sup; Ahn, Byung-Yoon; Park, Young; Lim, Dae-Sik; Han, Ye Sun

2003-06-13

5

Arsenic mediated disruption of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies induces ganciclovir susceptibility in Epstein-Barr positive epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect

Promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML NBs) have been implicated in host immune response to viral infection. PML NBs are targeted for degradation during reactivation of herpes viruses, suggesting that disruption of PML NB function supports this aspect of the viral life cycle. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) has been shown to suppress EBV reactivation. Our finding that LMP1 induces PML NB immunofluorescence intensity led to the hypothesis that LMP1 may modulate PML NBs as a means of maintaining EBV latency. Increased PML protein and morphometric changes in PML NBs were observed in EBV infected alveolar epithelial cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Treatment with low dose arsenic trioxide disrupted PML NBs, induced expression of EBV lytic proteins, and conferred ganciclovir susceptibility. This study introduces an effective modality to induce susceptibility to ganciclovir in epithelial cells with implications for the treatment of EBV associated pathologies.

Sides, Mark D. [Department of Medicine, Section of Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States); Block, Gregory J. [University of Washington Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Shan, Bin; Esteves, Kyle C. [Department of Medicine, Section of Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States); Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K. [Department of Pathology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States); Lasky, Joseph A., E-mail: jlasky@tulane.edu [Department of Medicine, Section of Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States)

2011-06-20

6

Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies support a late step in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.  

PubMed

The PML protein and PML nuclear bodies (PML-NB) are implicated in multiple cellular functions relevant to tumor suppression, including DNA damage response. In most cases of acute promyelocytic leukemia, the PML and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) genes are translocated, resulting in expression of oncogenic PML-RAR? fusion proteins. PML-NB fail to form normally, and promyelocytes remain in an undifferentiated, abnormally proliferative state. We examined the involvement of PML protein and PML-NB in homologous recombinational repair (HRR) of chromosomal DNA double-strand breaks. Transient overexpression of wild-type PML protein isoforms produced hugely enlarged or aggregated PML-NB and reduced HRR by ~2-fold, suggesting that HRR depends to some extent upon normal PML-NB structure. Knockdown of PML by RNA interference sharply attenuated formation of PML-NB and reduced HRR by up to 20-fold. However, PML-knockdown cells showed apparently normal induction of H2AX phosphorylation and RAD51 foci after DNA damage by ionizing radiation. These findings indicate that early steps in HRR, including recognition of DNA double-strand breaks, initial processing of ends, and assembly of single-stranded DNA/RAD51 nucleoprotein filaments, do not depend upon PML-NB. The HRR deficit in PML-depleted cells thus reflects inhibition of later steps in the repair pathway. Expression of PML-RAR? fusion proteins disrupted PML-NB structure and reduced HRR by up to 10-fold, raising the possibility that defective HRR and resulting genomic instability may figure in the pathogenesis, progression and relapse of acute promyelocytic leukemia. PMID:22213200

Yeung, Percy Luk; Denissova, Natalia G; Nasello, Cara; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Chen, J Don; Brenneman, Mark A

2012-05-01

7

The Human Cytomegalovirus IE2 and UL112-113 Proteins Accumulate in Viral DNA Replication Compartments That Initiate from the Periphery of Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein-Associated Nuclear Bodies (PODs or ND10)  

Microsoft Academic Search

During human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, the periphery of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML)- associated nuclear bodies (also known as PML oncogenic domains (PODs) or ND10) are sites for both input viral genome deposition and immediate-early (IE) gene transcription. At very early times after infection, the IE1 protein localizes to and subsequently disrupts PODs, whereas the IE2 protein localizes within or adjacent

JIN-HYUN AHN; WON-JONG JANG; GARY S. HAYWARD

1999-01-01

8

JC virus inclusions in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: scaffolding promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies grow with cell cycle transition through an S-to-G2-like state in enlarging oligodendrocyte nuclei.  

PubMed

In progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, JC virus-infected oligodendroglia display 2 distinct patterns of intranuclear viral inclusions: full inclusions in which progeny virions are present throughout enlarged nuclei and dot-shaped inclusions in which virions are clustered in subnuclear domains termed "promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies" (PML-NBs). Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies may serve a scaffolding role in viral progeny production. We analyzed the formation process of intranuclear viral inclusions by morphometry and assessed PML-NB alterations in the brains of 2 patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. By immunohistochemistry, proliferating cell nuclear antigen was most frequently detected in smaller nuclei; cyclin A was detected in larger nuclei. This suggests an S-to-G2 cell cycle transition in infected cells associated with nuclear enlargement. Sizes of PML-NBs were variable, but they were usually either small speckles 200 to 400 nm in diameter or distinct spherical shells with a diameter of 1 ?m or more. By confocal microscopy, JC virus capsid proteins were associated with both small and large PML-NBs, but disruption of large PML-NBs was observed by ground-state depletion fluorescence nanoscopy. Clusters of progeny virions were also detected by electron microscopy. Our data suggest that, in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, JC virus produces progeny virions in enlarging oligodendrocyte nuclei in association with growing PML-NBs and with cell cycle transition through an S-to-G2-like state. PMID:24709678

Shishido-Hara, Yukiko; Yazawa, Takuya; Nagane, Motoo; Higuchi, Kayoko; Abe-Suzuki, Shiho; Kurata, Morito; Kitagawa, Masanobu; Kamma, Hiroshi; Uchihara, Toshiki

2014-05-01

9

Biogenesis of nuclear bodies.  

PubMed

The nucleus is unique amongst cellular organelles in that it contains a myriad of discrete suborganelles. These nuclear bodies are morphologically and molecularly distinct entities, and they host specific nuclear processes. Although the mode of biogenesis appears to differ widely between individual nuclear bodies, several common design principles are emerging, particularly, the ability of nuclear bodies to form de novo, a role of RNA as a structural element and self-organization as a mode of formation. The controlled biogenesis of nuclear bodies is essential for faithful maintenance of nuclear architecture during the cell cycle and is an important part of cellular responses to intra- and extracellular events. PMID:21068152

Dundr, Miroslav; Misteli, Tom

2010-12-01

10

Nucleation of Nuclear Bodies  

PubMed Central

The nucleus is a complex organelle containing numerous highly dynamic, structurally stable domains and bodies, harboring functions that have only begun to be defined. However, the molecular mechanisms for their formation are still poorly understood. Recently it has been shown that a nuclear body can form de novo by self-organization. But little is known regarding what triggers the formation of a nuclear body and how subsequent assembly steps are orchestrated. Nuclear bodies are frequently associated with specific active gene loci that directly contribute to their formation. Both coding and noncoding RNAs can initiate the assembly of nuclear bodies with which they are physiologically associated. Thus, the formation of nuclear bodies occurs via recruitment and consequent accumulation of resident proteins in the nuclear bodies by nucleating RNA acting as a seeder. In this chapter I describe how to set up an experimental cell system to probe de novo biogenesis of a nuclear body by nucleating RNA and nuclear body components tethered on chromatin. PMID:23980018

Dundr, Miroslav

2014-01-01

11

Recruitment of cyclin G2 to promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies promotes dephosphorylation of ?H2AX following treatment with ionizing radiation.  

PubMed

Cyclin G2 (CycG2) and Cyclin G1 (CycG1), two members of the Cyclin G subfamily, share high amino acid homology in their Cyclin G boxes. Functionally, they play a common role as association partners of the B'? subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and regulate PP2A function, and their expression is increased following DNA damage. However, whether or not CycG1 and CycG2 have distinct roles during the cellular DNA damage response has remained unclear. Here, we report that CycG2, but not CycG1, co-localized with promyelocytic leukemia (PML) and ?H2AX, forming foci following ionizing radiation (IR), suggesting that CycG2 is recruited to sites of DNA repair and that CycG1 and CycG2 have distinct functions. PML failed to localize to nuclear foci when CycG2 was depleted, and vice versa. This suggests that PML and CycG2 mutually influence each other's functions following IR. Furthermore, we generated CycG2-knockout (Ccng2 (-/-) ) mice to investigate the functions of CycG2. These mice were born healthy and developed normally. However, CycG2-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts displayed an abnormal response to IR. Dephosphorylation of ?H2AX and checkpoint kinase 2 following IR was delayed in Ccng2 (-/-) cells, suggesting that DNA damage repair may be perturbed in the absence of CycG2. Although knockdown of B'? in wild-type cells also delayed dephosphorylation of ?H2AX, knockdown of B'? in Ccng2 (-/-) cells prolonged this delay, suggesting that CycG2 cooperates with B'? to dephosphorylate ?H2AX. Taken together, we conclude that CycG2 is localized at DNA repair foci following DNA damage, and that CycG2 regulates the dephosphorylation of several factors necessary for DNA repair. PMID:23656780

Naito, Yoko; Yabuta, Norikazu; Sato, Jun; Ohno, Shouichi; Sakata, Muneki; Kasama, Takashi; Ikawa, Masahito; Nojima, Hiroshi

2013-06-01

12

Whole-genome screening identifies proteins localized to distinct nuclear bodies.  

PubMed

The nucleus is a unique organelle that contains essential genetic materials in chromosome territories. The interchromatin space is composed of nuclear subcompartments, which are defined by several distinctive nuclear bodies believed to be factories of DNA or RNA processing and sites of transcriptional and/or posttranscriptional regulation. In this paper, we performed a genome-wide microscopy-based screening for proteins that form nuclear foci and characterized their localizations using markers of known nuclear bodies. In total, we identified 325 proteins localized to distinct nuclear bodies, including nucleoli (148), promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (38), nuclear speckles (27), paraspeckles (24), Cajal bodies (17), Sam68 nuclear bodies (5), Polycomb bodies (2), and uncharacterized nuclear bodies (64). Functional validation revealed several proteins potentially involved in the assembly of Cajal bodies and paraspeckles. Together, these data establish the first atlas of human proteins in different nuclear bodies and provide key information for research on nuclear bodies. PMID:24127217

Fong, Ka-Wing; Li, Yujing; Wang, Wenqi; Ma, Wenbin; Li, Kunpeng; Qi, Robert Z; Liu, Dan; Songyang, Zhou; Chen, Junjie

2013-10-14

13

Leukemia among participants in military maneuvers at a nuclear bomb test  

Microsoft Academic Search

To test the possibility of a casual relationship between leukemia and exposure to nuclear radiation, the frequency of leukemia in personnel observing the detonation of a nuclear device called ''Smoky'' during August 1957 was determined. Of some 3224 men who witnessed the detonation, nine cases of leukemia were observed. They included four cases of acute myelocytic leukemia, three of chronic

G. G. Caldwell; D. B. Kelley; C. W. Heath

1980-01-01

14

Leukemia among participants in military maneuvers at a nuclear bomb test. [Plumbbob Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preliminary studies indicate that nine cases of leukemia have occurred among 3224 men who participated in military maneuvers during the 1957 nuclear test explosion Smoky. This represents a significant increase over the expected incidence of 3.5 cases. They included four cases of acute myelocytic leukemia, three of chronic myelocytic leukemia, and one each of hairy cell and acute lymphocytic leukemia.

G. G. Caldwell; D. B. Kelley; C. W. Jr. Heath

1980-01-01

15

NCI Scientists Discover How T-Cell Leukemia Viruses Evade Body's Defense Mechanisms  

Cancer.gov

NCI scientists have discovered how human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), which infects about 20 million people worldwide, evades being held in check by one of the body's natural defense mechanisms. An active infection with HTLV-1 leads to T-cell leukemia in up to five percent of all cases worldwide.

16

Childhood leukemia and fallout from the Nevada nuclear tests  

SciTech Connect

Cancer mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics, covering the period 1950 through 1978, were used to test a reported association between childhood leukemia and exposure to radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons tests in Nevada between 1951 and 1958. No pattern of temporal and geographic variation in risk supportive of the reported association was found. Comparison of these results with those presented in support of an association of risk with fallout suggests that the purported association merely reflects an anomalously low leukemia rate in southern Utah during the period 1944 to 1949. 14 references, 4 figures, 7 tables.

Land, C.E.; McKay, F.W.; Machado, S.G.

1984-01-13

17

Altered bone mineral density and body composition, and increased fracture risk in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate fracture rate and bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with dexamethasone-based chemotherapy. Study design: Children with ALL (n = 61) participated. At diagnosis, during therapy, and one year after cessation of therapy, BMD and body composition were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry of lumbar spine (LS) and

Inge M. van der Sluis; Marry M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink; Karel Hählen; Eric P. Krenning; Sabine M. P. F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama

2002-01-01

18

Histone Deacetylase 7 Promotes PML Sumoylation and Is Essential for PML Nuclear Body Formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) sumoylation has been proposed to control the formation of PML nuclear bodies (NBs) and is crucial for PML-dependent cellular processes, including apoptosis and transcrip- tional regulation. However, the regulatory mechanisms of PML sumoylation and its specific roles in the formation of PML NBs remain largely unknown. Here, we show that histone deacetylase 7 (HDAC7) knock- down

Chengzhuo Gao; Chun-Chen Ho; Erin Reineke; Minh Lam; Xiwen Cheng; Kristopher J. Stanya; Yu Liu; Sharmistha Chakraborty; Hsiu-Ming Shih; Hung-Ying Kao

2008-01-01

19

Nuclear body formation and PML body remodeling by the human cytomegalovirus protein UL35  

SciTech Connect

The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL35 gene encodes two proteins, UL35 and UL35a. Expression of UL35 in transfected cells results in the formation of UL35 nuclear bodies that associate with promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein. PML forms the basis for PML nuclear bodies that are important for suppressing viral lytic gene expression. Given the important relationship between PML and viral infection, we have further investigated the association of UL35 with PML bodies. We demonstrate that UL35 bodies form independently of PML and subsequently recruit PML, Sp100 and Daxx. In contrast, UL35a did not form bodies; however, it could bind UL35 and inhibit the formation of UL35 bodies. The HCMV tegument protein pp71 promoted the formation of UL35 bodies and the cytoplasmic localization of UL35a. Similarly, UL35a shifted pp71 to the cytoplasm. These results indicate that the interplay between UL35, UL35a and pp71 affects their subcellular localization and likely their functions throughout infection.

Salsman, Jayme; Wang Xueqi; Frappier, Lori, E-mail: lori.frappier@utoronto.ca

2011-06-05

20

Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... adults and occur more often in men than women. Many Treatments Are Available There are many methods available to treat acute and chronic leukemia. They include chemotherapy, biological therapy, or stem cell transplantation. Some people receive a combination of ...

21

Nuclear remodeling of telomeres in chronic myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematologic cancer characterized by the proliferation of myeloid cells and the translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22, [t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2)]. At the chronic phase (CP), CML cells present longer telomeres than at the other clinical phases, display arm-specific maintenance of individual telomere lengths, and are chromosomally stable. We asked whether an alteration of nuclear organization of telomeres, which is associated with genomic instability, occurs in CML cells at the CP. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization of telomeres combined with three-dimensional (3D) quantification to study the nuclear telomeric architecture of CML cells at the CP. We found that cells can exhibit high telomere numbers, different telomere distributions, and alterations in peripheral or central nuclear location of telomeres. Also, we show that CML cells can be categorized in two groups according to the number of their telomere aggregates (TAs). We propose that the presence of high TAs in some samples is associated with the increased genomic instability and could be an indication of the clinical transitional phase. Also, alterations of nuclear organization of telomeres at the CP confirm that nuclear remodeling of telomeres can occur at an early clinical stage of a cancer. PMID:23341124

Samassekou, Oumar; Hébert, Josée; Mai, Sabine; Yan, Ju

2013-05-01

22

TTRAP is a novel PML nuclear bodies-associated protein  

SciTech Connect

PML nuclear body (PML NB) is an important macromolecular nuclear structure that is involved in many essential aspects of cellular function. Tens of proteins have been found in PML NBs, and promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) has been proven to be essential for the formation of this structure. Here, we showed that TRAF and TNF receptor-associated protein (TTRAP) was a novel PML NBs-associated protein. TTRAP colocalized with three important PML NBs-associated proteins, PML, DAXX and Sp100 in the typical fashion of PML NBs. By yeast mating assay, TTRAP was identified to interact with these PML NBs-associated proteins. The transcription and expression of TTRAP could be induced by IFN-{gamma}, representing another common feature of PML NBs-associated proteins. These results would not only be important for understanding PML NBs but also be helpful in studying the TTRAP function in the future.

Xu Guanlan; Pan Yukun; Wang Bingyin; Huang Lu; Tian Ling; Xue Jinglun [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chen Jinzhong [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)], E-mail: kingbellchen@fudan.edu.cn; Jia, William [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)], E-mail: wjia@interchange.ubc.ca

2008-10-24

23

Body composition and phase angle in Russian children in remission from acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Elevated degree of body fatness and changes in other body composition parameters are known to be common effects of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children. In order to study peculiarities of somatic growth and development in ALL survivors, we describe the results of BIA body composition analysis of 112 boys and 108 girls aged 5-18 years in remission from ALL (remission time range 1-13 years) compared to data from the same number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n=220). Detrimental effect on height in ALL boys was observed, whereas girls experienced additional weight gain compared to healthy subjects. In ALL patients, resistance, body fat, and percent body fat were significantly increased. The reactance, phase angle, absolute and relative values of skeletal muscle and body cell mass were significantly decreased. Principal component analysis revealed an early prevalence of adiposity traits in the somatic growth and development of ALL girls compared to healthy controls.

Tseytlin, G. Ja; Khomyakova, I. A.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Konovalova, M. V.; Vashura, A. Yu; Tretyak, A. V.; Godina, E. Z.; Rudnev, S. G.

2010-04-01

24

PML nuclear bodies: dynamic sensors of DNA  

E-print Network

cirrhosis.(1­4) PML NBs are also referred to as PML oncogenic domains (PODS), Kremer (Kr) bodies and nuclear- antigen in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, was the first characterised protein to localise

Dellaire, Graham

25

Pharmacogenetic risk factors for altered bone mineral density and body composition in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background This study investigates pharmacogenetic risk factors for bone mineral (apparent) density (BM(A)D) and body composition in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia Design and Methods We determined the influence of SNPs in 4 genes (vitamin-D receptor (VDR: BsmI\\/ApaI\\/TaqI and Cdx-2\\/GATA), collagen type I alpha 1 (SpI), estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1: PvuII\\/XbaI), glucocorticoid receptor (BclI)) on body composition, BM(A)D and fracture risk

Winkel te M. L; Beek van R. D; S. M. P. F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama; A. G. Uitterlinden; W. C. J. Hop; R. A. Pieters; M. M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink

2010-01-01

26

Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2013-10-29

27

Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

2014-05-22

28

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)  

MedlinePLUS

... this page Print this page Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a fast-growing cancer of a type ... that your body needs. Tweet Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) How transplant can treat ALL Transplant outcomes for ...

29

SUMO: of branched proteins and nuclear bodies  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMO belongs to a growing number of ubiquitin-like proteins that covalently modify their target proteins. Although some evidence supports a role of SUMO modification in regulating protein stability, most studied examples support a model by which SUMO alters the interaction properties of its targets, often affecting their subcellular localization behavior. Examination of the PML nuclear bodies, whose principal components are

Jacob-S Seeler; Anne Dejean

2001-01-01

30

Relativistic nuclear many-body theory  

SciTech Connect

Nonrelativistic models of nuclear systems have provided important insight into nuclear physics. In future experiments, nuclear systems will be examined under extreme conditions of density and temperature, and their response will be probed at momentum and energy transfers larger than the nucleon mass. It is therefore essential to develop reliable models that go beyond the traditional nonrelativistic many-body framework. General properties of physics, such as quantum mechanics, Lorentz covariance, and microscopic causality, motivate the use of quantum field theories to describe the interacting, relativistic, nuclear many-body system. Renormalizable models based on hadronic degrees of freedom (quantum hadrodynamics) are presented, and the assumptions underlying this framework are discussed. Some applications and successes of quantum hadrodynamics are described, with an emphasis on the new features arising from relativity. Examples include the nuclear equation of state, the shell model, nucleon-nucleus scattering, and the inclusion of zero-point vacuum corrections. Current issues and problems are also considered, such as the construction of improved approximations, the full role of the quantum vacuum, and the relationship between quantum hadrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics. We also speculate on future developments. 103 refs., 18 figs.

Serot, B.D. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)); Walecka, J.D. (Southeastern Universities Research Association, Newport News, VA (United States). Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility)

1991-09-11

31

A Cluster of Childhood Leukemia near a Nuclear Reactor in Northern Germany  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between February 1990 and December 1995, professionals diagnosed six cases of childhood leukemia among residents of the small rural community of Elbmarsch in Northern Germany. Five of these cases were diagnosed in only a 16-mo period between February 1990 and May 1991. All cases lived in close proximity (i.e., 500–4 500 m) to Germany's largest capacity nuclear boiling-water reactor. We

Wolfgang Hoffmann; Helga Dieckmann; Hayo Dieckmann; Inge Schmitz-feuerhake

1997-01-01

32

Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2014-07-22

33

Hepatitis C-associated liver carcinogenesis: Role of PML nuclear bodies  

PubMed Central

Successful escape from immune response characterises chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, which results in persistence of infection in about 80% of the patients. The deleterious consequences are cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV accounts the most frequent cause for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver transplantation (LT) in the western world. The underlying molecular mechanisms how HCV promotes tumor development are largely unknown. There is some in vitro and in vivo evidence that HCV interferes with the tumor suppressor PML and may thereby importantly contribute to the HCV-associated pathogenesis with respect to the development of HCC. The tumor suppressor protein “promyelocytic leukemia” (PML) has been implicated in the regulation of important cellular processes like differentiation and apoptosis. In cancer biology, PML and its associated nuclear bodies (NBs) have initially attracted intense interest due to its role in the pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). More recently, loss of PML has been implicated in human cancers of various histologic origins. Moreover, number and intensity of PML-NBs increase in response to interferons (IFNs) and there is evidence that PML-NBs may represent preferential targets in viral infections. Thus, PML could not only play a role in the mechanisms of the antiviral action of IFNs but may also be involved in a direct oncogenic effect of the HCV on hepatocytes. This review aims to summarise current knowledge about HCV-related liver carcinogenesis and to discuss a potential role of the nuclear body protein PML for this this hard-to-treat cancer. PMID:25253937

Herzer, Kerstin; Gerken, Guido; Hofmann, Thomas G

2014-01-01

34

21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2011-04-01

35

21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2011-04-01

36

21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2010-04-01

37

21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2014-04-01

38

21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2012-04-01

39

21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2010-04-01

40

21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2012-04-01

41

21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2014-04-01

42

21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2013-04-01

43

21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2013-04-01

44

Childhood Leukemia in the Vicinity of the Geesthacht Nuclear Establishments near Hamburg, Germany  

PubMed Central

Background During 1990–1991 a childhood leukemia cluster was observed in the sparsely populated region surrounding two nuclear establishments southeast of Hamburg, Germany. Since then, several new cases have been reported. Recently a possible accidental release of radionuclides in 1986 was hypothesized. Objective The objective of this study was to analyze the childhood leukemia incidence in this area since 1990. Methods All incident cases (< 15 years of age) were ascertained during 1990–2005 within a 5-km radius of the Krümmel nuclear power plant. We derived standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) using county and national leukemia incidence rates as referents. We stratified analyses by calendar period and attained age, and by subdividing the study region into areas north versus south of the Elbe river. Results Fourteen cases were ascertained in the study area, whereas 4.0 were expected based on national referent rates [1990–2005: SIR = 3.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.9–5.9]. The excess was not confined to the early 1990s; for the more recent time period 1999–2005, the SIR is still elevated (SIR = 2.7; 95% CI, 0.9–6.2). SIRs of greatest magnitude were observed for children 0–4 years of age (SIR = 4.9; 95% CI, 2.4–9.0) and for residents south of the Elbe (SIR = 7.5; 95% CI, 2.8–16.4). Conclusions The incidence in this region is significantly higher than the childhood leukemia incidence for Germany as a whole. To date, no unique hazards have been identified in this population. The fact that the elevated rates have persisted in this community for > 15 years warrants further investigation. PMID:17589605

Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Terschueren, Claudia; Richardson, David B.

2007-01-01

45

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

46

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

47

Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

48

Optimization of conditioning therapy for leukemia prior to BMT. I. Optimal synergism between cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation for eradication of murine B cell leukemia (BCL1).  

PubMed

The doses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy and the sequence-dependent influence of CY administration and total body irradiation (TBI) on the eradication of murine B cell leukemia (BCL1) were investigated. Tumor-bearing BALB/c mice were treated with either CY followed by TBI (CY/TBI) or in the reverse (TBI/CY) at different time intervals after injection of 10(6) BCL1 cells. The presence of residual tumor cells after cytoreduction was assessed in secondary BALB/c recipients by monitoring leukemia-free survival. The anti-leukemic effect of CY followed by TBI was significantly better than TBI followed by CY. The survival of secondary adoptive recipients inoculated with 10(5) spleen cells obtained from mice treated with CY/TBI was 54% (57 of 105) compared with 25% (25 of 98) of recipients inoculated with 10(5) spleen cells obtained from mice treated with TBI/CY (p = 0.0001). PMID:8401354

Loewenthal, E; Weiss, L; Samuel, S; Or, R; Slavin, S

1993-08-01

49

Murine Leukemia Virus Uses NXF1 for Nuclear Export of Spliced and Unspliced Viral Transcripts  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Intron-containing mRNAs are subject to restricted nuclear export in higher eukaryotes. Retroviral replication requires the nucleocytoplasmic transport of both spliced and unspliced RNA transcripts, and RNA export mechanisms of gammaretroviruses are poorly characterized. Here, we report the involvement of the nuclear export receptor NXF1/TAP in the nuclear export of gammaretroviral RNA transcripts. We identified a conserved cis-acting element in the pol gene of gammaretroviruses, including murine leukemia virus (MLV) and xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMRV), named the CAE (cytoplasmic accumulation element). The CAE enhanced the cytoplasmic accumulation of viral RNA transcripts and the expression of viral proteins without significantly affecting the stability, splicing, or translation efficiency of the transcripts. Insertion of the CAE sequence also facilitated Rev-independent HIV Gag expression. We found that the CAE sequence interacted with NXF1, whereas disruption of NXF1 ablated CAE function. Thus, the CAE sequence mediates the cytoplasmic accumulation of gammaretroviral transcripts in an NXF1-dependent manner. Disruption of NXF1 expression impaired cytoplasmic accumulations of both spliced and unspliced RNA transcripts of XMRV and MLV, resulting in their nuclear retention or degradation. Thus, our results demonstrate that gammaretroviruses use NXF1 for the cytoplasmic accumulation of both spliced and nonspliced viral RNA transcripts. IMPORTANCE Murine leukemia virus (MLV) has been studied as one of the classic models of retrovirology. Although unspliced host messenger RNAs are rarely exported from the nucleus, MLV actively exports unspliced viral RNAs to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive studies, how MLV achieves this difficult task has remained a mystery. Here, we have studied the RNA export mechanism of MLV and found that (i) the genome contains a sequence which supports the efficient nuclear export of viral RNAs, (ii) the cellular factor NXF1 is involved in the nuclear export of both spliced and unspliced viral RNAs, and, finally, (iii) depletion of NXF1 results in nuclear retention or degradation of viral RNAs. Our study provides a novel insight into MLV nuclear export. PMID:24478440

Sakuma, Toshie; Davila, Jaime I.; Malcolm, Jessica A.; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A.; Tonne, Jason M.

2014-01-01

50

Effect of Body Mass Index on the Outcome of Children with Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND The effect of body mass index (BMI) on treatment outcome of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is unclear and needs further evaluation. METHODS Children with AML (n=314) enrolled in 4 consecutive St. Jude protocols were grouped according to BMI (underweight, <5th percentile; healthy weight, 5th to 85th percentile; and overweight/obese, ? 85th percentile). RESULTS Twenty-five (8.0%) patients were underweight, 86 (27.4%) overweight/obese, and 203 (64.6%) had healthy weight. Five-year overall survival of overweight/obese patients (46.5±7.3%) was lower than that of patients with healthy weight (67.1±4.3%, P < .001); underweight patients also tended to have lower survival rates (50.6±10.7%, P = .18). In a multivariable analysis adjusting for age, leukocyte count, FAB type, and study protocols, patients with healthy weight had the best survival rate among the 3 groups (P = .01). When BMI was considered as continuous variable, patients with lower or higher BMI percentiles had worse survival (P = .03). There was no difference in the occurrence of induction failure or relapse among BMI groups but underweight and overweight/obese patients had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of treatment-related mortality, especially due to infection (P = .009). CONCLUSIONS An unhealthy BMI is associated with worse survival and more treatment-related mortality in children with AML. Meticulous supportive care, with nutritional support and education, infection prophylaxis, and detailed laboratory and physical examination is required for these patients. These measures, together with pharmacokinetics-guided chemotherapy dosing may improve outcome. PMID:22648558

Inaba, Hiroto; Surprise, Harriet C.; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Howard, Scott C.; Ringwald-Smith, Karen; Buaboonnam, Jassada; Dahl, Gary; Bowman, W. Paul; Taub, Jeffrey W.; Campana, Dario; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.

2012-01-01

51

Father's occupational exposure to radiation and the raised level of childhood leukemia near the Sellafield Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The first indications that childhood leukemia rates may be raised near the Sellafield nuclear plant in West Cumbria, England, came from largely anecdotal evidence in a television program Windscale: The Nuclear Laundry shown during 1983. During subsequent years, various epidemiological studies have investigated the claim in more detail. Geographical analyses of childhood leukemia incidence in the northern region and mortality in England and Wales using routinely available data made the first contribution. As a result, it was confirmed that leukemia rates in the area, particularly the neighboring village of Seascale, were high compared to other districts, although not totally extreme. Cohort studies of children born in Seascale or attending schools in Seascale were carried out to resolve some of the difficulties of interpretation of geographical analysis. Cohort studies indicated that the excess of leukemia was concentrated among children born in Seascale and was not found among those moving in after birth and suggested that any causal factors may be acting before birth or very early in life. A case-control study of leukemia (and lymphoma) among young people in West Cumbria has examined potentially important individual factors in detail. The study demonstrated a relationship between the raised incidence of leukemia in children and father's recorded external radiation dose during work at Sellafield before his child's conception. The association can effectively explain statistically the observed geographical excess.

Gardner, M.J. (Univ. of Southampton (England))

1991-08-01

52

Time-lapse imaging of nuclear bodies.  

PubMed

Fluorescence microscopy is a powerful technique that has become central in the study of the structure and function of biological specimens. This is due in large part to its specificity and versatility. Although an understanding of structure-typically through high-resolution imaging of fixed material-has proved an important tool to understanding function, fluorescence microscopy also offers a mechanism to interrogate cells in the living state, providing a means to explore dynamic process within the specimen over long time periods at high temporal resolution. The cell nucleus is a highly compartmented environment whose components are often highly motile and in a constant state of flux. The ability to monitor the dynamic behavior of nuclear bodies by live-cell imaging provides the researcher with important information regarding underlying mechanistic processes relating to their formation and maintenance. Two techniques have proved particularly valuable to our study of cellular dynamics and molecular mobility, namely, time-lapse imaging and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Time-lapse microscopy allows for qualitative and quantitative analysis of a wide range of events at the cellular and subcellular level. FRAP provides a mechanism to study the mobility of a population of proteins in a range of conditions within discrete areas of the biological specimen. Therefore, fluorescence microscopy is unique in its ability to provide data at high temporal resolution and in such exquisite detail. PMID:25555575

Hutten, Saskia; Swift, Samuel; Lamond, Angus I

2015-01-01

53

Simplified three-body problem in nuclear matter  

Microsoft Academic Search

We treat the three-particle problem in nuclear matter for the special class of two-body potentials for which the two-body interaction energy vanishes. We compare the results obtained using the variational method, the Bethe-Faddeev method, and a slightly modified version of the latter in which certain fourth-order diagrams, which can lead to divergences, are eliminated. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE Bethe-Faddeev, three-body problem in

S. A. Moszkowski; I. Alexandrov

1979-01-01

54

Leukemia risk associated with chronic external exposure to ionizing radiation in a French cohort of nuclear workers.  

PubMed

Leukemia is one of the earliest cancer effects observed after acute exposure to relatively high doses of ionizing radiation. Leukemia mortality after external exposure at low doses and low-dose rates has been investigated at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and Nuclear Fuel Company (AREVA NC) after an additional follow-up of 10 years. The cohort included radiation-monitored workers employed for at least one year during 1950-1994 at CEA or AREVA NC and followed during 1968-2004. Association between external exposure and leukemia mortality was estimated with excess relative risk (ERR) models and time-dependent modifying factors were investigated with time windows. The cohort included 36,769 workers, followed for an average of 28 years, among whom 73 leukemia deaths occurred. Among the workers with a positive recorded dose, the mean cumulative external dose was 21.7 mSv. Results under a 2-year lag assumption suggested that the risk of leukemia (except chronic lymphatic leukemia) increased significantly by 8% per 10 mSv. The magnitude of the association for myeloid leukemia was larger. The higher ERR/Sv for doses received 2-14 years earlier suggest that time since exposure modifies the effect. The ERR/Sv also appeared higher for doses received at exposure rates ?20 mSv per year. These results are consistent with those found in other studies of nuclear workers. However, confidence intervals are still wide. Further analyses should be conducted in pooled cohorts of nuclear workers. PMID:23050984

Metz-Flamant, C; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Acker, A; Laurier, D

2012-11-01

55

Structural diversity and nuclear protein binding sites in the long terminal repeats of feline leukemia virus.  

PubMed Central

The long terminal repeat U3 sequences were determined for multiple feline leukemia virus proviruses isolated from naturally occurring T-cell tumors. Heterogeneity was evident, even among proviruses cloned from individual tumors. Proviruses with one, two, or three repeats of the long terminal repeat enhancer sequences coexisted in one tumor, while two proviruses with distinct direct repeats were found in another. The enhancer repeats are characteristic of retrovirus variants with accelerated leukemogenic potential and occur between -155 and -244 base pairs relative to the RNA cap site. The termini of the repeats occur at or near sequence features which have been recognized at other retrovirus recombinational junctions. In vitro footprint analysis of the feline leukemia virus enhancer revealed three major nuclear protein binding sites, located at consensus sequences for the simian virus 40 core enhancer, the nuclear factor 1 binding site, and an indirect repeat which is homologous to the PEA2 binding site in the polyomavirus enhancer. Only the simian virus 40 core enhancer sequence is present in all of the enhancer repeats. Cell type differences in binding activities to the three motifs may underlie the selective process which leads to outgrowth of viruses with specific sequence duplications. Images PMID:2157050

Fulton, R; Plumb, M; Shield, L; Neil, J C

1990-01-01

56

Expression of maturation-specific nuclear antigens in differentiating human myeloid leukemia cells  

SciTech Connect

The expression of three myeloid-specific nuclear antigens was studied by indirect immunofluorescence with murine monoclonal antibodies in human myeloid (HL-60, ML-2, KG-1, and B-II) leukemia cells treated with chemical inducers of cell differentiation. Treatment of the promyelocytic HL-60 cells with dimethyl sulfoxide or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin DT induced the cells to acquire a phenotype that resembled that of granulocytes and monocytesmacrophages, respectively. These phenotypes were characterized by changes in cell growth, cell morphology, expression of specific cell surface antigens, and activities of lysozyme and nonspecific esterase enzymes. Induction of these differentiation markers in the HL-60 cells was associated with induction of the myeloid-specific nuclear antigens. The ML-2 cells, which are arrested at the myeloblast-promyelocyte stage, were also susceptible to the induction of cell differentiation and to changes in the expression of the nuclear antigens, but the degree of susceptibility was less than in the HL-60 cells. The less-differentiated KG-1 and B-II myeloid cells were either not responsive or responded only in a limited degree to the induction of cell differentiation or to changes in the expression of the nuclear antigens. The authors suggest that the reactivity of cells with monoclonal antibodies to specific nuclear antigens can be used as a maturational marker in cell differentiation studies. Furthermore, nuclear antigens expressed early in cellular differentiation may provide information about changes in regulatory elements in normal and malignant cells. 40 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

Murao, S.; Epstein, A.L.; Clevenger, C.V.; Huberman, E.

1985-02-01

57

Three-Body Equations for Nuclear Reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of calculating three-body differential cross sections for two-body interactions which are local in configuration space is considered. The integral equations of Faddeev and recent modifications are reviewed. The difficulties both in solving and interpreting the various equations are discussed. An alternative set of exact operator equations is proposed. This new set of operator equations involve the two-body potentials

Shao-Hua Chao

1980-01-01

58

Regulation of neuronal differentiation by proteins associated with nuclear bodies.  

PubMed

Nuclear bodies are large sub-nuclear structures composed of RNA and protein molecules. The Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein localizes to Cajal bodies (CBs) and nuclear gems. Diminished cellular concentration of SMN is associated with the neurodegenerative disease Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). How nuclear body architecture and its structural components influence neuronal differentiation remains elusive. In this study, we analyzed the effects of SMN and two of its interaction partners in cellular models of neuronal differentiation. The nuclear 23 kDa isoform of Fibroblast Growth Factor - 2 (FGF-2(23)) is one of these interacting proteins - and was previously observed to influence nuclear bodies by destabilizing nuclear gems and mobilizing SMN from Cajal bodies (CBs). Here we demonstrate that FGF-2(23) blocks SMN-promoted neurite outgrowth, and also show that SMN disrupts FGF-2(23)-dependent transcription. Our results indicate that FGF-2(23) and SMN form an inactive complex that interferes with neuronal differentiation by mutually antagonizing nuclear functions. Coilin is another nuclear SMN binding partner and a marker protein for Cajal bodies (CBs). In addition, coilin is essential for CB function in maturation of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs). The role of coilin outside of Cajal bodies and its putative impacts in tissue differentiation are poorly defined. The present study shows that protein levels of nucleoplasmic coilin outside of CBs decrease during neuronal differentiation. Overexpression of coilin has an inhibitory effect on neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we find that nucleoplasmic coilin inhibits neurite outgrowth independent of SMN binding revealing a new function for coilin in neuronal differentiation. PMID:24358231

Förthmann, Benjamin; van Bergeijk, Jeroen; Lee, Yu-Wei; Lübben, Verena; Schill, Yvonne; Brinkmann, Hella; Ratzka, Andreas; Stachowiak, Michal K; Hebert, Michael; Grothe, Claudia; Claus, Peter

2013-01-01

59

Super-Resolution Imaging of Nuclear Bodies by STED Microscopy.  

PubMed

The sizes of nuclear bodies and other nuclear structures are normally no more than a few hundred nanometers. This size is below the resolution limit of light microscopy and thus requires electron microscopy for direct observation. Recent developments in super-resolution microscopy have extended the resolution of light microscopy to beyond 100 nm. Here, we describe a super-resolution technique, gated STED, for the analysis of the structure of nuclear bodies, with emphasis on the sample preparation and other technical tips that are important to obtain high-quality super-resolution images. PMID:25555573

Okada, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Shinichi

2015-01-01

60

Total body irradiation correlates with chronic graft versus host disease and affects prognosis of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia receiving an HLA identical allogeneic bone marrow transplant  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To investigate whether different procedure variables involved in the delivery of fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) impact on prognosis of patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT).Methods and Materials: Ninety-three consecutive patients with ALL receiving a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical allogeneic BMT between 1 August 1983 and 30 September 1995 were conditioned

Renzo Corvň; Gabriella Paoli; Salvina Barra; Almalina Bacigalupo; Maria Teresa Van Lint; Paola Franzone; Francesco Frassoni; Daniele Scarpati; Andrea Bacigalupo; Vito Vitale

1999-01-01

61

Risk of Chronic Myeloid and Acute Leukemia Mortality after Exposure to Ionizing Radiation among Workers at Four U.S. Nuclear Weapons Facilities and a Nuclear Naval Shipyard  

Microsoft Academic Search

Schubauer-Berigan, M. K., Daniels, R. D., Fleming, D. A., Markey, A. M., Couch, J. R., Ahrenholz, S. H., Burphy, J. S., Anderson, J. L. and Tseng, C-Y. Risk of Chronic Myeloid and Acute Leukemia Mortality after Exposure to Ionizing Radi- ation among Workers at Four U.S. Nuclear Weapons Facili- ties and a Nuclear Naval Shipyard. Radiat. Res. 167, 222-232 (2007).

Mary K. Schubauer-Berigan; Robert D. Daniels; Donald A. Fleming; Andrea M. Markey; James R. Couch; Steven H. Ahrenholz; Jenneh S. Burphy; Jeri L. Andersona; Chih-Yu Tsenga

2007-01-01

62

Computational nuclear quantum many-body problem: The UNEDF project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The UNEDF project was a large-scale collaborative effort that applied high-performance computing to the nuclear quantum many-body problem. The primary focus of the project was on constructing, validating, and applying an optimized nuclear energy density functional, which entailed a wide range of pioneering developments in microscopic nuclear structure and reactions, algorithms, high-performance computing, and uncertainty quantification. UNEDF demonstrated that close associations among nuclear physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists can lead to novel physics outcomes built on algorithmic innovations and computational developments. This review showcases a wide range of UNEDF science results to illustrate this interplay.

Bogner, S.; Bulgac, A.; Carlson, J.; Engel, J.; Fann, G.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Gandolfi, S.; Hagen, G.; Horoi, M.; Johnson, C.; Kortelainen, M.; Lusk, E.; Maris, P.; Nam, H.; Navratil, P.; Nazarewicz, W.; Ng, E.; Nobre, G. P. A.; Ormand, E.; Papenbrock, T.; Pei, J.; Pieper, S. C.; Quaglioni, S.; Roche, K. J.; Sarich, J.; Schunck, N.; Sosonkina, M.; Terasaki, J.; Thompson, I.; Vary, J. P.; Wild, S. M.

2013-10-01

63

Short History of Nuclear Many-Body Problem  

E-print Network

This is a very short presentation regarding developments in the theory of nuclear many-body problems, as seen and experienced by the author during the past 60 years with particular emphasis on the contributions of Gerry Brown and his research-group. Much of his work was based on Brueckner's formulation of the nuclear many-body problem. It is reviewed briefly together with the Moszkowski-Scott separation method that was an important part of his early work. The core-polarisation and his work related to effective interactions in general are also addressed.

H. S. Köhler

2014-05-02

64

RESEARCH Open Access Low nuclear body formation and tax  

E-print Network

encoded by Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a powerful activator of the NF-B pathway, a property critical for HTLV-1-induced immortalization of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Tax permanently stimulates+ primary T lymphocytes. Moreover, we show that Tax nuclear bodies are hardly observed in HTLV-1-infected

Boyer, Edmond

65

Nuclear Many-Body Physics Where Structure And Reactions Meet  

E-print Network

The path from understanding a simple reaction problem of scattering or tunneling to contemplating the quantum nuclear many-body system, where structure and continuum of reaction-states meet, overlap and coexist, is a complex and nontrivial one. In this presentation we discuss some of the intriguing aspects of this route.

Naureen Ahsan; Alexander Volya

2009-06-24

66

Some highlights in few-body nuclear physics.  

SciTech Connect

During the past five years, there have been tremendous advances in both experiments and theoretical calculations in few-body nuclear systems. Advances in technology have permitted experiments of unprecedented accuracy. Jefferson Laboratory has begun operation and the first round of experimental results have become available. New polarization techniques have been exploited at a number of laboratories, in particular, at Jefferson Lab, IUCF, RIKEN, NIKHEF, Mainz, MIT-Bates and HERMES. Some of these results will be shown here. In addition, there have been tremendous advances in few-body theory. Five modern two-nucleon potentials have which describe the nucleon-nucleon data extremely well have become available. A standard model of nuclear physics based on these two nucleon potentials as well as modern three-nucleon forces has emerged. This standard model has enjoyed tremendous success in the few body systems. Exact three-body calculations have been extended into the continuum in order to take full advantage of scattering data in advancing our understanding of the the few-nucleon system. In addition, the application of chiral symmetry has become an important constraint on nucleon-nucleon as well as three-nucleon forces. As a result of all these efforts, we have seen rapid developments in the three-body force. Despite these advances, there remain some extremely important open issues: (1) What is the role of quarks and gluons in nuclear structure; (2) Can we distinguish meson exchange from quark interchange; (3) Is few-body theory sufficient to describe simultaneously the mass 2, 3 and 4 form factors; (4) What is the isospin and spin dependence of the three-body force; (5) Are there medium modifications for nucleons and mesons in nuclei; (6) Is there an enhancement of antiquarks or pions in nuclei related to the binding; and (7) Are short range correlations observable in nuclei? In this paper the author summarizes the status of our understanding of these issues.

Holt, R. J.

2000-12-07

67

Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2014-10-10

68

The spinal muscular atrophy protein SMN affects Drosophila germline nuclear organization through the U bodyP body pathway  

E-print Network

Drosophila Nurse cell Oocyte Cajal body Histone locus body Survival motor neuron protein (SMNThe spinal muscular atrophy protein SMN affects Drosophila germline nuclear organization through the U body­P body pathway Lin Lee, Siân E. Davies, Ji-Long Liu Medical Research Council Functional

69

Computational analysis of whole body CT documents a bone structure alteration in adult advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia  

E-print Network

structure and bone marrow metabolism in adult patients with suspected advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia of the disease. Keywords: Image Analysis, Bone Marrow, Skeletal Structure, ACLL, PET/CT #12;3 Introduction the hematopoietic niche. In mouse models, leukemia causes a measurable bone loss [3] whose role in disease evolution

Piana, Michele

70

Does total body irradiation conditioning improve outcomes of myeloablative human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling transplantations for chronic lymphocytic leukemia?  

PubMed

An allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation from an HLA-identical donor after high-dose (myeloablative) pretransplantation conditioning is an effective therapy for some people with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Because CLL is a highly radiosensitive cancer, we hypothesized that total body irradiation (TBI) conditioning regimens may be associated with better outcomes than those without TBI. To answer this, we analyzed data from 180 subjects with CLL receiving myeloablative doses of TBI (n = 126) or not (n = 54), who received transplants from an HLA-identical sibling donor between 1995 and 2007 and reported to the Center for International Blood & Marrow Transplant Research. At 5 years, treatment-related mortality was 48% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39% to 57%) versus 50% (95% CI, 36% to 64%); P = NS. Relapse rates were 17% (95% CI, 11% to 25%) versus 22% (95% CI, 11% to 35%); P = NS. Five-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 34% (95% CI, 26% to 43%) versus 28% (95% CI, 15% to 42%); P = NS and 42% (95% CI, 33% to 51%) versus 33% (95% CI, 19% to 48%); P = NS, respectively. The single most common cause of death in both cohorts was recurrent/progressive CLL. No variable tested in the multivariate analysis was found to significantly affect these outcomes, including having failed fludarabine. Within the limitations of this study, we found no difference in HLA-identical sibling transplantation outcomes between myeloablative TBI and chemotherapy pretransplantation conditioning in persons with CLL. PMID:24321745

Sabloff, Mitchell; Sobecks, Ronald M; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Zhu, Xiaochun; de Lima, Marcos; Brown, Jennifer R; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Holland, H Kent; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Laughlin, Mary J; Kamble, Rammurti T; Hsu, Jack W; Wirk, Baldeep M; Seftel, Matthew; Lewis, Ian D; Arora, Mukta; Alyea, Edwin P; Kalaycio, Matt E; Cortes, Jorge; Maziarz, Richard T; Gale, Robert Peter; Saber, Wael

2014-03-01

71

Effects of total body irradiation-based conditioning on allogeneic stem cell transplantation for pediatric acute leukemia: a single-institution study  

PubMed Central

Purpose To evaluate the effects of total body irradiation (TBI), as a conditioning regimen prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), in pediatric acute leukemia patients. Materials and Methods From January 2001 to December 2011, 28 patients, aged less than 18 years, were treated with TBI-based conditioning for allo-SCT in our institution. Of the 28 patients, 21 patients were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, 75%) and 7 were diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 25%). TBI was completed 4 days or 1 day before stem cell infusion. Patients underwent radiation therapy with bilateral parallel opposing fields and 6-MV X-rays. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival outcomes. Results The 2-year event-free survival and overall survival rates were 66% and 56%, respectively (71.4% and 60.0% in AML patients vs. 64.3% and 52.4% in ALL patients, respectively). Treatment related mortality rate were 25%. Acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease was a major complication; other complications included endocrine dysfunction and pulmonary complications. Common complications from TBI were nausea (89%) and cataracts (7.1%). Conclusion The efficacy and toxicity data in this study of TBI-based conditioning to pediatric acute leukemia patients were comparable with previous studies. However, clinicians need to focus on the acute and chronic complications related to allo-SCT. PMID:25324992

Park, Jongmoo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Lee, Sang-wook; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Su Ssan; Park, Jin-hong; Park, Jaehyeon

2014-01-01

72

Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-07-10

73

Relationship between leukemia incidence and residing and/or working near the Pilgrim 1 nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

To determine whether a strong association between leukemia incidence between 1978 and 1986 and potential for exposure to radiation emitted from the Pilgrim 1 nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts was a spurious finding resulting from either (1) failure to account for temporal variation in the level of radioactivity released from the plant or (2) inattention to certain potentially confounding factors, additional age/sex-matched case-control analyses controlled for the effects of socioeconomic status (SES), work history, and cigarette smoking were performed with data collected in the Southeastern Massachusetts Health Investigation -- a study of leukemia among residents aged 13 and older of 22 southeastern Massachusetts towns. None of the additional analyses, including incorporation of emissions data into the exposure-assessment scheme and crude attempts to control for (1) medical-radiation exposure, (2) potential for exposure to pesticides sprayed on cranberry bogs, or (3) workplace exposure to radiation, chemical solvents, dust, or fumes, altered the finding of a statistically significant dose-response relationship between leukemia incidence and potential for exposure to radioactive emissions. The trend in the association over time was not entirely consistent, however, with the hypothesis that unusually large amounts of radioactivity reportedly released from the plant during the mid-1970s were responsible for the observed effects. Recommendations were made for further study of the Plymouth-area population for studies of this problem elsewhere.

Morris, M.S.

1992-01-01

74

40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is...

2013-07-01

75

40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is...

2011-07-01

76

40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is...

2012-07-01

77

40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is...

2014-07-01

78

40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is...

2010-07-01

79

Leukemia in the proximity of a German boiling-water nuclear reactor: evidence of population exposure by chromosome studies and environmental radioactivity.  

PubMed Central

Exceptional elevation of children's leukemia appearing 5 years after the 1983 startup of the Krümmel nuclear power plant, accompanied by a significant increase of adult leukemia cases, led to investigations of radiation exposures of the population living near the plant. The rate of dicentric chromosomes in peripheral lymphocytes of seven parents of children with leukemia and in 14 other inhabitants near the plant was significantly elevated and indicated ongoing exposures over the years of its operation. These findings led to the hypothesis that chronic reactor leakages had occurred. This assumption is support by identification of artificial radioactivity in air, rainwater, soil and vegetation by the environmental monitoring program at the nuclear power plant. Calculations of the corresponding source terms show that emissions must have been well above authorized annual limits. Bone marrow doses supposedly result primarily through incorporation of bone-seeking beta- and alpha-emitters. PMID:9467072

Schmitz-Feuerhake, I; Dannheim, B; Heimers, A; Oberheitmann, B; Schröder, H; Ziggel, H

1997-01-01

80

Treosulfan and Fludarabine Phosphate With or Without Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome

2014-12-12

81

Decreased nuclear matrix DNA topoisomerase II in human leukemia cells resistant to VM-26 and m-AMSA  

SciTech Connect

CEM leukemia cells selected for resistance to VM-26 (CEM/VM-1) are cross-resistant to various other DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors but not to Vinca alkaloids. Since DNA topoisomerase II is a major protein of the nuclear matrix, the authors asked if alterations in nuclear matrix topoisomerase II might be important in this form of multidrug resistance. Pretreatment of drug-sensitive CEM cells for 2 h with either 5 {mu}M VM-26 or 3 {mu}M m-AMSA reduced the specific activity of newly replicated DNA on the nuclear matrix by 75 and 50%, respectively, relative to that of the bulk DNA. The decatenating and unknotting activities of DNA topoisomerase II were 6- and 7-fold lower, respectively, in the nuclear matrix preparations from the CEM/VM-1 cells compared to parental CEM cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the amount of immunoreactive topoisomerase II in the nuclear matrices of the CEM/VM-1 cells decreased 3.2-fold relative to that in CEM cells. Increasing the NaCl concentration used in the matrix isolation procedure from 0.2 to 1.8 M resulted in a progressive decrease in the specific activity of topoisomerase II in matrices of CEM/VM-1 but not CEM cells, which suggested that the association of the enzyme with the matrix is altered in the resistant cells. These data support the hypothesis that resistance to VM-26 and m-AMSA is directly related to the decreased activity of nuclear matrix topoisomerase II. In CEM/VM-1 cells the interaction of either VM-26 or m-AMSA with nuclear matrix topoisomerase II is specifically diminished.

Fernandes, D.J. (Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (USA)); Danks, M.K.; Beck, W.T. (St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA))

1990-05-01

82

Glycogen synthase kinase-3? inhibition induces nuclear factor-?B-mediated apoptosis in pediatric acute lymphocyte leukemia cells  

PubMed Central

Background Molecular therapies that target genetic abnormalities in leukemic cells and their affected signaling pathways have been emerging in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Glycogen synthase kinase-3? (GSK-3?) has recently been found to positively regulate the activity of nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B). Here, we investigated the relationship between GSK-3? inhibition and NF-?B in apoptosis of pediatric primary leukemia cells obtained from 39 newly diagnosed ALL children in China. Methods Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) were isolated by density gradient centrifugation from the heparinized aspirates of children with ALL. We used immunofluorescence staining to detect nuclear GSK-3? in these cells. After treatment with chemically distinct GSK-3? inhibitors in vitro, NF-?B transcriptional activity was identified by means of western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). NF-?B-mediated apoptosis was detected by Annexin V-PE/7-AAD double-staining flow cytometry. The expression level of the survivin gene was detected by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results GSK-3? significantly accumulates in the nuclei of ALL cells than in the nuclei of control cells. Cell death induced by GSK-3? inhibition in ALL cells was mediated by a downregulation of NF-?B p65 transcriptional activity. GSK-3? inhibition significantly decreased the expression of the NF-?B target gene survivin. Conclusions These results indicate that inhibition of GSK-3? downregulates the NF-?B activation pathway, leading to suppression of the expression of an NF-?B-regulated gene and promotion of apoptosis in ALL cells in vitro. Furthermore, our findings suggest that GSK-3? or NF-?B is a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of pediatric ALL. PMID:21110852

2010-01-01

83

Selective inhibitors of nuclear export show that CRM1/XPO1 is a target in chronic lymphocytic leukemia  

PubMed Central

The nuclear export protein XPO1 is overexpressed in cancer, leading to the cytoplasmic mislocalization of multiple tumor suppressor proteins. Existing XPO1-targeting agents lack selectivity and have been associated with significant toxicity. Small molecule selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINEs) were designed that specifically inhibit XPO1. Genetic experiments and X-ray structures demonstrate that SINE covalently bind to a cysteine residue in the cargo-binding groove of XPO1, thereby inhibiting nuclear export of cargo proteins. The clinical relevance of SINEs was explored in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a disease associated with recurrent XPO1 mutations. Evidence is presented that SINEs can restore normal regulation to the majority of the dysregulated pathways in CLL both in vitro and in vivo and induce apoptosis of CLL cells with a favorable therapeutic index, with enhanced killing of genomically high-risk CLL cells that are typically unresponsive to traditional therapies. More importantly, SINE slows disease progression, and improves overall survival in the E?-TCL1-SCID mouse model of CLL with minimal weight loss or other toxicities. Together, these findings demonstrate that XPO1 is a valid target in CLL with minimal effects on normal cells and provide a basis for the development of SINEs in CLL and related hematologic malignancies. PMID:23034282

Lapalombella, Rosa; Sun, Qingxiang; Williams, Katie; Tangeman, Larissa; Jha, Shruti; Zhong, Yiming; Goettl, Virginia; Mahoney, Emilia; Berglund, Caroline; Gupta, Sneha; Farmer, Alicia; Mani, Rajeswaran; Johnson, Amy J.; Lucas, David; Mo, Xiaokui; Daelemans, Dirk; Sandanayaka, Vincent; Shechter, Sharon; McCauley, Dilara; Shacham, Sharon; Kauffman, Michael

2012-01-01

84

Comparison of outcomes of allogeneic transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia with cyclophosphamide in combination with intravenous busulfan, oral busulfan, or total body irradiation.  

PubMed

Cyclophosphamide (Cy) in combination with busulfan (Bu) or total body irradiation (TBI) is the most commonly used myeloablative conditioning regimen in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We used data from the Center for International Bone Marrow Transplantation Research to compare outcomes in adults who underwent hematopoietic cell transplantation for CML in first chronic phase after myeloablative conditioning with Cy in combination with TBI, oral Bu, or intravenous (i.v.) Bu. Four hundred thirty-eight adults received human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling grafts and 235 received well-matched grafts from unrelated donors (URD) from 2000 through 2006. Important differences existed between the groups in distribution of donor relation, exposure to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and year of transplantation. In multivariate analysis, relapse occurred less frequently among patients receiving i.v. Bu compared with TBI (relative risk [RR], .36; P = .022) or oral Bu (RR, .39; P = .028), but nonrelapse mortality and survival were similar. A significant interaction was detected between donor relation and the main effect in leukemia-free survival (LFS). Among recipients of HLA-identical sibling grafts, but not URD grafts, LFS was better in patients receiving i.v. Bu (RR, .53; P = .025) or oral Bu (RR, .64; P = .017) compared with TBI. In CML in first chronic phase, Cy in combination with i.v. Bu was associated with less relapse than TBI or oral Bu. LFS was better after i.v. or oral Bu compared with TBI. PMID:25528388

Copelan, Edward A; Avalos, Belinda R; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Zhu, Xiaochun; Gale, Robert Peter; Grunwald, Michael R; Hamadani, Mehdi; Hamilton, Betty K; Hale, Gregory A; Marks, David I; Waller, Edmund K; Savani, Bipin N; Costa, Luciano J; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Khoury, H Jean; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kamble, Rammurti T; Schouten, Harry C; Wirk, Baldeep; Litzow, Mark R; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; van Besien, Koen W; Ustun, Celalettin; Bolwell, Brian J; Bredeson, Christopher N; Fasan, Omotayo; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Horowitz, Mary M; Arora, Mukta; Szer, Jeffrey; Loren, Alison W; Alyea, Edwin P; Cortes, Jorge; Maziarz, Richard T; Kalaycio, Matt E; Saber, Wael

2015-03-01

85

Micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities observed in erythroblasts in myelodysplastic syndromes and in de novo acute leukemia after treatment.  

PubMed

The frequencies of erythroblasts with micronuclei (EBM) and erythroblasts with aberrant nuclear shapes (EBAN) in bone marrow were evaluated in 60 patients with untreated myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and also in 21 patients with acute leukemia before and after treatment, and the results were compared regarding cytogenetic patterns. In patients with acute leukemia, the frequencies of EBM and EBAN in bone marrow were 0.60 +/- 0.35% (mean +/- SD) and 1.2 +/- 1.1% before treatment, respectively, the former of which was higher than those obtained from 93 patients with various nonmalignant diseases (p < 0.01). After treatment with antileukemic drugs, the mean values of them significantly increased 9.7 and 6.1 times from the pretreatment ones, respectively. No correlation was found between the yields of EBM and EBAN and cytogenetic patterns, although regimens including administration of vincristine seemed to cause them more frequently. Most patients with MDS showed a consistent increase of EBM and EBAN at the time of diagnosis irrespective of the treatment; the mean frequencies were 7. 7 and 6.3 times higher than those obtained from patients with nonmalignant diseases, respectively. Furthermore, the numbers of EBM and EBAN were significantly higher in patients with an abnormal karyotype than those with a normal karyotype (p < 0.05 for EBM and p < 0.001 for EBAN). In particular, 8 patients with a monosomy 7q showed a marked increase of EBAN (4.7 +/- 4.4%) and EBAN (13 +/- 6. 5%). These findings revealed that drastic changes in the morphology of erythroblasts were characteristic features of MDS, and may reflect a disturbance in kinetochore/spindle microtubules, such as endoreduplication, c-mitosis or restitution, in addition to chromosome lagging. PMID:10085436

Yashige, H; Horiike, S; Taniwaki, M; Misawa, S; Abe, T

1999-03-01

86

Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, methyl 2,5-dihydromethylcinnimate, induces PML nuclear body formation and apoptosis in tumor cells  

SciTech Connect

Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are the nuclear structure consisting of various proteins such as PML, SUMO-1, and p53. PML-NBs are implicated in the regulation of tumor suppression, antiviral responses, and apoptosis. In this study, we searched for bioactive metabolites that would promote the formation of PML-NBs in tumor cells. As a result, methyl 2,5-dihydromethylcinnimate (2,5-MeC), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, enhanced expression and/or stability of PML proteins and induced PML-NB formation in p53 null H1299 cells established from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and wild-type p53-expressing U2OS cells derived from osteosarcoma. Furthermore, it enhanced apoptosis by exogenously expressed wild type p53 and the expression of p53-responsive genes, such as PUMA and p21, in H1299 cells. 2,5-MeC also activated endogenous p53 and induced apoptosis in U2OS cells. The results suggest that 2,5-MeC is likely to be a promising candidate drug for the clinical treatment of terminal cancer-expressing wild-type p53.

Komura, Naoyuki [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-0061 (Japan); Asakawa, Mayako [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Keio University, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Umezawa, Kazuo [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-0061 (Japan)]. E-mail: umezawa@applc.keio.ac.jp; Segawa, Kaoru [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Keio University, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)

2007-08-01

87

Altered nuclear co-factor switching in retinoic resistant variants of the PML-RAR? oncoprotein of acute promyelocytic leukemia  

PubMed Central

Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) results from a reciprocal translocation that fuses the gene for the PML tumor suppressor to that encoding the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR?). The resulting PML-RAR? oncogene product interferes with multiple regulatory pathways associated with myeloid differentiation, including normal PML and RAR? functions. The standard treatment for APL includes anthracycline-based chemotherapeutic agents plus the RAR? agonist all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). Relapse, which is often accompanied by ATRA resistance, occurs in an appreciable frequency of treated patients. One potential mechanism suggested by model experiments featuring the selection of ATRA resistant APL cell lines involves ATRA resistant versions of the PML-RAR? oncogene, where the relevant mutations localize to the RAR? ligand-binding domain (LBD). Such mutations may act by compromising agonist binding, but other mechanisms are possible. Here, we studied the molecular consequence of ATRA resistance by use of circular dichroism, protease resistance, and fluorescence anisotropy assays employing peptides derived from the NCOR nuclear co-repressor and the ACTR nuclear co-activator. The consequences of the mutations on global structure and co-factor interaction functions were assessed quantitatively, providing insights into the basis of agonist resistance. Attenuated co-factor switching and increased protease resistance represent features of the LBDs of ATRA-resistant PML-RAR?, and these properties may be recapitulated in the full-length oncoproteins. PMID:22228505

Farris, Mindy; Lague, Astrid; Manuelyan, Zara; Statnekov, Jacob; Francklyn, Christopher

2011-01-01

88

Detecting body cavity bombs with nuclear quadrupole resonance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a technology with great potential for detecting hidden explosives. Past NQR research has studied the detection of land mines and bombs concealed within luggage and packages. This thesis focuses on an NQR application that has received less attention and little or no publicly available research: detecting body cavity bombs (BCBs). BCBs include explosives that have been ingested, inserted into orifices, or surgically implanted. BCBs present a threat to aviation and secure facilities. They are extremely difficult to detect with the technology currently employed at security checkpoints. To evaluate whether or not NQR can be used to detect BCBs, a computational model is developed to assess how the dielectric properties of biological tissue affect the radio frequency magnetic field employed in NQR (0.5-5MHz). The relative permittivity of some biological tissue is very high (over 1,000 at 1MHz), making it conceivable that there is a significant effect on the electromagnetic field. To study this effect, the low-frequency approximation known as the Darwin model is employed. First, the electromagnetic field of a coil is calculated in free space. Second, a dielectric object or set of objects is introduced, and the free-space electric field is modified to accommodate the dielectric object ensuring that the relevant boundary conditions are obeyed. Finally, the magnetic field associated with the corrected electric field is calculated. This corrected magnetic field is evaluated with an NQR simulation to estimate the impact of dielectric tissue on NQR measurements. The effect of dielectric tissue is shown to be small, thus obviating a potential barrier to BCB detection. The NQR model presented may assist those designing excitation and detection coils for NQR. Some general coil design considerations and strategies are discussed.

Collins, Michael London

89

Congenital leukemia.  

PubMed

Congenital leukemia is a rare but a well-documented disease in which leukemic process is detected at birth or very shortly thereafter (Philip McCoy and Roy Overton, Commun Clin Cytom 22:85-88, 1995). These leukemias represent approximately 0.8 % of all childhood leukemias. We present a case of congenital acute myeloid leukemia manifesting from the very first day of birth. Diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia was suspected by the presence of blasts in the peripheral blood smear and was confirmed on bone marrow by flowcytometry. Karyotyping revealed Trisomy 21. PMID:25332567

Raj, Aishwarya; Talukdar, Sewali; Das, Smita; Gogoi, Pabitra Kumar; Das, Damodar; Bhattacharya, Jina

2014-09-01

90

What Is Childhood Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... slowing the activity of other immune system cells. Acute lymphocytic (lymphoblastic) leukemia (ALL), the most common type of childhood leukemia, ... leukemias The main types of acute leukemia are: Acute lymphocytic (lymphoblastic) leukemia (ALL): About 3 out of 4 cases of ...

91

Total body irradiation as preparation for bone marrow transplantation in treatment of acute leukemia and aplastic anemia  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to improve survival while minimizing toxicity, many bone marrow transplant centers are now studying the use of cytoreduction regimens with an increased amount of radiation in single-dose or fractionated-exposure schedules for patients with leukemia and aplastic anemia. In order to review the current results, the literature prior to September, 1982 was surveyed and data were tabulated for each transplant center regarding the number of patients receiving transplants, diagnoses, cytoreduction regimen, clinical status, remission duration, relapse rate, causes of death and incidence of interstitial pneumonia. The incidence and severity of cataracts, growth failure, hypothyroidism and second malignant neoplasms were noted, and the data obtained from the literature search were updated and expanded by telephone questionnaire when possible. Marked variation in the technique of tranplantation was found among the participating institutions, making it difficult to determine the contribution of the various TBI doses, dose rates and fractionation schedules to the efficacy and toxicity of the combined regimen. In order to define the risk-benefit ratio of the various TBI regimens more clearly, prospective controlled, randomized studies will be required.

Serota, F.T.; Burkey, E.D.; August, C.S.; D'Angio, G.J.

1983-12-01

92

REVIEW ARTICLE: Nuclear-based techniques for the in vivo study of human body composition  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variety of nuclear-based techniques for the in vivo study of human body decomposition is now available for clinical diagnosis and research, and the number of centres where such work is performed is likely to grow substantially in the next few years. Their most important applications at present are in the measurement of bone mineral mass (calcium), body protein (nitrogen)

S. H. Cohn; R. M. Parr

1985-01-01

93

Nuclear-based techniques for the in vivo study of human body composition  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variety of nuclear-based techniques for the in vivo study of human body decomposition is now available for clinical diagnosis and research, and the number of centres where such work is performed is likely to grow substantially in the next few years. Their most important applications at present are in the measurement of bone mineral mass (calcium), body protein (nitrogen)

S H Cohn; R M Parr

1985-01-01

94

Nuclear stopping for heavy-ion induced reactions in the Fermi energy range : from 1-Body to 2-Body dissipation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the stopping in heavy-ion induced reactions around the Fermi energy in central collisions. The stopping is minimal around the Fermi energy and corresponds to the crossover between the Mean-Field and the nucleonic regimes. This is attributed to the change in the energy dissipation going from 1-body (Mean-Field) to 2-body (nucleonnucleon collisions) dissipation. For this latter, a connection to in-medium transport properties of nuclear matter is proposed and comprehensive values of the nucleon mean free path and nucleon-nucleon cross section are extracted.

Lopez, O.; Lehaut, G.; Durand, D.; Aouadi, M.

2014-03-01

95

Chromatin insulator bodies are nuclear structures that form in response to osmotic stress and cell death  

PubMed Central

Chromatin insulators assist in the formation of higher-order chromatin structures by mediating long-range contacts between distant genomic sites. It has been suggested that insulators accomplish this task by forming dense nuclear foci termed insulator bodies that result from the coalescence of multiple protein-bound insulators. However, these structures remain poorly understood, particularly the mechanisms triggering body formation and their role in nuclear function. In this paper, we show that insulator proteins undergo a dramatic and dynamic spatial reorganization into insulator bodies during osmostress and cell death in a high osmolarity glycerol–p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase–independent manner, leading to a large reduction in DNA-bound insulator proteins that rapidly repopulate chromatin as the bodies disassemble upon return to isotonicity. These bodies occupy distinct nuclear territories and contain a defined structural arrangement of insulator proteins. Our findings suggest insulator bodies are novel nuclear stress foci that can be used as a proxy to monitor the chromatin-bound state of insulator proteins and provide new insights into the effects of osmostress on nuclear and genome organization. PMID:23878275

Schoborg, Todd; Rickels, Ryan; Barrios, Josh

2013-01-01

96

Childhood leukemia near nuclear plants in the United Kingdom: The evolution of a systematic approach to studying rare disease in small geographic areas  

SciTech Connect

A cluster of childhood leukemia in a village near a nuclear plant in northern England prompted further studies of cancer in the vicinity of other nuclear plants in the United Kingdom. These studies demonstrated that the risk of childhood leukemia was increased near certain other nuclear plants. Although the reasons for the increase are still unclear, the scientific debate stimulated by these findings has clarified some of the special methodological problems encountered when studying rare diseases in small areas. Firstly, unless a specific hypothesis is defined in advance, the relevance of a single geographic cluster of disease can rarely be interpreted. Even when a prior hypothesis exists, the small number of cases which generally occur in a small area make the findings highly sensitive to reporting, diagnostic, or classification errors. The statistical power of such investigations is also usually low and only marked increases in risk can be detected. Furthermore, conventional statistical tests may be inappropriate if the underlying spatial distribution of the disease is not random; and little is known about the background distribution of disease in small areas. Investigations of specific hypotheses about defined sources of environmental contamination, especially if they can be replicated, are more likely to result in conclusive findings that are in-depth studies of individual clusters.

Beral, V. (I.C.R.F. Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (England))

1990-07-01

97

SUMOylation regulates the nuclear mobility of CREB binding protein and its association with nuclear bodies in live cells  

SciTech Connect

The lysine acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP) is required for chromatin modification and transcription at many gene promoters. In fixed cells, a large proportion of CBP colocalises to PML or nuclear bodies. Using live cell imaging, we show here that YFP-tagged CBP expressed in HEK293 cells undergoes gradual accumulation in nuclear bodies, some of which are mobile and migrate towards the nuclear envelope. Deletion of a short lysine-rich domain that contains the major SUMO acceptor sites of CBP abrogated its ability to be SUMO modified, and prevented its association with endogenous SUMO-1/PML speckles in vivo. This SUMO-defective CBP showed enhanced ability to co-activate AML1-mediated transcription. Deletion mapping revealed that the SUMO-modified region was not sufficient for targeting CBP to PML bodies, as C-terminally truncated mutants containing this domain showed a strong reduction in accumulation at PML bodies. Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) experiments revealed that YFP-CBP{Delta}998-1087 had a retarded recovery time in the nucleus, as compared to YFP-CBP. These results indicate that SUMOylation regulates CBP function by influencing its shuttling between nuclear bodies and chromatin microenvironments.

Ryan, Colm M.; Kindle, Karin B.; Collins, Hilary M. [Gene Regulation Group, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)] [Gene Regulation Group, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Heery, David M., E-mail: david.heery@nottingham.ac.uk [Gene Regulation Group, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

2010-01-01

98

Amplitudes of Seismic Body Waves from Underground Nuclear Explosions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seismic waves from underground nuclear explosions in Nevada were observed at a number of temporary stations along a line extending eastward to Maine. A study of the seismograms from these stations and from a large number of permanent stations has shown that the amplitude of Pn varies inversely as the cube of the distance between 200 and 1100 km. Pn

Carl Romney

1959-01-01

99

Nuclear three-body force effect on a kaon condensate in neutron star matter  

SciTech Connect

We explore the effects of a microscopic nuclear three-body force on the threshold baryon density for kaon condensation in chemical equilibrium neutron star matter and on the composition of the kaon condensed phase in the framework of the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach. Our results show that the nuclear three-body force affects strongly the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy and consequently reduces considerably the critical density for kaon condensation provided that the proton strangeness content is not very large. The dependence of the threshold density on the symmetry energy becomes weaker as the proton strangeness content increases. The kaon condensed phase of neutron star matter turns out to be proton rich instead of neutron rich. The three-body force has an important influence on the composition of the kaon condensed phase. Inclusion of the three-body force contribution in the nuclear symmetry energy results in a significant reduction of the proton and kaon fractions in the kaon condensed phase which is more proton-rich in the case of no three-body force. Our results are compared to other theoretical predictions by adopting different models for the nuclear symmetry energy. The possible implications of our results for the neutron star structure are also briefly discussed.

Zuo, W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Physics and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, D-35392, Giessen (Germany); Li, A. [School of Physics and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Z.H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Lombardo, U. [INFN-LNS, Via Santa Sofia 44, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

2004-11-01

100

The translation initiation factor 3 subunit eIF3K interacts with PML and associates with PML nuclear bodies  

SciTech Connect

The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) is a tumor suppressor protein that regulates a variety of important cellular processes, including gene expression, DNA repair and cell fate decisions. Integral to its function is the ability of PML to form nuclear bodies (NBs) that serve as hubs for the interaction and modification of over 90 cellular proteins. There are seven canonical isoforms of PML, which encode diverse C-termini generated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Recruitment of specific cellular proteins to PML NBs is mediated by protein–protein interactions with individual PML isoforms. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen employing peptide sequences unique to PML isoform I (PML-I), we identified an interaction with the eukaryotic initiation factor 3 subunit K (eIF3K), and in the process identified a novel eIF3K isoform, which we term eIF3K-2. We further demonstrate that eIF3K and PML interact both in vitro via pull-down assays, as well as in vivo within human cells by co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunofluorescence. In addition, eIF3K isoform 2 (eIF3K-2) colocalizes to PML bodies, particularly those enriched in PML-I, while eIF3K isoform 1 associates poorly with PML NBs. Thus, we report eIF3K as the first known subunit of the eIF3 translation pre-initiation complex to interact directly with the PML protein, and provide data implicating alternative splicing of both PML and eIF3K as a possible regulatory mechanism for eIF3K localization at PML NBs. - Highlights: • The PML-I C-terminus, encoded by exon 9, interacts with translation factor eIF3K. • We identify a novel eIF3K isoform that excludes exon 2 (eIF3K-2). • eIF3K-2 preferentially associates with PML bodies enriched in PML-I vs. PML-IV. • Alternative splicing of eIF3K regulates association with PML bodies.

Salsman, Jayme; Pinder, Jordan; Tse, Brenda [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, P.O. Box 15000, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4R2 (Canada); Corkery, Dale [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Dellaire, Graham, E-mail: dellaire@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, P.O. Box 15000, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4R2 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

2013-10-15

101

Uncovering many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths by central spin decoherence  

PubMed Central

Central spin decoherence caused by nuclear spin baths is often a critical issue in various quantum computing schemes, and it has also been used for sensing single-nuclear spins. Recent theoretical studies suggest that central spin decoherence can act as a probe of many-body physics in spin baths; however, identification and detection of many-body correlations of nuclear spins in nanoscale systems are highly challenging. Here, taking a phosphorus donor electron spin in a 29Si nuclear spin bath as our model system, we discover both theoretically and experimentally that many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths produce identifiable signatures in decoherence of the central spin under multiple-pulse dynamical decoupling control. We demonstrate that under control by an odd or even number of pulses, the central spin decoherence is principally caused by second- or fourth-order nuclear spin correlations, respectively. This study marks an important step toward studying many-body physics using spin qubits. PMID:25205440

Ma, Wen-Long; Wolfowicz, Gary; Zhao, Nan; Li, Shu-Shen; Morton, John J.L.; Liu, Ren-Bao

2014-01-01

102

GATA transcription factors associate with a novel class of nuclear bodies in erythroblasts and megakaryocytes.  

PubMed Central

The nuclear distribution of GATA transcription factors in murine haemopoietic cells was examined by indirect immunofluorescence. Specific bright foci of GATA-1 fluorescence were observed in erythroleukaemia cells and primary murine erythroblasts and megakaryocytes, in addition to diffuse nucleoplasmic localization. These foci, which were preferentially found adjacent to nucleoli or at the nuclear periphery, did not represent sites of active transcription or binding of GATA-1 to consensus sites in the beta-globin loci. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated the presence of intensely labelled structures likely to represent the GATA-1 foci seen by immunofluorescence. The GATA-1 nuclear bodies differed from previously described nuclear structures and there was no co-localization with nuclear antigens involved in RNA processing or other ubiquitous (Spl, c-Jun and TBP) or haemopoietic (NF-E2) transcription factors. Interestingly, GATA-2 and GATA-3 proteins also localized to the same nuclear bodies in cell lines co-expressing GATA-1 and -2 or GATA-1 and -3 gene products. This pattern of distribution is, thus far, unique to the GATA transcription factors and suggests a protein-protein interaction with other components of the nuclear bodies via the GATA zinc finger domain. Images PMID:8617207

Elefanty, A G; Antoniou, M; Custodio, N; Carmo-Fonseca, M; Grosveld, F G

1996-01-01

103

The SUN Protein Mps3 Is Required for Spindle Pole Body Insertion into the Nuclear Membrane and Nuclear Envelope Homeostasis  

PubMed Central

The budding yeast spindle pole body (SPB) is anchored in the nuclear envelope so that it can simultaneously nucleate both nuclear and cytoplasmic microtubules. During SPB duplication, the newly formed SPB is inserted into the nuclear membrane. The mechanism of SPB insertion is poorly understood but likely involves the action of integral membrane proteins to mediate changes in the nuclear envelope itself, such as fusion of the inner and outer nuclear membranes. Analysis of the functional domains of the budding yeast SUN protein and SPB component Mps3 revealed that most regions are not essential for growth or SPB duplication under wild-type conditions. However, a novel dominant allele in the P-loop region, MPS3-G186K, displays defects in multiple steps in SPB duplication, including SPB insertion, indicating a previously unknown role for Mps3 in this step of SPB assembly. Characterization of the MPS3-G186K mutant by electron microscopy revealed severe over-proliferation of the inner nuclear membrane, which could be rescued by altering the characteristics of the nuclear envelope using both chemical and genetic methods. Lipid profiling revealed that cells lacking MPS3 contain abnormal amounts of certain types of polar and neutral lipids, and deletion or mutation of MPS3 can suppress growth defects associated with inhibition of sterol biosynthesis, suggesting that Mps3 directly affects lipid homeostasis. Therefore, we propose that Mps3 facilitates insertion of SPBs in the nuclear membrane by modulating nuclear envelope composition. PMID:22125491

Smoyer, Christine J.; McCroskey, Scott; Miller, Brandon D.; Weaver, Kyle J.; Delventhal, Kym M.; Unruh, Jay; Slaughter, Brian D.; Jaspersen, Sue L.

2011-01-01

104

Genetic contribution to variation in body configuration in Belgian nuclear families: a closer look at body lengths and circumferences.  

PubMed

The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the contribution of genetic factors on body configuration related phenotypes. The sample consisted of 119 Belgian nuclear families including 231 males and 229 females. Factor analysis with varimax rotation was carried out to analyse 13 length and circumference measures and the resulting two synthetic traits (LF and CF; linear and circumference factors, respectively) were used as summary variables. Univariate quantitative genetic analysis indicated that variation in anthropometric as well as in synthetic traits was significantly dependent on additive genetic effects, with heritabilities ranging from 0.55 to 0.88. Narrow sense heritability estimates were higher for measurements principally characterizing skeletal mass than in variables that also involve soft-tissues. Sex, age and their interactions explained 11-67% of the total phenotypic variance. This report also examined the covariations between pairs of anthropometric and synthetic traits (length measurements and LF vs. height; circumference measures and CF vs. weight and BMI; LF vs. CF). Significant genetic correlations among all the studied traits (except for middle finger length vs. height) confirmed the influence of pleiotropy on genetic determination of these phenotypes. Bivariate analysis showed that pleiotropic effects had a great influence in determining body traits variation within body length measurements, as well as between body circumferences and weight or BMI. In relation to the two synthetic traits, even the variation of body lengths and circumferences was highly determined by genetic factors, shared genetic influences were unlikely to explain much of the observed variation between LF and CF. The results of the present study allow us to conclude that in this population body configuration related traits are subject to a strong genetic control and that shared genes also contribute to this genetic structure. PMID:20698125

Poveda, Alaitz; Jelenkovic, Aline; Susanne, Charles; Rebato, Esther

2010-06-01

105

Dynamics of nuclear four- and five-body systems with correlated Gaussian method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report our recent applications of the correlated Gaussian (CG) method to nuclear four- and five-body systems: (I) Spin-dipole response functions of 4He and (II) 16 O as a 12C+n + n + p + p five-body model. The CG is flexible to describe complex few-nucleon dynamics. The above examples actually demonstrate the power of the CG, giving a simultaneous description of both four-nucleon bound and unbound states using a realistic nuclear force, and both shell- and cluster-configurations in the ground and first excited 0+ states of 16O.

Horiuchi, W.; Suzuki, Y.

2014-12-01

106

Uncovering many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths by central spin decoherence  

E-print Network

Many-body correlations can yield key insights into the nature of interacting systems; however, detecting them is often very challenging in many-particle physics, especially in nanoscale systems. Here, taking a phosphorus donor electron spin in a natural-abundance 29Si nuclear spin bath as our model system, we discover both theoretically and experimentally that many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths produce identifiable signatures in the decoherence of the central spin under multiple-pulse dynamical decoupling control. We find that when the number of decoupling -pulses is odd, central spin decoherence is primarily driven by second-order nuclear spin correlations (pairwise flip-flop processes). In contrast, when the number of -pulses is even, fourth-order nuclear spin correlations (diagonal interaction renormalized pairwise flip-flop processes) are principally responsible for the central spin decoherence. Many-body correlations of different orders can thus be selectively detected by central spin decoherence under different dynamical decoupling controls, providing a useful approach to probing many-body processes in nanoscale nuclear spin baths.

Wen-Long Ma; Gary Wolfowicz; Nan Zhao; Shu-Shen Li; John J. L. Morton; Ren-Bao Liu

2014-04-10

107

Quantum many-body theory and mechanisms for low energy nuclear reaction processes in matter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, a theoretical model of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) mechanism has been developed to describe low-energy nuclear reaction in a quantum many-body system confined in a micro\\/nano scale trap. The BEC mechanism is applied to explain various anomalous results observed recently in experiments involved with low-energy nuclear reaction processes in matter and in acoustic cavitation. Experimental tests of the BEC mechanism

Yeong E. Kim

2004-01-01

108

Quantum Many-Body Theory and Mechanisms for Low Energy Nuclear Reaction Processes in Matter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, a theoretical model of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) mechanism has been developed to describe low-energy nuclear reaction in a quantum many-body system confined in a micro\\/nano scale trap. The BEC mechanism is applied to explain various anomalous results observed recently in experiments involved with low-energy nuclear reaction processes in matter and in acoustic cavitation. Experimental tests of the BEC mechanism

Y. E. Kim

2004-01-01

109

The role of the cytoskeleton in cell body enlargement, increased nuclear eccentricity and chromatolysis in axotomized spinal motor neurons  

PubMed Central

Background When spinal motor axons are injured, the nucleolus, nucleus and cell body of the injured cell transiently increase in size, the nucleus becomes more eccentrically placed, and the organization of polyribosomes into Nissl bodies is temporarily disrupted. The mechanisms for these classical morphological responses to axotomy have not been satisfactorily explained. Results In this study we address the role of the cell body cytoskeleton in these structural changes. We show that the cytoskeleton of uninjured lumbar motor neuron cell bodies maintains nucleolar, nuclear and cell body size and nuclear position. When isolated, the relatively insoluble cell body cytoskeleton contains Nissl bodies and lipofuscin granules. After axotomy, protein labeling increases markedly and the cytoskeleton enlarges, increasing nucleolar, nuclear and cell body size, as well as nuclear eccentricity. Nearly all of the protein mass that accumulates in the cell body after axotomy appears to be added to the cytoskeleton. Conclusion We conclude that axotomy causes the conjugate enlargement of the nucleolus, nucleus and cell body and increases nuclear eccentricity in spinal motor neurons by adding protein to the cytoskeleton. The change in nuclear position, we propose, occurs when cytoskeletal elements of the axon cannot enter the shortened axon and "dam up" between the nucleus and axon hillock. As a consequence, we suggest that Nissl body-free axonal cytoskeleton accumulates between the nucleus and axon, displaces Nissl body-containing cytoskeleton, and produces central chromatolysis in that region of the cell. PMID:15774011

McIlwain, David L; Hoke, Victoria B

2005-01-01

110

Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... acute. Acute childhood leukemias are also divided into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) , depending on ... Leukemia (CML) Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) Cancer Center Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) When Cancer Keeps You Home Some Kinds ...

111

Childhood Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... and having had radiation or chemotherapy. Treatment often cures childhood leukemia. Treatment options include chemotherapy, other drug therapy and radiation. In some cases bone marrow and blood stem cell transplantation might help. NIH: National Cancer Institute

112

Understanding Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... For acute leukemia, they include: { { Tiredness or no energy { { Shortness of breath during physical activity { { Pale skin { { ... therapy. Treatment with x-rays or other high-energy rays. Refractory disease. Disease that has not responded ...

113

Three-Body Effect in Nuclear Matter to All Orders of Perturbation  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown that there are three-body clusters in all orders of the Goldstone expansion for the binding energy of nuclear matter and that they converge extremely poorly. A Gamma matrix is defined which, on expansion, is shown to generate this infinite sequence of three-nucleon clusters. It is shown that the Gamma matrix can be evaluated in terms of a

R. Rajaraman

1963-01-01

114

Nuclear bodies in the Drosophila germinal vesicle Ji-Long Liu, Michael Buszczak & Joseph G. Gall*  

E-print Network

RNP after about stage 5 of oogenesis. Several other nuclear bodies of unknown nature can be detected's monograph on Drosophila oogenesis (King 1970) and in papers by Mahowald and his collaborators (Mahowald mentioned in papers dealing with various aspects of oogenesis, but relatively few studies give details

115

Identification of a role for the nuclear receptor EAR-2 in the maintenance of clonogenic status within the leukemia cell hierarchy.  

PubMed

Identification of genes that regulate clonogenicity of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is hindered by the difficulty of isolating pure populations of cells with defined proliferative abilities. By analyzing the growth of clonal siblings in low passage cultures of the cell line OCI/AML4 we resolved this heterogeneous population into strata of distinct clonogenic potential, permitting analysis of the transcriptional signature of single cells with defined proliferative abilities. By microarray analysis we showed that the expression of the orphan nuclear receptor EAR-2 (NR2F6) is greater in leukemia cells with extensive proliferative capacity than in those that have lost proliferative ability. EAR-2 is expressed highly in long-term hematopoietic stem cells, relative to short-term hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and is downregulated in AML cells after induction of differentiation. Exogenous expression of EAR-2 increased the growth of U937 cells and prevented the proliferative arrest associated with terminal differentiation, and blocked differentiation of U937 and 32Dcl3 cells. Conversely, silencing of EAR-2 by short-hairpin RNA initiated terminal differentiation of these cell lines. These data identify EAR-2 as an important factor in the regulation of clonogenicity and differentiation, and establish that analysis of clonal siblings allows the elucidation of differences in gene expression within the AML hierarchy. PMID:21637284

Ichim, C V; Atkins, H L; Iscove, N N; Wells, R A

2011-11-01

116

Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies  

SciTech Connect

HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies. -- Highlights: ? We produce and validate new antibody reagents for the ubiquitin-protein ligase HHARI. ? HHARI colocalizes with nuclear bodies including Cajal, PML and SC35 bodies. ? We establish new functions in cell proliferation regulation for HHARI. ? Increased HHARI expression associates with squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation.

Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)] [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Adams, Matthew [BioScreening Technology Group, Biomedical Health Research Center, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)] [BioScreening Technology Group, Biomedical Health Research Center, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); High, Alec S. [Department of Histopathology, Bexley Wing, St. James's University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)] [Department of Histopathology, Bexley Wing, St. James's University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Johnson, Colin A., E-mail: c.johnson@leeds.ac.uk [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Robinson, Philip A. [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)] [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)

2013-02-01

117

Deterministic Model for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Classification  

E-print Network

there is always a need for a cost effective and robust automated system for leukemia screening which can greatly for defense mechanism in the body. However, the blasts are not fully formed in AML and hence cannot fight

Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

118

The U3 region of Moloney murine leukemia virus contains position-independent cis-acting sequences involved in the nuclear export of full-length viral transcripts.  

PubMed

The distinguishing feature of self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors is the deletion of the enhancer/promoter sequences in the U3 region of the 3' long terminal repeat. This design is used to overcome transcriptional interference and prevent downstream transcription from the 3' long terminal repeat. SIN vectors were derived from a number of different retroviruses. Studies of SIN vectors show that extensive U3 deletions in HIV-based vectors do not alter viral titers or the in vitro and in vivo properties of the vectors. However, deletion of the U3 sequences in ?- and ?-retroviruses correlates with defects in 3' RNA processing and reduces viral titers by >10-fold. Here, we studied the steps in the retroviral life cycle that are affected by the deletion of sequences in the 3' U3 region of Moloney murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vectors. The results show that the amounts of both full-length and internal RNA transcripts of U3-minus vectors are reduced in the nuclei of transfected cells, an effect that is probably due to a general defect in 3' RNA processing. Furthermore, full-length RNA transcripts were also defective in terms of nuclear export. This defect was complemented by transferring the U3 region to another position within the retroviral vector, indicating that the U3 region contains position-independent cis-acting sequences that are required for the transport of full-length viral transcripts. The results also suggest that the leader region of Moloney murine leukemia virus contains inhibitory/regulatory sequences, which prevent export and mediate nuclear retention of full-length viral RNA. PMID:24878957

Volkova, Natalia A; Fomina, Elena G; Smolnikova, Viktoryia V; Zinovieva, Natalia A; Fomin, Igor K

2014-07-18

119

Increased health care utilization by survivors of childhood lymphoblastic leukemia is confined to those treated with cranial or total body irradiation: a case cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies have indicated that survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have an increased morbidity measured in terms of health care utilization. However, earlier studies have several potentially important limitations. To overcome some of these, we investigated hospital contact rates, and predictors thereof, among 5-year survivors of ALL in a population-based setting, and compared them to a control cohort regarding outcome measures from a comprehensive nation-wide health register. Methods All individuals diagnosed with ALL before the age of 18 in Southern Sweden during 1970–1999 and alive January 2007 (n?=?213; male?=?107) were identified through the Swedish Cancer Register. Each subject was matched to fifty controls, identified in the Swedish Population Register. All study subjects were linked to the National Hospital Register and detailed information was obtained on all hospital contacts (hospital admissions and outpatients visits) starting five years after cancer diagnosis, and the corresponding date for the controls, until 2009. Results The median follow-up among the 5-year survivors of ALL was 16 years (range 5–33), accruing a total of 3,527 person-years. Of the 213 5-year survivors, 105 (49.3%) had at least one hospital contact compared to 3,634 (34.1%) of the controls (p?body irradiation (45% and 7%, respectively) had an increased risk of at least one hospital contact (OR 2.3, 95%CI; 1.5–3.6 and OR 11.0, 95%CI; 3.2–50.7, respectively), while there was no significant difference between the non-irradiated survivors and controls. Conclusions We show that irradiated survivors of childhood ALL have an increased morbidity measured in terms of hospital contacts, in comparison to non-irradiated survivors and controls, while non-irradiated survivors have not. These findings are encouraging regarding the future morbidity of children currently treated for ALL, as radiotherapy is necessary only for a minority of these. PMID:24917272

2014-01-01

120

Three-body dynamics and channel distortions in direct nuclear reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Starting from an exact three-body formulation of nuclear rearrangement, inclastic and break-up processes, we develop an operator\\u000a reduction procedure of the three-body equations, by which the components from implicit channels—channels different from the\\u000a initial and final ones—are formally eliminated. This procedure allows us to introduce in a simple way a distorted-wave approximation\\u000a scheme involving generalized transition potentials, which take account

R. Anni; L. Taffara; V. Vanzani

1974-01-01

121

What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... years. But chronic leukemias are generally harder to cure than acute leukemias. What is a lymphocytic leukemia? Whether leukemia is myeloid or lymphocytic depends on which bone marrow cells the cancer starts in. Lymphocytic leukemias (also known as lymphoid ...

122

Nuclear-matter equation of state with consistent two- and three-body perturbative chiral interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We compute the energy per particle of infinite symmetric nuclear matter from chiral NLO3 (next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order) two-body potentials plus NLO2 three-body forces. The low-energy constants of the chiral three-nucleon force that cannot be constrained by two-body observables are fitted to reproduce the triton binding energy and the H3-He3 Gamow-Teller transition matrix element. In this way, the saturation properties of nuclear matter are reproduced in a parameter-free approach. The equation of state is computed up to third order in many-body perturbation theory, with special emphasis on the role of the third-order particle-hole diagram. The dependence of these results on the cutoff scale and regulator function is studied. We find that the inclusion of three-nucleon forces consistent with the applied two-nucleon interaction leads to a reduced dependence on the choice of the regulator only for lower values of the cutoff.

Coraggio, L.; Holt, J. W.; Itaco, N.; Machleidt, R.; Marcucci, L. E.; Sammarruca, F.

2014-04-01

123

The nuclear matter equation of state with consistent two- and three-body perturbative chiral interactions  

E-print Network

We compute the energy per particle of infinite symmetric nuclear matter from chiral N3LO (next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order) two-body potentials plus N2LO three-body forces. The low-energy constants of the chiral three-nucleon force that cannot be constrained by two-body observables are fitted to reproduce the triton binding energy and the 3H-3He Gamow-Teller transition matrix element. In this way, the saturation properties of nuclear matter are reproduced in a parameter-free approach. The equation of state is computed up to third order in many-body perturbation theory, with special emphasis on the role of the third-order particle-hole diagram. The dependence of these results on the cutoff scale and regulator function is studied. We find that the inclusion of three-nucleon forces consistent with the applied two-nucleon interaction leads to a reduced dependence on the choice of the regulator only for lower values of the cutoff.

L. Coraggio; J. W. Holt; N. Itaco; R. Machleidt; L. E. Marcucci; F. Sammarruca

2014-04-10

124

28 CFR 79.12 - Criteria for eligibility for claims relating to leukemia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...claims relating to leukemia. 79.12 Section...CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION...Claims Relating to Leukemia § 79.12 Criteria...period of atmospheric nuclear testing and was...detonation of a nuclear device; (b...claimant contracted leukemia; (c) That...

2010-07-01

125

Busulfan\\/Melphalan\\/Antithymocyte Globulin Followed by Unrelated Donor Cord Blood Transplantation for Treatment of Infant Leukemia and Leukemia in Young Children: The Cord Blood Transplantation Study (COBLT) Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

A non-total body irradiation-containing preparative regimen was studied in young children (<4 years old) undergoing unrelated donor cord blood transplantation as part of the Cord Blood Transplantation trial for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 14), acute myeloid leukemia (n = 13), undifferentiated leukemia (n = 1), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (n = 2), and myelodysplastic syndromes (n =

Donna A. Wall; Shelly L. Carter; Nancy A. Kernan; Neena Kapoor; Naynesh R. Kamani; Joel A. Brochstein; Haydar Frangoul; Rakesh K. Goyal; John T. Horan; Daniel Pietryga; John E. Wagner; Joanne Kurtzberg

2005-01-01

126

The DNA Binding Property of PML/RARA but Not the Integrity of PML Nuclear Bodies Is Indispensable for Leukemic Transformation  

PubMed Central

PML/RARA is the oncoprotein driving acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). It suppresses genes expression by recruitment of a number of transcriptional repressors, resulting in differentiation block and malignant transformation of hematopoietic cells. Here, we found that mice primary hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), transduced by DNA-binding-defective PML/RARA mutants, were deficient in colony formation. Further experiments showed that DNA-binding-defective PML/RARA mutants could not repress the transcription of retinoic acid regulated genes. Intriguingly, there were no significant differences of the micro-speckled intracellular distribution between the mutants and wild-type PML/RARA. Some retinoic acid target genes regulated by PML/RARA are involved in not only differentiation block but also hematopoietic cell self-renewal. Altogether, our data demonstrate that direct DNA-binding is essential for PML/RARA to immortalize hematopoietic cells, while disruption of PML-nuclear body does not seem to be a prerequisite for hematopoietic cell transformation. PMID:25119106

Liu, Xi; Yuan, Hao; Peres, Laurent; Chen, Saijuan; Chen, Zhu; de The, Hugues; Zhou, Jun; Zhu, Jun

2014-01-01

127

Cajal body-specific small nuclear RNAs: a novel class of 2?-O-methylation and pseudouridylation guide RNAs  

PubMed Central

Cajal (coiled) bodies are conserved subnuclear organelles that are present in the nucleoplasm of both animal and plant cells. Although Cajal bodies were first described nearly 100 years ago, their function has remained largely speculative. Here, we describe a novel class of human small nuclear RNAs that localize specifically to Cajal bodies. The small Cajal body- specific RNAs (scaRNAs) are predicted or have already been demonstrated to function as guide RNAs in site-specific synthesis of 2?-O-ribose-methylated nucleotides and pseudouridines in the RNA polymerase II-transcribed U1, U2, U4 and U5 spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Our results provide strong support for the idea that the Cajal body, this mysterious nuclear organelle, provides the cellular locale for post-transcriptional modification of spliceosomal snRNAs. PMID:12032087

Darzacq, Xavier; Jády, Beáta E.; Verheggen, Céline; Kiss, Arnold M.; Bertrand, Edouard; Kiss, Tamás

2002-01-01

128

Understanding Leukemias  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tutorial is designed to aid medical students at all levels understand the laboratory diagnosis of leukemias. It includes introductory material on the basic laboratory tests specific to diagnoses, their general application and pitfalls in interpretation. The introductory material is followed by a series of short clinical vignettes illustrating the major categories of leukemia. This tutorial focuses on diagnosis and relative little on treatment is included. QuickTime movie player, Flash player and Java script runtime plug-in scripts are required for some pages. The tutorial concludes with a short self-help quiz covering the major points developed. The plug-ins noted above are available free at the following sites: http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/win.html and http://www.sun.com/ . Questions should be directed to Dr. Mark Braun; braunm@indiana.edu.Annotated: falseDisease diagnosis: neoplastic

Braun, Mark

129

Faddeev-type calculation of three-body nuclear reactions including core excitation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The core excitation, being an important reaction mechanism, so far is not properly included in most calculations of three-body nuclear reactions. We aim to include the excitation of the core nucleus using an exact Faddeev-type framework for nuclear reactions in the three-body (core+neutron+proton) system. We employ Alt, Grassberger, and Sandhas (AGS) integral equations for the three-particle transition operators and solve them in the momentum-space framework. The Coulomb interaction is included via the method of screening and renormalization. We calculate elastic, inelastic, and transfer reactions involving 10Be and 24Mg nuclear cores. Important effects of the core excitation are found, often improving the description of the experimental data. In the neutron transfer reactions the core excitation effect is by far not just a simple reduction of the cross section by the respective spectroscopic factor. This indicates that widely used extraction of the spectroscopic factors from the ratio of the experimental and theoretical transfer cross sections is an unreliable approach.

Deltuva, A.

2013-07-01

130

ALS-associated protein FIG4 is localized in Pick and Lewy bodies, and also neuronal nuclear inclusions, in polyglutamine and intranuclear inclusion body diseases.  

PubMed

FIG4 is a phosphatase that regulates intracellular vesicle trafficking along the endosomal-lysosomal pathway. Mutations of FIG4 lead to the development of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4J and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Moreover, ALS-associated proteins (transactivation response DNA protein 43 (TDP-43), fused in sarcoma (FUS), optineurin, ubiquilin-2, charged mutivesicular body protein 2b (CHMP2B) and valosin-containing protein) are involved in inclusion body formation in several neurodegenerative diseases. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined the brains and spinal cords of patients with various neurodegenerative diseases, including sporadic TDP-43 proteinopathy (ALS and frontotemporal lobar degeneration). TDP-43 proteinopathy demonstrated no FIG4 immunoreactivity in neuronal inclusions. However, FIG4 immunoreactivity was present in Pick bodies in Pick's disease, Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, neuronal nuclear inclusions in polyglutamine and intranuclear inclusion body diseases, and Marinesco and Hirano bodies in aged control subjects. These findings suggest that FIG4 is not incorporated in TDP-43 inclusions and that it may have a common role in the formation or degradation of neuronal cytoplasmic and nuclear inclusions in several neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23888880

Kon, Tomoya; Mori, Fumiaki; Tanji, Kunikazu; Miki, Yasuo; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Yoshida, Mari; Sasaki, Hidenao; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Wakabayashi, Koichi

2014-02-01

131

Yields of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from seismic body and surface waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 USSR underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (m\\/sub b\\/) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The

L. R. Sykes; G. C. Wiggins

1986-01-01

132

Yields of Soviet Underground Nuclear Explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from Seismic Body and Surface Waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 U.S.S.R. underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (mb) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The most

Lynn R. Sykes; Graham C. Wiggins

1986-01-01

133

Synergy against PML-RARa: targeting transcription, proteolysis, differentiation, and self-renewal in acute promyelocytic leukemia  

PubMed Central

Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a hematological malignancy driven by a chimeric oncoprotein containing the C terminus of the retinoic acid receptor-a (RARa) fused to an N-terminal partner, most commonly promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML). Mechanistically, PML-RARa acts as a transcriptional repressor of RARa and non-RARa target genes and antagonizes the formation and function of PML nuclear bodies that regulate numerous signaling pathways. The empirical discoveries that PML-RARa–associated APL is sensitive to both all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO), and the subsequent understanding of the mechanisms of action of these drugs, have led to efforts to understand the contribution of molecular events to APL cell differentiation, leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) clearance, and disease eradication in vitro and in vivo. Critically, the mechanistic insights gleaned from these studies have resulted not only in a better understanding of APL itself, but also carry valuable lessons for other malignancies. PMID:24344243

dos Santos, Guilherme Augusto; Kats, Lev

2013-01-01

134

Origin of the short-range part of generalized two- and three-body nuclear force  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Origin of the short-range baryon-baryon interactions is discussed from the quark substructure viewpoints of baryons. It is pointed out that the generalized nuclear force, recently obtained from the lattice QCD calculations, can be interpreted at short distances by the combinatory effects of the Pauli exclusion principle and the color-magnetic spin-spin interactions among the quarks. Classifications according to the spin-flavor SU(6) symmetry representations give us a general guidance on the features of the short-range interactions. The SU(6) analysis of the three-body baryon interactions reveals that the genuine three-body force is repulsive at short distances due to the quark antisymmetrization.

Oka, Makoto

2012-05-01

135

An immunoelectron study of karyosphere and nuclear bodies in oocytes of mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Polyphaga)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The karyosphere and nuclear bodies (NBs) were studied in Tenebrio molitor oocytes using immunoelectron cytochemistry. During early diplotene (previtellogenic stage), oocyte chromosomes begin to unite in a small nuclear volume forming the karyosphere. In vitellogenic oocyte nuclei, the chromatin undergoes condensation, and the karyosphere acquires a ring-shaped structure. The karyosphere is the only structure containing DNA in the oocyte nucleus.

Dmitry Bogolyubov; Olga Alexandrova; Alexander Tsvetkov; Vladimir Parfenov

2000-01-01

136

Conference discussion of the nuclear few-body problem: questions and issues  

SciTech Connect

During the final session of the conference participants discussed important questions and issues from the current study of the nuclear few body problem. The discussion was preceded by five very short ''mini-summaries'' (limited to about 5 minutes each) presented by each member of the panel. These ''mini-summaries'' are presented in Sec. 1 below, and the questions and discussion is summarized in Sec. 2. The ''mini-summaries'' are presented in Sec. 1 in the order they were given to the conference.

Franz Gross; Dieter Drechsel; James L. Friar; Vijay R. Pandharipande; Ingo Sick

2001-06-01

137

Mutations in yeast calmodulin cause defects in spindle pole body functions and nuclear integrity  

PubMed Central

Yeast calmodulin (CaM) is required for the progression of nuclear division (Ohya, Y. and Y. Anraku. 1989. Curr. Genet. 15:113-120), although the precise mechanism and physiological role of CaM in this process are unclear. In this paper we have characterized the phenotype caused by a temperature-sensitive lethal mutation (cmdl-101) in the yeast CaM. The cmdl-101 mutation expresses a carboxyl-terminal half of the yeast CaM (Met72-Cys147) under the control of an inducible GAL1 promoter. Incubation of the cmdl-101 cells at a nonpermissive temperature causes a severe defect in chromosome segregation. The rate of chromosome loss in the cmdl-101 mutant is higher than wild-type cell even at permissive temperature. The primary visible defect observed by immunofluorescence and electron microscopic analyses is that the organization of spindle microtubules is abnormal in the cmdl-101 cells grown at nonpermissive temperature. Majority of budded cells arrested at the high temperature contain only one spindle pole body (SPB), which forms monopolar spindle, whereas the budded cells of the same strain incubated at permissive temperature all contain two SPBs. Using the freeze-substituted fixation method, we found that the integrity of the nuclear morphology of the cmdl-101 mutant cell is significantly disturbed. The nucleus in wild-type cells is round with smooth contours of nuclear envelope. However, the nuclear envelope in the mutant cells appears to be very flexible and forms irregular projections and invaginations that are never seen in wild-type cells. The deformation of the nuclear becomes much more severe as the incubation at nonpermissive temperature continues. The single SPB frequently localizes on the projections or the invaginations of the nuclear envelope. These observations suggest that CaM is required for the functions of SPB and spindle, and the integrity of nucleus. PMID:1469052

1992-01-01

138

Leukemia revisited  

SciTech Connect

Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately.

Cronkite, E P

1980-01-01

139

Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 bind to human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 RNA regulatory elements.  

PubMed Central

Efficient expression of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) and human immunodeficiency virus structural proteins requires Rx and Rev proteins, respectively. Decreased expression of Gag and Env appears to be due, in part, to intragenic RNA sequences, termed cis-acting repressive sequences (CRS), and may be mediated by binding of specific cellular factors. We demonstrated previously that two cellular proteins, p60CRS and p40CRS, interact with HTLV type 2.5' long terminal repeat CRS RNA and that the interaction of both proteins with CRS RNA correlates with function (A. C. Black, C. T. Ruland, J. Luo, A. Bakker, J. K. Fraser, and J. D. Rosenblatt, Virology 200:29-41, 1994). By radioimmunoprecipitation of HeLa nuclear proteins UV cross-linked to CRS RNAs with murine monoclonal antibodies, we now show that p40CRS is heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 and p60CRS is polypyrimidine tract-binding protein or hnRNP I. These immunoprecipitation results were confirmed by an immunobinding assay with hnRNP I and hnRNP AI antibodies and by cross-competition electrophoretic mobility shift experiments. In addition, we mapped a putative hnRNP A1 binding site in U5 RNA and demonstrated that p40CRS (hnRNP A1) binding to that site correlates with CRS function. Since both hnRNP I and hnRNP A1 have been shown to influence splicing and potentially other steps in RNA processing, the binding of both hnRNP I and hnRNP A1 to HTLV RNA regulatory elements may alter retrovirus RNA processing and may be involved in regulation by Rex. PMID:7474099

Black, A C; Luo, J; Watanabe, C; Chun, S; Bakker, A; Fraser, J K; Morgan, J P; Rosenblatt, J D

1995-01-01

140

NDC1: a nuclear periphery component required for yeast spindle pole body duplication  

PubMed Central

The spindle pole body (SPB) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae serves as the centrosome in this organism, undergoing duplication early in the cell cycle to generate the two poles of the mitotic spindle. The conditional lethal mutation ndc1-1 has previously been shown to cause asymmetric segregation, wherein all the chromosomes go to one pole of the mitotic spindle (Thomas, J. H., and D. Botstein. 1986. Cell. 44:65-76). Examination by electron microscopy of mutant cells subjected to the nonpermissive temperature reveals a defect in SPB duplication. Although duplication is seen to occur, the nascent SPB fails to undergo insertion into the nuclear envelope. The parental SPB remains functional, organizing a monopolar spindle to which all the chromosomes are presumably attached. Order-of-function experiments reveal that the NDC1 function is required in G1 after alpha-factor arrest but before the arrest caused by cdc34. Molecular analysis shows that the NDC1 gene is essential and that it encodes a 656 amino acid protein (74 kD) with six or seven putative transmembrane domains. This evidence for membrane association is further supported by immunofluorescent localization of the NDC1 product to the vicinity of the nuclear envelope. These findings suggest that the NDC1 protein acts within the nuclear envelope to mediate insertion of the nascent SPB. PMID:8349727

1993-01-01

141

PML body meets telomere  

PubMed Central

The unlimited proliferation potential of cancer cells requires the maintenance of their telomeres. This is frequently accomplished by reactivation of telomerase. However, in a significant fraction of tumors an alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanism is active. The molecular mechanism of the ALT pathway remains elusive. In particular, the role of characteristic complexes of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) with telomeres, the ALT-associated PML-NBs (APBs), is currently under investigation. Here, we review recent findings on the assembly, structure and functions of APBs. It is discussed how genomic aberrations in ALT-positive cancer cells could result in the formation of APBs and in ALT activity. We conclude that they are important functional intermediates in what is considered the canonical ALT pathway and discuss deregulations of cellular pathways that contribute to the emergence of the ALT phenotype. PMID:22572954

Chung, Inn; Osterwald, Sarah; Deeg, Katharina I.; Rippe, Karsten

2012-01-01

142

Epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits tax-dependent activation of nuclear factor kappa B and of matrix metalloproteinase 9 in human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 positive leukemia cells.  

PubMed

Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the most abundant polyphenol molecule from green tea and is known to exhibit antioxidative as well as tumor suppressing activity. In order to examine EGCG tumor invasion and suppressing activity against adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), two HTLV-1 positive leukemia cells (HuT-102 and C91- PL) were treated with non-cytotoxic concentrations of EGCG for 2 and 4 days. Proliferation was significantly inhibited by 100 ?M at 4 days, with low cell lysis or cytotoxicity. HTLV-1 oncoprotein (Tax) expression in HuT- 102 and C91-PL cells was inhibited by 25 ?M and 125 ?M respectively. The same concentrations of EGCG inhibited NF-kB nuclearization and stimulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression in both cell lines. These results indicate that EGCG can inhibit proliferation and reduce the invasive potential of HTLV-1- positive leukemia cells. It apparently exerted its effects by suppressing Tax expression, manifested by inhibiting the activation of NF-kB pathway and induction of MMP-9 transcription in HTLV-1 positive cells. PMID:24606444

Harakeh, Steve; Diab-Assaf, Mona; Azar, Rania; Hassan, Hani Mutlak Abdulla; Tayeb, Safwan; Abou-El-Ardat, Khalil; Damanhouri, Ghazi Abdullah; Qadri, Ishtiaq; Abuzenadah, Adel; Chaudhary, Adeel; Kumosani, Taha; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Mathias; Yacoub, Haitham; Azhar, Esam; Barbour, Elie

2014-01-01

143

Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

144

Leukemia Trial Results  

MedlinePLUS

... Program Coordinating Center for Clinical Trials Leukemia Trial Results Ibrutinib Improves Survival Compared with Ofatumumab in Patients with Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (Posted: 06/27/2014) - In an international randomized phase III clinical trial, ...

145

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

What is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)? This type of cancer begins in the blood and bone marrow or mediastinum. The abnormal cells interfere ... www.mayoclinic.com (Mayo Clinic). Type the keywords acute lymphoblastic leukemia or leukemia into the search box. Healing begins ...

146

Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

What is acute myeloid leukemia (AML)? The second most common type of acute leukemia in adults, AML is a cancer of the blood and bone ... American Cancer Society). Type the keywords acute myeloid leukemia into the search box. What kinds of questions ...

147

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2011 Shell 1 -Battery Electric Vehicle Chassis and Body Design  

E-print Network

, Texas. The team performed better than our projected performance. The Battery Electric Vehicle achievedPENNSTATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2011 Shell 1 - Battery Electric Vehicle Chassis and Body Design Overview The team faced the challenging task of redesigning a previous

Demirel, Melik C.

148

Formation of nuclear bodies by the lncRNA Gomafu-associating proteins Celf3 and SF1  

PubMed Central

Gomafu/MIAT/Rncr2 is a long noncoding RNA that has been proposed to control retinal cell specification, stem cell differentiation and alternative splicing of schizophrenia-related genes. However, how Gomafu controls these biological processes at the molecular level has remained largely unknown. In this study, we identified the RNA-binding protein Celf3 as a novel Gomafu-associating protein. Knockdown of Celf3 led to the down-regulation of Gomafu, and cross-link RNA precipitation analysis confirmed specific binding between Celf3 and Gomafu. In the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2A, Celf3 formed novel nuclear bodies (named CS bodies) that colocalized with SF1, another Gomafu-binding protein. Gomafu, however, was not enriched in the CS bodies; instead, it formed distinct nuclear bodies in separate regions in the nucleus. These observations suggest that Gomafu indirectly modulates the function of the splicing factors SF1 and Celf3 by sequestering these proteins into separate nuclear bodies. PMID:25145264

Ishizuka, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuko; Ishida, Kentaro; Yanaka, Kaori; Nakagawa, Shinichi

2014-01-01

149

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with 131I–anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome  

PubMed Central

We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of 131I–anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with 131I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3+ and CD33+ cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of 131I-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177. PMID:19786617

Gooley, Theodore A.; Rajendran, Joseph; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Matthews, Dana C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, Paul J.; Storb, Rainer F.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

2009-01-01

150

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with I-131-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.  

SciTech Connect

We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

Pagel, John M.; Gooley, T. A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, B. M.; Matthews, D. C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, P. J.; Storb, R.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

2009-12-24

151

Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy: a whole-body nuclear MRI and metabolic study.  

PubMed

Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy (NLSDM) is caused by a mutation in the gene encoding adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and is characterized by the presence of numerous triglyceride-containing cytoplasmic droplets in type I muscle fibers. Major clinical manifestations concern the heart and skeletal muscle, and some patients also present diabetes mellitus. We report the clinical, metabolic, and whole-body nuclear magnetic resonance imaging findings of three patients with NLSDM. Muscle MRI study was consistent with previous descriptions, and allowed to show a common pattern of fatty replacement. Muscle changes predominated in the paravertebral muscles, both compartments of legs, and posterior compartment of the thighs. A more variable distribution of muscle involvement was observed on upper limbs, with marked asymmetry in one patient, and alterations predominating on supra and infra spinatus, biceps brachialis and anterior compartment of arms. Cardiac NMR studies revealed anomalies despite normal echocardiography in two patients. Endocrine studies showed low leptin and adiponectine levels, a moderate increase in insulin levels at fasting state, and even greater increase after oral glucose tolerance test in one patient. Two patients had elevated triglycerides and low cholesterol-HDL. Based on these analyses, regular control of cardiometabolic risks appear mandatory in the clinical follow-up of these subjects. PMID:23333026

Laforęt, Pascal; Stojkovic, Tanya; Bassez, Guillaume; Carlier, Pierre G; Clément, Karine; Wahbi, Karim; Petit, François M; Eymard, Bruno; Carlier, Robert-Yves

2013-02-01

152

Supportive Care for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... lymphocytic leukemia Radiation therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Leukapheresis for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Supportive care for chronic ... treatment information about chronic lymphocytic leukemia Previous Topic Leukapheresis for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Next Topic Stem cell ...

153

Protein Kinase A Activation Enhances ?-Catenin Transcriptional Activity through Nuclear Localization to PML Bodies  

PubMed Central

The Protein Kinase A (PKA) and Wnt signaling cascades are fundamental pathways involved in cellular development and maintenance. In the osteoblast lineage, these pathways have been demonstrated functionally to be essential for the production of mineralized bone. Evidence for PKA-Wnt crosstalk has been reported both during tumorigenesis and during organogenesis, and the nature of the interaction is thought to rely on tissue and cell context. In this manuscript, we analyzed bone tumors arising from mice with activated PKA caused by mutation of the PKA regulatory subunit Prkar1a. In primary cells from these tumors, we observed relocalization of ?-catenin to intranuclear punctuate structures, which were identified as PML bodies. Cellular redistribution of ?-catenin could be recapitulated by pharmacologic activation of PKA. Using 3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts as a model system, we found that PKA phosphorylation sites on ?-catenin were required for nuclear re-localization. Further, ?-catenin's transport to the nucleus was accompanied by an increase in canonical Wnt-dependent transcription, which also required the PKA sites. PKA-Wnt crosstalk in the cells was bi-directional, including enhanced interactions between ?-catenin and the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and transcriptional crosstalk between the Wnt and PKA signaling pathways. Increases in canonical Wnt/?-catenin signaling were associated with a decrease in the activity of the non-canonical Wnt/Ror2 pathway, which has been shown to antagonize canonical Wnt signaling. Taken together, this study provides a new understanding of the complex regulation of the subcellular distribution of ?-catenin and its differential protein-protein interaction that can be modulated by PKA signaling. PMID:25299576

Zhang, Mei; Mahoney, Emilia; Zuo, Tao; Manchanda, Parmeet K.; Davuluri, Ramana V.; Kirschner, Lawrence S.

2014-01-01

154

Three-body forces in nuclear matter from intermediate Delta-states in three-nucleon clusters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Those three-body force contributions in nuclear matter usually generated through a piN scattering amplitude dominated by the Delta(1236) resonance, are here treated as a three-nucleon cluster, in which one of the nucleons becomes, in an intermediate state, a Delta-resonance. All exchange diagrams are calculated and found to significantly reduce the energy per particle from the direct graph. This is contrary

T. Kouki; L. E. W. Smulter; A. M. Green

1977-01-01

155

Distribution spherical structure and predicted Mie scattering of multilamellar bodies in human age-related nuclear cataracts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Purpose: To characterize multilamellar bodies (MLBs), determine their distribution along the optic axis and predict their potential Mie scattering within human,age-related nuclear cataracts. Previous studies restricted to the equatorial plane have shown,that MLBs are rare spherical objects that are 1–4 mm in diameter and covered by multiple layers of thin lipid-rich membranes. Methods: Eight human,aged transparent lenses were obtained

Kurt O. Gilliland; Christopher D. Freel; Sonke Johnsen; M. Joseph Costello

156

Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2013-06-03

157

Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-12-09

158

The Family Leukemia Association  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

Pollitt, Eleanor

1976-01-01

159

Ohio State study shows how chronic inflammation can cause leukemia  

Cancer.gov

A hormone-like substance produced by the body to promote inflammation can cause an aggressive form of leukemia when present at high levels, according to a new study by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. The study shows that high levels of interleukin-15 (IL-15) alone can cause large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia, a rare and usually fatal form of cancer, in an animal model. The researchers also developed a treatment for the leukemia that showed no discernible side effects in the animal model.

160

Immunotherapy for Pediatric Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of leukemia in childhood. Despite this, leukemia remains a leading cause of pediatric cancer-related mortality and the prognosis is guarded for individuals with relapsed or refractory disease. Standard therapies are associated with a wide array of acute and long-term toxicities and further treatment intensification may not be tolerable or beneficial. The curative potential of allogeneic stem cell transplantation is due in part to the graft-versus-leukemia effect, which provides evidence for the therapeutic capacity of immune-based therapies. In recent years there have been significant advances in the development and application of immunotherapy in the treatment of leukemias, including the demonstration of activity in chemotherapy-resistant cases. This review summarizes immunotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of pediatric leukemia including current results and future directions. PMID:23847759

Shah, Nirali N.; Dave, Hema; Wayne, Alan S.

2013-01-01

161

Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-04-09

162

Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-01-08

163

Mitoxantrone resistance in HL-60 leukemia cells: Reduced nuclear topoisomerase II catalytic activity and drug-induced DNA cleavage in association with reduced expression of the topoisomerase II. beta. isoform  

SciTech Connect

Mitoxantrone-resistant variants of the human HL-60 leukemia cell line are cross-resistant to several natural product and synthetic antineoplastic agents. The resistant cells (HL-60/MX2) retain sensitivity to the Vinca alkaloids vincristine and vinblastine, drugs that are typically associated with the classical multidrug resistance phenotype. Mitoxantrone accumulation and retention are equivalent in the sensitive and resistant cell types, suggesting that mitoxantrone resistance inn HL-60/MX2 cells might be associated with an alteration in the type II DNA topoisomerases. The authors discovered that topoisomerase II catalytic activity in 1.0 M NaCl nuclear extracts from the HL-60/MX2 variant was reduced 4- to 5-fold compared to that in the parental HL-60 cells. Studies were designed to minimize the proteolytic degradation of the topoisomerase II enzymes by extraction of whole cells with hot SDS. When nuclear extracts from the two cell types were normalized for equivalent catalytic activity, mitoxantrone inhibited the decatenation of kDNA by these extracts to an equal extent but levels of mitoxantrone-induced cleavage of {sup 32}P-labeled pBR322 DNA by nuclear extracts from HL-60/MX2 cells were 3- to 4-fold lower than in comparable HL-60 extracts. Resistance to the topoisomerase II inhibitor mitoxantrone in HL-60/MX2 is associated with reduced nuclear and whole cell topoisomerase II catalytic activity, immunologically undetectable levels of the 180-kDa topoisomerase II isozyme, and reduced mitoxantrone-induced cleavage of radiolabeled DNA by topoisomerase II in nuclear extracts from these cells.

Harker, W.G.; Slade, D.L.; Parr, R.L. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)); Drake, F.H. (SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, King of Prussia, PA (United States))

1991-10-15

164

Body-fixed relativistic molecular Hamiltonian and its application to nuclear spin-rotation tensor: Linear molecules  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relativistic molecular Hamiltonian written in the body-fixed frame of reference is the basis for high-precision calculations of spectroscopic parameters involving nuclear vibrations and/or rotations. Such a Hamiltonian that describes electrons fully relativistically and nuclei quasi-relativistically is just developed for semi-rigid nonlinear molecules [Y. Xiao and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134104 (2013)], 10.1063/1.4797496. Yet, the formulation should somewhat be revised for linear molecules thanks to some unusual features arising from the redundancy of the rotation around the molecular axis. Nonetheless, the resulting isomorphic Hamiltonian is rather similar to that for nonlinear molecules. Consequently, the relativistic formulation of nuclear spin-rotation (NSR) tensor for linear molecules is very much the same as that for nonlinear molecules. So is the relativistic mapping between experimental NSR and NMR.

Xiao, Yunlong; Liu, Wenjian

2013-07-01

165

Cordycepin Regulates GSK-3?/?-Catenin Signaling in Human Leukemia Cells  

PubMed Central

Background Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are a limitless cell source for the initiation and maintenance of leukemia. Activation of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway is required for the survival and development of LSCs. Therefore, targeting ?-catenin is considered a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia. The goal of this study was to explore whether cordycepin, an active component of the traditional medicine Cordyceps sinensis, regulates ?-catenin expression in leukemia cells. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, we found that cordycepin significantly suppressed cell proliferation in all malignant cancer cells, including U937, K562, A549, HepG2, SK-Hep1 and MCF7 in a dose-dependent manner. However, cordycepin reduced ?-catenin levels in U937, K562 and THP1 leukemia cells and had no effect on other solid cancer cells. In addition, treatment with cordycepin significantly suppressed leukemia colony formation in soft agar assay. Cordycepin enhanced proteasome-dependent degradation and inhibited nuclear translocation of ?-catenin in leukemia cells. Cordycepin-reduced ?-catenin stability was restored by the addition of a pharmacological inhibitor of GSK-3?, indicating that cordycepin-suppressed ?-catenin stability is mediated by the activation of GSK-3?. Furthermore, cordycepin abolished the effect of Wnt3a-induced ?-catenin in leukemia cells. In addition, cordycepin-impaired ?-catenin is regulated by Akt activation but is not significantly influenced by AMPK or mTOR signal pathways. Significance Our findings show for the first time that codycepin selectively reduces ?-catenin stability in leukemia but not in other solid tumor cells. This suppressive effect is mediated by regulating GSK-3?. A synergistic combination of cordycepin with other treatments should be used as a novel strategy to eradicate leukemia via elimination of LSCs. PMID:24086728

Liu, Tzu-An; Tzean, Shean-Shong; Shen, Tang-Long; Liou, Jun-Yang

2013-01-01

166

How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Found?  

MedlinePLUS

... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia found? At this time there are no special ... oncologist (doctor who treats cancer). Tests to find acute lymphocytic leukemia Most of the symptoms seen in leukemia can ...

167

Leukemia -- Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic  

MedlinePLUS

... Lymphocytic : Overview Print to PDF Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic : Overview This section has been reviewed and ... leukemia (AML) Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) About T-cell leukemia There are also less common types of ...

168

The t(15;17) translocation alters a nuclear body in a retinoic acid-reversible fashion.  

PubMed Central

Nuclear bodies (NBs) are ultrastructurally defined granules predominantly found in dividing cells. Here we show that PML, a protein involved in the t(15;17) translocation of acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), is specifically bound to a NB. PML and several NB-associated proteins, found as auto-antigens in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), are co-localized and co-regulated. The APL-derived PML-RAR alpha fusion protein is shown to be predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, whereas a fraction is nuclear and delocalizes the NB antigens to multiple smaller nuclear clusters devoid of ultrastructural organization. RA administration (which in APL patients induces blast differentiation and consequently complete remissions) causes the re-aggregation of PML and PBC auto-antigens onto the NB, while PML-RAR alpha remains mainly cytoplasmic. Thus, PML-RAR alpha expression leads to a RA-reversible alteration of a nuclear domain. These results shed a new light on the pathogenesis of APL and provide a molecular link between NBs and oncogenesis. Images PMID:8131741

Koken, M H; Puvion-Dutilleul, F; Guillemin, M C; Viron, A; Linares-Cruz, G; Stuurman, N; de Jong, L; Szostecki, C; Calvo, F; Chomienne, C

1994-01-01

169

Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Body Position in the Transport of Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes safety requirements for transport of radioactive waste in Slovakia and the role of regulatory body in the transport licensing and assessment processes. Importance of radioactive waste shipments have been increased since 1999 by starting of NPP A-1 decommissioning and operation of near surface disposal facility. Also some information from history of shipment as well as future activities are given. Legal basis for radioactive waste transport is resulting from IAEA recommendations in this area. Different types of transport equipment were approved by regulatory body for both liquid and solid waste and transportation permits were issued to their shipment. Regulatory body attention during evaluation of transport safety is focused mainly on ability of individual packages to withstand different transport conditions and on safety analyses performed for transport equipment for liquid waste with high frequency of shipments. During past three years no event was occurred in connection with radioactive waste transport in Slovakia.

Homola, J.

2003-02-27

170

Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

2013-01-16

171

Bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein inhibition suppresses human T cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein-mediated tumorigenesis by inhibiting nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) signaling.  

PubMed

The etiology of human T cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1)-mediated adult T cell leukemia is associated with the ability of viral oncoprotein Tax to induce sustained NF-?B activation and the expression of many NF-?B target genes. Acetylation of the RelA subunit of NF-?B and the subsequent recruitment of bromodomain-containing factor Brd4 are important for the expression of NF-?B target genes in response to various stimuli. However, their contributions to Tax-mediated NF-?B target gene expression and tumorigenesis remain unclear. Here we report that Tax induced the acetylation of lysine 310 of RelA and the binding of Brd4 to acetylated RelA to facilitate Tax-mediated transcriptional activation of NF-?B. Depletion of Brd4 down-regulated Tax-mediated NF-?B target gene expression and cell proliferation. Inhibiting the interaction of Brd4 and acetylated RelA with the bromodomain extraterminal protein inhibitor JQ1 suppressed the proliferation of Tax-expressing rat fibroblasts and Tax-positive HTLV-1-infected cells and Tax-mediated cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Moreover, JQ1 attenuated the Tax-mediated transcriptional activation of NF-?B, triggering the polyubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of constitutively active nuclear RelA. Our results identify Brd4 as a key regulator for Tax-mediated NF-?B gene expression and suggest that targeting epigenetic regulators such as Brd4 with the bromodomain extraterminal protein inhibitor might be a potential therapeutic strategy for cancers and other diseases associated with HTLV-1 infection. PMID:24189064

Wu, Xuewei; Qi, Jun; Bradner, James E; Xiao, Gutian; Chen, Lin-Feng

2013-12-13

172

Acute myeloid leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is cancer that starts inside bone marrow. This is the soft tissue in the center of bones that helps form all blood cells. The cancer grows from cells that would normally turn into ...

173

Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)  

MedlinePLUS

Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is cancer that starts inside bone marrow. This is the soft tissue in the center of bones that helps form all blood cells. CML causes an uncontrolled growth of immature cells that make ...

174

Nuclear domain 10 of the viral aspect  

PubMed Central

Nuclear domain 10 (ND10) are spherical bodies distributed throughout the nucleoplasm and measuring around 0.2-1.0 ?m. First observed under an electron microscope, they were originally described as dense bodies found in the nucleus. They are known by a number of other names, including Promyelocytic Leukemia bodies (PML bodies), Kremer bodies, and PML oncogenic domains. ND10 are frequently associated with Cajal bodies and cleavage bodies. It has been suggested that they play a role in regulating gene transcription. ND10 were originally characterized using human autoantisera, which recognizes Speckled Protein of 100 kDa, from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. At the immunohistochemical level, ND10 appear as nuclear punctate structures, with 10 indicating the approximate number of dots per nucleus observed. ND10 do not colocalize with kinetochores, centromeres, sites of mRNA processing, or chromosomes. Resistance of ND10 antigens to nuclease digestion and salt extraction suggest that ND10 are associated with the nuclear matrix. They are often identified by immunofluorescent assay using specific antibodies against PML, Death domain-associated protein, nuclear dot protein (NDP55), and so on. The role of ND10 has long been the subject of investigation, with the specific connection of ND10 and viral infection having been a particular focus for almost 20 years. This review summarizes the relationship of ND10 and viral infection. Some future study directions are also discussed. PMID:24255882

Rivera-Molina, Yisel A; Martínez, Francisco Puerta; Tang, Qiyi

2013-01-01

175

Reuters -June 19, 2008 Approach enlists immune system to fight leukemia  

E-print Network

Reuters - June 19, 2008 Approach enlists immune system to fight leukemia Leukemia patients may said. The idea behind the new approach is to get the body's own immune system to take over the fight diagnosed, the immune system of CML patients is low, but as they begin to respond to treatment, the immune

Levy, Doron

176

Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Multiple Myeloma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-10-30

177

Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-04-01

178

Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) and Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML)  

MedlinePLUS

... Leukemia (CMML) and Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML)/5 Stem Cell Transplantation for CMML. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (giving ... stabilization and partial remission rather than complete remission. Stem Cell Transplantation for JMML. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (giving ...

179

Three Lectures on Random Matrices and the Nuclear Many-body Problem  

SciTech Connect

In the first lecture, I give an overview of the random--matrix approach to the statistical theory of nuclear reactions, with application to recent data on a microwave billiard. In the second lecture, I discuss the preponderance of ground states with spin zero and of states with positive parity. In the third lecture, I discuss constrained ensembles of random matrices.

Weidenmueller, Hans A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

2008-11-13

180

Ferritinopathy: diagnosis by muscle or nerve biopsy, with a note on other nuclear inclusion body diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ferritinopathy (neuroferritinopathy) has recently been identified as an autosomal dominant, multisystem disease, mainly affecting the central nervous system. It is caused by mutations in exon 4 of the ferritin light chain gene on chromosome 19. Its fine structural hallmarks are granular nuclear inclusions in neurons, oligodendroglial and microglial cells with similar extracellular derivatives in the central nervous system, muscle, peripheral

J. Michael Schröder

2005-01-01

181

Double decimation and sliding vacua in the nuclear many-body system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose that effective field theories for nuclei and nuclear matter comprise of “double decimation”: (1) the chiral symmetry decimation (CSD) and (2) Fermi liquid decimation (FLD). The Brown-Rho scaling recently identified as the parametric dependence intrinsic in the “vector manifestation” of hidden local symmetry theory of Harada and Yamawaki results from the first decimation. This scaling governs dynamics down to the scale at which the Fermi surface is formed as a quantum critical phenomenon. The next decimation to the top of the Fermi sea where standard nuclear physics is operative makes up the FLD. Thus, nuclear dynamics are dictated by two fixed points, namely, the vector manifestation fixed point and the Fermi liquid fixed point. It has been a prevalent practice in nuclear physics community to proceed with the second decimation only, assuming density-independent masses, without implementing the first, CSD. We show why most nuclear phenomena can be reproduced by theories using either density-independent, or density-dependent masses, a grand conspiracy of nature that is an aspect that could be tied to the Cheshire Cat phenomenon in hadron physics. We identify what is left out in the FLD that does not incorporate the CSD. Experiments such as the dilepton production in relativistic heavy ion reactions, which are specifically designed to observe effects of dropping masses, could exhibit large effects from the reduced masses. However, they are compounded with effects that are not directly tied to chiral symmetry. We discuss a recent STAR/RHIC observation where BR scaling can be singled out in a pristine environment.

Brown, G. E.; Rho, Mannque

2004-06-01

182

Graft-versus-leukemia in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

Immune-mediated anti-leukemia effects, often termed graft-versus-leukemia (GvL), operate after bone marrow or blood cell transplants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia. Sometimes the magnitude of this anti-leukemia effect exceeds that of high-dose anti-leukemia drugs and radiation and can result in leukemia cure. We analyzed leukemia relapse data after transplants for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in this context. These data support the notion of a strong GvL effect in CLL. However, as most of these data are from studies of allotransplants, it is uncertain whether GvL operates in settings where the anti-leukemia effector cells and target CLL cells are genetically identical except for leukemia-related mutations. It is also uncertain whether GvL is distinct from GvHD. These potential limitations have important implications on whether immune therapy of CLL will work in non-allotransplant settings. PMID:17322931

Ben-Bassat, I; Raanani, P; Gale, R P

2007-04-01

183

What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... breast and then spread to the bone marrow. Cancers that start elsewhere and then spread to the bone marrow are not leukemia. Normal bone marrow, blood, and lymphoid tissue To understand the different types of leukemia, it ...

184

Nuclear translocation of the 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (membrane associated rapid response to steroids) receptor protein and NF{kappa}B in differentiating NB4 leukemia cells  

SciTech Connect

1,25 Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) primes NB4 promyelocytic leukemia cells to differentiate along the monocyte/macrophage lineage through a non-genomic mechanism. Here we show that NB4 cells express high levels of the recently identified membrane receptor for 1,25D{sub 3}, which is a distinct gene product from the classical nuclear vitamin D receptor. This 57 kDa protein, named 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (Membrane Activated Rapid Response to Steroids)/ERp57/PIA3 appears to associate in a complex with the transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B). In unstimulated cells, 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS can be co-immunoprecipitated with antibodies directed at NF{kappa}B, and NF{kappa}B is co-precipitated when antibodies against 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS or ERp57 are used. Confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation studies demonstrate that both 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS and NF{kappa}B begin translocating to the nucleus within minutes of co-stimulation with 1,25D{sub 3} and phorbol ester. The predominant nuclear localization of both proteins precedes the expression of the monocyte/macrophage phenotype and suggests that this event may be critical to the differentiation pathway. This suggests a role for 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS in the nucleus as a regulator of gene expression. Here it may also regulate the activity of NF{kappa}B and other factors with which it may be interacting.

Wu, Wenqing; Beilhartz, Greg; Roy, Yvette; Richard, Cynthia L.; Curtin, Maureen; Brown, Lauren; Cadieux, Danielle [Departments of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada)] [Departments of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada); Coppolino, Marc [Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada)] [Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada); Farach-Carson, Mary C. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)] [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Nemere, Ilka [Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Center for Integrated BioSystems, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 8700 (United States)] [Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Center for Integrated BioSystems, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 8700 (United States); Meckling, Kelly A., E-mail: kmecklin@uoguelph.ca [Departments of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada)

2010-04-15

185

ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA FALLON, NEVADA  

E-print Network

1 ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA FALLON, NEVADA REVIEW AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE EXPERT PANEL the state health department's investigation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases that had been of a hazardous chemical contaminant. However, the absence of cases of acute myeloid leukemia, the type

186

Obatoclax, Fludarabine, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

2013-09-27

187

Electron tomography of fiber cell cytoplasm and dense cores of multilamellar bodies from human age-related nuclear cataracts  

PubMed Central

Human nuclear cataract formation is a multi-factorial disease with contributions to light scattering from many cellular sources that change their scattering properties over decades. The aging process produces aggregation of cytoplasmic crystallin proteins, which alters the protein packing and texture of the cytoplasm. Previous studies of the cytoplasmic texture quantified increases in density fluctuations in protein packing and theoretically predicted the corresponding scattering. Multilamellar bodies (MLBs) are large particles with a core of crystallin cytoplasm that have been suggested to be major sources of scattering in human nuclei. The core has been shown to condense over time such that the refractive index increases compared to the adjacent aged and textured cytoplasm. Electron tomography is used here to visualize the 3D arrangement of protein aggregates in aged and cataractous lens nuclear cytoplasm compared to the dense protein packing in the cores of MLBs. Thin sections, 70 nm thick, were prepared from epoxy-embedded human transparent donor lenses and nuclear cataracts. Tilt series were collected on an FEI T20 transmission electron microscope (TEM) operated at 200 kV using 15 nm gold particles as fiducial markers. Images were aligned and corrected with FEI software and reconstructed with IMOD and other software packages to produce animated tilt series and stereo anaglyphs. The 3D views of protein density showed the relatively uniform packing of proteins in aged transparent lens nuclear cytoplasm and less dense packing of aged cataractous cytoplasm where many low-density regions can be appreciated in the absence of the TEM projection artifacts. In contrast the cores of the MLBs showed a dense packing of protein with minimal density fluctuations. These observations support the conclusion that, during the nuclear cataract formation, alterations in protein packing are extensive and can result in pronounced density fluctuations. Aging causes the MLB cores to become increasingly different in their protein packing from the adjacent cytoplasm. These results support the hypothesis that the MLBs increase their scattering with age and nuclear cataract formation. PMID:22728317

Costello, M. Joseph; Burette, Alain; Weber, Mariko; Metlapally, Sangeetha; Gilliland, Kurt O.; Fowler, W. Craig; Mohamed, Ashik; Johnsen, Sönke

2012-01-01

188

Electron tomography of fiber cell cytoplasm and dense cores of multilamellar bodies from human age-related nuclear cataracts.  

PubMed

Human nuclear cataract formation is a multi-factorial disease with contributions to light scattering from many cellular sources that change their scattering properties over decades. The aging process produces aggregation of cytoplasmic crystallin proteins, which alters the protein packing and texture of the cytoplasm. Previous studies of the cytoplasmic texture quantified increases in density fluctuations in protein packing and theoretically predicted the corresponding scattering. Multilamellar bodies (MLBs) are large particles with a core of crystallin cytoplasm that have been suggested to be major sources of scattering in human nuclei. The core has been shown to condense over time such that the refractive index increases compared to the adjacent aged and textured cytoplasm. Electron tomography is used here to visualize the 3D arrangement of protein aggregates in aged and cataractous lens nuclear cytoplasm compared to the dense protein packing in the cores of MLBs. Thin sections, 70 nm thick, were prepared from epoxy-embedded human transparent donor lenses and nuclear cataracts. Tilt series were collected on an FEI T20 transmission electron microscope (TEM) operated at 200 kV using 15 nm gold particles as fiducial markers. Images were aligned and corrected with FEI software and reconstructed with IMOD and other software packages to produce animated tilt series and stereo anaglyphs. The 3D views of protein density showed the relatively uniform packing of proteins in aged transparent lens nuclear cytoplasm and less dense packing of aged cataractous cytoplasm where many low-density regions can be appreciated in the absence of the TEM projection artifacts. In contrast the cores of the MLBs showed a dense packing of protein with minimal density fluctuations. These observations support the conclusion that, during the nuclear cataract formation, alterations in protein packing are extensive and can result in pronounced density fluctuations. Aging causes the MLB cores to become increasingly different in their protein packing from the adjacent cytoplasm. These results support the hypothesis that the MLBs increase their scattering with age and nuclear cataract formation. PMID:22728317

Costello, M Joseph; Burette, Alain; Weber, Mariko; Metlapally, Sangeetha; Gilliland, Kurt O; Fowler, W Craig; Mohamed, Ashik; Johnsen, Sönke

2012-08-01

189

[Classification of myeloid leukemias].  

PubMed

Myeloid leukemia in this series corresponds to the myeloid neoplasms of the 4th WHO classification of pathology and genetics of tumor of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissue. The myeloid neoplasms are composed of six categories, which are 1) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), a new category of 2) myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRA, PDGFRB or FGFR1, 3) myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/MPN, 4) MDS, 5) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and related precursor neoplasms, and 6) acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage. In MPNs without chronic myelogenous leukemia, the genetic marker of JAK2 V617F is added to the diagnostic criteria for polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis. MDS has the new subtype of refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia composed of refractory anemia, refractory neutropenia and refractory thrombocytopenia. AML with t(9; 11) (p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL, AML with t(6;9) (p23; q34); DEK-NUP214, AML with inv(3) (q21q26.2) or t(3; 3) (q21 ; q26.2); RPN1-EVI1 and AML (megakaryoblastic) with t(1; 22) (p13; q13); RBM15-MKL1 are added to the subtype of AML with recurrent genetic abnormalities, and AML with gene mutations of NPM1 and CEBPA are also added as provisional entities of it. The myeloid neoplasms of the 4th WHO classification are comprehensive and seem to be dynamic by incorporating the results of leukemia researches. PMID:19860179

Kuriyama, Kazutaka

2009-10-01

190

Heterochromatin Instability in Cancer: From the Barr Body to Satellites and the Nuclear Periphery  

PubMed Central

In recent years it has been recognized that the development of cancer involves a series of not only genetic but epigenetic changes across the genome. At the same time, connections between epigenetic regulation, chromatin packaging, and overall nuclear architecture are increasingly appreciated. The cell-type specific organization of heterochromatin, established upon cell differentiation, is responsible for maintaining much of the genome in a repressed state, within a highly compartmentalized nucleus. This review focuses on recent evidence that in cancer the normal packaging and higher organization of heterochromatin is often compromised. Gross changes in nuclear morphology have long been a criterion for pathologic diagnosis of many cancers, but the specific nuclear components impacted, the mechanisms involved, and the implications for cancer progression have barely begun to emerge. We discuss recent findings regarding distinct heterochromatin types, including the inactive X chromosome, constitutive heterochromatin of peri/centric satellites, and the peripheral heterochromatic compartment (PHC). A theme developed here is that the higher-order organization of satellites and the peripheral heterochromatic compartment may be tightly linked, and that compromise of this organization may promote broad epigenomic imbalance in cancer. Recent studies into the potential role(s) of the breast cancer tumor suppressor, BRCA1, in maintaining heterochromatin will be highlighted. Many questions remain about this new area of cancer epigenetics, which is likely more important in cancer development and progression than widely appreciated. We propose that broad, stochastic compromise in heterochromatin maintenance would create a diversity of expression profiles, and thus a rich opportunity for one or more cells to emerge with a selective growth advantage and potential for neoplasia. PMID:22722067

Carone, Dawn M.; Lawrence, Jeanne B.

2012-01-01

191

High-resolution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study of Chlamydia trachomatis: induction of ATPase activity in elementary bodies.  

PubMed Central

ATPase activity of elementary bodies (EBs) of Chlamydia trachomatis was investigated by using high-resolution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. ATPase activity was detected in EBs of C. trachomatis serovars A, B, and L2 after treatment with the reducing agents 2-mercaptoethanol and glutathione. ATPase activity was oligomycin sensitive and magnesium ion dependent. EBs heated at 60 degrees C for 10 min or pretreated with Triton X-100 before exposure to 2-mercaptoethanol did not exhibit ATPase activity. Monoclonal antibody to the major outer membrane protein abrogated ATPase activity of EBs, whereas monoclonal antibody to chlamydial lipopolysaccharide only marginally reduced the level of ATPase activity. These findings suggest that EBs possess intrinsic ATPase activity and that cysteine-rich outer membrane proteins of EBs are important in the regulation of ATPase activity. The major outer membrane protein may be the major route through which ATP accesses ATPase. Images PMID:2530175

Peeling, R W; Peeling, J; Brunham, R C

1989-01-01

192

Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2013-09-27

193

TCP1 complex proteins interact with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and can co-localize in oligonucleotide-induced nuclear bodies in mammalian cells  

PubMed Central

Phosphorothioate (PS) antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have been successfully developed as drugs to reduce the expression of disease-causing genes. PS-ASOs can be designed to induce degradation of complementary RNAs via the RNase H pathway and much is understood about that process. However, interactions of PS-ASOs with other cellular proteins are not well characterized. Here we report that in cells transfected with PS-ASOs, the chaperonin T-complex 1 (TCP1) proteins interact with PS-ASOs and enhance antisense activity. The TCP1-? subunit co-localizes with PS-ASOs in distinct nuclear structures, termed phosphorothioate bodies or PS-bodies. Upon Ras-related nuclear protein (RAN) depletion, cytoplasmic PS-body-like structures were observed and nuclear concentrations of PS-ASOs were reduced, suggesting that TCP1-? can interact with PS-ASOs in the cytoplasm and that the nuclear import of PS-ASOs is at least partially through the RAN-mediated pathway. Upon free uptake, PS-ASOs co-localize with TCP1 proteins in cytoplasmic foci related to endosomes/lysosomes. Together, our results indicate that the TCP1 complex binds oligonucleotides with TCP1-? subunit being a nuclear PS-body component and suggest that the TCP1 complex may facilitate PS-ASO uptake and/or release from the endocytosis pathway. PMID:24861627

Liang, Xue-hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Prakash, Thazha P.; Crooke, Stanley T.

2014-01-01

194

TCP1 complex proteins interact with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and can co-localize in oligonucleotide-induced nuclear bodies in mammalian cells.  

PubMed

Phosphorothioate (PS) antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have been successfully developed as drugs to reduce the expression of disease-causing genes. PS-ASOs can be designed to induce degradation of complementary RNAs via the RNase H pathway and much is understood about that process. However, interactions of PS-ASOs with other cellular proteins are not well characterized. Here we report that in cells transfected with PS-ASOs, the chaperonin T-complex 1 (TCP1) proteins interact with PS-ASOs and enhance antisense activity. The TCP1-? subunit co-localizes with PS-ASOs in distinct nuclear structures, termed phosphorothioate bodies or PS-bodies. Upon Ras-related nuclear protein (RAN) depletion, cytoplasmic PS-body-like structures were observed and nuclear concentrations of PS-ASOs were reduced, suggesting that TCP1-? can interact with PS-ASOs in the cytoplasm and that the nuclear import of PS-ASOs is at least partially through the RAN-mediated pathway. Upon free uptake, PS-ASOs co-localize with TCP1 proteins in cytoplasmic foci related to endosomes/lysosomes. Together, our results indicate that the TCP1 complex binds oligonucleotides with TCP1-? subunit being a nuclear PS-body component and suggest that the TCP1 complex may facilitate PS-ASO uptake and/or release from the endocytosis pathway. PMID:24861627

Liang, Xue-hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Prakash, Thazha P; Crooke, Stanley T

2014-07-01

195

Yields of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from seismic body and surface waves.  

PubMed

Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 U.S.S.R. underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (m(b)) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The most pronounced cluster consists of six explosions of yield near 500 kilotons. Several of these seem to be tests of warheads for major strategic systems that became operational in the late 1970s. The largest Soviet underground explosion is estimated to have a yield of 3500 +/- 600 kilotons, somewhat smaller than the yield of the largest U.S. underground test. A preliminary estimation of the significance of tectonic release is made by measuring the amplitude of Love waves. The bias in m(b) for Novaya Zemlya relative to the Nevada test site is about 0.35, nearly identical to that of the eastern Kazakhstan test site relative to Nevada. PMID:16593645

Sykes, L R; Wiggins, G C

1986-01-01

196

Yields of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from seismic body and surface waves  

PubMed Central

Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 U.S.S.R. underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (mb) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The most pronounced cluster consists of six explosions of yield near 500 kilotons. Several of these seem to be tests of warheads for major strategic systems that became operational in the late 1970s. The largest Soviet underground explosion is estimated to have a yield of 3500 ± 600 kilotons, somewhat smaller than the yield of the largest U.S. underground test. A preliminary estimation of the significance of tectonic release is made by measuring the amplitude of Love waves. The bias in mb for Novaya Zemlya relative to the Nevada test site is about 0.35, nearly identical to that of the eastern Kazakhstan test site relative to Nevada. PMID:16593645

Sykes, Lynn R.; Wiggins, Graham C.

1986-01-01

197

Yields of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from seismic body and surface waves  

SciTech Connect

Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 USSR underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (m/sub b/) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The most pronounced cluster consists of six explosions of yield near 500 kilotons. Several of these seem to be tests of warheads for major strategic systems that became operational in the late 1970s. The largest Soviet underground explosion is estimated to have a yield of 3500 +/- 600 kilotons, somewhat smaller than the yield of the largest US underground test. A preliminary estimation of the significance of tectonic release is made by measuring the amplitude of Love waves. The bias in m/sub b/ for Novaya Zemlya relative to the Nevada test site is about 0.35, nearly identical to that of the eastern Kazakhstan test site relative to Nevada.

Sykes, L.R.; Wiggins, G.C.

1986-01-01

198

Computational approaches to many-body dynamics of unstable nuclear systems  

E-print Network

The goal of this presentation is to highlight various computational techniques used to study dynamics of quantum many-body systems. We examine the projection and variable phase methods being applied to multi-channel problems of scattering and tunneling; here the virtual, energy-forbidden channels and their treatment are of particular importance. The direct time-dependent solutions using Trotter-Suzuki propagator expansion provide yet another approach to exploring the complex dynamics of unstable systems. While presenting computational tools, we briefly revisit the general theory of the quantum decay of unstable states. The list of questions here includes those of the internal dynamics in decaying systems, formation and evolution of the radiating state, and low-energy background that dominates at remote times. Mathematical formulations and numerical approaches to time-dependent problems are discussed using the quasi-stationary methods involving effective Non-Hermitian Hamiltonian formulation.

Alexander Volya

2014-12-19

199

Computational approaches to many-body dynamics of unstable nuclear systems  

E-print Network

The goal of this presentation is to highlight various computational techniques used to study dynamics of quantum many-body systems. We examine the projection and variable phase methods being applied to multi-channel problems of scattering and tunneling; here the virtual, energy-forbidden channels and their treatment are of particular importance. The direct time-dependent solutions using Trotter-Suzuki propagator expansion provide yet another approach to exploring the complex dynamics of unstable systems. While presenting computational tools, we briefly revisit the general theory of the quantum decay of unstable states. The list of questions here includes those of the internal dynamics in decaying systems, formation and evolution of the radiating state, and low-energy background that dominates at remote times. Mathematical formulations and numerical approaches to time-dependent problems are discussed using the quasi-stationary methods involving effective Non-Hermitian Hamiltonian formulation.

Volya, Alexander

2014-01-01

200

Modification of Sm small nuclear RNAs occurs in the nucleoplasmic Cajal body following import from the cytoplasm  

PubMed Central

Biogenesis of functional spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) includes the post-transcriptional covalent modification of numerous internal nucleotides. We have recently demonstrated that synthesis of 2?-O-methylated nucleotides and pseudouridines in the RNA polymerase II-synthesized Sm snRNAs is directed by sequence-specific guide RNAs. Here, we provide evidence supporting the notion that modification of Sm snRNAs occurs in nucleoplasmic Cajal bodies (CBs), where modification guide RNAs accumulate. We show that short fragments of Sm snRNAs are correctly and efficiently modified when targeted to CBs, but not when these same fragments are targeted to the nucleolus. We also demonstrate that internal modification of the U2 snRNA occurs exclusively after nuclear import of the newly assembled Sm snRNP from the cytoplasm. Finally, we show that p80 coilin, the CB marker protein, is not required for snRNA modification. In coilin knockout cells, Sm snRNAs and their modification guide RNAs colocalize in residual CBs, which do not stockpile fibrillarin and fail to recruit the U3 small nucleolar RNA. PMID:12682020

Jády, Beáta E.; Darzacq, Xavier; Tucker, Karen E.; Matera, A.Gregory; Bertrand, Edouard; Kiss, Tamás

2003-01-01

201

The Herpesvirus Associated Ubiquitin Specific Protease, USP7, Is a Negative Regulator of PML Proteins and PML Nuclear Bodies  

PubMed Central

The PML tumor suppressor is the founding component of the multiprotein nuclear structures known as PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), which control several cellular functions including apoptosis and antiviral effects. The ubiquitin specific protease USP7 (also called HAUSP) is known to associate with PML-NBs and to be a tight binding partner of two herpesvirus proteins that disrupt PML NBs. Here we investigated whether USP7 itself regulates PML-NBs. Silencing of USP7 was found to increase the number of PML-NBs, to increase the levels of PML protein and to inhibit PML polyubiquitylation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. This effect of USP7 was independent of p53 as PML loss was observed in p53-null cells. PML-NBs disruption was induced by USP7 overexpression independently of its catalytic activity and was induced by either of the protein interaction domains of USP7, each of which localized to PML-NBs. USP7 also disrupted NBs formed from some single PML isoforms, most notably isoforms I and IV. CK2? and RNF4, which are known regulators of PML, were dispensable for USP7-associated PML-NB disruption. The results are consistent with a novel model of PML regulation where a deubiquitylase disrupts PML-NBs through recruitment of another cellular protein(s) to PML NBs, independently of its catalytic activity. PMID:21305000

Sarkari, Feroz; Wang, Xueqi; Nguyen, Tin; Frappier, Lori

2011-01-01

202

Leukemia diagnostics with ow G. Ciuperca1  

E-print Network

Leukemia diagnostics with ow cytometry G. Ciuperca1 , M. Mafouz1 , C. Dumontet2 , V. Louvet1 , A'exposé Hematopoiesis and leukemias Flow cytometry Leukemias classication and Medical diagnosis Mathematical Models for diagnosis and classication of acute myeloid leukemia #12;Leukemia diagnostics with ow cytometry G. Ciuperca

Louvet, Violaine

203

Relativistic and Field Theoretic Effects in the Nuclear Many-Body Problem.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field theoretic effects of a nucleon of an oxygen -17 have been studied. A computational scheme involving sigma and omega mesons has been set up. It employs the Furry picture of quantum field theory along with an introduction of vector and scalar Woods-Saxon potentials. Use of an adiabatic switching on an interaction leads to an energy shift in form of a symmetric Gell-Mann and Low formula which contains the S matrix. The S matrix allows an expansion in terms of Feynman diagrams which in turn enables us to write a perturbative series analogous to that in many-body perturbation theory. Retardation effects and the first-order energy correction E_{1} of two valence states, 1d_{5/2} and 2s_{1/2}, have been calculated from the diagrams. The self-energy of the 1s _{1/2} state is investigated along with the use of a renormalization technique. The retardation effects are small in the order of 10 kev while the self-energy and E_{1} corrections are big in the order of 700 and 10 Mev respectively.

Poorakkiat, Chaisingh

204

Relativistic and field theoretic effects in the nuclear many-body problem  

SciTech Connect

Field theoretic effects of a nucleon of an oxygen-17 have been studied. A computational scheme involving {sigma} and {omega} mesons has been set up. It employs the Furry picture of quantum field theory along with an introduction of vector and scalar Woods-Saxon potentials. Use of an adiabatic switching on an interaction leads to an energy shift in form of a symmetric Gell-Mann and Low formula which contains the S matrix. The S matrix allows an expansion in terms of Feynman diagrams which in turn enables us to write a perturbative series analogous to that in many-body perturbation theory. Retardation effects and the first-order energy correction E{sub 1} of two valence states, 1d{sub 5/2} and 2s{sub 1/2}, have been calculated from the diagrams. The self-energy of the 1s{sub 1/2} state is investigated along with the use of a renormalization technique. The retardation along with the use of a renormalization technique. The retardation effects are small in the order of 10 kev while the self-energy and E{sub 1} corrections are big in the order of 700 and 10 Mev respectively.

PooRakkiat, C.

1989-01-01

205

Predictions of Leukemia Risks to Astronauts from Solar Particle Events  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Leukemias consisting of acute and chronic myeloid leukemia and acute lymphatic lymphomas represent the earliest cancers that appear after radiation exposure, have a high lethality fraction, and make up a significant fraction of the overall fatal cancer risk from radiation for adults. Several considerations impact the recommendation of a preferred model for the estimation of leukemia risks from solar particle events (SPE's): The BEIR VII report recommends several changes to the method of calculation of leukemia risk compared to the methods recommended by the NCRP Report No. 132 including the preference of a mixture model with additive and multiplicative components in BEIR VII compared to the additive transfer model recommended by NCRP Report No. 132. Proton fluences and doses vary considerably across marrow regions because of the characteristic spectra of primary solar protons making the use of an average dose suspect. Previous estimates of bone marrow doses from SPE's have used an average body-shielding distribution for marrow based on the computerized anatomical man model (CAM). We have developed an 82-point body-shielding distribution that faithfully reproduces the mean and variance of SPE doses in the active marrow regions (head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and thighs) allowing for more accurate estimation of linear- and quadratic-dose components of the marrow response. SPE's have differential dose-rates and a pseudo-quadratic dose response term is possible in the peak-flux period of an event. Also, the mechanistic basis for leukemia risk continues to improve allowing for improved strategies in choosing dose-rate modulation factors and radiation quality descriptors. We make comparisons of the various choices of the components in leukemia risk estimates in formulating our preferred model. A major finding is that leukemia could be the dominant risk to astronauts for a major solar particle event.

Cucinotta, F. A.; Atwell, W.; Kim, M. Y.; George, K. A.; Ponomarev, A.; Nikjoo, H.; Wilson, J. W.

2006-01-01

206

Role of integrin alpha4 in drug resistance of leukemia.  

PubMed

Chemotherapeutic drug resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a significant problem, resulting in poor responsiveness to first-line treatment or relapse after transient remission. Classical anti-leukemic drugs are non-specific cell cycle poisons; some more modern drugs target oncogenic pathways in leukemia cells, although in ALL these do not play a very significant role. By contrast, the molecular interactions between microenvironment and leukemia cells are often neglected in the design of novel therapies against drug resistant leukemia. It was shown however, that chemotherapy resistance is promoted in part through cell-cell contact of leukemia cells with bone marrow (BM) stromal cells, also called cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Incomplete response to chemotherapy results in persistence of resistant clones with or without detectable minimal residual disease (MRD). Approaches for how to address CAM-DR and MRD remain elusive. Specifically, studies using anti-functional antibodies and genetic models have identified integrin alpha4 as a critical molecule regulating BM homing and active retention of normal and leukemic cells. Pre-clinical evidence has been provided that interference with alpha4-mediated adhesion of ALL cells can sensitize them to chemotherapy and thus facilitate eradication of ALL cells in an MRD setting. To this end, Andreeff and colleagues recently provided evidence of stroma-induced and alpha4-mediated nuclear factor-?B signaling in leukemia cells, disruption of which depletes leukemia cells of strong survival signals. We here review the available evidence supporting the targeting of alpha4 as a novel strategy for treatment of drug resistant leukemia. PMID:24904821

Shishido, Stephanie; Bönig, Halvard; Kim, Yong-Mi

2014-01-01

207

Role of Integrin Alpha4 in Drug Resistance of Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Chemotherapeutic drug resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a significant problem, resulting in poor responsiveness to first-line treatment or relapse after transient remission. Classical anti-leukemic drugs are non-specific cell cycle poisons; some more modern drugs target oncogenic pathways in leukemia cells, although in ALL these do not play a very significant role. By contrast, the molecular interactions between microenvironment and leukemia cells are often neglected in the design of novel therapies against drug resistant leukemia. It was shown however, that chemotherapy resistance is promoted in part through cell–cell contact of leukemia cells with bone marrow (BM) stromal cells, also called cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Incomplete response to chemotherapy results in persistence of resistant clones with or without detectable minimal residual disease (MRD). Approaches for how to address CAM-DR and MRD remain elusive. Specifically, studies using anti-functional antibodies and genetic models have identified integrin alpha4 as a critical molecule regulating BM homing and active retention of normal and leukemic cells. Pre-clinical evidence has been provided that interference with alpha4-mediated adhesion of ALL cells can sensitize them to chemotherapy and thus facilitate eradication of ALL cells in an MRD setting. To this end, Andreeff and colleagues recently provided evidence of stroma-induced and alpha4-mediated nuclear factor-?B signaling in leukemia cells, disruption of which depletes leukemia cells of strong survival signals. We here review the available evidence supporting the targeting of alpha4 as a novel strategy for treatment of drug resistant leukemia. PMID:24904821

Shishido, Stephanie; Bönig, Halvard; Kim, Yong-Mi

2014-01-01

208

Notch Signaling in Leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent discoveries indicate that gain-of-function mutations in the Notch1 receptor are very common in human T cell acute lym- phoblastic leukemia\\/lymphoma. This review discusses what these mutations have taught us about normal and pathophysiologic Notch1 signaling, and how these insights may lead to new targeted therapies for patients with this aggressive form of cancer.

Jon C. Aster; Warren S. Pear; Stephen C. Blacklow

2008-01-01

209

Leukemia Steering Committee  

Cancer.gov

The LKSC follows an efficient, cost-effective, science-driven, and transparent process to identify and promote the "Best Science" in clinical research on leukemia and related diseases by addressing the design and prioritization of phase III trials and large phase II studies.

210

Myelodysplasia nd the leukemias  

Microsoft Academic Search

The armistice after World War II marked the beginning of an era that was to last to the end of the present century. It was an era in which many changes in medicine and nursing combined to alter the entire philosophy of managing malignant disease. More specifically, the fluid-phase tumors, which comprise myelodysplasia and the leukemias, were singled out for

Peter Jacobs

1997-01-01

211

Leukemia and Benzene  

PubMed Central

Excessive exposure to benzene has been known for more than a century to damage the bone marrow resulting in decreases in the numbers of circulating blood cells, and ultimately, aplastic anemia. Of more recent vintage has been the appreciation that an alternative outcome of benzene exposure has been the development of one or more types of leukemia. While many investigators agree that the array of toxic metabolites, generated in the liver or in the bone marrow, can lead to traumatic bone marrow injury, the more subtle mechanisms leading to leukemia have yet to be critically dissected. This problem appears to have more general interest because of the recognition that so-called “second cancer” that results from prior treatment with alkylating agents to yield tumor remissions, often results in a type of leukemia reminiscent of benzene-induced leukemia. Furthermore, there is a growing literature attempting to characterize the fine structure of the marrow and the identification of so called “niches” that house a variety of stem cells and other types of cells. Some of these “niches” may harbor cells capable of initiating leukemias. The control of stem cell differentiation and proliferation via both inter- and intra-cellular signaling will ultimately determine the fate of these transformed stem cells. The ability of these cells to avoid checkpoints that would prevent them from contributing to the leukemogenic response is an additional area for study. Much of the study of benzene-induced bone marrow damage has concentrated on determining which of the benzene metabolites lead to leukemogenesis. The emphasis now should be directed to understanding how benzene metabolites alter bone marrow cell biology. PMID:23066403

Snyder, Robert

2012-01-01

212

Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-08-18

213

How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified?  

MedlinePLUS

... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia treated? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? Most types of cancer are assigned a ... other organs. The outlook for the person with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) depends on other information, such as the ...

214

Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... to Expect Ebola: What to Know Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Juvenile ... Causes Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

215

Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

2010-09-21

216

MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-02-09

217

Human autoantibody to a novel protein of the nuclear coiled body: immunological characterization and cDNA cloning of p80-coilin  

PubMed Central

Antibodies producing an unusual immunofluorescent pattern were identified in the sera of patients with diverse autoimmune features. This pattern was characterized by the presence of up to six round discrete nuclear bodies in interphase cell nuclei. Immunoblotting analysis showed that these sera recognized an 80-kD nuclear protein, and affinity-purified anti-p80 antibody from the protein band reproduced the fluorescent staining of nuclear bodies. Colloidal gold immunoelectron microscopy showed that the affinity-purified anti-p80 antibody recognized the coiled body, an ultramicroscopic nuclear structure probably first described by the Spanish cytologist Ramon y Cajal. Five cDNA clones were isolated from a MOLT-4 cell lambda gt-11 expression library using human antibody and oligonucleotide probes. The longest cDNA insert was 2.1 kb and had an open reading frame of 405 amino acids. A clone encoding a 14-kD COOH-terminal region of the protein was used for expression of a beta-galactosidase fusion protein. An epitope was present in this COOH-terminal 14-kD region, which was recognized by 18 of 20 sera with anti-p80 reactivity, and affinity- purified antibody from the recombinant protein also reacted in immunofluorescence to show specific staining of the coiled body. This is the first demonstration and molecular cloning of a protein that appears to have particular identification with the coiled body, and it was designated p80-coilin. Autoantibody to p80-coilin may be useful for the elucidation of the structure and function of the coiled body, and the availability of a cDNA sequence could be helpful in further studies to clarify the clinical significance of this autoantibody response. PMID:2033369

1991-01-01

218

Imatinib Mesylate and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2013-01-22

219

Temsirolimus and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2013-01-11

220

Resveratrol blocks interleukin-1-induced activation of the nuclear transcription factor NF-B, inhibits proliferation, causes S-phase arrest, and induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resveratrol, an edible polyphenolic stil- bene, has been reported to possess sub- stantial antileukemic activities in differ- ent leukemia cell lines. We investigated whether resveratrol is active against fresh acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and itsmechanismofaction.Becauseinterleu- kin 1 (IL-1) plays a key role in prolifera- tion ofAML cells, we first tested the effect of resveratrol on theAMLcell lines OCIM2 and

Zeev Estrov; Shishir Shishodia; Stefan Faderl; David Harris; Quin Van; Hagop M. Kantarjian; Moshe Talpaz; Bharat B. Aggarwal

2003-01-01

221

Triangle Diagram with Off-Shell Coulomb T-Matrix for (In-)Elastic Atomic and Nuclear Three-Body Processes  

E-print Network

The driving terms in three-body theories of elastic and inelastic scattering of a charged particle off a bound state of two other charged particles contain the fully off-shell two-body Coulomb T-matrix describing the intermediate-state Coulomb scattering of the projectile with each of the charged target particles. Up to now the latter is usually replaced by the Coulomb potential, either when using the multiple-scattering approach or when solving three-body integral equations. General properties of the exact and the approximate on-shell driving terms are discussed, and the accuracy of this approximation is investigated numerically, both for atomic and nuclear processes including bound-state excitation, for energies below and above the corresponding three-body dissociation threshold, over the whole range of scattering angles.

E. O. Alt; A. S. Kadyrov; A. M. Mukhamedzhanov; M. Rauh

1995-03-16

222

Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-01-09

223

Body-wave magnitudes of underground nuclear explosions at major test sites derived by the maximum-likelihood method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Body-wave magnitudes (mb) of ~600 underground nuclear tests have been derived from station amplitudes collected by the International Seismological Centre (ISC), by a joint inversion for mb and station-specific magnitude corrections (Lilwall 1986). The maximum-likelihood method was used, to reduce the upward bias of network mean magnitudes caused by data censoring for low-magnitude disturbances where stations do not report arrivals that are hidden by the ambient noise at the time. Threshold noise levels at each station were derived from the ISC amplitudes using the method of Kelly and Lacoss (1969). The joint inversion is valid only for sites where enough explosions occurred, and stations with enough arrivals (a minimum of three for both), for a statistical treatment to be valid. It is used on the sites: Kazakhstan and Novaya Zemlya, former Soviet Union; Singer, China; Mururoa and Fangataufa, French Polynesia; and Nevada, USA. At sites where four or more arrivals could be used to derive magnitudes and station terms for twenty-five or more explosions (Nevada, Kazakhstan and Mururoa), the resulting magnitudes and station terms were fixed and a second inversion carried out to derive magnitudes for additional explosions with as few as three arrivals. A further ~90 magnitudes were derived thus, mostly of Nevada explosions.

Peacock, Sheila; Douglas, Alan; Bowers, David; Selby, Neil

2013-04-01

224

Phase 1 Study of Terameprocol (EM-1421) in Patients With Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Leukemias; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL); Adult T Cell Leukemia (ATL); Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML-BP); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

2009-01-29

225

Down syndrome preleukemia and leukemia.  

PubMed

Children with Down syndrome (DS) and acute leukemias acute have unique biological, cytogenetic, and intrinsic factors that affect their treatment and outcome. Myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome (ML-DS) is associated with high event-free survival (EFS) rates and frequently preceded by a preleukemia condition, the transient abnormal hematopoiesis (TAM) present at birth. For acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), their EFS and overall survival are poorer than non-DS ALL, it is important to enroll them on therapeutic trials, including relapse trials; investigate new agents that could potentially improve their leukemia-free survival; and strive to maximize the supportive care these patients need. PMID:25435116

Maloney, Kelly W; Taub, Jeffrey W; Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi; Roberts, Irene; Vyas, Paresh

2015-02-01

226

White cell fragmentation after therapeutic leukapheresis for acute leukemia.  

PubMed

A 70-year-old woman with newly diagnosed acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (FAB M5) underwent therapeutic leukapheresis because of a white cell count (WBC) of 144 X 10(9) per I and clinical evidence of leukostasis. A peripheral blood film taken immediately after leukapheresis showed numerous cytoplasmic and nuclear fragments. The patient's clinical course thereafter was significantly compromised by disseminated intravascular coagulation with a severe bleeding diathesis, renal failure, and respiratory failure that led to her death. This case illustrates that therapeutic leukapheresis for elevated WBC in patients with acute leukemia may result in leukocyte fragmentation and possible intravascular coagulation. PMID:3603666

Van Rybroek, J J; Olson, J D; Burns, C P

1987-01-01

227

SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-01-10

228

Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia  

PubMed Central

In three patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia who were heterozygous at the X-linked glucose-6-phospháte dehydrogenase locus, lymphocytes were studied to determine if they had the same stem cell origin as the leukemic myeloid cells. Normal tissues such as skin had both B and A glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzymes, but the leukemic myelogenous cells displayed only one isoenzyme type, consistent with their clonal origin. A population of cells with undoubted thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte characteristics had both isoenzymes. Presumably, then, these T cells did not arise from the leukemic stem cell, either because they antedated the development of leukemia in that stem cell or, more likely, because they arose from progenitors not involved by the disease. In contrast, another population of lymphocytes showed only one isoenzyme type, suggesting that it arose from the chronic myelocytic leukemia stem cell. However, although this population contained many cells with the characteristics of bone marrow-derived (B) lymphocytes, it is not certain that the single enzyme produced by the cells over all can be attributed to B lymphocytes rather than to contaminating non-B-lymphoid cells. PMID:308953

Fialkow, Philip J.; Denman, A. Michael; Jacobson, Robert J.; Lowenthal, Mark N.

1978-01-01

229

Leukemia incidence in the Russian cohort of Chernobyl emergency workers.  

PubMed

Of all potentially radiogenic cancers, leukemia, a type of cancer of the blood, has the highest risk attributable to ionizing radiation. Despite this, the quantitative estimation of radiation risk of a leukemia demands studying very large exposed cohorts, because of the very low level of this disease in unexposed populations and because of the tendency for its radiation risk to decrease with time. At present, the Japanese cohort of atomic bomb survivors is still the primary source of data that allows analysis of radiation-induced leukemia and the underlying dose-response relationship. The second large cohort that would allow to study radiation-induced leukemia is comprised of individuals who were exposed due to the accident of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986. The objective of the present study was to estimate radiation risks of leukemia incidence among the Russian cohort of Chernobyl emergency workers, for different time periods after the accident. Twenty-five years after the Chernobyl accident and based on the results of the present study, one can conclude that the radiation risk of leukemia incidence derived from the Russian cohort of Chernobyl emergency workers is similar to that derived from the cohort of atomic bomb survivors: The time-averaged excess relative risk per Gray (ERR Gy(-1)) equals 4.98 for the Russian cohort and 3.9 for the life span study (LSS) cohort; excess absolute risk decreases with time after exposure at an annual rate of 9% for the Russian cohort, and of 6.5% for the LSS cohort. Thus, the excess in risk of leukemia incidence in a population due to a single exposure is restricted in time after exposure by the period of about 15 years. PMID:22246583

Ivanov, V K; Tsyb, A F; Khait, S E; Kashcheev, V V; Chekin, S Yu; Maksioutov, M A; Tumanov, K A

2012-05-01

230

Risk of leukemia in Seascale from radiation exposure  

SciTech Connect

An excess of leukemias in children has been observed between 1950 and 1980 in the village of Seascale (population about 3,000) which is situated approximately 3 km to the south of Sellafield nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in West Cumbria, England. Radiation doses from all the main sources of radiation exposure of the population and risks of radiation-induced leukemia have been calculated for children born and living in Seascale during the period of operation of the plant. For the Seascale study population of 1225 children and young persons, followed to age 20 y, or followed until 1980 for those born after 1960, 0.016 radiation-induced leukemias are predicted from the Sellafield discharges. This corresponds to an average risk to children in the population of about one in 75,000. For the four fatal leukemias observed in the study population (0.5 expected from United Kingdom statistics) to be attributed to the operations at Sellafield, the average risk would have to be increased by a factor of about 250, to one in 300. Although there is some uncertainty about the releases from the plant and concentrations of radionuclides in environmental materials in the Sellafield area, particularly for the early years of its operation, the possibility that the doses calculated and the risk coefficients used for radiation-induced leukemia could be so substantially wrong is very unlikely. The number of radiation-induced leukemias from all radiation sources is calculated to be 0.1, which corresponds to a risk of about one in 12,250 for the average child in the study population. About two-thirds of the risk is from natural radiation, 16% from the Sellafield discharges, and nuclear weapons fallout and medical exposure each contribute about 9%.

Stather, J.W.; Dionian, J.; Brown, J.; Fell, T.P.; Muirhead, C.R.

1988-08-01

231

Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for…

Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A.

1995-01-01

232

Multicomponent analysis of radiolytic products in human body fluids using high field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High field proton Hahn spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate radiolytic damage to biomolecules present in intact human body fluids. ?-Radiolysis of healthy or rheumatoid human serum (5.00 kGy) in the presence of atmospheric O 2 gave rise to reproducible elevations in the concentration of NMR-detectable acetate which are predominantly ascribable to the prior oxidation of lactate to pyruvate by hydroxyl radical (·OH) followed by oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate by radiolytically-generated hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) and/or further ·OH radical. Increases in the serum levels of non-protein-bound, low-molecular-mass components such as citrate and glutamine were also observed subsequent to ?-radiolysis, an observation which may reflect their mobilisation from protein binding-sites by ·OH radical, superoxide anion and/or H 2O 2. Moreover, substantial radiolytically-mediated elevations in the concentration of serum formate were also detectable. In addition to the above modifications, ?-radiolysis of inflammatory knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) generated a low-molecular-mass oligosaccharide species derived from the radiolytic fragmentation of hyaluronate. The radiolytically-mediated production of acetate in SF samples was markedly greater than that observed in serum samples, a consequence of the much higher levels of ·OH radical-scavenging lactate present. Indeed, increases in SF acetate concentration were detectable at doses as low as 48 Gy. We conclude that high field proton NMR analysis provides much useful information regarding the relative radioprotectant abilities of endogenous components and the nature, status and levels of radiolytic products generated in intact biofluids. We also suggest that NMR-detectable radiolytic products with associated toxicological properties (e.g. formate) may play a role in contributing to the deleterious effects observed following exposure of living organisms to sources of ionising radiation.

Grootveld, Martin C.; Herz, Herman; Haywood, Rachel; Hawkes, Geoffrey E.; Naughton, Declan; Perera, Anusha; Knappitt, Jacky; Blake, David R.; Claxson, Andrew W. D.

1994-05-01

233

Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2013-01-22

234

SJG-136 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2013-09-27

235

ZNF198, a zinc finger protein rearranged in myeloproliferative disease, localizes to the PML nuclear bodies and interacts with SUMO-1 and PML  

SciTech Connect

The ZNF198/FGFR1 fusion gene in atypical myeloproliferative disease produces a constitutively active cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase, unlike ZNF198 which is normally a nuclear protein. We have now shown that the ZNF198/FGFR1 fusion kinase interacts with the endogenous ZNF198 protein suggesting that the function of ZNF198 may be compromised in cells expressing it. Little is currently known about the endogenous function of ZNF198 and to investigate this further we performed a yeast two-hybrid analysis and identified SUMO-1 as a binding partner of ZNF198. These observations were confirmed using co-immunoprecipitation which demonstrated that ZNF198 is covalently modified by SUMO-1. Since many of the SUMO-1-modified proteins are targeted to the PML nuclear bodies we used confocal microscopy to show that SUMO-1, PML and ZNF198 colocalize to punctate structures, shown by immunocytochemistry to be PML bodies. Using co-immunoprecipitation we now show that PML and sumoylated ZNF198 can be found in a protein complex in the cell. Mutation of the SUMO-1 binding site in wild-type ZNF198 resulted in loss of distinct PML bodies, reduced PML levels and a more dispersed nuclear localization of the PML protein. In cells expressing ZNF198/FGFR1, which also lack the SUMO-1 binding site, SUMO-1 is preferentially localized in the cytoplasm, which is associated with loss of distinct PML bodies. Recently, arsenic trioxide (ATO) was proposed as an alternative therapy for APL that was resistant to traditional therapy. Treatment of cells expressing ZNF198/FGFR1 with ATO demonstrated reduced autophosphorylation of the ZNF198/FGFR1 protein and induced apoptosis, which is not seen in cells expressing wild-type ZNF198. Overall our results suggest that the sumoylation of ZNF198 is important for PML body formation and that the abrogation of sumoylation of ZNF198 in ZNF198/FGFR1 expressing cells may be an important mechanism in cellular transformation.

Kunapuli, Padmaja [Department of Cancer Genetics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States); Kasyapa, Chitta S. [Department of Cancer Genetics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States); Chin, Suet-Feung [Cancer Genomics Program, Hutchison/MRC Research Centre, Cambridge CB2 2XZ (United Kingdom); Caldas, Carlos [Cancer Genomics Program, Hutchison/MRC Research Centre, Cambridge CB2 2XZ (United Kingdom); Cowell, John K. [Department of Cancer Genetics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States)]. E-mail: John.Cowell@RoswellPark.org

2006-11-15

236

Serum-dependent expression of promyelocytic leukemia protein suppresses propagation of influenza virus  

SciTech Connect

The rate of propagation of influenza virus in human adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells was found to negatively correlate with the concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS) in the culture medium. Virus replicated more rapidly at lower FBS concentrations (0 or 2%) than at higher concentrations (10 or 20%) during an early stage of infection. Basal and interferon (IFN)-induced levels of typical IFN-inducible anti-viral proteins, such as 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, dsRNA-activated protein kinase and MxA, were unaffected by variation in FBS concentrations. But promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) was expressed in a serum-dependent manner. In particular, the 65 to 70 kDa isoform of PML was markedly upregulated following the addition of serum. In contrast, other isoforms were induced by IFN treatment, and weakly induced by FBS concentrations. Immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that PML was mainly formed nuclear bodies in Caco-2 cells at various FBS concentrations, and the levels of the PML-nuclear bodies were upregulated by FBS. Overexpression of PML isoform consisting of 560 or 633 amino acid residues by transfection of expression plasmid results in significantly delayed viral replication rate in Caco-2 cells. On the other hand, downregulation of PML expression by RNAi enhanced viral replication. These results indicate that PML isoforms which are expressed in a serum-dependent manner suppress the propagation of influenza virus at an early stage of infection.

Iki, Shigeo [Department of Microbiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Hokkaido Institute of Public Health, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Yokota, Shin-ichi [Department of Microbiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Okabayashi, Tamaki [Department of Microbiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Yokosawa, Noriko [Department of Microbiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Nagata, Kyosuke [Department of Infection Biology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences and Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Fujii, Nobuhiro [Department of Microbiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan)]. E-mail: fujii@sapmed.ac.jp

2005-12-05

237

Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-04-30

238

Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

2015-02-03

239

Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

2014-11-21

240

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), a rare myeloid malignancy that occurs in young children, is considered a clonal disease originating in pluripotent stem cells of the hematopoietic system. The pathogenesis of JMML involves disruption of signal transduction through the RAS pathway, with resultant selective hypersensitivity of JMML cells to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Progress has been made in understanding aspects of the molecular basis of JMML. How these molecular mechanisms may lead to targeted therapeutics and improved outcomes remains to be elucidated. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant is the only curative option for children with JMML, and it is fraught with frequent relapse and significant toxicity. PMID:25435114

Satwani, Prakash; Kahn, Justine; Dvorak, Christopher C

2015-02-01

241

Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-07-16

242

Marrow transplantation for leukemia  

SciTech Connect

Marrow transplantation for selected patients with leukemia, as for patients with severe combined immunologic deficiency or severe aplastic anemia, has now become an accepted clinical procedure. For patients with acute leukemia who have relapsed after achieving a remission of chemotherapy, marrow grafting from an identical twin or an HLA-identical sibling has now been demonstrated to produce median remissions as long as or longer than any reported for combination chemotherapy. In contrast to chemotherapy, marrow transplantation offers the possibility of cure for a small but significant fraction of these patients. Marrow transplantation for patients with ANL in first remission has now resulted in median survivals much longer than any reported with chemotherapy. Although it now appears that more than 50% of these patients can be cured with marrow transplantation, a much longer follow-up is indicated since some patients who achieve a complete remission with combination chemotherapy are now living for a long time, and some of these patients (less than 20%) may also be cured. Current intensive research with new modalities such as interferon, Acyclovir, Cyclosporin A, and monoclonal antibodies can reasonably be expected to improve the overall results of marrow transplantation.

Thomas, E.D.

1981-07-01

243

Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-07-25

244

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) in Adults (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... genetics of chronic myeloid leukemia Overview of the myeloproliferative neoplasms Overview of the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia ... genetics of chronic myeloid leukemia Overview of the myeloproliferative neoplasms Overview of the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia ...

245

CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2013-01-22

246

Cilengitide in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b)

2013-01-23

247

Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-09-23

248

PXD101 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-08

249

Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-02-25

250

Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-09-09

251

Management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia  

PubMed Central

In the last decade, the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has undergone profound changes that have been driven by an improved understanding of the biology of the disease and the approval of several new drugs. Moreover, many novel drugs are currently under evaluation for rapid approval or have been approved by regulatory agencies, further broadening the available therapeutic armamentarium for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The use of novel biological and genetic parameters combined with a careful clinical evaluation allows us to dissect some of the heterogeneity of the disease and to distinguish patients with a very mild onset and course, who often will not need any treatment, from those with an intermediate prognosis and a third group with a very aggressive course (high-risk leukemia). On this background, it becomes increasingly challenging to select the right treatment strategy. In this paper, we describe our own approach to the management of different patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:24881042

Ghia, Paolo; Hallek, Michael

2014-01-01

252

What Is Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... In this way CMML is more like a myeloproliferative disease ( myelo -- bone marrow, proliferative -- excessive growth). Chronic myeloid leukemia is an example of a myeloproliferative disease where there is an overproduction of white ...

253

Genetic predispositions to childhood leukemia  

PubMed Central

While the majority of leukemia cases occur in the absence of any known predisposing factor, there are germline mutations that significantly increase the risk of developing hematopoietic malignancies in childhood. In this review article, we describe a number of these mutations and their clinical features. These predispositions can be broadly classified as those leading to bone marrow failure, those involving tumor suppressor genes, DNA repair defects, immunodeficiencies or other congenital syndromes associated with transient myeloid disorders. While leukemia can develop as a secondary event in the aforementioned syndromes, there are also several syndromes that specifically lead to the development of leukemia as their primary phenotype. Many of the genes discussed in this review can also be somatically mutated in other cancers, highlighting the importance of understanding shared alterations and mechanisms underpinning syndromic and sporadic leukemia. PMID:23926459

Stieglitz, Elliot

2013-01-01

254

Spliceosome mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia  

PubMed Central

The recently discovered spliceosome mutations represent a group of acquired genetic alterations that affect both myeloid and lymphoid malignancies. A substantial proportion of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytoic leukemia (CMML) or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) harbor such mutations, which are often missense in type. Genotype-phenotype correlations have been observed, including the clustering of ring sideroblasts with SF3B1 mutations in MDS. Spliceosome mutations might result in defective small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes assembly on the pre-mRNA, deregulated global and alternative mRNA splicing, nuclear-cytoplasm export, and unpliced mRNA degradation, and thus may alter the expression of multiple genes. In the current review, we discuss the potential role of these mutations in cell transformation and how they could impact the therapeutic approaches. PMID:23327988

Chesnais, Virginie; Kosmider, Olivier; Damm, Frederik; Itzykson, Raphael; Bernard, Olivier A.; Solary, Eric; Fontenay, Michaela

2012-01-01

255

Nuclear  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What part does nuclear energy play in satisfying energy demands? This informational piece, part of a series about the future of energy, introduces students to the uranium atom as an energy source. Here students read about the history of nuclear energy, how energy is derived from uranium, and benefits of nuclear energy. Information is also provided about limitations, particularly disposal problems and radioactivity, and geographical considerations of nuclear power in the United States. Thought-provoking questions afford students chances to reflect on what they've read about the uses of nuclear power. Articles and information on new nuclear plant design and nuclear accidents are available from a sidebar. Five energy-related PBS NewsHour links are provided. A web link to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is included. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

Iowa Public Television. Explore More Project

2004-01-01

256

Chromatin redistribution of the DEK oncoprotein represses hTERT transcription in leukemias.  

PubMed

Although numerous factors have been found to modulate hTERT transcription, the mechanism of its repression in certain leukemias remains unknown. We show here that DEK represses hTERT transcription through its enrichment on the hTERT promoter in cells from chronic and acute myeloid leukemias, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but not acute lymphocytic leukemias where hTERT is overexpressed. We isolated DEK from the hTERT promoter incubated with nuclear extracts derived from fresh acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells and from cells expressing Tax, an hTERT repressor encoded by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1. In addition to the recruitment of DEK, the displacement of two potent known hTERT transactivators from the hTERT promoter characterized both AML cells and Tax-expressing cells. Reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays permitted to map the region that supports the repressive effect of DEK on hTERT transcription, which was proportionate to the level of DEK-promoter association but not with the level of DEK expression. Besides hTERT repression, this context of chromatin redistribution of DEK was found to govern about 40% of overall transcriptional modifications, including those of cancer-prone genes. In conclusion, DEK emerges as an hTERT repressor shared by various leukemia subtypes and seems involved in the deregulation of numerous genes associated with leukemogenesis. PMID:24563617

Karam, Maroun; Thenoz, Morgan; Capraro, Valérie; Robin, Jean-Philippe; Pinatel, Christiane; Lancon, Agnčs; Galia, Perrine; Sibon, David; Thomas, Xavier; Ducastelle-Lepretre, Sophie; Nicolini, Franck; El-Hamri, Mohamed; Chelghoun, Youcef; Wattel, Eric; Mortreux, Franck

2014-01-01

257

Chromatin Redistribution of the DEK Oncoprotein Represses hTERT Transcription in Leukemias12  

PubMed Central

Although numerous factors have been found to modulate hTERT transcription, the mechanism of its repression in certain leukemias remains unknown. We show here that DEK represses hTERT transcription through its enrichment on the hTERT promoter in cells from chronic and acute myeloid leukemias, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but not acute lymphocytic leukemias where hTERT is overexpressed. We isolated DEK from the hTERT promoter incubated with nuclear extracts derived from fresh acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells and from cells expressing Tax, an hTERT repressor encoded by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1. In addition to the recruitment of DEK, the displacement of two potent known hTERT transactivators from the hTERT promoter characterized both AML cells and Tax-expressing cells. Reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays permitted to map the region that supports the repressive effect of DEK on hTERT transcription, which was proportionate to the level of DEK-promoter association but not with the level of DEK expression. Besides hTERT repression, this context of chromatin redistribution of DEK was found to govern about 40% of overall transcriptional modifications, including those of cancer-prone genes. In conclusion, DEK emerges as an hTERT repressor shared by various leukemia subtypes and seems involved in the deregulation of numerous genes associated with leukemogenesis. PMID:24563617

Karam, Maroun; Thenoz, Morgan; Capraro, Valérie; Robin, Jean-Philippe; Pinatel, Christiane; Lancon, Agnčs; Galia, Perrine; Sibon, David; Thomas, Xavier; Ducastelle-Lepretre, Sophie; Nicolini, Franck; El-Hamri, Mohamed; Chelghoun, Youcef; Wattel, Eric; Mortreux, Franck

2014-01-01

258

[Plasma cell leukemia].  

PubMed

Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare disorder which develops spontaneously (primary PCL) or evolves in patients with multiple myeloma (secondary PCL). It is defined by the presence of 2 × 10(9)/L peripheral blood plasma cells or plasmacytosis accounting for more than 20 % of the differential white cell count. PCL presents more often extramedullary involvement, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypercalcemia, as well as impaired renal function. Cytogenetic abnormalities and mutations observed in PCL lead to escape from immune surveillance and independence from the bone marrow microenvironment with changes in expression of adhesion molecules or chemokines receptors. The outcome of PCL has improved with combination approaches with novel agents (including bortezomib and immunomodulatory drugs, such as lenalidomide) and with autologous stem cell transplantation. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is currently available for young patients. This article is an overview of this rare and severe disease and the different therapeutics options that are recommended. PMID:25418598

Ravinet, Aurélie; Bay, Jacques Olivier; Tournilhac, Olivier

2014-11-01

259

Myelodysplasia and the leukemias.  

PubMed

The armistice after World War II marked the beginning of an era that was to last to the end of the present century. It was an era in which many changes in medicine and nursing combined to alter the entire philosophy of managing malignant disease. More specifically, the fluid-phase tumors, which comprise myelodysplasia and the leukemias, were singled out for special attention. First there was the ease with which blood and bone marrow could be sampled, making serial investigations simple and practical. Second, cytotoxic drugs became available ranging from nitrogen mustard through cytosine arabinoside, the anthracycline antibiotics, and the epi-podophyllotoxins. Although cytomorphology of the hematopoietic tissue had been exquisitely defined with the use of Romanowsky stains coupled with electron microscopy, the diagnosis of leukemia was, before 1945, a death sentence for want of effective therapy. This changed dramatically with the introduction of the folate antagonists, and progress was unremitting as the range of new products expanded. Suddenly responses could be obtained with single agents, and fairly rapidly combinations were developed for cumulative antitumor effect. Many agents had undesirable toxicity among different organs. Although slightly different for myeloblastic or lymphoblastic variants, this approach produced apparent disease eradication. The concept of complete remission, both clinical and hematologic, was born. Some of our early enthusiasm has had to be tempered with the somber appreciation that not all patients can improve and many others experience relapses. Where then do we stand? Leukemic cells themselves seldom kill. It is the relentless and uncontrolled expansion of a neoplastic clone that leads to bone marrow failure, albeit at different rates in the various subtypes. In the acute forms, the common presentation remains symptomatic anemia, neutropenic sepsis, and thrombocytopenic bleeding. Differentiation from marrow aplasia may not be possible at first on clinical grounds, although bone tenderness, gingival hypertrophy, and skin infiltration are among the general useful differential signs. Findings in the circulation and the marrow are of cardinal importance in diagnosis; they provide the basis for classification. Improved accuracy has followed the introduction of cytochemical stains, and a widening range of monoclonal antibodies, and greater recourse to karyotyping, have enhanced diagnostic acumen. Treatment decisions rest on many variables or prognostic factors that include age, performance status, comorbidity, and disease category, with an ever increasing regard for the part played by cellular and molecular genetics. Despite skillful utilization of this wealth of information for optimal management, outcome often leaves much to be desired. Myelodysplasia encompasses a number of different syndromes in which the refractory anemias are indolent, whereas those with excess blasts progress toward overt leukemia. Considerable judgment is necessary in selecting patients for whom supportive therapy alone is appropriate and recognizing others, up to one third of patients for whom use growth factors that include erythropoietin, granulocyte or granulocyte monocyte-colony stimulating factors, and thrombopoietin can be justified. The often unfavorable result has been a stimulus to current investigations that examine the value of intensive chemotherapy or the more innovative bone marrow transplantation and its peripheral blood equivalent. Autografting is a newer alternative that does not have proved potential. Acute leukemia, whether myeloblastic or lymphoblastic, has been managed with mixed success. Remission rates have steadily increased and, notably among children, moved toward 100% in certain groupings. The downside of nonspecific drug regimens is that some patients simply may not respond, whereas others experience remissions and then relapses. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED) PMID:9301644

Jacobs, P

1997-08-01

260

Immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with current chemotherapy regimens is still disappointing, with overall survival rates of ? 40% at 5 years. It is now well established that AML cells can evade the immune system through multiple mechanisms, including the expression of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase. Immunotherapeutic strategies, including both active, such as vaccination with leukemia-associated antigens, and passive, such as adoptive transfer of allogeneic natural killer cells, may overcome leukemia escape and lead to improved cure. Allogeneic hemopoeitic stem cell transplantation, the most effective treatment of AML, is the best known model of immunotherapy. Following transplant, recipient AML cells are eradicated by donor immune cells through the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. However, GVL is clinically associated with graft-versus-host disease, the major cause of mortality after transplant. GVL is mediated by donor T cells recognizing either leukemia-associated antigens or minor as well as major histocompatibility antigens. Several innovative strategies have been devised to generate leukemia reactive T cells so as to increase GVL responses with no or little graft-versus-host disease. PMID:24341888

Arpinati, Mario; Curti, Antonio

2014-01-01

261

Antibody Therapy for Pediatric Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Despite increasing cure rates for pediatric leukemia, relapsed disease still carries a poor prognosis with significant morbidity and mortality. Novel targeted therapies are currently being investigated in an attempt to reduce adverse events and improve survival outcomes. Antibody therapies represent a form of targeted therapy that offers a new treatment paradigm. Monoclonal antibodies are active in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are currently in Phase III trials. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are the next generation of antibodies where a highly potent cytotoxic agent is bound to an antibody by a linker, resulting in selective targeting of leukemia cells. ADCs are currently being tested in clinical trials for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and ALL. Bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) antibodies are a construct whereby each antibody contains two binding sites, with one designed to engage the patient’s own immune system and the other to target malignant cells. BiTE antibodies show great promise as a novel and effective therapy for childhood leukemia. This review will outline recent developments in targeted agents for pediatric leukemia including monoclonal antibodies, ADCs, and BiTE antibodies. PMID:24795859

Vedi, Aditi; Ziegler, David S.

2014-01-01

262

Unitary-Model-Operator Approach to Nuclear Effective Interaction. II Effects of Three-Body Cluster Term  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of the short-range correlations in nuclei is studied in the framework of the unitary-model-operator approach. A unitary-transformed Hamiltonian is introduced and given in a cluster expansion form. A general theory of treating the effects of the three-body cluster term is proposed. It is emphasized that the one-body average field representing the dispersive effect of medium plays an important

Kenji Suzuki

1982-01-01

263

Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-11-15

264

Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation

2014-12-01

265

C P -Violating Effect of the Th Nuclear Magnetic Quadrupole Moment: Accurate Many-Body Study of ThO  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Investigations of C P violation in the hadron sector may be done using measurements in the ThO molecule. Recent measurements in this molecule improved the limit on the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) by an order of magnitude. Another time-reversal (T ) and parity (P )-violating effect in 229ThO is induced by the nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment. We perform nuclear and molecular calculations to express this effect in terms of the strength constants of T , P -odd nuclear forces, neutron EDM, QCD vacuum angle ? , quark EDM, and chromo-EDM.

Skripnikov, L. V.; Petrov, A. N.; Titov, A. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

2014-12-01

266

Effects of lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing on human chronic myeloid leukemia cells and leukemia mice  

PubMed Central

Objective: To investigate the effects of lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing on human chronic myeloid leukemia cells (K562) and the growth of chronic myeloid leukemia mice as well as to explore the potential mechanisms. Methods: Unbtreated K562 cells (CON), blank lentivirus transfected K562 cells (NC) and K562 cells expressing STAT3 siRNA (STAT3 siRNA) were injected into SCID mice to establish the chronic myeloid leukemia model in mice. The growth, peripheral white blood cell count and spleen index in these mice were determined. Results: In vitro experiment showed, when compared with control group, the interference efficiency of STAT3 expression was as high as 97.5% in K562 cells. Western blot assay revealed that the expression of c-Myc, Bcl-xL and Cyclin D1 reduced by 17.01%, 7.3% and 6.82%, respectively, showing significant difference when compared with control group (P < 0.01). These findings were consistent with those from fluorescence quantitative PCR. In vivo experiment showed the body weight of mice reduced progressively and the peripheral white blood cell count increased gradually in control group, accompanied by dragging hind limbs and progressive enlargement of the spleen. The body weight remained unchanged, peripheral white blood cell count reduced gradually and the spleen did not enlarge in mice treated with STAT3 siRNA expressing cells. Conclusion: Lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing may inhibit the expression of its downstream genes (c-Myc, Bcl-xL and Cyclin D1) related to cell proliferation, apoptosis and cycle to suppress the malignant biological behaviors, and STAT3 silencing also inhibit the leukemogenic potency of K562 cells in mice.

Jia, Xinyan; Yang, Wenzhong; Han, Jia; Xiong, Hong

2014-01-01

267

Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-02-17

268

General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... radiation may affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

269

General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

270

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Print A A A Text Size What's in ... child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood ...

271

What Happens After Treatment for Childhood Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Leukemia in Children » Detailed Guide » What happens after treatment for childhood ... 2014 Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Leukemia in Children? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, ...

272

The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium  

PubMed Central

Background Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children under 15 years of age; 80% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 17% are acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Childhood leukemia shows further diversity based on cytogenetic and molecular characteristics, which may relate to distinct etiologies. Case–control studies conducted worldwide, particularly of ALL, have collected a wealth of data on potential risk factors and in some studies, biospecimens. There is growing evidence for the role of infectious/immunologic factors, fetal growth, and several environmental factors in the etiology of childhood ALL. The risk of childhood leukemia, like other complex diseases, is likely to be influenced both by independent and interactive effects of genes and environmental exposures. While some studies have analyzed the role of genetic variants, few have been sufficiently powered to investigate gene–environment interactions. Objectives The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) was established in 2007 to promote investigations of rarer exposures, gene–environment interactions and subtype-specific associations through the pooling of data from independent studies. Methods By September 2012, CLIC included 22 studies (recruitment period: 1962–present) from 12 countries, totaling approximately 31 000 cases and 50 000 controls. Of these, 19 case–control studies have collected detailed epidemiologic data, and DNA samples have been collected from children and child–parent trios in 15 and 13 of these studies, respectively. Two registry-based studies and one study comprising hospital records routinely obtained at birth and/or diagnosis have limited interview data or biospecimens. Conclusions CLIC provides a unique opportunity to fill gaps in knowledge about the role of environmental and genetic risk factors, critical windows of exposure, the effects of gene–environment interactions and associations among specific leukemia subtypes in different ethnic groups. PMID:23403126

Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Clavel, Jacqueline; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Petridou, Eleni; Taylor, Malcolm; Schüz, Joachim; Spector, Logan G.; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Sinnett, Daniel; Murphy, Michael; Roman, Eve; Monge, Patricia; Ezzat, Sameera; Mueller, Beth A.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Birch, Jill; Kaatsch, Peter; Koifman, Sergio; Lightfoot, Tracy; Bhatti, Parveen; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rudant, Jérémie; O’Neill, Kate; Miligi, Lucia; Dessypris, Nick; Kang, Alice Y.; Buffler, Patricia A.

2013-01-01

273

Childhood leukemia in Woburn, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

Possible associations between environmental hazards and the occurrence of childhood leukemia were investigated in Woburn, MA, for the period 1969-79. Residents of Woburn were concerned over what they perceived to be a large number of childhood leukemia cases; at the same time there was extensive publicity about uncontrolled hazardous waste sites in Woburn, which resulted in its being placed on the Superfund list. Many believed that the elevated rate of childhood leukemia was related to these sites or to two city water wells that had been closed in 1979 when they were found to be contaminated by organic chemicals. An occurrence was defined as childhood leukemia when it was diagnosed in a Woburn resident less than 20 years old between 1969 and 1979 and confirmed by review of hospital and pathology records. This investigation confirmed an increase in incidence which was distributed uniformly over the 11-year period. Six of the persons with leukemia were located close to each other in one census tract, 7.5 times the expected number. Parents of the children and of two matched control groups were interviewed about medical history, mother's pregnancy history, school history, and environmental exposures. There were no significant differences between the leukemia victims and persons in the control groups. No leukemia sufferer had contact with a hazardous waste site. While the contaminants of Wells G and H, which had been closed, are not known leukemogens, it is not possible to rule out exposure to this water as a factor, particularly in the eastern Woburn residents.

Cutler, J.J.; Parker, G.S.; Rosen, S.; Prenney, B.; Healey, R.; Caldwell, G.G.

1986-03-01

274

Nuclear Scans  

MedlinePLUS

Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

275

Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-10-30

276

The European LeukemiaNet: achievements and perspectives  

PubMed Central

The only way to cure leukemia is by cooperative research. To optimize research, the European LeukemiaNet integrates 105 national leukemia trial groups and networks, 105 interdisciplinary partner groups and about 1,000 leukemia specialists from 175 institutions. They care for tens of thousands of leukemia patients in 33 countries across Europe. Their ultimate goal is to cure leukemia. Since its inception in 2002, the European LeukemiaNet has steadily expanded and has unified leukemia research across Europe. The European LeukemiaNet grew from two major roots: 1) the German Competence Network on Acute and Chronic Leukemias; and 2) the collaboration of European Investigators on Chronic Myeloid Leukemia. The European LeukemiaNet has improved leukemia research and management across Europe. Its concept has led to funding by the European Commission as a network of excellence. Other sources (European Science Foundation; European LeukemiaNet-Foundation) will take over when the support of the European Commission ends. PMID:21048032

Hehlmann, Rüdiger; Grimwade, David; Simonsson, Bengt; Apperley, Jane; Baccarani, Michele; Barbui, Tiziano; Barosi, Giovanni; Bassan, Renato; Béné, Marie C.; Berger, Ute; Büchner, Thomas; Burnett, Alan; Cross, Nicolas C.P.; de Witte, Theo J.M.; Döhner, Hartmut; Dombret, Hervé; Einsele, Hermann; Engelich, Georg; Foŕ, Robin; Fonatsch, Christa; Gökbuget, Nicola; Gluckman, Elaine; Gratwohl, Alois; Guilhot, Francois; Haferlach, Claudia; Haferlach, Thorsten; Hallek, Michael; Hasford, Jörg; Hochhaus, Andreas; Hoelzer, Dieter; Kiladjian, Jean-Jaques; Labar, Boris; Ljungman, Per; Mansmann, Ulrich; Niederwieser, Dietger; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Ribera, José M.; Rieder, Harald; Serve, Hubert; Schrotz-King, Petra; Sanz, Miguel A.; Saußele, Susanne

2011-01-01

277

LEADING ARTICLE Proteomic analysis of childhood leukemia  

E-print Network

LEADING ARTICLE Proteomic analysis of childhood leukemia CM Hegedus1 , L Gunn1 , CF Skibola1 , L of Hematology-Oncology, Stanford, CA, USA Childhood acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemias are stratified expression profiles can discriminate between leukemia sub- types. Thus, proteome analysis similarly holds

California at Berkeley, University of

278

DNA synthesis in nuclei and nuclear matrices of regenerating rat liver: Effect of whole-body gamma irradiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Partial hepatectomy (PH) of rats (Wistar strain) resulted in acceleration of DNA synthesis in liver which reached a maximum at 36 h after PH. Whole-body radiation exposure (10 Gy) of the rats at 12 h after PH completely arrested this stimulation in DNA synthesis. The elevation of DNA synthetic rate in response to PH and complete obliteration of this

V. P. Dave; M. S. Patil; V. N. Pandey; D. S. Pradhan

1991-01-01

279

Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)  

MedlinePLUS

... los pacientes que hablan espanol Caregivers and transplant Role of the transplant caregiver Before transplant After transplant ... your body. The Philadelphia chromosome is an abnormal change where DNA from one chromosome exchanges with another. ...

280

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)  

MedlinePLUS

... cells in the bone marrow making too many lymphocytes. While lymphocytes help the body to fight infection when present ... tests the specimen to see if the cancerous lymphocytes originate from B or T lymphocytes. Molecular studies ...

281

Strategic Treatment Interruptions During Imatinib Treatment of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Although imatinib is an effective treatment for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and nearly all patients treated with imatinib attain some form of remission, imatinib does not completely eliminate leukemia. Moreover, if the imatinib treatment is stopped, most patients eventually relapse (Cortes et al. in Clin. Cancer Res. 11:3425–3432, 2005). In Kim et al. (PLoS Comput. Biol. 4(6):e1000095, 2008), the authors presented a mathematical model for the dynamics of CML under imatinib treatment that incorporates the anti-leukemia immune response. We use the mathematical model in Kim et al. (PLoS Comput. Biol. 4(6):e1000095, 2008) to study and numerically simulate strategic treatment interruptions as a potential therapeutic strategy for CML patients. We present the results of numerous simulated treatment programs in which imatinib treatment is temporarily stopped to stimulate and leverage the anti-leukemia immune response to combat CML. The simulations presented in this paper imply that treatment programs that involve strategic treatment interruptions may prevent leukemia from relapsing and may prevent remission for significantly longer than continuous imatinib treatment. Moreover, in many cases, strategic treatment interruptions may completely eliminate leukemic cells from the body. Thus, strategic treatment interruptions may be a feasible clinical approach to enhancing the effects of imatinib treatment for CML. We study the effects of both the timing and the duration of the treatment interruption on the results of the treatment. We also present a sensitivity analysis of the results to the parameters in the mathematical model. PMID:20532990

Kim, Peter S.; Lee, Peter P.; Levy, Doron

2013-01-01

282

Virus-like Particles in Chemically Induced Sarcomas in High and Low-Leukemia Strains of Mice1  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Well-differentiated fibrosarcomas and anaplastic sarcomas developed in the s.c. tissues of four low-leukemia strains of mice (BALB\\/cf\\/Ki, Af\\/Ki, C3H\\/KĂŚ and C3Hf\\/Ki) as well as two high-leukemia strains (AKR\\/Ki and C58\\/KĂŚ) following a single injection of benzpyrene (0.004 mg\\/g body weight) as young adults. The incidence of sarcomas was significantly less in both high-leukemia strains than that in all four

R. A. Liebelt; S. Suzuki; A. G. Liebelt

283

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare fatal hematopoietic disorder of early childhood. We are presenting a case of 9-month-old female child who was admitted with abdominal distension, irritability, and hepatosplenomegaly. Peripheral blood film examination showed leukoerythroblastosis with leukocytosis, absolute monocytosis, microcytic hypo chromic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow examination showed myeloid hyperplasia, Hb HPLC revealed normal HbF (1.3 %) and HbA2 (2.9 %). There was absolute gamma globulinemia and DCT positivity. Cytogenetic studies revealed a normal karyotype with absence of Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, monosomy 7 or any other chromosomal abnormality. Diagnosis of JMML was rendered according to the diagnostic criteria laid down by WHO classification 2008 with presence of peripheral blood monocytosis >1 × 10(9)/L, blasts <20 % of leucocytes in blood or nucleated cells in bone marrow, absence of Ph chromosome, presence of immature granulocytes in the blood and WBC count >10 × 10(9)/L. The patient was then started on a regimen of chemotherapy to which she gave a promising response. PMID:24426365

Sethi, Neha; Kushwaha, Shivani; Dhingra, Bhawana; Pujani, Mukta; Chandra, Jagdish; Shukla, Shailaja

2013-09-01

284

Hairy cell leukemia.  

PubMed

Hairy cell leukemia is an indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with a characteristic presentation of pancytopenia, splenomegaly, and circulating hairy cells. An immunophenotypic pattern of CD11c, CD25, and CD103 expression. TRAP staining, reticulin deposition, and morphology of bone marrow and circulating cells help establish the diagnosis. Although up to 10% of patients might not require systemic treatment, for the vast majority effective treatments are available with the purine-nucleoside analogues cladribine and pentostatin. Cladribine is considered the drug of choice in the first-line setting due to the very high complete remission rate and prolonged duration of response following a single 7-day infusion. Cladribine and pentostatin both have unique but different mechanisms of action, with a lack of cross-resistance between them, which might be exploited in the relapsed or refractory disease setting. Therapy for relapsed and refractory patients also includes novel biologic agents as well as splenectomy. Despite the effective treatment options, the prospect of cure remains elusive due to the frequent presence of MRD even in complete responders. Future studies employing combination therapies targeting the eradication of MRD will hopefully improve relapse-free survivals as well as overall survival, and might even offer the prospect of cure. PMID:18283787

Fanta, Paul Timothy; Saven, Alan

2008-01-01

285

PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA  

PubMed Central

Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (? 20%) and absolute number (? 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

2014-01-01

286

Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

2014-10-23

287

Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-01-23

288

Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-02-02

289

Cutaneous manifestations in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia involving the head, neck and distal extremities  

PubMed Central

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) infiltrating the skin is uncommon and can present in many different ways. The present study reports a case of CLL infiltrating multiple body areas. A 57-year-old male with a 10-year history of subclinical B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) presented with skin hypertrophic changes of the ears, eyebrows, tip of the nose, toes and fingers. In addition, the patient had erythematous plaques on the buttocks. Histopathology revealed a lymphocytic infiltrate. The patient rejected the recommended chemotherapy and, following a three-year follow-up, remained alive with mildly aggravated symptoms. It has previously been reported that infiltrative CLL can involve the head and neck; however, involvement of multiple body areas, particularly toes and fingers is rare. This case highlights the importance of considering leukemia cutis in patients with underlying CLL who present with unusual clinical features.

LU, CHONGRONG; LI, LI; QIAO, QIAOHUA; LIU, GUOZHEN; FANG, LIZHENG

2015-01-01

290

Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-03-22

291

Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-05-13

292

Body radiation exposure in breast cancer radiotherapy: Impact of breast IMRT and virtual wedge compensation techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Recent reports demonstrate a dramatically increased rate of secondary leukemia for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant high-dose anthracycline and radiotherapy, and that radiation is an independent factor for the development of leukemia. This study aimed to evaluate the radiation body exposure during breast radiotherapy and to characterize the factors associated with an increased exposure. Patients and Methods: In a

Tony Woo; Jean-Philippe. Pignol; Eileen Rakovitch; Toni Vu; Deanna Hicks; Peter OBrien; Kathleen Pritchard

2006-01-01

293

Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2013-09-27

294

Infection and childhood leukemia: review of evidence  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To analyze studies that evaluated the role of infections as well as indirect measures of exposure to infection in the risk of childhood leukemia, particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia. METHODS A search in Medline, Lilacs, and SciELO scientific publication databases initially using the descriptors "childhood leukemia" and "infection" and later searching for the words "childhood leukemia" and "maternal infection or disease" or "breastfeeding" or "daycare attendance" or "vaccination" resulted in 62 publications that met the following inclusion criteria: subject aged ? 15 years; specific analysis of cases diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or total leukemia; exposure assessment of mothers' or infants' to infections (or proxy of infection), and risk of leukemia. RESULTS Overall, 23 studies that assessed infections in children support the hypothesis that occurrence of infection during early childhood reduces the risk of leukemia, but there are disagreements within and between studies. The evaluation of exposure to infection by indirect measures showed evidence of reduced risk of leukemia associated mainly with daycare attendance. More than 50.0% of the 16 studies that assessed maternal exposure to infection observed increased risk of leukemia associated with episodes of influenza, pneumonia, chickenpox, herpes zoster, lower genital tract infection, skin disease, sexually transmitted diseases, Epstein-Barr virus, and Helicobacter pylori. CONCLUSIONS Although no specific infectious agent has been identified, scientific evidence suggests that exposure to infections has some effect on childhood leukemia etiology. PMID:24626555

Maia, Raquel da Rocha Paiva; Wünsch, Victor

2013-01-01

295

Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for childhood leukemia following a busulfan and melphalan preparative regimen.  

PubMed

Thirty children with leukemia underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) following a radiation-free preparative regimen, from July 1988 to January 1996. Twelve males and 18 females, ages 9 months to 15 years (median 8.5 years), received busulfan (BU, 4 mg/kg/day for 4 days by mouth), followed by melphalan (L-PAM, 60-70 mg/m2/day i.v. for 3 days), and infusion of allogeneic marrow from an HLA-matched related donor. Diagnoses included acute myelogenous leukemia (n = 20), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 8) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (n = 2). Twenty-five patients were transplanted in first complete remission (CR), three in second CR, and two patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in the first chronic phase. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of methotrexate (MTX) alone in 27 patients and short-term MTX and cyclosporin A in three patients. Engraftment was achieved in all patients. Toxicities were mild or moderate. Six patients developed acute GVHD: four had grade I and two had grade II. Chronic GVHD was documented in eight patients. Three patients relapsed. As of September 1997, 27 patients were alive and well at 22-110 months (median 61) of follow-up. The disease-free survival rate at 5 years after BMT was 90%. A regimen consisting of high-dose BU and L-PAM without total body irradiation is useful for conditioning for allogeneic BMT in children with leukemia. PMID:9678791

Matsuyama, T; Kojima, S; Kato, K

1998-07-01

296

Promyelocytic leukemia gene functions and roles in tumorigenesis.  

PubMed

The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) gene is a gene known to be a tumor suppressor, although recent data suggest that it has a dual function in tumorigenesis. It was initially discovered in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a t(15; 17) chromosomal translocation fused it to the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR?). It has been shown to be involved in various types of cancer. It has at least 6 nuclear isoforms and a cytoplasmic type with different characteristics. Its multiple functions in growth inhibition, apoptosis induction, replicative senescence, inhibition of oncogenic transformation, and suppression of migration and angiogenesis have made it a therapeutic target for cancer therapy. However, its dual role in the process of tumorigenesis has made this field challenging. In this review, we discuss PML structure, functions and expression in tumors. PMID:25338978

Imani-Saber, Zeinab; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh

2014-01-01

297

Selective T Cell Depletion in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Graft Versus Host Disease; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2014-09-03

298

Selective T Cell Depletion in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Graft Versus Host Disease; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2015-02-04

299

Protective effects of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 on whole body heat stress-induced oxidative damage in the mouse testis  

PubMed Central

Background Whole body heat stress had detrimental effect on male reproductive function. It's known that the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activates expression of cytoprotective genes to enable cell adaptation to protect against oxidative stress. However, it’s still unclear about the exactly effects of Nrf2 on the testis. Here, we investigate the protective effect of Nrf2 on whole body heat stress-induced oxidative damage in mouse testis. Methods Male mice were exposed to the elevated ambient temperature (42°C) daily for 2 h. During the period of twelve consecutive days, mice were sacrificed on days 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 immediately following heat exposure. Testes weight, enzymatic antioxidant activities and concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) in the testes were determined and immunohistochemical detection of Nrf2 protein and mRNA expression of Nrf2-regulated genes were analyzed to assess the status of Nrf2-antioxidant system. Results Heat-exposed mice presented significant increases in rectal, scrotal surface and body surface temperature. The concentrations of cortisol and testosterone in serum fluctuated with the number of exposed days. There were significant decrease in testes weight and relative testes weight on day 12 compared with those on other days, but significant increases in catalase (CAT) activity on day 1 and GSH level on day 4 compared with control group. The activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) and copper-zinc SOD (CuZn-SOD) increased significantly on days 8 and 12. Moreover, prominent nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 protein was observed in Leydig cells on day 2, accompanying with up-regulated mRNA levels of Nrf2-regulated genes such as Nrf2, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), ?-Glutamylcysteine synthetase (GCLC) and NAD (P) H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1)) in heat-treated groups. Conclusions These results suggest that Nrf2 displayed nuclear accumulation and protective activity in the process of heat treated-induced oxidative stress in mouse testes, indicating that Nrf2 might be a potential target for new drugs designed to protect germ cell and Leydig cell from oxidative stress. PMID:23514035

2013-01-01

300

Sorafenib Tosylate and Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-11-03

301

Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2015-01-30

302

A dynamic model to estimate the activity concentration and whole body dose rate of marine biota as consequences of a nuclear accident.  

PubMed

This paper describes a dynamic compartment model (K-BIOTA-DYN-M) to assess the activity concentration and whole body dose rate of marine biota as a result of a nuclear accident. The model considers the transport of radioactivity between the marine biota through the food chain, and applies the first order kinetic model for the sedimentation of radionuclides from seawater onto sediment. A set of ordinary differential equations representing the model are simultaneously solved to calculate the activity concentration of the biota and the sediment, and subsequently the dose rates, given the seawater activity concentration. The model was applied to investigate the long-term effect of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the marine biota using (131)I, (134)Cs, and, (137)Cs activity concentrations of seawater measured for up to about 2.5 years after the accident at two locations in the port of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) which was the most highly contaminated area. The predicted results showed that the accumulated dose for 3 months after the accident was about 4-4.5Gy, indicating the possibility of occurrence of an acute radiation effect in the early phase after the Fukushima accident; however, the total dose rate for most organisms studied was usually below the UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation)'s bench mark level for chronic exposure except for the initial phase of the accident, suggesting a very limited radiological effect on the marine biota at the population level. The predicted Cs sediment activity by the first-order kinetic model for the sedimentation was in a good agreement with the measured activity concentration. By varying the ecological parameter values, the present model was able to predict the very scattered (137)Cs activity concentrations of fishes measured in the port of FDNPS. Conclusively, the present dynamic model can be usefully applied to estimate the activity concentration and whole body dose rate of the marine biota as the consequence of a nuclear accident. PMID:25461520

Keum, Dong-Kwon; Jun, In; Kim, Byeong-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Choi, Yong-Ho

2014-11-25

303

Integrative Meta-Analysis of Differential Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundAcute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with an overall poor prognosis. Gene expression profiling studies of patients with AML has provided key insights into disease pathogenesis while exposing potential diagnostic and prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. A systematic comparison of the large body of gene expression profiling studies in AML has the potential to test the extensibility of

Brady G. Miller; John A. Stamatoyannopoulos; Chad Creighton

2010-01-01

304

UNEDF: Advanced Scienti?c Computing Collaboration Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem  

SciTech Connect

With diverse scienti?c backgrounds, the UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quanti?ed uncertainties. This paper describes the UNEDF collaboration and identi?es attributes that classify UNEDF as a successful computational collaboration. We illustrate signi?cant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integrative solutions using the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and leadership class computational resources.

Nam, Hai A.; Stoitsov, M.; Nazarewicz, Witold; Bulgac, Aurel; Hagen, Gaute; Kortelainene, Markus; Maris, P.; Pei, Junchen; Roche, Kenneth J.; Schunck, Nicolas; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James; Wild, Stefan

2012-11-03

305

Immunoregulatory properties of childhood leukemias  

SciTech Connect

Investigation of in vitro humoral immune responses and immunoregulatory properties of leukemic cell was carried out in 17 children with acute leukemia prior to therapy. Leukemias were of the non-T, non-B-cell type in 13 patients and of T-cell origin in four. Bone marrow and peripheral blood cells consisted of 24-96% lymphoblasts and were generally deficient in surface Ig-positive cells. Induction of Ig secreting cells in response to pokeweed mitogen was markedly decreased in marrow and peripheral mononuclear cell cultures of leukemic patients. Co-culture of leukemic cells with normal lymphocytes led to marked deviations from the expected Ig secreting-cell response of the cell mixtures. The predominant effect was enhancement, as was the case with eight non-T, non-B-cell and one T-cell leukemia samples. Suppression of the Ig secreting-cell response was observed in only three instances, two with non-T, non-B-cell and one with T-cell leukemia samples. These findings implicate non-T, non-B as well as more differentiated leukemic cells in having the potential for modifying Ig production by B cells.

Banker, D.S.; Pahwa, R.N.; Miller, D.R.; Hilgartner, M.W.; Good, R.A.; Pahwa, S.G.

1982-07-01

306

Bortezomib and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

2015-02-12

307

Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-12-19

308

Combination Chemotherapy and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non-T, Non-B Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2013-10-07

309

3-AP and Fludarabine in Treating Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Accelerated Phase or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Primary Myelofibrosis; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2014-12-16

310

Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML)  

MedlinePLUS

... for childhood leukemias Prognostic factors in childhood leukemia (ALL or AML) Certain differences among patients that affect ... myelogenous leukemia (AML). Prognostic factors for children with ALL Different systems are used to classify childhood ALL ...

311

What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... leukemia? What should you ask your doctor about acute lymphocytic leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... answer many of your questions. What kind of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) do I have? Do I have any ...

312

Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia by Risk Group  

MedlinePLUS

... lymphocytic leukemia Radiation therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Leukapheresis for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Supportive care for chronic ... removed from the blood with a procedure called leukapheresis. This treatment lowers blood counts right away. The ...

313

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Treatment in Adults (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... Leukemia Patient information Patient information: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment in adults (Beyond the Basics) Author Richard ... article ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA OVERVIEW GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT ALL TREATMENT INDUCTION OF REMISSION CONSOLIDATION/INTENSIFICATION THERAPY MAINTENANCE ...

314

ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying differentially expressed genes in human acute leukemia  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying differentially expressed genes in human acute leukemia and mouse brain the experimental-wise false discovery rate. A human acute leukemia dataset corrected from 38 leukemia patients

Gu, Xun

315

Many-body correlations of quasiparticle random-phase approximation in nuclear matrix element of neutrinoless double-beta decay  

E-print Network

We show that the correlations of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) significantly reduce the nuclear matrix element (NME) of neutrinoless double-beta decay by a new mechanism in the calculation for $^{150}$Nd $\\rightarrow$ $^{150}$Sm. This effect is due mainly to the normalization factors of the QRPA ground states included in the overlap of intermediate states, to which the QRPA states based on the initial and final ground states are applied. These normalization factors arise according to the definition of the QRPA ground state as the vacuum of quasibosons. Our NME is close to those of other groups in spite of this new reduction effect because we do not use the proton-neutron pairing interaction usually used for reproducing the experimental NME of the two-neutrino double-beta ($2\

J. Terasaki

2015-01-19

316

Fusion body formation, germ tube anastomosis, and nuclear migration during the germination of urediniospores of the wheat leaf rust fungus, Puccinia triticina.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT Vegetative or parasexual recombination is thought to be a key mechanism for the genetic diversity of cereal rust fungi. The process of germ tube fusion leading to hyphal anastomosis and nuclear recombination was analyzed in wheat leaf rust fungus, Puccinia triticina. Germ tube anastomosis was observed in 27 P. triticina isolates, each representing a different virulence phenotype. Germ tube fusion bodies (GFBs), which appeared as viscid globules formed at tips of germ tubes, were essential for germ tube anastomosis. The formation of GFBs was affected by the urediniospore density and the length of illumination during germination. GFBs were formed at the highest frequency when urediniospores were spread to a concentration of 1 x 10(6) urediniospores/ml and incubated in dark for 12 to 24 h during germination. GFB attached to either the side of another germ tube ("tip to side") or to another GFB formed at the tip of a second germ tube ("tip to tip"). In "tip to side" anastomosis, two nuclei in the germ tube bearing the GFB migrated into the second germ tube through the GFB which resulted in four nuclei within this germ tube. In "tip to tip" anastomosis, nuclei in both germ tubes migrated into the fused GFB and all four nuclei came into close proximity. Urediniospores of isolates MBDS-3-115 and TBBJ-5-11 were stained with DAPI (4',6'diamine-2-phenylindole) and Nuclear Yellow (Hoechst S769121), respectively, and then mixed and germinated on water agar. Some fused GFBs contained nuclei stained with DAPI and nuclei stained with Nuclear Yellow in close proximity, demonstrating the fusion between genetically different P. triticina isolates. In some fused GFBs, "bridge-like" structures connecting different nuclei were observed. PMID:19900001

Wang, Xiben; McCallum, Brent

2009-12-01

317

Relationship between electron density and effective densities of body tissues for stopping, scattering, and nuclear interactions of proton and ion beams  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In treatment planning of charged-particle radiotherapy, patient heterogeneity is conventionally modeled as variable-density water converted from CT images to best reproduce the stopping power, which may lead to inaccuracies in the handling of multiple scattering and nuclear interactions. Although similar conversions can be defined for these individual interactions, they would be valid only for specific CT systems and would require additional tasks for clinical application. This study aims to improve the practicality of the interaction-specific heterogeneity correction. Methods: The authors calculated the electron densities and effective densities for stopping power, multiple scattering, and nuclear interactions of protons and ions, using the standard elemental-composition data for body tissues to construct the invariant conversion functions. The authors also simulated a proton beam in a lung-like geometry and a carbon-ion beam in a prostate-like geometry to demonstrate the procedure and the effects of the interaction-specific heterogeneity correction. Results: Strong correlations were observed between the electron density and the respective effective densities, with which the authors formulated polyline conversion functions. Their effects amounted to 10% differences in multiple-scattering angle and nuclear interaction mean free path for bones compared to those in the conventional heterogeneity correction. Although their realistic effect on patient dose distributions would be generally small, it could be at the level of a few percent when a carbon-ion beam traverses a large bone. Conclusions: The present conversion functions are invariant and may be incorporated in treatment planning systems with a common function relating CT number to electron density. This will enable improved beam dose calculation while minimizing initial setup and quality management of the user's specific system.

Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Koba, Yusuke [Department of Accelerator and Medical Physics, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

2012-02-15

318

Methotrexate and Cyclosporine Versus Cyclosporine Alone for Prophylaxis of Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Given HLA-Identical Marrow Grafts for Leukemia: Long-Term Follow-up of a Controlled Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia (ANL) in first remission (n = 38) or chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) (n = 55) were given cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation. followed by marrow infusion from HLA- identical siblings. To evaluate postgrafting prophylaxis for acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). the patients were randomized to receive either methotrexate and cyclospo- rine (n = 43) or cyclosporine

Rainer Storb; H. Joachim Deeg; Margaret Pepe; Frederick Appelbaum; Patrick Beatty; William Bensinger; Ronald Berenson; C. Dean Buckner; Reginald Clift; Gary Longton; John Hansen; Thomas Loughran; Jack Singer; Jean Sanders; Patricia Stewart; Keith Sullivan; Robert Witherspoon; E. Donnall Thomas

1989-01-01

319

Phytochrome B Nuclear Bodies Respond to the Low Red to Far-Red Ratio and to the Reduced Irradiance of Canopy Shade in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN  

PubMed Central

The current consensus is that plant responses to canopy shade involve the perception of low red to far-red ratios (R:FRs) by phytochrome B (phyB), which leads to the direct activation of auxin synthesis genes by PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORs (PIFs). In addition to its effect on R:FRs, shade also reduces irradiance, but whether shade-induced drops in irradiance affect phyB activity has not been demonstrated. To address this issue, we investigated whether irradiance and R:FRs have similar effects on the nuclear distribution of phyB in petiole cells of light-grown plants. Under high-irradiance white light, phyB formed large nuclear bodies. Lowering irradiance without changing R:FRs or lowering R:FRs by adding far-red light led to the appearance of small nuclear bodies containing phyB. Large nuclear bodies remained but with some concomitant reduction in diameter. The appearance of small nuclear bodies was rapid, stable, and reversible upon the return to high irradiance and high R:FRs. High levels of red light but not of blue light were enough to restrain the formation of small phyB nuclear bodies. Irradiance was effective within the range found in natural canopies and even under relatively low R:FRs. The promotion of leaf hyponasty by lowering irradiance was impaired in phyB and pif mutants, as previously reported for the response to R:FRs. The expression of auxin-related genes showed a similar hierarchy of response to low R:FRs and low irradiance. We propose that phyB is able to perceive not only the low R:FRs, but also the low irradiance of shade. PMID:24948827

Trupkin, Santiago Ariel; Legris, Martina; Buchovsky, Ana Sabrina; Tolava Rivero, María Belén; Casal, Jorge José

2014-01-01

320

Recognizing familial myeloid leukemia in adults  

PubMed Central

Germline testing for familial cases of myeloid leukemia in adults is becoming more common with the recognition of multiple genetic syndromes predisposing people to bone marrow disease. Currently, Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments approved testing exists for several myeloid leukemia predisposition syndromes: familial platelet disorder with propensity to acute myeloid leukemia (FPD/AML), caused by mutations in RUNX1; familial AML with mutated CEBPA; familial myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia with mutated GATA2; and the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, including dyskeratosis congenita, a disease of abnormal telomere maintenance. With the recognition of additional families with a genetic component to their leukemia, new predisposition alleles will likely be identified. We highlight how to recognize and manage these cases as well as outline the characteristics of the major known syndromes. We look forward to future research increasing our understanding of the scope of inherited myeloid leukemia syndromes. PMID:23926458

Nickels, Eric M.; Soodalter, Jesse; Churpek, Jane E.

2013-01-01

321

Noninvasive measurement of liver iron concentration at MRI in children with acute leukemia: initial results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Routine assessment of body iron load in patients with acute leukemia is usually done by serum ferritin (SF) assay; however,\\u000a its sensitivity is impaired by different conditions including inflammation and malignancy.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  To estimate, using MRI, the extent of liver iron overload in children with acute leukemia and receiving blood transfusions,\\u000a and to examine the association between the degree of hepatic

Tibor Vag; Karim Kentouche; Ines Krumbein; Jürgen R. Reichenbach; Eric Lopatta; Diane M. Renz; Martin Stenzel; James Beck; Werner A. Kaiser; Hans-Joachim Mentzel

322

Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-02-01

323

Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2013-07-03

324

Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-02-18

325

Assessment of skeletal muscle triglyceride content by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in lean and obese adolescents: relationships to insulin sensitivity, total body fat, and central adiposity.  

PubMed

The metabolism and composition of skeletal muscle tissue is of special interest because it is a primary site of insulin action and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Intramyocellular (IMCL) triglyceride stores are an accessible form of energy that may decrease skeletal muscle glucose utilization, thereby contributing to impaired glucose metabolism. Because of the invasive nature of muscle biopsies, there is limited, if any, information about intramuscular lipid stores in children. The development of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a unique noninvasive alternative method that differentiates intracellular fat from intercellular fat in muscle tissue. The present study was performed to determine whether IMCL and extramyocellular (EMCL) lipid contents are increased early in the development of juvenile obesity and to explore the relationships between IMCL and EMCL to in vivo insulin sensitivity, independently of total body fat and central adiposity in obese and nonobese adolescents. Eight nonobese (BMI 21 kg/m(2), age 11-16 years) and 14 obese (BMI 35 +/- 1.5 kg/m(2), age 11-15 years) adolescents underwent 1) (1)H-NMR spectroscopy to noninvasively quantify IMCL and EMCL triglyceride content of the soleus muscle, 2) a 2-h euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (40 mU.m(-2).min(-1)) to assess insulin sensitivity, 3) a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan to measure total percent body fat, and 4) magnetic resonance imaging to measure abdominal fat distribution. Both the IMCL and EMCL content of the soleus muscle were significantly greater in the obese adolescents than in the lean control subjects. A strong inverse correlation was found between IMCL and insulin sensitivity, which persisted and became even stronger after controlling for percent total body fat and abdominal subcutaneous fat mass (partial correlation r = -0.73, P < 0.01) but not when adjusting for visceral fat (r = - 0.54, P < 0.08). In obese adolescents, increase in total body fat and central adiposity were accompanied by higher IMCL and EMCL lipid stores. The striking relationships between both IMCL and EMCL with insulin sensitivity in childhood suggest that these findings are not a consequence of aging but occur early in the natural course of obesity. PMID:11916921

Sinha, Ranjana; Dufour, Sylvie; Petersen, Kitt Falk; LeBon, Vincent; Enoksson, Staffan; Ma, Yong-Zhan; Savoye, Mary; Rothman, Douglas L; Shulman, Gerald I; Caprio, Sonia

2002-04-01

326

Optimizing the conditioning regimen for acute myeloid leukemia  

PubMed Central

The conditioning regimen administered prior to allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) must be sufficiently immunosuppressive to ensure engraftment and contributes to the antileukemic impact of the procedure. A broad spectrum of regimens have been studied, varying in their intensity, whether high-dose or reduced intensity, and in the agents used, containing total body irradiation (TBI) plus cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, busulfan, and/or antithymocyte globulin. Over the past two decades, research has influenced the way conditioning regimens are applied. Newer research shows that targeted radiotherapy using an anti-CD45 antibody should be able to reduce toxicity, improve tumor cell kill, and thereby improve results. PMID:19959106

Appelbaum, Frederick R.

2011-01-01

327

Azacitidine and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-04-25

328

Genetics Home Reference: Acute promyelocytic leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... myeloid leukemia ; AML ; anemia ; blood clotting ; bone marrow ; cancer ; chromosome ; clotting ; differentiation ; fever ; gene ; gene transcription ; gums ; hematopoietic ; hematuria ; infection ; inherited ; ...

329

Lenalidomide and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Early-Stage Asymptomatic Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

2015-02-18

330

Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-09

331

An antiviral disulfide compound blocks interaction between arenavirus Z protein and cellular promyelocytic leukemia protein  

SciTech Connect

The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) forms nuclear bodies (NB) that can be redistributed by virus infection. In particular, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) influences disruption of PML NB through the interaction of PML with the arenaviral Z protein. In a previous report, we have shown that the disulfide compound NSC20625 has antiviral and virucidal properties against arenaviruses, inducing unfolding and oligomerization of Z without affecting cellular RING-containing proteins such as the PML. Here, we further studied the effect of the zinc-finger-reactive disulfide NSC20625 on PML-Z interaction. In HepG2 cells infected with LCMV or transiently transfected with Z protein constructs, treatment with NSC20625 restored PML distribution from a diffuse-cytoplasmic pattern to punctate, discrete NB which appeared identical to NB found in control, uninfected cells. Similar results were obtained in cells transfected with a construct expressing a Z mutant in zinc-binding site 2 of the RING domain, confirming that this Z-PML interaction requires the integrity of only one zinc-binding site. Altogether, these results show that the compound NSC20625 suppressed Z-mediated PML NB disruption and may be used as a tool for designing novel antiviral strategies against arenavirus infection.

Garcia, C.C. [Laboratory of Virology, Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Sciences, University of Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Laboratory of Virology, Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Sciences, University of Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Topisirovic, I. [Institute de Recherche en Immunologie et en Cancerologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada)] [Institute de Recherche en Immunologie et en Cancerologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada); Djavani, M. [Institute of Human Virology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)] [Institute of Human Virology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Borden, K.L.B. [Institute de Recherche en Immunologie et en Cancerologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada)] [Institute de Recherche en Immunologie et en Cancerologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada); Damonte, E.B. [Laboratory of Virology, Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Sciences, University of Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Laboratory of Virology, Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Sciences, University of Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Salvato, M.S., E-mail: msalvato@ihv.umaryland.edu [Institute of Human Virology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

2010-03-19

332

How I treat prolymphocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

T- and B-cell subtypes of prolymphocytic leukemia (PLL) are rare, aggressive lymphoid malignancies with characteristic morphologic, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular features. Recent studies have highlighted the role of specific oncogenes, such as TCL-1, MTCP-1, and ATM in the case of T-cell and TP53 mutations in the case of B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia. Despite the advances in the understanding of the biology of these conditions, the prognosis for these patients remains poor with short survival and no curative therapy. The advent of monoclonal antibodies has improved treatment options. Currently, the best treatment for T-PLL is intravenous alemtuzumab, which has resulted in very high response rates of more than 90% when given as first-line treatment and a significant improvement in survival. Consolidation of remissions with autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation further prolongs survival, and the latter may offer potential cure. In B-PLL, rituximab-based combination chemo-immunotherapy is effective in fitter patients. TP53 abnormalities are common and, as for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, these patients should be managed using an alemtuzumab-based therapy. The role of allogeneic transplant with nonmyeloablative conditioning needs to be explored further in both T- and B-cell PLL to broaden the patient eligibility for what may be a curative treatment. PMID:22649104

Dearden, Claire

2012-07-19

333

Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

SciTech Connect

Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury.

Pendergrass, T.W.

1985-06-01

334

Updates of the nuclear equation of state for core-collapse supernovae and neutron stars: effects of 3-body forces, QCD, and magnetic fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We summarize several new developments in the nuclear equation of state for supernova simulations and neutron stars. We discuss an updated and improved Notre-Dame-Livermore Equation of State (NDL EoS) for use in supernovae simulations. This Eos contains many updates. Among them are the effects of 3- body nuclear forces at high densities and the possible transition to a QCD chiral and/or super-conducting color phase at densities. We also consider the neutron star equation of state and neutrino transport in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We study a new quantum hadrodynamic (QHD) equation of state for neutron stars (with and without hyperons) in the presence of strong magnetic fields. The parameters are constrained by deduced masses and radii. The calculated adiabatic index for these magnetized neutron stars exhibit rapid changes with density. This may provide a mechanism for star-quakes and flares in magnetars. We also investigate the strong magnetic field effects on the moments of inertia and spin down of neutron stars. The change of the moment of inertia associated with emitted magnetic flares is shown to match well with observed glitches in some magnetars. We also discuss a perturbative calculation of neutrino scattering and absorption in hot and dense hyperonic neutron-star matter in the presence of a strong magnetic field. The absorption cross-sections show a remarkable angular dependence in that the neutrino absorption strength is reduced in a direction parallel to the magnetic field and enhanced in the opposite direction. The pulsar kick velocities associated with this asymmetry comparable to observed pulsar velocities and may affect the early spin down rate of proto-neutron star magnetars with a toroidal field configuration.

Mathews, G. J.; Meixner, M.; Olson, J. P.; Suh, I.-S.; Kajino, T.; Maruyama, T.; Hidaka, J.; Ryu, C.-Y.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Lan, N. Q.

2013-07-01

335

Targeting Leukemia: From Bench to Bedside  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

FASEB Breakthroughs in Bioscience article. As researchers discovered effective treatments for leukemia, there remained a stumbling block: the drugs that killed leukemia cells were unable to penetrate into the brain and spinal cord. Fortunately, using animal models, scientists were able to develop a direct injection and irradiation protocol that eliminated this problem.

Margie Patlak (Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Office of Public Affairs)

2002-03-01

336

Advances in treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia  

PubMed Central

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most prevalent type of leukemia, affects mostly elderly CLL patients, and is incurable without allogeneic transplantation. Although classic chemo(immuno)therapy is still the standard of care for patients in need of treatment, this paradigm might change in the near future with the advent of new therapeutic agents targeting major pathogenic pathways in CLL. PMID:25165564

Tausch, Eugen; Mertens, Daniel

2014-01-01

337

Chronic Granulocytic Leukemia cutis Treated with Hydroxyurea  

Microsoft Academic Search

The clinical course of a patient with chronic granulocytic leukemia cutis associated with myeloid metaplasia is described. Cutaneous manifestations of leukemia appeared only at the sites of bone marrow aspiration and vena puncture. Radiotherapy to both spleen and skin and chemotherapy with busulfan failed to control spreading cutaneous lesions. Treatment with hydroxyurea was followed by a marked reduction in spleen

F. W. Friedhoff; M. A. Atamer; W. L. Thelmo

1978-01-01

338

Eosinophilia in a cat with acute leukemia  

PubMed Central

A 4-year-old castrated male domestic shorthaired cat with a history of vomiting and anorexia was diagnosed with leukemia with marked hepatic and splenic infiltration and concurrent eosinophilia with marked tissue infiltration. Despite thorough immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical immunophenotyping, the cell lineage of the leukemia was not identified. PMID:22379202

Gilroy, Cornelia; Forzán, María; Drew, Anne; Vernau, William

2011-01-01

339

Assessment of internal exposure doses in Fukushima by a whole body counter within one month after the nuclear power plant accident.  

PubMed

Information on early internal radiation doses in Fukushima after the nuclear power plant accident on March 11, 2011, is quite limited due to initial organizational difficulties, high background radiation and contamination of radiation measuring devices. In Nagasaki, approximately 1,200 km away from Fukushima, the internal radioactivity in evacuees and short-term visitors to Fukushima has been measured by a whole body counter (WBC) since March 15, 2011. A horizontal bed-type scanning WBC equipped with two NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors was used for 173 people who stayed in the Fukushima prefecture between March 11 and April 10, 2011. The average length of stay was 4.8 days. The internal radioactivity was converted to an estimated amount of intake according to the scenario of acute inhalation, and then the committed effective dose and the thyroid dose were evaluated. (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs were detected in more than 30% of examined individuals. In subjects who stayed in Fukushima from March 12 to March 18, the detection rate was approximately 50% higher for each radionuclide and 44% higher for all three nuclides. The maximum committed effective dose and thyroid equivalent dose were 1 mSv and 20 mSv, respectively. Although the number of subjects and settlements in the study are limited, the results suggest that the internal radiation exposure in Fukushima due to the intake of radioactive materials shortly after the accident will probably not result in any deterministic or stochastic health effects. PMID:23642080

Matsuda, Naoki; Kumagai, Atsushi; Ohtsuru, Akira; Morita, Naoko; Miura, Miwa; Yoshida, Masahiro; Kudo, Takashi; Takamura, Noboru; Yamashita, Shunichi

2013-06-01

340

Role of the SUMO-interacting motif in HIPK2 targeting to the PML nuclear bodies and regulation of p53  

SciTech Connect

Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is a key regulator of various transcription factors including p53 and CtBP in the DNA damage signaling pathway. PML-nuclear body (NB) is required for HIPK2-mediated p53 phosphorylation at Ser46 and induction of apoptosis. Although PML-NB targeting of HIPK2 has been shown, much is not clear about the molecular mechanism of HIPK2 recruitment to PML-NBs. Here we show that HIPK2 colocalizes specifically with PML-I and PML-IV. Mutational analysis showed that HIPK2 recruitment to PML-IV-NBs is mediated by the SUMO-interaction motifs (SIMs) of both PML-IV and HIPK2. Wild-type HIPK2 associated with SUMO-conjugated PML-IV at a higher affinity than with un-conjugated PML-IV, while the association of a HIPK2 SIM mutant with SUMO-modified PML-IV was impaired. In colony formation assays, HIPK2 strongly suppressed cell proliferation, but HIPK2 SIM mutants did not. In addition, activation and phosphorylation of p53 at the Ser46 residue were impaired by HIPK2 SIM mutants. These results suggest that SIM-mediated HIPK2 targeting to PML-NBs is crucial for HIPK2-mediated p53 activation and induction of apoptosis.

Sung, Ki Sa; Lee, Yun-Ah [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eui Tae [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Rock [Department of Biochemistry, Research Center for Aging and Geriatrics, Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-190 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, Research Center for Aging and Geriatrics, Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-190 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jin-Hyun [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Cheol Yong, E-mail: choicy@skku.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-04-15

341

Immunomodulation therapy for feline leukemia virus infection.  

PubMed

Clinically ill feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-infected cats, treated with Staphylococcus protein A (SPA) or oral interferon alpha (IFN), or both, were compared with cats treated with saline (SAL). Nine cats received SPA/SAL, nine received SPA/IFN, 10 received SAL/IFN, and eight received SAL/SAL. Twelve cats survived and completed the 100-week therapy. Significantly more owners of cats treated with SPA/SAL thought their cat's health improved during treatment compared to owners of cats treated with SAL/SAL (P=0.05, pair-wise comparison) or SPA/IFN (P=0.05, pair-wise comparison). No significant differences in body weight, temperature, hematocrit, red blood cell counts, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, reticulocyte counts, white blood cell or neutrophil numbers, lymphocyte concentrations, bone-marrow cytopathology, FeLV status, survival time, activity, or appetite scores were observed. No significant differences in the owners' subjective assessment of their cat's health following treatment with SAL/IFN, SPA/IFN, or SAL/SAL were seen. Therapy with SPA as a single agent results in the owners' subjective impression of improved health of their FeLV-infected cats. PMID:11450836

McCaw, D L; Boon, G D; Jergens, A E; Kern, M R; Bowles, M H; Johnson, J C

2001-01-01

342

Pomalidomide After Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-12-12

343

Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-02-18

344

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Molecular recognition of acute myeloid leukemia using aptamers  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Molecular recognition of acute myeloid leukemia using aptamers K Sefah1,2 , ZW live acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells to select a group of DNA aptamers, which can recognize AML molecular analysis of leukemia and its subcategories. Leukemia (2009) 23, 235­244; doi:10.1038/leu.2008

Tan, Weihong

345

Midostaurin and Azacitidine in Treating Elderly Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-10-11

346

Perspectives on the Causes of Childhood Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children but the causes of the disease in the majority of cases are not known. About 80% are precursor-B cell in origin (CD19+, CD10+), and this immunophenotype has increased in incidence over the past several decades in the Western world. Part of this increase may be due to the introduction of new chemical exposures into the child's environment including parental smoking, pesticides, traffic fumes, paint and household chemicals. However, much of the increase in leukemia rates is likely linked to altered patterns of infection during early childhood development, mirroring causal pathways responsible for a similarly increased incidence of other childhood-diagnosed immune-related illnesses including allergy, asthma, and type 1 diabetes. Factors linked to childhood leukemia that are likely surrogates for immune stimulation include exposure to childcare settings, parity status and birth order, vaccination history, and population mixing. In case-control studies, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is consistently inversely associated with greater exposure to infections, via daycare and later birth order. New evidence suggests also that children who contract leukemia may harbor a congenital defect in immune responder status, as indicated by lower levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 at birth in children who grow up to contract leukemia, as well as higher need for clinical care for infections within the first year of life despite having lower levels of exposure to infections. One manifestation of this phenomenon may be leukemia clusters which tend to appear as a leukemia “outbreak” among populations with low herd immunity to a new infection. Critical answers to the etiology of childhood leukemia will require incorporating new tools into traditional epidemiologic approaches – including the classification of leukemia at a molecular scale, better exposure assessments at all points in a child's life, a comprehensive understanding of genetic risk factors, and an appraisal of the interplay between infectious exposures and the status of immune response in individuals. PMID:22326931

Wiemels, Joseph

2013-01-01

347

Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-05-09

348

Inhibition of the development of radiation-induced leukemia in mice by reduction of food intake  

SciTech Connect

We have reported previously that the incidence of tumors induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by total-body gamma-ray irradiation can be considerably reduced by restriction of food intake (Gross, L. and Dreyfuss, Y. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 7596-7598). In experiments reported here we investigated the influence of reduced food intake on the development of radiation-induced leukemia in C/sub 3/H(f) mice. The incidence of spontaneous leukemia in mice of this strain does not exceed 0.5%, but it can be considerably increased by total-body x-irradiation. In our study, two groups of C/sub 3/H(f) mice were submitted to fractionated total-body gamma-irradiation (150 rads, five times at weekly intervals; 1 rad = 0.01 gray). The first group received a full ad lib diet (4.5-5.4 g of Purina Rodent Lab Chow pellets per day, each). In this group 31 out of 58 females (53.4%) and 24 out of 50 males (48%) developed leukemia at an average age of 8 months. In the second group, consisting of sisters and brothers of the first group, and submitted to the same gamma-irradiation but receiving a restricted diet (2 g of Purina Lab Chow pellets each, followed by 3 g on alternate days), only 2 out of 55 females (3.6%), and 1 out of 36 males (2.8%), developed leukemia at an average age of 9 and 12 months, respectively. Leukemia in both groups was predominantly of the lymphatic or lymphoblastic form, the leukemic cells infiltrating most organs, particularly the thymus, mesenteric and peripheral lymph nodes, spleen, liver, kidneys, and bone marrow; in most instances the peripheral blood was also leukemic.

Gross, L.; Dreyfuss, Y.

1986-10-01

349

Biosampling Case Children with Leukemia (Acute Lymphocytic and Myelocytic Leukemia) and a Reference Population in Sierra Vista, Arizona  

E-print Network

. Timeline for Diagnosis of Children with Leukemia, Sierra Vista, Arizona, By Sex, Age at Diagnosis, and TypeBiosampling Case Children with Leukemia (Acute Lymphocytic and Myelocytic Leukemia) and a Reference. Statistical methods E. Investigation Protocol, Biosampling of case Children with Leukemia (Acute Lymphocytic

350

VIEW OF A BODY COUNTING ROOM IN BUILDING 122. BODY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF A BODY COUNTING ROOM IN BUILDING 122. BODY COUNTING MEASURES RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL IN THE BODY. DESIGNED TO MINIMIZE EXTERNAL SOURCES OF RADIATION, BODY COUNTING ROOMS ARE CONSTRUCTED OF PRE-WORLD WAR II (WWII) STEEL. PRE-WWII STEEL, WHICH HAS NOT BEEN AFFECTED BY NUCLEAR FALLOUT, IS LOWER IS RADIOACTIVITY THAN STEEL CREATED AFTER WWII. (10/25/85) - Rocky Flats Plant, Emergency Medical Services Facility, Southwest corner of Central & Third Avenues, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

351

Traumatic stress in acute leukemia  

PubMed Central

Objective Acute leukemia is a condition with an acute onset that is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. However, the psychological impact of this life-threatening condition and its intensive treatment has not been systematically examined. In the present study, we investigate the prevalence and correlates of post-traumatic stress symptoms in this population. Methods Patients with acute myeloid, lymphocytic, and promyelocytic leukemia who were newly diagnosed, recently relapsed, or treatment failures were recruited at a comprehensive cancer center in Toronto, Canada. Participants completed the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire, Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, CARES Medical Interaction Subscale, and other psychosocial measures. A multivariate regression analysis was used to assess independent predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Results Of the 205 participants, 58% were male, mean age was 50.1 ± 15.4 years, 86% were recently diagnosed, and 94% were receiving active treatment. The mean Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire score was 30.2 ± 22.5, with 27 of 200 (14%) patients meeting criteria for acute stress disorder and 36 (18%) for subsyndromal acute stress disorder. Post-traumatic stress symptoms were associated with more physical symptoms, physical symptom distress, attachment anxiety, and perceived difficulty communicating with health-care providers, and poorer spiritual well-being (all p <0.05). Conclusions The present study demonstrates that clinically significant symptoms of traumatic stress are common in acute leukemia and are linked to the degree of physical suffering, to satisfaction with relationships with health-care providers, and with individual psychological characteristics. Longitudinal study is needed to determine the natural history, but these findings suggest that intervention may be indicated to alleviate or prevent traumatic stress in this population. PMID:22081505

Rodin, Gary; Yuen, Dora; Mischitelle, Ashley; Minden, Mark D; Brandwein, Joseph; Schimmer, Aaron; Marmar, Charles; Gagliese, Lucia; Lo, Christopher; Rydall, Anne; Zimmermann, Camilla

2013-01-01

352

7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-09-27

353

Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

2014-08-05

354

Leukemia Inhibitory Factor is Expressed by the Preimplantation Uterus and Selectively Blocks Primitive Ectoderm Formation in vitro  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among its many activities, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) can maintain embryonic stem cell monolayers in a pluripotent undifferentiated state. Presuming that this might reflect its physiologic role during embryogenesis, we have examined LIF expression in the embryonic environment by RNase protection assays and have determined its in vitro effect on differentiating embryonic stem cell embryoid bodies. Of all adult tissues

Michael M. Shen; Philip Leder

1992-01-01

355

Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Immunotherapeutic strategies have become part of standard cancer treatment. Chimeric and humanized antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumors. Although the humanized anti-CD33 antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with b-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45, and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukemic therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conversely, a-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumor cell kill while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33- calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions in relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. T-cell recognition of peptide antigens presented on the cell surface in combination with major histocompatibility complex antigen provides another potentially promising approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:16091194

Jurcic, Joseph G

2005-09-01

356

Leukemia studies continue to draw a blank  

SciTech Connect

When large numbers of childhood thyroid cancer cases began showing up in the three most heavily contaminated republics about Chernobyl 5 years after the accident, many thought there would be a jump in the incidence of leukemia. Studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors and other radiation accidents have pinpointed leukemia as the key early indicator of the effects of radiation. But so far, thyroid cancer remains an anomaly. Three major international studies have so far failed to detect any measurable increase in leukemia - or any other cancers - in the general population. This paper describes the studies and discusses possible reasons as well as what might happen in the future.

Williams, N.

1996-04-19

357

Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-04-10

358

S1312, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma

2015-01-07

359

Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-07-02

360

Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-12-09

361

Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

2014-09-17

362

Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-08-28

363

Small Molecule that Reverses Dexamethasone Resistance in Tcell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL)  

E-print Network

Small Molecule that Reverses Dexamethasone Resistance in Tcell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T are one of the most utilized and effective therapies in treating T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia lymphoblastic leukemia, dexamethasone, glucocorticoid resistance, NOTCH1 Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL

Stockwell, Brent R.

364

Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

2014-08-05

365

Family history of cancer in children with acute leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: the  

E-print Network

1 Family history of cancer in children with acute leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma or non history, cancer, children, acute leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma, non- Hodgkin's lymphoma Abbreviations used: AL, acute leukemia; ALL, acute lymphoblastic leukemia; AML, acute myeloblastic leukemia; HL, Hodgkin

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

366

Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-30

367

Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

2015-01-06

368

Bioelectrical Impedance Measurement for Predicting Treatment Outcome in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-02-02

369

Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-04-11

370

Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-04-25

371

Body Hair  

MedlinePLUS

Home Body Puberty Body hair Body hair Even before you get your first period , you will likely see new hair growing in your pubic area , under your arms, and ... removing pubic hair Ways to get rid of hair top Removing body hair can cause skin irritation, ...

372

What Is Nuclear Medicine?  

MedlinePLUS

... Normal Enzyme Level Smoker Reduced Enzyme Level 5 Nuclear medicine can detect the radiation coming from inside a patient’s body. All of ... from outside the body using machines that send radiation through the body. As a result, nuclear medicine determines the cause of a medical problem ...

373

Improved outcome of adult T cell leukemia\\/lymphoma with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adult T cell leukemia\\/lymphoma (ATL) is a poor prognosis T cell malignancy. In order to improve the outcome, we employed allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for ATL in 10 patients, nine of whom were from HLA-identical siblings and one from an unrelated donor. Conditioning regimens varied among the patients except that all received total body irradiation. The patients tolerated the

A Utsunomiya; Y Miyazaki; Y Takatsuka; S Hanada; K Uozumi; S Yashiki; M Tara; F Kawano; Y Saburi; H Kikuchi; M Hara; H Sao; Y Morishima; Y Kodera; S Sonoda; M Tomonaga

2001-01-01

374

Temporal changes in water quality at a childhood leukemia cluster.  

PubMed

Since 1997, 15 cases of acute lymphocytic leukemia and one case of acute myelocytic leukemia have been diagnosed in children and teenagers who live, or have lived, in an area centered on the town of Fallon, Nevada. The expected rate for the population is about one case every five years. In 2001, 99 domestic and municipal wells and one industrial well were sampled in the Fallon area. Twenty-nine of these wells had been sampled previously in 1989. Statistical comparison of concentrations of major ions and trace elements in those 29 wells between 1989 and 2001 using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test indicate water quality did not substantially change over that period; however, short-term changes may have occurred that were not detected. Volatile organic compounds were seldom detected in ground water samples and those that are regulated were consistently found at concentrations less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). The MCL for gross-alpha radioactivity and arsenic, radon, and uranium concentrations were commonly exceeded, and sometimes were greatly exceeded. Statistical comparisons using the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test indicate gross-alpha and -beta radioactivity, arsenic, uranium, and radon concentrations in wells used by families having a child with leukemia did not statistically differ from the remainder of the domestic wells sampled during this investigation. Isotopic measurements indicate the uranium was natural and not the result of a 1963 underground nuclear bomb test near Fallon. In arid and semiarid areas where trace-element concentrations can greatly exceed the MCL, household reverse-osmosis units may not reduce their concentrations to safe levels. In parts of the world where radon concentrations are high, water consumed first thing in the morning may be appreciably more radioactive than water consumed a few minutes later after the pressure tank has been emptied because secular equilibrium between radon and its immediate daughter progeny is attained in pressure tanks overnight. PMID:15161161

Seiler, Ralph L

2004-01-01

375

Temporal changes in water quality at a childhood leukemia cluster  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since 1997, 15 cases of acute lymphocytic leukemia and one case of acute myelocytic leukemia have been diagnosed in children and teenagers who live, or have lived, in an area centered on the town of Fallon, Nevada. The expected rate for the population is about one case every five years. In 2001, 99 domestic and municipal wells and one industrial well were sampled in the Fallon area. Twenty-nine of these wells had been sampled previously in 1989. Statistical comparison of concentrations of major ions and trace elements in those 29 wells between 1989 and 2001 using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test indicate water quality did not substantially change over that period; however, short-term changes may have occurred that were not detected. Volatile organic compounds were seldom detected in ground water samples and those that are regulated were consistently found at concentrations less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). The MCL for gross-alpha radioactivity and arsenic, radon, and uranium concentrations were commonly exceeded, and sometimes were greatly exceeded. Statistical comparisons using the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test indicate gross-alpha and -beta radioactivity, arsenic, uranium, and radon concentrations in wells used by families having a child with leukemia did not statistically differ from the remainder of the domestic wells sampled during this investigation. Isotopic measurements indicate the uranium was natural and not the result of a 1963 underground nuclear bomb test near Fallon. In arid and semiarid areas where trace-element concentrations can greatly exceed the MCL, household reverse-osmosis units may not reduce their concentrations to safe levels. In parts of the world where radon concentrations are high, water consumed first thing in the morning may be appreciably more radioactive than water consumed a few minutes later after the pressure tank has been emptied because secular equilibrium between radon and its immediate daughter progeny is attained in pressure tanks overnight.

Seiler, R.L.

2004-01-01

376

Extramedullary sites of leukemia relapse after transplant.  

PubMed

Recurrent or residual leukemia found in extramedullary sites after intensive treatments adversely affects prognosis. To summarize the sites and outcomes when extramedullary relapses have been reported after stem cell transplants, and to elucidate when long survival has been achieved, 207 cases were analysed. Authors were contacted for follow-up information. The most commonly reported sites are soft tissue in acute leukemias and bone in CML. Extramedullary relapse occurred typically within 2 years in ALL, but later in one-third of myeloid leukemias. Most testicular relapses reported in AML followed non-TBI conditioning. Marrow relapse was not inevitable if aggressive treatment was begun early. Local therapy alone was generally inadequate. Intensive therapy has produced lengthy remissions in cases of acute leukemias involving various sites, whereas CML cases, particularly involving bone, were most resistant to treatment. Heightened awareness and aggressive treatment should improve the prospect for cure after extramedullary relapse. PMID:17064985

Cunningham, Isabel

2006-09-01

377

General Information about Hairy Cell Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... is made mostly of fat. Leukemia may affect red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Normally, ... one of three types of mature blood cells: Red blood cells that carry oxygen and other substances ...

378

Pediatric Leukemia and Lymphoma Steering Committee  

Cancer.gov

The Pediatric Leukemia and Lymphoma Steering Committee (PLLSC) was established in 2011. PLLSC members include representatives from the Children's Oncology Group, pediatric and medical oncologists and other specialists, translational scientists, biostatisticians, patient advocates, and NCI staff.

379

Empowering Preadolescent and Adolescent Leukemia Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes effects of leukemia diagnosis and treatment for preadolescents and adolescents. Discusses strategies for social workers to assist these cancer patients in participating actively in the day-to-day management of their own care. (ABL)

Price, Kathy

1988-01-01

380

Oblimersen, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-06-03

381

Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-09-30

382

Combination Chemotherapy and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-07-21

383

Childhood Leukemia--A Look at the Past, the Present and the Future.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an overview of childhood leukemia. The causes, the survival period, different types (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia), symptoms, treatment, side effects of treatment (including learning problems), and the expected future direction of…

Findeisen, Regina; Barber, William H.

1997-01-01

384

The Cajal Body and Histone Locus Body  

PubMed Central

The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear organelle present in all eukaryotes that have been carefully studied. It is identified by the signature protein coilin and by CB-specific RNAs (scaRNAs). CBs contain high concentrations of splicing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and other RNA processing factors, suggesting that they are sites for assembly and/or posttranscriptional modification of the splicing machinery of the nucleus. The histone locus body (HLB) contains factors required for processing histone pre-mRNAs. As its name implies, the HLB is associated with the genes that code for histones, suggesting that it may function to concentrate processing factors at their site of action. CBs and HLBs are present throughout the interphase of the cell cycle, but disappear during mitosis. The biogenesis of CBs shows the features of a self-organizing structure. PMID:20504965

Nizami, Zehra; Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gall, Joseph G.

2010-01-01

385

Body/bone-marrow differential-temperature sensor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Differential-temperature sensor developed to compare bone-marrow and body temperature in leukemia patients uses single stable amplifier to monitor temperature difference recorded by thermocouples. Errors are reduced by referencing temperatures to each other, not to separate calibration points.

Anselmo, V. J.; Berdahl, C. M.

1978-01-01

386

Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Version 2.2013  

PubMed Central

These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize several key updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and discuss the clinical evidence that support the recommendations. The updates described in this article focus on the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) section, featuring recommendations for additional induction/consolidation regimens in patients with low- or intermediate-risk APL, and providing guidance on maintenance strategies for APL. PMID:24029121

O'Donnell, Margaret R.; Tallman, Martin S.; Abboud, Camille N.; Altman, Jessica K.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Arber, Daniel A.; Attar, Eyal; Borate, Uma; Coutre, Steven E.; Damon, Lloyd E.; Lancet, Jeffrey; Maness, Lori J.; Marcucci, Guido; Martin, Michael G.; Millenson, Michael M.; Moore, Joseph O.; Ravandi, Farhad; Shami, Paul J.; Smith, B. Douglas; Stone, Richard M.; Strickland, Stephen A.; Wang, Eunice S.; Gregory, Kristina M.; Naganuma, Maoko

2014-01-01

387

Immune Therapy of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a prototype for immune therapy of cancer in humans. CML cells express one or more cancer-specific\\u000a antigens: peptide sequences spanning the BCR-ABL-related gene product. Substantial data in humans receiving blood cell and\\u000a bone marrow transplants indicate a strong immune- mediated anti-leukemia effect. Because this effect occurs in an allogeneic\\u000a setting it is uncertain whether this

Axel Hoos; Robert Peter Gale

388

New drugs in acute myeloid leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The acute myeloid leukemias (AML) are often fatal disorders with a range of clinical, morphologic, cytogenetic, and molecular\\u000a features and a consequent need for a diverse array of therapies. This need for tailored therapy for subsets of patients with\\u000a AML is exemplified in those with acute promyelocytic leukemia, the subject of a separate article in this issue (Tallman and\\u000a Nabhan).

Francis J. Giles

2002-01-01

389

A special case of acute leukemia in childhood  

PubMed Central

Hybrid leukemia is a clinical entity that includes: biphenotypic leukemia, characterized by the presence of markers of more than two lineages of a single tumor cell, bilineage leukemia, a combination of more than two lineage markers on two distinct blast cells, and biclonal leukemia, the concomitancy of more than two types of leukemic cells, derived from different clonal expansions. We present a case of a 7–year–old female diagnosed with bilineage leukemia. We propose a treatment for biphenotypic/bilineage leukemia in the cases with good prognostic factors. We suggest that hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is often not required for cure of these patients. PMID:22567056

Vladasel, R; Gheorghe, A

2011-01-01

390

Work-related leukemia: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Leukemia is a complex disease, which only became better understood during the last decades following the development of new laboratory techniques and diagnostic methods. Despite our improved understanding of the physiology of the disease, little is yet known about the causes of leukemia. A variety of potential risk factors have been suggested so far, including personal habits and lifestyle, and a wide range of occupational or environmental exposures. A causal association with leukemia has only been documented to date for ionizing radiation, benzene and treatment with cytostatic drugs, but there is an ongoing scientific debate on the possible association of leukemia with a number of other work-related hazards. In this article, we have reviewed scientific studies, published over the past 5 years, which investigated potential associations between leukemia and exposure to occupational risk factors. The systematic literature review took place via electronic databases, using specific search criteria, and independent reviewers have further filtered the search results to identify the number of articles, presented in our paper. A large number of studies included in the review referred to the effects of ionizing radiation, where new data suggest that the effects of exposure to small doses of ionizing radiation should probably be reevaluated. Some other works appear to substantiate a potential association of the disease with certain pesticides. Further research is also suggested regarding the role of infectious agents or exposure to certain chemicals like formaldehyde or butadiene in the pathogenesis of leukemia. PMID:23697536

2013-01-01

391

Leukemia: an overview for primary care.  

PubMed

Leukemia is a clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. The four broad subtypes most likely to be encountered by primary care physicians are acute lymphoblastic, acute myelogenous, chronic lymphocytic, and chronic myelogenous. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia occurs more often in children, whereas the other subtypes are more common in adults. Risk factors include a genetic predisposition as well as environmental factors, such as exposure to ionizing radiation. Symptoms are nonspecific and include fever, fatigue, weight loss, bone pain, bruising, or bleeding. A complete blood count usually reveals leukocytosis and other abnormally elevated or depressed cell lines. Patients with suspected leukemia should be referred promptly to a hematologist-oncologist. The diagnosis is confirmed by further examination of the bone marrow or peripheral blood. Treatment may include chemotherapy, radiation, monoclonal antibodies, or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Complications of treatment include tumor lysis syndrome and serious infections from immunosuppression. Leukemia survivors should be monitored closely for secondary malignancies, cardiac complications, and endocrine disturbances such as metabolic syndrome, hypothyroidism, and hypogonadism. Five-year survival rates are highest in younger patients and in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:24784336

Davis, Amanda S; Viera, Anthony J; Mead, Monica D

2014-05-01

392

Outpatient Induction Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-11-26

393

Trametinib and Akt Inhibitor GSK2141795 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-02-18

394

Trebananib With or Without Low-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-15

395

Trametinib and Akt Inhibitor GSK2141795 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-12-24

396

Three-Dimensional Dose Calculation for Total Body Irradiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) therapy has been a big success in the treatment of leukemia and other haematopoietic diseases 1 . Prior to BMT, total body irradiation (TBI) is given to the patient for the purpose of (1) killing leukemia cells in bone marrow, as well as in the whole body, and (2) producing immuno-suppressive status in the patient so that the donor's marrow cells will be transplanted without rejection. TBI employs a very large field photon beam to irradiate the whole body of the patient. A uniform dose distribution over the entire body is the treatment goal. To prevent the occurrence of a serious side effect (interstitial pneumonia), the lung dose should not exceed a certain level. This novel technique poses various new radiological physics problems. The accurate assessment of dose and dose distribution in the patient is essential. Physical and dosimetric problems associated with TBI are reviewed elsewhere 2,3 .

Ito, Akira

397

Large granular lymphocyte leukemia. A heterogeneous lymphocytic leukemia in F344 rats.  

PubMed Central

The morphology, histochemistry, cell surface antigens, and natural killer cell (NK) activity of 10 primary and 10 transplantable large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukemias of aging F344 rats were studied. The LGL leukemia is the major cause of death of aging F344 rats. Morphologically, the LGL leukemias were composed of cells with either pleomorphic nuclei with many intracytoplasmic granules or round nuclei with few intracytoplasmic granules. The granules appeared to be lysosomes containing beta-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase and ultrastructurally developed in association with vesicles in the Golgi apparatus. Splenic natural killer cell activity against YAC-1 cells varied from case to case, and it appeared to be associated with LGL leukemia cells. Some transplantable leukemias had stable NK activity. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis of surface antigens revealed the LGL leukemias to be heterogeneous, and there was no correlation between cytotoxic activity and cell surface antigens. Although the morphologic features of cells in LGL leukemias resemble those of normal rat LGLs, differences in cytotoxic activity and surface antigens suggest that LGL tumors represent a heterogeneous group of leukemias which may serve as a model for the study of origin and lineage of normal LGL and NK cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6837719

Ward, J. M.; Reynolds, C. W.

1983-01-01

398

Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... often be cured. Other types are hard to cure, but you can often control them. Treatments may include chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplantation. Even if symptoms disappear, you might need therapy to prevent a relapse. NIH: National Cancer Institute

399

Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... for your specific condition. ©1995-2013, The Patient Education Institute, Inc. www.X-Plain.com oc160106 Last ... for your specific condition. ©1995-2013, The Patient Education Institute, Inc. www.X-Plain.com oc160106 Last ...

400

MK2206 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-04-28

401

The negative impact of being underweight and weight loss on survival of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

PubMed Central

Body mass index and change in body mass index during treatment may influence treatment outcome of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, previous studies in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia reported contradictory results. We prospectively collected data on body composition from a cohort of newly diagnosed Dutch pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=762, age 2–17 years). Patients were treated from 1997–2004 and the median follow-up was 9 years (range, 0–10). Body mass index at diagnosis was expressed as age- and gender-matched standard deviation scores and on the basis of these scores the patients were categorized as being underweight, of normal weight or overweight. Multivariate analyses showed that patients who were underweight (8%) had a higher risk of relapse [hazard ratio: 1.88, 95% confidence interval (1.13–3.13)], but similar overall survival and event-free survival as patients who had a normal weight or who were overweight. Patients with loss of body mass index during the first 32 weeks of treatment had a similar risk of relapse and event-free survival, but decreased overall survival [hazard ratio: 2.10, 95% confidence interval (1.14–3.87)] compared to patients without a loss of body mass index. In addition, dual X-ray absorptiometry scans were performed in a nested, single-center cohort. Data from these scans revealed that a loss of body mass consisted mainly of a loss of lean body mass, while there was a gain in the percentage of fat. In conclusion, being underweight at diagnosis is a risk factor for relapse, and a decrease in body mass index early during treatment is associated with decreased survival. In addition, loss of body mass during treatment seems to consist mainly of a loss of lean body mass. This study was approved by the Medical Ethical Committee in 1996 (trial number NTR460/SNWLK-ALL-9). PMID:25304613

den Hoed, Marissa A.H.; Pluijm, Saskia M.F.; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A.; te Winkel, Mariël L.; Fiocco, Martha; van den Akker, Erica L.T.; Hoogerbrugge, Peter; van den Berg, Henk; Leeuw, Jan A.; Bruin, Marrie C.A.; Bresters, Dorine; Veerman, Anjo J.P.; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

2015-01-01

402

Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth  

SciTech Connect

Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

Wang, Jiying [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Rao, Qing, E-mail: raoqing@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China)

2009-09-04

403

Nuclear Scans (Cancer)  

MedlinePLUS

... Nuclear scans make pictures based on the body’s chemistry rather than on physical shapes and forms (as ... risk of being toxic or causing an allergic reaction. Some people may have pain or swelling at ...

404

AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-11-13

405

What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... lymphocytic leukemia? What are the risk factors for acute lymphocytic leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects your ... this is unknown. Having an identical twin with ALL Someone who has an identical twin who develops ...

406

What's New in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment?  

MedlinePLUS

... Topic Additional resources for chronic lymphocytic leukemia What`s new in chronic lymphocytic leukemia research and treatment? Many ... person's outlook and whether they will need treatment. New treatment combinations Many different drugs are now used ...

407

What Are the Key Statistics for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... for chronic lymphocytic leukemia? What are the key statistics for chronic lymphocytic leukemia? The American Cancer Society's ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

408

What Are the Key Statistics about Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... for chronic myeloid leukemia? What are the key statistics about chronic myeloid leukemia? The American Cancer Society's ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

409

What Should You Ask Your Child's Doctor about Childhood Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Leukemia in Children » Detailed Guide » What should you ask your child’s ... 2014 Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Leukemia in Children? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, ...

410

Treatment of Children with APL (Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia)  

MedlinePLUS

... Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Leukemia in Children » Overview Guide » Treatment of children with acute promyelocytic ... Overview + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » Treating Leukemia in Children TOPICS Document Topics GO » SEE A LIST » How ...

411

Dasatinib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Did Not Respond to Imatinib Mesylate  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2013-02-04

412

Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report contains brief papers that discusses the following topics: Fundamental Symmetries in the Nucleus; Internucleon Interactions; Dynamics of Very Light Nuclei; Facets of the Nuclear Many-Body Problem; and Nuclear Instruments and Methods.

Not Available

1991-01-01

413

[WT1 gene expression difference in leukemia and non-leukemia and its clinical significance].  

PubMed

This study was aimed to investigate the expression level of Wilms' tumor 1( WT1) gene in hematologic neoplasm (leukemia, multiple myeloma and lymphoma) patients and its clinical significance. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) was used to detect the copy number of WT1 gene and reference gene (ALB) in bone marrow cells of 228 patients with hematologic neoplasm in our hospital. The gene expression level was determined by using the ratio of the copy number of WT1 gene and reference gene. The results showed that the WT1 expression level between male and female patients was not statistically significantly different (P > 0.05). All the patients were divided into 3 groups: the group aged under 19, the group aged between 19-50, and the group aged over 50; the WT1 expression level among the three groups were not statistically significantly different (P > 0.05) . The above-mentioned patients were redivided into the groups aged under 45 and over 45, the difference between them was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The difference of WT1 expression level between newly diagnosed patients and treated patients with hematologic neoplasm was statistically significant (P < 0.01), but no statistically significant difference of WT1 expression was found (P > 0.05) at each stage within 3 years after treatment, however, among them the difference between newly diagnosed leukemia patients and treated leukemia patients was very statistically significant (P < 0.01), while the difference between newly diagnosed and treated non-leukemia patients was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The expression difference of WT1 between leukemia and non-leukemia patients was very statistically significant (P < 0.01), the difference between the newly diagnosed leukemia and non-leukemia patients also was very statistically significant (P < 0.01). The difference of WT1 expression between treated leukemia and non-leukemia patients was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). It is concluded that the WT1 expression level in leukemia patients can be a reliable marker to evaluate the prognosis of newly diagnosed leukemia and the curative effect for minimal residual disease. No WT1 expression difference has been found before and after treatment among the patients with non-leukemia, such as multiple myeloma and lymphoma, therefore, which should be furtherly explored. PMID:25338560

Liu, Hua-Sheng; Zhu, Ming-Shang; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Wei, Shuang-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Xi, Xiao-Ping; Yu, Fang-Fang; Xi, Jie-Ying; Wang, Meng-Chang; Zhang, Mei

2014-10-01

414

Aurora kinase inhibitors: novel small molecules with promising activity in acute myeloid and Philadelphia-positive leukemias.  

PubMed

Aurora kinases are a family of protein kinases that have a key role in multiple stages of mitosis. Over-expression of Aurora kinases, particularly Aurora A, has been demonstrated in a number of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Not surprisingly, these serine/threonine kinases have become attractive small molecule targets for cancer therapeutics, with several inhibitors currently in early-phase clinical trials. A small number of compounds developed to date are highly selective for either Aurora A or Aurora B, while the majority inhibit both Aurora A and Aurora B; many of these compounds exhibit 'off-target' inhibition of kinases such as ABL, JAK2 and FLT3. It is currently unclear whether the therapeutic activity of these compounds in leukemia is primarily due to selective Aurora or multi-kinase inhibition. The most promising application for Aurora kinase inhibitors to date appears to be in FLT3-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia/Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia, particularly when caused by the T315I mutation. Here we review the growing body of evidence supporting the use of Aurora kinase inhibitors as effective agents for AML and Ph+ leukemias. PMID:20147976

Moore, A S; Blagg, J; Linardopoulos, S; Pearson, A D J

2010-04-01

415

Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-09-13

416

Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-09-27

417

CPX-351 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2015-02-04

418

Ixazomib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-02-04

419

AKT Inhibitor MK-2206 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-12-23

420

Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-01-29

421

Actual biological diagnosis of acute myeloblastic leukemia in children  

PubMed Central

Abstract Acute myeloblastic leukemia accounts for approximately 20% of acute leukemias in children. The days the microscope represented the main tool in the diagnosis and classification of Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia seem to be very far. This review summarizes the current diagnosis of this malignancy, where the morphological, cytochemical, immunophenotyping, cytogenetic and molecular characterization represents the basement of a risk group related therapy. PMID:25408742

Buga Corbu, V; Gl?ck, A; Arion, C

2014-01-01

422

42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public Health...Probability of Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more...

2011-10-01

423

42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public Health...Probability of Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more...

2013-10-01

424

The allometry of chronic myeloid leukemia Jorge M. Pacheco a  

E-print Network

The allometry of chronic myeloid leukemia Jorge M. Pacheco a , Arne Traulsen b , David Dingli c Available online 10 April 2009 Keywords: Chronic myeloid leukemia Hematopoiesis Modeling Allometry a b s t r a c t Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is an acquired neoplastic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) disorder

Traulsen, Arne

425

Network model of survival signaling in large granular lymphocyte leukemia  

E-print Network

Network model of survival signaling in large granular lymphocyte leukemia Ranran Zhang , Mithun granular lymphocyte (T-LGL) leukemia features a clonal expansion of antigen-primed, competent, cytotoxic-LGL leukemia, we constructed a T-LGL survival signaling network by integrating the signaling pathways involved

Albert, RĂ©ka

426

42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public Health...Probability of Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more...

2012-10-01

427

Leukemia . Author manuscript Controlling TRAIL-mediated caspase-3 activation  

E-print Network

Leukemia . Author manuscript Page /1 3 Controlling TRAIL-mediated caspase-3 activation Olivier ; Caspases ; metabolism ; Enzyme Activation ; drug effects ; Humans ; Leukemia ; enzymology ; pathology of ( Differential involvement ofLeukemia ` Bax and Bak in TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of leukemic T cells

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

428

42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public Health...Probability of Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more...

2014-10-01

429

42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public Health...Probability of Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more...

2010-10-01

430

Induction of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) oncogenic domains (PODs) by papillomavirus  

SciTech Connect

Promyelocytic leukemia oncogenic domains (PODs), also called nuclear domain 10 (ND10), are subnuclear structures that have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes as well as the life cycle of DNA viruses including papillomaviruses. In order to investigate the interplay between papillomaviruses and PODs, we analyzed the status of PODs in organotypic raft cultures of human keratinocytes harboring HPV genome that support the differentiation-dependent HPV life cycle. The number of PODs per nucleus was increased in the presence of HPV genomes selectively within the poorly differentiated layers but was absent in the terminally differentiated layers of the stratified epithelium. This increase in PODs was correlated with an increase in abundance of post-translationally modified PML protein. Neither the E2-dependent transcription nor viral DNA replication was reliant upon the presence of PML. Implications of these findings in terms of HPV's interaction with its host are discussed.

Nakahara, Tomomi [McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 1400 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lambert, Paul F. [McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 1400 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)], E-mail: lambert@oncology.wisc.edu

2007-09-30

431

MS-275 and GM-CSF in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and/or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-01-08

432

Targeted drug discovery for pediatric leukemia.  

PubMed

Despite dramatic advances in the treatment of pediatric leukemia over the past 50?years, there remain subsets of patients who respond poorly to treatment. Many of the high-risk cases of childhood leukemia with the poorest prognosis have been found to harbor specific genetic signatures, often resulting from chromosomal rearrangements. With increased understanding of the genetic and epigenetic makeup of high-risk pediatric leukemia has come the opportunity to develop targeted therapies that promise to be both more effective and less toxic than current chemotherapy. Of particular importance is an understanding of the interconnections between different targets within the same cancer, and observations of synergy between two different targeted therapies or between a targeted drug and conventional chemotherapy. It has become clear that many cancers are able to circumvent a single specific blockade, and pediatric leukemias are no exception in this regard. This review highlights the most promising approaches to new drugs and drug combinations for high-risk pediatric leukemia. Key biological evidence supporting selection of molecular targets is presented, together with a critical survey of recent progress toward the discovery, pre-clinical development, and clinical study of novel molecular therapeutics. PMID:23847761

Napper, Andrew D; Watson, Venita G

2013-01-01

433

Targeted Drug Discovery for Pediatric Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Despite dramatic advances in the treatment of pediatric leukemia over the past 50?years, there remain subsets of patients who respond poorly to treatment. Many of the high-risk cases of childhood leukemia with the poorest prognosis have been found to harbor specific genetic signatures, often resulting from chromosomal rearrangements. With increased understanding of the genetic and epigenetic makeup of high-risk pediatric leukemia has come the opportunity to develop targeted therapies that promise to be both more effective and less toxic than current chemotherapy. Of particular importance is an understanding of the interconnections between different targets within the same cancer, and observations of synergy between two different targeted therapies or between a targeted drug and conventional chemotherapy. It has become clear that many cancers are able to circumvent a single specific blockade, and pediatric leukemias are no exception in this regard. This review highlights the most promising approaches to new drugs and drug combinations for high-risk pediatric leukemia. Key biological evidence supporting selection of molecular targets is presented, together with a critical survey of recent progress toward the discovery, pre-clinical development, and clinical study of novel molecular therapeutics. PMID:23847761

Napper, Andrew D.; Watson, Venita G.

2013-01-01

434

Flavaglines target primitive leukemia cells and enhance anti-leukemia drug activity.  

PubMed

Identification of agents that target human leukemia stem cells is an important consideration for the development of new therapies. The present study demonstrates that rocaglamide and silvestrol, closely related natural products from the flavagline class of compounds, are able to preferentially kill functionally defined leukemia stem cells, while sparing normal stem and progenitor cells. In addition to efficacy as single agents, flavaglines sensitize leukemia cells to several anticancer compounds, including front-line chemotherapeutic drugs used to treat leukemia patients. Mechanistic studies indicate that flavaglines strongly inhibit protein synthesis, leading to the reduction of short-lived antiapoptotic proteins. Notably though, treatment with flavaglines, alone or in combination with other drugs, yields a much stronger cytotoxic activity toward leukemia cells than the translational inhibitor temsirolimus. These results indicate that the underlying cell death mechanism of flavaglines is more complex than simply inhibiting general protein translation. Global gene expression profiling and cell biological assays identified Myc inhibition and the disruption of mitochondrial integrity to be features of flavaglines, which we propose contribute to their efficacy in targeting leukemia cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that rocaglamide and silvestrol are distinct from clinically available translational inhibitors and represent promising candidates for the treatment of leukemia. PMID:24577530

Callahan, K P; Minhajuddin, M; Corbett, C; Lagadinou, E D; Rossi, R M; Grose, V; Balys, M M; Pan, L; Jacob, S; Frontier, A; Grever, M R; Lucas, D M; Kinghorn, A D; Liesveld, J L; Becker, M W; Jordan, C T

2014-10-01

435

Two decades of leukemia oncoprotein epistasis: the MLL1 paradigm for epigenetic deregulation in leukemia.  

PubMed

MLL1, located on human chromosome 11, is disrupted in distinct recurrent chromosomal translocations in several leukemia subsets. Studying the MLL1 gene and its oncogenic variants has provided a paradigm for understanding cancer initiation and maintenance through aberrant epigenetic gene regulation. Here we review the historical development of model systems to recapitulate oncogenic MLL1-rearrangement (MLL-r) alleles encoding mixed-lineage leukemia fusion proteins (MLL-FPs) or internal gene rearrangement products. These largely mouse and human cell/xenograft systems have been generated and used to understand how MLL-r alleles affect diverse pathways to result in a highly penetrant, drug-resistant leukemia. The particular features of the animal models influenced the conclusions of mechanisms of transformation. We discuss significant downstream enablers, inhibitors, effectors, and collaborators of MLL-r leukemia, including molecules that directly interact with MLL-FPs and endogenous mixed-lineage leukemia protein, direct target genes of MLL-FPs, and other pathways that have proven to be influential in supporting or suppressing the leukemogenic activity of MLL-FPs. The use of animal models has been complemented with patient sample, genome-wide analyses to delineate the important genomic and epigenomic changes that occur in distinct subsets of MLL-r leukemia. Collectively, these studies have resulted in rapid progress toward developing new strategies for targeting MLL-r leukemia and general cell-biological principles that may broadly inform targeting aberrant epigenetic regulators in other cancers. PMID:25264566

Li, Bin E; Ernst, Patricia

2014-12-01

436

An autologous leukemia cell vaccine prevents murine acute leukemia relapse after cytarabine treatment.  

PubMed

Acute leukemias with adverse prognostic features carry a high relapse rate without allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Allo-SCT has a high morbidity and is precluded for many patients because of advanced age or comorbidities. Postremission therapies with reduced toxicities are urgently needed. The murine acute leukemia model C1498 was used to study the efficacy of an intravenously administered vaccine consisting of irradiated leukemia cells loaded with the natural killer T (NKT)-cell agonist ?-galactosylceramide (?-GalCer). Prophylactically, the vaccine was highly effective at preventing leukemia development through the downstream activities of activated NKT cells, which were dependent on splenic langerin(+)CD8?(+) dendritic cells and which led to stimulation of antileukemia CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. However, hosts with established leukemia received no protective benefit from the vaccine, despite inducing NKT-cell activation. Established leukemia was associated with increases in regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and the leukemic cells themselves were highly suppressive in vitro. Although this suppressive environment impaired both effector arms of the immune response, CD4(+) T-cell responses were more severely affected. When cytarabine chemotherapy was administered prior to vaccination, all animals in remission posttherapy were protected against rechallenge with viable leukemia cells. PMID:25237205

Gibbins, John D; Ancelet, Lindsay R; Weinkove, Robert; Compton, Benjamin J; Painter, Gavin F; Petersen, Troels R; Hermans, Ian F

2014-11-01

437

Effect of a body-tie structure fabricated by partial trench isolation on the suppression of floating body effect induced soft errors in SOI SRAM investigated using nuclear probes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soft errors induced by proton, helium and oxygen ion irradiations were measured as a function of distance between a body electrode under partial trench isolation and a metal pad connected to a tungsten via for the first metal layer of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) static random access memory. Abnormal drain charges induced by ion irradiations with various distances in the SOI metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor were simulated to be compared with the experimental results. The soft errors were found to depend on the distance between the body electrode and the metal pad in the case of the abnormal drain charge, which is induced by incident ions, lower than the critical charge of the SRAM cells. The soft errors did not depend on the distance for the abnormal drain charges higher than the critical charge.

Abo, Satoshi; Masuda, Naoyuki; Wakaya, Fujio; Onoda, Shinobu; Makino, Takahiro; Hirao, Toshio; Ohshima, Takeshi; Iwamatsu, Toshiaki; Oda, Hidekazu; Takai, Mikio

2011-10-01

438

Daunorubicin Hydrochloride, Cytarabine and Oblimersen Sodium in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-06-04

439

Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-05-07

440

Vaccine Therapy and Basiliximab in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

2014-10-14

441

Obinutuzumab for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a frequent hematological malignancy that is incurable using standard approaches. Two anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb), rituximab and ofatumumab, have been approved for CLL treatment. A new glycoengineered type II humanized anti-CD20 mAb, obinutuzumab (GA101), has been developed and demonstrates increased activity against B-cell malignancies by inducing direct cell death and better antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In a recent randomized Phase III study in patients with newly diagnosed CLL and coexisting conditions, obinutuzumab plus chlorambucil demonstrated significant improvement in progression-free survival and several other outcome parameters, in contrast to rituximab plus chlorambucil. Grade 3-4 infusion-related reactions and neutropenia occurred more frequently in patients who received obinutuzumab compared with those who received rituximab; however, the rate of serious infections was similar. Obinutuzumab represents a promising new option for patients with CLL and must be investigated with other chemotherapy regimens or with new targeted agents. PMID:25163491

Rioufol, Catherine; Salles, Gilles

2014-10-01

442

Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

2015-01-08

443

Patient Activation through Counseling and Exercise – Acute Leukemia (PACE-AL) – a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with acute leukemia experience a substantial symptom burden and are at risk of developing infections throughout the course of repeated cycles of intensive chemotherapy. Physical activity in recent years has been a strategy for rehabilitation in cancer patients to remedy disease and treatment related symptoms and side effects. To date, there are no clinical practice exercise guidelines for patients with acute leukemia undergoing induction and consolidation chemotherapy. A randomized controlled trial is needed to determine if patients with acute leukemia can benefit by a structured and supervised counseling and exercise program. Methods/design This paper presents the study protocol: Patient Activation through Counseling and Exercise – Acute Leukemia (PACE-AL) trial, a two center, randomized controlled trial of 70 patients with acute leukemia (35 patients/study arm) following induction chemotherapy in the outpatient setting. Eligible patients will be randomized to usual care or to the 12 week exercise and counseling program. The intervention includes 3 hours?+?30 minutes per week of supervised and structured aerobic training (moderate to high intensity 70 - 80%) on an ergometer cycle, strength exercises using hand weights and relaxation exercise. Individual health counseling sessions include a self directed home walk program with a step counter. The primary endpoint is functional performance/exercise capacity (6 minute walk distance). The secondary endpoints are submaximal VO2 max test, sit to stand and bicep curl test, physical activity levels, patient reported outcomes (quality of life, anxiety and depression, symptom prevalence, intensity and interference). Evaluation of clinical outcomes will be explored including incidence of infection, hospitalization days, body mass index, time to recurrence and survival. Qualitative exploration of patients’ health behavior and experiences. Discussion PACE-AL will provide evidence of the effect of exercise and health promotion counseling on functional and physical capacity, the symptom burden and quality of life in patients with acute leukemia during out patient management. The results will inform clinical practice exercise guidelines and rehabilitation programs for patients undergoing treatment for acute leukemia. Optimizing the treatment and care pathway may ease the transition for patients from illness to the resumption of everyday activities. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01404520. PMID:24083543

2013-01-01

444

Formaldehyde and leukemia: an improbable causal relationship.  

PubMed

Formaldehyde has been the subject of numerous toxicological and epidemiological investigations for almost 25 years. Though most toxicology studies have focused on the effects of the chemical on the nasal tract and respiratory system, epidemiology investigations have been more extensive evaluating the association between formaldehyde and cancers not only of the nasal cavities, nasopharynx, and lung, but also of the brain, prostate, pancreas, and hematopoietic system. Recently, three studies have been published which report on the possible association between exposure to formaldehyde and an increased incidence of leukemia, specifically myeloid leukemia. The article summarizes the results of these three studies, evaluates the evidence for causality based on recognized epidemiologic criteria, and provides an assessment that the association between formaldehyde and the increased incidence of leukemia reported in these studies is not plausible. PMID:15450714

Cole, Philip; Axten, Charles

2004-10-01

445

Inherited predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Germline testing for familial predisposition to myeloid malignancies is becoming more common with the recognition of multiple familial syndromes. Currently, Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-approved testing exists for the following: familial platelet disorder with propensity to acute myeloid leukemia, caused by mutations in RUNX1; familial myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with mutated GATA2; familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA; and the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, including dyskeratosis congenita, a disease of abnormal telomere maintenance. With the recognition of additional families with a genetic component to their myeloid diseases, new predisposition alleles are likely to be identified. Awareness of the existence of these syndromes will facilitate proper genetic counseling, appropriate testing, and clinical management of these cases. PMID:25311743

Godley, Lucy A

2014-10-01

446

Deep vein thrombosis in acute myelogenous leukemia.  

PubMed

Thrombotic complications in acute leukemia are often underestimated because bleeding complications generally dominate the clinical picture. While there are many thrombogenic factors shared by both solid tumors and leukemia, many additional prothrombotic features are present in leukemia. The prothrombotic factors include hyperleukocytosis, increased expression of tissue factor and its activation in leukemic cells, and the prothrombotic adverse effects of therapeutic agents and vascular access cathethers. A 18-year old woman came with swelling on her right leg 10 days before hospital admission. Since 2 months before she had had weakness, pallor and fever without bleeding manifestation. Hematologic examinations showed anemia, leukocytosis with monoblast and thrombocytopenia. Deep vein thrombosis in right femoral and right popliteal vein was confirmed using compression ultrasonography. The treatment of such complications is challenging because of the high risk of hemorrhage in this group of patients, especially due to their severe thrombocytopenia. PMID:20124617

Oehadian, Amaylia; Iqbal, Mohammad; Sumantri, Rachmat

2009-10-01

447

Body Parts  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this online game, learners test their knowledge of human anatomy. Learners are presented a mystery image of a body part and use their mouse to select the proper body part from a full size anatomical model (known as "Jerome"). Learners try to match all 10 body parts correctly. Use this activity to review human anatomy and/or introduce learners to the use of anatomical models.

National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution

2012-06-26

448

Black Body  

Microsoft Academic Search

A black body was first defined by Gustav R. Kirchhoff (1824–87) in 1859 as an object that absorbs all radiation falling upon\\u000a it. Such a conception of an ideal black body was crucial for understanding heat radiation and its laws. Since a completely\\u000a black body does not exist in nature, it had to be constructed. Kirchhoff had already suggested that

Dieter Hoffmann

449

Myeloid Sarcoma: An Unusual Presentation of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Causing Spinal Cord Compression  

PubMed Central

Acute promyelocytic leukemia with concurrent myeloid sarcoma is a rare clinical event. Herein we describe a patient that presented with back pain and bilateral leg weakness caused by spinal cord compression due to extramedullary deposition of leukemic cells. Acute promyelocytic leukemia was suspected based on immunophenotypic findings of malignant cells in bone marrow aspirate. The diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of PML-RAR? fusion copies. MRI showed multiple hyperintense changes on the vertebral bodies, together with intraspinal masses causing spinal cord compression. The patient immediately underwent radiotherapy, and was treated with all-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin. Reassessment MRI showed complete resolution of all intraspinal masses and the disappearance of most of the bony lesions. Post-treatment bone marrow aspirate showed complete hematological and molecular remission. The motor power of his legs fully recovered from 0/5 to 5/5; however, sensory loss below the T4 level persisted. PMID:24744674

Kyaw, Tay Za; Maniam, Jayaranee A.S.; Bee, Ping Chong; Chin, Edmund Fui; Nadarajan, Veera Sekaran; Shanmugam, Hemalatha; Kadir, Khairul Azmi Abd