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1

A Bayesian Network Model of Proteins' Association with Promyelocytic Leukemia (PML) Nuclear Bodies  

E-print Network

A Bayesian Network Model of Proteins' Association with Promyelocytic Leukemia (PML) Nuclear Bodies the complement of proteins associated with these intra-nuclear bodies, we construct a Bayesian network model%, the true positive rate is almost 50%, indicated by an independent nuclear proteome reference set. The model

Dellaire, Graham

2

Arsenic-Induced PML Targeting onto Nuclear Bodies: Implications for the Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is associated with the t(15;17) translocation, which generates a PML\\/RARalpha fusion protein between PML, a growth suppressor localized on nuclear matrix-associated bodies, and RARalpha , a nuclear receptor for retinoic acid (RA). PML\\/RARalpha was proposed to block myeloid differentiation through inhibition of nuclear receptor response, as does a dominant negative RARalpha mutant. In addition, in APL

Jun Zhu; Marcel H. M. Koken; Frederique Quignon; Mounira K. Chelbi-Alix; Laurent Degos; Zhen Yi Wang; Zhu Chen; Hugues de The

1997-01-01

3

PML nuclear bodies in the pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia: active players or innocent bystanders?  

PubMed

The promyelocytic leukemia gene (PML) encodes a protein which localizes to PML-nuclear bodies (NBs), sub-nuclear multi-protein structures, which have been implicated in diverse biological functions such as apoptosis, cell proliferation and senescence. However, the exact biochemical and molecular basis of PML function up until now has not been defined. Strikingly, over a decade ago, PML-NBs were found to be disrupted in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which PML is fused to the gene encoding retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) due to the t(15;17) chromosomal translocation, generating the PML-RARA chimeric protein. The treatment of APL patients with all-transretinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide which target the PML-RARA oncoprotein results in clinical remission, associated with blast cell differentiation and reformation of the PML NBs, thus linking NB integrity with disease status. This review focuses on the current theories for molecular and biochemical functions of the PML-NBs, which would imply a role in the pathogenesis of APL, whilst also discussing the intriguing possibility that their disruption may not be in itself a significant oncogenic event. PMID:19273155

Brown, Nicola J M; Ramalho, Michal; Pedersen, Eva W; Moravcsik, Eva; Solomon, Ellen; Grimwade, David

2009-01-01

4

Trafficking of the Transcription Factor Nrf2 to Promyelocytic Leukemia-Nuclear Bodies  

PubMed Central

Ubiquitylation of Nrf2 by the Keap1-Cullin3/RING box1 (Cul3-Rbx1) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex targets Nrf2 for proteasomal degradation in the cytoplasm and is an extensively studied mechanism for regulating the cellular level of Nrf2. Although mechanistic details are lacking, reports abound that Nrf2 can also be degraded in the nucleus. Here, we demonstrate that Nrf2 is a target for sumoylation by both SUMO-1 and SUMO-2. HepG2 cells treated with As2O3, which enhances attachment of SUMO-2/3 to target proteins, increased SUMO-2/3-modification (polysumoylation) of Nrf2. We show that Nrf2 traffics, in part, to promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs). Cell fractions harboring key components of PML-NBs did not contain biologically active Keap1 but contained modified Nrf2 as well as RING finger protein 4 (RNF4), a poly-SUMO-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase. Overexpression of wild-type RNF4, but not the catalytically inactive mutant, decreased the steady-state levels of Nrf2, measured in the PML-NB-enriched cell fraction. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 interfered with this decrease, resulting in elevated levels of polysumoylated Nrf2 that was also ubiquitylated. Wild-type RNF4 accelerated the half-life (t½) of Nrf2, measured in PML-NB-enriched cell fractions. These results suggest that RNF4 mediates polyubiquitylation of polysumoylated Nrf2, leading to its subsequent degradation in PML-NBs. Overall, this work identifies Nrf2 as a target for sumoylation and provides a novel mechanism for its degradation in the nucleus, independent of Keap1. PMID:23543742

Malloy, Melanie Theodore; McIntosh, Deneshia J.; Walters, Treniqka S.; Flores, Andrea; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Arinze, Ifeanyi J.

2013-01-01

5

Arsenic mediated disruption of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies induces ganciclovir susceptibility in Epstein-Barr positive epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect

Promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML NBs) have been implicated in host immune response to viral infection. PML NBs are targeted for degradation during reactivation of herpes viruses, suggesting that disruption of PML NB function supports this aspect of the viral life cycle. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) has been shown to suppress EBV reactivation. Our finding that LMP1 induces PML NB immunofluorescence intensity led to the hypothesis that LMP1 may modulate PML NBs as a means of maintaining EBV latency. Increased PML protein and morphometric changes in PML NBs were observed in EBV infected alveolar epithelial cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Treatment with low dose arsenic trioxide disrupted PML NBs, induced expression of EBV lytic proteins, and conferred ganciclovir susceptibility. This study introduces an effective modality to induce susceptibility to ganciclovir in epithelial cells with implications for the treatment of EBV associated pathologies.

Sides, Mark D. [Department of Medicine, Section of Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States); Block, Gregory J. [University of Washington Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Shan, Bin; Esteves, Kyle C. [Department of Medicine, Section of Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States); Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K. [Department of Pathology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States); Lasky, Joseph A., E-mail: jlasky@tulane.edu [Department of Medicine, Section of Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States)

2011-06-20

6

Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies support a late step in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY The PML protein and PML nuclear bodies (PML-NB) are implicated in multiple cellular functions relevant to tumor suppression, including DNA damage response. In most cases of acute promyelocytic leukemia, the PML and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) genes are translocated, resulting in expression of oncogenic PML-RAR? fusion proteins. PML-NB fail to form normally, and promyelocytes remain in an undifferentiated, abnormally proliferative state. We examined the involvement of PML protein and PML-NB in homologous recombinational repair (HRR) of chromosomal DNA double-strand breaks. Transient overexpression of wild-type PML protein isoforms produced hugely enlarged or aggregated PML-NB and reduced HRR by ~2 fold, suggesting that HRR depends to some extent upon normal PML-NB structure. Knockdown of PML by RNA interference sharply attenuated formation of PML-NB and reduced HRR by up to 20 fold. However, PML-knockdown cells showed apparently normal induction of H2AX phosphorylation and RAD51 foci after DNA damage by ionizing radiation. These findings indicate that early steps in HRR, including recognition of DNA double-strand breaks, initial processing of ends, and assembly of single-stranded DNA/RAD51 nucleoprotein filaments, do not depend upon PML-NB. The HRR deficit in PML-depleted cells thus reflects inhibition of later steps in the repair pathway. Expression of PML-RAR? fusion proteins disrupted PML-NB structure and reduced HRR by up to 10 fold, raising the possibility that defective HRR and resulting genomic instability may figure in the pathogenesis, progression and relapse of acute promyelocytic leukemia. PMID:22213200

Yeung, Percy Luk; Denissova, Natalia G.; Nasello, Cara; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Chen, J. Don; Brenneman, Mark A.

2012-01-01

7

Contribution of the C-terminal Regions of Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein (PML) Isoforms II and V to PML Nuclear Body Formation*  

PubMed Central

Promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear bodies are dynamic and heterogeneous nuclear protein complexes implicated in various important functions, most notably tumor suppression. PML is the structural component of PML nuclear bodies and has several nuclear splice isoforms that share a common N-terminal region but differ in their C termini. Previous studies have suggested that the coiled-coil motif within the N-terminal region is sufficient for PML nuclear body formation by mediating homo/multi-dimerization of PML molecules. However, it has not been investigated whether any of the C-terminal variants of PML may contribute to PML body assembly. Here we report that the unique C-terminal domains of PML-II and PML-V can target to PML-NBs independent of their N-terminal region. Strikingly, both domains can form nuclear bodies in the absence of endogenous PML. The C-terminal domain of PML-II interacts transiently with unknown binding sites at PML nuclear bodies, whereas the C-terminal domain of PML-V exhibits hyperstable binding to PML bodies via homo-dimerization. This strong interaction is mediated by a putative ?-helix in the C terminus of PML-V. Moreover, nuclear bodies assembled from the C-terminal domain of PML-V also recruit additional PML body components, including Daxx and Sp100. These observations establish the C-terminal domain of PML-V as an additional important contributor to the assembly mechanism(s) of PML bodies. PMID:22773875

Geng, Yunyun; Monajembashi, Shamci; Shao, Anwen; Cui, Di; He, Weiyong; Chen, Zhongzhou; Hemmerich, Peter; Tang, Jun

2012-01-01

8

Novel Nuclear Nesprin-2 Variants Tether Active Extracellular Signal-regulated MAPK1 and MAPK2 at Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein Nuclear Bodies and Act to Regulate Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation*  

PubMed Central

Nuclear and cytoplasmic scaffold proteins have been shown to be essential for temporal and spatial organization, as well as the fidelity, of MAPK signaling pathways. In this study we show that nesprin-2 is a novel extracellular signal-regulated MAPK1 and 2 (ERK1/2) scaffold protein that serves to regulate nuclear signaling by tethering these kinases at promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML NBs). Using immunofluorescence microscopy, GST pull-down and immunoprecipitation, we show that nesprin-2, ERK1/2, and PML colocalize and bind to form a nuclear complex. Interference of nesprin-2 function, by either siRNA-mediated knockdown or overexpression of a dominant negative nesprin-2 fragment, augmented ERK1/2 nuclear signaling shown by increased SP1 activity and ELK1 phosphorylation. The functional outcome of nesprin-2 disruption and the resultant sustained ERK1/2 signal was increased proliferation. Importantly, these activities were not induced by previously identified nuclear envelope (NE)-targeted nesprin-2 isoforms but rather were mediated by novel nuclear isoforms that lacked the KASH domain. Taken together, this study suggests that nesprin-2 is a novel intranuclear scaffold, essential for nuclear ERK1/2 signaling fidelity and cell cycle progression. PMID:19861416

Warren, Derek T.; Tajsic, Tamara; Mellad, Jason A.; Searles, Richelle; Zhang, Qiuping; Shanahan, Catherine M.

2010-01-01

9

Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

10

Total body irradiation in chronic myeloid leukemia  

SciTech Connect

Total body irradiation (TBI), given as 10 rad daily for five days a week for a total dose of 150 rad has been used in an attempt to control the chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Thirteen patients with CML received fractionated TBI leading to rapid and good control of WBC count without any adverse reaction. The chronic phase of CML could also be controlled with TBI, even in three patients who were resistant to busulfan. Following TBI, WBC count remained under control for a period of 32 weeks as compared to 40 weeks following vusulfan alone. Repeat TBI was also well tolerated with good response. It appears that TBI is an effective and safe therapy for controlling the chronic phase of CML.

Advani, S.H.; Dinshaw, K.A.; Nair, C.N.; Ramakrishnan, G.

1983-04-01

11

Infantile cortical measles inclusion body encephalitis during combined treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A case of cortical measles inclusion body encephalitis occuring in a boy aged 6 years 7 months, 4 months after uncomplicated measles is reported. The child was undergoing combined treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He was in primary remission for 2 years. The neuropathological findings are characterized by necrosis, eosinophilic nuclear and cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in the neuronal and glial

G. Spalke; C. Eschenbach

1979-01-01

12

JC Virus Inclusions in Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy: Scaffolding Promyelocytic Leukemia Nuclear Bodies Grow With Cell Cycle Transition Through an S-to-G2-Like State in Enlarging Oligodendrocyte Nuclei  

PubMed Central

Abstract In progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, JC virus–infected oligodendroglia display 2 distinct patterns of intranuclear viral inclusions: full inclusions in which progeny virions are present throughout enlarged nuclei and dot-shaped inclusions in which virions are clustered in subnuclear domains termed “promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies” (PML-NBs). Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies may serve a scaffolding role in viral progeny production. We analyzed the formation process of intranuclear viral inclusions by morphometry and assessed PML-NB alterations in the brains of 2 patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. By immunohistochemistry, proliferating cell nuclear antigen was most frequently detected in smaller nuclei; cyclin A was detected in larger nuclei. This suggests an S-to-G2 cell cycle transition in infected cells associated with nuclear enlargement. Sizes of PML-NBs were variable, but they were usually either small speckles 200 to 400 nm in diameter or distinct spherical shells with a diameter of 1 ?m or more. By confocal microscopy, JC virus capsid proteins were associated with both small and large PML-NBs, but disruption of large PML-NBs was observed by ground-state depletion fluorescence nanoscopy. Clusters of progeny virions were also detected by electron microscopy. Our data suggest that, in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, JC virus produces progeny virions in enlarging oligodendrocyte nuclei in association with growing PML-NBs and with cell cycle transition through an S-to-G2-like state. PMID:24709678

Yazawa, Takuya; Nagane, Motoo; Higuchi, Kayoko; Abe-Suzuki, Shiho; Kurata, Morito; Kitagawa, Masanobu; Kamma, Hiroshi; Uchihara, Toshiki

2014-01-01

13

Nucleation of Nuclear Bodies  

PubMed Central

The nucleus is a complex organelle containing numerous highly dynamic, structurally stable domains and bodies, harboring functions that have only begun to be defined. However, the molecular mechanisms for their formation are still poorly understood. Recently it has been shown that a nuclear body can form de novo by self-organization. But little is known regarding what triggers the formation of a nuclear body and how subsequent assembly steps are orchestrated. Nuclear bodies are frequently associated with specific active gene loci that directly contribute to their formation. Both coding and noncoding RNAs can initiate the assembly of nuclear bodies with which they are physiologically associated. Thus, the formation of nuclear bodies occurs via recruitment and consequent accumulation of resident proteins in the nuclear bodies by nucleating RNA acting as a seeder. In this chapter I describe how to set up an experimental cell system to probe de novo biogenesis of a nuclear body by nucleating RNA and nuclear body components tethered on chromatin. PMID:23980018

Dundr, Miroslav

2014-01-01

14

Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia What Is Leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ... diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. Leukemia Starts in Bone Marrow Click for more information ...

15

Whole-genome screening identifies proteins localized to distinct nuclear bodies  

PubMed Central

The nucleus is a unique organelle that contains essential genetic materials in chromosome territories. The interchromatin space is composed of nuclear subcompartments, which are defined by several distinctive nuclear bodies believed to be factories of DNA or RNA processing and sites of transcriptional and/or posttranscriptional regulation. In this paper, we performed a genome-wide microscopy-based screening for proteins that form nuclear foci and characterized their localizations using markers of known nuclear bodies. In total, we identified 325 proteins localized to distinct nuclear bodies, including nucleoli (148), promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (38), nuclear speckles (27), paraspeckles (24), Cajal bodies (17), Sam68 nuclear bodies (5), Polycomb bodies (2), and uncharacterized nuclear bodies (64). Functional validation revealed several proteins potentially involved in the assembly of Cajal bodies and paraspeckles. Together, these data establish the first atlas of human proteins in different nuclear bodies and provide key information for research on nuclear bodies. PMID:24127217

Fong, Ka-wing; Li, Yujing; Wang, Wenqi; Ma, Wenbin; Li, Kunpeng; Qi, Robert Z.; Liu, Dan; Songyang, Zhou

2013-01-01

16

Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)  

MedlinePLUS

CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

17

Leukemia among participants in military maneuvers at a nuclear bomb test  

SciTech Connect

To test the possibility of a casual relationship between leukemia and exposure to nuclear radiation, the frequency of leukemia in personnel observing the detonation of a nuclear device called ''Smoky'' during August 1957 was determined. Of some 3224 men who witnessed the detonation, nine cases of leukemia were observed. They included four cases of acute myelocytic leukemia, three of chronic myelocytic leukemia, one of hairy cell lymphocyctic leukemia, and one of acute lymphocytic luekemia. These findings represent a significant increase over the expected leukemia incidence of 3.5 cases. Mean film-badge gamma radiation dose for the study group was 466.2 mrem. (17 references, 3 tables)

Caldwell, G.G.; Kelley, D.B.; Heath, C.W.

1980-10-03

18

NCI Scientists Discover How T-Cell Leukemia Viruses Evade Body's Defense Mechanisms  

Cancer.gov

NCI scientists have discovered how human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), which infects about 20 million people worldwide, evades being held in check by one of the body's natural defense mechanisms. An active infection with HTLV-1 leads to T-cell leukemia in up to five percent of all cases worldwide.

19

Childhood leukemia and fallout from the Nevada nuclear tests.  

PubMed

Cancer mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics, covering the period 1950 through 1978, were used to test a reported association between childhood leukemia and exposure to radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons tests in Nevada between 1951 and 1958. No pattern of temporal and geographic variation in risk supportive of the reported association was found. Comparison of these results with those presented in support of an association of risk with fallout suggests that the purported association merely reflects an anomalously low leukemia rate in southern Utah during the period 1944 to 1949. PMID:6691139

Land, C E; McKay, F W; Machado, S G

1984-01-13

20

Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... embed/Ya8IzYwguVM?rel=0 SEER Stat Fact Sheets: Leukemia Expand All Collapse All Statistics at a Glance ... 5 Years Or More after Being Diagnosed with Leukemia? Relative survival statistics compare the survival of patients ...

21

Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... 27,000 adults and more than 2,000 children in the United States are diagnosed with leukemia ... effects of radiotherapy may be long lasting. Young children who receive radiation to the brain may develop ...

22

Body composition, muscle strength deficits and mobility limitations in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Chronicity of muscle weakness from cancer and its treatment may be problematic, particularly in those treated for cancer during childhood. We compared body composition, muscle strength, and mobility between 75 adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and expected values based on population normative data. Methods. Subjects were young adults treated for childhood ALL between 1970 and 1986,

Kirsten K. Ness; K. Scott Baker; Donald R. Dengel; Nancy Youngren; Shalamar Sibley; Ann C. Mertens; James G. Gurney

2007-01-01

23

What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... for chronic lymphocytic leukemia? What is chronic lymphocytic leukemia? Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a type of ... in the body from functioning normally. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

24

The eleven-nineteen-leukemia protein ENL connects nuclear MLL fusion partners with chromatin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion proteins are derived from translocations at 11q23 that occur in aggressive subtypes of leukemia. As a consequence, MLL is joined to different unrelated proteins to form oncogenic transcription factors. Here we demonstrate a direct interaction between several nuclear MLL fusion partners and present evidence for a role of these proteins in histone binding. In two-hybrid

Deniz T Zeisig; Claudia B Bittner; Bernd B Zeisig; Maria-Paz García-Cuéllar; Jay L Hess; Robert K Slany

2005-01-01

25

Childhood Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

26

TTRAP is a novel PML nuclear bodies-associated protein  

SciTech Connect

PML nuclear body (PML NB) is an important macromolecular nuclear structure that is involved in many essential aspects of cellular function. Tens of proteins have been found in PML NBs, and promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) has been proven to be essential for the formation of this structure. Here, we showed that TRAF and TNF receptor-associated protein (TTRAP) was a novel PML NBs-associated protein. TTRAP colocalized with three important PML NBs-associated proteins, PML, DAXX and Sp100 in the typical fashion of PML NBs. By yeast mating assay, TTRAP was identified to interact with these PML NBs-associated proteins. The transcription and expression of TTRAP could be induced by IFN-{gamma}, representing another common feature of PML NBs-associated proteins. These results would not only be important for understanding PML NBs but also be helpful in studying the TTRAP function in the future.

Xu Guanlan; Pan Yukun; Wang Bingyin; Huang Lu; Tian Ling; Xue Jinglun [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chen Jinzhong [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)], E-mail: kingbellchen@fudan.edu.cn; Jia, William [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)], E-mail: wjia@interchange.ubc.ca

2008-10-24

27

Body composition and phase angle in Russian children in remission from acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Elevated degree of body fatness and changes in other body composition parameters are known to be common effects of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children. In order to study peculiarities of somatic growth and development in ALL survivors, we describe the results of BIA body composition analysis of 112 boys and 108 girls aged 5-18 years in remission from ALL (remission time range 1-13 years) compared to data from the same number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n=220). Detrimental effect on height in ALL boys was observed, whereas girls experienced additional weight gain compared to healthy subjects. In ALL patients, resistance, body fat, and percent body fat were significantly increased. The reactance, phase angle, absolute and relative values of skeletal muscle and body cell mass were significantly decreased. Principal component analysis revealed an early prevalence of adiposity traits in the somatic growth and development of ALL girls compared to healthy controls.

Tseytlin, G. Ja; Khomyakova, I. A.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Konovalova, M. V.; Vashura, A. Yu; Tretyak, A. V.; Godina, E. Z.; Rudnev, S. G.

2010-04-01

28

Leukemia among participants in military maneuvers at a nuclear bomb test. [Plumbbob Project  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary studies indicate that nine cases of leukemia have occurred among 3224 men who participated in military maneuvers during the 1957 nuclear test explosion Smoky. This represents a significant increase over the expected incidence of 3.5 cases. They included four cases of acute myelocytic leukemia, three of chronic myelocytic leukemia, and one each of hairy cell and acute lymphocytic leukemia. At time of diagnosis, patient ages ranged from 21 to 60 years (mean, 41.8 years) and the interval from time of nuclear test to diagnosis from two to 19 years (mean, 14.2 years). Film-badge records, which are available for eight of the nine men, indicated gamma radiation exposure levels ranging from 0 to 2977 mrem (mean, 1033 mrem). Mean film-badge gamma dose for the entire Smoky cohort was 466.2 mrem.

Caldwell, G.G.; Kelley, D.B.; Heath, C.W. Jr.

1980-10-03

29

Total-body irradiation before bone marrow transplantation for acute leukemia in first or second complete remission  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim  In order to assess the influence of total-body irradiation (TBI) on the outcome and incidence of complication after bone marrow\\u000a transplantation (BMT), we retrospectively analyzed our patients treated for acute leukemia and conditioned with TBI prior\\u000a to BMT.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and Methods  Between 1980 and 1993, 326 patients referred to our department with acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL, n=182) and acute\\u000a lymphoblastic leukemia

Y. Belkacémi; F. Pène; E. Touboul; B. Rio; V. Leblond; N. C. Gorin; A. Laugier; C. Gemici; M. Housset; M. Ozsahin

1998-01-01

30

21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a wide-aperture...

2011-04-01

31

21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a wide-aperture...

2013-04-01

32

21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.  

...Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a wide-aperture...

2014-04-01

33

21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a wide-aperture...

2012-04-01

34

21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a wide-aperture...

2010-04-01

35

Hyperfractionated total body irradiation for bone marrow transplantation. Results in seventy leukemia patients with allogeneic transplants  

SciTech Connect

From May, 1979 to March, 1981, 76 leukemia patients were prepared for bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with a new hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) regimen (1320 cGy in 11 fractions, 3x/day), followed by cyclophosphamide, 60 mg/kg, for two days. Partial lung shielding was done on each treatment, with supplemental electron beam treatments of the chest wall to compensate, and of the testes, a sanctuary site. This regimen was initiated to potentially reduce fatal interstitial pneumonitis as well as decrease leukemic relapse. Overall actuarial survival at 1 year for acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) patients is 63%, while relapse-free survival at 1 year is 53%. On the other hand, for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) patients, there is no significant difference between relapse or remission patients with regard to overall survival or relapse-free survival, when relapse is defined as > 5% blasts in the marrow at the time of cytoreduction. Overall actuarial survival at 1 year for ALL is 61% and relapse-free survival is 45% at 1 year. Fatal interstitial pneumonitis has dropped to 18% compared with 50% in our previous single-dose TBI regimen (1000 cGy), in which the same doses of cyclophosphamide were given prior to TBI. In conclusion, not only has fatal interstitial pneumonitis been reduced by hyperfractionation and partial lung blocking, but there may be a survival advantage in ALL patients in relapse, who have a survival equal to that of remission patients. This may indicate a greater cell kill with the higher dose (1320 cGy) attained with this regimen, in these patients with a higher leukemic cell burden.

Shank, B.; Chu, F.C.H.; Dinsmore, R.; Kapoor, N.; Kirkpatrick, D.; Teitelbaum, H.; Reid, A.; Bonfiglio, P.; Simpson, L.; O'Reilly, R.J.

1983-11-01

36

Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia by total body irradiation alone and combined with chemotherapy. [Efficacy and complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Total body irradiation (TBI) offers a new dimension in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a disease heretofore refractory to effective management. Excellent responses were observed in 50\\/57 (88%) consecutive patients with active CLL treated since 1964, and complete remissions were achieved in 22\\/57 (39%). Toxicity was acceptable and was minimized by combining TBI and chemotherapy in attenuated doses

Johnson

1979-01-01

37

Leukemia, Lymphomas, and Myeloma Mortality in the Vicinity of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Fuel Facilities in Spain1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mortality due to hematological tumors in towns near Spain's seven nuclear power plants and five nuclear fuel facilities during the period 1975-1993 was ascertained. The study was based on 610 leukemia-, 198 lymphoma-, and 122 myeloma-induced deaths in 489 towns situated within a 30-km radius of such installations. As control areas, we used 477 towns lying within a 50- to

Gonzalo Lopez-Abente; Nuria Aragones; Marina Pollan; Maria Ruiz; Ana Gandarillas

38

Childhood leukemia and cancers near German nuclear reactors: significance, context, and ramifications of recent studies.  

PubMed

A government-sponsored study of childhood cancer in the proximity of German nuclear power plants (German acronym KiKK) found that children < 5 years living < 5 km from plant exhaust stacks had twice the risk for contracting leukemia as those residing > 5 km. The researchers concluded that since "this result was not to be expected under current radiation-epidemiological knowledge" and confounders could not be identified, the observed association of leukemia incidence with residential proximity to nuclear plants "remains unexplained." This unjustified conclusion illustrates the dissonance between evidence and assumptions. There exist serious flaws and gaps in the knowledge on which accepted models for population exposure and radiation risk are based. Studies with results contradictory to those of KiKK lack statistical power to invalidate its findings. The KiKK study's ramifications add to the urgency for a public policy debate regarding the health impact of nuclear power generation. PMID:19650588

Nussbaum, Rudi H

2009-01-01

39

Relativistic nuclear many-body theory  

SciTech Connect

Nonrelativistic models of nuclear systems have provided important insight into nuclear physics. In future experiments, nuclear systems will be examined under extreme conditions of density and temperature, and their response will be probed at momentum and energy transfers larger than the nucleon mass. It is therefore essential to develop reliable models that go beyond the traditional nonrelativistic many-body framework. General properties of physics, such as quantum mechanics, Lorentz covariance, and microscopic causality, motivate the use of quantum field theories to describe the interacting, relativistic, nuclear many-body system. Renormalizable models based on hadronic degrees of freedom (quantum hadrodynamics) are presented, and the assumptions underlying this framework are discussed. Some applications and successes of quantum hadrodynamics are described, with an emphasis on the new features arising from relativity. Examples include the nuclear equation of state, the shell model, nucleon-nucleus scattering, and the inclusion of zero-point vacuum corrections. Current issues and problems are also considered, such as the construction of improved approximations, the full role of the quantum vacuum, and the relationship between quantum hadrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics. We also speculate on future developments. 103 refs., 18 figs.

Serot, B.D. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)); Walecka, J.D. (Southeastern Universities Research Association, Newport News, VA (United States). Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility)

1991-09-11

40

Nuclear export signal within CALM is necessary for CALM-AF10-induced leukemia.  

PubMed

The CALM-AF10 fusion gene, which results from a t(10;11) translocation, is found in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies. Certain HOXA cluster genes and MEIS1 genes are upregulated in patients and mouse models that express CALM-AF10. Wild-type clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid leukemia protein (CALM) primarily localizes in a diffuse pattern within the cytoplasm, whereas AF10 localizes in the nucleus; however, it is not clear where CALM-AF10 acts to induce leukemia. To investigate the influence of localization on leukemogenesis involving CALM-AF10, we determined the nuclear export signal (NES) within CALM that is necessary and sufficient for cytoplasmic localization of CALM-AF10. Mutations in the NES eliminated the capacity of CALM-AF10 to immortalize murine bone-marrow cells in vitro and to promote development of acute myeloid leukemia in mouse models. Furthermore, a fusion of AF10 with the minimal NES can immortalize bone-marrow cells and induce leukemia in mice. These results suggest that during leukemogenesis, CALM-AF10 plays its critical roles in the cytoplasm. PMID:24397609

Suzuki, Mai; Yamagata, Kazutsune; Shino, Mika; Aikawa, Yukiko; Akashi, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshio; Kitabayashi, Issay

2014-03-01

41

Viral Immediate-Early Proteins Abrogate the Modification by SUMO1 of PML and Sp100 Proteins, Correlating with Nuclear Body Disruption  

Microsoft Academic Search

PML nuclear bodies (NBs) are subnuclear structures whose integrity is compromised in certain human dis- eases, including leukemia and neurodegenerative disorders. Infection by a number of DNA viruses similarly triggers the reorganization of these structures, suggesting an important role for the NBs in the viral infection process. While expression of the adenovirus E4 ORF3 protein leads to only a moderate

STEFAN MULLER; ANNE DEJEAN

1999-01-01

42

Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2014-07-22

43

Childhood Leukemia in the Vicinity of the Geesthacht Nuclear Establishments near Hamburg, Germany  

PubMed Central

Background During 1990–1991 a childhood leukemia cluster was observed in the sparsely populated region surrounding two nuclear establishments southeast of Hamburg, Germany. Since then, several new cases have been reported. Recently a possible accidental release of radionuclides in 1986 was hypothesized. Objective The objective of this study was to analyze the childhood leukemia incidence in this area since 1990. Methods All incident cases (< 15 years of age) were ascertained during 1990–2005 within a 5-km radius of the Krümmel nuclear power plant. We derived standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) using county and national leukemia incidence rates as referents. We stratified analyses by calendar period and attained age, and by subdividing the study region into areas north versus south of the Elbe river. Results Fourteen cases were ascertained in the study area, whereas 4.0 were expected based on national referent rates [1990–2005: SIR = 3.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.9–5.9]. The excess was not confined to the early 1990s; for the more recent time period 1999–2005, the SIR is still elevated (SIR = 2.7; 95% CI, 0.9–6.2). SIRs of greatest magnitude were observed for children 0–4 years of age (SIR = 4.9; 95% CI, 2.4–9.0) and for residents south of the Elbe (SIR = 7.5; 95% CI, 2.8–16.4). Conclusions The incidence in this region is significantly higher than the childhood leukemia incidence for Germany as a whole. To date, no unique hazards have been identified in this population. The fact that the elevated rates have persisted in this community for > 15 years warrants further investigation. PMID:17589605

Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Terschueren, Claudia; Richardson, David B.

2007-01-01

44

Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

45

Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

46

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

47

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

48

Nuclear Few-Body Physics at FAIR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The FAIR facility, to be constructed at the GSI site in Darmstadt, will be addressing a wealth of outstanding questions within the realm of subatomic, atomic and plasma physics through a combination of novel accelerators, storage rings and innovative experimental set-ups. One of the key installations is the fragment separator Super-FRS that will be able to deliver an unprecedented range of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) in the energy range of 0-1.5 GeV/u to the envisaged experiments collected within the NuSTAR collaboration. This will in particular permit new experimental investigations of nuclear few-body systems at extreme isospins, also reaching beyond the drip-lines, using the NuSTAR-R3B set-up. The outcome of pilot experiments on unbound systems are reported, as well as crucial detector upgrades.

Nilsson, Thomas

2011-05-01

49

21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2010-04-01

50

21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2012-04-01

51

21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.  

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2014-04-01

52

21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2011-04-01

53

21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear...

2013-04-01

54

Father's occupational exposure to radiation and the raised level of childhood leukemia near the Sellafield Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The first indications that childhood leukemia rates may be raised near the Sellafield nuclear plant in West Cumbria, England, came from largely anecdotal evidence in a television program Windscale: The Nuclear Laundry shown during 1983. During subsequent years, various epidemiological studies have investigated the claim in more detail. Geographical analyses of childhood leukemia incidence in the northern region and mortality in England and Wales using routinely available data made the first contribution. As a result, it was confirmed that leukemia rates in the area, particularly the neighboring village of Seascale, were high compared to other districts, although not totally extreme. Cohort studies of children born in Seascale or attending schools in Seascale were carried out to resolve some of the difficulties of interpretation of geographical analysis. Cohort studies indicated that the excess of leukemia was concentrated among children born in Seascale and was not found among those moving in after birth and suggested that any causal factors may be acting before birth or very early in life. A case-control study of leukemia (and lymphoma) among young people in West Cumbria has examined potentially important individual factors in detail. The study demonstrated a relationship between the raised incidence of leukemia in children and father's recorded external radiation dose during work at Sellafield before his child's conception. The association can effectively explain statistically the observed geographical excess.

Gardner, M.J. (Univ. of Southampton (England))

1991-08-01

55

SUMO-1 promotes association of SNURF (RNF4) with PML nuclear bodies  

SciTech Connect

Small nuclear RING finger protein SNURF (RNF4) is involved in transcriptional and cell growth regulation. We show here that a significant portion of endogenous SNURF localizes to nuclear bodies (NBs) that overlap with or are adjacent to domains containing endogenous promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein and small ubiquitin-like modifier-1 (SUMO-1). In biochemical assays, SNURF efficiently binds SUMO-1 in a noncovalent fashion. SNURF is also covalently modified by SUMO-1 at nonconsensus attachment sites. Ectopic expression of SUMO-1 markedly enhances the interaction between PML3 (PML IV) and SNURF, but covalent attachment of SUMO-1 to neither protein is required. Moreover, overexpression of PML3, but not PML-L (PML III), abolishes the coactivation function of SNURF in transactivation assays, which parallels the ability of PML3 to recruit SNURF to nuclear bodies. In sum, we have identified SNURF as a novel component in PML bodies and suggest that SUMO-1-facilitated sequestration into these nuclear domains regulates the transcriptional activity of SNURF.

Haekli, Marika [Biomedicum Helsinki, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Karvonen, Ulla [Biomedicum Helsinki, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Jaenne, Olli A. [Biomedicum Helsinki, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Department of Clinical Chemistry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Palvimo, Jorma J. [Biomedicum Helsinki, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland) and Department of Medical Biochemistry, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)]. E-mail: jorma.palvimo@helsinki.fi

2005-03-10

56

Leukemia risk associated with chronic external exposure to ionizing radiation in a French cohort of nuclear workers.  

PubMed

Leukemia is one of the earliest cancer effects observed after acute exposure to relatively high doses of ionizing radiation. Leukemia mortality after external exposure at low doses and low-dose rates has been investigated at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and Nuclear Fuel Company (AREVA NC) after an additional follow-up of 10 years. The cohort included radiation-monitored workers employed for at least one year during 1950-1994 at CEA or AREVA NC and followed during 1968-2004. Association between external exposure and leukemia mortality was estimated with excess relative risk (ERR) models and time-dependent modifying factors were investigated with time windows. The cohort included 36,769 workers, followed for an average of 28 years, among whom 73 leukemia deaths occurred. Among the workers with a positive recorded dose, the mean cumulative external dose was 21.7 mSv. Results under a 2-year lag assumption suggested that the risk of leukemia (except chronic lymphatic leukemia) increased significantly by 8% per 10 mSv. The magnitude of the association for myeloid leukemia was larger. The higher ERR/Sv for doses received 2-14 years earlier suggest that time since exposure modifies the effect. The ERR/Sv also appeared higher for doses received at exposure rates ?20 mSv per year. These results are consistent with those found in other studies of nuclear workers. However, confidence intervals are still wide. Further analyses should be conducted in pooled cohorts of nuclear workers. PMID:23050984

Metz-Flamant, C; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Acker, A; Laurier, D

2012-11-01

57

Uterine simple and complex nuclear bodies are separate structural entities.  

PubMed

In rat uterine luminal epithelial cells, nuclear bodies occur in the euchromatin in varying numbers in relation to the nuclear concentration of the estrogen receptor (Clark et al., 1978; Padykula et al., 1981, 1982). This functional responsiveness indicates that nuclear bodies may be useful indicators of the degree of cellular estrogenization. Because these filamentous bodies vary in size (200-1200 nm), shape, and composition, quantitative analysis of frequency of their occurrence has been difficult. A fundamental division into 2 categories can be made by the following criteria: 1) simple nuclear bodies (200-500 nm) consisting of a protein mesh of microfilaments, and 2) complex nuclear bodies (200-1200 nm) composed of an outer filamentous protein capsule enclosing a lucent core that may contain granules. Previous quantitative analyses at the electron microscopic level has excluded "simple bodies" because they might actually be ultrathin sections through the filamentous capsule of complex bodies (Le Goascogne and Baulieu, 1977; Clark et al., 1978). To resolve this sampling problem, we have performed serial ultrathin section analysis of nuclear bodies in hyperestrogenized luminal epithelial cells. Ultrastructural evidence presented here demonstrates that simple and complex nuclear bodies are anatomically separate entities. Ultrathin sections through the capsule of complex nuclear bodies will be misidentified as profiles of simple bodies during quantitative analysis. This anatomic distinctness of simple and complex nuclear bodies correlates with their differing responses to estrogenic stimulation and withdrawal (Fitzgerald and Padykula, pp. 131-141, this volume). Thus the existence of these two major categories should be taken into consideration during quantitative analyses. PMID:6846864

Padykula, H A; Pockwinse, S M

1983-02-01

58

Expression of maturation-specific nuclear antigens in differentiating human myeloid leukemia cells  

SciTech Connect

The expression of three myeloid-specific nuclear antigens was studied by indirect immunofluorescence with murine monoclonal antibodies in human myeloid (HL-60, ML-2, KG-1, and B-II) leukemia cells treated with chemical inducers of cell differentiation. Treatment of the promyelocytic HL-60 cells with dimethyl sulfoxide or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin DT induced the cells to acquire a phenotype that resembled that of granulocytes and monocytesmacrophages, respectively. These phenotypes were characterized by changes in cell growth, cell morphology, expression of specific cell surface antigens, and activities of lysozyme and nonspecific esterase enzymes. Induction of these differentiation markers in the HL-60 cells was associated with induction of the myeloid-specific nuclear antigens. The ML-2 cells, which are arrested at the myeloblast-promyelocyte stage, were also susceptible to the induction of cell differentiation and to changes in the expression of the nuclear antigens, but the degree of susceptibility was less than in the HL-60 cells. The less-differentiated KG-1 and B-II myeloid cells were either not responsive or responded only in a limited degree to the induction of cell differentiation or to changes in the expression of the nuclear antigens. The authors suggest that the reactivity of cells with monoclonal antibodies to specific nuclear antigens can be used as a maturational marker in cell differentiation studies. Furthermore, nuclear antigens expressed early in cellular differentiation may provide information about changes in regulatory elements in normal and malignant cells. 40 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

Murao, S.; Epstein, A.L.; Clevenger, C.V.; Huberman, E.

1985-02-01

59

Murine Leukemia Virus Uses TREX Components for Efficient Nuclear Export of Unspliced Viral Transcripts  

PubMed Central

Previously we reported that nuclear export of both unspliced and spliced murine leukemia virus (MLV) transcripts depends on the nuclear export factor (NXF1) pathway. Although the mRNA export complex TREX, which contains Aly/REF, UAP56, and the THO complex, is involved in the NXF1-mediated nuclear export of cellular mRNAs, its contribution to the export of MLV mRNA transcripts remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the involvement of TREX components in the export of MLV transcripts. Depletion of UAP56, but not Aly/REF, reduced the level of both unspliced and spliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, depletion of THO components, including THOC5 and THOC7, affected only unspliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the RNA immunoprecipitation assay showed that only the unspliced viral transcript interacted with THOC5. These results imply that MLV requires UAP56, THOC5 and THOC7, in addition to NXF1, for nuclear export of viral transcripts. Given that naturally intronless mRNAs, but not bulk mRNAs, require THOC5 for nuclear export, it is plausible that THOC5 plays a key role in the export of unspliced MLV transcripts. PMID:24618812

Sakuma, Toshie; Tonne, Jason M.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

2014-01-01

60

Radioactive Body Politics: AIDS as Nuclear Text  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, images of nuclear holocaust have proliferated in cultural discourse in the United States, marking nearly every large-scale disaster. In these nuclear narratives, horrific destruction spreads in concentric rings from \\

Ann Larabee; Derek Jarman

1994-01-01

61

Induction of apoptosis in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells through nuclear entrapment of BCR–ABL tyrosine kinase  

Microsoft Academic Search

The chimeric BCR–ABL oncoprotein is the molecular hallmark of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). BCR–ABL contains nuclear import and export signals but it is localized only in the cytoplasm where it activates mitogenic and anti-apoptotic pathways. We have found that inhibition of the BCR–ABL tyrosine kinase, either by mutation or by the drug STI571, can stimulate its nuclear entry. By combining

Paolo Vigneri; Jean Y. J. Wang

2001-01-01

62

Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... Causes Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects the ... and protect the body against disease. But in leukemia, WBCs turn cancerous and multiply when they shouldn' ...

63

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... Causes Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects the ... and protect the body against disease. But in leukemia, WBCs turn cancerous and multiply when they shouldn' ...

64

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... Causes Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects the ... and protect the body against disease. But in leukemia, WBCs turn cancerous and multiply when they shouldn' ...

65

Total body irradiation correlates with chronic graft versus host disease and affects prognosis of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia receiving an HLA identical allogeneic bone marrow transplant  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To investigate whether different procedure variables involved in the delivery of fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) impact on prognosis of patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT).Methods and Materials: Ninety-three consecutive patients with ALL receiving a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical allogeneic BMT between 1 August 1983 and 30 September 1995 were conditioned

Renzo Corvò; Gabriella Paoli; Salvina Barra; Almalina Bacigalupo; Maria Teresa Van Lint; Paola Franzone; Francesco Frassoni; Daniele Scarpati; Andrea Bacigalupo; Vito Vitale

1999-01-01

66

Computational Nuclear Quantum Many-Body Problem: The UNEDF Project  

E-print Network

The UNEDF project was a large-scale collaborative effort that applied high-performance computing to the nuclear quantum many-body problem. UNEDF demonstrated that close associations among nuclear physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists can lead to novel physics outcomes built on algorithmic innovations and computational developments. This review showcases a wide range of UNEDF science results to illustrate this interplay.

Scott Bogner; Aurel Bulgac; Joseph A. Carlson; Jonathan Engel; George Fann; Richard J. Furnstahl; Stefano Gandolfi; Gaute Hagen; Mihai Horoi; Calvin W. Johnson; Markus Kortelainen; Ewing Lusk; Pieter Maris; Hai Ah Nam; Petr Navratil; Witold Nazarewicz; Esmond G. Ng; Gustavo P. A. Nobre; Erich Ormand; Thomas Papenbrock; Junchen Pei; Steven C. Pieper; Sofia Quaglioni; Kenneth J. Roche; Jason Sarich; Nicolas Schunck; Masha Sosonkina; Jun Terasaki; Ian J. Thompson; James P. Vary; Stefan M. Wild

2013-04-12

67

Three-Body Nuclear Forces from a Matrix Model  

E-print Network

We compute three-body nuclear forces at short distances by using the nuclear matrix model of holographic QCD proposed in our previous paper with P. Yi. We find that the three-body forces at short distances are repulsive for (a) aligned three neutrons with averaged spins, and (b) aligned proton-proton-neutron / proton-neutron-neutron. These indicate that in dense states of neutrons such as cores of neutron stars, or in Helium-3 / tritium nucleus, the repulsive forces are larger than the ones estimated from two-body forces only.

Koji Hashimoto; Norihiro Iizuka

2010-05-24

68

Effect of fractionated versus unfractionated total body irradiation on the growth of the BN acute myelocytic leukemia  

SciTech Connect

The efficacy of various total body irradiation (TBI) regimens prior to bone marrow transplantation was evaluated in a rat model for acute myelocytic leukemia (Dq = 85.1 cGy gamma ; N = 3.7). Using high dose rate gamma-irradiation (115 cGy/min), fractionated TBI with large total daily doses (400 to 600 cGy), either given as acute doses or as split doses at 8 hr intervals, was most effective. Split doses (2 fractions per day) offered no additional advantage. At the most, a 4 log leukemic cell kill was induced. No lethal toxicity was observed. Nine-hundred cGy flash TBI had a similar anti-tumor effect, but with this regimen almost half of the rats died from radiation-induced toxicity (lungs and gastro-intestinal tract). The results are explained in terms of differences between normal and leukemic cells as regards (a) repair of sublethal damage; and (b) repopulation. Low dose rate continuous gamma-irradiation (0.26 cGy/min) with total doses ranging from 900 to 2000 cGy was also quite effective. Maximally a 4 log cell kill was obtained. With 2000 cGy, 50% of the rats died from the gastro-intestinal tract-syndrome. In addition to the major role played by chemotherapy, TBI is mainly of importance in sterilizing the various sanctuaries in the body which contain leukemic cells anatomically resistant to most cytostatic agents.

Hagenbeek, A.; Martens, A.C.M.

1981-08-01

69

Case-control study of leukemia at a naval nuclear shipyard  

SciTech Connect

A matched case-control study was conducted of 53 leukemia deaths and of 212 controls within a previously studied cohort of 24,545 on-shore workers employed between January 1, 1952 and August 15, 1977 at the Portsmouth (New Hampshire) Naval Shipyard. The study sought to ascertain a priori whether there was an association between leukemia deaths and occupational exposure to either ionizing radiation or organic solvents. To obtain information on individual exposures, radiation dose histories and detailed work histories by job and shop were evaluated for each subject. No statistically significant associations were found either between ionizing radiation or presumed solvent exposure and myelogenous or lymphatic leukemia. However, when specific job categories and shops were examined without benefit of a priori hypotheses, two occupations, electrician and welder, were found to be associated with leukemia. For electricians, the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio (ORMH) was significantly elevated for all leukemias (ORMH = 3.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.29-6.98), particularly for lymphatic leukemia (ORMH = 6.00, 95% CI = 1.47-24.45). For welders, the odds ratio was not significantly elevated for all leukemias (ORMH = 2.25, 95% CI = 0.92-5.53), but was significantly elevated for myeloid leukemia (ORMH = 3.83, 95% CI = 1.28-11.46). These findings persisted when potential confounders were adjusted by means of a conditional logistic regression model.

Stern, F.B.; Waxweiler, R.A.; Beaumont, J.J.; Lee, S.T.; Rinsky, R.A.; Zumwalde, R.D.; Halperin, W.E.; Bierbaum, P.J.; Landrigan, P.J.; Murray, W.E. Jr.

1986-06-01

70

Short History of Nuclear Many-Body Problem  

E-print Network

This is a very short presentation regarding developments in the theory of nuclear many-body problems, as seen and experienced by the author during the past 60 years with particular emphasis on the contributions of Gerry Brown and his research-group. Much of his work was based on Brueckner's formulation of the nuclear many-body problem. It is reviewed briefly together with the Moszkowski-Scott separation method that was an important part of his early work. The core-polarisation and his work related to effective interactions in general are also addressed.

H. S. Köhler

2014-05-02

71

Nuclear Many-Body Physics Where Structure And Reactions Meet  

E-print Network

The path from understanding a simple reaction problem of scattering or tunneling to contemplating the quantum nuclear many-body system, where structure and continuum of reaction-states meet, overlap and coexist, is a complex and nontrivial one. In this presentation we discuss some of the intriguing aspects of this route.

Naureen Ahsan; Alexander Volya

2009-06-24

72

Nuclear Astrophysics from View Point of Few-Body Problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Few-body systems provide very useful tools to solve different problems for nuclear astrophysics. This is the case of indirect techniques, developed to overcome some of the limits of direct measurements at astrophysical energies. Here the Coulomb dissociation, the asymptotic normalization coefficient and the Trojan Horse method are discussed.

Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Bertulani, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.

2013-08-01

73

Association between Baseline Body Mass Index (BMI) and Overall Survival among Patients over Age 60 with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)  

PubMed Central

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is more common and more lethal among patients over the age of 60. Increased body mass index (BMI) has been associated with a higher incidence of various malignancies, including AML. We sought to determine whether patient BMI at the time of AML diagnosis is related to overall survival among elderly patients. We identified 97 patients with AML diagnosed after the age of 60 and treated with cytarabine-based induction chemotherapy. The median age was 68 years (range 60-87); 52% of patients were male, and our study population was predominantly white (89% of patients). The median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 316 days (95% CI 246-459). The hazard ratio for mortality was increased among patients with a BMI < 25 compared to BMI ? 30 (HR 2.14, P=0.009, 95% CI 1.21-3.77), as well as with older age (HR 1.76, P=0.015, 95% CI 1.12-2.79) and with secondary versus de novo disease (HR 1.95, P=0.006, 95% CI 1.21-3.14). After multivariable analysis, we did not find a significant association between OS and other potential confounders such as coronary artery disease or diabetes among these patients. We conclude that increased BMI was independently associated with improved OS among older AML patients at our institution. PMID:23619915

Brunner, Andrew M.; Sadrzadeh, Hossein; Feng, Yang; Drapkin, Benjamin J.; Ballen, Karen K.; Attar, Eyal C.; Amrein, Philip C.; McAfee, Steven L.; Chen, Yi-Bin A.; Neuberg, Donna S.; Fathi, Amir T.

2014-01-01

74

Effects of total body irradiation-based conditioning on allogeneic stem cell transplantation for pediatric acute leukemia: a single-institution study  

PubMed Central

Purpose To evaluate the effects of total body irradiation (TBI), as a conditioning regimen prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), in pediatric acute leukemia patients. Materials and Methods From January 2001 to December 2011, 28 patients, aged less than 18 years, were treated with TBI-based conditioning for allo-SCT in our institution. Of the 28 patients, 21 patients were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, 75%) and 7 were diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 25%). TBI was completed 4 days or 1 day before stem cell infusion. Patients underwent radiation therapy with bilateral parallel opposing fields and 6-MV X-rays. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival outcomes. Results The 2-year event-free survival and overall survival rates were 66% and 56%, respectively (71.4% and 60.0% in AML patients vs. 64.3% and 52.4% in ALL patients, respectively). Treatment related mortality rate were 25%. Acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease was a major complication; other complications included endocrine dysfunction and pulmonary complications. Common complications from TBI were nausea (89%) and cataracts (7.1%). Conclusion The efficacy and toxicity data in this study of TBI-based conditioning to pediatric acute leukemia patients were comparable with previous studies. However, clinicians need to focus on the acute and chronic complications related to allo-SCT.

Park, Jongmoo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Lee, Sang-wook; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Su Ssan; Park, Jin-hong; Park, Jaehyeon

2014-01-01

75

Diet, physical activity, and body composition changes during the first year of treatment for childhood acute leukemia and lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Background Children who undergo treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and lymphoma are at risk for several long-term health problems. Obesity, for which survivors of ALL and lymphoma are also at risk, may further exacerbate these problems. This pilot study evaluates changes in physical activity and body composition among children being treated for ALL and lymphoma and their parents. Procedures Recently diagnosed adolescent ALL and lymphoma patients were recruited from two pediatric hematology and oncology clinics, and matched on age, race, and gender to healthy individuals in the community. Changes in diet, physical activity and body composition were collected at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Results All children (n = 15) were, on average, 10.3 years of age at enrollment, and were fairly evenly distributed with regard to gender. Analyses revealed a significant difference between cases and controls with respect to the change in BMI from baseline to 12 months (p = 0.01). Additionally, controls demonstrated a significantly greater increase in moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) than the cases (229.8 Metabolic equivalent of tasks [METs] vs. 23.5 METs); indicating cases remained fairly inactive over the course of treatment. Conclusion Our data corroborate previous findings that, following treatment for ALL and lymphoma, childhood cancer survivors tend to be less active and at greater risk for obesity than their healthy peers. The present study, which assessed cases prospectively over a 12 month period during the early phases of treatment, extends prior reports by demonstrating that these outcomes are evident at an early stage in treatment. PMID:23211695

Fuemmeler, Bernard F.; Pendzich, Margaret K.; Clark, Kalin; Lovelady, Cheryl; Rosoff, Philip; Blatt, Julie; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

2012-01-01

76

Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-07-10

77

Comparison of total body irradiation vs chlorambucil and prednisone for remission induction of active chronic lymphocytic leukemia: an ECOG study. Part I: total body irradiation-response  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-six evaluable patients were entered into two fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) programs; 11 patients received a course of 150 rad TBI (x 3 if tolerated) and 15 patients received a lower dose course of 50 rad (x 3 if tolerated). Complete remissions (CR) were not produced by either course; however, the higher dose course (Plan I) yielded a partial response (PR) rate of 73%, while the lower dose course yielded a PR of 47%. Although fraction size seemed trivial in both TBI plans, an unexpected high degree of hematologic toxicity was encountered, and was parallel to the response rates: in Plan I 73% of patients experienced severe to life-threatening depression of platelets or granulocytes, whereas in Plan II this rate was 47%. This was of short duration with rapid return of blood counts to normal levels. One death can be attributed to TBI. The chemotherapy arm of the study demonstrated superiority in terms of complete responses. Twenty-three percent of patients treated by cholrambucil and prednisone attained CR, in contrast to 0% of TBI patients. PR for chemotherapy was similar to that obtained with TBI. Chemotherapy also proved superior in terms of overall response rate, number of patients in remission, and in the median duration of response, but not in the median duration of survival. Fractional TBI techniques for active chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) should be interrupted when the platelet count dips below 100,000 and the granulocyte count is lower than 2,000. Future studies should combine TBI radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

Rubin, P.I. (Univ. of Rochester Cancer Center, NY); Bennett, J.M.; Begg, C.; Bozdech, M.J.; Silber, R.

1981-12-01

78

Oxidative stress-induced assembly of PML nuclear bodies controls sumoylation of partner proteins  

PubMed Central

The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein organizes PML nuclear bodies (NBs), which are stress-responsive domains where many partner proteins accumulate. Here, we clarify the basis for NB formation and identify stress-induced partner sumoylation as the primary NB function. NB nucleation does not rely primarily on intermolecular interactions between the PML SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) and SUMO, but instead results from oxidation-mediated PML multimerization. Oxidized PML spherical meshes recruit UBC9, which enhances PML sumoylation, allow partner recruitment through SIM interactions, and ultimately enhance partner sumoylation. Intermolecular SUMO–SIM interactions then enforce partner sequestration within the NB inner core. Accordingly, oxidative stress enhances NB formation and global sumoylation in vivo. Some NB-associated sumoylated partners also become polyubiquitinated by RNF4, precipitating their proteasomal degradation. As several partners are protein-modifying enzymes, NBs could act as sensors that facilitate and confer oxidative stress sensitivity not only to sumoylation but also to other post-translational modifications, thereby explaining alterations of stress response upon PML or NB loss. PMID:24637324

Sahin, Umut; Ferhi, Omar; Jeanne, Marion; Benhenda, Shirine; Berthier, Caroline; Jollivet, Florence; Niwa-Kawakita, Michiko; Faklaris, Orestis; Setterblad, Niclas; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valerie

2014-01-01

79

Nuclear protein IK undergoes dynamic subcellular translocation and forms unique nuclear bodies during the cell cycle  

PubMed Central

IK is a nuclear protein containing a unique domain named RED due to the presence of a repetitive arginine (R), aspartic (E), and glutamic acid (D) sequence. To date, the function of this protein remains largely unknown despite of a couple of previous studies in the literature. Here we report that depletion of IK via RNA interference results in mitotic arrest. We also demonstrate that IK undergoes dynamic translocation during interphase and mitosis. In particular, IK is primarily present in some interphase cells as nuclear foci/bodies which do not co-localize with nucleoli, PMA bodies and Cajal bodies. Pull-down analysis coupled with mass spectrometry reveals that IK is associated with DHX15, a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase. Our results strongly suggest that IK may participate in pre-mRNA splicing and that it may be a useful biomarker for a new nuclear structure in the cell. PMID:24252166

2013-01-01

80

40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is...

2010-07-01

81

40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is...

2012-07-01

82

40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is...

2013-07-01

83

40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is...

2011-07-01

84

Leukemia in the proximity of a German boiling-water nuclear reactor: evidence of population exposure by chromosome studies and environmental radioactivity.  

PubMed Central

Exceptional elevation of children's leukemia appearing 5 years after the 1983 startup of the Krümmel nuclear power plant, accompanied by a significant increase of adult leukemia cases, led to investigations of radiation exposures of the population living near the plant. The rate of dicentric chromosomes in peripheral lymphocytes of seven parents of children with leukemia and in 14 other inhabitants near the plant was significantly elevated and indicated ongoing exposures over the years of its operation. These findings led to the hypothesis that chronic reactor leakages had occurred. This assumption is support by identification of artificial radioactivity in air, rainwater, soil and vegetation by the environmental monitoring program at the nuclear power plant. Calculations of the corresponding source terms show that emissions must have been well above authorized annual limits. Bone marrow doses supposedly result primarily through incorporation of bone-seeking beta- and alpha-emitters. PMID:9467072

Schmitz-Feuerhake, I; Dannheim, B; Heimers, A; Oberheitmann, B; Schroder, H; Ziggel, H

1997-01-01

85

Many-body theory of indirect nuclear interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We derive an expression for the indirect nuclear coupling tensor (A??jj') including spin-orbit and many-body effects. We use a finite-temperature Green's-function method where the thermodynamic potential is expressed in terms of the exact one-particle propagator and the proper self-energy, and derive a general expression for A??jj' in the Bloch representation. While the effects of spin-orbit interaction appear in our expression through the modification of the one-particle eigenvalues and eigenstates and through a change in the orbital hyperfine interaction via the modification of the electronic momentum operator, the many-body effects are more subtle. We find that the many-body corrections to A??jj' in the quasiparticle approximation are cancelled in part by the inclusion of exchange and correlation effects. We also show, by making drastic assumptions while solving the matrix integral equations for the nuclear spin-dependent part of the self-energy, that the exchange enhancement effects in a band model on A??jj' are different for different terms. The remarkability of the theory is that for the first time a systematic effort has been made to study the effects of electron-electron interaction on the various contributions to A??jj'. We also discuss the importance of relativistic and electron-electron interaction effects in the calculation of the coupling constant in real systems. The theory is general and can be applied to metals, semiconductors, and insulators.

Tripathi, Gouri S.

1985-04-01

86

PML nuclear bodies: regulation, function and therapeutic perspectives.  

PubMed

PML nuclear bodies (NBs) were first described by electron microscopy and rediscovered through their treatment-reversible disruption in a rare leukaemia. They recruit multiple partner proteins and now emerge as interferon- and oxidative stress-responsive sumoylation factories. NBs mediate interferon-induced viral restriction, enhance proteolysis, finely tune metabolism and enforce stress-induced senescence. Apart from being markers of cellular stress, PML NBs could be harnessed pharmacologically in a number of conditions, including cancer, viral infection or neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25138686

Sahin, Umut; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie; de Thé, Hugues

2014-11-01

87

Impact of immune modulation with in vivo T-cell depletion and myleoablative total body irradiation conditioning on outcomes after unrelated donor transplantation for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

PubMed Central

To determine whether in vivo T-cell depletion, which lowers GVHD, abrogates the antileukemic benefits of myeloablative total body irradiation–based conditioning and unrelated donor transplantation, in the present study, we analyzed 715 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Patients were grouped for analysis according to whether conditioning included antithymocyte globulin (ATG; n = 191) or alemtuzumab (n = 132) and no in vivo T-cell depletion (n = 392). The median follow-up time was 3.5 years for the ATG group and 5 years for the alemtuzumab and T cell–replete groups. Using Cox regression analysis, we compared transplantation outcomes between groups. Compared with no T-cell depletion, grade 2-4 acute and chronic GVHD rates were significantly lower after in vivo T-cell depletion with ATG (relative risk [RR] = 0.66; P = .005 and RR = 0.55; P < .0001, respectively) or alemtuzumab (RR = 0.09; P < .003 and RR = 0.21; P < .0001, respectively). Despite lower GVHD rates after in vivo T-cell depletion, nonrelapse mortality, relapse, overall survival, and leukemia-free survival (LFS) did not differ significantly among the treatment groups. The 3-year probabilities of LFS after ATG-containing, alemtuzumab-containing, and T cell–replete transplantations were 43%, 49%, and 46%, respectively. These data suggest that in vivo T-cell depletion lowers GVHD without compromising LFS among children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who are undergoing unrelated donor transplantation with myeloablative total body irradiation–based regimens. PMID:22573402

Wynn, Robert F.; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Samarasinghe, Sujith; He, Wensheng; Bonney, Denise; Craddock, John; Cornish, Jacqueline; Davies, Stella M.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Duerst, Reggie E.; Gross, Thomas G.; Kapoor, Neena; Kitko, Carrie; Krance, Robert A.; Leung, Wing; Lewis, Victor A.; Steward, Colin; Wagner, John E.; Carpenter, Paul A.; Eapen, Mary

2012-01-01

88

Localization of interchromatin granule cluster and Cajal body components in oocyte nuclear bodies of the hemipterans.  

PubMed

An oocyte nucleus contains different extrachromosomal nuclear domains collectively called nuclear bodies (NBs). In the present work we revealed, using immunogold labeling electron microscopy, some marker components of interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs) and Cajal bodies (CBs) in morphologically heterogeneous oocyte NBs studied in three hemipteran species: Notostira elongata, Capsodes gothicus (Miridae) and Velia caprai (Veliidae). Both IGC and CB counterparts were revealed in oocyte nuclei of the studied species but morphological and biochemical criteria were found to be not sufficient to determine carefully the define type of oocyte NBs. We found that the molecular markers of the CBs (coilin and non-phosphorylated RNA polymerase II) and IGCs (SC35 protein) may be localized in the same NB. Anti-SC35 antibody may decorate not only a granular material representing "true" interchromatin granules but also masks some fibrillar parts of complex NBs. Our first observations on the hemipteran oocyte NBs confirm the high complexity and heterogeneity of insect oocyte IGCs and CBs in comparison with those in mammalian somatic cells and amphibian oocytes. PMID:17889915

Bogolyubov, D S; Batalova, F M; Ogorza?ek, A

2007-10-01

89

The Mechanisms of PML-Nuclear Body Formation  

PubMed Central

Summary PML nuclear bodies (NBs) are nuclear structures that have been implicated in processes such as transcriptional regulation, genome stability, response to viral infection, apoptosis and tumor suppression. PML has been found to be essential for the formation of the NBs, as these structures do not form in Pml null cells, while PML add back fully rescues their formation. However, the basis for such a structural role of PML is unknown. We demonstrate that PML contains a SUMO binding motif that is independent of its SUMOylation sites and is surprisingly necessary for PML-NB formation. We demonstrate that the PML RING domain is critical for PML SUMOylation and PML-NB formation. We propose a model for PML-NB formation whereby PML SUMOylation and non-covalent binding of PML to SUMOylated PML through the SUMO binding motif constitutes the nucleation event for subsequent recruitment of SUMOylated proteins and/or proteins containing SUMO binding motifs to the PML-NBs. PMID:17081985

Shen, Tian Huai; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Scaglioni, Pier Paolo; Yung, Thomas M.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

2007-01-01

90

DNA repair polymorphisms in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia in sufferers of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident.  

PubMed

An association between DNA repair gene polymorphisms, environmental factors, and development of some types of cancer has been suggested by several studies. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common form of leukemia in the clean-up workers of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident and it has some specific features. Therefore, we have studied the possible differences in DNA repair gene polymorphisms in CLL patients depending on ionizing radiation (IR) exposure history and their clinical characterictics. Arg399Gln XRCC1, Thr241Met XRCC3, and Lys751Gln XPD polymorphisms were studied in 64 CLL patients, exposed to IR due to the Chernobyl NPP accident, 114 IR-non-exposed CLL patients, and 103 sex- and age-matched IR-exposed controls using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis. All investigated polymorphisms were equally distributed between two groups of CLL patients and IR-exposed controls, except that that there was a significant reduction of the common homozygous Lys/Lys XPD genotype among IR-exposed CLL patients (23.7%) compared with IR-exposed controls (45.6%), OR = 0.37; 95% CI = 0.18-0.75; (P = 0.005). The number of IR-non-exposed CLL patients (37.4%) with the Lys/Lys XPD genotype was also decreased compared to IR-exposed controls, although this difference was not significant (P = 0.223). These preliminary data suggest a possible modifying role of Lys751Gln XPD polymorphism for the development of CLL, expecially in radiation-exposed persons. PMID:22739018

Abramenko, Iryna; Bilous, Nadiia; Chumak, Anatolyi; Kostin, Alexey; Martina, Zoya; Dyagil, Iryna

2012-01-01

91

FINAL HEIGHT AND BODY MASS INDEX AFTER TREATMENT FOR CHILDHOOD ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA KON?NA VIŠINA IN INDEKS TELESNE MASE PRI BOLNIKIH, ZDRAVLJENIH ZARADI AKUTNE LIMFOBLASTNE LEVKEMIJE V OTROŠTVU  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Newer and more agressive forms of chemotherapy and newer protocols in the treatment have increased the survival rate of children with malignancies. Improved survival rates in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia have focused attention on late effects including disorders of growth and puberty, and development of overweight or obesity. Methods The height and weight expressed as body mass

Mojca Žerjav-Tanšek; Janez Jazbec; Lorna Zaletel-Zadravec; Tadej Battelino

92

A distinctive nuclear morphology in acute myeloid leukemia is strongly associated with loss of HLA-DR expression and FLT3 internal tandem duplication  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a 5-year survey of nonpromyelocytic\\/nonmonocytic acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) diagnosed in the University of Washington Hematopathology Laboratory, we identified 19 cases containing distinctive, cup-like nuclear indentation in 10% or more of the blasts (‘AML-cuplike’). Fourteen of these cases (74%) demonstrated near-complete loss of HLA-DR expression, while the other five cases showed partial loss of HLA-DR. A total of 16

S J Kussick; D L Stirewalt; H S Yi; K M Sheets; E Pogosova-Agadjanyan; S Braswell; T H Norwood; J P Radich; B L Wood

2004-01-01

93

Congenital leukemia.  

PubMed

Congenital leukemia is a rare but a well-documented disease in which leukemic process is detected at birth or very shortly thereafter (Philip McCoy and Roy Overton, Commun Clin Cytom 22:85-88, 1995). These leukemias represent approximately 0.8 % of all childhood leukemias. We present a case of congenital acute myeloid leukemia manifesting from the very first day of birth. Diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia was suspected by the presence of blasts in the peripheral blood smear and was confirmed on bone marrow by flowcytometry. Karyotyping revealed Trisomy 21. PMID:25332567

Raj, Aishwarya; Talukdar, Sewali; Das, Smita; Gogoi, Pabitra Kumar; Das, Damodar; Bhattacharya, Jina

2014-09-01

94

Nuclear electric dipole moment of three-body systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Background: The existence of the electric dipole moment (EDM) of stable nuclei would be a direct evidence of the time reversal invariance violation (TRIV). Therefore, its measurement could be considered as a complement to the search for neutron and atomic EDMs.Purpose: To clarify theoretical issues related to calculations of EDMs in many-body systems we calculated the EDMs of the simplest nuclei.Method: For calculations of three-nucleon systems EDMs we used TRIV potentials based on the meson exchange theory, as well as the ones derived by using effective field theories (EFT) with and without explicit pions. Nuclear wave functions were obtained by solving Faddeev equations in configuration space for the complete Hamiltonians comprising both TRIV and realistic strong interactions.Results: The expressions for EDMs of 3He and 3H are given in terms of meson exchange couplings and low energy constants of EFT potentials.Conclusions: The obtained results are compared with the previous calculations of 3He EDM and with time reversal invariance violating effects in neutron-deuteron scattering. The model dependence on strong interactions is discussed.

Song, Young-Ho; Lazauskas, Rimantas; Gudkov, Vladimir

2013-01-01

95

Nuclear envelope insertion of spindle pole bodies and nuclear pore complexes  

PubMed Central

The defining feature of eukaryotic cells is the double lipid bilayer of the nuclear envelope (NE) that serves as a physical barrier separating the genome from the cytosol. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are embedded in the NE to facilitate transport of proteins and other macromolecules into and out of the nucleus. In fungi and early embryos where the NE does not completely breakdown during mitosis, microtubule-organizing centers such as the spindle pole body (SPB) must also be inserted into the NE to facilitate organization of the mitotic spindle. Several recent papers have shed light on the mechanism by which SPB complexes are inserted into the NE. An unexpected link between the SPB and NPCs suggests that assembly of these NE complexes is tightly coordinated. We review the findings of these reports in light of our current knowledge of SPB, NPC and NE structure, assembly and function. PMID:22572959

Jaspersen, Sue L.; Ghosh, Suman

2012-01-01

96

The fractal dimension of nuclear chromatin as a prognostic factor in acute precursor B lymphoblastic leukemia.  

PubMed

The fractal nature of the DNA arrangement has been postulated to be a common feature of all cell nuclei. We investigated the prognostic importance of the fractal dimension (FD) of chromatin in blasts of patients with acute precursor B lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). In 28 patients, gray scale transformed pseudo-3D images of 100 nuclei (May-Grünwald-Giemsa stained bone marrow smears) were analyzed. FD was determined by the Minkowski-Bouligand method extended to three dimensions. Goodness-of-fit of FD was estimated by the R2 values in the log-log plots. Whereas FD presented no prognostic relevance, patients with higher R2 values showed a prolonged survival. White blood cell count (WBC), age and mean fluorescence intensity of CD45 (MFICD45) were all unfavorable prognostic factors in univariate analyses. In a multivariate Cox-regression, R2, WBC, and MFICD45, entered the final model, which showed to be stable in a bootstrap resampling study. Blasts with lower R2 values, equivalent to accentuated "coarseness" of the chromatin pattern, which may reflect profound changes of the DNA methylation, indicated a poor prognosis. In conclusion the goodness-of-fit of the Minkowski-Bouligand dimension of chromatin can be regarded as a new and biologically relevant prognostic factor for patients with B-ALL. PMID:16675881

Adam, Randall L; Silva, Rosana C; Pereira, Fernanda G; Leite, Neucimar J; Lorand-Metze, Irene; Metze, Konradin

2006-01-01

97

Sequential combination of decitabine and idarubicin synergistically enhances anti-leukemia effect followed by demethylating Wnt pathway inhibitor promoters and downregulating Wnt pathway nuclear target  

PubMed Central

Background The methylation inhibitor 5-Aza-2?-deoxycytidine (decitabine, DAC) has a great therapeutic value for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). But decitabine monotherapy was associated with a relatively low rate of complete remission in AML and MDS. We aimed to investigate the effect of several anti-leukemia drugs in combination with decitabine on the proliferation of myeloid leukemia cells, to select the most efficient combination group and explore the associated mechanisms of these combination therapies. Methods Cell proliferation was tested by MTT assay and CFU-GM assay. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by Annexin V and PI staining in cell culture, TUNEL assay and transmission electron microscopy in animal study. MicroPET was used to imaging the tumor in mouse model. Molecular studies were conducted using microarray expression analysis, which was used to explore associated pathways, and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry, used to assess regulation of Wnt/?-catenin pathway. Statistical significance among groups was determined by one-way ANOVA analysis followed by post hoc Bonferroni’s multiple comparison test. Results Among five anti-leukemia agents in combining with decitabine, the sequential combination of decitabine and idarubicin induced synergistic cell death in U937 cells, and this effect was verified in HEL, SKM-1 cells and AML cells isolated from AML patients. Importantly, tumor growth inhibition in this sequential combination was found to be higher than in single agent or controls in vivo. Moreover, sequential combination of the two agents induced apoptosis and depression of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway in both AML cell culture and animal studies. Conclusions The findings demonstrated that sequentially combination of decitabine and idarubicin had synergistic anti-leukemia effects. These effects were mainly attributed to demethylation of Wnt/?-catenin pathway inhibitors and downregulation of Wnt/?-catenin pathway nuclear targets. PMID:24923330

2014-01-01

98

Academic difficulties and occupational outcomes of adult survivors of childhood leukemia who have undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and fractionated total body irradiation conditioning.  

PubMed

We studied academic and employment outcomes in 59 subjects who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (a-HSCT) with fractionated total body irradiation (fTBI) for childhood leukemia, comparing them with, first, the general French population and, second, findings in 19 who underwent a-HSCT with chemotherapy conditioning. We observed an average academic delay of 0.98 years among the 59 subjects by Year 10 of secondary school (French class Troisième), which was higher than the 0.34-year delay in the normal population (P < .001) but not significantly higher than the delay of 0.68 years in our cohort of 19 subjects who underwent a-HSCT with chemotherapy. The delay was dependent on age at leukemia diagnosis, but not at fTBI. This delay increased to 1.32 years by the final year of secondary school (Year 13, Terminale) for our 59 subjects versus 0.51 years in the normal population (P = .0002), but did not differ significantly from the 1.08-year delay observed in our cohort of 19 subjects. The number of students who received their secondary school diploma (Baccalaureate) was similar to the expected rate in the general French population for girls (observed/expected = 1.02) but significantly decreased for boys (O/E = 0.48; CI: 95%[0.3-0.7]). Compared with 13.8% of the general population, 15.3% of the cancer survivors received no diploma (P = NS). Reported job distribution did not differ significantly between our cohort of childhood cancer survivors and the general population except that more female survivors were employed in intermediate-level professional positions. Academic difficulties after fTBI are common and their early identification will facilitate educational and professional achievement. PMID:24087985

Freycon, Fernand; Trombert-Paviot, Béatrice; Casagranda, Léonie; Frappaz, Didier; Mialou, Valérie; Armari-Alla, Corinne; Gomez, Frederic; Faure-Conter, Cécile; Plantaz, Dominique; Berger, Claire

2014-04-01

99

Computational analysis of whole body CT documents a bone structure alteration in adult advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia  

E-print Network

abundances between CR1, CR2, and CR3 chon- drites indicate aqueous alteration on the CR chondrite parent body ion imaging of IOM extracted from primitive members of different meteorite groups. We show can be explained by parent body thermal metamorphism at an estimated tem- perature of $440 °C. Minor

Piana, Michele

100

Leukemia Ecology: Ecological Prophylaxis of Leukemia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Etiopathogenesis of leukemia; Ecological leukemogenic factors; Epidemiology of leukemias; Geochemical environment in relationship to health and disease; Leukemia risk factor bank; Perspectives of leukemia prophylaxis by ecological and dietary me...

J. Aleksandrowica, A. B. Skotnicki

1982-01-01

101

What Is Childhood Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... key statistics for childhood leukemia? What is childhood leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in early ... germs by surrounding and digesting them. Types of leukemia in children Leukemia is often described as being ...

102

Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)-3 Activates Nuclear Factor (NF)-?B in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells  

PubMed Central

Nuclear factor (NF)-?B plays a major role in the pathogenesis of B-cell neoplasms. A broad array of mostly extracellular stimuli has been reported to activate NF-?B, to various degrees, in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. Because CLL cells harbor high levels of unphosphorylated (U) signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 protein and U-STAT3 was reported to activate NF-?B, we sought to determine whether U-STAT3 activates NF-?B in CLL. Using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) we studied peripheral blood low-density cells from 15 patients with CLL and found that CLL cell nuclear extracts from all the samples bound to an NF-?B DNA probe, suggesting that NF-?B is constitutively activated in CLL. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that STAT3 bound NF-?B p65, and confocal microscopy studies detected U-STAT3/NF-?B complexes in the nuclei of CLL cells, thereby confirming these findings. Furthermore, infection of CLL cells with retroviral STAT3-shRNA attenuated the binding of NF-?B to DNA, as assessed by EMSA, and downregulated mRNA levels of NF-?B-regulated genes, as assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Taken together, our data suggest that U-STAT3 binds to the NF-?B p50/p65 dimers and that the U-STAT3/NF-?B complexes bind to DNA and activate NF-?B-regulated genes in CLL cells. PMID:21364020

Liu, Zhiming; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Harris, David M.; Li, Ping; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J.; Estrov, Zeev

2014-01-01

103

Total body irradiation as preparation for bone marrow transplantation in treatment of acute leukemia and aplastic anemia  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to improve survival while minimizing toxicity, many bone marrow transplant centers are now studying the use of cytoreduction regimens with an increased amount of radiation in single-dose or fractionated-exposure schedules for patients with leukemia and aplastic anemia. In order to review the current results, the literature prior to September, 1982 was surveyed and data were tabulated for each transplant center regarding the number of patients receiving transplants, diagnoses, cytoreduction regimen, clinical status, remission duration, relapse rate, causes of death and incidence of interstitial pneumonia. The incidence and severity of cataracts, growth failure, hypothyroidism and second malignant neoplasms were noted, and the data obtained from the literature search were updated and expanded by telephone questionnaire when possible. Marked variation in the technique of tranplantation was found among the participating institutions, making it difficult to determine the contribution of the various TBI doses, dose rates and fractionation schedules to the efficacy and toxicity of the combined regimen. In order to define the risk-benefit ratio of the various TBI regimens more clearly, prospective controlled, randomized studies will be required.

Serota, F.T.; Burkey, E.D.; August, C.S.; D'Angio, G.J.

1983-12-01

104

RNA-Templated Replication of Hepatitis Delta Virus: Genomic and Antigenomic RNAs Associate with Different Nuclear Bodies  

PubMed Central

Lacking an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, hepatitis delta virus (HDV), which contains a circular RNA of 1.7 kilobases, is nonetheless able to replicate its RNA by use of cellular transcription machineries. Previously, we have shown that the replications of genomic- and antigenomic-strand HDV RNAs have different sensitivities to ?-amanitin, suggesting that these two strands are synthesized in different transcription machineries in the cells, but the nature of these transcription machineries is not clear. In this study, we performed metabolic labeling and immunofluorescence staining of newly synthesized HDV RNA with bromouridine after HDV RNA transfection into hepatocytes and confirmed that HDV RNA synthesis had both ?-amanitin-sensitive and -resistant components. The antigenomic RNA labeling was ?-amanitin resistant and localized to the nucleolus. The genomic RNA labeling was ?-amanitin sensitive and more diffusely localized in the nucleoplasm. Most of the genomic RNA labeling appeared to colocalize with the PML nuclear bodies. Furthermore, promyelocytic leukemia protein, RNA polymerase II (Pol II), and the Pol I-associated transcription factor SL1 could be precipitated together with hepatitis delta antigen, suggesting the association of HDV replication complex with the Pol I and Pol II transcription machineries. This conclusion was further confirmed by an in vitro replication assay. These findings provide additional evidence that HDV RNA synthesis occurs in the Pol I and Pol II transcription machineries, thus extending the capability of the cellular DNA-dependent RNA polymerases to utilizing RNA as templates. PMID:16775335

Li, Yi-Jia; Macnaughton, Thomas; Gao, Lu; Lai, Michael M. C.

2006-01-01

105

Relativistic effects in the atomic and nuclear few-body problems  

SciTech Connect

Relativistic effects in the atomic and nuclear few-body systems are classified and discussed with the emphasis on electromagnetic transitions. The size of relativistic corrections, calculational techniques and ambiguities, and comparison of theory and experiment are considered. 8 figures.

Friar, J.L.

1980-01-01

106

Growth Retardation and Bilateral Cataracts Followed by Anaplastic Meningioma 23 Years after High-Dose Cranial and Whole-Body Irradiation for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Case Report and Review of the Literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary We report a case of meningioma diagnozed 23 years after high-dose cranial and whole-body irradiation for the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Radiotherapy in this case also caused early radiation injury to the lenses and the pituitary gland, with growth retardation and mineralizing angiopathy. Radiation-induced meningiomas are more commonly malignant, more commonly multiple, and more likely to recur

Alexei I. Korenkov; Hans G. Imhof; Sebastian Brandner; Ethan Taub; Pia U. Huguenin; Michael R. Gaab; Yasuhiro Yonekawa

2005-01-01

107

Low-dose fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) adversely affects prognosis of patients with leukemia receiving an HLA-matched allogeneic bone marrow transplant from an unrelated donor (UD-BMT)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The optimal total body irradiation (TBI) regimen for unrelated donor bone marrow transplant (UD-BMT) is unknown. In the present study we analyze the outcomes of two different TBI regimens used in our center for patients with leukemia undergoing an UD-BMT. Between January 1994 and August 2001, 99 consecutive UD-BMT patients entered this comparative study. The conditioning regimen consisted of cyclophosphamide,

R Corvò; T Lamparelli; B Bruno; S Barra; MT Van Lint; V Vitale; A Bacigalupo

2002-01-01

108

Dynamics of the nuclear one-body density: Small amplitude regime  

SciTech Connect

We present a microscopic treatment for the small amplitude limit of the equations of motion for the nuclear one-body density. These were derived previously by means of projection techniques, and allow for the explicit separation of mean-field and collision effects which result from the dynamics of many-body correlations. The form of the nuclear response in the presence of collision effects is derived. An illustrative application to a soluble model is discussed.

Nemes, M.C.; de Toledo Piza, A.F.R.

1985-02-01

109

H-1 Parvovirus-Associated Replication Bodies: a Distinct Virus-Induced Nuclear Structure  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have identified a nuclear structure that is induced after infection with the autonomous parvovirus H-1. Using fluorescence microscopy, we observed that the major nonstructural protein (NS1) of H-1 virus which is essential for viral DNA amplification colocalized with virus-specific DNA sequences and sites of ongoing viral DNA replication in distinct nuclear bodies which we designated H-1 parvovirus-associated replication bodies

CELINA CZIEPLUCH; STEFAN LAMPEL; ANNABEL GREWENIG; CHRISTINE GRUND; PETER LICHTER; JEAN ROMMELAERE

2000-01-01

110

Few-body decay and recombination in nuclear astrophysics  

E-print Network

Three-body continuum problems are investigated for light nuclei of astrophysical relevance. We focus on three-body decays of resonances or recombination via resonances or the continuum background. The concepts of widths, decay mechanisms and dynamic evolution are discussed. We also discuss results for the triple $\\alpha$ decay in connection with $2^+$ resonances and density and temperature dependence rates of recombination into light nuclei from $\\alpha$-particles and neutrons.

A. S. Jensen; D. V. Fedorov; R. de Diego; E. Garrido; R. Alvarez-Rodriguez

2010-09-29

111

Childhood leukemia near nuclear plants in the United Kingdom: The evolution of a systematic approach to studying rare disease in small geographic areas  

SciTech Connect

A cluster of childhood leukemia in a village near a nuclear plant in northern England prompted further studies of cancer in the vicinity of other nuclear plants in the United Kingdom. These studies demonstrated that the risk of childhood leukemia was increased near certain other nuclear plants. Although the reasons for the increase are still unclear, the scientific debate stimulated by these findings has clarified some of the special methodological problems encountered when studying rare diseases in small areas. Firstly, unless a specific hypothesis is defined in advance, the relevance of a single geographic cluster of disease can rarely be interpreted. Even when a prior hypothesis exists, the small number of cases which generally occur in a small area make the findings highly sensitive to reporting, diagnostic, or classification errors. The statistical power of such investigations is also usually low and only marked increases in risk can be detected. Furthermore, conventional statistical tests may be inappropriate if the underlying spatial distribution of the disease is not random; and little is known about the background distribution of disease in small areas. Investigations of specific hypotheses about defined sources of environmental contamination, especially if they can be replicated, are more likely to result in conclusive findings that are in-depth studies of individual clusters.

Beral, V. (I.C.R.F. Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (England))

1990-07-01

112

REVIEW ARTICLE: Nuclear-based techniques for the in vivo study of human body composition  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variety of nuclear-based techniques for the in vivo study of human body decomposition is now available for clinical diagnosis and research, and the number of centres where such work is performed is likely to grow substantially in the next few years. Their most important applications at present are in the measurement of bone mineral mass (calcium), body protein (nitrogen)

S. H. Cohn; R. M. Parr

1985-01-01

113

Nuclear-based techniques for the in vivo study of human body composition  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variety of nuclear-based techniques for the in vivo study of human body decomposition is now available for clinical diagnosis and research, and the number of centres where such work is performed is likely to grow substantially in the next few years. Their most important applications at present are in the measurement of bone mineral mass (calcium), body protein (nitrogen)

S H Cohn; R M Parr

1985-01-01

114

Chiral nuclear forces and many-body applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Description of light nuclei and low-energy nuclear reactions can be given in a model-independent way by using chiral effective field theory of QCD. In this framework, nuclear forces are described by pion and nucleon rather than fundamental quark degrees of freedom in harmony with the symmetries of QCD. In this proceeding I discuss chiral nuclear forces derived within this framework and present our first results on the three-nucleon forces calculated up to next-to-nextto-next-to-leading order in chiral effective field theory. I will also discuss our recent lattice simulations of the 12C-spectrum where the next-to-next-to-leading order nuclear forces serve as an input. In addition to the ground state and excited spin-2 state, we find a resonance at -85(3) MeV with all of the properties of the Hoyle state and in agreement with the experimentally observed energy.

Krebs, Hermann

2012-09-01

115

Two-body interaction currents and nuclear magnetic moments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The meson-theoretical approach to nuclear interaction currents is considered in the one-meson exchange approximation. Results are presented for two models of charge-symmetric piN coupling: the gamma5 model and the static model. The effect of interaction currents on the nuclear dipole magnetic moment of odd-mass-nuclei with jj closed-shells plus (or minus) one nucleon is calculated within the framework of the pure

Marc Chemtob

1969-01-01

116

Treosulfan, fludarabine, and 2-Gy total body irradiation followed by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers curative therapy for many patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, post-HCT relapse remains a major problem, particularly in patients with high-risk cytogenetics. In this prospective phase II trial, we assessed the efficacy and toxicity of treosulfan, fludarabine, and 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) as conditioning for allogeneic HCT in patients with MDS or AML. Ninety-six patients with MDS (n = 36: 15 refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, 10 refractory anemia with excess blasts type 1, 10 refractory anemia with excess blasts type 2, 1 chronic myelomonocytic leukemia type 1) or AML (n = 60: 35 first complete remission [CR], 18 second CR, 3 advanced CR, 4 refractory relapse) were enrolled; median age was 51 (range, 1 to 60) years. Twelve patients had undergone a prior HCT with high-intensity conditioning. Patients received 14 g/m(2)/day treosulfan i.v. on days -6 to -4, 30 mg/m(2)/day fludarabine i.v. on days -6 to -2, and 2 Gy TBI on day 0, followed by infusion of hematopoietic cells from related (n = 27) or unrelated (n = 69) donors. Graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis consisted of tacrolimus and methotrexate. With a median follow-up of 30 months, the 2-year overall survival (OS), relapse incidence, and nonrelapse mortality were 73%, 27%, and 8%, respectively. The incidences of grades II to IV (III to IV) acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease were 59% (10%) and 47%, respectively. Two-year OS was not significantly different between MDS patients with poor-risk and good/intermediate-risk cytogenetics (69% and 85%, respectively) or between AML patients with unfavorable and favorable/intermediate-risk cytogenetics (64% and 76%, respectively). In AML patients, minimal residual disease (MRD; n = 10) at the time of HCT predicted higher relapse incidence (70% versus 18%) and lower OS (41% versus 79%) at 2 years, when compared with patients without MRD. In conclusion, treosulfan, fludarabine, and low-dose TBI provided effective conditioning for allogeneic HCT in patients with MDS or AML and resulted in low relapse incidence, regardless of cytogenetic risk. In patients with AML, MRD at the time of HCT remained a risk factor for post-HCT relapse. PMID:24440648

Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Gutman, Jonathan; Nemecek, Eneida R; Bar, Merav; Milano, Filippo; Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Scott, Bart; Fang, Min; Wood, Brent; Pagel, John M; Baumgart, Joachim; Delaney, Colleen; Maziarz, Richard T; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Estey, Elihu H; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Storer, Barry E; Deeg, Hans Joachim

2014-04-01

117

Nuclear electric dipole moment of three-body system  

E-print Network

Nuclear electric dipole moments of $^{3}He$ and $^{3}H$ are calculated using Time Reversal Invariance Violating (TRIV) potentials based on the meson exchange theory, as well as the ones derived by using pionless and pionful effective field theories, with nuclear wave functions obtained by solving Faddeev equations in configuration space for the complete Hamiltonians comprising both TRIV and realistic strong interactions. The obtained results are compared with the previous calculations of $^{3}He$ EDM and with time reversal invariance violating effects in neutron-deuteron scattering.

Young-Ho Song; Rimantas Lazauskas; Vladimir Gudkov

2012-11-15

118

Nuclear electric dipole moment of three-body system  

E-print Network

Nuclear electric dipole moments of $^{3}He$ and $^{3}H$ are calculated using Time Reversal Invariance Violating (TRIV) potentials based on the meson exchange theory, as well as the ones derived by using pionless and pionful effective field theories, with nuclear wave functions obtained by solving Faddeev equations in configuration space for the complete Hamiltonians comprising both TRIV and realistic strong interactions. The obtained results are compared with the previous calculations of $^{3}He$ EDM and with time reversal invariance violating effects in neutron-deuteron scattering.

Song, Young-Ho; Gudkov, Vladimir

2012-01-01

119

Chronic leukemia.  

PubMed

The chronic leukemias include chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). CML is a clonal myeloproliferative hematopoietic stem-cell disorder, and CLL is a monoclonal B-cell disorder. CML is Philadelphia chromosome positive. There are 3 phases of CML: the chronic phase, the accelerated phase, and the blast phase. The primary treatment of CML consists of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. CLL can present as indolent or fulminant disease. Early disease is managed with observation. Fulminant disease is currently treated with alkylating agents, purine analogues, and monoclonal antibodies, but new biotarged therapies are being developed. PMID:24267282

Greenberg, Edythe M Lyn; Probst, Alexandra

2013-12-01

120

Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... vera, essential thrombocythemia, or primary myelofibrosis. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Chronic myelogenous leukemia is a disease in which ... other problems related to essential thrombocythemia. Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia Chronic neutrophilic leukemia is a disease in which ...

121

A one-body transport model of fluctuation processes in nuclear collisions  

SciTech Connect

Many aspects of a many-body system can be described in terms of one- body transport models in which the system at any time is characterized by its single-particle density rather than by the full many-body information. In these one-body models evaluation of the single-particle density is determined by a transport equation which contains the self-consistent mean-field potential and a collision term due to binary two-body collisions. Recently, this approach in a semi-classical limit with a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) form of a collision term has been applied to nuclear collisions at intermediate energies. Common to all one-body models, only the average effects of two-body collisions are retained in the equation of motion and higher order correlations are entirely neglected. This approximation corresponds to an ensemble averaging which is evident, for example, from the molecular chaos assumption'' introduced in derivation of Boltzmann equation. As a result, these one-body models determine the ensemble averaged single-particle density and cannot provide a description for the fluctuation processes in nuclear collisions. On the other hand, at low and intermediate energies dynamical fluctuations are substantial due to large available phase space for decay into many final states. Therefore, it is of great interest to improve one-body transport models by incorporating dynamical fluctuations due to high order correlations into the equation of motion. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Ayik, S. (Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (USA)); Gregoire, C.; Suraud, E.; Stryjewski, J.; Belkacem, M. (Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France))

1990-01-01

122

Evaluation of changes in random blood glucose and body mass index during and after completion of chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

PubMed Central

Purpose Improved survival of patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has drawn attention to the potential for late consequences of previous treatments among survivors, including metabolic syndrome. In this study, we evaluated changes in 3 parameters, namely, random blood glucose, body mass index (BMI), and Z score for BMI (Z-BMI), in children with ALL during chemotherapy and after completion of treatment. Methods Patients newly diagnosed with ALL from January, 2005 to December, 2008 at Saint Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, who completed treatment with chemotherapy only were included (n=107). Random glucose, BMI, and Z-BMI were recorded at 5 intervals: at diagnosis, before maintenance treatment, at completion of maintenance treatment, and 6 and 12 months after completion of maintenance treatment. Similar analyses were conducted on 2 subcohorts based on ALL risk groups. Results For random glucose, a paired comparison showed significantly lower levels at 12 months post-treatment compared to those at initial diagnosis (P<0.001) and before maintenance (P<0.001). The Z-BMI score was significantly higher before maintenance than at diagnosis (P<0.001), but decreased significantly at the end of treatment (P<0.001) and remained low at 6 months (P<0.001) and 12 months (P<0.001) post-treatment. Similar results were obtained upon analysis of risk group-based subcohorts. Conclusion For a cohort of ALL patients treated without allogeneic transplantation or cranial irradiation, decrease in random glucose and Z-BMI after completion of chemotherapy does not indicate future glucose intolerance or obesity. PMID:22574072

Bang, Kyong-Won; Seo, Soo Young; Lee, Jae Wook; Jang, Pil-Sang; Jung, Min Ho; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Jeong, Dae-Chul; Suh, Byung Kyu; Kim, Hack-Ki

2012-01-01

123

Uncovering many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths by central spin decoherence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Central spin decoherence caused by nuclear spin baths is often a critical issue in various quantum computing schemes, and it has also been used for sensing single-nuclear spins. Recent theoretical studies suggest that central spin decoherence can act as a probe of many-body physics in spin baths; however, identification and detection of many-body correlations of nuclear spins in nanoscale systems are highly challenging. Here, taking a phosphorus donor electron spin in a 29Si nuclear spin bath as our model system, we discover both theoretically and experimentally that many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths produce identifiable signatures in decoherence of the central spin under multiple-pulse dynamical decoupling control. We demonstrate that under control by an odd or even number of pulses, the central spin decoherence is principally caused by second- or fourth-order nuclear spin correlations, respectively. This study marks an important step toward studying many-body physics using spin qubits.

Ma, Wen-Long; Wolfowicz, Gary; Zhao, Nan; Li, Shu-Shen; Morton, John J. L.; Liu, Ren-Bao

2014-09-01

124

Uncovering many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths by central spin decoherence  

PubMed Central

Central spin decoherence caused by nuclear spin baths is often a critical issue in various quantum computing schemes, and it has also been used for sensing single-nuclear spins. Recent theoretical studies suggest that central spin decoherence can act as a probe of many-body physics in spin baths; however, identification and detection of many-body correlations of nuclear spins in nanoscale systems are highly challenging. Here, taking a phosphorus donor electron spin in a 29Si nuclear spin bath as our model system, we discover both theoretically and experimentally that many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths produce identifiable signatures in decoherence of the central spin under multiple-pulse dynamical decoupling control. We demonstrate that under control by an odd or even number of pulses, the central spin decoherence is principally caused by second- or fourth-order nuclear spin correlations, respectively. This study marks an important step toward studying many-body physics using spin qubits. PMID:25205440

Ma, Wen-Long; Wolfowicz, Gary; Zhao, Nan; Li, Shu-Shen; Morton, John J.L.; Liu, Ren-Bao

2014-01-01

125

Nuclear shell-model calculations and strong two-body correlations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two-body Hamiltonians, like the Reid interaction, are derived by fitting the two-nucleon data. It is an assumption that the many-body eigenstates of this Hamiltonian form a representation of the observed nuclear states. At best, this has been demonstrated for the ground states of a few nuclei, e.g., the triton, and there the binding energy is off by 15--20%, this being

J. M. Irvine; G. S. Mani; V. F. E. Pucknell; M. Vallieres; F. Yazici

1976-01-01

126

Uncovering many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths by central spin decoherence  

E-print Network

Many-body correlations can yield key insights into the nature of interacting systems; however, detecting them is often very challenging in many-particle physics, especially in nanoscale systems. Here, taking a phosphorus donor electron spin in a natural-abundance 29Si nuclear spin bath as our model system, we discover both theoretically and experimentally that many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths produce identifiable signatures in the decoherence of the central spin under multiple-pulse dynamical decoupling control. We find that when the number of decoupling -pulses is odd, central spin decoherence is primarily driven by second-order nuclear spin correlations (pairwise flip-flop processes). In contrast, when the number of -pulses is even, fourth-order nuclear spin correlations (diagonal interaction renormalized pairwise flip-flop processes) are principally responsible for the central spin decoherence. Many-body correlations of different orders can thus be selectively detected by central spin decoherence under different dynamical decoupling controls, providing a useful approach to probing many-body processes in nanoscale nuclear spin baths.

Wen-Long Ma; Gary Wolfowicz; Nan Zhao; Shu-Shen Li; John J. L. Morton; Ren-Bao Liu

2014-04-10

127

Low nuclear body formation and tax SUMOylation do not prevent NF-kappaB promoter activation  

PubMed Central

Background The Tax protein encoded by Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a powerful activator of the NF-?B pathway, a property critical for HTLV-1-induced immortalization of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Tax permanently stimulates this pathway at a cytoplasmic level by activating the I?B kinase (IKK) complex and at a nuclear level by enhancing the binding of the NF-?B factor RelA to its cognate promoters and by forming nuclear bodies, believed to represent transcriptionally active structures. In previous studies, we reported that Tax ubiquitination and SUMOylation play a critical role in Tax localization and NF-?B activation. Indeed, analysis of lysine Tax mutants fused or not to ubiquitin or SUMO led us to propose a two-step model in which Tax ubiquitination first intervenes to activate IKK while Tax SUMOylation is subsequently required for promoter activation within Tax nuclear bodies. However, recent studies showing that ubiquitin or SUMO can modulate Tax activities in either the nucleus or the cytoplasm and that SUMOylated Tax can serve as substrate for ubiquitination suggested that Tax ubiquitination and SUMOylation may mediate redundant rather than successive functions. Results In this study, we analyzed the properties of a new Tax mutant that is properly ubiquitinated, but defective for both nuclear body formation and SUMOylation. We report that reducing Tax SUMOylation and nuclear body formation do not alter the ability of Tax to activate IKK, induce RelA nuclear translocation, and trigger gene expression from a NF-?B promoter. Importantly, potent NF-?B promoter activation by Tax despite low SUMOylation and nuclear body formation is also observed in T cells, including CD4+ primary T lymphocytes. Moreover, we show that Tax nuclear bodies are hardly observed in HTLV-1-infected T cells. Finally, we provide direct evidence that the degree of NF-?B activation by Tax correlates with the level of Tax ubiquitination, but not SUMOylation. Conclusions These data reveal that the formation of Tax nuclear bodies, previously associated to transcriptional activities in Tax-transfected cells, is dispensable for NF-?B promoter activation, notably in CD4+ T cells. They also provide the first evidence that Tax SUMOylation is not a key determinant for Tax-induced NF-?B activation. PMID:23009398

2012-01-01

128

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Inhibition Enhances Nuclear Proapoptotic Function of p53 in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Activation of the Raf\\/MEK\\/ERK pathway and inactivation of wild-type p53 by Mdm2 overexpression are frequent molecular events in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). We investigated the interaction of Raf\\/MEK\\/ERK and p53 pathways after their simultaneous blockades using a selective small-molecule antagonist of Mdm2, Nutlin-3a, and a pharmacologic MEK- specific inhibitor, PD98059. We found that PD98059, which itself has minimal apoptogenic activity,

Kensuke Kojima; Marina Konopleva; Ismael J. Samudio; Vivian Ruvolo; Michael Andreeff

2007-01-01

129

Comparison of total body irradiation vs chlorambucil and prednisone for remission induction of active chronic lymphocytic leukemia: an ECOG study. Part I: total body irradiation-response and toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-six evaluable patients were entered into two fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) programs; 11 patients received a course of 150 rad TBI (x 3 if tolerated) and 15 patients received a lower dose course of 50 rad (x 3 if tolerated). Complete remissions (CR) were not produced by either course; however, the higher dose course (Plan I) yielded a partial response (PR) rate of 73%, while the lower dose course yielded a PR of 47%. Although fraction size seemed trivial in both TBI plans, an unexpected high degree of hematologic toxicity was encountered, and was parallel to the response rates: in Plan I 73% of patients experienced severe to life-threatening depression of platelets, or granulocytes, whereas in Plan II this rate was 47%. This was of short duration with rapid return of blood counts to normal levels. One death can be attributed to TBI. The chemotherapy arm of the study demonstrated superiority in terms of complete responses. Twenty-three percent of patients treated by cholrambucil and prednisone attained CR, in contrast to 0% of TBI patients. PR for chemotherapy was similar to that obtained with TBI. Chemotherapy also proved superior in terms of overall response rate, number of patients in remission, and in the median duration of response, but not in the median duration of survival. Fractional TBI techniques for active chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) should be interrupted when the platelet count dips below 100,000 and the granulocyte count is lower than 2,000. Future studies should continue TBI radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

Rubin, P. (Univ. of Rochester, NY); Bennent, J.M.; Begg, C.; Bozdech, M.J.; Silber, R.

1981-12-01

130

Three-body force effect on the neutron and proton spectral functions in asymmetric nuclear matter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the effect of microscopic three-body forces (TBFs) on the off-shell behavior of the neutron and proton mass operators M?(k,?)=V?(k,?)+iW?(k,?) in asymmetric nuclear matter within the framework of the extended Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach. We adopt the Argonne V18 two-body potential supplemented with a microscopic TBF as the realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction. At high densities well above the normal nuclear matter density, the TBF turns out to affect significantly the off-shell behavior of both the proton and neutron mass operators. The neutron and proton spectral functions in asymmetric nuclear matter are calculated and discussed. At low densities around and below the normal density, the TBF effect on the spectral functions turns out to be negligibly weak. At high densities well above the saturation density, the TBF is shown to affect noticeably the neutron and proton spectral functions.

Wang, Pei; Zuo, Wei

2014-05-01

131

Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies  

SciTech Connect

HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies. -- Highlights: ? We produce and validate new antibody reagents for the ubiquitin-protein ligase HHARI. ? HHARI colocalizes with nuclear bodies including Cajal, PML and SC35 bodies. ? We establish new functions in cell proliferation regulation for HHARI. ? Increased HHARI expression associates with squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation.

Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)] [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Adams, Matthew [BioScreening Technology Group, Biomedical Health Research Center, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)] [BioScreening Technology Group, Biomedical Health Research Center, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); High, Alec S. [Department of Histopathology, Bexley Wing, St. James's University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)] [Department of Histopathology, Bexley Wing, St. James's University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Johnson, Colin A., E-mail: c.johnson@leeds.ac.uk [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Robinson, Philip A. [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)] [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)

2013-02-01

132

Nuclear actin is partially associated with Cajal bodies in human cells in culture and relocates to the nuclear periphery after infection of cells by adenovirus 5  

SciTech Connect

Cajal bodies are intra-nuclear structures enriched in proteins involved in transcription and mRNA processing. In this study, immunofluorescence microscopy experiments using a highly specific antibody to actin revealed nuclear actin spots that colocalized in part with p80 coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Actin remained associated with Cajal bodies in cells extracted to reveal the nuclear matrix. Adenovirus infection, which is known to disassemble Cajal bodies, resulted in loss of actin from these structures late in infection. In infected cells, nuclear actin was observed to relocate to structures at the periphery of the nucleus, inside the nuclear envelope. Based on these findings, it is suggested that actin may play an important role in the organization or function of the Cajal body.

Gedge, L.J.E. [School of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Morrison, E.E. [CRUK Clinical Centre at Leeds, St. James' University Hospital, Leeds, LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Blair, G.E. [School of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Walker, J.H. [School of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: J.H.Walker@leeds.ac.uk

2005-02-15

133

How Is Childhood Leukemia Classified?  

MedlinePLUS

... childhood leukemia (ALL or AML) How is childhood leukemia classified? Classification of the leukemia plays a major ... of the early diagnostic testing. Acute lymphocytic (lymphoblastic) leukemia (ALL) Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is a fast- ...

134

What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... get acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Leukemia is a type of cancer that starts ... person to bleed or bruise easily. Acute myeloid leukemia Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) goes by many names, ...

135

Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplantation and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-03-03

136

Characterization of nuclear protein binding to a site in the long terminal repeat of a murine leukemia virus: comparison with the NFAT complex.  

PubMed Central

We previously identified a protein-binding site (MLPal) that is located downstream of the enhancer element in the long terminal repeat (LTR) of a mink cell focusing-forming (MCF) murine leukemia virus (F. K. Yoshimura, K. Diem, H. Chen, and J. Tupper, J. Virol. 67:2298-2304, 1993). We determined that the MLPal site regulates transcription specifically in T cells and affects the lymphomagenicity of the MCF isolate 13 murine leukemia virus with a single enhancer repeat in its LTR. In this report, we present evidence that two different proteins, a T-cell-specific protein and a ubiquitous protein, bind the MLPal site in a sequence-specific manner. By mutational analysis, we determined that the T-cell-specific and the ubiquitous proteins require different nucleotides in the MLPal sequence for DNA binding. By competitive electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we demonstrated that the T-cell-specific protein that binds MLPal is identical or similar to a protein from nonactivable T cells that interacts with the binding site of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). Unlike the NFAT-binding site, however, the MLPal site does not bind proteins that are inducible by T-cell activation. We observed that the MLPal sequence is conserved in the LTRs of other mammalian retroviruses that cause T-cell diseases. Furthermore, the MLPal sequence is present in the transcriptional regulatory regions of cellular genes that either are expressed specifically in T cells or are commonly rearranged by provirus integration in thymic lymphomas. Thus, the MLPal-binding proteins may play a role in the transcriptional regulation not only of the MCF virus LTR but also of cellular genes involved in T-cell development. PMID:7815567

Yoshimura, F K; Diem, K

1995-01-01

137

Understanding Leukemias  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tutorial is designed to aid medical students at all levels understand the laboratory diagnosis of leukemias. It includes introductory material on the basic laboratory tests specific to diagnoses, their general application and pitfalls in interpretation. The introductory material is followed by a series of short clinical vignettes illustrating the major categories of leukemia. This tutorial focuses on diagnosis and relative little on treatment is included. QuickTime movie player, Flash player and Java script runtime plug-in scripts are required for some pages. The tutorial concludes with a short self-help quiz covering the major points developed. The plug-ins noted above are available free at the following sites: http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/win.html and http://www.sun.com/ . Questions should be directed to Dr. Mark Braun; braunm@indiana.edu.Annotated: falseDisease diagnosis: neoplastic

Braun, Mark

2009-11-09

138

Dynamic force-induced direct dissociation of protein complexes in a nuclear body in living cells  

PubMed Central

Despite past progress in understanding mechanisms of cellular mechanotransduction, it is unclear whether a local surface force can directly alter nuclear functions without intermediate biochemical cascades. Here we show that a local dynamic force via integrins resulted in direct displacements of coilin and SMN proteins in Cajal bodies (CBs) and direct dissociation of coilin-SMN complexes. Spontaneous movements of coilin increased more than those of SMN in the same CB after dynamic force application. FRET changes of coilin-SMN depended on force magnitude, an intact F-actin, cytoskeletal tension, Lamin A/C, or substrate rigidity. Other protein pairs in CBs exhibited different magnitudes of FRET. Dynamic cyclic force induced tiny phase lags between various protein pairs in CBs, suggesting viscoelastic interactions between them. These findings demonstrate that dynamic force-induced direct structural changes of protein complexes in Cajal bodies may represent a unique mechanism of mechanotransduction that impacts on nuclear functions involved in gene expression. PMID:22643893

Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Shevtsov, Sergey P.; Chowdhury, Farhan; Wu, Douglas C.; Na, Sungsoo; Dundr, Miroslav; Wang, Ning

2012-01-01

139

Oleylethanolamide regulates feeding and body weight through activation of the nuclear receptor PPAR-alpha  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oleylethanolamide (OEA) is a naturally occurring lipid that regulates satiety and body weight. Although structurally related to the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide, OEA does not bind to cannabinoid receptors and its molecular targets have not been defined. Here we show that OEA binds with high affinity to the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha), a nuclear receptor that regulates several aspects of lipid metabolism.

Jin Fu; Silvana Gaetani; Fariba Oveisi; Jesse Lo Verme; Antonia Serrano; Fernando Rodríguez de Fonseca; Anja Rosengarth; Hartmut Luecke; Barbara Di Giacomo; Giorgio Tarzia; Daniele Piomelli

2003-01-01

140

Association of hepatitis B virus polymerase with promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies mediated by the S100 family protein p11  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase (Pol) interacts with cellular chaperone proteins and thereby performs multiple functions necessary for viral replication. Yeast two-hybrid analysis was applied to identify additional cellular targets required for HBV Pol function. HBV Pol interacted with S100A10 (p11), a Ca2+-modulated protein previously shown to bind to annexin II. The interaction between HBV Pol and p11 was confirmed

Juhyun Choi; Jin-Sook Chang; Min-Sup Song; Byung-Yoon Ahn; Young In Park; Dae-Sik Lim; Ye Sun Han

2003-01-01

141

The DNA Binding Property of PML/RARA but Not the Integrity of PML Nuclear Bodies Is Indispensable for Leukemic Transformation  

PubMed Central

PML/RARA is the oncoprotein driving acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). It suppresses genes expression by recruitment of a number of transcriptional repressors, resulting in differentiation block and malignant transformation of hematopoietic cells. Here, we found that mice primary hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), transduced by DNA-binding-defective PML/RARA mutants, were deficient in colony formation. Further experiments showed that DNA-binding-defective PML/RARA mutants could not repress the transcription of retinoic acid regulated genes. Intriguingly, there were no significant differences of the micro-speckled intracellular distribution between the mutants and wild-type PML/RARA. Some retinoic acid target genes regulated by PML/RARA are involved in not only differentiation block but also hematopoietic cell self-renewal. Altogether, our data demonstrate that direct DNA-binding is essential for PML/RARA to immortalize hematopoietic cells, while disruption of PML-nuclear body does not seem to be a prerequisite for hematopoietic cell transformation. PMID:25119106

Liu, Xi; Yuan, Hao; Peres, Laurent; Chen, Saijuan; Chen, Zhu; de The, Hugues; Zhou, Jun; Zhu, Jun

2014-01-01

142

The leukemias: Epidemiologic aspects  

SciTech Connect

Particularly geared to physicians and cancer researchers, this study of the epidemiology and etiology of leukemia analyzes the four major leukemia subtypes in terms of genetic and familial determinant factors and examines the incidence, distribution and frequency of reported leukemia clusters. Linet discusses the connection between other types of malignancies, their treatments, and the subsequent development of leukemia and evaluates the impact on leukemia onset of such environmental factors as radiation therapy, drugs, and occupational hazards.

Linet, M.S.

1984-01-01

143

Nuclear LSm8 affects number of cytoplasmic processing bodies via controlling cellular distribution of Like-Sm proteins  

PubMed Central

Processing bodies (P-bodies) are dynamic cytoplasmic structures involved in mRNA degradation, but the mechanism that governs their formation is poorly understood. In this paper, we address a role of Like-Sm (LSm) proteins in formation of P-bodies and provide evidence that depletion of nuclear LSm8 increases the number of P-bodies, while LSm8 overexpression leads to P-body loss. We show that LSm8 knockdown causes relocalization of LSm4 and LSm6 proteins to the cytoplasm and suggest that LSm8 controls nuclear accumulation of all LSm2–7 proteins. We propose a model in which redistribution of LSm2–7 to the cytoplasm creates new binding sites for other P-body components and nucleates new, microscopically visible structures. The model is supported by prolonged residence of two P-body proteins, DDX6 and Ago2, in P-bodies after LSm8 depletion, which indicates stronger interactions between these proteins and P-bodies. Finally, an increased number of P-bodies has negligible effects on microRNA-mediated translation repression and nonsense mediated decay, further supporting the view that the function of proteins localized in P-bodies is independent of visible P-bodies. PMID:22875987

Novotny, Ivan; Podolska, Katerina; Blazikova, Michaela; Valasek, Leos Shivaya; Svoboda, Petr; Stanek, David

2012-01-01

144

Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) and Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML)  

MedlinePLUS

... and Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML)/2 Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) CMML is a clonal disorder, which means ... progresses to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) JMML is an uncommon blood cancer. It ...

145

Distinct roles of enhancer nuclear factor 1 (NF1) sites in plasmacytoma and osteopetrosis induction by Akv1-99 murine leukemia virus  

SciTech Connect

Murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) can be lymphomagenic and bone pathogenic. In this work, the possible roles of two distinct proviral enhancer nuclear factor 1 (NF1) binding sites in osteopetrosis and tumor induction by B-lymphomagenic Akv1-99 MLV were investigated. Akv1-99 and mutants either with NF1 site 1, NF1 site 2 or both sites disrupted induced tumors (plasma cell proliferations by histopathology) with remarkably similar incidence and mean latency in inbred NMRI mice. Clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangement detection, by Southern analysis, confirmed approximately half of the tumors induced by each virus to be plasmacytomas while the remaining lacked detectable clonally rearranged Ig genes and were considered polyclonal; a demonstration that enhancer NF1 sites are dispensable for plasmacytoma induction by Akv1-99. In contrast, X-ray analysis revealed significant differences in osteopetrosis induction by the four viruses strongly indicating that NF1 site 2 is critical for viral bone pathogenicity, whereas NF1 site 1 is neutral or moderately inhibitory. In conclusion, enhancer NF1 sites are major determinants of osteopetrosis induction by Akv1-99 without significant influence on viral oncogenicity.

Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Aarhus, C.F. Mollers Alle, Building 130, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Sorensen, Annette Balle [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Aarhus, C.F. Mollers Alle, Building 130, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia [Institute of Pathology, GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany); Kunder, Sandra [Institute of Pathology, GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany); Schmidt, Joerg [Department of Comparative Medicine, GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany); Pedersen, Finn Skou [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Aarhus, C.F. Mollers Alle, Building 130, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark) and Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Aarhus (Denmark)]. E-mail: fsp@mb.au.dk

2005-04-10

146

ALS-associated protein FIG4 is localized in Pick and Lewy bodies, and also neuronal nuclear inclusions, in polyglutamine and intranuclear inclusion body diseases.  

PubMed

FIG4 is a phosphatase that regulates intracellular vesicle trafficking along the endosomal-lysosomal pathway. Mutations of FIG4 lead to the development of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4J and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Moreover, ALS-associated proteins (transactivation response DNA protein 43 (TDP-43), fused in sarcoma (FUS), optineurin, ubiquilin-2, charged mutivesicular body protein 2b (CHMP2B) and valosin-containing protein) are involved in inclusion body formation in several neurodegenerative diseases. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined the brains and spinal cords of patients with various neurodegenerative diseases, including sporadic TDP-43 proteinopathy (ALS and frontotemporal lobar degeneration). TDP-43 proteinopathy demonstrated no FIG4 immunoreactivity in neuronal inclusions. However, FIG4 immunoreactivity was present in Pick bodies in Pick's disease, Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, neuronal nuclear inclusions in polyglutamine and intranuclear inclusion body diseases, and Marinesco and Hirano bodies in aged control subjects. These findings suggest that FIG4 is not incorporated in TDP-43 inclusions and that it may have a common role in the formation or degradation of neuronal cytoplasmic and nuclear inclusions in several neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23888880

Kon, Tomoya; Mori, Fumiaki; Tanji, Kunikazu; Miki, Yasuo; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Yoshida, Mari; Sasaki, Hidenao; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Wakabayashi, Koichi

2014-02-01

147

Yields of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from seismic body and surface waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 USSR underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (m\\/sub b\\/) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The

L. R. Sykes; G. C. Wiggins

1986-01-01

148

Yields of Soviet Underground Nuclear Explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from Seismic Body and Surface Waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 U.S.S.R. underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (mb) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The most

Lynn R. Sykes; Graham C. Wiggins

1986-01-01

149

Low-Temperature Triple-Alpha Rate in a Full Three-Body Nuclear Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new three-body method is used to compute the rate of the triple-alpha capture reaction, which is the primary source of C12 in stars. In this Letter, we combine the Faddeev hyperspherical harmonics and the R-matrix method to obtain a full solution to the three-body ?+?+? continuum. Particular attention is paid to the long-range effects caused by the pairwise Coulomb interactions. The new rate agrees with the Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of Reaction rates for temperatures greater than 0.07 GK, but a large enhancement at lower temperature is found (?1012 at 0.02 GK). Our results are compared to previous calculations where additional approximations were made. We show that the new rate does not significantly change the evolution of stars around one solar mass. In particular, such stars still undergo a red-giant phase consistent with observations, and no significant differences are found in the final white dwarfs.

Nguyen, N. B.; Nunes, F. M.; Thompson, I. J.; Brown, E. F.

2012-10-01

150

What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... about chronic myeloid leukemia? What is chronic myeloid leukemia? Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), also known as chronic ... and start making antibodies to fight them. How leukemia starts Any blood-forming or lymphoid cells can ...

151

Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

About Leukemia The term leukemia refers to cancers of the white blood cells (also called leukocytes or WBCs). When ... the disease without it coming back. Types of Leukemia In general, leukemias are classified into acute (rapidly ...

152

Nuclear three-body problem in the complex energy plane: Complex-Scaling-Slater method  

E-print Network

The physics of open quantum systems is an interdisciplinary area of research. The nuclear "openness" manifests itself through the presence of the many-body continuum representing various decay, scattering, and reaction channels. As the radioactive nuclear beam experimentation extends the known nuclear landscape towards the particle drip lines, the coupling to the continuum space becomes exceedingly more important. Of particular interest are weakly bound and unbound nuclear states appearing around particle thresholds. Theories of such nuclei must take into account their open quantum nature. To describe open quantum systems, we introduce a Complex Scaling (CS) approach in the Slater basis. We benchmark it with the complex-energy Gamow Shell Model (GSM) by studying energies and wave functions of the bound and unbound states of the two-neutron halo nucleus 6He viewed as an $\\alpha$+ n + n cluster system. In the CS approach, we use the Slater basis, which exhibits the correct asymptotic behavior at large distances. To extract particle densities from the back-rotated CS solutions, we apply the Tikhonov regularization procedure, which minimizes the ultraviolet numerical noise. While standard applications of the inverse complex transformation to the complex-rotated solution provide unstable results, the stabilization method fully reproduces the GSM benchmark. We also propose a method to determine the smoothing parameter of the Tikhonov regularization. The combined suite of CS-Slater and GSM techniques has many attractive features when applied to nuclear problems involving weakly-bound and unbound states. While both methods can describe energies, total widths, and wave functions of nuclear states, the CS-Slater method, if it can be applied, can provide an additional information about partial energy widths associated with individual thresholds.

A. T. Kruppa; G. Papadimitriou; W. Nazarewicz; N. Michel

2013-10-28

153

PODs in the Nuclear Spot: Enigmas in the Magician's Pot  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear body, also known as the PML oncogenic domain (POD), is implicated in the pathophysiology of PML. These nuclear subcompartments are dynamic structures. The PML protein, which undergoes a fusion event in patients with promyelocytic leukemia, is normally found in PODs. The PML protein may be a major regulator of the constituents of PODs, controlling POD organization and function. Hatta and Fukamizu describe the functions of PML and discuss how the POD structure and organization may be regulated and affect apoptosis, gene expression, and cellular transformation.

Mitsutoki Hatta (University of Tsukuba;Center for Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance, Institute of Applied Biochemistry REV); Akiyoshi Fukamizu (University of Tsukuba;Center for Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance, Institute of Applied Biochemistry REV)

2001-08-21

154

Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... Net Patient Education Video : View a short video led by an ASCO expert in leukemia that provides basic information and areas of research. To continue reading this guide, use the menu on the side of your screen to select another section. ‹ Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic ...

155

Dynamic localization of tripartite motif-containing 22 in nuclear and nucleolar bodies  

SciTech Connect

Tripartite motif-containing 22 (TRIM22) exhibits antiviral and growth inhibitory properties, but there has been no study on the localization and dynamics of the endogenous TRIM22 protein. We report here that TRIM22 is dramatically induced by progesterone in MDA-MB-231-derived ABC28 cells and T47D cells. This induction was associated with an increase in TRIM22 nuclear bodies (NB), and an even more prominent increase in nucleolar TRIM22 bodies. Distinct endogenous TRIM22 NB were also demonstrated in several other cell lines including MCF7 and HeLa cells. These TRIM22 NB resemble Cajal bodies, co-localized with these structures and co-immunoprecipitated with p80-coilin. However, IFN{gamma}-induced TRIM22 in HeLa and MCF7 cells did not form NB, implying the forms and distribution of TRIM22 are regulated by specific cellular signals. This notion is also supported by the observation that TRIM22 NB undergoes dynamic cell-cycle dependent changes in distribution such that TRIM22 NB started to form in early G0/G1 but became dispersed in the S-phase. In light of its potential antiviral and antitumor properties, the findings here provide an interesting gateway to study the relationship between the different forms and functions of TRIM22.

Sivaramakrishnan, Gayathri; Sun, Yang; Tan, Si Kee [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore)] [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Lin, Valerie C.L., E-mail: cllin@ntu.edu.sg [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore)

2009-05-01

156

Challenges for Modeling Nuclear Structure: Are the Proton and Neutron Masses and A-body Interactions Relevant?  

E-print Network

We discuss some of the challenges that future nuclear modeling may face in order to improve the description of the nuclear structure. One challenge is related to the need for A-body nuclear interactions justified by various contemporary nuclear physics studies. Another challenge is related to the discrepancy in the NNN contact interaction parameters for 3He and 3H that suggests the need for accurate proton and neutron masses in the future precision calculations. MSC2010 Classification: 17B81 Applications to physics, 17B80 Applications to integrable systems, 81R12 Relations with integrable systems, 81V70 Many-body theory, 81V35 Nuclear physics, 81U15 Exactly and quasi-solvable systems, 82B23 Exactly solvable models; Bethe ansatz.

V. G. Gueorguiev; P. Navratil; J. P. Vary; J. P. Draayer; F. Pan

2010-11-27

157

DECREASED OLIGODENDROCYTE NUCLEAR DIAMETER IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE AND LEWY BODY DEMENTIA  

PubMed Central

To better understand the pathogenesis of dementia, it is important to understand histopathologic changes in neurodegenerative diseases because they might highlight key aspects of the degenerative process. In this study the nuclear diameter of neurons and oligodendrocytes in selected temporal lobe areas were determined in autopsy tissue sections from patients with in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Lewy body dementia (LBD), and controls. Our morphometric studies targeted neurons in the CA4 region of the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus, neurons in the granular layer of the dentate gyrus and oligodendrocytes in parahippocampal white matter. Mean neuronal nuclear diameters were not different among the studied groups. However, our studies revealed a statistically significant reduction of mean oligodendrocyte nuclear diameter in AD and LBD relative to controls. The reduction of the mean nucleus diameter of oligodendrocytes in LBD was independent of the presence of associated AD pathology in LBD. These findings for the first time identify decreased oligodendrocyte nucleus diameter as a morphologic feature of AD and LBD and may lead to a better understanding the role of oligodendrocytes in AD and LBD pathogenesis. PMID:22429607

Gagyi, Eva; Kormos, Bernadett; Castellanos, Karla J.; Valyi-Nagy, Klara; Korneff, Dennis; LoPresti, Patrizia; Woltjer, Randy; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor

2014-01-01

158

Snapshot of Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... for Leukemia Research The National Cancer Institute's (NCI) investment 2 in leukemia research increased from $216.4 ... Report , in 2010 dollars. 2 The estimated NCI investment is based on funding associated with a broad ...

159

Leukemia Trial Results  

MedlinePLUS

... Trials Reporting Program Coordinating Center for Clinical Trials Leukemia Trial Results Ibrutinib Improves Survival Compared with Ofatumumab in Patients with Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (Posted: 06/27/2014) - In an international randomized ...

160

Nuclear Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Is localized to Cajal Bodies  

PubMed Central

Fragile X syndrome is caused by loss of function of a single gene encoding the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). This RNA-binding protein, widely expressed in mammalian tissues, is particularly abundant in neurons and is a component of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes present within the translational apparatus. The absence of FMRP in neurons is believed to cause translation dysregulation and defects in mRNA transport essential for local protein synthesis and for synaptic development and maturation. A prevalent model posits that FMRP is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that transports its mRNA targets from the nucleus to the translation machinery. However, it is not known which of the multiple FMRP isoforms, resulting from the numerous alternatively spliced FMR1 transcripts variants, would be involved in such a process. Using a new generation of anti-FMRP antibodies and recombinant expression, we show here that the most commonly expressed human FMRP isoforms (ISO1 and 7) do not localize to the nucleus. Instead, specific FMRP isoforms 6 and 12 (ISO6 and 12), containing a novel C-terminal domain, were the only isoforms that localized to the nuclei in cultured human cells. These isoforms localized to specific p80-coilin and SMN positive structures that were identified as Cajal bodies. The Cajal body localization signal was confined to a 17 amino acid stretch in the C-terminus of human ISO6 and is lacking in a mouse Iso6 variant. As FMRP is an RNA-binding protein, its presence in Cajal bodies suggests additional functions in nuclear post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. Supporting this hypothesis, a missense mutation (I304N), known to alter the KH2-mediated RNA binding properties of FMRP, abolishes the localization of human FMRP ISO6 to Cajal bodies. These findings open unexplored avenues in search for new insights into the pathophysiology of Fragile X Syndrome. PMID:24204304

Tremblay, Sandra; Rose, Timothy M.; Cote, Jocelyn; De Koninck, Paul; Khandjian, Edouard W.

2013-01-01

161

B-lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma: overexpression of nuclear DNA repair protein PARP-1 correlates with antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and complex chromosomal abnormalities.  

PubMed

Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and Bcl-2 are emerging as therapeutic targets in various cancers. The former is a DNA repair protein associated with genomic stability and apoptosis, whereas the latter is an antiapoptotic protein having a DNA repair function through inhibition of PARP-1. Because genomic stability is critical for prognosis in B-lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (B-ALL), we studied the expression of PARP-1 and Bcl-2 proteins in patients with B-ALL of different ages and compared the results with cytogenetic data. The PARP-1 protein was overexpressed in about two-thirds (61%) of patients with B-ALL. It had a nuclear location, whereas Bcl-2 protein was cytosolic. Expression of the 2 proteins showed a highly positive correlation (? = 0.367; P < .001). Overexpression of PARP-1 correlated with a complex karyotype (P = .030), and this correlation remained significant for coexpression of PARP-1 and Bcl-2 proteins (?(2) = 7.498; P = .024) as well as after exclusion of pediatric patients (n = 9, P = .042). Overexpression of PARP-1 was not significantly more common in diploid versus aneuploid karyotypes (50% versus 59%, P = .610). The PARP-1 protein showed no correlation with specific chromosomal abnormalities associated with prognosis in B-ALL, as defined by the World Health Organization. In conclusion, high expression of the PARP-1 protein among patients with B-ALL is related to a complex karyotype and Bcl-2 positivity. Although these findings require validation in a larger population, the observations will be valuable in planning therapeutic trials (such as of PARP inhibitors and BH3 mimetics). PMID:24856976

Pournazari, Payam; Padmore, Ruth F; Kosari, Farid; Scalia, Peter; Shahbani-Rad, Meer-Taher; Shariff, Sami; Demetrick, Douglas J; Bosch, Mark; Mansoor, Adnan

2014-08-01

162

Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

Cancer.gov

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. An acute leukemia can become worse quickly if it is not treated and can result in death within months. AML is the most common type of acute leukemia in American adults and the average age of a patient with AML is 67.

163

PML body meets telomere  

PubMed Central

The unlimited proliferation potential of cancer cells requires the maintenance of their telomeres. This is frequently accomplished by reactivation of telomerase. However, in a significant fraction of tumors an alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanism is active. The molecular mechanism of the ALT pathway remains elusive. In particular, the role of characteristic complexes of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) with telomeres, the ALT-associated PML-NBs (APBs), is currently under investigation. Here, we review recent findings on the assembly, structure and functions of APBs. It is discussed how genomic aberrations in ALT-positive cancer cells could result in the formation of APBs and in ALT activity. We conclude that they are important functional intermediates in what is considered the canonical ALT pathway and discuss deregulations of cellular pathways that contribute to the emergence of the ALT phenotype. PMID:22572954

Chung, Inn; Osterwald, Sarah; Deeg, Katharina I.; Rippe, Karsten

2012-01-01

164

[The infant with leukemia].  

PubMed

Infant leukemia is rare and especially in newborn leukemoid reactions should be excluded by careful cytogenetic analysis before starting cytotoxic therapy. Infants have either acute lymphoblastic leukemia, monoblastic leukemia or acute undifferentiated leukemia. At present they have a bad outlook due to many coinciding unfavorable initial disease characteristics: high leukocyte count, liver and spleen enlargement, meningeal involvement, no expression of common ALL antigen, and a high frequency of pseudodiploid cells, that is with a translocation 4;II. The immaturity of organs and systems makes it difficult to treat these infants, and requires optimal supportive care. Therapeutic protocols for prospective clinical trials for leukemia in this age group are urgently needed. PMID:3287687

Kamps, W A; Sjamsoedin-Visser, E J; van Wering, E R

1988-04-01

165

Measurement of the whole-body 137Cs in residents around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant.  

PubMed

To understand the current situation of internal radiation exposure in the population around the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP), we examined the 137Cs body burden in six residents of Belarus, Ukraine and Russia in 2002 and 2004 using the whole-body counter (WBC) at Nagasaki University (Japan). The data were compared with those of our previous study performed in 1993-1994 using the same method. In 2002 and 2004, peaks of 137Cs were detected in two residents from Gomel, which was heavily contaminated by the CNPP accident, one from Minsk (Belarus) and one from Kiev (Ukraine), but another resident from Minsk showed no 137Cs peaks. The results of the present study suggests that residents around the CNPP are still exposed to chronic 137Cs internal irradiation, probably due to the daily consumption of contaminated domestic foods, but the risk of any disease by the irradiation is quite low. Long-term follow-up of WBC around the CNPP is useful and may contribute to radiation safety regulation together with a reduction of unnecessary radiophobia for the residents. PMID:15703186

Morita, Naoko; Takamura, Noboru; Ashizawa, Kiyoto; Shimasaki, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Shunichi; Okumura, Yutaka

2005-01-01

166

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with I-131-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.  

SciTech Connect

We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

Pagel, John M.; Gooley, T. A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, B. M.; Matthews, D. C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, P. J.; Storb, R.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

2009-12-24

167

Leukemia risk following radiotherapy for breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate further the relationship between high-dose radiotherapy and leukemia incidence, a nested case-control study was conducted in a cohort of 22,753 women who were 18-month survivors of invasive breast cancer diagnosed from 1935 to 1972. Women treated for breast cancer after 1973 were excluded to minimize the possible confounding influence of treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. The cases had histologically confirmed leukemia reported to the Connecticut Tumor Registry (CTR) between 1935 and 1984. A total of 48 cases of leukemia following breast cancer were included in the study. Two controls were individually matched to each leukemia case on the basis of age, calendar year when diagnosed with breast cancer, and survival time. Leukemia diagnoses were verified by one hematologist. Radiation dose to active bone marrow was estimated by medical physicists on the basis of the original radiotherapy records of study subjects. Local radiation doses to each of the 16 bone marrow components for each patient were reconstructed; the dose averaged over the entire body was 530 rad (5.3 Gy). Based on this dosage and assuming a linear relationship between dose and affect, a relative risk (RR) in excess of 10 would have been expected. However, there was little evidence that radiotherapy increased the overall risk of leukemia (RR = 1.16; 90% confidence interval (CI), 0.6 to 2.1). The risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, one of the few malignancies without evidence for an association with ionizing radiation, was not significantly increased (RR = 1.8; n = 10); nor was the risk for all other forms of leukemia (RR = 1.0; n = 38). There was no indication that risk varied over categories of radiation dose.

Curtis, R.E.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Stovall, M.; Flannery, J.T.; Moloney, W.C.

1989-01-01

168

What Is Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... about chronic myelomonocytic leukemia? What is chronic myelomonocytic leukemia? Chronic myelomonocytic (MY-eh-loh-MAH-noh-SIH- ... can bleed and bruise a lot. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia CMML patients have a high number of monocytes ...

169

Pions and neutrinos as probes of the nucleon and nuclear few-body system  

SciTech Connect

A number of studies of few-body nucleon and nuclear systems are being pursued at LAMPF using pions and neutrinos as probes. These include: a high-statistics measurement of the cross section for the reaction {pi}{sup +}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sub o}{pi}{sup 0} to determine the 1 = 2 {pi}{pi} scattering length; precision measurements of the {pi}{sup {minus}}p charge exchange cross section in the region of the A; measurements of the cross section for the ({pi}{sup +}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} p), from D, {sup 3}He as {sup 4}He as tests of charge symmetry and reaction mechanisms; measurements of the {pi}{sup +}p cross section below the {Delta}; and studies of vp elastic scattering at low Q{sup 2} to determine the quark content of the proton spin. Some of these experiments acquired data last year, while others are presently running. LAMPF, the highest power proton accelerator in the world, is presently in the midst of its 1993 production run.

Hoffman, C.M.

1993-09-01

170

Leukemia CTPM November 2011  

Cancer.gov

The Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Working Group of the Leukemia Steering Committee held an in- person meeting on November 2nd, 2011 in Rockville, MD to discuss ALL treatment strategies, consider trials for disease subtypes, and obtain a general consensus on the next clinical trial(s).

171

Hairy cell leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 24 patients with hairy cell leukemia, histological and fine structural findings from biopsies of the bone marrow are reported and their validity is compared with other diagnostic procedures available. Diagnosis by light microscopy of anterior iliac crest biopsies obtained by the method of myelotomy is possible with a high degree of accuracy. The differentiation of hairy cell leukemia from

K. F. Vykoupil; J. Thiele; A. Georgii

1976-01-01

172

Leukemia Steering Committee Roster  

Cancer.gov

Leukemia Steering Committee Roster Co-chairs Jerry Radich, M.D.Fred Hutchinson Cancer CenterSeattle, WA Wendy Stock, M.D.University of ChicagoChicago, IL Members Fred Appelbaum, M.D.Fred Hutchinson Cancer CenterSeattle, WA Deborah Banker, Ph.D.Leukemia

173

The Family Leukemia Association  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

Pollitt, Eleanor

1976-01-01

174

Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-04-25

175

Protein Kinase A Activation Enhances ?-Catenin Transcriptional Activity through Nuclear Localization to PML Bodies  

PubMed Central

The Protein Kinase A (PKA) and Wnt signaling cascades are fundamental pathways involved in cellular development and maintenance. In the osteoblast lineage, these pathways have been demonstrated functionally to be essential for the production of mineralized bone. Evidence for PKA-Wnt crosstalk has been reported both during tumorigenesis and during organogenesis, and the nature of the interaction is thought to rely on tissue and cell context. In this manuscript, we analyzed bone tumors arising from mice with activated PKA caused by mutation of the PKA regulatory subunit Prkar1a. In primary cells from these tumors, we observed relocalization of ?-catenin to intranuclear punctuate structures, which were identified as PML bodies. Cellular redistribution of ?-catenin could be recapitulated by pharmacologic activation of PKA. Using 3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts as a model system, we found that PKA phosphorylation sites on ?-catenin were required for nuclear re-localization. Further, ?-catenin's transport to the nucleus was accompanied by an increase in canonical Wnt-dependent transcription, which also required the PKA sites. PKA-Wnt crosstalk in the cells was bi-directional, including enhanced interactions between ?-catenin and the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and transcriptional crosstalk between the Wnt and PKA signaling pathways. Increases in canonical Wnt/?-catenin signaling were associated with a decrease in the activity of the non-canonical Wnt/Ror2 pathway, which has been shown to antagonize canonical Wnt signaling. Taken together, this study provides a new understanding of the complex regulation of the subcellular distribution of ?-catenin and its differential protein-protein interaction that can be modulated by PKA signaling. PMID:25299576

Zhang, Mei; Mahoney, Emilia; Zuo, Tao; Manchanda, Parmeet K.; Davuluri, Ramana V.; Kirschner, Lawrence S.

2014-01-01

176

Immunotoxins for leukemia.  

PubMed

Unconjugated monoclonal antibodies that target hematopoietic differentiation antigens have been developed to treat hematologic malignancies. Although some of these have activity against chronic lymphocytic leukemia and hairy cell leukemia, in general, monoclonal antibodies have limited efficacy as single agents in the treatment of leukemia. To increase their potency, the binding domains of monoclonal antibodies can be attached to protein toxins. Such compounds, termed immunotoxins, are delivered to the interior of leukemia cells based on antibody specificity for cell surface target antigens. Recombinant immunotoxins have been shown to be highly cytotoxic to leukemic blasts in vitro, in xenograft model systems, and in early-phase clinical trials in humans. These agents will likely play an increasing role in the treatment of leukemia. PMID:24578503

Wayne, Alan S; Fitzgerald, David J; Kreitman, Robert J; Pastan, Ira

2014-04-17

177

Multicomponent analysis of radiolytic products in human body fluids using high field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

High field proton Hahn spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate radiolytic damage to biomolecules present in intact human body fluids. gamma-Radiolysis of healthy or rheumatoid human serum (5.00 kGy) in the presence of atmospheric O2 gave rise to reproducible elevations in the concentration of NMR-detectable acetate which are predominantly ascribable to the prior oxidation of

Martin C. Grootveld; Herman Herz; Rachel Haywood; Geoffrey E. Hawkes; Declan Naughton; Anusha Perera; Jacky Knappitt; David R. Blake; Andrew W. D. Claxson

1994-01-01

178

General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Search Español Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®) Last Modified: 06/06/2014 General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a ...

179

Ohio State study shows how chronic inflammation can cause leukemia  

Cancer.gov

A hormone-like substance produced by the body to promote inflammation can cause an aggressive form of leukemia when present at high levels, according to a new study by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. The study shows that high levels of interleukin-15 (IL-15) alone can cause large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia, a rare and usually fatal form of cancer, in an animal model. The researchers also developed a treatment for the leukemia that showed no discernible side effects in the animal model.

180

[Nuclear techniques in nutrition: assessment of body fat and intake of human milk in breast-fed infants].  

PubMed

The application of nuclear techniques in the area of nutrition is safe because they use stable isotopes. The deuterium dilution method is used in body composition and human milk intake analysis. It is a reference method for body fat and validates inexpensive tools because of its accuracy, simplicity of application in individuals and population and the background of its usefulness in adults and children as an evaluation tool in clinical and health programs. It is a non-invasive technique as it uses saliva, which facilitates the assessment in pediatric populations. Changes in body fat are associated with non-communicable diseases; moreover, normal weight individuals with high fat deposition were reported. Furthermore, this technique is the only accurate way to determine whether infants are exclusively breast-fed and validate conventional methods based on surveys to mothers. PMID:25362913

Pallaro, Anabel; Tarducci, Gabriel

2014-12-01

181

Hodgkin's disease and leukemia  

PubMed Central

Four cases of acute leukemia occurring in patients with Hodgkin's disease are described. The literature on the association of these two diseases is reviewed. Acute myeloid or undifferentiated leukemias appear to be, at least in part, a complication affecting long-term survivors of Hodgkin's disease. Reed Sternberg cell leukemia is an unusual form of Hodgkin's disease and may be associated with a poor prognosis. The cytology and cytochemistry of Reed Sternberg cells are briefly discussed. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4503267

Chan, B. W. B.; McBride, J. A.

1972-01-01

182

Morphological subtyping of acute myeloid leukemia with maturation (AML-M2): homogeneous pink-colored cytoplasm of mature neutrophils is most characteristic of AML-M2 with t(8;21)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Morphologic and cytochemical features of 30 acute myeloid leukemia subtype M2 (AML-M2) patients with t(8;21) were compared with those of 50 AML-M2 patients without t(8;21). It was disclosed that irregular nuclear shape, Auer bodies, and at least 90% myeloperoxidase positivity in blast cells, and pseudo-Pelger-Huët anomaly of the nuclei and homogeneous pink-colored cytoplasm of mature neutrophils were observed in 90–100%

H Nakamura; K Kuriyama; N Sadamori; M Mine; T Itoyama; I Sasagawa; K Matsumoto; Y Tsuji; N Asou; S-I Kageyama; H Sakamaki; N Emi; R Ohno; M Tomonaga

1997-01-01

183

Intranuclear inclusions in paramyxovirus-induced encephalitis: evidence for altered nuclear body differentiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intranuclear inclusion bodies (INB) are frequently encountered in viral infections, where they are thought to be accumulations of viral particles. However, for RNA viruses replicating in the cytoplasm, this compartmentalization represents a paradox not consistent with the viral replication cycle. To define the basis for intranuclear paramyxoviral inclusion bodies in astrocytes, natural cases of canine distemper virus subacute encephalitis were

M. Oglesbee

1992-01-01

184

What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?  

MedlinePLUS

... about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic ... germs by surrounding and digesting them. Development of leukemia Any type of early blood-forming cell of ...

185

How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Found?  

MedlinePLUS

... acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia found? At this time there are no special ... doctor right away. Tests to find acute lymphocytic leukemia Most of the symptoms seen in leukemia also ...

186

Cordycepin Regulates GSK-3?/?-Catenin Signaling in Human Leukemia Cells  

PubMed Central

Background Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are a limitless cell source for the initiation and maintenance of leukemia. Activation of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway is required for the survival and development of LSCs. Therefore, targeting ?-catenin is considered a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia. The goal of this study was to explore whether cordycepin, an active component of the traditional medicine Cordyceps sinensis, regulates ?-catenin expression in leukemia cells. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, we found that cordycepin significantly suppressed cell proliferation in all malignant cancer cells, including U937, K562, A549, HepG2, SK-Hep1 and MCF7 in a dose-dependent manner. However, cordycepin reduced ?-catenin levels in U937, K562 and THP1 leukemia cells and had no effect on other solid cancer cells. In addition, treatment with cordycepin significantly suppressed leukemia colony formation in soft agar assay. Cordycepin enhanced proteasome-dependent degradation and inhibited nuclear translocation of ?-catenin in leukemia cells. Cordycepin-reduced ?-catenin stability was restored by the addition of a pharmacological inhibitor of GSK-3?, indicating that cordycepin-suppressed ?-catenin stability is mediated by the activation of GSK-3?. Furthermore, cordycepin abolished the effect of Wnt3a-induced ?-catenin in leukemia cells. In addition, cordycepin-impaired ?-catenin is regulated by Akt activation but is not significantly influenced by AMPK or mTOR signal pathways. Significance Our findings show for the first time that codycepin selectively reduces ?-catenin stability in leukemia but not in other solid tumor cells. This suppressive effect is mediated by regulating GSK-3?. A synergistic combination of cordycepin with other treatments should be used as a novel strategy to eradicate leukemia via elimination of LSCs. PMID:24086728

Liu, Tzu-An; Tzean, Shean-Shong; Shen, Tang-Long; Liou, Jun-Yang

2013-01-01

187

Total body irradiation and cyclophosphamide plus antithymocyte globulin regimen is well tolerated and promotes stable engraftment as a preparative regimen before T cell-replete haploidentical transplantation for acute leukemia.  

PubMed

We compared total body irradiation (TBI, 700 cGy)/cyclophosphamide (Cy, 3.6 g/m(2))/simustine (250 mg/m(2)) plus antithymocyte globulin (ATG) (TBI/Cy plus ATG) with cytarabine (8 g/m(2))/i.v. busulfan (Bu, 9.6 mg/kg)/Cy (3.6 g/m(2))/simustine (250 mg/m(2)) plus ATG (modified Bu/Cy plus ATG) as preparative therapy in T cell-replete haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) for acute leukemia. From August 2009 to August 2013, 38 consecutive patients using TBI/Cy plus ATG regimen for T cell-replete haplo-HSCT (TBI group) at our center were eligible, which contained 28 high-risk and 10 standard-risk patients. A nested case-control study was designed. Seventy-seven patients using modified Bu/Cy plus ATG regimen (Bu group) were randomly selected in a 1 to 3:1 ratio matching for age, disease and status, year of HSCT (±2 years), and length of follow-up. Only 1 graft failure occurred in the TBI group. The incidence and time of neutrophil and platelet engraftment were comparable between the 2 groups. Severe grades III/IV graft-versus-host disease was observed in 13.4% of Bu group and only 2.6% of TBI group (P = .083). More toxicity of the liver (37.7% versus 10.5%; P = .002) and more hemorrhagic cystitis occurred in the Bu group (49.3% versus 23.7%, P = .008). Diarrhea was more common in the TBI group (44.7% versus 22.1%; P = .031). No significant differences were found in the 2-year incidences of relapse (26.5% for TBI group versus 32.3% for Bu group, P = .742), 1-year transplant-related mortality (12.6% versus 16.2%, P = .862), 2-year overall survival (60.2% versus 57.0%, P = .937), and 2-year incidence of disease-free survival (57.9% versus 56.6%, P = .845) between the 2 groups. We conclude that the TBI/Cy plus ATG regimen seems to be feasible in T cell-replete haplo-HSCT, which promotes stable engraftment and a lower incidence of liver toxicity and hemorrhagic cystitis. However, longer follow-up is necessary to determine the late relapse rate and late toxicity. PMID:24747336

Fu, Haixia; Xu, Lanping; Liu, Daihong; Liu, Kaiyan; Zhang, Xiaohui; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yuhong; Han, Wei; Wang, Yu; Wang, Jingzhi; Wang, Fengrong; Huang, Xiaojun

2014-08-01

188

Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)  

MedlinePLUS

... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Stories Anna, transplant recipient and her daughter Every ... can support the cause. For Patients and Families Learning about your disease Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) How ...

189

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)  

MedlinePLUS

... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Stories Anna, transplant recipient and her daughter Every ... can support the cause. For Patients and Families Learning about your disease Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) How ...

190

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)  

MedlinePLUS

... called staging. Tests that look at changes in DNA inside the cancer cells may also be done. Results from these ... PDQ Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment. Bethesda, Md: National ... last modified: April 19, 2013. Available at: http://www.cancer. ...

191

Steroid resistance in leukemia  

PubMed Central

There are several types of leukemia which are characterized by the abnormal growth of cells from the myeloid or lymphoid lineage. Because of their lympholytic actions, glucocorticoids (GCs) are included in many therapeutic regimens for the treatment of various forms of leukemia. Although a significant number of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients respond well to GC treatment during initial phases; prolonged treatments sometimes results in steroid-resistance. The exact mechanism of this resistance has yet not been completely elucidated, but a correlation between functional GC receptor expression levels and steroid-resistance in patients has been found. In recent years, several other mechanisms of action have been reported that could play an important role in the development of such drug resistances in leukemia. Therefore, a better understanding of how leukemic patients develop drug resistance should result in drugs designed appropriately to treat these patients. PMID:24520542

Shah, Darshan S; Kumar, Raj

2013-01-01

192

Drugs Approved for Leukemia  

Cancer.gov

This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

193

Mixed phenotype murine leukemias.  

PubMed

Cell lines were derived from eight individual leukemias induced by X-rays in NFS mice. First typed as null cells (surface immunoglobulin negative, Thy-1 negative), they turned out to have a mixed phenotype with myeloid cytochemical markers, pre-B surface antigens and molecular markers of pro-B lymphocytes. They represent murine models for mixed phenotype (pro-pre-B-myeloid) leukemias. PMID:8350626

Defresne, M P; Borremans, B; Verhofstede, C; Peled, A; Thiry, A; Greimers, R; Robberecht, P; Nabarra, B; Verschaeve, L; Hooghe, R

1993-08-01

194

Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins  

SciTech Connect

One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase 11, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11 q23 or 21 q22. The MLL gene at 11 q23 or the AML1 gene at 21 q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 1 1 q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11 q23 or 21 q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

Larson, R.A.; LeBeau, M.M.; Vardiman, J.W.; Rowley, J.D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

1996-12-01

195

Thrombosis and acute leukemia.  

PubMed

Thrombosis is a common complication in patients with acute leukemia. While the presence of central venous lines, concomitant steroids, the use of Escherichia coli asparaginase and hereditary thrombophilic abnormalities are known risk factors for thrombosis in children, information on the pathogenesis, risk factors, and clinical outcome of thrombosis in adult patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still scarce. Expert consensus and guidelines regarding leukemia-specific risk factors, thrombosis prevention, and treatment strategies, as well as optimal type of central venous catheter in acute leukemia patients are required. It is likely that each subtype of acute leukemia represents a different setting for the development of thrombosis and the risk of bleeding. This is perhaps due to a combination of different disease-specific pathogenic mechanisms of thrombosis, including the type of chemotherapy protocol chosen, the underlying patients health, associated risk factors, as well as the biology of the disease itself. The risk of thrombosis may also vary according to ethnicity and prevalence of hereditary risk factors for thrombosis; thus, it is advisable for Latin American, Asian, and African countries to report on their specific patient population. PMID:22507812

Crespo-Solís, Erick

2012-04-01

196

Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

2013-01-16

197

Bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein inhibition suppresses human T cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein-mediated tumorigenesis by inhibiting nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) signaling.  

PubMed

The etiology of human T cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1)-mediated adult T cell leukemia is associated with the ability of viral oncoprotein Tax to induce sustained NF-?B activation and the expression of many NF-?B target genes. Acetylation of the RelA subunit of NF-?B and the subsequent recruitment of bromodomain-containing factor Brd4 are important for the expression of NF-?B target genes in response to various stimuli. However, their contributions to Tax-mediated NF-?B target gene expression and tumorigenesis remain unclear. Here we report that Tax induced the acetylation of lysine 310 of RelA and the binding of Brd4 to acetylated RelA to facilitate Tax-mediated transcriptional activation of NF-?B. Depletion of Brd4 down-regulated Tax-mediated NF-?B target gene expression and cell proliferation. Inhibiting the interaction of Brd4 and acetylated RelA with the bromodomain extraterminal protein inhibitor JQ1 suppressed the proliferation of Tax-expressing rat fibroblasts and Tax-positive HTLV-1-infected cells and Tax-mediated cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Moreover, JQ1 attenuated the Tax-mediated transcriptional activation of NF-?B, triggering the polyubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of constitutively active nuclear RelA. Our results identify Brd4 as a key regulator for Tax-mediated NF-?B gene expression and suggest that targeting epigenetic regulators such as Brd4 with the bromodomain extraterminal protein inhibitor might be a potential therapeutic strategy for cancers and other diseases associated with HTLV-1 infection. PMID:24189064

Wu, Xuewei; Qi, Jun; Bradner, James E; Xiao, Gutian; Chen, Lin-Feng

2013-12-13

198

Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Multiple Myeloma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-04-25

199

Subacute Myelogenous Leukemia: A Special Type of Myelogenous Leukemia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The clinical course, laboratory findings, cytochemical studies and ultrastructural observations of 22 subacute myelogenous leukemia (SML) cases are reported and compared with those of 28 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cases. There were marked difference...

C. Yang, W. Yan, S. Qi T. Yang, Y. Wang

1982-01-01

200

High incidence of obesity in young adults after treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine whether obesity complicated the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we studied the body mass index (BMI) of 63 female when and 51 male patients from the time of diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia to the time when final height was attained. The BMI z score was calculated for each patient at diagnosis, at end of treatment, and

Mohamed Didi; Elizabeth Didcock; Helena A. Davies; Amanda L. Ogilvy-Stuart; Jeremy K. H. Wales; Stephen M. Shalet

1995-01-01

201

Adipocytes impair leukemia treatment in mice.  

PubMed

Obesity is associated with increased cancer incidence and mortality. We have previously found that obesity in children is associated with a 50% increased recurrence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in high-risk patients. We have therefore developed novel in vivo and in vitro preclinical models to study the mechanism(s) of this association. Obesity increased relapse after monotherapy with vincristine (P = 0.03) in obese mice injected with syngeneic ALL cells. This occurred although the drug was dosed proportionally to body weight, equalizing blood and tissue drug levels. In coculture, 3T3-L1 adipocytes significantly impaired the antileukemia efficacy of vincristine, as well as three other chemotherapies (P < 0.05). Interestingly, this protection was independent of cell-cell contact, and it extended to human leukemia cell lines as well. Adipocytes prevented chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, and this was associated with increased expression of the two prosurvival signals Bcl-2 and Pim-2. These findings highlight the role of the adipocyte in fostering leukemia chemotherapy resistance, and may help explain the increased leukemia relapse rate in obese children and adults. Given the growing prevalence of obesity worldwide, these effects are likely to have increasing importance to cancer treatment. PMID:19773440

Behan, James W; Yun, Jason P; Proektor, Marina P; Ehsanipour, Ehsan A; Arutyunyan, Anna; Moses, Ara S; Avramis, Vassilios I; Louie, Stan G; Butturini, Anna; Heisterkamp, Nora; Mittelman, Steven D

2009-10-01

202

An RNA Interference Screen Identifies the Deubiquitinase STAMBPL1 as a Critical Regulator of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax Nuclear Export and NF-?B Activation  

PubMed Central

The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax oncoprotein actively shuttles between the nucleus, where it interacts with transcriptional and splicing regulatory proteins, and the cytoplasm, where it activates NF-?B. Posttranslational modifications of Tax such as ubiquitination regulate its subcellular localization and hence its function; however, the regulation of Tax trafficking and NF-?B activation by host factors is poorly understood. By screening a deubiquitinating (DUB) enzyme small interfering RNA (siRNA) library, we identified the metalloprotease STAM-binding protein-like 1 (STAMBPL1) as a positive regulator of Tax-mediated NF-?B activation. Overexpression of wild-type STAMBPL1, but not a catalytically inactive mutant, enhanced Tax-mediated NF-?B activation, whereas silencing of STAMBPL1 with siRNA impaired Tax activation of both the canonical and noncanonical NF-?B signaling pathways. STAMBPL1 regulated Tax-induced NF-?B signaling indirectly by controlling Tax nuclear/cytoplasmic transport and was required for DNA damage-induced Tax nuclear export. Together, these results reveal that the deubiquitinase STAMBPL1 is a key regulator of Tax trafficking and function. PMID:22258247

Lavorgna, Alfonso

2012-01-01

203

Anticipation in familial leukemia  

SciTech Connect

Anticipation refers to worsening severity or earlier age at onset with each generation for an inherited disease and primarily has been described for neurodegenerative illnesses resulting from expansion of trinucleotide repeats. We have tested for evidence of anticipation in familial leukemia. Of 49 affected individuals in nine families transmitting autosomal dominant acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the mean age at onset is 57 years in the grandparental generation, 32 years in the parental generation, and 13 years in the youngest generation (P < .001). Of 21 parent-child pairs with AML, 19 show younger ages at onset in the child and demonstrate a mean decline in age at onset of 28 years (P < .001). Of 18 affected individuals from seven pedigrees with autosomal dominant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the mean age at onset in the parental generation is 66 years versus 51 years in the youngest generation (P = .008). Of nine parent-child pairs with CLL, eight show younger ages at onset in the child and reveal a mean decline in age at onset of 21 years (P = .001). Inspection of rare pedigrees transmitting acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple types of leukemia, and lymphoma is also compatible with anticipation. Sampling bias is unlikely to explain these findings. This suggests that dynamic mutation of unstable DNA sequence repeats could be a common mechanism of inherited hematopoietic malignancy with implications for the role of somatic mutation in the more frequent sporadic cases. We speculate on three possible candidate genes for familial leukemia with anticipation: a locus on 21q22.1-22.2, CBL2 on 11q23.3, and CBFB or a nearby gene on 16q22. 55 refs., 4 figs.

Horwitz, M.; Jarvik, G.P.; Goode, E.L. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

1996-11-01

204

Three-body description of direct nuclear reactions: Comparison with the continuum discretized coupled channels method  

E-print Network

The continuum discretized coupled channels (CDCC) method is compared to the exact solution of the three-body Faddeev equations in momentum space. We present results for: i) elastic and breakup observables of d-12C at E_d=56 MeV, ii) elastic scattering of d-58Ni at E_d=80 MeV, and iii) elastic, breakup and transfer observables for 11Be+p at E_{11Be}/A=38.4 MeV. Our comparative studies show that, in the first two cases, the CDCC method is a good approximation to the full three-body Faddeev solution, but for the 11Be exotic nucleus, depending on the observable or the kinematic regime, it may miss out some of the dynamic three-body effects that appear through the explicit coupling to the transfer channel.

Deltuva, A; Cravo, E; Nunes, F M; Fonseca, A C

2007-01-01

205

Three-body description of direct nuclear reactions: Comparison with the continuum discretized coupled channels method  

E-print Network

The continuum discretized coupled channels (CDCC) method is compared to the exact solution of the three-body Faddeev equations in momentum space. We present results for: i) elastic and breakup observables of d-12C at E_d=56 MeV, ii) elastic scattering of d-58Ni at E_d=80 MeV, and iii) elastic, breakup and transfer observables for 11Be+p at E_{11Be}/A=38.4 MeV. Our comparative studies show that, in the first two cases, the CDCC method is a good approximation to the full three-body Faddeev solution, but for the 11Be exotic nucleus, depending on the observable or the kinematic regime, it may miss out some of the dynamic three-body effects that appear through the explicit coupling to the transfer channel.

A. Deltuva; A. M. Moro; E. Cravo; F. M. Nunes; A. C. Fonseca

2007-10-31

206

Three-body description of direct nuclear reactions: Comparison with the continuum discretized coupled channels method  

SciTech Connect

The continuum discretized coupled channels (CDCC) method is compared with the exact solution of the three-body Faddeev equations in momentum space. We present results for (i) elastic and breakup observables of d+{sup 12}C at E{sub d}=56 MeV (ii) elastic scattering of d+{sup 58}Ni at E{sub d}=80 MeV, and (iii) elastic, breakup, and transfer observables for {sup 11}Be+p at E{sub {sup 11}Be}/A=38.4 MeV. Our comparative studies show that in the first two cases, the CDCC method is a good approximation of the full three-body Faddeev solution, but for the {sup 11}Be exotic nucleus, depending on the observable or the kinematic regime, it may miss some of the dynamic three-body effects that appear through the explicit coupling to the transfer channel.

Deltuva, A.; Cravo, E.; Fonseca, A. C. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, P-1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Moro, A. M. [Departamento de FAMN, Univ. de Sevilla (Spain); Nunes, F. M. [NSCL and Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824 (United States)

2007-12-15

207

ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA FALLON, NEVADA  

E-print Network

1 ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA FALLON, NEVADA REVIEW AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE EXPERT PANEL the state health department's investigation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases that had been of a hazardous chemical contaminant. However, the absence of cases of acute myeloid leukemia, the type

208

The nuclear shell model as a testing ground for many-body quantum chaos  

Microsoft Academic Search

Atomic nuclei analyzed in the framework of the shell model provide a good example of a many-body quantum system with strong interactions between its constituents. As excitation energy and level density increase, the system evolves in the direction of very complicated (“stochastic”) dynamics. Energy levels and stationary wave functions obtained in realistic shell-model calculations are studied from the viewpoint of

Vladimir Zelevinsky; B. Alex Brown; Njema Frazier; Mihai Horoi

1996-01-01

209

Studies of a laser/nuclear thermal-hardened body armor. Final report, 31 Jan 91-30 Sep 91  

SciTech Connect

The problem of laser/nuclear hardening of body armors and other applications, such as rigid wall, etc, has been investigated in this study. Earlier results from studies of hardening against space systems, which were supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and carried out by the Principal Investigator during 1984 to 1989 are summarized. The concepts of particle layer and photon multiple scattering inside the layers were utilized in developing a laser shield to protect against laser weapons in the 0.22 to 2.4 micrometer region of the spectrum. Protection against the threats from C02 laser weapons are addressed, and the development of a protective shield is detailed. It is now possible to apply a coating that will protect against laser/nuclear threats and reduction of solar loads for 0.22 to 16 micrometers of the spectrum. Applications are expected for rigid walls (Army containers), human body armor, thermal jackets for military hardware, etc. Finally, a mathematical model was created to help predict how the laser hardening material will behave under specific constraints that have not yet been tested in the laboratory. Also, this model can be used to extrapolate the performance of similar materials/coatings in the mid- to far-infrared wavelengths and also predict the broadband performance.

Misconi, N.Y.; Caldarella, G.J.; Roach, J.F.

1992-08-01

210

Nuclear quantum many-body dynamics. From collective vibrations to heavy-ion collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A summary of recent researches on nuclear dynamics with realistic microscopic quantum approaches is presented. The Balian-Vénéroni variational principle is used to derive the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) equation describing the dynamics at the mean-field level, as well as an extension including small-amplitude quantum fluctuations which is equivalent to the time-dependent random-phase approximation (TDRPA). Such formalisms as well as their practical implementation in the nuclear physics framework with modern three-dimensional codes are discussed. Recent applications to nuclear dynamics, from collective vibrations to heavy-ion collisions are presented. Particular attention is devoted to the interplay between collective motions and internal degrees of freedom. For instance, the harmonic nature of collective vibrations is questioned. Nuclei are also known to exhibit superfluidity due to pairing residual interaction. Extensions of the theoretical approach to study such pairing vibrations are now available. Large amplitude collective motions are investigated in the framework of heavy-ion collisions leading, for instance, to the formation of a compound system. How fusion is affected by the internal structure of the collision partners, such as their deformation, is discussed. Other mechanisms in competition with fusion, and responsible for the formation of fragments which differ from the entrance channel (transfer reactions, deep-inelastic collisions, and quasi-fission) are investigated. Finally, studies of actinide collisions forming, during very short times of few zeptoseconds, the heaviest nuclear systems available on Earth, are presented.

Simenel, Cédric

2012-11-01

211

Nuclear magnetic resonance whole-body imager operating at 3. 5 Kgauss  

Microsoft Academic Search

The theoretical advantages of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at higher field strengths are discussed. Examples of images created at 3.5 KGauss (0.35 T) are demonstrated. The authors present a method of collecting several tomographic images sequentially during the time required for a single image.

Lawrence Crooks; Mitsuaki Arakawa; John Hoenninger; Jeffrey Watts; R. McRee; L. Kaufman; Peter L. Davis; Alexander R. Margulis; Jack DeGroot

1982-01-01

212

Three Lectures on Random Matrices and the Nuclear Many-body Problem  

SciTech Connect

In the first lecture, I give an overview of the random--matrix approach to the statistical theory of nuclear reactions, with application to recent data on a microwave billiard. In the second lecture, I discuss the preponderance of ground states with spin zero and of states with positive parity. In the third lecture, I discuss constrained ensembles of random matrices.

Weidenmueller, Hans A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

2008-11-13

213

Obatoclax, Fludarabine, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

2013-09-27

214

Phosphorylation of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transactivator tax on adjacent serine residues is critical for tax activation.  

PubMed

The Tax transactivator protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) plays a central role in the activation of viral gene expression. In addition, Tax is capable of activating the expression of specific cellular genes and is involved in the transformation of T-lymphocytes resulting in the development of adult T-cell leukemia. Tax is a phosphoprotein that colocalizes in nuclear bodies with RNA polymerase II, splicing complexes, and specific transcription factors including members of the ATF/CREB and NF-kappaB families. In this study, we identified adjacent serine residues at positions 300 and 301 in the carboxy terminus of Tax as the major sites for phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of at least one of these serine residues is required for Tax localization in nuclear bodies and for Tax-mediated activation of gene expression via both the ATF/CREB and NF-kappaB pathways. Introduction of amino acid substitutions which are phosphoserine mimetics at positions 300 and 301 restored the ability of a phosphorylation-defective Tax mutant to form nuclear bodies and to activate gene expression. These studies define sites for regulatory phosphorylation events in Tax which are critical for its ability to activate gene transcription. PMID:9847380

Bex, F; Murphy, K; Wattiez, R; Burny, A; Gaynor, R B

1999-01-01

215

[Transport processes of low-level radioactive liquid effluent of nuclear power station in closed water body].  

PubMed

The transport processes of low-level radioactive liquid effluent of Xianning nuclear power station in the closed water body Fushui Reservoir are simulated using the EFDC model. Six nuclides concentration distribution with different half-lives in the reservoir are analyzed under the condition of 97% guarantee rate incoming water and four-running nuclear power units. The results show that the nuclides concentration distribution is mainly affected by the flow field of the reservoir and the concentration is decided by the half-lives of nuclide and the volume of incoming water. In addition, the influence region is enlarged as increasing of half-life and tends to be stable when the half-life is longer than 5 years. Moreover, the waste water discharged from the outlet of the nuclear power plant has no effect on the water-intake for the outlet located at the upstream of the water-intake and the flow field flows to the dam of the reservoir. PMID:23002624

Wu, Guo-Zheng; Xu, Zong-Xue

2012-07-01

216

17-DMAG targets the nuclear factor-?B family of proteins to induce apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical implications of HSP90 inhibition  

PubMed Central

The HSP90 client chaperone interaction stabilizes several important enzymes and antiapoptotic proteins, and pharmacologic inhibition of HSP90 results in rapid client protein degradation. Therefore, HSP90 inhibition is an attractive therapeutic approach when this protein is active, a phenotype commonly observed in transformed but not normal cells. However, preclinical studies with HSP90 inhibitors such as 17-AAG demonstrated depletion of only a subset of client proteins and very modest tumor cytotoxicity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. Herein, we describe another HSP90 inhibitor, 17-DMAG, which is cytotoxic to CLL but not normal lymphocytes. Treatment with 17-DMAG leads to depletion of the HSP90 client protein IKK, resulting in diminished NF-?B p50/p65 DNA binding, decreased NF-?B target gene transcription, and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment with 17-DMAG significantly decreased the white blood cell count and prolonged the survival in a TCL1-SCID transplant mouse model. The ability of 17-DMAG to function as an NF-?B inhibitor is of great interest clinically, as few currently available CLL drugs target this transcription factor. Therefore, the effect of 17-DMAG on NF-?B signaling pathways represents a novel therapy warranting further clinical pursuit in this and other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:20351313

Hertlein, Erin; Wagner, Amy J.; Jones, Jeffrey; Lin, Thomas S.; Maddocks, Kami J.; Towns, William H.; Goettl, Virginia M.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jarjoura, David; Raymond, Chelsey A.; West, Derek A.; Croce, Carlo M.; Byrd, John C.

2010-01-01

217

Heterochromatin condensation in central and peripheral nuclear regions of maturing lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of patients suffering from B chronic lymphocytic leukemia - a cytochemical study.  

PubMed

The present study was undertaken to provide complementary information on heterochromatin condensation in central and peripheral nuclear regions during maturation of human leukemic lymphocytes using simple image processing and DNA image densitometry at the single cell level. Such approach indicated that the heterochromatin condensation in perinucleolar and extranucleolar "gene rich" central nucleolar regions preceded that in the "gene poor" nuclear periphery at the nuclear membrane. Thus, the maturation of lymphocytes was accompanied by a marked increase of the heterochromatin condensation at the nuclear membrane that reflected the maturity of these cells. In addition, in contrary to the nuclear size, no substantial differences of the heterochromatin condensation in central and peripheral nuclear regions were noted between untreated and treated patients with cytostatic therapy at the time of taking samples for the present study. On the other hand, the larger heterochromatin condensation in central nuclear regions occasionally persisted in small mature lymphocytes of all studied patients. Such phenomenon might represent the return to the cell cycle or a further type of maturation asynchrony that in leukemic cells is not exceptional. PMID:21895400

Smetana, K; Karhan, J; Trneny, M

2011-01-01

218

Electron tomography of fiber cell cytoplasm and dense cores of multilamellar bodies from human age-related nuclear cataracts  

PubMed Central

Human nuclear cataract formation is a multi-factorial disease with contributions to light scattering from many cellular sources that change their scattering properties over decades. The aging process produces aggregation of cytoplasmic crystallin proteins, which alters the protein packing and texture of the cytoplasm. Previous studies of the cytoplasmic texture quantified increases in density fluctuations in protein packing and theoretically predicted the corresponding scattering. Multilamellar bodies (MLBs) are large particles with a core of crystallin cytoplasm that have been suggested to be major sources of scattering in human nuclei. The core has been shown to condense over time such that the refractive index increases compared to the adjacent aged and textured cytoplasm. Electron tomography is used here to visualize the 3D arrangement of protein aggregates in aged and cataractous lens nuclear cytoplasm compared to the dense protein packing in the cores of MLBs. Thin sections, 70 nm thick, were prepared from epoxy-embedded human transparent donor lenses and nuclear cataracts. Tilt series were collected on an FEI T20 transmission electron microscope (TEM) operated at 200 kV using 15 nm gold particles as fiducial markers. Images were aligned and corrected with FEI software and reconstructed with IMOD and other software packages to produce animated tilt series and stereo anaglyphs. The 3D views of protein density showed the relatively uniform packing of proteins in aged transparent lens nuclear cytoplasm and less dense packing of aged cataractous cytoplasm where many low-density regions can be appreciated in the absence of the TEM projection artifacts. In contrast the cores of the MLBs showed a dense packing of protein with minimal density fluctuations. These observations support the conclusion that, during the nuclear cataract formation, alterations in protein packing are extensive and can result in pronounced density fluctuations. Aging causes the MLB cores to become increasingly different in their protein packing from the adjacent cytoplasm. These results support the hypothesis that the MLBs increase their scattering with age and nuclear cataract formation. PMID:22728317

Costello, M. Joseph; Burette, Alain; Weber, Mariko; Metlapally, Sangeetha; Gilliland, Kurt O.; Fowler, W. Craig; Mohamed, Ashik; Johnsen, Sonke

2012-01-01

219

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... of ALL occur each year in the United States. Most children who are treated are cured. While adults have a lower cure rate, they too can be successfully treated. Who is most likely to have ALL? ALL is the most common leukemia among children. About 60 percent of those ...

220

LEUKEMIA, SARCOMA AND RADIOACTIVITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data are reviewed on the induction of leukemia, osteogenic sarcoma, ; thyroid cancer, and skin cancer by exposure to ionizing radiation. Available ; data on man are compared with experimental data from laboratory animals. The ; radiation danger from fallout for human populations is considered. (43 ; references.) (C.H.);

1962-01-01

221

Leukemia in benzene workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate the possible association between occupational exposure to benzene and subsequent death from leukemia, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a retrospective cohort mortality study of workers who had been exposed to benzene in the manufacture of rubber hydrochloride at two locations in Ohio. Ascertainment of vital status was accomplished for 98% of the cohort.

Robert A. Rinsky; Ronald J. Young; Alexander B. Smith

1981-01-01

222

Leukemia Steering Committee  

Cancer.gov

The LKSC follows an efficient, cost-effective, science-driven, and transparent process to identify and promote the "Best Science" in clinical research on leukemia and related diseases by addressing the design and prioritization of phase III trials and large phase II studies.

223

Leukemia and Benzene  

PubMed Central

Excessive exposure to benzene has been known for more than a century to damage the bone marrow resulting in decreases in the numbers of circulating blood cells, and ultimately, aplastic anemia. Of more recent vintage has been the appreciation that an alternative outcome of benzene exposure has been the development of one or more types of leukemia. While many investigators agree that the array of toxic metabolites, generated in the liver or in the bone marrow, can lead to traumatic bone marrow injury, the more subtle mechanisms leading to leukemia have yet to be critically dissected. This problem appears to have more general interest because of the recognition that so-called “second cancer” that results from prior treatment with alkylating agents to yield tumor remissions, often results in a type of leukemia reminiscent of benzene-induced leukemia. Furthermore, there is a growing literature attempting to characterize the fine structure of the marrow and the identification of so called “niches” that house a variety of stem cells and other types of cells. Some of these “niches” may harbor cells capable of initiating leukemias. The control of stem cell differentiation and proliferation via both inter- and intra-cellular signaling will ultimately determine the fate of these transformed stem cells. The ability of these cells to avoid checkpoints that would prevent them from contributing to the leukemogenic response is an additional area for study. Much of the study of benzene-induced bone marrow damage has concentrated on determining which of the benzene metabolites lead to leukemogenesis. The emphasis now should be directed to understanding how benzene metabolites alter bone marrow cell biology. PMID:23066403

Snyder, Robert

2012-01-01

224

T cell leukemia-associated human Notch/translocation-associated Notch homologue has I kappa B-like activity and physically interacts with nuclear factor-kappa B proteins in T cells  

PubMed Central

Translocation-associated Notch homologue (TAN-1), a gene originally cloned from the translocation breakpoint of a human T cell leukemia carrying a 9:7(q34.3) translocation, encodes a protein belonging to the Notch/Lin-12/Glp-1 receptor family. These receptors mediate the specification of numerous cell fates during development in invertebrates and vertebrates. The intracellular portion of Notch/TAN-1 contains six ankyrin repeats that are similar to those found in cytoplasmic I kappa B proteins. I kappa B proteins are specific inhibitors of nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B/Rel transcription factors. Here we show that TAN-1 has functional properties of an I kappa B-like regulator with specificity for the NF-kappa B p50 subunit. A recombinant polypeptide corresponding to the cytoplasmic portion of TAN- 1 (TAN-1C) specifically inhibited the DNA binding of p50-containing NF- kappa B complexes. When overexpressed in an appropriate cell line, TAN- 1C prevented kappa B-dependent transactivation in transient reporter gene assays in a fashion similar to the structurally related protein, Bcl-3. TAN-1C could activate kappa B-dependent gene expression by attenuating the inhibitory effect of an excess of p50 homodimers. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the TAN-1 from a T cell line is associated with NF-kappa B containing p50 and p65 subunits. These observations indicate that TAN-1C may directly engage NF-kappa B transcription factors and modulate nuclear gene expression. PMID:8642313

1996-01-01

225

Predictions of Leukemia Risks to Astronauts from Solar Particle Events  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Leukemias consisting of acute and chronic myeloid leukemia and acute lymphatic lymphomas represent the earliest cancers that appear after radiation exposure, have a high lethality fraction, and make up a significant fraction of the overall fatal cancer risk from radiation for adults. Several considerations impact the recommendation of a preferred model for the estimation of leukemia risks from solar particle events (SPE's): The BEIR VII report recommends several changes to the method of calculation of leukemia risk compared to the methods recommended by the NCRP Report No. 132 including the preference of a mixture model with additive and multiplicative components in BEIR VII compared to the additive transfer model recommended by NCRP Report No. 132. Proton fluences and doses vary considerably across marrow regions because of the characteristic spectra of primary solar protons making the use of an average dose suspect. Previous estimates of bone marrow doses from SPE's have used an average body-shielding distribution for marrow based on the computerized anatomical man model (CAM). We have developed an 82-point body-shielding distribution that faithfully reproduces the mean and variance of SPE doses in the active marrow regions (head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and thighs) allowing for more accurate estimation of linear- and quadratic-dose components of the marrow response. SPE's have differential dose-rates and a pseudo-quadratic dose response term is possible in the peak-flux period of an event. Also, the mechanistic basis for leukemia risk continues to improve allowing for improved strategies in choosing dose-rate modulation factors and radiation quality descriptors. We make comparisons of the various choices of the components in leukemia risk estimates in formulating our preferred model. A major finding is that leukemia could be the dominant risk to astronauts for a major solar particle event.

Cucinotta, F. A.; Atwell, W.; Kim, M. Y.; George, K. A.; Ponomarev, A.; Nikjoo, H.; Wilson, J. W.

2006-01-01

226

Yields of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from seismic body and surface waves  

PubMed Central

Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 U.S.S.R. underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (mb) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The most pronounced cluster consists of six explosions of yield near 500 kilotons. Several of these seem to be tests of warheads for major strategic systems that became operational in the late 1970s. The largest Soviet underground explosion is estimated to have a yield of 3500 ± 600 kilotons, somewhat smaller than the yield of the largest U.S. underground test. A preliminary estimation of the significance of tectonic release is made by measuring the amplitude of Love waves. The bias in mb for Novaya Zemlya relative to the Nevada test site is about 0.35, nearly identical to that of the eastern Kazakhstan test site relative to Nevada. PMID:16593645

Sykes, Lynn R.; Wiggins, Graham C.

1986-01-01

227

Yields of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from seismic body and surface waves  

SciTech Connect

Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 USSR underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (m/sub b/) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The most pronounced cluster consists of six explosions of yield near 500 kilotons. Several of these seem to be tests of warheads for major strategic systems that became operational in the late 1970s. The largest Soviet underground explosion is estimated to have a yield of 3500 +/- 600 kilotons, somewhat smaller than the yield of the largest US underground test. A preliminary estimation of the significance of tectonic release is made by measuring the amplitude of Love waves. The bias in m/sub b/ for Novaya Zemlya relative to the Nevada test site is about 0.35, nearly identical to that of the eastern Kazakhstan test site relative to Nevada.

Sykes, L.R.; Wiggins, G.C.

1986-01-01

228

Yields of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from seismic body and surface waves.  

PubMed

Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 U.S.S.R. underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (m(b)) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The most pronounced cluster consists of six explosions of yield near 500 kilotons. Several of these seem to be tests of warheads for major strategic systems that became operational in the late 1970s. The largest Soviet underground explosion is estimated to have a yield of 3500 +/- 600 kilotons, somewhat smaller than the yield of the largest U.S. underground test. A preliminary estimation of the significance of tectonic release is made by measuring the amplitude of Love waves. The bias in m(b) for Novaya Zemlya relative to the Nevada test site is about 0.35, nearly identical to that of the eastern Kazakhstan test site relative to Nevada. PMID:16593645

Sykes, L R; Wiggins, G C

1986-01-01

229

Connecting Neutron Star Observations to Three-Body Forces in Neutron Matter and to the Nuclear Symmetry Energy  

E-print Network

Using a phenomenological form of the equation of state of neutron matter near the saturation density which has been previously demonstrated to be a good characterization of quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we show that currently available neutron star mass and radius measurements provide a significant constraint on the equation of state of neutron matter. At higher densities we model the equation of state using polytropes and a quark matter model, and we show that our results do not change strongly upon variation of the lower boundary density where these polytropes begin. Neutron star observations offer an important constraint on a coefficient which is directly connected to the strength of the three-body force in neutron matter, and thus some theoretical models of the three-body may be ruled out by currently available astrophysical data. In addition, we obtain an estimate of the symmetry energy of nuclear matter and its slope that can be directly compared to the experiment and other theoretical calculations.

A. W. Steiner; S. Gandolfi

2011-10-18

230

What Are the Risk Factors for Childhood Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... leukemia? What are the risk factors for childhood leukemia? A risk factor is anything that affects your ... of leukemia. Having a brother or sister with leukemia Siblings (brothers and sisters) of children with leukemia ...

231

UNEDF: Advanced Scientific Computing Collaboration Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The demands of cutting-edge science are driving the need for larger and faster computing resources. With the rapidly growing scale of computing systems and the prospect of technologically disruptive architectures to meet these needs, scientists face the challenge of effectively using complex computational resources to advance scientific discovery. Multi-disciplinary collaborating networks of researchers with diverse scientific backgrounds are needed to address these complex challenges. The UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quantified uncertainties. This paper describes UNEDF and identifies attributes that classify it as a successful computational collaboration. We illustrate significant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integrative solutions using the most reliable theoretical approaches, most advanced algorithms, and leadership-class computational resources.

Nam, H.; Stoitsov, M.; Nazarewicz, W.; Bulgac, A.; Hagen, G.; Kortelainen, M.; Maris, P.; Pei, J. C.; Roche, K. J.; Schunck, N.; Thompson, I.; Vary, J. P.; Wild, S. M.

2012-12-01

232

TCP1 complex proteins interact with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and can co-localize in oligonucleotide-induced nuclear bodies in mammalian cells.  

PubMed

Phosphorothioate (PS) antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have been successfully developed as drugs to reduce the expression of disease-causing genes. PS-ASOs can be designed to induce degradation of complementary RNAs via the RNase H pathway and much is understood about that process. However, interactions of PS-ASOs with other cellular proteins are not well characterized. Here we report that in cells transfected with PS-ASOs, the chaperonin T-complex 1 (TCP1) proteins interact with PS-ASOs and enhance antisense activity. The TCP1-? subunit co-localizes with PS-ASOs in distinct nuclear structures, termed phosphorothioate bodies or PS-bodies. Upon Ras-related nuclear protein (RAN) depletion, cytoplasmic PS-body-like structures were observed and nuclear concentrations of PS-ASOs were reduced, suggesting that TCP1-? can interact with PS-ASOs in the cytoplasm and that the nuclear import of PS-ASOs is at least partially through the RAN-mediated pathway. Upon free uptake, PS-ASOs co-localize with TCP1 proteins in cytoplasmic foci related to endosomes/lysosomes. Together, our results indicate that the TCP1 complex binds oligonucleotides with TCP1-? subunit being a nuclear PS-body component and suggest that the TCP1 complex may facilitate PS-ASO uptake and/or release from the endocytosis pathway. PMID:24861627

Liang, Xue-hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Prakash, Thazha P; Crooke, Stanley T

2014-01-01

233

Leukemia -- Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic  

MedlinePLUS

... Cell Lymphocytic : Overview Download PDF Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic : Overview This section has been reviewed and ... Statistics › f t g e + Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic Guide Cancer.Net Guide Leukemia - Chronic T- ...

234

Genetics Home Reference: Acute promyelocytic leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Acute promyelocytic leukemia On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... definitions Reviewed April 2011 What is acute promyelocytic leukemia? Acute promyelocytic leukemia is a form of acute ...

235

Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... Lessons Social Media: Connect With Us Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Juvenile ... Causes Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

236

How Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed?  

MedlinePLUS

... chronic myeloid leukemia classified? How is chronic myeloid leukemia diagnosed? Many people with CML do not have ... of samples used to test for chronic myeloid leukemia If signs and symptoms suggest you may have ...

237

Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-08-18

238

MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-14

239

Leukemia in Animals and Man  

PubMed Central

General comparative aspects of leukemia were reviewed. Leukemia in adult cattle occurs frequently within certain multiple case herds. Cattle in these herds often have persistent lymphocytosis and increased numbers of atypical lymphocytes in blood. Attempts are being made to demonstrate the frequency in which this is a “pre-leukemic” or “perileukemic” condition. With the recognition of viral causative agent(s) in chickens, laboratory rodents and cats, there is increased interest in the leukemia of dogs, cattle and other animals, for the disease in these animals may serve as valuable models in the study and isolation of human leukemogenic agents. Epidemiologic and clinicopathologic aspects of animal leukemias share comparative similarities with themselves and with lymphoreticular neoplasms of man. Causative factor(s) probably act on the host, regardless of species, in a similar fashion. It is not likely, but neither improbable, that leukemia in domesticated animals and leukemia in man share common causal relationships. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:18730090

Theilen, Gordon H.; Dungworth, Donald L.; Kawakami, Thomas G.

1968-01-01

240

Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

2010-09-21

241

Parental smoking and childhood leukemia.  

PubMed

Childhood leukemia is the most common cancer among children, representing 31% of all cancer cases occurring in children younger than the age of 15 years in the USA. There are only few known risk factors of childhood leukemia (sex, age, race, exposure to ionizing radiation, and certain congenital diseases, such as Down syndrome and neurofibromatosis), which account for only 10% of the childhood leukemia cases. Several lines of evidence suggest that childhood leukemia may be more due to environmental rather than genetic factors, although genes may play modifying roles. Human and animal studies showed that the development of childhood leukemia is a two-step process that requires a prenatal initiating event(s) plus a postnatal promoting event(s). Despite a substantial public health effort to reduce cigarette smoking, a large proportion of the US and world population still smoke. Tobacco smoke contains at least 60 known human or animal carcinogens, with the major chemical classes being volatile hydrocarbons, aldehydes, aromatic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and nitrosamines; among these chemicals, only benzene is an established leukemogen, although other chemicals in the tobacco could interact with one another in a complex way to jointly attain a significant carcinogenic effect on the development of leukemia. Although tobacco smoke is an established risk factor for adult myeloid leukemia, the studies of association between parental smoking and childhood leukemia have produced inconsistent results. The majority of the studies on maternal smoking and childhood leukemia did not find a significant positive association and some even reported an inverse association. In contrast to studies of maternal smoking, studies of paternal smoking and childhood leukemia reported more positive associations but only by less than half of the studies. Future directions to be considered for improving the study of parental smoking and childhood leukemia are: 1) consider all sources of benzene exposure in addition to smoking, including occupational exposure and traffic exhausts; 2) childhood leukemia is a heterogeneous disease and epidemiologic studies of childhood leukemia can be greatly improved by grouping childhood leukemia into more homogeneous groups by molecular techniques (e.g., structural and numerical chromosomal changes); and 3) assess gene-environment interaction. It is hoped that through the continual effort, more will be uncovered regarding the causes of childhood leukemia. In the meantime, more effort should be spent on educating the parents to quit smoking, because parental smoking is known to affect many childhood diseases (e.g., asthma, respiratory tract infection, and otitis media) that are much more prevalent than childhood leukemia. PMID:19107431

Chang, Jeffrey S

2009-01-01

242

Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-03

243

Hairy Cell Leukemia Variant  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 59-year-old man presented with lymphocytosis with huge splenomegaly. The abnormal lymphocytes had a high nucleoplasmxytoplasm ratio, a prominent nucleolus and hairy cytoplasmic projections. Immunophenotyping revealed B-cell leukemia with negative reactions to CD5 and CD25. Cytogenetic study showed 46, XY, der(5)t(5;6)(q35;p21), del(7)(p13)\\/ 46, idem, add(22)(q13). The patient did not respond to chlorambucil and a combination of cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisolone.

Po Dunn; Lee-Yung Shih; Yat-Sen Ho; Hwai-Fang Tien

1995-01-01

244

Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia  

PubMed Central

In three patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia who were heterozygous at the X-linked glucose-6-phospháte dehydrogenase locus, lymphocytes were studied to determine if they had the same stem cell origin as the leukemic myeloid cells. Normal tissues such as skin had both B and A glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzymes, but the leukemic myelogenous cells displayed only one isoenzyme type, consistent with their clonal origin. A population of cells with undoubted thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte characteristics had both isoenzymes. Presumably, then, these T cells did not arise from the leukemic stem cell, either because they antedated the development of leukemia in that stem cell or, more likely, because they arose from progenitors not involved by the disease. In contrast, another population of lymphocytes showed only one isoenzyme type, suggesting that it arose from the chronic myelocytic leukemia stem cell. However, although this population contained many cells with the characteristics of bone marrow-derived (B) lymphocytes, it is not certain that the single enzyme produced by the cells over all can be attributed to B lymphocytes rather than to contaminating non-B-lymphoid cells. PMID:308953

Fialkow, Philip J.; Denman, A. Michael; Jacobson, Robert J.; Lowenthal, Mark N.

1978-01-01

245

Phase 1 Study of Terameprocol (EM-1421) in Patients With Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Leukemias; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL); Adult T Cell Leukemia (ATL); Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML-BP); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

2009-01-29

246

SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-01-10

247

Leukemia incidence in the Russian cohort of Chernobyl emergency workers.  

PubMed

Of all potentially radiogenic cancers, leukemia, a type of cancer of the blood, has the highest risk attributable to ionizing radiation. Despite this, the quantitative estimation of radiation risk of a leukemia demands studying very large exposed cohorts, because of the very low level of this disease in unexposed populations and because of the tendency for its radiation risk to decrease with time. At present, the Japanese cohort of atomic bomb survivors is still the primary source of data that allows analysis of radiation-induced leukemia and the underlying dose-response relationship. The second large cohort that would allow to study radiation-induced leukemia is comprised of individuals who were exposed due to the accident of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986. The objective of the present study was to estimate radiation risks of leukemia incidence among the Russian cohort of Chernobyl emergency workers, for different time periods after the accident. Twenty-five years after the Chernobyl accident and based on the results of the present study, one can conclude that the radiation risk of leukemia incidence derived from the Russian cohort of Chernobyl emergency workers is similar to that derived from the cohort of atomic bomb survivors: The time-averaged excess relative risk per Gray (ERR Gy(-1)) equals 4.98 for the Russian cohort and 3.9 for the life span study (LSS) cohort; excess absolute risk decreases with time after exposure at an annual rate of 9% for the Russian cohort, and of 6.5% for the LSS cohort. Thus, the excess in risk of leukemia incidence in a population due to a single exposure is restricted in time after exposure by the period of about 15 years. PMID:22246583

Ivanov, V K; Tsyb, A F; Khait, S E; Kashcheev, V V; Chekin, S Yu; Maksioutov, M A; Tumanov, K A

2012-05-01

248

Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for…

Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A.

1995-01-01

249

Body-wave magnitudes of underground nuclear explosions at major test sites derived by the maximum-likelihood method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Body-wave magnitudes (mb) of ~600 underground nuclear tests have been derived from station amplitudes collected by the International Seismological Centre (ISC), by a joint inversion for mb and station-specific magnitude corrections (Lilwall 1986). The maximum-likelihood method was used, to reduce the upward bias of network mean magnitudes caused by data censoring for low-magnitude disturbances where stations do not report arrivals that are hidden by the ambient noise at the time. Threshold noise levels at each station were derived from the ISC amplitudes using the method of Kelly and Lacoss (1969). The joint inversion is valid only for sites where enough explosions occurred, and stations with enough arrivals (a minimum of three for both), for a statistical treatment to be valid. It is used on the sites: Kazakhstan and Novaya Zemlya, former Soviet Union; Singer, China; Mururoa and Fangataufa, French Polynesia; and Nevada, USA. At sites where four or more arrivals could be used to derive magnitudes and station terms for twenty-five or more explosions (Nevada, Kazakhstan and Mururoa), the resulting magnitudes and station terms were fixed and a second inversion carried out to derive magnitudes for additional explosions with as few as three arrivals. A further ~90 magnitudes were derived thus, mostly of Nevada explosions.

Peacock, Sheila; Douglas, Alan; Bowers, David; Selby, Neil

2013-04-01

250

Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPS2 Encodes a Membrane Protein Localized at the Spindle Pole Body and the Nuclear Envelope  

PubMed Central

The MPS2 (monopolar spindle two) gene is one of several genes required for the proper execution of spindle pole body (SPB) duplication in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Winey et al., 1991). We report here that the MPS2 gene encodes an essential 44-kDa protein with two putative coiled-coil regions and a hydrophobic sequence. Although MPS2 is required for normal mitotic growth, some null strains can survive; these survivors exhibit slow growth and abnormal ploidy. The MPS2 protein was tagged with nine copies of the myc epitope, and biochemical fractionation experiments show that it is an integral membrane protein. Visualization of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) Mps2p fusion protein in living cells and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of 9xmyc-Mps2p revealed a perinuclear localization with one or two brighter foci of staining corresponding to the SPB. Additionally, immunoelectron microscopy shows that GFP-Mps2p localizes to the SPB. Our analysis suggests that Mps2p is required as a component of the SPB for insertion of the nascent SPB into the nuclear envelope. PMID:10397772

Munoz-Centeno, Maria de la Cruz; McBratney, Susan; Monterrosa, Antonio; Byers, Breck; Mann, Carl; Winey, Mark

1999-01-01

251

Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2013-01-22

252

Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-07-16

253

Serum-dependent expression of promyelocytic leukemia protein suppresses propagation of influenza virus  

SciTech Connect

The rate of propagation of influenza virus in human adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells was found to negatively correlate with the concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS) in the culture medium. Virus replicated more rapidly at lower FBS concentrations (0 or 2%) than at higher concentrations (10 or 20%) during an early stage of infection. Basal and interferon (IFN)-induced levels of typical IFN-inducible anti-viral proteins, such as 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, dsRNA-activated protein kinase and MxA, were unaffected by variation in FBS concentrations. But promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) was expressed in a serum-dependent manner. In particular, the 65 to 70 kDa isoform of PML was markedly upregulated following the addition of serum. In contrast, other isoforms were induced by IFN treatment, and weakly induced by FBS concentrations. Immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that PML was mainly formed nuclear bodies in Caco-2 cells at various FBS concentrations, and the levels of the PML-nuclear bodies were upregulated by FBS. Overexpression of PML isoform consisting of 560 or 633 amino acid residues by transfection of expression plasmid results in significantly delayed viral replication rate in Caco-2 cells. On the other hand, downregulation of PML expression by RNAi enhanced viral replication. These results indicate that PML isoforms which are expressed in a serum-dependent manner suppress the propagation of influenza virus at an early stage of infection.

Iki, Shigeo [Department of Microbiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Hokkaido Institute of Public Health, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Yokota, Shin-ichi [Department of Microbiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Okabayashi, Tamaki [Department of Microbiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Yokosawa, Noriko [Department of Microbiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Nagata, Kyosuke [Department of Infection Biology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences and Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Fujii, Nobuhiro [Department of Microbiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan)]. E-mail: fujii@sapmed.ac.jp

2005-12-05

254

State-dependent calculation of three-body cluster energy for nuclear matter and the validity of the lowest order constrained variational formalism  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that the method of lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) which is based on the cluster expansion theory is a reliable many-body technique to calculate the nuclear matter equation of state. In this respect, the state dependent correlation functions and the effective interactions which have been produced by the LOCV calculation with the Reid and {delta}-Reid soft core interactions are used to estimate the size of higher order cluster terms such as the effect of three-body cluster energy on the nuclear matter ground state energy. Finally it is shown that the LOCV normalization constraint plays a major role in the convergence of the cluster expansion and the result of LOCV calculation can be as good as more sophisticated approaches which go beyond lowest order.

Modarres, M.; Rajabi, A.; Moshfegh, H. R. [Physics Department, University of Tehran, North-Kargar Ave., 1439955961 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2007-12-15

255

Constitutive activation of transcription factor AP1 in primary adult T-cell leukemia cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human T-cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-I) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). This study exam- ined the status of the oncogenic transcrip- tion factor AP-1 in leukemic cells freshly isolated from patients with ATL. Leuke- mic cells from peripheral blood of all patients with ATL exhibited constitutive AP-1 DNA binding activity, whereas mono- nuclear cells from normal

Naoki Mori; Masahiro Fujii; Kousuke Iwai; Shuichi Ikeda; Yoshihiro Yamasaki; Tomoko Hata; Yasuaki Yamada; Yuetsu Tanaka; Masao Tomonaga; Naoki Yamamoto

2000-01-01

256

In vivo nuclear Overhauser effect in sup 31 P-(1H) double-resonance experiments in a 1. 5-T whole-body MR system  

SciTech Connect

In {sup 31}P-(1H) MR experiments of humans in a 1.5-T whole-body system, signal intensity enhancements of {sup 31}P resonances of up to 68 +/- 4% (for phosphocreatine of the calf muscle) have been observed upon irradiation at proton frequency. This observation is explained as a nuclear Overhauser effect due to the dipolar coupling between {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P spins.

Bachert-Baumann, P.; Ermark, F.; Zabel, H.J.; Sauter, R.; Semmler, W.; Lorenz, W.J. (Institut fuer Radiologie and Pathophysiologie, Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.))

1990-07-01

257

Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-07-25

258

Pharmacogenetics in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Progress in the treatment of acute leukemia in children has been remarkable, from a disease being lethal four decades ago to current cure rates exceeding 80%. This exemplary progress is largely due to the optimization of existing treatment modalities rather than the discovery of new antileukemic agents. However, despite these high cure rates, the annual number of children whose leukemia relapses after their initial therapy remains greater than that of new cases of most types of childhood cancers. The aim of pharmacogenetics is to develop strategies to personalize treatment and tailor therapy to individual patients, with the goal of optimizing efficacy and safety through better understanding of human genome variability and its influence on drug response. In this review, we summarize recent pharmacogenomic studies related to the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These studies illustrate the promise of pharmacogenomics to further advance the treatment of human cancers, with childhood leukemia serving as a paradigm. PMID:19100367

Cheok, Meyling H.; Pottier, Nicolas; Kager, Leo

2009-01-01

259

PXD101 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-08

260

Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-09-23

261

Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2013-01-04

262

[Chronic myeloid leukemia].  

PubMed

More than 10 years have passed since imatinib as a first developed BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) introduced in treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In globally, there are tremendous numbers of patients on imatinib therapy. Based upon randomized trials comparing second generation TKIs such as dasatinib and nilotinib versus imatinib, both TKIs produce faster and deeper response than imatinib and they can be selected as first-line therapy for newly diagnosed chronic phase of CML (CP-CML) as imatinib. Bosutinib is a potent for imatinib resistant/intolerant CP-CML and can be used as second or third-line therapy. Ponatinib is the only clinically available TKI that has activity against the T315 mutation that is resistant to all other TKIs. Currently, a choice among these potent TKIs should take into consideration the drug side effect profiles and the patient's comorbidities. PMID:25016806

Usui, Noriko

2014-06-01

263

Treatment of prolymphocytic leukemia  

SciTech Connect

Prolymphocytic leukemia is characterized by marked splenomegaly, distinctive cellular morphologic characteristics, and a poor clinical course. Five patients with typical PL were treated systematically with vincristine/prednisone, chlorambucil/prednisone, splenic irradiation, splenectomy, and other chemotherapy regimens. No patient responded to vincristine/prednisone. Two patients responded to chlorambucil/prednisone, and four patients had brief responses to splenic irradiation. Two patients underwent splenectomy, one of whom had a prolonged clinical remission. There were no complete remissions. No other chemotherapy combinations were of value. The median survival was 33 months. Recommendations are made to use chlorambucil/prednisone or splenic irradiation as initial treatment. Splenectomy should be considered in patients refractory to these modalities. The course of PL may be more protracted than originally reported.

Hollister, D. Jr.; Coleman, M.

1982-11-01

264

Treatment of prolymphocytic leukemia  

SciTech Connect

Prolymphocytic leukemia is characterized by marked splenomegaly, distinctive cellular morphologic characteristics, and a poor clinical course. Five patients with typical PL were treated systematically with vincristine/prednisone, chlorambucil/prednisone, splenic irradiation, splenectomy, and other chemotherapy regimens. No patient responded to vincristine/prednisone. Two patients responded to chlorambucil/prednisone, and four patients had brief responses to splenic irradiation. Two patients underwent splenectomy, one of whom had a prolonged clinical remissions. No other chemotherapy combinations were of value. The median survival was 33 months. Recommendations are made to use chlorambucil/prednisone or splenic irradiation as initial treatment. Splenectomy should be considered in patients refractory to these modalities. The course of PL may be more protracted than originally reported.

Hollister, S. Jr.; Coleman, M.

1982-11-01

265

Molecular diagnosis of lymphoblastic leukemia.  

PubMed

The mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene at chromosome band 11q23 is commonly involved in reciprocal translocations that is detected in acute leukemia. The MLL gene, commonly known as mixed lineage leukemia or myeloid lymphoid leukemia, has been independently identified and cloned from the 11q23 breakpoint of acute leukemia. We describe a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia whose cells had shown reciprocal translocation between short arm (p21) of chromosome 2 and long arm (q23) of chromosome number 11 [t(2;11) (p21;q23)] by cytogenetic analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) was also performed for reconfirmation with a probe for MLL which showed split signals, hybridizing to both the derivative 2 and 11 chromosomes. Our study confirmed FISH as the most suitable assay for detecting MLL rearrangements because of its sensitivity and speed. It recommended that FISH should be used as complementary to conventional cytogenetic analysis. In conclusion, evaluation of the t(2;11)(p21;q23) was done by molecular clarification and flow cytometry. PMID:24125990

Goud, Kalal Iravathy; Dayakar, Seetha; Prasad, S V S S; Rao, Koteshwar N; Shaik, Amina; Vanjakshi, S

2013-01-01

266

Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-09-09

267

Radioimmunoassay for intact Gross mouse leukemia virus.  

PubMed

A radioimmunoassay for intact Gross leukemia virus has been developed using 125I-labeled Gross virus grown in tissue culture and guinea pig antisera to Gross virus grown either in tissue culture or harvested from leukemic C3H(f) mice. Separation of bound from free labeled virus was effected using the double antibody method. The assay can detect fewer than 10(8) virus particles and has been used to measure the viral content of individual organs from inoculated leukemic C3H(f) mice and from Ak mice with spontaneous leukemia. Organs from noninoculated healthy C3H(f) mice crossreacted poorly in the system, virus generally being detectable only in the thymus and spleen and at low concentration. In some of the inoculated C3H(f) leukemic mice the viral content of as little as 0.5 mul of plasma is measurable. That this assay is for intact virus and not for soluble antigens of the viral envelope was proven by the observation that the immunoreactive material of plasma and extracts from thymus and liver of leukemic mice has a buoyant denisty in sucrose of 1.17-1.18 g/ml, corresponding to that of intact virus grown in tissue culture. With this sensitivity it may now be possible to quantitate viral concentrations in tissue and body fluids from the time of inoculation through the development of obvious pathology. PMID:1066697

Yalow, R S; Gross, L

1976-08-01

268

Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-02-17

269

Phase I/II Study of Nilotinib/Ruxolitinb Therapy for TKI Resistant Ph-Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Chronic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Philadelphia Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Resistant to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy

2013-08-01

270

Dasatinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-10-23

271

Childhood leukemia in Woburn, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

Possible associations between environmental hazards and the occurrence of childhood leukemia were investigated in Woburn, MA, for the period 1969-79. Residents of Woburn were concerned over what they perceived to be a large number of childhood leukemia cases; at the same time there was extensive publicity about uncontrolled hazardous waste sites in Woburn, which resulted in its being placed on the Superfund list. Many believed that the elevated rate of childhood leukemia was related to these sites or to two city water wells that had been closed in 1979 when they were found to be contaminated by organic chemicals. An occurrence was defined as childhood leukemia when it was diagnosed in a Woburn resident less than 20 years old between 1969 and 1979 and confirmed by review of hospital and pathology records. This investigation confirmed an increase in incidence which was distributed uniformly over the 11-year period. Six of the persons with leukemia were located close to each other in one census tract, 7.5 times the expected number. Parents of the children and of two matched control groups were interviewed about medical history, mother's pregnancy history, school history, and environmental exposures. There were no significant differences between the leukemia victims and persons in the control groups. No leukemia sufferer had contact with a hazardous waste site. While the contaminants of Wells G and H, which had been closed, are not known leukemogens, it is not possible to rule out exposure to this water as a factor, particularly in the eastern Woburn residents.

Cutler, J.J.; Parker, G.S.; Rosen, S.; Prenney, B.; Healey, R.; Caldwell, G.G.

1986-03-01

272

PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2013-01-22

273

Establishment and testing of a whole body counter for the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center  

E-print Network

on estimating worker internal exposures through analysis of air samples. With ready access to a whole body counter, emergency and routine bioassay measurements can be made for such exposures. All the associated counter electronic equipment had to be initially...

Baca, Bernadette Doris

2012-06-07

274

General Information about Hairy Cell Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Hairy cell leukemia is a type of cancer in which the bone marrow makes too many lymphocytes (a type of white ... platelets. Yellow marrow is made mostly of fat. Leukemia may affect red blood cells, white blood cells, ...

275

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare fatal hematopoietic disorder of early childhood. We are presenting a case of 9-month-old female child who was admitted with abdominal distension, irritability, and hepatosplenomegaly. Peripheral blood film examination showed leukoerythroblastosis with leukocytosis, absolute monocytosis, microcytic hypo chromic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow examination showed myeloid hyperplasia, Hb HPLC revealed normal HbF (1.3 %) and HbA2 (2.9 %). There was absolute gamma globulinemia and DCT positivity. Cytogenetic studies revealed a normal karyotype with absence of Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, monosomy 7 or any other chromosomal abnormality. Diagnosis of JMML was rendered according to the diagnostic criteria laid down by WHO classification 2008 with presence of peripheral blood monocytosis >1 × 10(9)/L, blasts <20 % of leucocytes in blood or nucleated cells in bone marrow, absence of Ph chromosome, presence of immature granulocytes in the blood and WBC count >10 × 10(9)/L. The patient was then started on a regimen of chemotherapy to which she gave a promising response. PMID:24426365

Sethi, Neha; Kushwaha, Shivani; Dhingra, Bhawana; Pujani, Mukta; Chandra, Jagdish; Shukla, Shailaja

2013-09-01

276

Familial Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Purpose of Review Families with multiple individuals affected with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other related B-cell tumors have been described in the literature and strong familial aggregation has been seen in population studies. However, predisposing germ line mutations have not been identified. We will discuss the spectrum of conditions associated with CLL in families and the advances in identifying the underlying susceptibility genes. Recent Findings Familial CLL does not appear to differ substantially from sporadic CLL in terms of prognostic markers and clinical outcome, although it may be associated with more indolent disease. The precursor condition, monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) also aggregates in CLL families. Linkage studies have been conducted in high-risk CLL families to screen the whole genome for susceptibility loci but no gene mutations have yet been identified by this method. Association studies of candidate genes have implicated several genes as being important in CLL but more studies are needed. Results from whole genome association studies are promising. Summary The ability to conduct large scale genomic studies in unrelated CLL cases and in high risk CLL families will play an important role in detecting susceptibility genes for CLL over the next few years and thereby help to delineate etiologic pathways. PMID:20389242

Goldin, Lynn R.; Slager, Susan L.; Caporaso, Neil E.

2010-01-01

277

PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA  

PubMed Central

Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (? 20%) and absolute number (? 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jesus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Blade, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

2014-01-01

278

Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-10-30

279

Nuclear  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What part does nuclear energy play in satisfying energy demands? This informational piece, part of a series about the future of energy, introduces students to the uranium atom as an energy source. Here students read about the history of nuclear energy, how energy is derived from uranium, and benefits of nuclear energy. Information is also provided about limitations, particularly disposal problems and radioactivity, and geographical considerations of nuclear power in the United States. Thought-provoking questions afford students chances to reflect on what they've read about the uses of nuclear power. Articles and information on new nuclear plant design and nuclear accidents are available from a sidebar. Five energy-related PBS NewsHour links are provided. A web link to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is included. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

Project, Iowa P.

2004-01-01

280

Regulating the leukemia stem cell  

PubMed Central

Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are responsible for sustaining and propagating malignant disease, and, as such, are promising targets for therapy. Studies of human LSCs have served an important role in defining the major tenets of the cancer stem cell model, which center on the frequencies of cancer stem cells, their potential hierarchical organization, and their degree of maturation. LSCs in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have recently been studied using mouse syngeneic models of leukemia induced by MLL oncogenes. These studies have revealed that LSCs are more analogous to progenitor cells and employ embryonic stem cell-like genetic programs for their maintenance, prompting a refinement of the original cancer stem cell model with important implications for design of therapies to selectively target LSCs. PMID:19959097

Cleary, Michael L.

2009-01-01

281

Pharmacogenetics in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.  

PubMed

Progress in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children has been remarkable, from a disease being lethal four decades ago to current cure rates exceeding 80%. This exemplary progress is largely due to the optimization of existing treatment modalities rather than the discovery of new antileukemic agents. However, despite these high cure rates, the annual number of children whose leukemia relapses after their initial therapy remains greater than that of new cases of most types of childhood cancers. The aim of pharmacogenetics is to develop strategies to personalize treatment and tailor therapy to individual patients, with the goal of optimizing efficacy and safety through better understanding of human genome variability and its influence on drug response. In this review, we summarize recent pharmacogenomic studies related to the treatment of pediatric ALL. These studies illustrate the promise of pharmacogenomics to further advance the treatment of human cancers, with childhood leukemia serving as a paradigm. PMID:19100367

Cheok, Meyling H; Pottier, Nicolas; Kager, Leo; Evans, William E

2009-01-01

282

Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-29

283

Cranial radiotherapy predisposes to abdominal adiposity in survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia  

PubMed Central

Background Advances in treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia increased the likelihood of developing late treatment-associated effects, such as abdominal adiposity, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population. Cranial radiotherapy is one of the factors that might be involved in this process. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cranial radiotherapy on adiposity indexes in survivors of acute lymphocytic leukemia. Methods A comparative cross-sectional study of 56 acute lymphocytic leukemia survivors, chronological age between 15 and 24 years, assigned into two groups according to the exposure to cranial radiotherapy (25 irradiated and 31 non-irradiated), assessed according to body fat (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), computed tomography scan-derived abdominal adipose tissue, lipid profile, and insulin resistance. Results Cranial radiotherapy increased body fat and abdominal adipose tissue and altered lipid panel. Yet, lipids showed no clinical relevance so far. There were significantly more obese patients among those who received cranial radiotherapy (52% irradiated versus 22.6% non-irradiated), based on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry body fat measurements. Nonetheless, no association was observed between cranial radiotherapy and body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio or insulin resistance. Conclusions Adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia showed an increase in body fat and an alteration of fat distribution, which were related to cranial radiotherapy. Fat compartment modifications possibly indicate a disease of adipose tissue, and cranial radiotherapy imports in this process. PMID:23433104

2013-01-01

284

Hairy Cell Leukemia (‘Leukemic Reticuloendotheliosis’), Reticulosarcoma, and Monocytic Leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cytochemical and electron-microscopic studies have been carried out on leukemic monocytes and ‘hairy cells’ (HC), ‘reticulosarcoma’ (RS) cells and cells of cases of ‘reticulosis’ and ‘reticulosarcoma cell leukemia’. Additional investigations included quantitative determinations of the urinary lysozyme excretion, skin window studies, testing of the phagocytosis of ferritin by HC, and labelling of the Fc receptors on HC at the ultrastructural

F. Schmalzl; D. Huhn; H. Asamer; H. Braunsteiner

1975-01-01

285

Myeloid hyperplasia in the SENCAR mouse: differentiation from granulocytic leukemia  

SciTech Connect

The term myeloid hyperplasia has been used interchangeably with many other terms to describe an increased production of granulocytes, megakaryocytes, and erythrocytes in the spleen and other organs in the mouse. This process is occasionally misdiagnosed as granulocytic leukemia. This paper reviews some of the terms used interchangeably with myeloid hyperplasia and describes criteria that can be used to differentiate myeloid hyperplasia from granulocytic leukemia. Additionally, the results of a study in which myeloid hyperplasia was induced following the formation of skin tumors in SENCAR mice is discussed. In this study, positive correlations were found between skin lesions, the spleen weight, and histologic appearance of the spleen. The liver rarely showed microscopic changes of myeloid hyperplasia unless the spleen weighed at least 1.0% of the body weight.

Long, R.E.; Knutsen, G.; Robinson, M.

1986-09-01

286

Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2013-09-27

287

Wild-Type Gross Leukemia Virus: Classification of Soluble Antigens (GSA)  

PubMed Central

By inhibiting techniques using indirect immunofluorescence tests and indirect immunoelectron microscopy, the G(Gross) soluble antigens (GSA) in the body fluids of AKR and C58 mice, which have a high incidence of spontaneous leukemia, were classified according to the known specificity of G antigens in the murine Gross leukemia system. GSA existing in the plasma of nonleukemic and leukemic AKR mice and in the ascitic fluid of transplanted AKR spontaneous leukemia K36 showed the several specificities corresponding to G cell surface antigens, GCSAa, b, and c, and type-specific and group-specific viral envelope antigens, tsVEA and gsVEA, respectively. However, the plasma of nonleukemic C58 mice lacks GSAc, which can be recognized by the G-typing mouse serum. GSA corresponding to GIX antigen was not detected in the body fluids. Images PMID:4566440

Aoki, Tadao; Herberman, Ronald B.; Johnson, Patricia A.; Liu, Margaret; Sturm, Macie M.

1972-01-01

288

Kinetic model building using advanced nuclear medicine techniques: the kinetics of chromium(III) in the human body. [¹Cr  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether a valid index of chromium (III) nutritional status can be determined with satisfaction through in vivo kinetic analysis. Three normal subjects and three patients suffering from hemochromatosis were periodically scanned with the Donner Laboratory computerized whole body scanners, starting seconds after radiochromium(III) was administered intravenously, up to a period of 84

1978-01-01

289

Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-05-13

290

Selective T Cell Depletion in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Graft Versus Host Disease; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2014-09-03

291

GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-04-09

292

Vasculitides in hairy cell leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forty-two cases of vasculitis coincident with hairy cell leukemia (HCL) havebeen reported, of which 17 had panarteritis nodosa (PAN), 21 had cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV), and 4 had vessel wall infiltration by hairy cells. PAN generally occurred after the diagnosis of HCL, splenectomy, and infection. HBs antigen was detected in 3 of 12 patients tested, whereas immune complexes were positive

Paul Hasler; Hansjörg Kistler; Heini Gerber

1995-01-01

293

Immunoregulatory properties of childhood leukemias  

SciTech Connect

Investigation of in vitro humoral immune responses and immunoregulatory properties of leukemic cell was carried out in 17 children with acute leukemia prior to therapy. Leukemias were of the non-T, non-B-cell type in 13 patients and of T-cell origin in four. Bone marrow and peripheral blood cells consisted of 24-96% lymphoblasts and were generally deficient in surface Ig-positive cells. Induction of Ig secreting cells in response to pokeweed mitogen was markedly decreased in marrow and peripheral mononuclear cell cultures of leukemic patients. Co-culture of leukemic cells with normal lymphocytes led to marked deviations from the expected Ig secreting-cell response of the cell mixtures. The predominant effect was enhancement, as was the case with eight non-T, non-B-cell and one T-cell leukemia samples. Suppression of the Ig secreting-cell response was observed in only three instances, two with non-T, non-B-cell and one with T-cell leukemia samples. These findings implicate non-T, non-B as well as more differentiated leukemic cells in having the potential for modifying Ig production by B cells.

Banker, D.S.; Pahwa, R.N.; Miller, D.R.; Hilgartner, M.W.; Good, R.A.; Pahwa, S.G.

1982-07-01

294

Targeting Progressive Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

Cancer.gov

In this study, researchers are testing the effectiveness of an immunotoxin called LMB-2 in selectively killing chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. LMB-2 binds to a protein called CD25 and delivers a bacterial toxin that may kill the cells.

295

Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-11-03

296

Sorafenib Tosylate and Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-09

297

Troglitazone Inhibits Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis of B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells with t(14;18)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR?), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, has been detected in several human leukemia cells. Recent studies reported that PPAR? ligands inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in both normal and malignant B-lineage cells. We investigated the expression of PPAR? and the effects of PPAR? ligands on UTree-O2, Bay91 and 380, three B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

M. Takenokuchi; K. Saigo; Y. Nakamachi; S. Kawano; M. Hashimoto; T. Fujioka; T. Koizumi; E. Tatsumi; S. Kumagai

2006-01-01

298

Imaging Therapeutic Response in Human Bone Marrow Using Rapid Whole-Body MRI  

PubMed Central

Whole-body imaging of therapeutic response in human bone marrow was achieved without introduced contrast agents using diffusion-weighted echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging of physiologic water. Bone marrow disease was identified relative to the strong overlying signals from water and lipids in other anatomy through selective excitation of the water resonance and generation of image contrast that was dependent upon differential nuclear relaxation times and self-diffusion coefficients. Three-dimensional displays were generated to aid image interpretation. The geometric distortion inherent in echo-planar imaging techniques was minimized through the acquisition of multiple axial slices at up to 12 anatomic stations over the entire body. Examples presented include the evaluation of therapeutic response in bone marrow during cytotoxic therapy for leukemia and metastatic prostate cancer and during cytokine administration for marrow mobilization prior to stem cell harvest. PMID:15562475

Ballon, Douglas; Watts, Richard; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Lis, Eric; Morris, Michael J.; Scher, Howard I.; Ulug, Aziz M.; Jakubowski, Ann A.

2008-01-01

299

Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-03-20

300

Combination Chemotherapy and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non-T, Non-B Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2013-10-07

301

3-AP and Fludarabine in Treating Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Accelerated Phase or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Primary Myelofibrosis; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2014-06-18

302

Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

2013-06-03

303

Treatment of Children with APL (Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia)  

MedlinePLUS

... Article Close Push escape to close saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS ... How is childhood leukemia treated? Immediate treatment of childhood leukemia Surgery for childhood leukemia Radiation ...

304

What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... leukemia? What should you ask your doctor about acute lymphocytic leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... answer many of your questions. What kind of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) do I have? Do I have any ...

305

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Treatment in Adults (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... Leukemia Patient information Patient information: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment in adults (Beyond the Basics) Author Richard ... article ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA OVERVIEW GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT ALL TREATMENT INDUCTION OF REMISSION CONSOLIDATION/INTENSIFICATION THERAPY MAINTENANCE ...

306

What's New in Childhood Leukemia Research and Treatment?  

MedlinePLUS

... Next Topic Additional resources for childhood leukemia What’s new in childhood leukemia research and treatment? Researchers are ... Children Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Leukemia in Children Research? Other Resources and ...

307

Genetics Home Reference: PDGFRB-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... PubMed Recent literature Conditions > PDGFRB-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... February 2013 What is PDGFRB-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia? PDGFRB -associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia is a type ...

308

Genetics Home Reference: Familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA  

MedlinePLUS

... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA On this page: Description Genetic ... Reviewed May 2012 What is familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA? Familial acute myeloid leukemia with ...

309

Genetics Home Reference: Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... PubMed Recent literature Conditions > Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... January 2014 What is cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia? Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) is ...

310

Protective effects of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 on whole body heat stress-induced oxidative damage in the mouse testis  

PubMed Central

Background Whole body heat stress had detrimental effect on male reproductive function. It's known that the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activates expression of cytoprotective genes to enable cell adaptation to protect against oxidative stress. However, it’s still unclear about the exactly effects of Nrf2 on the testis. Here, we investigate the protective effect of Nrf2 on whole body heat stress-induced oxidative damage in mouse testis. Methods Male mice were exposed to the elevated ambient temperature (42°C) daily for 2 h. During the period of twelve consecutive days, mice were sacrificed on days 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 immediately following heat exposure. Testes weight, enzymatic antioxidant activities and concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) in the testes were determined and immunohistochemical detection of Nrf2 protein and mRNA expression of Nrf2-regulated genes were analyzed to assess the status of Nrf2-antioxidant system. Results Heat-exposed mice presented significant increases in rectal, scrotal surface and body surface temperature. The concentrations of cortisol and testosterone in serum fluctuated with the number of exposed days. There were significant decrease in testes weight and relative testes weight on day 12 compared with those on other days, but significant increases in catalase (CAT) activity on day 1 and GSH level on day 4 compared with control group. The activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) and copper-zinc SOD (CuZn-SOD) increased significantly on days 8 and 12. Moreover, prominent nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 protein was observed in Leydig cells on day 2, accompanying with up-regulated mRNA levels of Nrf2-regulated genes such as Nrf2, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), ?-Glutamylcysteine synthetase (GCLC) and NAD (P) H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1)) in heat-treated groups. Conclusions These results suggest that Nrf2 displayed nuclear accumulation and protective activity in the process of heat treated-induced oxidative stress in mouse testes, indicating that Nrf2 might be a potential target for new drugs designed to protect germ cell and Leydig cell from oxidative stress. PMID:23514035

2013-01-01

311

Recognizing familial myeloid leukemia in adults  

PubMed Central

Germline testing for familial cases of myeloid leukemia in adults is becoming more common with the recognition of multiple genetic syndromes predisposing people to bone marrow disease. Currently, Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments approved testing exists for several myeloid leukemia predisposition syndromes: familial platelet disorder with propensity to acute myeloid leukemia (FPD/AML), caused by mutations in RUNX1; familial AML with mutated CEBPA; familial myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia with mutated GATA2; and the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, including dyskeratosis congenita, a disease of abnormal telomere maintenance. With the recognition of additional families with a genetic component to their leukemia, new predisposition alleles will likely be identified. We highlight how to recognize and manage these cases as well as outline the characteristics of the major known syndromes. We look forward to future research increasing our understanding of the scope of inherited myeloid leukemia syndromes. PMID:23926458

Nickels, Eric M.; Soodalter, Jesse; Churpek, Jane E.

2013-01-01

312

Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2013-07-03

313

Magnetic resonance imaging features of breast leukemia.  

PubMed

Breast leukemia is extremely rare. Only 7 other reports describe its magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings. This report describes a case of breast leukemia presenting as isolated intramammary leukemic relapse in the breasts after complete remission of acute myeloid leukemia. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging showed diffuse heterogeneous non-mass-like enhancement in one breast and a diffuse irregular heterogeneously enhancing mass in the other. Previous reports of MR imaging findings in breast leukemia have included only mass-like lesions; hence, the finding reported here is uncommon. PMID:24172785

Kim, Suk Jung

2013-12-25

314

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with gross hematuria  

PubMed Central

A case of a six-year-old boy presenting with gross hematuria is reported. Investigations revealed the etiology of the hematuria to be thrombocytopenia in the setting of newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The diagnosis of leukemia was confirmed by bone marrow examination. The patient’s hematuria completely resolved with platelet transfusions. Although thrombocytopenia is a very common presenting feature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, gross hematuria is exceedingly rare. Thus, thrombocytopenia potentially caused by acute leukemia should be considered in a child presenting with gross hematuria. PMID:19030428

Kalbani, Naifain Al; Weitzman, Sheila; Abdelhaleem, Mohamed; Carcao, Manuel; Abla, Oussama

2007-01-01

315

Bendamustine in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.  

PubMed

Bendamustine (Treanda(®); Pharmachemie BV, The Netherlands for Cephalon, Inc., PA, USA) is a unique cytotoxic agent with both alkylating and antimetabolite properties. A growing body of evidence demonstrates its efficacy in a number of hematologic malignancies, and as such, it has been US FDA approved for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that has not responded to, or progressed within 6 months of, a rituximab-based regimen. Bendamustine has efficacy both as a single agent as well as in combination with other chemotherapeutics and immunotherapeutics. Here, we will discuss in the detail the molecular properties, clinical efficacy and safety profile of bendamustine. PMID:20836669

Ujjani, Chaitra; Cheson, Bruce D

2010-09-01

316

Transplantability of human lymphoid cell line, lymphoma, and leukemia in splenectomized and/or irradiated nude mice  

SciTech Connect

The effects of splenectomy and/or whole-body irradiation of nude mice before xenotransplantation of lymphoid cell lines, lymphoma, and leukemia were studied. Transplantation after whole-body irradiation resulted in the increased ''take'' rate of three cultured cell lines (two of T-cell-derived acute lymphocytic leukemia and one of B-cell derived acute lymphocytic leukemia) and in the tumorous growth of Burkitt-derived Raji and spontaneously transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. With splenectomy plus irradiation as a pretreatment, tumorous growth occurred in four other cell lines which were not transplantable after irradiation only (two cell lines of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cord blood cells and one each of null acute lymphocytic leukemia and nodular lymphoma-derived cell lines). Direct transplantation of leukemia and lymphoma cells into the pretreated mice was successful in 7 of 24 cases (29%). B-cell-derived diffuse large lymphoid lymphoma was transplantable in three of seven cases (43%). However, lymphoma and leukemia of peripheral T-cell origin was difficult to transplant even with pretreatment, and only one pleomorphic T-cell lymphoma grew to a significant size (2 cm). One tumor each of B-cell-derived diffuse large lymphoid and T-cell diffuse lymphoblastic lymphoma became transplantable.

Watanabe, S.; Shimosato, Y.; Kuroki, M.; Sato, Y.; Nakajima, T.

1980-07-01

317

Deuterium enrichment of plasma determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Dilution kinetics of sup 2 H sub 2 O and estimation of total body water  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying the abundance of {sup 2}H in plasma by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. After adding internal standard (tert-butyl-d9 alcohol) to deproteinized plasma samples containing {sup 2}H{sub 2}O, we determined the ratio of NMR peak areas for {sup 2}H{sub 2}O and tert-butyl-d9 alcohol. This peak-area ratio was directly proportional to the exogenous {sup 2}H enrichment of plasma (difference between measured and naturally occurring {sup 2}H) between 0 and 0.272 atom % (r = 0.999). The coefficient of variation was 1.34% at an exogenous enrichment of 0.136 atom %. We applied this method to a study of the dilution kinetics of {sup 2}H{sub 2}O to determine the optimal time and method of blood sampling for estimation of total body water content. The {sup 2}H enrichment of plasma stabilized by 4 h after intravenous injection of {sup 2}H{sub 2}O, 1 g/kg of body weight, and fluctuated within 2-4% of the 4- to 8-h mean thereafter.

Brans, Y.W.; Schwartz, C.A.; Hood, R.J.; Ksebati, M.B.; Konduri, G.G. (Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (USA))

1990-10-01

318

Many-body correlations of quasiparticle random-phase approximation in nuclear matrix element of neutrinoless double-beta decay  

E-print Network

We show that the correlations of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) significantly reduce the nuclear matrix element of neutrinoless double-beta decay by a new mechanism in the calculation for 150Nd -> 150Sm. This effect is due mainly to the normalization factors of the QRPA ground states included in the overlap of intermediate states, to which the QRPA states based on the initial and final ground states are applied. These normalization factors arise according to the definition of the QRPA ground state as the vacuum of quasibosons. The consistency of QRPA approaches taking different virtual paths under the closure approximation is also discussed, and an extension of the QRPA ground state is proposed.

J. Terasaki

2014-08-07

319

Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-06-20

320

17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2013-06-03

321

Relationship between electron density and effective densities of body tissues for stopping, scattering, and nuclear interactions of proton and ion beams  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In treatment planning of charged-particle radiotherapy, patient heterogeneity is conventionally modeled as variable-density water converted from CT images to best reproduce the stopping power, which may lead to inaccuracies in the handling of multiple scattering and nuclear interactions. Although similar conversions can be defined for these individual interactions, they would be valid only for specific CT systems and would require additional tasks for clinical application. This study aims to improve the practicality of the interaction-specific heterogeneity correction. Methods: The authors calculated the electron densities and effective densities for stopping power, multiple scattering, and nuclear interactions of protons and ions, using the standard elemental-composition data for body tissues to construct the invariant conversion functions. The authors also simulated a proton beam in a lung-like geometry and a carbon-ion beam in a prostate-like geometry to demonstrate the procedure and the effects of the interaction-specific heterogeneity correction. Results: Strong correlations were observed between the electron density and the respective effective densities, with which the authors formulated polyline conversion functions. Their effects amounted to 10% differences in multiple-scattering angle and nuclear interaction mean free path for bones compared to those in the conventional heterogeneity correction. Although their realistic effect on patient dose distributions would be generally small, it could be at the level of a few percent when a carbon-ion beam traverses a large bone. Conclusions: The present conversion functions are invariant and may be incorporated in treatment planning systems with a common function relating CT number to electron density. This will enable improved beam dose calculation while minimizing initial setup and quality management of the user's specific system.

Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Koba, Yusuke [Department of Accelerator and Medical Physics, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

2012-02-15

322

Therapeutic use of fractionated total body and subtotal body irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Ninety-one patients were treated using fractionated subtotal body (STBI) or total body irradiation (TBI). These patients had generalized lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, leukemias, myelomas, seminomas, or oat-cell carcinomas. Subtotal body irradiation is delivered to the entire body, except for the skull and extremities. It was expected that a significantly higher radiation dose could be administered with STBI than with TBI. STBI was given when there was a reasonable likelihood that malignancy did not involve the shielded volumes. A five- to ten-fold increase in tolerance for STBI was demonstrated. Many of these patients have had long-term (up to 17 year--.permanent) remissions. There is little or no treatment-induced symptomatology, and no sanctuary sites. STBI and TBI are useful therapeutic modalities for many of these malignancies.

Loeffler, R.K.

1981-05-01

323

BCR-ABL Promotes PTEN Downregulation in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the t(9;22) translocation coding for the chimeric protein p210 BCR-ABL. The tumor suppressor PTEN plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of CML chronic phase, through non genomic loss of function mechanisms, such as protein down-regulation and impaired nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling. Here we demonstrate that BCR-ABL promotes PTEN downregulation through a MEK dependent pathway. Furthermore, we describe a novel not recurrent N212D-PTEN point mutation found in the EM2 blast crisis cell line. PMID:25343485

Panuzzo, Cristina; Crivellaro, Sabrina; Carra, Giovanna; Guerrasio, Angelo; Saglio, Giuseppe; Morotti, Alessandro

2014-01-01

324

An antiviral disulfide compound blocks interaction between arenavirus Z protein and cellular promyelocytic leukemia protein  

SciTech Connect

The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) forms nuclear bodies (NB) that can be redistributed by virus infection. In particular, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) influences disruption of PML NB through the interaction of PML with the arenaviral Z protein. In a previous report, we have shown that the disulfide compound NSC20625 has antiviral and virucidal properties against arenaviruses, inducing unfolding and oligomerization of Z without affecting cellular RING-containing proteins such as the PML. Here, we further studied the effect of the zinc-finger-reactive disulfide NSC20625 on PML-Z interaction. In HepG2 cells infected with LCMV or transiently transfected with Z protein constructs, treatment with NSC20625 restored PML distribution from a diffuse-cytoplasmic pattern to punctate, discrete NB which appeared identical to NB found in control, uninfected cells. Similar results were obtained in cells transfected with a construct expressing a Z mutant in zinc-binding site 2 of the RING domain, confirming that this Z-PML interaction requires the integrity of only one zinc-binding site. Altogether, these results show that the compound NSC20625 suppressed Z-mediated PML NB disruption and may be used as a tool for designing novel antiviral strategies against arenavirus infection.

Garcia, C.C. [Laboratory of Virology, Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Sciences, University of Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Laboratory of Virology, Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Sciences, University of Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Topisirovic, I. [Institute de Recherche en Immunologie et en Cancerologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada)] [Institute de Recherche en Immunologie et en Cancerologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada); Djavani, M. [Institute of Human Virology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)] [Institute of Human Virology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Borden, K.L.B. [Institute de Recherche en Immunologie et en Cancerologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada)] [Institute de Recherche en Immunologie et en Cancerologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada); Damonte, E.B. [Laboratory of Virology, Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Sciences, University of Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Laboratory of Virology, Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Sciences, University of Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Salvato, M.S., E-mail: msalvato@ihv.umaryland.edu [Institute of Human Virology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

2010-03-19

325

Eltrombopag Olamine in Improving Platelet Recovery in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-04-29

326

Phytochrome B Nuclear Bodies Respond to the Low Red to Far-Red Ratio and to the Reduced Irradiance of Canopy Shade in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN  

PubMed Central

The current consensus is that plant responses to canopy shade involve the perception of low red to far-red ratios (R:FRs) by phytochrome B (phyB), which leads to the direct activation of auxin synthesis genes by PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORs (PIFs). In addition to its effect on R:FRs, shade also reduces irradiance, but whether shade-induced drops in irradiance affect phyB activity has not been demonstrated. To address this issue, we investigated whether irradiance and R:FRs have similar effects on the nuclear distribution of phyB in petiole cells of light-grown plants. Under high-irradiance white light, phyB formed large nuclear bodies. Lowering irradiance without changing R:FRs or lowering R:FRs by adding far-red light led to the appearance of small nuclear bodies containing phyB. Large nuclear bodies remained but with some concomitant reduction in diameter. The appearance of small nuclear bodies was rapid, stable, and reversible upon the return to high irradiance and high R:FRs. High levels of red light but not of blue light were enough to restrain the formation of small phyB nuclear bodies. Irradiance was effective within the range found in natural canopies and even under relatively low R:FRs. The promotion of leaf hyponasty by lowering irradiance was impaired in phyB and pif mutants, as previously reported for the response to R:FRs. The expression of auxin-related genes showed a similar hierarchy of response to low R:FRs and low irradiance. We propose that phyB is able to perceive not only the low R:FRs, but also the low irradiance of shade. PMID:24948827

Trupkin, Santiago Ariel; Legris, Martina; Buchovsky, Ana Sabrina; Tolava Rivero, Maria Belen; Casal, Jorge Jose

2014-01-01

327

Chronic neutrophilic leukemia: a rare case report.  

PubMed

Chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) is a rare chronic myeloproliferative disorder characterized by splenomegaly, sustained neutrophilic leukocytosis, raised serum vitamin B12 level and absence of the Philadelphia chromosome and BCR/ABL1 fusion gene. CNL can be distinguished from chronic myelogenous leukemia, leukemoid reaction and myelodysplastic syndrome. We report a case of 45 year old male patient with CNL. PMID:25332542

Rane, Sharada R; Kulkarni, Maithili M; Puranik, Shaila C

2014-09-01

328

Advances in treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia  

PubMed Central

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most prevalent type of leukemia, affects mostly elderly CLL patients, and is incurable without allogeneic transplantation. Although classic chemo(immuno)therapy is still the standard of care for patients in need of treatment, this paradigm might change in the near future with the advent of new therapeutic agents targeting major pathogenic pathways in CLL. PMID:25165564

Tausch, Eugen; Mertens, Daniel

2014-01-01

329

Activating mutations in human acute megakaryoblastic leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oncogenic activation of tyrosine kinase signaling pathway is recurrent in human leukemia. To gain insight into the onco- genic process leading to acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL), we performed sequence analyses of a subset of oncogenes known to be activated in human myeloid and myeloproliferative disorders. In a series of human AMKL samples from both Down syndrome and non-Down syndrome patients,

Sebastien Malinge; Christine Ragu; Veronique Della-Valle; Didier Pisani; Stefan N. Constantinescu; Christelle Perez; Jean-Luc Villeval; Dirk Reinhardt; Judith Landman-Parker; Lucienne Michaux; Nicole Dastugue; William Vainchenker; Jean-Pierre Bourquin; Virginie Penard-Lacronique; Olivier A. Bernard

330

Acute leukemia following treatment of malignant glioma  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report two patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) following therapy for malignant glioma; one was a young women treated heavily with alkylating agents for glioblastoma and the other a young man treated with high doses of procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) for anaplastic astrocytoma. We found 26 other examples of therapy related leukemia in adult and pediatric brain tumor

James R. Perry; Mark T. Brown; Jon P. Gockerman

1998-01-01

331

Targeting Leukemia: From Bench to Bedside  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

FASEB Breakthroughs in Bioscience article. As researchers discovered effective treatments for leukemia, there remained a stumbling block: the drugs that killed leukemia cells were unable to penetrate into the brain and spinal cord. Fortunately, using animal models, scientists were able to develop a direct injection and irradiation protocol that eliminated this problem.

Margie Patlak (Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Office of Public Affairs)

2002-03-01

332

Acute leukemias of childhood: pathologic features.  

PubMed

Major advances have been made in the diagnosis and therapy of childhood leukemia over the last two decades (Zuelzer and Flatz, 1960; Miller, 1980; Steinhorn and Myers, 1981; Kobrinsky et al., 1980). Sophisticated phenotypic analysis of these leukemias has partially revealed their complexity; there are at least three to five distinct clinical pathological entities in the childhood leukemia groups. Improved therapy has resulted in marked increases in survival and cures. Less attention has been given to the pathology of childhood leukemia, although the frequency and complexity of tissue examinations have greatly increased. In particular, the pathologic manifestation of relapses, detection of focal leukemia after treatment and the pathology of complications have not been systematically reviewed. Our goal was to look at all of the pathologic manifestations of leukemia and to relate these manifestations to homogeneous patient populations grouped by their type of leukemia. Therefore all of the cytologic, hematologic, histopathologic, ultrastructural and immunologic materials on a consecutive group of leukemic children seen at Vanderbilt from 1970 to 1981 were reviewed; pathologic manifestations of leukemia were then analysed in relationship to diagnostic categories. PMID:3874813

Swerdlow, S H; Glick, A D; Cousar, J B; Collins, R D

1985-01-01

333

Bortezomib, Sorafenib Tosylate, and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-09-30

334

Tailoring of chronic lymphatic leukemia therapy  

PubMed Central

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease, with all patients who require therapy destined to relapse and understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has advanced significantly. It is now clear that chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a relatively proliferative disorder that requires the help of its microenvironment to be maintained and to progress. The stimulation of the chronic lymphatic leukemia cell occurs in most, if not all, patients through antigen stimulation via the B cell receptors. In addition, there is now a appreciation of the role of the p53 pathway leading to chemoresistance and the elucidation of the molecular and intracellular signaling mechanisms of disease is just beginning to facilitate the development of several targeted small molecules that promise to revolutionize the treatment of Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:23997983

Elhefni, Ashraf M

2013-01-01

335

Midostaurin and Azacitidine in Treating Elderly Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-10-11

336

Vorinostat and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2013-09-27

337

Traumatic stress in acute leukemia  

PubMed Central

Objective Acute leukemia is a condition with an acute onset that is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. However, the psychological impact of this life-threatening condition and its intensive treatment has not been systematically examined. In the present study, we investigate the prevalence and correlates of post-traumatic stress symptoms in this population. Methods Patients with acute myeloid, lymphocytic, and promyelocytic leukemia who were newly diagnosed, recently relapsed, or treatment failures were recruited at a comprehensive cancer center in Toronto, Canada. Participants completed the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire, Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, CARES Medical Interaction Subscale, and other psychosocial measures. A multivariate regression analysis was used to assess independent predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Results Of the 205 participants, 58% were male, mean age was 50.1 ± 15.4 years, 86% were recently diagnosed, and 94% were receiving active treatment. The mean Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire score was 30.2 ± 22.5, with 27 of 200 (14%) patients meeting criteria for acute stress disorder and 36 (18%) for subsyndromal acute stress disorder. Post-traumatic stress symptoms were associated with more physical symptoms, physical symptom distress, attachment anxiety, and perceived difficulty communicating with health-care providers, and poorer spiritual well-being (all p <0.05). Conclusions The present study demonstrates that clinically significant symptoms of traumatic stress are common in acute leukemia and are linked to the degree of physical suffering, to satisfaction with relationships with health-care providers, and with individual psychological characteristics. Longitudinal study is needed to determine the natural history, but these findings suggest that intervention may be indicated to alleviate or prevent traumatic stress in this population. PMID:22081505

Rodin, Gary; Yuen, Dora; Mischitelle, Ashley; Minden, Mark D; Brandwein, Joseph; Schimmer, Aaron; Marmar, Charles; Gagliese, Lucia; Lo, Christopher; Rydall, Anne; Zimmermann, Camilla

2013-01-01

338

Biosampling Case Children with Leukemia (Acute Lymphocytic and Myelocytic Leukemia) and a Reference Population in Sierra Vista, Arizona  

E-print Network

Biosampling Case Children with Leukemia (Acute Lymphocytic and Myelocytic Leukemia) and a Reference. Statistical methods E. Investigation Protocol, Biosampling of case Children with Leukemia (Acute Lymphocytic and Acute Myelocytic Leukemia) and a Reference Population in Sierra Vista, Arizona 2 #12;Tables 1. Selected

339

[Research progress on human acute leukemia xenograft mouse models].  

PubMed

The methods for modeling human acute leukemia in mice include xenotransplantation of human leukemia cells, retroviral transduction/transplantation, transgenesis, chemical mutagenesis and insertional mutagenesis. Establishing human acute leukemia mouse models through xenograft is an important way to study acute leukemia. This review focuses on the newest progress of studies on human acute leukemia xenograft mouse models in the regards of the immunodeficiency mouse, preconditioning, cytokines, cell transplantation, the evaluation and application of model. PMID:24763042

Guo, Yan-Ting; Li, Juan; Ouyang, Jian

2014-04-01

340

Targeting Leukemia Stem Cells and Stem Cell Pathways in ALL  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Growing evidence suggests that haematological malignancies are ­sustained by a critical population of leukemia-initiating\\u000a cells or leukemia stem cells. These cellular populations are likely to be the critical target for eradication of leukemia\\u000a and most likely form the reservoir for relapse and disease resistance. Leukemia stem cells (LSC) have been demonstrated in\\u000a Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL), although their origins, identity

Clare Pridans; Brian J. P. Huntly

341

Therapeutic use of fractionated total body and subtotal body irradiation. [X-rays  

SciTech Connect

Ninety-one patients were treated using fractionated subtotal body (STBI) or total body irradiation (TBI). These patients had generalized lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, leukemias, myelomas, seminomas, or oat-cell carcinomas. Subtotal body irradiation is delivered to the entire body, except for the skull and extremities. It was expected that a significantly higher radiation dose could be administered with STBI than with TBI. A five- to ten-fold increase in tolerance for STBI was demonstrated. Many of these patients have had long-term emissions. There is little or no treatment-induced symptomatology, and no sanctuary sites.

Loeffler, R.K.

1981-05-01

342

Therapy-related Myeloid Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/t-AML) are thought to be the direct consequence of mutational events induced by chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunosuppressive therapy, or a combination of these modalities, given for a pre-existing condition. The outcomes for these patients have been poor historically compared to people who develop de novo AML. The spectrum of cytogenetic abnormalities in t-AML is similar to de novo AML, but the frequency of unfavorable cytogenetics, such as a complex karyotype or deletion or loss of chromosomes 5 and/or 7, is considerably higher in t-AML. Survival varies according to cytogenetic risk group in t-AML patients, with better outcomes being observed in those with favorable-risk karyotypes. Treatment recommendations should be based on performance status and karyotype. A deeper understanding of the factors that predispose patients to the development of therapy-related myeloid leukemia would help clinicians monitor patients more carefully after treatment for a primary condition. Ultimately, this knowledge could influence initial treatment strategies with the goal of decreasing the incidence of this serious complication. PMID:18692692

Godley, Lucy A.; Larson, Richard A.

2008-01-01

343

Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Immunotherapeutic strategies have become part of standard cancer treatment. Chimeric and humanized antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumors. Although the humanized anti-CD33 antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with b-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45, and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukemic therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conversely, a-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumor cell kill while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33- calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions in relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. T-cell recognition of peptide antigens presented on the cell surface in combination with major histocompatibility complex antigen provides another potentially promising approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:16091194

Jurcic, Joseph G

2005-09-01

344

Assessment of internal exposure doses in Fukushima by a whole body counter within one month after the nuclear power plant accident.  

PubMed

Information on early internal radiation doses in Fukushima after the nuclear power plant accident on March 11, 2011, is quite limited due to initial organizational difficulties, high background radiation and contamination of radiation measuring devices. In Nagasaki, approximately 1,200 km away from Fukushima, the internal radioactivity in evacuees and short-term visitors to Fukushima has been measured by a whole body counter (WBC) since March 15, 2011. A horizontal bed-type scanning WBC equipped with two NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors was used for 173 people who stayed in the Fukushima prefecture between March 11 and April 10, 2011. The average length of stay was 4.8 days. The internal radioactivity was converted to an estimated amount of intake according to the scenario of acute inhalation, and then the committed effective dose and the thyroid dose were evaluated. (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs were detected in more than 30% of examined individuals. In subjects who stayed in Fukushima from March 12 to March 18, the detection rate was approximately 50% higher for each radionuclide and 44% higher for all three nuclides. The maximum committed effective dose and thyroid equivalent dose were 1 mSv and 20 mSv, respectively. Although the number of subjects and settlements in the study are limited, the results suggest that the internal radiation exposure in Fukushima due to the intake of radioactive materials shortly after the accident will probably not result in any deterministic or stochastic health effects. PMID:23642080

Matsuda, Naoki; Kumagai, Atsushi; Ohtsuru, Akira; Morita, Naoko; Miura, Miwa; Yoshida, Masahiro; Kudo, Takashi; Takamura, Noboru; Yamashita, Shunichi

2013-06-01

345

Role of the SUMO-interacting motif in HIPK2 targeting to the PML nuclear bodies and regulation of p53  

SciTech Connect

Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is a key regulator of various transcription factors including p53 and CtBP in the DNA damage signaling pathway. PML-nuclear body (NB) is required for HIPK2-mediated p53 phosphorylation at Ser46 and induction of apoptosis. Although PML-NB targeting of HIPK2 has been shown, much is not clear about the molecular mechanism of HIPK2 recruitment to PML-NBs. Here we show that HIPK2 colocalizes specifically with PML-I and PML-IV. Mutational analysis showed that HIPK2 recruitment to PML-IV-NBs is mediated by the SUMO-interaction motifs (SIMs) of both PML-IV and HIPK2. Wild-type HIPK2 associated with SUMO-conjugated PML-IV at a higher affinity than with un-conjugated PML-IV, while the association of a HIPK2 SIM mutant with SUMO-modified PML-IV was impaired. In colony formation assays, HIPK2 strongly suppressed cell proliferation, but HIPK2 SIM mutants did not. In addition, activation and phosphorylation of p53 at the Ser46 residue were impaired by HIPK2 SIM mutants. These results suggest that SIM-mediated HIPK2 targeting to PML-NBs is crucial for HIPK2-mediated p53 activation and induction of apoptosis.

Sung, Ki Sa; Lee, Yun-Ah [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eui Tae [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Rock [Department of Biochemistry, Research Center for Aging and Geriatrics, Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-190 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, Research Center for Aging and Geriatrics, Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-190 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jin-Hyun [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Cheol Yong, E-mail: choicy@skku.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-04-15

346

Gastrointestinal complications of leukemia and its treatment  

SciTech Connect

Leukemia represents 4% of all cancer deaths and is the leading cause of death from malignancy for all patients under 30 years of age. Various rare, usually preterminal gastrointestinal complications of leukemia have been reported. These complications are becoming more common and no longer should be considered unusual. Their increasing incidence is the result of new, more aggressive treatment methods and increased patient lifespan. The authors describe the relative incidence and common radiographic presentations of leukemia-related gastrointestinal disease and emphasize that its prognosis is favorable with prompt diagnosis and treatment.

Hunter, T.B.; Bjelland, J.C.

1984-03-01

347

Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

2014-08-05

348

Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-08-28

349

S1312, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma

2014-06-23

350

Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-07-02

351

Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-05-20

352

Azacitidine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-14

353

What If the Leukemia Doesn't Respond or Comes Back After Treatment? (AML)  

MedlinePLUS

... information about acute myeloid leukemia What if the leukemia doesn’t respond or comes back after treatment? For most types of acute myeloid leukemia If acute myeloid leukemia (AML) doesn’t go ...

354

S0432 Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-01-14

355

SUMOylation of the Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXL2 Promotes Its Stabilization/Activation through Transient Recruitment to PML Bodies  

PubMed Central

Background FOXL2 is a transcription factor essential for ovarian development and maintenance. It is mutated in the genetic condition called Blepharophimosis Ptosis Epicantus inversus Syndrome (BPES) and in cases of isolated premature ovarian failure. We and others have previously shown that FOXL2 undergoes several post-translational modifications. Methods and Principal Findings Here, using cells in culture, we show that interference with FOXL2 SUMOylation leads to a robust inhibition of its transactivation ability, which correlates with a decreased stability. Interestingly, FOXL2 SUMOylation promotes its transient recruitment to subnuclear structures that we demonstrate to be PML (Promyelocytic Leukemia) Nuclear Bodies. Since PML bodies are known to be sites where post-translational modifications of nuclear factors take place, we used tandem mass spectrometry to identify new post-translational modifications of FOXL2. Specifically, we detected four phosphorylated, one sulfated and three acetylated sites. Conclusions By analogy with other transcription factors, we propose that PML Nuclear Bodies might transiently recruit FOXL2 to the vicinity of locally concentrated enzymes that could be involved in the post-translational maturation of FOXL2. FOXL2 acetylation, sulfation, phosphorylation as well as other modifications yet to be discovered might alter the transactivation capacity of FOXL2 and/or its stability, thus modulating its global intracellular activity. PMID:22022399

Georges, Adrien; Benayoun, Berenice A.; Marongiu, Mara; Dipietromaria, Aurelie; L'Hote, David; Todeschini, Anne-Laure; Auer, Jana; Crisponi, Laura; Veitia, Reiner A.

2011-01-01

356

VIEW OF A BODY COUNTING ROOM IN BUILDING 122. BODY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF A BODY COUNTING ROOM IN BUILDING 122. BODY COUNTING MEASURES RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL IN THE BODY. DESIGNED TO MINIMIZE EXTERNAL SOURCES OF RADIATION, BODY COUNTING ROOMS ARE CONSTRUCTED OF PRE-WORLD WAR II (WWII) STEEL. PRE-WWII STEEL, WHICH HAS NOT BEEN AFFECTED BY NUCLEAR FALLOUT, IS LOWER IS RADIOACTIVITY THAN STEEL CREATED AFTER WWII. (10/25/85) - Rocky Flats Plant, Emergency Medical Services Facility, Southwest corner of Central & Third Avenues, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

357

Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

2014-08-05

358

Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-02

359

Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

2014-04-29

360

Bioelectrical Impedance Measurement for Predicting Treatment Outcome in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-07-28

361

What Happens After Treatment for Childhood Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... Article Close Push escape to close saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Childhood Leukemia + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » After Treatment TOPICS Document Topics GO » SEE A LIST » What ...

362

Pediatric Leukemia and Lymphoma Steering Committee  

Cancer.gov

The Pediatric Leukemia and Lymphoma Steering Committee (PLLSC) was established in 2011. PLLSC members include representatives from the Children's Oncology Group, pediatric and medical oncologists and other specialists, translational scientists, biostatisticians, patient advocates, and NCI staff.

363

General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... the genes . Having certain genetic conditions , such as: Down syndrome . Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Shwachman syndrome . Bloom syndrome . ... the lymphocytes with cancer. Whether the child has Down syndrome. Whether leukemia cells are found in the cerebrospinal ...

364

Troxacitabine-based therapy of refractory leukemia.  

PubMed

Unique among currently approved or in-development nucleoside analogs, troxacitabine (Troxatyl) is an L-nucleoside with significant cytotoxic activity. Its stereochemistry and cellular transport characteristics render it insensitive to some tumor cell mechanisms of resistance to D-nucleosides, such as cytarabine and fludarabine. Troxacitabine's dose-limiting toxicities were mucositis and hand-foot syndrome in patients with refractory leukemia. Three complete and one partial remissions were observed in 30 patients with refractory acute myeloid leukemia on a Phase I study. Significant activity in blastic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia was seen on a Phase II study. Combinations of troxacitabine with ara-C, topotecan and idarubicin are active in patients with refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Phase II studies in patients with refractory lymphoproliferative diseases are ongoing. Troxacitabine merits further study in patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:12113049

Giles, Francis J

2002-06-01

365

Comparing Treatments for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

Cancer.gov

In this trial, doctors will compare the effectiveness of imatinib (Gleevec) at the standard dose versus an increased dose and against a new drug called dasatinib (Sprycel) as initial therapy for chronic myelogenous leukemia.

366

Empowering Preadolescent and Adolescent Leukemia Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes effects of leukemia diagnosis and treatment for preadolescents and adolescents. Discusses strategies for social workers to assist these cancer patients in participating actively in the day-to-day management of their own care. (ABL)

Price, Kathy

1988-01-01

367

Decitabine and Midostaurin in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-09-14

368

Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-04-11

369

Osteopetrosis mimicking juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

A 5-month-old boy developed splenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia with elevated white cells, monocytosis and immature granulocytes in the peripheral blood. Bone marrow showed dysplasia without blastosis. Increased colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage was found in the peripheral blood, mimicking granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor hypersensitivity. These findings fulfilled the diagnosis criteria for juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), but no mutations in the CBL, NRAS, KRAS, or PTPN11 genes were detected. In addition to these findings severe hypogammaglobulinemia and elevated alkaline phosphatase were present. Bone X-ray showed dense and radiopaque bones with a bone-in-bone appearance characteristic of infantile malignant osteopetrosis (IMO). Genetic mutation in T-cell, immune regulator 1 (TCIRG1) was identified, confirming the diagnosis of IMO. Careful differential diagnosis including osteopetrosis, is therefore recommended in patients with clinical features and hematologic findings consistent with JMML. PMID:25335998

Hoyoux, Claire; Dresse, Marie Françoise; Forget, Patricia; Piette, Caroline; Rausin, Léon; Villa, Anna; Gothot, Andre; Florkin, Benoit

2014-10-01

370

Williams-Beuren Syndrome and Burkitt Leukemia.  

PubMed

Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS) is associated with constitutional deletion of 7q11.23, which includes the elastin gene. Cytogenetic abnormalities of chromosome 7 are frequently described in several human malignancies. Here, we report Burkitt Leukemia in an 8-year-old boy with WBS. In this patient, constitutional deletion of chromosome 7q11.23 including BCL7B was confirmed. WBS may predispose patients to Burkitt Leukemia. PMID:23018576

Zhukova, Nataliya; Naqvi, Ahmed

2013-01-01

371

Hairy cell leukemia in father and son.  

PubMed

Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is an uncommon B cell disorder, and familial HCL is rarely encountered among the first degree relatives of HCL patients. A father and son, both of whom developed hairy cell leukemia, is presented in this report. The HLA haplotype shared by the father and son was A2, B18, BW6, CW7, DR3, DR10, and DQ8. Among these haplotypes, HLA A2 and Bw6 have previously been reported. PMID:14716034

Cetiner, Mustafa; Adigüzel, Cafer; Argon, Dilek; Ratip, Siret; Eksioglu-Demiralp, Emel; Tecimer, Tulay; Bayik, Mahmut

2003-01-01

372

Scanning Immunoelectron Microscopy of Hairy Cell Leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scanning electron microscopy has shown a typical cell surface morphology in hairy cell leukemia. Scanning immunoelectron microscope techniques, utilizing monoclonal antibodies and colloidal gold particles, have recently become available. Eight patients with hairy cell leukemia have been studied with a panel of monoclonal antibodies of which Bl, BA1, OKM1, anti-TAC and LeuM5 were shown to be suitable for scanning immunoelectron

D. Soligo; G. Lambertenghi-Deliliers; M. T. Nava; N. Polli; G. Cattoretti; E. E. Polli

1985-01-01

373

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Epidemiology and Etiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), also known as acute lymphocytic leukemia, is a malignant neoplasm of the lymphocyte precursor\\u000a cells, or lymphoblasts, that occurs annually in nearly 4000 people in the US [51]. Leukemic lymphoblasts have exaggerated\\u000a and uncontrolled growth, fail to mount a normal immune response, and cause a drop in production of normal bone marrow cells\\u000a that leads to

Daniel Wartenberg; Frank D. Groves; Aaron S. Adelman

374

Temporal changes in water quality at a childhood leukemia cluster  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since 1997, 15 cases of acute lymphocytic leukemia and one case of acute myelocytic leukemia have been diagnosed in children and teenagers who live, or have lived, in an area centered on the town of Fallon, Nevada. The expected rate for the population is about one case every five years. In 2001, 99 domestic and municipal wells and one industrial well were sampled in the Fallon area. Twenty-nine of these wells had been sampled previously in 1989. Statistical comparison of concentrations of major ions and trace elements in those 29 wells between 1989 and 2001 using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test indicate water quality did not substantially change over that period; however, short-term changes may have occurred that were not detected. Volatile organic compounds were seldom detected in ground water samples and those that are regulated were consistently found at concentrations less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). The MCL for gross-alpha radioactivity and arsenic, radon, and uranium concentrations were commonly exceeded, and sometimes were greatly exceeded. Statistical comparisons using the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test indicate gross-alpha and -beta radioactivity, arsenic, uranium, and radon concentrations in wells used by families having a child with leukemia did not statistically differ from the remainder of the domestic wells sampled during this investigation. Isotopic measurements indicate the uranium was natural and not the result of a 1963 underground nuclear bomb test near Fallon. In arid and semiarid areas where trace-element concentrations can greatly exceed the MCL, household reverse-osmosis units may not reduce their concentrations to safe levels. In parts of the world where radon concentrations are high, water consumed first thing in the morning may be appreciably more radioactive than water consumed a few minutes later after the pressure tank has been emptied because secular equilibrium between radon and its immediate daughter progeny is attained in pressure tanks overnight.

Seiler, R. L.

2004-01-01

375

Leukemia  

Cancer.gov

Treatment of Adolescents and Treatment of Adolescents and Young Adults with ALL Young Adults with ALL with an Asparaginase with an Asparaginase - -Intensive Intensive Pediatric Regimen Pediatric Regimen Lewis Silverman, M.D. Lewis Silverman, M.D. Dana

376

Leukemia: an overview for primary care.  

PubMed

Leukemia is a clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. The four broad subtypes most likely to be encountered by primary care physicians are acute lymphoblastic, acute myelogenous, chronic lymphocytic, and chronic myelogenous. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia occurs more often in children, whereas the other subtypes are more common in adults. Risk factors include a genetic predisposition as well as environmental factors, such as exposure to ionizing radiation. Symptoms are nonspecific and include fever, fatigue, weight loss, bone pain, bruising, or bleeding. A complete blood count usually reveals leukocytosis and other abnormally elevated or depressed cell lines. Patients with suspected leukemia should be referred promptly to a hematologist-oncologist. The diagnosis is confirmed by further examination of the bone marrow or peripheral blood. Treatment may include chemotherapy, radiation, monoclonal antibodies, or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Complications of treatment include tumor lysis syndrome and serious infections from immunosuppression. Leukemia survivors should be monitored closely for secondary malignancies, cardiac complications, and endocrine disturbances such as metabolic syndrome, hypothyroidism, and hypogonadism. Five-year survival rates are highest in younger patients and in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:24784336

Davis, Amanda S; Viera, Anthony J; Mead, Monica D

2014-05-01

377

Work-related leukemia: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Leukemia is a complex disease, which only became better understood during the last decades following the development of new laboratory techniques and diagnostic methods. Despite our improved understanding of the physiology of the disease, little is yet known about the causes of leukemia. A variety of potential risk factors have been suggested so far, including personal habits and lifestyle, and a wide range of occupational or environmental exposures. A causal association with leukemia has only been documented to date for ionizing radiation, benzene and treatment with cytostatic drugs, but there is an ongoing scientific debate on the possible association of leukemia with a number of other work-related hazards. In this article, we have reviewed scientific studies, published over the past 5 years, which investigated potential associations between leukemia and exposure to occupational risk factors. The systematic literature review took place via electronic databases, using specific search criteria, and independent reviewers have further filtered the search results to identify the number of articles, presented in our paper. A large number of studies included in the review referred to the effects of ionizing radiation, where new data suggest that the effects of exposure to small doses of ionizing radiation should probably be reevaluated. Some other works appear to substantiate a potential association of the disease with certain pesticides. Further research is also suggested regarding the role of infectious agents or exposure to certain chemicals like formaldehyde or butadiene in the pathogenesis of leukemia. PMID:23697536

2013-01-01

378

Clinico-Hematological Study of Acutemyeloid Leukemias  

PubMed Central

Context: Acute Myeloid leukemia has been of special interest to innumerable workers in the field of cancer research since the blood and haematopoietic tissue can be easily and repeatedly sampled. Aim: To know the relative incidence of Acute myeloid leukemia among the patients referred for complete haemogram at the Department of Pathology, JJMMC, Davangere, India.To study the clinical manifestations and their correlation with various types of acute myeloid leukemia.To study the haematological profiles in acute myeloid leukemia. Settings and Design: This was a hospital based study conducted at haematology unit, Department of Pathology, JJM Medical College, Davangere, India. Materials and Method: The present study was done during the period of June 2006 to May 2008 at haematology unit department of Pathology, JJM Medical College, Davangere, India. Cases from Chigateri General Hospital, Bapuji Hospital and other private hospitals situated in and around Davangere were included for the study. The case selection was based on the clinical features and supported by laboratory evidence. Bone marrow aspiration was subsequently carried out after obtaining written consent from the patient or the guardian. Statistics: The results were expressed in percentage. Results and Conclusion: A total of 1039 patients who were referred to the Department of Haematology out of which 50 patients were diagnosed as Acute Myeloid Leukemia. The present study highlighted that light microscopic features of peripheral smear and bone marrow will still remain mainstay in the diagnosis of acute leukemias. PMID:24959452

2014-01-01

379

Ofatumumab, Pentostatin, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

2014-03-13

380

Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-09-30

381

Childhood Leukemia--A Look at the Past, the Present and the Future.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an overview of childhood leukemia. The causes, the survival period, different types (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia), symptoms, treatment, side effects of treatment (including learning problems), and the expected future direction of…

Findeisen, Regina; Barber, William H.

1997-01-01

382

Treatment of hairy-cell leukemia with chemoradiotherapy and identical-twin bone-marrow transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A patient with progressive hairy-cell leukemia and a normal genetically identical twin presented an opportunity to determine the sensitivity of this disease to high-dose alkylating-agent chemotherapy and total-body irradiation, since the marrow aplasia induced could potentially be overcome by reconstitution with normal marrow stem cells from the twin. After such therapy the patient rapidly recovered normal marrow function with no

Martin A. Cheever; Alexander Fefer; Philip D. Greenberg; Frederick Appelbaum; James O. Armitage; C. Dean Buckner; G. E. Sale; Rainer Storb; Robert P. Witherspoon; E. Donnall Thomas

1982-01-01

383

Improved outcome of adult T cell leukemia\\/lymphoma with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adult T cell leukemia\\/lymphoma (ATL) is a poor prognosis T cell malignancy. In order to improve the outcome, we employed allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for ATL in 10 patients, nine of whom were from HLA-identical siblings and one from an unrelated donor. Conditioning regimens varied among the patients except that all received total body irradiation. The patients tolerated the

A Utsunomiya; Y Miyazaki; Y Takatsuka; S Hanada; K Uozumi; S Yashiki; M Tara; F Kawano; Y Saburi; H Kikuchi; M Hara; H Sao; Y Morishima; Y Kodera; S Sonoda; M Tomonaga

2001-01-01

384

T cell-depleted unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The outcome for 39 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in remission who had CAMPATH 1M T cell-depleted unrelated donor bone marrow transplantations (BMTs) is described. Conditioning was mainly with cyclophosphamide (120 mg\\/kg) and total body irradiation (TBI) (14.4 Gy), but 5 patients received busulfan in place of TBI and 200 mg\\/kg cyclophosphamide. All patients received cyclosporin, and short-course methotrexate

David I. Marks; Jennifer M. Bird; Kim Vettenranta; Linda Hunt; Ann Green; Jacqueline M. Cornish; Nicholas Goulden; Derwood H. Pamphilon; Colin G. Steward; Anthony Oakhill

2000-01-01

385

Inhibition of STAT5: A therapeutic option in BCR-ABL1-driven leukemia.  

PubMed

The two transcription factors STAT5A and STAT5B are central signaling molecules in leukemias driven by Abelson fusion tyrosine kinases and they fulfill all criteria of drug targets. STAT5A and STAT5B display unique nuclear shuttling mechanisms and they have a key role in resistance of leukemic cells against treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). Moreover, STAT5A and STAT5B promote survival of leukemic stem cells. We here discuss the possibility of targeting up-stream kinases with TKI, direct STAT5 inhibition via SH2 domain obstruction and blocking nuclear translocation of STAT5. All discussed options will result in a stop of STAT5 transport to the nucleus to block STAT5-mediated transcriptional activity. In summary, recently described shuttling functions of STAT5 are discussed as potentially druggable pathways in leukemias. PMID:25333255

Berger, Angelika; Sexl, Veronika; Valent, Peter; Moriggl, Richard

2014-10-30

386

Trebananib With or Without Low-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-01-10

387

Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Pravastatin Sodium in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-08-04

388

Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type I Tax Protein Induces the Expression of Anti-Apoptotic Gene Bcl-xL in Human T-Cells through Nuclear Factor-?B and c-AMP Responsive Element Binding Protein Pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), which is an aggressive form of human T-cell malignancy. The viral protein, Tax, immortalizes human T-cells and inhibits various types of apoptosis, and is thought to play crucial roles in the development of ATL. We have recently demonstrated that Tax induces the constitutive expression

Naoki Mori; Masahiro Fujii; Genhong Cheng; Shuichi Ikeda; Yoshihiro Yamasaki; Yasuaki Yamada; Masao Tomonaga; Naoki Yamamoto

2001-01-01

389

A dose escalation study of total body irradiation followed by high-dose etoposide and allogeneic blood stem cell transplantation for the treatment of advanced hematologic malignancies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since approximately 30% of leukemia patients relapse after allogeneic BMT using total body irradiation (TBI)-based preparative regimens, treatment intensity may be suboptimal. The killing of leukemia cells is proportional to the radiation absorbed dose. We studied the feasibility and toxicity of escalating the doses of fractionated TBI above our previous prescription of 13.5 Gy. Sixteen evaluable patients with advanced hematologic

RM Sobecks; CK Daugherty; DE Hallahan; GF Laport; ND Wagner; RA Larson

2000-01-01

390

Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-09-27

391

MTHFR gene polymorphism and risk of myeloid leukemia: a meta-analysis.  

PubMed

An increasing body of evidence has shown that the amino acid changes at position 1298 might eliminate methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) enzyme activity, leading to insufficient folic acid and subsequent human chromosome breakage. Epidemiological studies have linked MTHFR single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1801131 to myeloid leukemia risk, with considerable discrepancy in their results. We therefore were prompted to clarify this issue by use of a meta-analysis. The search terms were used to cover the possible reports in the MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases. Odds ratios were estimated to assess the association of SNP rs1801131 with myeloid leukemia risk. Statistical heterogeneity was detected using the Q-statistic and I (2) metric. Subgroup analysis was performed by ethnicity, histological subtype, and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). This meta-analysis of eight publications with a total of 1,114 cases and 3,227 controls revealed no global association. Nor did the subgroup analysis according to histological subtype and HWE show any significant associations. However, Asian individuals who harbored the CC genotype were found to have 1.66-fold higher risk of myeloid leukemia (odds ratio, 1.66; 95 % confidence interval, 1.10 to 2.49; P h?=?0.342; I (2)?=?0.114). Our meta-analysis has presented evidence supporting a possible association between the CC genotype of MTHFR SNP rs1801131 and myeloid leukemia in Asian populations. PMID:24894669

Dong, Song; Liu, Yueling; Chen, Jieping

2014-09-01

392

Nutritional assessment of patients with acute leukemia during induction chemotherapy: association with hospital outcomes.  

PubMed

Cancer-related malnutrition causes morbidity and reduced survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional and inflammatory status of patients with acute leukemia in association with duration of neutropenic fever (DNF) and length of hospital stay (LHS) during induction chemotherapy. Fifty-five patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 28) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 27) completed the study. There were significant differences between the two groups according to LHS and DNF (p = 0.022 and p = 0.012, respectively): both had a longer period in patients with AML. The patients were statistically different according to body mass index (BMI), pre-albumin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) score (p = 0.049, p = 0.028, p < 0.001, p = 0.030). In patients with ALL, serum albumin and pre-albumin levels were associated with LHS and DNF, respectively. Moreover, PG-SGA score was associated with DNF. In patients with AML, BMI and second pre-albumin level < 10 mg/dL were associated with DNF. Pre-albumin was the common indicator for chemotherapy-related complications in patients with both ALL and AML. Early nutritional assessment can help to find patients with acute leukemia who need nutritional support, and it may contribute to better outcome and less toxicity. PMID:24128069

Esfahani, Ali; Ghoreishi, Zohreh; Abedi Miran, Mahdi; Sanaat, Zohreh; Ostadrahimi, Alireza; Eivazi Ziaei, Jamal; Ghayour Nahand, Mousa; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Sorusheh, Yashar; Esmaili, Heidarali

2014-08-01

393

MK2206 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-04-28

394

Body/bone-marrow differential-temperature sensor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Differential-temperature sensor developed to compare bone-marrow and body temperature in leukemia patients uses single stable amplifier to monitor temperature difference recorded by thermocouples. Errors are reduced by referencing temperatures to each other, not to separate calibration points.

Anselmo, V. J.; Berdahl, C. M.

1978-01-01

395

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) in Adults (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... fusion gene Chronic myeloid leukemia Dasatinib Donor lymphocyte infusion Imatinib Leukemia Myeloblasts Nilotinib Patient information Tyrosine kinase ... can be treated with a TKI or with infusions of leukocytes from the original donor, with the ...

396

Decades Later, Chernobyl Accident Yields Clues to Leukemia Risk  

MedlinePLUS

... Report Decades Later, Chernobyl Accident Yields Clues to Leukemia Risk Studies of cleanup workers from the Chernobyl ... a link between ionizing radiation and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. (Photo courtesy of Dr. Victor Kryuchkov, Burnazyan Federal ...

397

What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... lymphocytic leukemia? What are the risk factors for acute lymphocytic leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects your ... this is unknown. Having an identical twin with ALL Someone who has an identical twin who develops ...

398

What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?  

MedlinePLUS

... Topic Additional resources for acute myeloid leukemia What’s new in acute myeloid leukemia research and treatment? Researchers ... against AML (see below). Gene expression profiling This new lab technique is being studied to help identify ...

399

What's New in Adult Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research?  

MedlinePLUS

... Topic More information about acute lymphocytic leukemia What`s new in acute lymphocytic leukemia research? Researchers at many ... that use newer targeted treatments against ALL. A new lab technique is being studied to help find ...

400

Obese Children with Leukemia Fared Worse in Study  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. Obese Children With Leukemia Fared Worse in Study Excess weight linked to ... October 27, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Cancer Chemotherapy Obesity in Children MONDAY, Oct. 27, ...

401

Phase I Combination of Midostaurin, Bortezomib, and Chemo in Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-11-15

402

AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-09-20

403

[WT1 Gene Expression Difference in Leukemia and Non-Leukemia and Its Clinical Significance].  

PubMed

This study was aimed to investigate the expression level of Wilms' tumor 1( WT1) gene in hematologic neoplasm (leukemia, multiple myeloma and lymphoma) patients and its clinical significance. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) was used to detect the copy number of WT1 gene and reference gene (ALB) in bone marrow cells of 228 patients with hematologic neoplasm in our hospital. The gene expression level was determined by using the ratio of the copy number of WT1 gene and reference gene. The results showed that the WT1 expression level between male and female patients was not statistically significantly different (P > 0.05). All the patients were divided into 3 groups: the group aged under 19, the group aged between 19-50, and the group aged over 50; the WT1 expression level among the three groups were not statistically significantly different (P > 0.05) . The above-mentioned patients were redivided into the groups aged under 45 and over 45, the difference between them was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The difference of WT1 expression level between newly diagnosed patients and treated patients with hematologic neoplasm was statistically significant (P < 0.01), but no statistically significant difference of WT1 expression was found (P > 0.05) at each stage within 3 years after treatment, however, among them the difference between newly diagnosed leukemia patients and treated leukemia patients was very statistically significant (P < 0.01), while the difference between newly diagnosed and treated non-leukemia patients was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The expression difference of WT1 between leukemia and non-leukemia patients was very statistically significant (P < 0.01), the difference between the newly diagnosed leukemia and non-leukemia patients also was very statistically significant (P < 0.01). The difference of WT1 expression between treated leukemia and non-leukemia patients was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). It is concluded that the WT1 expression level in leukemia patients can be a reliable marker to evaluate the prognosis of newly diagnosed leukemia and the curative effect for minimal residual disease. No WT1 expression difference has been found before and after treatment among the patients with non-leukemia, such as multiple myeloma and lymphoma, therefore, which should be furtherly explored. PMID:25338560

Liu, Hua-Sheng; Zhu, Ming-Shang; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Wei, Shuang-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Xi, Xiao-Ping; Yu, Fang-Fang; Xi, Jie-Ying; Wang, Meng-Chang; Zhang, Mei

2014-09-01

404

Childhood leukaemia and nuclear power  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been considerable scientific and media interest in the question of whether the risk of childhood leukemia is raised near nuclear facilities, and, if so, the reasons why. Serious consideration of this issue was initiated by a media report of an unusually large number of cases around the Sellafield installation in England, and reports of excess cases in the

R. J. Berry; R. Wakeford

1992-01-01

405

Dasatinib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Did Not Respond to Imatinib Mesylate  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2013-02-04

406

Epigenetic Treatment of Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemias  

PubMed Central

Epigenetic mechanisms affecting chromatin structure contribute to regulate gene expression and assure the inheritance of information, which are essential for the proper expression of key regulatory genes in healthy cells, tissues and organs. In the medical field, an increasing body of evidence indicates that altered gene expression or de-regulated gene function lead to disease. Cancer cells also suffer a profound change in the genomic methylation patterns and chromatin status. Aberrant DNA methylation patterns, changes in chromatin structure and in gene expression are common in all kind of tumor types. However, studies on leukemias have provided paradigmatic examples for the functional implications of the epigenetic alterations in cancer development and progression as well as their relevance for therapeutical targeting. PMID:18537607

Leone, Giuseppe; D’Alò, Francesco; Zardo, Giuseppe; Teresa Voso, Maria; Nervi, Clara

2008-01-01

407

What Is Nuclear Medicine?  

MedlinePLUS

... Normal Enzyme Level Smoker Reduced Enzyme Level 5 Nuclear medicine can detect the radiation coming from inside a patient’s body. All of ... from outside the body using machines that send radiation through the body. As a result, nuclear medicine determines the cause of a medical problem ...

408

Temozolomide and cisplatin in relapsed\\/refractory acute leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cisplatin depletes MGMT and increases the sensitivity of leukemia cells to temozolomide. We performed a phase I study of cisplatin and temozolomide in patients with relapsed and refractory acute leukemia. Fifteen patients had AML, 3 had ALL, and 2 had biphenotypic leukemia. The median number of prior chemotherapy regimens was 3 (1–5). Treatment was well tolerated up to the maximal

Karen Seiter; Sreedhar Katragadda; Doris Ponce; Muhammad Rasul; Nasir Ahmed

2009-01-01

409

Actual biological diagnosis of acute myeloblastic leukemia in children  

PubMed Central

Abstract Acute myeloblastic leukemia accounts for approximately 20% of acute leukemias in children. The days the microscope represented the main tool in the diagnosis and classification of Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia seem to be very far. This review summarizes the current diagnosis of this malignancy, where the morphological, cytochemical, immunophenotyping, cytogenetic and molecular characterization represents the basement of a risk group related therapy.

Buga Corbu, V; Gl?ck, A; Arion, C

2014-01-01

410

Family cancer history and risk of childhood acute leukemia (France)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: A case–control study was carried out to investigate the role of a family history of solid tumor or hematologic neoplasm in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia. Methods: Family cancer history in first- and second-degree relatives was compared in 279 incident cases (242 cases of acute lymphocytic leukemia and 37 of acute myeloid leukemia) and 285 controls. Recruitment was

Florence Perrillat; Jacqueline Clavel; Isabelle Jaussent; André Baruchel; Guy Leverger; Brigitte Nelken; Noël Philippe; Gérard Schaison; Danièle Sommelet; Etienne Vilmer; Catherine Bonaïti-Pellié; Denis Hémon

2001-01-01

411

ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying differentially expressed genes in human acute leukemia  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying differentially expressed genes in human acute leukemia and mouse brain the experimental-wise false discovery rate. A human acute leukemia dataset corrected from 38 leukemia patients, a mouse brain dataset collected from six brain regions of two inbred strains (two- treatment factors

Gu, Xun

412

The Family Physician's Role in Managing Chronic Leukemia  

PubMed Central

This article provides a brief update on the clinical approach to chronic myelogenous leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, based on advances in pathbiology and the effect of new concepts on treatment policies. These disorders were selected because family physicians take most responsibility for the day-to-day management of these most common forms of chronic leukemias. PMID:21253119

Galbraith, Peter R.

1988-01-01

413

Economic burden of acute myeloid leukemia: a literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The primary objective was to examine the economic burden associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a deadly hematological malignancy. AML is the most common form of acute leukemia in adults, particularly in individuals over 60 years of age; AML also accounts for 15–20% of childhood leukemia.Materials and methods: A systematic review was conducted of relevant studies published in the

Alberto Redaelli; Marc F Botteman; Jennifer M Stephens; Suzanne Brandt; Chris L Pashos

2004-01-01

414

42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public Health...Probability of Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more...

2010-10-01

415

Benzene and leukemia. An epidemiologic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

To assess quantitatively the association between benzene exposure and leukemia, we examined the mortality rate of a cohort with occupational exposure to benzene. Cumulative exposure for each cohort member was estimated from historical air-sampling data and, when no sampling data existed, from interpolation on the basis of existing data. The overall standardized mortality ratio (a measure of relative risk multiplied by 100) for leukemia was 337 (95 percent confidence interval, 154 to 641), and that for multiple myeloma was 409 (95 percent confidence interval, 110 to 1047). With stratification according to levels of cumulative exposure, the standardized mortality ratios for leukemia increased from 109 to 322, 1186, and 6637 with increases in cumulative benzene exposure from less than 40 parts per million-years (ppm-years), to 40 to 199, 200 to 399, and 400 or more, respectively. A cumulative benzene exposure of 400 ppm-years is equivalent to a mean annual exposure of 10 ppm over a 40-year working lifetime; 10 ppm is the currently enforceable standard in the United States for occupational exposure to benzene. To examine the shape of the exposure-response relation, we performed a conditional logistic-regression analysis, in which 10 controls were matched to each cohort member with leukemia. From this model, it can be calculated that protection from benzene-induced leukemia would increase exponentially with any reduction in the permissible exposure limit.

Rinsky, R.A.; Smith, A.B.; Hornung, R.; Filloon, T.G.; Young, R.J.; Okun, A.H.; Landrigan, P.J.

1987-04-23

416

Cyclophosphamide, Alvocidib, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With High Risk B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

2014-09-16

417

Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-09-27

418

Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-09-13

419

Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-07-22

420

Vorinostat and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2011-11-03

421

Vorinostat, Azacitidine, and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-03-13

422

Bortezomib, Mitoxantrone, Etoposide, and Cytarabine in Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-03-18

423

Flavaglines target primitive leukemia cells and enhance anti-leukemia drug activity.  

PubMed

Identification of agents that target human leukemia stem cells is an important consideration for the development of new therapies. The present study demonstrates that rocaglamide and silvestrol, closely related natural products from the flavagline class of compounds, are able to preferentially kill functionally defined leukemia stem cells, while sparing normal stem and progenitor cells. In addition to efficacy as single agents, flavaglines sensitize leukemia cells to several anticancer compounds, including front-line chemotherapeutic drugs used to treat leukemia patients. Mechanistic studies indicate that flavaglines strongly inhibit protein synthesis, leading to the reduction of short-lived antiapoptotic proteins. Notably though, treatment with flavaglines, alone or in combination with other drugs, yields a much stronger cytotoxic activity toward leukemia cells than the translational inhibitor temsirolimus. These results indicate that the underlying cell death mechanism of flavaglines is more complex than simply inhibiting general protein translation. Global gene expression profiling and cell biological assays identified Myc inhibition and the disruption of mitochondrial integrity to be features of flavaglines, which we propose contribute to their efficacy in targeting leukemia cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that rocaglamide and silvestrol are distinct from clinically available translational inhibitors and represent promising candidates for the treatment of leukemia. PMID:24577530

Callahan, K P; Minhajuddin, M; Corbett, C; Lagadinou, E D; Rossi, R M; Grose, V; Balys, M M; Pan, L; Jacob, S; Frontier, A; Grever, M R; Lucas, D M; Kinghorn, A D; Liesveld, J L; Becker, M W; Jordan, C T

2014-10-01

424

An autologous leukemia cell vaccine prevents murine acute leukemia relapse after cytarabine treatment.  

PubMed

Acute leukemias with adverse prognostic features carry a high relapse rate without allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Allo-SCT has a high morbidity and is precluded for many patients because of advanced age or comorbidities. Postremission therapies with reduced toxicities are urgently needed. The murine acute leukemia model C1498 was used to study the efficacy of an intravenously administered vaccine consisting of irradiated leukemia cells loaded with the natural killer T (NKT)-cell agonist ?-galactosylceramide (?-GalCer). Prophylactically, the vaccine was highly effective at preventing leukemia development through the downstream activities of activated NKT cells, which were dependent on splenic langerin(+)CD8?(+) dendritic cells and which led to stimulation of antileukemia CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. However, hosts with established leukemia received no protective benefit from the vaccine, despite inducing NKT-cell activation. Established leukemia was associated with increases in regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and the leukemic cells themselves were highly suppressive in vitro. Although this suppressive environment impaired both effector arms of the immune response, CD4(+) T-cell responses were more severely affected. When cytarabine chemotherapy was administered prior to vaccination, all animals in remission posttherapy were protected against rechallenge with viable leukemia cells. PMID:25237205

Gibbins, John D; Ancelet, Lindsay R; Weinkove, Robert; Compton, Benjamin J; Painter, Gavin F; Petersen, Troels R; Hermans, Ian F

2014-11-01

425

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults  

PubMed Central

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent neoplastic disease in children, being a rare disease in adults. Many of the advances in pediatric ALL have been through modifications in the doses and schedules of available agents as opposed to the introduction of new compounds. In recent years some improvements in the outcome of ALL in adults have occurred. Application of pediatric regimens to young and middle-aged adults shows promise to improve outcome. Advances in the supportive care of patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), the use of alternative sources of hematopoietic stem cells and the use of reduced-intensity conditioning regimens will expand the number of patients who can benefit from this therapeutic modality. The evaluation of minimal residual disease will further stratify risk classification and redefine the role of therapeutic modalities such as SCT or biologic agents. New drugs such as thyrosin kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies have led to incremental improvements in outcome. Advances in the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of the disease provide hope that targeted therapies can more effectively treat the disease with less toxicity. PMID:22053271

Ribera, Josep-Maria

2011-01-01

426

Foreign Bodies  

MedlinePLUS

... sometimes stick things in their mouths, ears, and noses. Some foreign bodies, like a small splinter, do not cause serious harm. Inhaled or swallowed foreign bodies may cause choking or bowel obstruction and may require medical care.

427

Body Measurement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described are activities for measuring the human body. The activities include measurements and calculations, calculating volume and density, problems related to body measurement, and using a nomogram. Several charts, illustrations, and a nomogram are provided. (YP)

Neufeld, K. Allen

1989-01-01

428

Induction of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) oncogenic domains (PODs) by papillomavirus  

SciTech Connect

Promyelocytic leukemia oncogenic domains (PODs), also called nuclear domain 10 (ND10), are subnuclear structures that have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes as well as the life cycle of DNA viruses including papillomaviruses. In order to investigate the interplay between papillomaviruses and PODs, we analyzed the status of PODs in organotypic raft cultures of human keratinocytes harboring HPV genome that support the differentiation-dependent HPV life cycle. The number of PODs per nucleus was increased in the presence of HPV genomes selectively within the poorly differentiated layers but was absent in the terminally differentiated layers of the stratified epithelium. This increase in PODs was correlated with an increase in abundance of post-translationally modified PML protein. Neither the E2-dependent transcription nor viral DNA replication was reliant upon the presence of PML. Implications of these findings in terms of HPV's interaction with its host are discussed.

Nakahara, Tomomi [McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 1400 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lambert, Paul F. [McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 1400 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)], E-mail: lambert@oncology.wisc.edu

2007-09-30

429

MS-275 and GM-CSF in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and/or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-01-08

430

Adult Leukemia Risk and Diagnostic X-Rays: A Reanalysis of the Tri-State Leukemia Survey Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The present study examined adult leukemia risk as a function of X-ray exposure in a data set consisting of 1414 leukemia cases and 1370 controls, using Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio procedures to calculate relative risk for 30 sex/leukemia type/X-ray exposur...

M. E. Ginevan, J. R. B. Curtiss, D. Grahn

1981-01-01

431

[FLT3 inhibitors for acute myeloid leukemia].  

PubMed

FLT3 is a class III receptor tyrosine kinase. FLT3 mutation is the most frequent genetic alteration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and involved in the signaling pathway of autonomous proliferation and differentiation block in leukemia cells. Since FLT3 mutation is strongly associated with leukocytosis and a poor prognosis, it is expected that development of FLT3 kinase inhibitors will make more efficacious therapeutic strategy for leukemia therapy. Although many FLT3 inhibitors have been subjected to clinical trials, their clinical efficacies for AML seem unimpressive, and several problems regarding adverse effects and resistant mechanism are apparent. Here, I would like to summarize recent advances of FLT3 inhibitors in development. PMID:25016800

Kiyoi, Hitoshi

2014-06-01

432

The Pathogenesis of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by the clonal expansion of CD5+CD23+ B cells in blood, marrow, and second lymphoid tissues. Gene-expression profiling and phenotypic studies suggest that CLL is probably derived from CD5+ B cells similar to those found in the blood of healthy adults. Next-generation sequencing has revealed recurrent genetic lesions that are implicated in CLL pathogenesis and/or disease progression. The biology of CLL is entwined with its microenvironment, in which accessory cells can promote leukemia cell growth and/or survival. Recently, much attention has been focused on the CLL B cell receptor (BCR) and on chemokine receptors that enable CLL cells to home to lymphoid tissues and to establish the leukemia microenvironment. Agents that can interfere with BCR signaling or chemokine– receptor signaling, or that target surface antigens selectively expressed on CLL cells, promise to have significant therapeutic benefit in patients with this disease. PMID:23987584

Zhang, Suping; Kipps, Thomas J.

2014-01-01

433

Plumbagin modulates leukemia cell redox status.  

PubMed

Plumbagin is a plant naphtoquinone exerting anti-cancer properties including apoptotic cell death induction and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to elucidate parameters explaining the differential leukemia cell sensitivity towards this compound. Among several leukemia cell lines, U937 monocytic leukemia cells appeared more sensitive to plumbagin treatment in terms of cytotoxicity and level of apoptotic cell death compared to more resistant Raji Burkitt lymphoma cells. Moreover, U937 cells exhibited a ten-fold higher ROS production compared to Raji. Neither differential incorporation, nor efflux of plumbagin was detected. Pre-treatment with thiol-containing antioxidants prevented ROS production and subsequent induction of cell death by apoptosis whereas non-thiol-containing antioxidants remained ineffective in both cellular models. We conclude that the anticancer potential of plumbagin is driven by pro-oxidant activities related to the cellular thiolstat. PMID:25014531

Gaascht, François; Teiten, Marie-Hélène; Cerella, Claudia; Dicato, Mario; Bagrel, Denyse; Diederich, Marc

2014-01-01

434

Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy or Dasatinib, Prednisone, and Blinatumomab in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-09-16

435

Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

2014-06-25

436

Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is a rare malignancy associated with the human retrovirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1. It is characterized by the proliferation of highly pleomorphic lymphocytes. Involvement of peripheral blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes, spleen, and extranodal sites such as skin, liver, gastrointestinal tract, and central nervous system can occur. There are four distinct clinical variants, and the prognosis and clinical course range from highly aggressive to a more protracted course depending on the subtype. We describe a man with de novo adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and discuss the unique clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular features of this entity. PMID:24982574

Burch, Micah; Krause, John R.

2014-01-01

437

Atypical acute leukemia early after liver transplantation.  

PubMed

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been rarely reported after transplantation, namely seven cases described so far. The putative mechanism of action is long-standing immunosuppression, even though no clear correlation with the type of drug has ever been demonstrated. We report the case of a 28-year-old male patient who presented with a early onset of AML after liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus-related acute liver failure. The AML was characterized by aggressive clinical features with extrahematologic sites of involvement and an atypical immunophenotype; the laboratory findings were consistent with the diagnosis of monocytic acute leukemia. PMID:19917419

Mannelli, F; De Simone, P; Gianfaldoni, G; Nozzoli, C; Filipponi, F; Bosi, A

2009-11-01

438

Infections in patients with leukemia and lymphoma.  

PubMed

Infectious complications remain a significant issue in the care of patients with hematologic malignancies. Inherent immune defects related to the primary disease process are present in patients with disorders such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, hairy cell leukemia, and Hodgkin lymphoma. Therapy-related immunosuppression is also commonplace in these patients. This includes not only treatment-related neutropenia, but also defects in cell-mediated immunity, such as those that occur with purine analog therapy. In this chapter, we will review the pathogenesis of infection in these disorders, as well as the spectrum of infectious complications seen and suggested strategies for the prevention of infection. PMID:24706230

Morrison, Vicki A

2014-01-01

439

Hairy cell leukemia accompanied by Evans syndrome.  

PubMed

We report a case of Western type hairy cell leukemia (HCL), a very rare leukemia in Japan. In this malignancy, leukemic cells in a peripheral blood film may be missed due in part to accompanying pancytopenia and in part to loss of typical cytoplasmic projections if prepared in a conventional Japanese way using forced air-drying. Our present patient also had a variety of autoantibodies and the clinical picture was primarily that of Evans syndrome (ES), suggesting disturbed immune responses associated with the HCL. Although HCL accompanied by either AIHA or ITP has been reported, the occurrence of ES in HCL is extremely rare. PMID:24850460

Ebara, Shigeyuki; Kagosima, Mizuho; Marumo, Mikio; Ito, Yasusi; Tatumi, Eiji; Mitsutani, Susumu

2014-04-01

440

Patient Activation through Counseling and Exercise - Acute Leukemia (PACE-AL) - a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with acute leukemia experience a substantial symptom burden and are at risk of developing infections throughout the course of repeated cycles of intensive chemotherapy. Physical activity in recent years has been a strategy for rehabilitation in cancer patients to remedy disease and treatment related symptoms and side effects. To date, there are no clinical practice exercise guidelines for patients with acute leukemia undergoing induction and consolidation chemotherapy. A randomized controlled trial is needed to determine if patients with acute leukemia can benefit by a structured and supervised counseling and exercise program. Methods/design This paper presents the study protocol: Patient Activation through Counseling and Exercise – Acute Leukemia (PACE-AL) trial, a two center, randomized controlled trial of 70 patients with acute leukemia (35 patients/study arm) following induction chemotherapy in the outpatient setting. Eligible patients will be randomized to usual care or to the 12 week exercise and counseling program. The intervention includes 3 hours?+?30 minutes per week of supervised and structured aerobic training (moderate to high intensity 70 - 80%) on an ergometer cycle, strength exercises using hand weights and relaxation exercise. Individual health counseling sessions include a self directed home walk program with a step counter. The primary endpoint is functional performance/exercise capacity (6 minute walk distance). The secondary endpoints are submaximal VO2 max test, sit to stand and bicep curl test, physical activity levels, patient reported outcomes (quality of life, anxiety and depression, symptom prevalence, intensity and interference). Evaluation of clinical outcomes will be explored including incidence of infection, hospitalization days, body mass index, time to recurrence and survival. Qualitative exploration of patients’ health behavior and experiences. Discussion PACE-AL will provide evidence of the effect of exercise and health promotion counseling on functional and physical capacity, the symptom burden and quality of life in patients with acute leukemia during out patient management. The results will inform clinical practice exercise guidelines and rehabilitation programs for patients undergoing treatment for acute leukemia. Optimizing the treatment and care pathway may ease the transition for patients from illness to the resumption of everyday activities. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01404520. PMID:24083543

2013-01-01

441

Body Weight and Body Image  

Microsoft Academic Search

HEALTH ISSUE: Body weight is of physical and psychological importance to Canadian women; it is associated with health status, physical activity, body image, and self-esteem. Although the problems associated with overweight and obesity are indeed serious, there are also problems connected to being underweight. Weight prejudice and the dieting industry intensify body image concerns for Canadian women and can have

Marion P. Olmsted; Traci McFarlane

2004-01-01

442

Newly Diagnosed Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) represents a medical emergency with a high rate of early mortality. As a consequence, as soon as the diagnosis is suspected based upon cytologic criteria, it is necessary to start all- trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment without delay. For patients with newly diagnosed APL, induction therapy with ATRA plus anthracycline based chemotherapy is recommended. At present the combination of arsenic trioxide plus ATRA should be considered for patients who are not candidates for anthracycline-based therapy. For pediatric and adult patients with APL aged < 60 years who achieve a CR with induction, I recommend 3 intensive courses of consolidation chemotherapy associated to ATRA, targeted on the basis of the risk group at diagnosis. In patients treated with a very intensive consolidation chemotherapy maintenance treatment can be omitted. However If a maintenance treatment has to be adopted I suggest the use of intermittent ATRA for 15 days every 3 months for a period of 2 years, rather than ATRA associated to chemotherapy. Moreover, taking into account the medical literature, a reduced dosage of ATRA ( 25 mg/m2) in pediatric patients and a consolidation chemotherapy of reduced intensity in elderly patients is recommended. Furthermore, in order to maximize survival, careful attention should be reserved to the coagulopathy and to the appearance of the differentiation syndrome. Finally, PCR for the PML/RARA fusion gene on a bone marrow specimen every three months for two years, and then every six months for additional three years are needed during the follow-up. PMID:22220261

Avvisati, Giuseppe

2011-01-01

443

Hematopoietic modulators as potential agents for the treatment of leukemia.  

PubMed

Leukemias are the most common malignancy of childhood and have the highest mortality among aging people. Leukemias are a group of blood disorders characterized by an accumulation of leukemic cells in the peripheral blood of patients as a result of disturbances in proliferation and differentiation. Refractory leukemia remains the most common therapeutic challenge. In recent years, the presence of a cancer stem cell population in leukemias has been proposed as a cause for the refractory phenomenon. Insights into the cellular and molecular features of leukemia led to a new point of view in the choice of novel therapeutic agents. New agents for the treatment of this disease should selectively target leukemia stem cells or exhibit higher cytotoxic effects in cancer cells than in normal cells. A special interest is focused on anticancer agents from biological and natural sources that can be used in the treatment of leukemia. This review discusses the characteristics of some of these potential new agents. PMID:23276976

Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Nogueira-Pedro, Amanda; Miranda, Antonio; Justo, Giselle Zenker

2013-01-01

444

Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-05-02

445

Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Intensive Induction Chemotherapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-11-12

446

Loss of the Alox5 gene impairs leukemia stem cells and prevents chronic myeloid leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Targeting of cancer stem cells is believed to be essential for curative therapy of cancers, but supporting evidence is limited. Few selective target genes in cancer stem cells have been identified. Here we identify the arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) gene (Alox5) as a critical regulator for leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in BCR-ABL–induced chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In the absence of Alox5,

Yaoyu Chen; Yiguo Hu; Haojian Zhang; Cong Peng; Shaoguang Li

2009-01-01

447

Murine Models of Acute Leukemia: Important Tools in Current Pediatric Leukemia Research  

PubMed Central

Leukemia remains the most common diagnosis in pediatric oncology and, despite dramatic progress in upfront therapy, is also the most common cause of cancer-related death in children. Much of the initial improvement in outcomes for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was due to identification of cytotoxic agents that are active against leukemia followed by the recognition that combination of these cytotoxic agents and prolonged therapy are essential for cure. Recent data demonstrating lack of progress in patients for whom standard chemotherapy fails suggests that the ability to improve outcome for these children will not be dramatically impacted through more intensive or newer cytotoxic agents. Thus, much of the recent research focus has been in the area of improving our understanding of the genetics and the biology of leukemia. Although in vitro studies remain critical, given the complexity of a living system and the increasing recognition of the contribution of leukemia extrinsic factors such as the bone marrow microenvironment, in vivo models have provided important insights. The murine systems that are used can be broadly categorized into syngeneic models in which a murine leukemia can be studied in immunologically intact hosts and xenograft models where human leukemias are studied in highly immunocompromised murine hosts. Both of these systems have limitations such that neither can be used exclusively to study all aspects of leukemia biology and therapeutics for humans. This review will describe the various ALL model systems that have been developed as well as discuss the advantages and disadvantages inherent to these systems that make each particularly suitable for specific types of studies. PMID:24847444

Jacoby, Elad; Chien, Christopher D.; Fry, Terry J.

2014-01-01

448

Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

2014-02-14

449

Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-09-27

450

Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Cognitive/Functional Effects; Neurotoxicity; Pain; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Therapy-related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-06-30

451

Body Parts  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this online game, learners test their knowledge of human anatomy. Learners are presented a mystery image of a body part and use their mouse to select the proper body part from a full size anatomical model (known as "Jerome"). Learners try to match all 10 body parts correctly. Use this activity to review human anatomy and/or introduce learners to the use of anatomical models.

National Museum Of American History, Smithsonian I.

2012-06-26

452

Body Piercing  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To review the current information on medical complications, psychological implications, and legislative issues related to body piercing, a largely unregulated industry in the United States. METHODS We conducted a MEDLINE search of English language articles from 1966 until May 1998 using the search terms “body piercing” and “ear piercing.” Bibliographies of these references were reviewed for additional citations. We also conducted an Internet search for “body piercing” on the World Wide Web. MAIN RESULTS: In this manuscript, we review the available body piercing literature. We conclude that body piercing is an increasingly common practice in the United States, that this practice carries substantial risk of morbidity, and that most body piercing in the United States is being performed by unlicensed, unregulated individuals. Primary care physicians are seeing growing numbers of patients with body pierces. Practitioners must be able to recognize, treat, and counsel patients on body piercing complications and be alert to associated psychological conditions in patients who undergo body piercing. PMID:10354260

Koenig, Laura M; Carnes, Molly

1999-01-01

453

Genomic Approaches to Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Synopsis This article discusses recent advances in genomic approaches used to understand chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We describe tools for analyzing DNA sequence level alterations, summarize data obtained from these various platforms, and discuss the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:23561468

Improgo, Ma. Reina; Brown, Jennifer R.

2013-01-01

454

Pediatric Leukemia and Lymphoma Steering Committee Roster  

Cancer.gov

Pediatric Leukemia and Lymphoma Steering Committee Roster Chair Robert Arceci, M.D., Ph.D.Phoenix Childrens HospitalUniversity of Arizona College of MedicinePhoenix, AZ Vice-Chair William Carroll, M.D.NYU Langone Medical CenterNew York, NY Members Suzanne