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Sample records for leukemia stem cell-like

  1. Evidence that high-migration drug-surviving MOLT4 leukemia cells exhibit cancer stem cell-like properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoxing; Xiong, Meng; Jin, Yujie; Deng, Chaohua; Xu, Hui; An, Changqing; Hao, Ling; Yang, Xiangyong; Deng, Xinzhou; Tu, Zhenbo; Li, Xinran; Xiao, Ruijing; Zhang, Qiuping

    2016-07-01

    Leukemia represents a spectrum of hematological malignancies threatening human health. Resistance to treatments and metastasis of leukemia are the main causes of death in patients. Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are the initiating cells of leukemia as well as the main source of drug resistance, invasion and metastasis. Consequently, eliminating LSCs is a prerequisite to eradicate leukemia. Preliminary studies in our laboratory have shown that chemokines and their related receptors play an important role in the drug resistance and metastasis of leukemic cells. In this study, we obtained high migration drug-surviving (short term) MOLT4 cells (hMDSCs-MOLT4) with treatment of doxorubicin (DOX) after Transwell assay. Then we detected stem cell-associated molecular markers on hMDSCs-MOLT4 cells and the parental MOLT4 cells by FCM, QPCR, western blotting, H&E staining and immunohisto-chemistry experimental techniques in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we explored its impact on drug resistance and tumor formation. Then we found that compared with the parental MOLT4 cells, the mRNA expression levels of stem cell-related factors Sox2, Oct4, C-myc, Klf4, Nanog, Bmi-1, CXCR4 are increased in hMDSCs-MOLT4 cells, together with the protein expression levels of Sox2, Oct4, Klf4, Nanog, CXCR4 and CD34. Our results indicated that hMDSCs-MOLT4 cells exhibited strong drug resistance and certain cancer stem cell-like characteristics. It is the first indication that the targeting stemness factors such as Sox2, Oct4, Klf4, Nanog and CXCR4 may represent plausible options for eliminating T-ALL stem-like cells. The present findings shed light on the relationship between drug-tolerant leukemic cells and cancer stem cells. PMID:27210806

  2. Salinomycin overcomes ABC transporter-mediated multidrug and apoptosis resistance in human leukemia stem cell-like KG-1a cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Dominik; Daniel, Volker; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Opelz, Gerhard; Naujokat, Cord

    2010-04-16

    Leukemia stem cells are known to exhibit multidrug resistance by expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which constitute transmembrane proteins capable of exporting a wide variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cytosol. We show here that human promyeloblastic leukemia KG-1a cells exposed to the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate resemble many characteristics of leukemia stem cells, including expression of functional ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein, BCRP and MRP8. Consequently, KG-1a cells display resistance to the induction of apoptosis by various chemotherapeutic drugs. Resistance to apoptosis induction by chemotherapeutic drugs can be reversed by cyclosporine A, which effectively inhibits the activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP, thus demonstrating ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance in KG-1a cells. However, KG-1a are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction by salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to kill human breast cancer stem cell-like cells and to induce apoptosis in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug and apoptosis resistance. Whereas KG-1a cells can be adapted to proliferate in the presence of apoptosis-inducing concentrations of bortezomib and doxorubicin, salinomycin does not permit long-term adaptation of the cells to apoptosis-inducing concentrations. Thus, salinomycin should be regarded as a novel and effective agent for the elimination of leukemia stem cells and other tumor cells exhibiting ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance.

  3. Ph+/VE-cadherin+ identifies a stem cell like population of acute lymphoblastic leukemia sustained by bone marrow niche cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; O'Leary, Heather; Fortney, James; Gibson, Laura F

    2007-11-01

    Although leukemic stem cells (LSCs) show a symbiotic relationship with bone marrow microenvironmental niches, the mechanism by which the marrow microenvironment contributes to self-renewal and proliferation of LSCs remains elusive. In the present study, we identified a unique subpopulation of Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells coexpressing markers of endothelial cells (including VE-cadherin, PECAM-1, and Flk-1) and committed B-lineage progenitors. After long-term coculture with bone marrow stromal cells, tumor cells formed hematopoietic colonies and cords, expressed early stem- cell markers, and showed endothelial sprouting. Gene expression profiles of LSCs were altered in the presence of stromal cell contact. Stromal cell contact promoted leukemic cell VE-cadherin expression, stabilized beta-catenin, and up-regulated Bcr-abl fusion gene expression. Our study indicates that these specific tumor cells are uniquely positioned to respond to microenvironment-derived self-renewing and proliferative cues. Ph(+)/VE-cadherin(+) tumor subpopulation circumvents the requirement of exogenous Wnt signaling for self-renewal through stromal cell support of leukemic cell VE-cadherin expression and up-regulated Bcr-abl tyrosine kinase activity. These data suggest that strategies targeting signals in the marrow microenvironment that amplify the Bcr-abl/VE-cadherin/beta-catenin axis may have utility in sensitizing drug-resistant leukemic stem cells. PMID:17638851

  4. FLT3 Mutations in Early T-Cell Precursor ALL Characterize a Stem Cell Like Leukemia and Imply the Clinical Use of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Martin; Coskun, Ebru; Fransecky, Lars; Mochmann, Liliana H.; Bartram, Isabelle; Farhadi Sartangi, Nasrin; Heesch, Sandra; Gökbuget, Nicola; Schwartz, Stefan; Brandts, Christian; Schlee, Cornelia; Haas, Rainer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Griesshammer, Martin; Döhner, Hartmut; Ehninger, Gerhard; Burmeister, Thomas; Blau, Olga; Thiel, Eckhard; Hoelzer, Dieter; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Baldus, Claudia D.

    2013-01-01

    Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL) has been identified as high-risk subgroup of acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) with a high rate of FLT3-mutations in adults. To unravel the underlying pathomechanisms and the clinical course we assessed molecular alterations and clinical characteristics in a large cohort of ETP-ALL (n = 68) in comparison to non-ETP T-ALL adult patients. Interestingly, we found a high rate of FLT3-mutations in ETP-ALL samples (n = 24, 35%). Furthermore, FLT3 mutated ETP-ALL was characterized by a specific immunophenotype (CD2+/CD5-/CD13+/CD33-), a distinct gene expression pattern (aberrant expression of IGFBP7, WT1, GATA3) and mutational status (absence of NOTCH1 mutations and a low frequency, 21%, of clonal TCR rearrangements). The observed low GATA3 expression and high WT1 expression in combination with lack of NOTCH1 mutations and a low rate of TCR rearrangements point to a leukemic transformation at the pluripotent prothymocyte stage in FLT3 mutated ETP-ALL. The clinical outcome in ETP-ALL patients was poor, but encouraging in those patients with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (3-year OS: 74%). To further explore the efficacy of targeted therapies, we demonstrate that T-ALL cell lines transfected with FLT3 expression constructs were particularly sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In conclusion, FLT3 mutated ETP-ALL defines a molecular distinct stem cell like leukemic subtype. These data warrant clinical studies with the implementation of FLT3 inhibitors in addition to early allogeneic stem cell transplantation for this high risk subgroup. PMID:23359050

  5. Epigenetic remodeling in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia occurs in two tracks and employs embryonic stem cell-like signatures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Tae; Muench, Marcus O.; Fomin, Marina E.; Xiao, Jianqiao; Zhou, Mi; de Smith, Adam; Martín-Subero, José I.; Heath, Simon; Houseman, E. Andres; Roy, Ritu; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiencke, John; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated DNA methylomes of pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALLs) using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and high-definition microarrays, along with RNA expression profiles. Epigenetic alteration of B-ALLs occurred in two tracks: de novo methylation of small functional compartments and demethylation of large inter-compartmental backbones. The deviations were exaggerated in lamina-associated domains, with differences corresponding to methylation clusters and/or cytogenetic groups. Our data also suggested a pivotal role of polycomb and CTBP2 in de novo methylation, which may be traced back to bivalency status of embryonic stem cells. Driven by these potent epigenetic modulations, suppression of polycomb target genes was observed along with disruption of developmental fate and cell cycle and mismatch repair pathways and altered activities of key upstream regulators. PMID:25690899

  6. Epigenetic remodeling in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia occurs in two tracks and employs embryonic stem cell-like signatures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Tae; Muench, Marcus O; Fomin, Marina E; Xiao, Jianqiao; Zhou, Mi; de Smith, Adam; Martín-Subero, José I; Heath, Simon; Houseman, E Andres; Roy, Ritu; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiencke, John; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2015-03-11

    We investigated DNA methylomes of pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALLs) using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and high-definition microarrays, along with RNA expression profiles. Epigenetic alteration of B-ALLs occurred in two tracks: de novo methylation of small functional compartments and demethylation of large inter-compartmental backbones. The deviations were exaggerated in lamina-associated domains, with differences corresponding to methylation clusters and/or cytogenetic groups. Our data also suggested a pivotal role of polycomb and CTBP2 in de novo methylation, which may be traced back to bivalency status of embryonic stem cells. Driven by these potent epigenetic modulations, suppression of polycomb target genes was observed along with disruption of developmental fate and cell cycle and mismatch repair pathways and altered activities of key upstream regulators. PMID:25690899

  7. An evidence for adhesion-mediated acquisition of acute myeloid leukemic stem cell-like immaturities

    SciTech Connect

    Funayama, Keiji; Shimane, Miyuki; Nomura, Hitoshi; Asano, Shigetaka

    2010-02-12

    For long-term survival in vitro and in vivo of acute myeloid leukemia cells, their adhesion to bone marrow stromal cells is indispensable. However, it is still unknown if these events are uniquely induced by the leukemic stem cells. Here we show that TF-1 human leukemia cells, once they have formed a cobblestone area by adhering to mouse bone marrow-derived MS-5 cells, can acquire some leukemic stem cell like properties in association with a change in the CD44 isoform-expression pattern and with an increase in a set of related microRNAs. These findings strongly suggest that at least some leukemia cells can acquire leukemic stem cell like properties in an adhesion-mediated stochastic fashion.

  8. Involvement of Plant Stem Cells or Stem Cell-Like Cells in Dedifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fangwei; Feng, Zhenhua; Liu, Hailiang; Zhu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Dedifferentiation is the transformation of cells from a given differentiated state to a less differentiated or stem cell-like state. Stem cell-related genes play important roles in dedifferentiation, which exhibits similar histone modification and DNA methylation features to stem cell maintenance. Hence, stem cell-related factors possibly synergistically function to provide a specific niche beneficial to dedifferentiation. During callus formation in Arabidopsis petioles, cells adjacent to procambium cells (stem cell-like cells) are dedifferentiated and survive more easily than other cell types. This finding indicates that stem cells or stem cell-like cells may influence the dedifferentiating niche. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of stem cell maintenance and dedifferentiation regulation. We also summarize current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the balance between differentiation and dedifferentiation. Furthermore, we discuss the correlation of stem cells or stem cell-like cells with dedifferentiation. PMID:26635851

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Nora; Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva; Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs; Apati, Agota

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  10. Induction of Germ Cell-like Cells from Porcine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hanning; Xiang, Jinzhu; Zhang, Wei; Li, Junhong; Wei, Qingqing; Zhong, Liang; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Han, Jianyong

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generate germ cells from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is valuable for human regenerative medicine and animal breeding. Germ cell-like cells (GCLCs) have been differentiated from mouse and human PSCs, but not from porcine PSCs, which are considered an ideal model for stem cell applications. Here, we developed a defined culture system for the induction of primordial germ cell-like cells (PGCLCs) from porcine induced PSCs (piPSCs). The identity of the PGCLCs was characterized by observing cell morphology, detecting germ cell marker gene expression and evaluating epigenetic properties. PGCLCs could further differentiate into spermatogonial stem cell-like cells (SSCLCs) in vitro. Importantly, meiosis occurred during SSCLC induction. Xenotransplantation of GCLCs into seminiferous tubules of infertile immunodeficient mice resulted in immunohistochemically identifiable germ cells in vivo. Overall, our study provides a feasible strategy for directing piPSCs to the germ cell fate and lays a foundation for exploring germ cell development mechanisms. PMID:27264660

  11. Induction of Germ Cell-like Cells from Porcine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanning; Xiang, Jinzhu; Zhang, Wei; Li, Junhong; Wei, Qingqing; Zhong, Liang; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Han, Jianyong

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generate germ cells from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is valuable for human regenerative medicine and animal breeding. Germ cell-like cells (GCLCs) have been differentiated from mouse and human PSCs, but not from porcine PSCs, which are considered an ideal model for stem cell applications. Here, we developed a defined culture system for the induction of primordial germ cell-like cells (PGCLCs) from porcine induced PSCs (piPSCs). The identity of the PGCLCs was characterized by observing cell morphology, detecting germ cell marker gene expression and evaluating epigenetic properties. PGCLCs could further differentiate into spermatogonial stem cell-like cells (SSCLCs) in vitro. Importantly, meiosis occurred during SSCLC induction. Xenotransplantation of GCLCs into seminiferous tubules of infertile immunodeficient mice resulted in immunohistochemically identifiable germ cells in vivo. Overall, our study provides a feasible strategy for directing piPSCs to the germ cell fate and lays a foundation for exploring germ cell development mechanisms. PMID:27264660

  12. Long Noncoding RNA MALAT-1 Enhances Stem Cell-Like Phenotypes in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Feng; Hu, Hai; Han, Ting; Yuan, Cuncun; Wang, Lei; Jin, Ziliang; Guo, Zhen; Wang, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play a vital role in tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, chemoresistance, and recurrence. The mechanisms that maintain the stemness of these cells remain largely unknown. Our previous study indicated that MALAT-1 may serve as an oncogenic long noncoding RNA in pancreatic cancer by promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and regulating CSCs markers expression. More significantly, there is emerging evidence that the EMT process may give rise to CSCs, or at least cells with stem cell-like properties. Therefore, we hypothesized that MALAT-1 might enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. In this study, our data showed that MALAT-1 could increase the proportion of pancreatic CSCs, maintain self-renewing capacity, decrease the chemosensitivity to anticancer drugs, and accelerate tumor angiogenesis in vitro. In addition, subcutaneous nude mouse xenografts revealed that MALAT-1 could promote tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. The underlying mechanisms may involve in increased expression of self-renewal related factors Sox2. Collectively, we for the first time found the potential effects of MALAT-1 on the stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells, suggesting a novel role of MALAT-1 in tumor stemness, which remains to be fully elucidated. PMID:25811929

  13. The lymphovascular embolus of inflammatory breast cancer expresses a stem cell-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yi; Ye, Yin; Yearsley, Kurtis; Jones, Susie; Barsky, Sanford H

    2008-08-01

    Inflammatory breast carcinoma (IBC) is a particularly lethal form of breast cancer characterized by exaggerated lymphovascular invasion, which is a phenotype recapitulated in our human xenograft MARY-X. MARY-X generated spheroids in vitro that resemble the embryonal blastocyst. Because of the resemblance of the spheroids to the embryonal blastocyst and their resistance to traditional chemotherapy/radiotherapy, we hypothesized that the spheroids expressed a stem cell-like phenotype. MARY-X spheroids expressed embryonal stem cell markers including stellar, rex-1, nestin, H19, and potent transcriptional factors, oct-4, nanog, and sox-2, which are associated with stem cell self-renewal and developmental potential. Most importantly, MARY-X spheroids expressed a cancer stem cell profile characterized by CD44(+)/CD24(-/low), ALDH1, and most uniquely, CD133. A significant percentage of single cells of MARY-X exhibited distinct proliferative and morphogenic potencies in vitro. As few as 100 cells derived from single-cell clonogenic expansion were tumorigenic with recapitulation of the IBC phenotype. Prototype stem cell signaling pathways such as notch3 were active in MARY-X. The stem cell phenotype exhibited by MARY-X also was exhibited by the lymphovascular emboli of human IBC cases independent of their molecular subtype. This stem cell-like phenotype may contribute to the aggressive nature of IBC but also may lend itself to selective targeting. PMID:18599608

  14. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation

    PubMed Central

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K.; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R.; Paty, Philip B.; Chiu, Vi K.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer initiation by performing gene set enrichment analysis on gene expression from human colon tissues. We find that KRASmut imposes the embryonic stem cell-like program during human colon cancer initiation from colon adenoma to stage I carcinoma. Expression of miR145, an embryonic SC program inhibitor, promotes cell lineage differentiation marker expression in KRASmut colon cancer cells and significantly suppresses their tumorigenicity. Our data support an in vivo plasticity model of human colon cancer initiation that merges the intrinsic stem cell properties of aberrant colon stem cells with the embryonic stem cell-like program induced by KRASmut to optimize malignant transformation. Inhibition of the embryonic SC-like program in KRASmut colon cancer cells reveals a novel therapeutic strategy to programmatically inhibit KRASmut tumors and prevent colon cancer. PMID:26744320

  15. Inner Ear Hair Cell-Like Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ronaghi, Mohammad; Nasr, Marjan; Ealy, Megan; Durruthy-Durruthy, Robert; Waldhaus, Joerg; Diaz, Giovanni H.; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Oshima, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the permanence of many forms of hearing loss is the result of the inner ear's inability to replace lost sensory hair cells. Here, we apply a differentiation strategy to guide human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into cells of the otic lineage using chemically defined attached-substrate conditions. The generation of human otic progenitor cells was dependent on fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, and protracted culture led to the upregulation of markers indicative of differentiated inner ear sensory epithelia. Using a transgenic ESC reporter line based on a murine Atoh1 enhancer, we show that differentiated hair cell-like cells express multiple hair cell markers simultaneously. Hair cell-like cells displayed protrusions reminiscent of stereociliary bundles, but failed to fully mature into cells with typical hair cell cytoarchitecture. We conclude that optimized defined conditions can be used in vitro to attain otic progenitor specification and sensory cell differentiation. PMID:24512547

  16. Inner ear hair cell-like cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ronaghi, Mohammad; Nasr, Marjan; Ealy, Megan; Durruthy-Durruthy, Robert; Waldhaus, Joerg; Diaz, Giovanni H; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Oshima, Kazuo; Heller, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    In mammals, the permanence of many forms of hearing loss is the result of the inner ear's inability to replace lost sensory hair cells. Here, we apply a differentiation strategy to guide human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into cells of the otic lineage using chemically defined attached-substrate conditions. The generation of human otic progenitor cells was dependent on fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, and protracted culture led to the upregulation of markers indicative of differentiated inner ear sensory epithelia. Using a transgenic ESC reporter line based on a murine Atoh1 enhancer, we show that differentiated hair cell-like cells express multiple hair cell markers simultaneously. Hair cell-like cells displayed protrusions reminiscent of stereociliary bundles, but failed to fully mature into cells with typical hair cell cytoarchitecture. We conclude that optimized defined conditions can be used in vitro to attain otic progenitor specification and sensory cell differentiation. PMID:24512547

  17. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Hamada, Hirofumi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  18. Spatial Distribution of Stem Cell-Like Keratinocytes in Dissected Compound Hair Follicles of the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Dominique J.; Doherr, Marcus G.; Müller, Eliane J.; Welle, Monika M.

    2016-01-01

    Hair cycle disturbances are common in dogs and comparable to some alopecic disorders in humans. A normal hair cycle is maintained by follicular stem cells which are predominately found in an area known as the bulge. Due to similar morphological characteristics of the bulge area in humans and dogs, the shared particularity of compound hair follicles as well as similarities in follicular biomarker expression, the dog is a promising model to study human hair cycle and stem cell disorders. To gain insight into the spatial distribution of follicular keratinocytes with stem cell potential in canine compound follicles, we microdissected hair follicles in anagen and telogen from skin samples of freshly euthanized dogs. The keratinocytes isolated from different locations were investigated for their colony forming efficiency, growth and differentiation potential as well as clonal growth. Our results indicate that i) compound and single hair follicles exhibit a comparable spatial distribution pattern with respect to cells with high growth potential and stem cell-like characteristics, ii) the lower isthmus (comprising the bulge) harbors most cells with high growth potential in both, the anagen and the telogen hair cycle stage, iii) unlike in other species, colonies with highest growth potential are rather small with an irregular perimeter and iv) the keratinocytes derived from the bulbar region exhibit characteristics of actively dividing transit amplifying cells. Our results now provide the basis to conduct comparative studies of normal dogs and those with hair cycle disorders with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients. PMID:26788850

  19. Spatial Distribution of Stem Cell-Like Keratinocytes in Dissected Compound Hair Follicles of the Dog.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Dominique J; Doherr, Marcus G; Müller, Eliane J; Welle, Monika M

    2016-01-01

    Hair cycle disturbances are common in dogs and comparable to some alopecic disorders in humans. A normal hair cycle is maintained by follicular stem cells which are predominately found in an area known as the bulge. Due to similar morphological characteristics of the bulge area in humans and dogs, the shared particularity of compound hair follicles as well as similarities in follicular biomarker expression, the dog is a promising model to study human hair cycle and stem cell disorders. To gain insight into the spatial distribution of follicular keratinocytes with stem cell potential in canine compound follicles, we microdissected hair follicles in anagen and telogen from skin samples of freshly euthanized dogs. The keratinocytes isolated from different locations were investigated for their colony forming efficiency, growth and differentiation potential as well as clonal growth. Our results indicate that i) compound and single hair follicles exhibit a comparable spatial distribution pattern with respect to cells with high growth potential and stem cell-like characteristics, ii) the lower isthmus (comprising the bulge) harbors most cells with high growth potential in both, the anagen and the telogen hair cycle stage, iii) unlike in other species, colonies with highest growth potential are rather small with an irregular perimeter and iv) the keratinocytes derived from the bulbar region exhibit characteristics of actively dividing transit amplifying cells. Our results now provide the basis to conduct comparative studies of normal dogs and those with hair cycle disorders with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients. PMID:26788850

  20. Induction of Pluripotency in Astrocytes through a Neural Stem Cell-like State.

    PubMed

    Nakajima-Koyama, May; Lee, Joonseong; Ohta, Sho; Yamamoto, Takuya; Nishida, Eisuke

    2015-12-25

    It remains controversial whether the routes from somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are related to the reverse order of normal developmental processes. Specifically, it remains unaddressed whether or not the differentiated cells become iPSCs through their original tissue stem cell-like state. Previous studies analyzing the reprogramming process mostly used fibroblasts; however, the stem cell characteristics of fibroblasts made it difficult to address this. Here, we generated iPSCs from mouse astrocytes, a type of glial cells, by three (OCT3/4, KLF4, and SOX2), two (OCT3/4 and KLF4), or four (OCT3/4, KLF4, and SOX2 plus c-MYC) factors. Sox1, a neural stem cell (NSC)-specific transcription factor, is transiently up-regulated during reprogramming, and Sox1-positive cells become iPSCs. The up-regulation of Sox1 is essential for OCT3/4- and KLF4-induced reprogramming. Genome-wide analysis revealed that the gene expression profile of Sox1-expressing intermediate-state cells resembles that of NSCs. Furthermore, the intermediate-state cells are able to generate neurospheres, which can differentiate into both neurons and glial cells. Remarkably, during fibroblast reprogramming, neither Sox1 up-regulation nor an increase in neurogenic potential occurs. Our results thus demonstrate that astrocytes are reprogrammed through an NSC-like state. PMID:26553868

  1. Targeting chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kinstrie, Ross; Copland, Mhairi

    2013-03-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disorder that is characterized by the presence of the fusion oncogene BCR-ABL that encodes the tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL. Constitutive expression of BCR-ABL leads to the unregulated production of mature myeloid cells in the bone marrow and their subsequent release into the blood. Untreated, CML will progress from a chronic to accelerated phase over a number of years before quickly proceeding to a terminal blast crisis phase, reminiscent of acute leukemia. The advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has led to much improved management of the disease, but these drugs do not provide a cure as they are unable to eradicate the most primitive, quiescent fraction of CML stem cells. This review looks at recent research into targeting CML stem cells and focuses on major signalling pathways of interest. PMID:23264204

  2. Immunological Analyses of Leukemia Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Naka, Kazuhito; Takihara, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the intracellular localization and expression levels of specific proteins in CML Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) have been evaluated by fluorescence immunohistochemistry (FIHC). More recently, Duolink(®) in situ PLA technology has opened up a new and more quantitative way to evaluate signal transduction, posttranslational modification, and protein-protein interaction at the single-stem-cell level. This novel methodology, which employs two antibody-based probes, has already increased our understanding of the biology of the rare CML LSC population. In the future, the use of this approach may contribute to the development of novel therapeutics aimed at eradicating CML LSCs in CML patients. PMID:27581137

  3. Epigenetic DNA Demethylation Causes Inner Ear Stem Cell Differentiation into Hair Cell-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Hu, Zhengqing

    2016-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor 5-azacytidine (5-aza) causes genomic demethylation to regulate gene expression. However, it remains unclear whether 5-aza affects gene expression and cell fate determination of stem cells. In this study, 5-aza was applied to mouse utricle sensory epithelia-derived progenitor cells (MUCs) to investigate whether 5-aza stimulated MUCs to become sensory hair cells. After treatment, MUCs increased expression of hair cell genes and proteins. The DNA methylation level (indicated by percentage of 5-methylcytosine) showed a 28.57% decrease after treatment, which causes significantly repressed DNMT1 protein expression and DNMT activity. Additionally, FM1-43 permeation assays indicated that the permeability of 5-aza-treated MUCs was similar to that of sensory hair cells, which may result from mechanotransduction channels. This study not only demonstrates a possible epigenetic approach to induce tissue specific stem/progenitor cells to become sensory hair cell-like cells, but also provides a cell model to epigenetically modulate stem cell fate determination. PMID:27536218

  4. PTEN deficiency reprogrammes human neural stem cells towards a glioblastoma stem cell-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Shunlei; Yuan, Guohong; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Li, Jingyi; Zhang, Weizhou; Wu, Jun; Xu, Xiuling; Fu, Lina; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Weiqi; Bai, Ruijun; Yi, Fei; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Gao, Hua; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Zhang, Chuanbao; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiaomin; Jiang, Tao; Qu, Jing; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Here we show that targeted disruption of PTEN leads to neoplastic transformation of human neural stem cells (NSCs), but not mesenchymal stem cells. PTEN-deficient NSCs display neoplasm-associated metabolic and gene expression profiles and generate intracranial tumours in immunodeficient mice. PTEN is localized to the nucleus in NSCs, binds to the PAX7 promoter through association with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB)/CREB binding protein (CBP) and inhibits PAX7 transcription. PTEN deficiency leads to the upregulation of PAX7, which in turn promotes oncogenic transformation of NSCs and instates ‘aggressiveness' in human glioblastoma stem cells. In a large clinical database, we find increased PAX7 levels in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. Furthermore, we identify that mitomycin C selectively triggers apoptosis in NSCs with PTEN deficiency. Together, we uncover a potential mechanism of how PTEN safeguards NSCs, and establish a cellular platform to identify factors involved in NSC transformation, potentially permitting personalized treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:26632666

  5. Octamer 4 small interfering RNA results in cancer stem cell-like cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tingsong; Liu, Shanrong; Breiter, Deborah R; Wang, Fang; Tang, Ying; Sun, Shuhan

    2008-08-15

    Octamer 4 (Oct4), a member of the POU family of transcription factors, plays a key role in the maintenance of pluripotency and proliferation potential of embryonic stem cells. Cancer stem cell-like cells (CSCLC) are reported to be a minor population in tumors or even in tumor cell lines which also express Oct4. The role of Oct4 in CSCLCs still remains to be defined. In our study, we show that, in vitro, almost all murine Lewis lung carcinoma 3LL cells and human breast cancer MCF7 cells express Oct4 at high levels. This expression of Oct4 is successfully reduced by small interfering RNA, which eventually results in cell apoptosis. The signal pathway Oct4/Tcl1/Akt1 has been observed to be involved in this event. The repression of Oct4 reduces Tcl1 expression and further down-regulates the level of p-Ser.473-Akt1. In vivo, only approximately 5% of tumor cells were detected to express Oct4 in established 3LL and MCF7 tumor models, respectively. Small interfering RNA against Oct4 successfully decreases the CSCLCs and markedly inhibits tumor growth. In summary, we show that Oct4 might maintain the survival of CSCLCs partly through Oct4/Tcl1/Akt1 by inhibiting apoptosis, which strongly indicates that targeting Oct4 may have important clinical applications in cancer therapy. PMID:18701476

  6. The Distribution of Human Stem Cell-like Memory T Cell in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hai; Gu, Yong; Sheng, Si Yuan; Lu, Chuan Gang; Zou, Jian Yong; Wu, Chang You

    2016-01-01

    Human stem cell-like memory T (Tscm) cells are long-lived, self-renewing memory lymphocytes that can differentiate into effector cells and mediate strong antitumour response in murine model. The distribution and function of Tscm cells in human lung cancer remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the properties of human Tscm cells in the blood and lymph node of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. There were more CD4 Tscm cells in blood from NSCLC patients than from healthy donors, fewer CD4 and CD8 TSCM cells in blood than in lymph node from NSCLC patients. To further analyze their properties, we stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from NSCLC patients by mitogens to examine cytokine production. Our data suggest that both CD4 and CD8 Tscm cells in blood produced interferon-γ significantly increased in NSCLC patients compare with healthy subjects. In addition, fewer Tscm cells produced interferon-γ in lymph node than in blood from NSCLC patients. Our results strongly suggest that the distribution and function of CD4 Tscm cells in NSCLC patients is upregulated. Understanding of the properties of stem-like memory T cells will supply a good rationale for designing the new adoptive immunotherapy in cancer. PMID:27244531

  7. Survival regulation of leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yiguo; Li, Shaoguang

    2016-03-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are a subpopulation cells at the apex of hierarchies in leukemia cells and responsible for disease continuous propagation. In this article, we discuss some cellular and molecular components, which are critical for LSC survival. These components include intrinsic signaling pathways and extrinsic microenvironments. The intrinsic signaling pathways to be discussed include Wnt/β-catenin signaling, Hox genes, Hh pathway, Alox5, and some miRNAs, which have been shown to play important roles in regulating LSC survival and proliferation. The extrinsic components to be discussed include selectins, CXCL12/CXCR4, and CD44, which involve in LSC homing, survival, and proliferation by affecting bone marrow microenvironment. Potential strategies for eradicating LSCs will also discuss. PMID:26686687

  8. Regulation of nonsmall-cell lung cancer stem cell like cells by neurotransmitters and opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Jheelam; Papu John, Arokya M S; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2015-12-15

    Nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading type of lung cancer and has a poor prognosis. We have shown that chronic stress promoted NSCLC xenografts in mice via stress neurotransmitter-activated cAMP signaling downstream of beta-adrenergic receptors and incidental beta-blocker therapy was reported to improve clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients. These findings suggest that psychological stress promotes NSCLC whereas pharmacologically or psychologically induced decreases in cAMP may inhibit NSCLC. Cancer stem cells are thought to drive the development, progression and resistance to therapy of NSCLC. However, their potential regulation by stress neurotransmitters has not been investigated. In the current study, epinephrine increased the number of cancer stem cell like cells (CSCs) from three NSCLC cell lines in spheroid formation assays while enhancing intracellular cAMP and the stem cell markers sonic hedgehog (SHH), aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH-1) and Gli1, effects reversed by GABA or dynorphin B via Gαi -mediated inhibition of cAMP formation. The growth of NSCLC xenografts in a mouse model of stress reduction was significantly reduced as compared with mice maintained under standard conditions. Stress reduction reduced serum levels of corticosterone, norepinephrine and epinephrine while the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and opioid peptides increased. Stress reduction significantly reduced cAMP, VEGF, p-ERK, p-AKT, p-CREB, p-SRc, SHH, ALDH-1 and Gli1 in xenograft tissues whereas cleaved caspase-3 and p53 were induced. We conclude that stress neurotransmitters activate CSCs in NSCLC via multiple cAMP-mediated pathways and that pharmacologically or psychologically induced decreases in cAMP signaling may improve clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients. PMID:26088878

  9. CD73-mediated adenosine production promotes stem cell-like properties in mouse Tc17 cells.

    PubMed

    Flores-Santibáñez, Felipe; Fernández, Dominique; Meza, Daniel; Tejón, Gabriela; Vargas, Leonardo; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Arredondo, Sebastián; Guixé, Victoria; Rosemblatt, Mario; Bono, María Rosa; Sauma, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The CD73 ectonucleotidase catalyses the hydrolysis of AMP to adenosine, an immunosuppressive molecule. Recent evidence has demonstrated that this ectonucleotidase is up-regulated in T helper type 17 cells when generated in the presence of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and hence CD73 expression is related to the acquisition of immunosuppressive potential by these cells. TGF-β is also able to induce CD73 expression in CD8(+) T cells but the function of this ectonucleotidase in CD8(+) T cells is still unknown. Here, we show that Tc17 cells present high levels of the CD73 ectonucleotidase and produce adenosine; however, they do not suppress the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells. Interestingly, we report that adenosine signalling through A2A receptor favours interleukin-17 production and the expression of stem cell-associated transcription factors such as tcf-7 and lef-1 but restrains the acquisition of Tc1-related effector molecules such as interferon-γ and Granzyme B by Tc17 cells. Within the tumour microenvironment, CD73 is highly expressed in CD62L(+) CD127(+) CD8(+) T cells (memory T cells) and is down-regulated in GZMB(+) KLRG1(+) CD8(+) T cells (terminally differentiated T cells), demonstrating that CD73 is expressed in memory/naive cells and is down-regulated during differentiation. These data reveal a novel function of CD73 ectonucleotidase in arresting CD8(+) T-cell differentiation and support the idea that CD73-driven adenosine production by Tc17 cells may promote stem cell-like properties in Tc17 cells. PMID:26331349

  10. Pushing the Limits: Defeating Leukemia Stem Cells by Depleting Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ya-Huei; Bhatia, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs), featuring unlimited self-renewal capacity and chemoresistance, are critical cellular targets for new treatments to improve outcomes for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this issue, Bruedigam et al. demonstrate that inhibition of telomerase is damaging to LSCs and may represent a promising therapeutic approach in AML. PMID:25479742

  11. AB241. Cancer stem cell-like side population cells in clear cell renal cell carcinoma cell line 769P

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Wang, Dao-Hu; Chen, Jun-Xing; Qiu, Shao-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background Although cancers are widely considered to be maintained by stem cells, the existence of stem cells in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has seldom been reported, in part due to the lack of unique surface markers. We here identified cancer stem cell-like cells with side population (SP) phenotype in five human RCC cell lines. Methods We here identified cancer stem cell-like cells with side population (SP) phenotype in five human RCC cell lines. Results Flow cytometry analysis revealed that 769P, a human clear cell RCC cell line, contained the largest amount of SP cells among five cell lines. These 769P SP cells possessed characteristics of proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation, as well as strong resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy that were possibly related to the ABCB1 transporter. In vivo experiments with serial tumor transplantation in mice also showed that 769P SP cells formed tumors in NOD/SCID mice. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicate that 769P SP cells have the properties of cancer stem cells, which may play important roles in tumorigenesis and therapy-resistance of RCC.

  12. Bacterial-induced cell reprogramming to stem cell-like cells: new premise in host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Samuel; Rambukkana, Anura

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens employ a myriad of strategies to alter host tissue cell functions for bacterial advantage during infection. Recent advances revealed a fusion of infection biology with stem cell biology by demonstrating developmental reprogramming of lineage committed host glial cells to progenitor/stem cell-like cells by an intracellular bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. Acquisition of migratory and immunomodulatory properties of such reprogrammed cells provides an added advantage for promoting bacterial spread. This presents a previously unseen sophistication of cell manipulation by hijacking the genomic plasticity of host cells by a human bacterial pathogen. The rationale for such extreme fate conversion of host cells may be directly linked to the exceedingly passive obligate life style of M. leprae with a degraded genome and host cell dependence for both bacterial survival and dissemination, particularly the use of host-derived stem cell-like cells as a vehicle for spreading infection without being detected by immune cells. Thus, this unexpected link between cell reprogramming and infection opens up a new premise in host-pathogen interactions. Furthermore, such bacterial ingenuity could also be harnessed for developing natural ways of reprogramming host cells for repairing damaged tissues from infection, injury and diseases. PMID:25541240

  13. Acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors is associated with a manifestation of stem cell-like properties in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shien, Kazuhiko; Toyooka, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Soh, Junichi; Jida, Masaru; Thu, Kelsie L; Hashida, Shinsuke; Maki, Yuho; Ichihara, Eiki; Asano, Hiroaki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Gazdar, Adi F; Lam, Wan L; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2013-05-15

    Acquired resistance to EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) is a critical problem in the treatment of lung cancer. Although several mechanisms have been shown to be responsible for acquired resistance, all mechanisms have not been uncovered. In this study, we investigated the molecular and cellular profiles of the acquired resistant cells to EGFR-TKI in EGFR-mutant lung cancers. Four EGFR-mutant cell lines were exposed to gefitinib by stepwise escalation and high-concentration exposure methods, and resistant sublines to gefitinib were established. The molecular profiles and cellular phenotypes of these resistant sublines were characterized. Although previously reported, alterations including secondary EGFR T790M mutation, MET amplification, and appearance of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) features were observed, these 2 drug-exposure methods revealed different resistance mechanisms. The resistant cells with EMT features exhibited downregulation of miRNA-200c by DNA methylation. Furthermore, the HCC827-derived subline characterized by the high-concentration exposure method exhibited not only EMT features but also stem cell-like properties, including aldehyde dehydrogenase isoform 1 (ALDH1A1) overexpression, increase of side-population, and self-renewal capability. Resistant sublines with stem cell-like properties were resistant to conventional chemotherapeutic agents but equally sensitive to histone deacetylase and proteasome inhibitors, compared with their parental cells. ALDH1A1 was upregulated in clinical samples with acquired resistance to gefitinib. In conclusion, our study indicates that the manner of EGFR-TKI exposure influences the mechanism of acquired resistance and the appearance of stem cell-like property with EGFR-TKI treatment. PMID:23542356

  14. Lin28B Is an Oncofetal Circulating Cancer Stem Cell-Like Marker Associated with Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yih-Jyh; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Chang, Yu-Chung; Yen, Chia-Jui; Huang, Hsuan-Pang; Chuang, Yun-Pei; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Lee, Chung-Ta; Chao, Anning; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Chan, Shih-Huang; Chow, Nan-Haw; Ho, Chung-Liang

    2013-01-01

    By using an expressed sequence tag bioinformatic algorithm, we identified that Lin28 homolog B (Lin28B) may have an oncofetal expression pattern which may facilitate detecting cancer cells in adults. It is also reported to be a potential marker for cancer stem cells. Therefore, we sought to verify oncofetal-stemness characters of Lin28B and test its potential as a circulating cancer stem cell-like marker in adult HCC patients. Lin28B mRNA was examined in a panel of fetal tissue, adult tissue and tumors. Lin28B was over-expressed or knocked down in HepG2 cells to evaluate its potential as a stem cell-like marker. RT-qPCR for Lin28B was performed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with HCC receiving surgery (n=96) and non-HCC controls (n=60) and analyzed its clinical significance. Lin28B showed an oncofetal expression pattern. Its overexpression could upregulate stemness markers (OCT4, Nanog and SOX2) and enhance tumorsphere formation in vitro. Lin28B knockdown had opposite effects. Circulating Lin28B was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in 3 cases (5%) of non-HCC controls and 32 cases (33.3%) of HCC patients. In HCC patients, circulating Lin28B was associated with high tumor grade (P=0.046), large size (P=0.005), high AJCC stage (P=0.044) and BCLC stage (P=0.017). Circulating Lin28B was significantly associated with decreased recurrence-free survival (P<0.001). Circulating Lin28B separated early stage HCC into 2 recurrence-free survival curves (P=0.003). In multivariate analysis, circulating Lin28B was an independent variable associated with early recurrence (P=0.045) and recurrence in early stage HCC (P=0.006). In conclusion, the oncofetal gene Lin28B is a potential oncofetal cancer-stem-cell-like circulating tumor cell marker that correlates with HCC recurrence after hepatectomy. Circulating Lin28B could refine early AJCC stages. Our finding supports the possible use of a TNMC (C for circulating tumor cells) staging system in HCC

  15. Lin28B is an oncofetal circulating cancer stem cell-like marker associated with recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu-Wen; Tsai, Hung-Wen; Lin, Yih-Jyh; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Chang, Yu-Chung; Yen, Chia-Jui; Huang, Hsuan-Pang; Chuang, Yun-Pei; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Lee, Chung-Ta; Chao, Anning; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Chan, Shih-Huang; Chow, Nan-Haw; Ho, Chung-Liang

    2013-01-01

    By using an expressed sequence tag bioinformatic algorithm, we identified that Lin28 homolog B (Lin28B) may have an oncofetal expression pattern which may facilitate detecting cancer cells in adults. It is also reported to be a potential marker for cancer stem cells. Therefore, we sought to verify oncofetal-stemness characters of Lin28B and test its potential as a circulating cancer stem cell-like marker in adult HCC patients. Lin28B mRNA was examined in a panel of fetal tissue, adult tissue and tumors. Lin28B was over-expressed or knocked down in HepG2 cells to evaluate its potential as a stem cell-like marker. RT-qPCR for Lin28B was performed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with HCC receiving surgery (n=96) and non-HCC controls (n=60) and analyzed its clinical significance. Lin28B showed an oncofetal expression pattern. Its overexpression could upregulate stemness markers (OCT4, Nanog and SOX2) and enhance tumorsphere formation in vitro. Lin28B knockdown had opposite effects. Circulating Lin28B was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in 3 cases (5%) of non-HCC controls and 32 cases (33.3%) of HCC patients. In HCC patients, circulating Lin28B was associated with high tumor grade (P=0.046), large size (P=0.005), high AJCC stage (P=0.044) and BCLC stage (P=0.017). Circulating Lin28B was significantly associated with decreased recurrence-free survival (P<0.001). Circulating Lin28B separated early stage HCC into 2 recurrence-free survival curves (P=0.003). In multivariate analysis, circulating Lin28B was an independent variable associated with early recurrence (P=0.045) and recurrence in early stage HCC (P=0.006). In conclusion, the oncofetal gene Lin28B is a potential oncofetal cancer-stem-cell-like circulating tumor cell marker that correlates with HCC recurrence after hepatectomy. Circulating Lin28B could refine early AJCC stages. Our finding supports the possible use of a TNMC (C for circulating tumor cells) staging system in HCC

  16. FOXP1 functions as an oncogene in promoting cancer stem cell-like characteristics in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Jung; Seo, Eun Jin; Kim, Dae Kyoung; Lee, Su In; Kwon, Yang Woo; Jang, Il Ho; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Suh, Dong-Soo; Kim, Jae Ho

    2016-01-19

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality rate of all gynecological cancers with a high recurrence rate. It is important to understand the nature of recurring cancer cells to terminally eliminate ovarian cancer. The winged helix transcription factor Forkhead box P1 (FOXP1) has been reported to function as either oncogene or tumor-suppressor in various cancers. In the current study, we show that FOXP1 promotes cancer stem cell-like characteristics in ovarian cancer cells. Knockdown of FOXP1 expression in A2780 or SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells decreased spheroid formation, expression of stemness-related genes and epithelial to mesenchymal transition-related genes, cell migration, and resistance to Paclitaxel or Cisplatin treatment, whereas overexpression of FOXP1 in A2780 or SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells increased spheroid formation, expression of stemness-related genes and epithelial to mesenchymal transition-related genes, cell migration, and resistance to Paclitaxel or Cisplatin treatment. In addition, overexpression of FOXP1 increased promoter activity of ABCG2, OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2, among which the increases in ABCG2, OCT4, and SOX2 promoter activity were dependent on the presence of FOXP1-binding site. In xenotransplantation of A2780 ovarian cancer cells into nude mice, knockdown of FOXP1 expression significantly decreased tumor size. These results strongly suggest FOXP1 functions as an oncogene by promoting cancer stem cell-like characteristics in ovarian cancer cells. Targeting FOXP1 may provide a novel therapeutic opportunity for developing a relapse-free treatment for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:26654944

  17. Stem Cell Modeling of Core Binding Factor Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mosna, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Even though clonally originated from a single cell, acute leukemia loses its homogeneity soon and presents at clinical diagnosis as a hierarchy of cells endowed with different functions, of which only a minority possesses the ability to recapitulate the disease. Due to their analogy to hematopoietic stem cells, these cells have been named “leukemia stem cells,” and are thought to be chiefly responsible for disease relapse and ultimate survival after chemotherapy. Core Binding Factor (CBF) Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is cytogenetically characterized by either the t(8;21) or the inv(16)/t(16;16) chromosomal abnormalities, which, although being pathognomonic, are not sufficient per se to induce overt leukemia but rather determine a preclinical phase of disease when preleukemic subclones compete until the acquisition of clonal dominance by one of them. In this review we summarize the concepts regarding the application of the “leukemia stem cell” theory to the development of CBF AML; we will analyze the studies investigating the leukemogenetic role of t(8;21) and inv(16)/t(16;16), the proposed theories of its clonal evolution, and the role played by the hematopoietic niches in preserving the disease. Finally, we will discuss the clinical implications of stem cell modeling of CBF AML for the therapy of the disease. PMID:26880987

  18. SREBP-2 promotes stem cell-like properties and metastasis by transcriptional activation of c-Myc in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangyan; Wu, Jason Boyang; Li, Qinlong; Shigemura, Katsumi; Chung, Leland W.K.; Huang, Wen-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) transcription factor mainly controls cholesterol biosynthesis and homeostasis in normal cells. The role of SREBP-2 in lethal prostate cancer (PCa) progression remains to be elucidated. Here, we showed that expression of SREBP-2 was elevated in advanced pathologic grade and metastatic PCa and significantly associated with poor clinical outcomes. Biofunctional analyses demonstrated that SREBP-2 induced PCa cell proliferation, invasion and migration. Furthermore, overexpression of SREBP-2 increased the PCa stem cell population, prostasphere-forming ability and tumor-initiating capability, whereas genetic silencing of SREBP-2 inhibited PCa cell growth, stemness, and xenograft tumor growth and metastasis. Clinical and mechanistic data showed that SREBP-2 was positively correlated with c-Myc and induced c-Myc activation by directly interacting with an SREBP-2-binding element in the 5′-flanking c-Myc promoter region to drive stemness and metastasis. Collectively, these clinical and experimental results reveal a novel role of SREBP-2 in the induction of a stem cell-like phenotype and PCa metastasis, which sheds light on translational potential by targeting SREBP-2 as a promising therapeutic approach in PCa. PMID:26883200

  19. Activation of the methylation cycle in cells reprogrammed into a stem cell-like state

    PubMed Central

    Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Alarcón, Tomás; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A.

    2015-01-01

    Generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and cancer biogenesis share similar metabolic switches. Most studies have focused on how the establishment of a cancer-like glycolytic phenotype is necessary for the optimal routing of somatic cells for achieving stemness. However, relatively little effort has been dedicated towards elucidating how one-carbon (1C) metabolism is retuned during acquisition of stem cell identity. Here we used ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ionization source and a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer [UHPLC-ESI-QqQ-MS/MS] to quantitatively examine the methionine/folate bi-cyclic 1C metabolome during nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells into iPS cells. iPS cells optimize the synthesis of the universal methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), apparently augment the ability of the redox balance regulator NADPH in SAM biosynthesis, and greatly increase their methylation potential by triggering a high SAM:S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) ratio. Activation of the methylation cycle in iPS cells efficiently prevents the elevation of homocysteine (Hcy), which could alter global DNA methylation and induce mitochondrial toxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation. In this regard, the methyl donor choline is also strikingly accumulated in iPS cells, suggesting perhaps an overactive intersection of the de novo synthesis of choline with the methionine-Hcy cycle. Activation of methylogenesis and maintenance of an optimal SAM:Hcy ratio might represent an essential function of 1C metabolism to provide a labile pool of methyl groups and NADPH-dependent redox products required for successfully establishing and maintaining an embryonic-like DNA methylation imprint in stem cell states. PMID:26909364

  20. Gigantol Suppresses Cancer Stem Cell-Like Phenotypes in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhummaphan, Narumol; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2015-01-01

    As cancer stem cells (CSCs) contribute to malignancy, metastasis, and relapse of cancers, potential of compound in inhibition of CSCs has garnered most attention in the cancer research as well as drug development fields recently. Herein, we have demonstrated for the first time that gigantol, a pure compound isolated from Dendrobium draconis, dramatically suppressed stem-like phenotypes of human lung cancer cells. Gigantol at nontoxic concentrations significantly reduced anchorage-independent growth and survival of the cancer cells. Importantly, gigantol significantly reduced the ability of the cancer cells to form tumor spheroids, a critical hallmark of CSCs. Concomitantly, the treatment of the compound was shown to reduce well-known lung CSCs markers, including CD133 and ALDH1A1. Moreover, we revealed that gigantol decreased stemness in the cancer cells by suppressing the activation of protein kinase B (Akt) signal which in turn decreased the cellular levels of pluripotency and self-renewal factors Oct4 and Nanog. In conclusion, gigantol possesses CSCs suppressing activity which may facilitate the development of this compound for therapeutic approaches by targeting CSCs. PMID:26339272

  1. CML Mouse Model Generated from Leukemia Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder with a high number of well-differentiated neutrophils in peripheral blood and myeloid cells in bone marrow (BM). CML is derived from the hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph(+), t(9;22)-(q34;q11)), resulting in generating a fusion oncogene, BCR/ABL1. HSCs with Ph(+) are defined as leukemia stem cells (LSCs), a subpopulation cell at the apex of hierarchies in leukemia cells and responsible for the disease continuous propagation. Several kinds of CML models have been developed to reveal the mechanism of CML pathogenesis and evaluate therapeutic drugs in the past three decades. Here, we describe the procedures to generate a CML mouse model by introducing BCR/ABL1 into Lin(-)Sca1(+) cKit(+) population cells purified from mouse bone marrow. In CML retroviral transduction/transplantation mouse models, this modified model can mimic CML pathogenesis on high fidelity. PMID:27581136

  2. Nitric oxide induces cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yongsanguanchai, Nuttida; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Rojanasakul, Yon; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2015-01-15

    Even though tremendous advances have been made in the treatment of cancers during the past decades, the success rate among patients with cancer is still dismal, largely because of problems associated with chemo/radioresistance and relapse. Emerging evidence has indicated that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are behind the resistance and recurrence problems, but our understanding of their regulation is limited. Rapid reversible changes of CSC-like cells within tumors may result from the effect of biological mediators found in the tumor microenvironment. Here we show how nitric oxide (NO), a key cellular modulator whose level is elevated in many tumors, affects CSC-like phenotypes of human non-small cell lung carcinoma H292 and H460 cells. Exposure of NO gradually altered the cell morphology toward mesenchymal stem-like shape. NO exposure promoted CSC-like phenotype, indicated by increased expression of known CSC markers, CD133 and ALDH1A1, in the exposed cells. These effects of NO on stemness were reversible after cessation of the NO treatment for 7 days. Furthermore, such effect was reproducible using another NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine. Importantly, inhibition of NO by the known NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5 tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxy-3-oxide strongly inhibited CSC-like aggressive cellular behavior and marker expression. Last, we unveiled the underlying mechanism of NO action through the activation of caveolin-1 (Cav-1), which is upregulated by NO and is responsible for the aggressive behavior of the cells, including anoikis resistance, anchorage-independent cell growth, and increased cell migration and invasion. These findings indicate a novel role of NO in CSC regulation and its importance in aggressive cancer behaviors through Cav-1 upregulation. PMID:25411331

  3. Modulation of mTOR Signalling Triggers the Formation of Stem Cell-like Memory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Godehard; Jandus, Camilla; Zhang, Lianjun; Grandclément, Camille; Lopez-Mejia, Isabel C; Soneson, Charlotte; Delorenzi, Mauro; Fajas, Lluis; Held, Werner; Dormond, Olivier; Romero, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    Robust, long-lasting immune responses are elicited by memory T cells that possess properties of stem cells, enabling them to persist long-term and to permanently replenish the effector pools. Thus, stem cell-like memory T (TSCM) cells are of key therapeutic value and efforts are underway to characterize TSCM cells and to identify means for their targeted induction. Here, we show that inhibition of mechanistic/mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) by rapamycin or the Wnt-β-catenin signalling activator TWS119 in activated human naive T cells leads to the induction of TSCM cells. We show that these compounds switch T cell metabolism to fatty acid oxidation as favoured metabolic programme for TSCM cell generation. Of note, pharmacologically induced TSCM cells possess superior functional features as a long-term repopulation capacity after adoptive transfer. Furthermore, we provide insights into the transcriptome of TSCM cells. Our data identify a mechanism of pharmacological mTORC1 inhibitors, allowing us to confer stemness to human naive T cells which may be significantly relevant for the design of innovative T cell-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26981571

  4. Microgel microenvironment primes adipose-derived stem cells towards an NP cells-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Gianluca; Thomas, Dilip; Collin, Estelle; Pandit, Abhay

    2014-12-01

    Cell therapy of the degenerated intervertebral disc is limited by the lack of appropriate cell sources, thus new strategies for the differentiation of stem cells towards a nucleus pulposus (NP)-like phenotype need investigation. In the current study, it is hypothesized that spherical niche-like structures composed of type II collagen and hyaluronan (HA) mimic the NP microenvironment and promote the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) towards an NP-like phenotype. ADSCs are embedded in microgels of different concentrations of collagen II/HA. Cells' response to the different environments is studied by characterizing differences in cells' viability, morphology, and gene expression. After 21 days of culture, ADSCs maintain ± 80% viability in all the conditions tested. Moreover, microgels with higher concentration of collagen are stable and maintain cells in a rounder shape. In presence of differentiation media, cells are able to differentiate in all the conditions tested, but in a more pronounced manner in the microgel with a higher concentration of collagen. By tuning microgels' properties, it is possible to influence ADSCs' phenotype and ability to differentiate. Indeed, when cultured in high concentrations of collagen, ADSCs expresses high levels of collagen II, aggrecan, SOX9, and low levels of collagen I. PMID:25100329

  5. Involvement of UTR-dependent gene expression in the maintenance of cancer stem cell like phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    YASUDA, MOTOAKI; HATANAKA, TOMOYUKI; SHIRATO, HIROKI; NISHIOKA, TAKESHI

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrated the acquisition of additional malignant characteristics in irradiated mouse fibrosarcoma cells compared with the parent cells. Several reporter assays indicated that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, activator protein-1 and Ets-dependent transcription were activated in irradiated cells. The cis-elements in the 5′-untranslated region (UTR) of these transcription factors plays a major role in their expression in surviving irradiated cancer cells. By contrast, there were no evident differences between the 3′-UTR-dependent repression demonstrated by parent cells and irradiated cells. A small population of parental fibrosarcoma cells was also found to exhibit the same enhanced 5′-UTR-dependent HIF-1α expression as that demonstrated by irradiated cells. These observations may indicate that high-dose X-ray irradiation affects the majority of proliferating cancer cells, but not the cancer stem cells (CSCs), and an increased CSC population may explain the progressive phenotypes of the irradiated cells. It appears likely that the transcription factors that maintain stemness are regulated by the same 5′-UTR-dependent mechanism. PMID:26722307

  6. Metastable primordial germ cell-like state induced from mouse embryonic stem cells by Akt activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamano, Noriko; Kimura, Tohru; Watanabe-Kushima, Shoko; Shinohara, Takashi; Nakano, Toru

    2010-02-12

    Specification to primordial germ cells (PGCs) is mediated by mesoderm-induction signals during gastrulation. We found that Akt activation during in vitro mesodermal differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generated self-renewing spheres with differentiation states between those of ESCs and PGCs. Essential regulators for PGC specification and their downstream germ cell-specific genes were expressed in the spheres, indicating that the sphere cells had commenced differentiation to the germ lineage. However, the spheres did not proceed to spermatogenesis after transplantation into testes. Sphere cell transfer to the original feeder-free ESC cultures resulted in chaotic differentiation. In contrast, when the spheres were cultured on mouse embryonic fibroblasts or in the presence of ERK-cascade and GSK3 inhibitors, reversion to the ESC-like state was observed. These results indicate that Akt signaling promotes a novel metastable and pluripotent state that is intermediate to those of ESCs and PGCs.

  7. Induction of neural stem cell-like cells (NSCLCs) from mouse astrocytes by Bmi1

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Jai-Hee; Yoon, Byung Sun; Kim, Bona; Park, Gyuman; Jung, Hye-Youn; Maeng, Isaac; Jun, Eun Kyoung; Yoo, Seung Jun; Kim, Aeree; Oh, Sejong; Whang, Kwang Youn; Kim, Hyunggee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Ki Dong; You, Seungkwon

    2008-06-27

    Recently, Bmi1 was shown to control the proliferation and self-renewal of neural stem cells (NSCs). In this study, we demonstrated the induction of NSC-like cells (NSCLCs) from mouse astrocytes by Bmi1 under NSC culture conditions. These NSCLCs exhibited the morphology and growth properties of NSCs, and expressed NSC marker genes, including nestin, CD133, and Sox2. In vitro differentiation of NSCLCs resulted in differentiated cell populations containing astrocytes, neurons, and oligodendrocytes. Following treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A and valproic acid), the potential of NSCLCs for proliferation, dedifferentiation, and self-renewal was significantly inhibited. Our data indicate that multipotent NSCLCs can be generated directly from astrocytes by the addition of Bmi1.

  8. Serial transplantation reveals the stem-cell-like regenerative potential of adult mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Overturf, K.; al-Dhalimy, M.; Ou, C. N.; Finegold, M.; Grompe, M.

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has shown that adult mouse hepatocytes can divide at least 18 times in vivo. To test whether this represents the upper limit of their regenerative capacity, we performed serial transplantation of hepatocytes in the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficiency murine model of liver repopulation. Hepatocytes from adult donors were serially transplanted in limiting numbers six times and resulted in complete repopulation during each cycle. This corresponds to a minimal number of 69 cell doublings or a 7.3 x 10(20)-fold expansion. No evidence for abnormal liver function or altered hepatic architecture was found in repopulated animals. We conclude that a fraction of adult mouse hepatocytes have growth potential similar to that of hematopoietic stem cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9358753

  9. Ovarian-cell-like cells from skin stem cells restored estradiol production and estrus cycling in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Bong-Wook; Pan, Bo; Toms, Derek; Huynh, Evanna; Byun, June-Ho; Lee, Yeon-Mi; Shen, Wei; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Li, Julang

    2014-07-15

    Reduction of estradiol production and high serum concentrations of follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) are endocrine disorders associated with premature ovarian failure. Here, we report that transplantation of ovarian-like cells differentiated from stem cells restored endogenous serum estradiol levels. Stem cells were isolated from postnatal mouse skin and differentiated into ovarian-cell-like cells that are consistent with female germ, and ovarian follicle somatic cells. The ovarian-cell-like cells were transplanted into ovariectomized mice (Cell Trans), whereas control mice were subjected to bilateral ovariectomies without cell transplantation (OVX). Using vaginal cytology analysis, it was revealed that in 13 out of 19 Cell Trans mice, estrus cycles were restored around 8 weeks after cell transplantation and were maintained until 16 weeks post-transplantation, whereas in the OVX group, all mice were arrested at metestrus/diestrus of the estrus cycle. The uterine weight in the Cell Trans group was similar to sham operation mice (Sham OP), while severe uterine atrophy and a decreased uterine weight were observed in the OVX group. Histologically, ectopic follicle-like structures and blood vessels were found within and around the transplants. At 12-14 weeks after cell transplantation, mean serum estradiol level in Cell Trans mice (178.0±35 pg/mL) was comparable to that of the Sham OP group (188.9±29 pg/mL), whereas it was lower in the OVX group (59.0±4 pg/mL). Serum FSH concentration increased in the OVX group (1.62±0.32 ng/mL) compared with the Sham OP group (0.39±0.34 ng/mL). Cell Trans mice had a similar FSH level (0.94±0.23 ng/mL; P<0.05) to Sham OP mice. Our results suggest that ovarian somatic cells differentiated from stem cells are functional in vivo. In addition to providing insights into the function of ovarian somatic cells derived from stem cells, our study may offer potential therapeutic means for patients with hypo-estradiol levels

  10. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Felthaus, O.; Ettl, T.; Gosau, M.; Driemel, O.; Brockhoff, G.; Reck, A.; Zeitler, K.; Hautmann, M.; Reichert, T.E.; Schmalz, G.; Morsczeck, C.

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). {yields} Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. {yields} Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. {yields} In situ CD133{sup +} cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. {yields} CD133{sup +} and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133{sup +} cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  11. Cancer stem cell-like phenotype and survival are coordinately regulated by Akt/FoxO/Bim pathway.

    PubMed

    Gargini, Ricardo; Cerliani, Juan P; Escoll, Maribel; Antón, Inés M; Wandosell, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    Many solid tumors contain a subpopulation of cells with stem characteristics and these are known as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells (TICs). These cells drive tumor growth and appear to be regulated by molecular pathway different from other cells in the tumor bulk. Here, we set out to determine whether elements of the PI3K-AKT pathway are necessary to maintain the CSC-like phenotype in breast tumor cells and for these cells to survive, bearing in mind that the identification of such elements is likely to be relevant to define future therapeutic targets. Our results demonstrate a close relationship between the maintenance of the CSC-like phenotype and the survival of these TICs. Inhibiting PI3K activity, or eliminating AKT activity, mostly that of the AKT1 isoform, produces a clear drop in TICs survival, and a reduction in the generation and growth of CD44(High) /CD24(Low) mammospheres. Surprisingly, the apoptosis of these TICs that is triggered by AKT1 deficiency is also associated with a loss of the stem cell/mesenchymal phenotype and a recovery of epithelial-like markers. Finally, we define downstream effectors that are responsible for controlling the CSC-phenotype, such as FoxO-Bim, and the death of these cells in the absence of AKT1. In summary, these data closely link the maintenance of the stem cell-like phenotype and the survival of these cells to the AKT-FoxO-Bim pathway. PMID:25407338

  12. Monocytes and macrophages, implications for breast cancer migration and stem cell-like activity and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ward, Rebecca; Sims, Andrew H; Lee, Alexander; Lo, Christina; Wynne, Luke; Yusuf, Humza; Gregson, Hannah; Lisanti, Michael P; Sotgia, Federica; Landberg, Göran; Lamb, Rebecca

    2015-06-10

    Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumour stroma and contribute to breast cancer prognosis. The precise role and treatment strategies to target macrophages remain elusive. As macrophage infiltration is associated with poor prognosis and high grade tumours we used the THP-1 cell line to model monocyte-macrophage differentiation in co-culture with four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) to model in vivo cellular interactions. Polarisation into M1 and M2 subtypes was confirmed by specific cell marker expression of ROS and HLA-DR, respectively. Co-culture with all types of macrophage increased migration of ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, while M2-macrophages increased mammosphere formation, compared to M1-macrophages, in all breast cancer cells lines. Treatment of cells with Zoledronate in co-culture reduced the "pro-tumourigenic" effects (increased mammospheres/migration) exerted by macrophages. Direct treatment of breast cancer cells in homotypic culture was unable to reduce migration or mammosphere formation.Macrophages promote "pro-tumourigenic" cellular characteristics of breast cancer cell migration and stem cell activity. Zoledronate targets macrophages within the microenvironment which in turn, reduces the "pro-tumourigenic" characteristics of breast cancer cells. Zoledronate offers an exciting new treatment strategy for both primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26008983

  13. Cells Isolated from Human Periapical Cysts Express Mesenchymal Stem Cell-like Properties

    PubMed Central

    Marrelli, Massimo; Paduano, Francesco; Tatullo, Marco

    2013-01-01

    We provide a detailed description of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from human periapical cysts, which we have termed hPCy-MSCs. These cells have a fibroblast-like shape and adhere to tissue culture plastic surfaces. hPCy-MSCs possess high proliferative potential and self-renewal capacity properties. We characterised the immunophenotype of hPCy-MSCs (CD73+, CD90+, CD105+, CD13+, CD29+, CD44+, CD45-, STRO-1+, CD146+) by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence. hPCy-MSCs possess the potential to differentiate into osteoblast- and adipocyte-like cells in vitro. Multi-potentiality was evaluated with culture-specific staining and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis for osteo/odontogenic and adipogenic markers. This is the first report to indicate that human periapical cysts contain cells with MSC-like properties. Taken together, our findings indicate that human periapical cysts could be a rich source of MSCs. PMID:24250252

  14. Leukemia Stem Cells and Microenvironment: Biology and Therapeutic Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Konopleva, Marina Y.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2011-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia is propagated by a subpopulation of leukemia stem cells (LSCs). In this article, we review both the intrinsic and extrinsic components that are known to influence the survival of human LSCs. The intrinsic factors encompass regulators of cell cycle and prosurvival pathways (such as nuclear factor kappa B [NF-κB], AKT), pathways regulating oxidative stress, and specific molecular components promoting self-renewal. The extrinsic components are generated by the bone marrow microenvironment and include chemokine receptors (CXCR4), adhesion molecules (VLA-4 and CD44), and hypoxia-related proteins. New strategies that exploit potentially unique properties of the LSCs and their microenvironment are discussed. PMID:21220598

  15. A cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus shows enhanced suppression of stem-cell like colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, So Young; Bang, Seo Young; Jeong, Su-Nam; Kang, Dae Hwan; Heo, Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-like colon cancer cells (SCCs) pose a major challenge in colon cancer treatment because of their resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Oncolytic virus-based therapy has shown promising results in uncured cancer patients; however, its effects on SCCs are not well studied yet. Here, we engineered a cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus (CVV) as a potent biotherapeutic and investigated its therapeutic efficacy in terms of killing SCCs. CVV is an evolved Wyeth strain vaccinia virus (EVV) lacking the viral thymidine kinase. SCC models were established using human or mouse colon cancer spheres, which continuously expressed stemness markers. The cancer-favoring characteristics and different cytotoxic pathways for killing cancer cells successfully overrode general drug resistance, thereby killing colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of SCCs. Subcutaneously injected HT29 spheres showed lower growth in CVV-treated models than in 5-Fu-treated models. Intraperitoneally injected CT26 spheres induced tumor masses in the abdominal region. CVV-treated groups showed higher survival rates and smaller tumor mass formation, compared to 5-Fu-treated groups. Interestingly, the combined treatment of CVV with 5-Fu showed improved survival rates and complete suppression of tumor mass. The CVV developed in this study, thus, effectively suppresses SCCs, which can be synergistically enhanced by simultaneous treatment with the anticancer drug 5-Fu. Our novel CVV is highly advantageous as a next-generation therapeutic for treating colon cancer. PMID:26918725

  16. A cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus shows enhanced suppression of stem-cell like colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, So Young; Bang, Seo Young; Jeong, Su-Nam; Kang, Dae Hwan; Heo, Jeong

    2016-03-29

    Stem cell-like colon cancer cells (SCCs) pose a major challenge in colon cancer treatment because of their resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Oncolytic virus-based therapy has shown promising results in uncured cancer patients; however, its effects on SCCs are not well studied yet. Here, we engineered a cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus (CVV) as a potent biotherapeutic and investigated its therapeutic efficacy in terms of killing SCCs. CVV is an evolved Wyeth strain vaccinia virus (EVV) lacking the viral thymidine kinase. SCC models were established using human or mouse colon cancer spheres, which continuously expressed stemness markers. The cancer-favoring characteristics and different cytotoxic pathways for killing cancer cells successfully overrode general drug resistance, thereby killing colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of SCCs. Subcutaneously injected HT29 spheres showed lower growth in CVV-treated models than in 5-Fu-treated models. Intraperitoneally injected CT26 spheres induced tumor masses in the abdominal region. CVV-treated groups showed higher survival rates and smaller tumor mass formation, compared to 5-Fu-treated groups. Interestingly, the combined treatment of CVV with 5-Fu showed improved survival rates and complete suppression of tumor mass. The CVV developed in this study, thus, effectively suppresses SCCs, which can be synergistically enhanced by simultaneous treatment with the anticancer drug 5-Fu. Our novel CVV is highly advantageous as a next-generation therapeutic for treating colon cancer. PMID:26918725

  17. Induction of CXCR2 ligands, stem cell-like phenotype, and metastasis in chemotherapy-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhawna; Varney, Michelle L; Saxena, Sugandha; Wu, Lingyun; Singh, Rakesh K

    2016-03-28

    CXCR2 and its ligands have been shown to play an important role in tumor angiogenesis, therapy resistance and progression. In this study, we investigated whether CXCR2 ligands are responsible for the survival advantage and metastasis of drug-resistant cells and examined the underlying mechanism(s) doxorubicin or paclitaxel resistant mammary tumor cells. Our results demonstrated that drug-resistant Cl66 cells upregulated CXCR2 ligands but downregulated expression of CXCR2. We observed delayed tumor growth but increased metastasis in mice using these drug-resistant cells. Furthermore, we observed differential upregulation of stem cell and mesenchymal markers in the doxorubicin and paclitaxel-resistant tumor cells. Abrogation of the CXCR2 signaling axis using CXCR2 ligand neutralization resulted in significant inhibition of drug-resistant cell growth. Together, our data suggest chemotherapy-specific differential regulation of CXCR2 ligands, stem cell-like and mesenchymal phenotypes, and enhanced metastasis in drug-resistant cells and targeting CXCR2 signaling, may help circumvent therapy resistance in breast cancer. PMID:26797460

  18. Acquisition of cancer stem cell-like properties in non-small cell lung cancer with acquired resistance to afatinib

    PubMed Central

    Hashida, Shinsuke; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Shien, Kazuhiko; Miyoshi, Yuichiro; Ohtsuka, Tomoaki; Suzawa, Ken; Watanabe, Mototsugu; Maki, Yuho; Soh, Junichi; Asano, Hiroaki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Toyooka, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Afatinib is an irreversible epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that is known to be effective against the EGFR T790M variant, which accounts for half of the mechanisms of acquired resistance to reversible EGFR-TKIs. However, acquired resistance to afatinib was also observed in clinical use. Thus, elucidating and overcoming the mechanisms of resistance are important issues in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. In this study, we established various afatinib-resistant cell lines and investigated the resistance mechanisms. EGFR T790M mutations were not detected using direct sequencing in established resistant cells. Several afatinib-resistant cell lines displayed MET amplification, and these cells were sensitive to the combination of afatinib plus crizotinib. As a further investigation, a cell line that acquired resistance to afatinib plus crizotinib, HCC827-ACR, was established from one of the MET amplified-cell lines. Several afatinib-resistant cell lines including HCC827-ACR displayed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) features and epigenetic silencing of miR-200c, which is a suppresser of EMT. In addition, these cell lines also exhibited overexpression of ALDH1A1 and ABCB1, which are putative stem cell markers, and resistance to docetaxel. In conclusion, we established afatinib-resistant cells and found that MET amplification, EMT, and stem cell-like features are observed in cells with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs. This finding may provide clues to overcoming resistance to EGFR-TKIs. PMID:26202045

  19. Acquisition of cancer stem cell-like properties in non-small cell lung cancer with acquired resistance to afatinib.

    PubMed

    Hashida, Shinsuke; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Shien, Kazuhiko; Miyoshi, Yuichiro; Ohtsuka, Tomoaki; Suzawa, Ken; Watanabe, Mototsugu; Maki, Yuho; Soh, Junichi; Asano, Hiroaki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Toyooka, Shinichi

    2015-10-01

    Afatinib is an irreversible epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that is known to be effective against the EGFR T790M variant, which accounts for half of the mechanisms of acquired resistance to reversible EGFR-TKIs. However, acquired resistance to afatinib was also observed in clinical use. Thus, elucidating and overcoming the mechanisms of resistance are important issues in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. In this study, we established various afatinib-resistant cell lines and investigated the resistance mechanisms. EGFR T790M mutations were not detected using direct sequencing in established resistant cells. Several afatinib-resistant cell lines displayed MET amplification, and these cells were sensitive to the combination of afatinib plus crizotinib. As a further investigation, a cell line that acquired resistance to afatinib plus crizotinib, HCC827-ACR, was established from one of the MET amplified-cell lines. Several afatinib-resistant cell lines including HCC827-ACR displayed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) features and epigenetic silencing of miR-200c, which is a suppresser of EMT. In addition, these cell lines also exhibited overexpression of ALDH1A1 and ABCB1, which are putative stem cell markers, and resistance to docetaxel. In conclusion, we established afatinib-resistant cells and found that MET amplification, EMT, and stem cell-like features are observed in cells with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs. This finding may provide clues to overcoming resistance to EGFR-TKIs. PMID:26202045

  20. Stem Cells Antigen-1 Enriches for a Cancer Stem Cell-Like Subpopulation in Mouse Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Won; Park, Jung Min; Park, Dong Min; Kim, Dae-Yong; Kim, Hark Kyun

    2016-05-01

    There is a strong need to identify markers to enrich gastric cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, CSC enrichment markers for mouse gastric cancers have not yet been determined. In our previous study, we generated primary mouse gastric cancer cell line NCC-S1 (S1) established from a Villin-cre;Smad4(F/F) ;Trp53(F/F) ;Cdh1(F/wt) mouse and its metastatic variant cell line NCC-S1M (S1M). Interestingly, S1M cells exhibited CSC-like features, such as increased tumorigenic potential and chemoresistance. By comparing gene expression profiles between S1 and S1M cells, we identified Stem Cells Antigen-1 (Sca-1) as a cell surface marker, which was mostly upregulated in S1M. Sca-1 was upregulated in tumorspheres from S1 cells or after cisplatin treatment in S1 cells. Immunofluorescence (IF) analysis showed that approximately 7% of cancer cells exhibited positivity for Sca-1 in primary mouse gastric cancer tissues. An in vivo-limiting dilution assay showed that Sca-1(high) mouse gastric cancer cells demonstrated increased tumorigenicity compared with Sca-1(negative) cells. The Sca-1 expression was downregulated by TGF-β pathway activation and Wnt pathway inhibition in mouse gastric cancer cells. Sca-1(high) cells showed relatively low TGF-β reporter activity and high TCF/LEF1 reporter activity compared with Sca-1(negative) cells. A chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that Sca-1 was a β-catenin/LEF1 target gene. Sca-1(high) allografts were more resistant to cisplatin/fluorouracil chemotherapy than Sca-1(negative) allografts, and overexpressed Bcl-xL. Eighty-five mouse genes overexpressed in Sca-1(high) S1 cells compared with Sca-1(negative) cells clustered 123 pretreatment gastric cancer patient samples according to survival following chemotherapy. Taken together, Sca-1 is a novel CSC enrichment marker that mediates TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mouse gastric cancer. Stem Cells 2016;34:1177-1187. PMID:26869189

  1. TLR4-dependent tumor-initiating stem cell-like cells (TICs) in alcohol-associated hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Machida, Keigo; Feldman, Douglas E; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse predisposes individuals to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and synergistically heightens the HCC risk in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The mechanisms of this synergism have been elusive until our recent demonstration of the obligatory role of ectopically expressed TLR4 in liver tumorigenesis in alcohol-fed HCV Ns5a or Core transgenic mice. CD133+/CD49f+ tumor-initiating stem cell-like cells (TICs) isolated from these models are tumorigenic in a manner dependent on TLR4 and NANOG. TICs' tumor-initiating activity and chemoresistance are causally associated with inhibition of TGF-β tumor suppressor pathway due to NANOG-mediated expression of IGF2BP3 and YAP1. TLR4/NANOG activation causes p53 degradation via phosphorylation of the protective protein NUMB and its dissociation from p53 by the oncoprotein TBC1D15. Nutrient deprivation reduces overexpressed TBC1D15 in TICs via autophagy-mediated degradation, suggesting a possible role of this oncoprotein in linking metabolic reprogramming and self-renewal. PMID:25427905

  2. Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia stem cells in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs), which constitute a minority of the tumor bulk, are functionally defined on the basis of their ability to transfer leukemia into an immunodeficient recipient animal. The presence of LSCs has been demonstrated in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), of which ALL with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+). The use of imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), as part of front-line treatment and in combination with cytotoxic agents, has greatly improved the proportions of complete response and molecular remission and the overall outcome in adults with newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL. New challenges have emerged with respect to induction of resistance to imatinib via Abelson tyrosine kinase mutations. An important recent addition to the arsenal against Ph+ leukemias in general was the development of novel TKIs, such as nilotinib and dasatinib. However, in vitro experiments have suggested that TKIs have an antiproliferative but not an antiapoptotic or cytotoxic effect on the most primitive ALL stem cells. None of the TKIs in clinical use target the LSC. Second generation TKI dasatinib has been shown to have a more profound effect on the stem cell compartment but the drug was still unable to kill the most primitive LSCs. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) remains the only curative treatment available for these patients. Several mechanisms were proposed to explain the resistance of LSCs to TKIs in addition to mutations. Hence, TKIs may be used as a bridge to SCT rather than monotherapy or combination with standard chemotherapy. Better understanding the biology of Ph+ ALL will open new avenues for effective management. In this review, we highlight recent findings relating to the question of LSCs in Ph+ ALL. PMID:22993661

  3. Preferential eradication of acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells by fenretinide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Mi, Jian-Qing; Fang, Hai; Wang, Zhao; Wang, Chun; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Bin; Minden, Mark; Yang, Wen-Tao; Wang, Huan-Wei; Li, Jun-Min; Xi, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Sai-Juan; Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zhu; Wang, Kan-Kan

    2013-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) play important roles in leukemia initiation, progression, and relapse, and thus represent a critical target for therapeutic intervention. However, relatively few agents have been shown to target LSCs, slowing progress in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on in vitro and in vivo evidence, we report here that fenretinide, a well-tolerated vitamin A derivative, is capable of eradicating LSCs but not normal hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells at physiologically achievable concentrations. Fenretinide exerted a selective cytotoxic effect on primary AML CD34+ cells, especially the LSC-enriched CD34+CD38− subpopulation, whereas no significant effect was observed on normal counterparts. Methylcellulose colony formation assays further showed that fenretinide significantly suppressed the formation of colonies derived from AML CD34+ cells but not those from normal CD34+ cells. Moreover, fenretinide significantly reduced the in vivo engraftment of AML stem cells but not normal hematopoietic stem cells in a nonobese diabetic/SCID mouse xenotransplantation model. Mechanistic studies revealed that fenretinide-induced cell death was linked to a series of characteristic events, including the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species, induction of genes associated with stress responses and apoptosis, and repression of genes involved in NF-κB and Wnt signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis revealed that the fenretinide–down-regulated genes were significantly correlated with the existing poor-prognosis signatures in AML patients. Based on these findings, we propose that fenretinide is a potent agent that selectively targets LSCs, and may be of value in the treatment of AML. PMID:23513221

  4. Stem cell-like ALDHbright cellular states in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Joven, Jorge; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Micol, Vicente; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-01-01

    . This report is the first to show that: (1) loss of responsiveness to erlotinib in EGFR-mutant NSCLC can be explained in terms of erlotinib-refractory ALDHbright cells, which have been shown to exhibit stem cell-like properties; and (2) erlotinib-refractory ALDHbright cells are sensitive to the natural agent silibinin. Our findings highlight the benefit of administration of silibinin in combination with EGFR TKIs to target CSCs and minimize the ability of tumor cells to escape cell death in EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients. PMID:24047698

  5. Identification and targeting leukemia stem cells: The path to the cure for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2014-09-26

    Accumulating evidence support the notion that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is organized in a hierarchical system, originating from a special proportion of leukemia stem cells (LSC). Similar to their normal counterpart, hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), LSC possess self-renewal capacity and are responsible for the continued growth and proliferation of the bulk of leukemia cells in the blood and bone marrow. It is believed that LSC are also the root cause for the treatment failure and relapse of AML because LSC are often resistant to chemotherapy. In the past decade, we have made significant advancement in identification and understanding the molecular biology of LSC, but it remains a daunting task to specifically targeting LSC, while sparing normal HSC. In this review, we will first provide a historical overview of the discovery of LSC, followed by a summary of identification and separation of LSC by either cell surface markers or functional assays. Next, the review will focus on the current, various strategies for eradicating LSC. Finally, we will highlight future directions and challenges ahead of our ultimate goal for the cure of AML by targeting LSC. PMID:25258669

  6. FGFR1 promotes the stem cell-like phenotype of FGFR1-amplified non-small cell lung cancer cells through the Hedgehog pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wenxiang; Yu, Yongfeng; Li, Ziming; Wang, Guan; Li, Fan; Xia, Weiliang; Lu, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cell-like phenotype is critical for tumor formation and treatment resistance. FGFR1 is found to be amplified in non-small cell lung cancer, particularly in the lung squamous cell cancer (LSCC). Whether FGFR1 contributes to the maintenance of stem cell-like phenotype of FGFR1-amplified lung cancer cells remains elusive. In this study, treatment with FGFR1 inhibitor AZD4547 suppressed the growth of tumor spheres and reduced ALDH positive proportion in FGFR1-amplified lung cancer cells in vitro, as well as inhibited the growth of oncospheres and parental cells in xenograft models. Knockdown of FGFR1 recaptured the similar effect as AZD4547 in vitro. Furthermore, activation of FGFR1 and subsequently its downstream ERK signaling enhanced the expression and transcriptional activity of GLI2, which could be blocked by FGFR1 inhibitor/silencing or ERK inhibitor. Knockdown of GLI2 directly inhibited the stem-like phenotype of FGFR1-amilified cells, whereas overexpression of GLI2 sufficiently rescued the phenotype caused by FGFR1 knockdown. Notably we also identified a correlation between FGFR1 and GLI2 expressions from clinical data, as well as an inverse relationship with progression free survival (PFS). Together our study suggests that the FGFR1/GLI2 axis promotes the lung cancer stem cell-like phenotype. These results support a rational strategy of combination of FGFR1 and GLI inhibitors for treatment of FGFR1-amplified lung cancers, especially LSCC. PMID:26936993

  7. Heterogeneity of leukemia-initiating capacity of chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Li, Ling; Ho, Yinwei; Li, Min; Marcucci, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from transformation of a long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LTHSC) by expression of the BCR-ABL fusion gene. However, BCR-ABL–expressing LTHSCs are heterogeneous in their capacity as leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Although discrepancies in proliferative, self-renewal, and differentiation properties of normal LTHSCs are being increasingly recognized, the mechanisms underlying heterogeneity of leukemic LTHSCs are poorly understood. Using a CML mouse model, we identified gene expression differences between leukemic and nonleukemic LTHSCs. Expression of the thrombopoietin (THPO) receptor MPL was elevated in leukemic LTHSC populations. Compared with LTHSCs with low MPL expression, LTHSCs with high MPL expression showed enhanced JAK/STAT signaling and proliferation in response to THPO in vitro and increased leukemogenic capacity in vivo. Although both G0 and S phase subpopulations were increased in LTHSCs with high MPL expression, LSC capacity was restricted to quiescent cells. Inhibition of MPL expression in CML LTHSCs reduced THPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling and leukemogenic potential. These same phenotypes were also present in LTHSCs from patients with CML, and patient LTHSCs with high MPL expression had reduced sensitivity to BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment but increased sensitivity to JAK inhibitors. Together, our studies identify MPL expression levels as a key determinant of heterogeneous leukemia-initiating capacity and drug sensitivity of CML LTHSCs and suggest that high MPL–expressing CML stem cells are potential targets for therapy. PMID:26878174

  8. Heterogeneity of leukemia-initiating capacity of chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Li, Ling; Ho, Yinwei; Li, Min; Marcucci, Guido; Tong, Wei; Bhatia, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from transformation of a long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LTHSC) by expression of the BCR-ABL fusion gene. However, BCR-ABL-expressing LTHSCs are heterogeneous in their capacity as leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Although discrepancies in proliferative, self-renewal, and differentiation properties of normal LTHSCs are being increasingly recognized, the mechanisms underlying heterogeneity of leukemic LTHSCs are poorly understood. Using a CML mouse model, we identified gene expression differences between leukemic and nonleukemic LTHSCs. Expression of the thrombopoietin (THPO) receptor MPL was elevated in leukemic LTHSC populations. Compared with LTHSCs with low MPL expression, LTHSCs with high MPL expression showed enhanced JAK/STAT signaling and proliferation in response to THPO in vitro and increased leukemogenic capacity in vivo. Although both G0 and S phase subpopulations were increased in LTHSCs with high MPL expression, LSC capacity was restricted to quiescent cells. Inhibition of MPL expression in CML LTHSCs reduced THPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling and leukemogenic potential. These same phenotypes were also present in LTHSCs from patients with CML, and patient LTHSCs with high MPL expression had reduced sensitivity to BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment but increased sensitivity to JAK inhibitors. Together, our studies identify MPL expression levels as a key determinant of heterogeneous leukemia-initiating capacity and drug sensitivity of CML LTHSCs and suggest that high MPL-expressing CML stem cells are potential targets for therapy. PMID:26878174

  9. CD90 and CD110 correlate with cancer stem cell potentials in human T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Hiroto; Nishida, Hiroko; Iwata, Satoshi; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao

    2009-05-29

    Although cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been recently identified in myeloid leukemia, published data on lymphoid malignancy have been sparse. T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is characterized by the abnormal proliferation of T-cell precursors and is generally aggressive. As CD34 is the only positive-selection marker for CSCs in T-ALL, we performed extensive analysis of CD markers in T-ALL cell lines. We found that some of the tested lines consisted of heterogeneous populations of cells with various levels of surface marker expression. In particular, a small subpopulation of CD90 (Thy-1) and CD110 (c-Mpl) were shown to correlate with stem cell properties both in vitro and in transplantation experiments. As these markers are expressed on hematopoietic stem cells, our results suggest that stem cell-like population are enriched in CD90+/CD110+ fraction and they are useful positive-selection markers for the isolation of CSCs in some cases of T-ALL.

  10. [Biomarker for Hematopoietic Tumors--Aiming for Personalized Diagnosis of Leukemia Stem Cells].

    PubMed

    Tohda, Shuji

    2015-09-01

    Biomarkers are defined as characteristics that are objectively measured and evaluated as indicators of normal biological processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers obtained by PCR or flow cytometry are used for the diagnosis and subtyping of hematopoietic tumor cases. They are also used to predict the effectiveness of molecular-targeted therapies and detect minimal residual leukemia cells. In order to cure leukemia, it is necessary to eradicate leukemia stem cells. For that purpose, biomarkers to identify and characterize the leukemia stem cells in each case are needed. Therefore, we examined molecules involved in various stemness-related signaling pathways, especially NOTCH signaling in acute leukemia cells. In T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells, which often have activating NOTCH1 mutations, NOTCH works in oncogenic signaling. Although acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells express NOTCH and NOTCH ligands, it is still controversial whether NOTCH is oncogenic or tumor-suppressive. To utilize the expression and activation of NOTCH as a leukemia stem cell biomarker, further investigation is required. Other stemness-related signaling molecules such as WNT, HEDGEHOG, HIF, and mTOR are also under investigation to assess whether they can be used as stem cell biomarkers in a clinical setting. PMID:26731901

  11. The target cell of transformation is distinct from the leukemia stem cell in murine CALM/AF10 leukemia models.

    PubMed

    Dutta, S; Krause, A; Vosberg, S; Herold, T; Ksienzyk, B; Quintanilla-Martinez, L; Tizazu, B; Chopra, M; Graf, A; Krebs, S; Blum, H; Greif, P A; Vetter, A; Metzeler, K; Rothenberg-Thurley, M; Schneider, M R; Dahlhoff, M; Spiekermann, K; Zimber-Strobl, U; Wolf, E; Bohlander, S K

    2016-05-01

    The CALM/AF10 fusion gene is found in various hematological malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and malignant lymphoma. We have previously identified the leukemia stem cell (LSC) in a CALM/AF10-driven murine bone marrow transplant AML model as B220+ lymphoid cells with B-cell characteristics. To identify the target cell for leukemic transformation or 'cell of origin of leukemia' (COL) in non-disturbed steady-state hematopoiesis, we inserted the CALM/AF10 fusion gene preceded by a loxP-flanked transcriptional stop cassette into the Rosa26 locus. Vav-Cre-induced panhematopoietic expression of the CALM/AF10 fusion gene led to acute leukemia with a median latency of 12 months. Mice expressing CALM/AF10 in the B-lymphoid compartment using Mb1-Cre or CD19-Cre inducer lines did not develop leukemia. Leukemias had a predominantly myeloid phenotype but showed coexpression of the B-cell marker B220, and had clonal B-cell receptor rearrangements. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified an average of two to three additional mutations per leukemia, including activating mutations in known oncogenes such as FLT3 and PTPN11. Our results show that the COL for CALM/AF10 leukemia is a stem or early progenitor cell and not a cell of B-cell lineage with a phenotype similar to that of the LSC in CALM/AF10+ leukemia. PMID:26686248

  12. ALDH1A1 Maintains Ovarian Cancer Stem Cell-Like Properties by Altered Regulation of Cell Cycle Checkpoint and DNA Repair Network Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Erhong; Mitra, Aparna; Tripathi, Kaushlendra; Finan, Michael A.; Scalici, Jennifer; McClellan, Steve; da Silva, Luciana Madeira; Reed, Eddie; Shevde, Lalita A.; Palle, Komaraiah; Rocconi, Rodney P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) expressing cells have been characterized as possessing stem cell-like properties. We evaluated ALDH+ ovarian cancer stem cell-like properties and their role in platinum resistance. Methods Isogenic ovarian cancer cell lines for platinum sensitivity (A2780) and platinum resistant (A2780/CP70) as well as ascites from ovarian cancer patients were analyzed for ALDH+ by flow cytometry to determine its association to platinum resistance, recurrence and survival. A stable shRNA knockdown model for ALDH1A1 was utilized to determine its effect on cancer stem cell-like properties, cell cycle checkpoints, and DNA repair mediators. Results ALDH status directly correlated to platinum resistance in primary ovarian cancer samples obtained from ascites. Patients with ALDHHIGH displayed significantly lower progression free survival than the patients with ALDHLOW cells (9 vs. 3 months, respectively p<0.01). ALDH1A1-knockdown significantly attenuated clonogenic potential, PARP-1 protein levels, and reversed inherent platinum resistance. ALDH1A1-knockdown resulted in dramatic decrease of KLF4 and p21 protein levels thereby leading to S and G2 phase accumulation of cells. Increases in S and G2 cells demonstrated increased expression of replication stress associated Fanconi Anemia DNA repair proteins (FANCD2, FANCJ) and replication checkpoint (pS317 Chk1) were affected. ALDH1A1-knockdown induced DNA damage, evidenced by robust induction of γ-H2AX and BAX mediated apoptosis, with significant increases in BRCA1 expression, suggesting ALDH1A1-dependent regulation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair networks in ovarian cancer stem-like cells. Conclusion This data suggests that ovarian cancer cells expressing ALDH1A1 may maintain platinum resistance by altered regulation of cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair network signaling. PMID:25216266

  13. Human acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells are rare and heterogeneous when assayed in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγc-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Sarry, Jean-Emmanuel; Murphy, Kathleen; Perry, Robin; Sanchez, Patricia V.; Secreto, Anthony; Keefer, Cathy; Swider, Cezary R.; Strzelecki, Anne-Claire; Cavelier, Cindy; Récher, Christian; Mansat-De Mas, Véronique; Delabesse, Eric; Danet-Desnoyers, G.; Carroll, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Human leukemic stem cells, like other cancer stem cells, are hypothesized to be rare, capable of incomplete differentiation, and restricted to a phenotype associated with early hematopoietic progenitors or stem cells. However, recent work in other types of tumors has challenged the cancer stem cell model. Using a robust model of xenotransplantation based on NOD/SCID/IL2Rγc-deficient mice, we confirmed that human leukemic stem cells, functionally defined by us as SCID leukemia-initiating cells (SL-ICs), are rare in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). In contrast to previous results, SL-ICs were found among cells expressing lineage markers (i.e., among Lin+ cells), CD38, or CD45RA, all markers associated with normal committed progenitors. Remarkably, each engrafting fraction consistently recapitulated the original phenotypic diversity of the primary AML specimen and contained self-renewing leukemic stem cells, as demonstrated by secondary transplants. While SL-ICs were enriched in the Lin–CD38– fraction compared with the other fractions analyzed, SL-ICs in this fraction represented only one-third of all SL-ICs present in the unfractionated specimen. These results indicate that human AML stem cells are rare and enriched but not restricted to the phenotype associated with normal primitive hematopoietic cells. These results suggest a plasticity of the cancer stem cell phenotype that we believe has not been previously described. PMID:21157036

  14. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia What Is Leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ... diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. Leukemia Starts in Bone Marrow Click for more information ...

  15. Stem Cell Hierarchy and Clonal Evolution in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Fabian; Wojcik, Bartosch; Rieger, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by a remarkable intertumoral, intratumoral, and cellular heterogeneity that might be explained by the cancer stem cell (CSC) and/or the clonal evolution models. CSCs have the ability to generate all different cells of a tumor and to reinitiate the disease after remission. In the clonal evolution model, a consecutive accumulation of mutations starting in a single cell results in competitive growth of subclones with divergent fitness in either a linear or a branching succession. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a highly malignant cancer of the lymphoid system in the bone marrow with a dismal prognosis after relapse. However, stabile phenotypes and functional data of CSCs in ALL, the so-called leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), are highly controversial and the question remains whether there is evidence for their existence. This review discusses the concepts of CSCs and clonal evolution in respect to LICs mainly in B-ALL and sheds light onto the technical controversies in LIC isolation and evaluation. These aspects are important for the development of strategies to eradicate cells with LIC capacity. Common properties of LICs within different subclones need to be defined for future ALL diagnostics, treatment, and disease monitoring to improve the patients' outcome in ALL. PMID:26236346

  16. Targeting Leukemia Stem Cells in vivo with AntagomiR-126 Nanoparticles in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dorrance, Adrienne M.; Neviani, Paolo; Ferenchak, Greg J.; Huang, Xiaomeng; Nicolet, Deedra; Maharry, Kati S.; Ozer, Hatice G; Hoellarbauer, Pia; Khalife, Jihane; Hill, Emily B.; Yadav, Marshleen; Bolon, Brad N.; Lee, Robert J.; Lee, L.James; Croce, Carlo M.; Garzon, Ramiro; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Marcucci., Guido

    2015-01-01

    Current treatments for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are designed to target rapidly dividing blast populations with limited success in eradicating the functionally distinct leukemia stem cell (LSC) population, which is postulated to be responsible for disease resistance and relapse. We have previously reported high miR-126 expression levels to be associated with a LSC-gene expression profile. Therefore, we hypothesized that miR-126 contributes to “stemness” and is a viable target for eliminating the LSC in AML. Here we first validate the clinical relevance of miR-126 expression in AML by showing that higher expression of this microRNA (miR) is associated with worse outcome in a large cohort of older (≥60 years) cytogenetically normal AML patients treated with conventional chemotherapy. We then show that miR-126 overexpression characterizes AML LSC-enriched cell subpopulations and contributes to LSC long-term maintenance and self-renewal. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of therapeutic targeting of miR-126 in LSCs with novel targeting nanoparticles (NP) containing antagomiR-126 resulting in in vivo reduction of LSCs likely by depletion of the quiescent cell subpopulation. Our findings suggest that by targeting a single miR, i.e., miR-126, it is possible to interfere with LSC activity, thereby opening potentially novel therapeutic approaches to treat AML patients. PMID:26055302

  17. MicroRNA-34a suppresses the breast cancer stem cell-like characteristics by downregulating Notch1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Le; Mao, Jun; Tao, Yajun; Song, Bo; Ma, Wei; Lu, Ying; Zhao, Lijing; Li, Jiazhi; Yang, Baoxue; Li, Lianhong

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs play pivotal roles in cancer stem cell regulation. Previous studies have shown that microRNA-34a (miR-34a) is downregulated in human breast cancer. However, it is unknown whether and how miR-34a regulates breast cancer stem cells. Notch signaling is one of the most important pathways in stem cell maintenance and function. In this study, we verified that miR-34a directly and functionally targeted Notch1 in MCF-7 cells. We reported that miR-34a negatively regulated cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and breast cancer stem cell propagation by downregulating Notch1. The expression of miR-34a was negatively correlated with tumor stages, metastasis, and Notch1 expression in breast cancer tissues. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-34a increased chemosensitivity of breast cancer cells to paclitaxel (PTX) by downregulating the Notch1 pathway. Mammosphere formation and expression of the stemness factor ALDH1 were also reduced in the cells treated with miR-34a and PTX compared to those treated with PTX alone. Taken together, our results indicate that miR-34a inhibited breast cancer stemness and increased the chemosensitivity to PTX partially by downregulating the Notch1 pathway, suggesting that miR-34a/Notch1 play an important role in regulating breast cancer stem cells. Thus miR-34a is a potential target for prevention and therapy of breast cancer. PMID:25783790

  18. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. ID3 Contributes to the Acquisition of Molecular Stem Cell-Like Signature in Microvascular Endothelial Cells: Its implication for understanding microvascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jayanta K.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Felty, Quentin

    2015-01-01

    While significant progress has been made to advance our knowledge of microvascular lesion formation, yet the investigation of how stem-like cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of microvascular diseases is still in its infancy. We assessed whether the inhibitor of DNA binding and differentiation 3 (ID3) contributes to the acquisition of a molecular stem cell-like signature in microvascular endothelial cells. The effects of stable ID3 overexpression and SU5416 treatment — a chemical inducer of microvascular lesions, had on the stemness signature was determined by flow cytometry, immunoblot, and immunohistochemistry. Continuous ID3 expression produced a molecular stemness signature consisting of CD133+ VEGFR3+ CD34+ cells. Cells exposed to SU5416 showed positive protein expression of ID3, VEGFR3, CD34 and increased expression of pluripotent transcription factors Oct-4 and Sox-2. ID3 overexpressing cells supported the formation of a 3-D microvascular lesion co-cultured with smooth muscle cells. In addition, in vivo microvascular lesions from SuHx rodent model showed an increased expression of ID3, VEGFR3, and Pyk2 similar to SU5416 treated human endothelial cells. Further investigations into how normal and stem-like cells utilize ID3 may open up new avenues for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms which are underlying the pathological development of microvascular diseases. PMID:25665868

  20. Genome-wide RNA profiling of long-lasting stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells induced by Yellow Fever vaccination in humans.

    PubMed

    Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Soneson, Charlotte; Delorenzi, Mauro; Speiser, Daniel E

    2015-09-01

    The live-attenuated Yellow Fever (YF) vaccine YF-17D induces a broad and polyfunctional CD8 T cell response in humans. Recently, we identified a population of stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells induced by YF-17D that persists at stable frequency for at least 25 years after vaccination. The YF-17D is thus a model system of human CD8 T cell biology that furthermore allows to track and study long-lasting and antigen-specific human memory CD8 T cells. Here, we describe in detail the sample characteristics and preparation of a microarray dataset acquired for genome-wide gene expression profiling of long-lasting YF-specific stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells, compared to the reference CD8 T cell differentiation subsets from total CD8 T cells. We also describe the quality controls, annotations and exploratory analyses of the dataset. The microarray data is available from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) public repository with accession number GSE65804. PMID:26484272

  1. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Genz, Berit; Thomas, Maria; Pützer, Brigitte M; Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte; Abshagen, Kerstin

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. PMID:24995995

  2. Ovarian Reserve in Women Treated for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia or Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Chemotherapy, but Not Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Brooke V.; Missmer, Stacey; Correia, Katharine F.; Wadleigh, Martha; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. It is well known that chemotherapy regimens may have a negative effect on ovarian reserve, leading to amenorrhea or premature ovarian failure. There are little data regarding the effects of leukemia chemotherapy on ovarian reserve, specifically in women who received the chemotherapy as adults and are having regular menstrual periods. Our primary objective was to determine if premenopausal women with a history of chemotherapy for leukemia, without subsequent stem cell transplantation, have decreased ovarian reserve. Materials and Methods. We measured ovarian reserve in five women who had been treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and compared them to age-matched control women without a history of chemotherapy. Results. There appeared to be a trend towards lower antimullerian hormone and antral follicle counts and higher follicle-stimulating hormone levels in the leukemia group. Conclusion. Our results indicate that chemotherapy for AML or ALL without stem cell transplantation may compromise ovarian reserve. Although our results should be confirmed by a larger study, oncologists, infertility specialists, and patients should be aware of the potential risks to ovarian function and should be counseled on options for fertility preservation. PMID:23050166

  3. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Genz, Berit; Thomas, Maria; Pützer, Brigitte M.; Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte; Abshagen, Kerstin

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells.

  4. 6-Shogaol Inhibits Breast Cancer Cells and Stem Cell-Like Spheroids by Modulation of Notch Signaling Pathway and Induction of Autophagic Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Ray, Anasuya; Vasudevan, Smreti; Sengupta, Suparna

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) pose a serious obstacle to cancer therapy as they can be responsible for poor prognosis and tumour relapse. In this study, we have investigated inhibitory activity of the ginger-derived compound 6-shogaol against breast cancer cells both in monolayer and in cancer-stem cell-like spheroid culture. The spheroids were generated from adherent breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol was effective in killing both breast cancer monolayer cells and spheroids at doses that were not toxic to noncancerous cells. The percentages of CD44+CD24-/low cells and the secondary sphere content were reduced drastically upon treatment with 6-shogaol confirming its action on CSCs. Treatment with 6-shogaol caused cytoplasmic vacuole formation and cleavage of microtubule associated protein Light Chain3 (LC3) in both monolayer and spheroid culture indicating that it induced autophagy. Kinetic analysis of the LC3 expression and a combination treatment with chloroquine revealed that the autophagic flux instigated cell death in 6-shogaol treated breast cancer cells in contrast to the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. Furthermore, 6-shogaol-induced cell death got suppressed in the presence of chloroquine and a very low level of apoptosis was exhibited even after prolonged treatment of the compound, suggesting that autophagy is the major mode of cell death induced by 6-shogaol in breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol reduced the expression levels of Cleaved Notch1 and its target proteins Hes1 and Cyclin D1 in spheroids, and the reduction was further pronounced in the presence of a γ-secretase inhibitor. Secondary sphere formation in the presence of the inhibitor was also further reduced by 6-shogaol. Together, these results indicate that the inhibitory action of 6-shogaol on spheroid growth and sustainability is conferred through γ-secretase mediated down-regulation of Notch signaling. The efficacy of 6-shogaol in monolayer and cancer stem cell-like spheroids raise hope for its

  5. 6-Shogaol Inhibits Breast Cancer Cells and Stem Cell-Like Spheroids by Modulation of Notch Signaling Pathway and Induction of Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Anasuya; Vasudevan, Smreti; Sengupta, Suparna

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) pose a serious obstacle to cancer therapy as they can be responsible for poor prognosis and tumour relapse. In this study, we have investigated inhibitory activity of the ginger-derived compound 6-shogaol against breast cancer cells both in monolayer and in cancer-stem cell-like spheroid culture. The spheroids were generated from adherent breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol was effective in killing both breast cancer monolayer cells and spheroids at doses that were not toxic to noncancerous cells. The percentages of CD44+CD24-/low cells and the secondary sphere content were reduced drastically upon treatment with 6-shogaol confirming its action on CSCs. Treatment with 6-shogaol caused cytoplasmic vacuole formation and cleavage of microtubule associated protein Light Chain3 (LC3) in both monolayer and spheroid culture indicating that it induced autophagy. Kinetic analysis of the LC3 expression and a combination treatment with chloroquine revealed that the autophagic flux instigated cell death in 6-shogaol treated breast cancer cells in contrast to the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. Furthermore, 6-shogaol-induced cell death got suppressed in the presence of chloroquine and a very low level of apoptosis was exhibited even after prolonged treatment of the compound, suggesting that autophagy is the major mode of cell death induced by 6-shogaol in breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol reduced the expression levels of Cleaved Notch1 and its target proteins Hes1 and Cyclin D1 in spheroids, and the reduction was further pronounced in the presence of a γ-secretase inhibitor. Secondary sphere formation in the presence of the inhibitor was also further reduced by 6-shogaol. Together, these results indicate that the inhibitory action of 6-shogaol on spheroid growth and sustainability is conferred through γ-secretase mediated down-regulation of Notch signaling. The efficacy of 6-shogaol in monolayer and cancer stem cell-like spheroids raise hope for its

  6. A Stem Cell-Like Chromatin Pattern May Predispose Tumor Suppressor Genes to DNA Hypermethylation and Silencing in Adult Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ohm, Joyce E.; McGarvey, Kelly M.; Yu, Xiaobing; Cheng, Linzhao; Schuebel, Kornel E.; Cope, Leslie; Mohammad, Helai P.; Chen, Wei; Daniel, Vincent C.; Yu, Wayne; Berman, David M.; Jenuwein, Thomas; Pruitt, Kevin; Sharkis, Saul J.; Watkins, D. Neil; Herman, James G.; Baylin, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    Adult cancers may derive from stem or early progenitor cells1,2. Epigenetic modulation of gene expression is essential for normal function of these early cells, but is highly abnormal in cancers, which often exhibit aberrant promoter CpG island hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes and pro-differentiation factors3-5. We find that, for such genes, both normal and malignant embryonic cells generally lack the gene DNA hypermethylation found in adult cancers. In embryonic stem (ES) cells, these genes are held in a “transcription ready” state mediated by a “bivalent” promoter chromatin pattern consisting of the repressive polycomb group (PcG) H3K27me mark plus the active mark, H3K4me. However, embryonic carcinoma (EC) cells add two key repressive marks, H3K9me2 and H3K9me3, both associated with DNA hypermethylated genes in adult cancers6-8. We hypothesize that cell chromatin patterns and transient silencing of these important growth regulatory genes in stem or progenitor cells of origin for cancer may leave these genes vulnerable to aberrant DNA hypermethylation and heritable gene silencing in adult tumors. PMID:17211412

  7. Stem cell transplantation for indolent lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gribben, John G; Hosing, Chitra; Maloney, David G.

    2012-01-01

    The indolent lymphomas, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL) remain incurable with standard therapy. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT[JHA1]) is feasible and has low treatment related mortality in follicular lymphoma, but there are questions relating to optimal timing of the procedure, conditioning regimen and late effects. Myeloablative allogeneic HSCT is associated with high treatment related morbidity and mortality, few late relapses, but is applicable to only a small number of patients. The major focus of HSCT in these lymphomas has been with reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic HSCT, which is applicable to the age distribution of these diseases and which exploit the graft versus lymphoma effect in these diseases. Steps to further decrease the morbidity and mortality of the RIC HSCT and in particular to reduce the incidence of chronic extensive graft versus host disease while maintaining tumor control remain the major focus. Many potential treatments are available for indolent lymphomas and CLL, and appropriate patient selection and the timing of HSCT remain controversial. The use of HSCT must always be weighed against the risk of the underlying disease, particularly in a setting where improvements in treatment are leading to improved outcome. PMID:21195313

  8. COX-2 Promotes Migration and Invasion by the Side Population of Cancer Stem Cell-Like Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhe; Jiang, Jing-Hang; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Hao-Jie; Yang, Fu-Quan; Qi, Ya-Peng; Zhong, Yan-Ping; Su, Jie; Yang, Ri-Rong; Li, Le-Qun; Xiang, Bang-De

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor relapse and metastasis due to their abilities to self-renew, differentiate, and give rise to new tumors. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is highly expressed in several kinds of CSCs, and it helps promote stem cell renewal, proliferation, and radioresistance. Whether and how COX-2 contributes to CSC migration and invasion is unclear. In this study, COX-2 was overexpressed in the CSC-like side population (SP) of the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line HCCLM3. COX-2 overexpression significantly enhanced migration and invasion of SP cells, while reducing expression of metastasis-related proteins PDCD4 and PTEN. Treating SP cells with the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib down-regulated COX-2 and caused a dose-dependent reduction in cell migration and invasion, which was associated with up-regulation of PDCD4 and PTEN. These results suggest that COX-2 exerts pro-metastatic effects on SP cells, and that these effects are mediated at least partly through regulation of PDCD4 and PTEN expression. These results further suggest that celecoxib may be a promising anti-metastatic agent to reduce migration and invasion by hepatic CSCs. PMID:26554780

  9. MicroRNA‑143 targets CD44 to inhibit breast cancer progression and stem cell-like properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhuangqing; Chen, Dedian; Nie, Jianyun; Zhou, Shaoqiang; Wang, Jiankui; Tang, Qi; Yang, Xiaojuan

    2016-06-01

    CD44 is closely linked to breast cancer progression; however, the regulatory functions of microRNAs (miRs) in breast cancer have yet to be fully elucidated. In order to investigate the regulation of CD44 by miRs in breast cancer, the present study isolated CD44+ and CD44- breast cancer cells by flow cytometry, revealing that CD44+ cells were enriched in transplanted compared with those in primary breast cancers, and that their proliferation and stem-cell sphere formation ability were enhanced. A miRNA array assay indicated that miR-143 expression in CD44+ breast cancer cells was lower than that in CD44- cells. Furthermore, miR-143 was decreased in breast cancer tissues and cell lines compared with that in normal tissues and cells. Restoration of miR-143 expression in CD44+ breast cancer cells inhibited their proliferation and sphere formation. A luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-143 directly tartgeted the 3'-untranslated region of CD44. In addition, miR-143 inhibited metastasis-associated features in breast cancer and reduced tumor growth in a mouse model of breast cancer. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that miR-143 inhibited the progression and stem-cell properties of breast cancer cells by targeting CD44. PMID:27121210

  10. CD95 maintains stem cell-like and non-classical EMT programs in primary human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Drachsler, M; Kleber, S; Mateos, A; Volk, K; Mohr, N; Chen, S; Cirovic, B; Tüttenberg, J; Gieffers, C; Sykora, J; Wirtz, C R; Mueller, W; Synowitz, M; Martin-Villalba, A

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most aggressive types of cancer with limited therapeutic options and unfavorable prognosis. Stemness and non-classical epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (ncEMT) features underlie the switch from normal to neoplastic states as well as resistance of tumor clones to current therapies. Therefore, identification of ligand/receptor systems maintaining this privileged state is needed to devise efficient cancer therapies. In this study, we show that the expression of CD95 associates with stemness and EMT features in GBM tumors and cells and serves as a prognostic biomarker. CD95 expression increases in tumors and with tumor relapse as compared with non-tumor tissue. Recruitment of the activating PI3K subunit, p85, to CD95 death domain is required for maintenance of EMT-related transcripts. A combination of the current GBM therapy, temozolomide, with a CD95 inhibitor dramatically abrogates tumor sphere formation. This study molecularly dissects the role of CD95 in GBM cells and contributes the rational for CD95 inhibition as a GBM therapy. PMID:27124583

  11. Global gene expression analyses of hematopoietic stem cell-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Karin; Wirta, Valtteri; Dahl, Lina; Bruce, Sara; Lundeberg, Joakim; Carlsson, Leif; Williams, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression of the LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 in murine hematopoietic cells allows for the generation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-like cell lines. To address the molecular basis of Lhx2 function, we generated HSC-like cell lines where Lhx2 expression is regulated by a tet-on system and hence dependent on the presence of doxycyclin (dox). These cell lines efficiently down-regulate Lhx2 expression upon dox withdrawal leading to a rapid differentiation into various myeloid cell types. Results Global gene expression of these cell lines cultured in dox was compared to different time points after dox withdrawal using microarray technology. We identified 267 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the genes overlapping with HSC-specific databases were those down-regulated after turning off Lhx2 expression and a majority of the genes overlapping with those defined as late progenitor-specific genes were the up-regulated genes, suggesting that these cell lines represent a relevant model system for normal HSCs also at the level of global gene expression. Moreover, in situ hybridisations of several genes down-regulated after dox withdrawal showed overlapping expression patterns with Lhx2 in various tissues during embryonic development. Conclusion Global gene expression analysis of HSC-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression has identified genes putatively linked to self-renewal / differentiation of HSCs, and function of Lhx2 in organ development and stem / progenitor cells of non-hematopoietic origin. PMID:16600034

  12. CD95 maintains stem cell-like and non-classical EMT programs in primary human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Drachsler, M; Kleber, S; Mateos, A; Volk, K; Mohr, N; Chen, S; Cirovic, B; Tüttenberg, J; Gieffers, C; Sykora, J; Wirtz, C R; Mueller, W; Synowitz, M; Martin-Villalba, A

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most aggressive types of cancer with limited therapeutic options and unfavorable prognosis. Stemness and non-classical epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (ncEMT) features underlie the switch from normal to neoplastic states as well as resistance of tumor clones to current therapies. Therefore, identification of ligand/receptor systems maintaining this privileged state is needed to devise efficient cancer therapies. In this study, we show that the expression of CD95 associates with stemness and EMT features in GBM tumors and cells and serves as a prognostic biomarker. CD95 expression increases in tumors and with tumor relapse as compared with non-tumor tissue. Recruitment of the activating PI3K subunit, p85, to CD95 death domain is required for maintenance of EMT-related transcripts. A combination of the current GBM therapy, temozolomide, with a CD95 inhibitor dramatically abrogates tumor sphere formation. This study molecularly dissects the role of CD95 in GBM cells and contributes the rational for CD95 inhibition as a GBM therapy. PMID:27124583

  13. ESAM is a novel human hematopoietic stem cell marker associated with a subset of human leukemias.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Tomohiko; Yokota, Takafumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Ichii, Michiko; Sudo, Takao; Satoh, Yusuke; Doi, Yukiko; Ueda, Tomoaki; Tanimura, Akira; Hamanaka, Yuri; Ezoe, Sachiko; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2016-04-01

    Reliable markers are essential to increase our understanding of the biological features of human hematopoietic stem cells and to facilitate the application of hematopoietic stem cells in the field of transplantation and regenerative medicine. We previously identified endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM) as a novel functional marker of hematopoietic stem cells in mice. Here, we found that ESAM can also be used to purify human hematopoietic stem cells from all the currently available sources (adult bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, and cord blood). Multipotent colony-forming units and long-term hematopoietic-reconstituting cells in immunodeficient mice were found exclusively in the ESAM(High) fraction of CD34(+)CD38(-) cells. The CD34(+)CD38(-) fraction of cord blood and collagenase-treated bone marrow contained cells exhibiting extremely high expression of ESAM; these cells are likely to be related to the endothelial lineage. Leukemia cell lines of erythroid and megakaryocyte origin, but not those of myeloid or lymphoid descent, were ESAM positive. However, high ESAM expression was observed in some primary acute myeloid leukemia cells. Furthermore, KG-1a myeloid leukemia cells switched from ESAM negative to ESAM positive with repeated leukemia reconstitution in vivo. Thus, ESAM is a useful marker for studying both human hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia cells. PMID:26774386

  14. Development of Liposomal Formulation for Delivering Anticancer Drug to Breast Cancer Stem-Cell-Like Cells and its Pharmacokinetics in an Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ajaz; Mondal, Sujan Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Alkharfy, Khalid M

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present study is to develop a liposomal formulation for delivering anticancer drug to breast cancer stem-cell-like cells, ANV-1, and evaluate its pharmacokinetics in an animal model. The anticancer drug ESC8 was used in dexamethasone (Dex)-associated liposome (DX) to form ESC8-entrapped liposome named DXE. ANV-1 cells showed high-level expression of NRP-1. To enhance tumor regression, we additionally adapted to codeliver the NRP-1 shRNA-encoded plasmid using the established DXE liposome. In vivo efficacy of DXE-NRP-1 was carried out in mice bearing ANV-1 cells as xenograft tumors and the extent of tumor growth inhibition was evaluated by tumor-size measurement. A significant difference in tumor volume started to reveal between DXE-NRP-1 group and DXE-Control group. DXE-NRP-1 group showed ∼4 folds and ∼2.5 folds smaller tumor volume than exhibited by untreated and DXE-Control-treated groups, respectively. DXE disposition was evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats following an intraperitoneal dose (3.67 mg/kg of ESC8 in DXE). The plasma concentrations of ESC8 in the DXE formulation were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using a noncompartmental analysis. ESC8 had a half-life of 11.01 ± 0.29 h, clearance of 2.10 ± 3.63 L/kg/h, and volume of distribution of 33.42 ± 0.83 L/kg. This suggests that the DXE liposome formulation could be administered once or twice daily for therapeutic efficacy. In overall, we developed a potent liposomal formulation with favorable pharmacokinetic and tumor regressing profile that could sensitize and kill highly aggressive and drug-resistive cancer stem-cell-like cells. PMID:26832839

  15. Association between cancer stem cell-like properties and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in primary and secondary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wonbong; Kim, Hye-Eun; Kim, Young; Na, Risu; Li, Xiaojie; Jeon, Sangmi; Choi, Hongran; Kim, Okjoon

    2016-09-01

    One of the theories on cancer stem cells (CSCs) states that these cells initiate most tumors and give rise to more-or-less differentiated tumor cells. Genetic signatures of CSCs are thought to predict tumor recurrence and metastases, thus, supporting the notion that CSCs may be metastatic precursors and induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this study, we tried to examine the association between CSCs and EMT (using specific markers) in the mucoepidermoid carcinoma cell line YD15 and its derivative cell line YD15M (lymph node metastasis). Relative protein expression levels were analyzed by western blotting, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence assays. In addition, cell cycle assay and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity assay were carried out. Under growth conditions, YD15M cells formed irregular spherical colonies consistent with a stem cell phenotype. YD15M cells demonstrated the low expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin but high expression of vimentin than that in YD15 cells. In the metastatic cells (YD15M), the coexpression of vimentin and CD133 was detected. Weak proliferation based on cell cycle analysis and decreased PCNA expression was also observed. In addition, expression levels of ALDHA1, OCT4, and NANOG (CSC-like properties) were significantly increased in YD15M cells. Taken together, these findings should help to elucidate the interplay between EMT and CSC-like properties during metastasis and may provide useful information for the development of a novel classification system and therapeutic strategies against head and neck cancer. PMID:27315437

  16. Playing musical chairs with bone marrow transplantation to eliminate leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Allison L; Bhatia, Mickie

    2015-01-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on the interactions between leukemia cells and their bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. We have recently shown that leukemic stem cells (LSCs) share common BM “niches” with their healthy counterparts. As a result of these shared niche requirements, human LSCs can be mobilized using existing pharmacological agents that facilitate competitive healthy reconstitution, leading to eradication of leukemia during BM transplantation. PMID:27308468

  17. p63 Inhibits Extravillous Trophoblast Migration and Maintains Cells in a Cytotrophoblast Stem Cell-Like State

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingchun; Moretto-Zita, Matteo; Leon-Garcia, Sandra; Parast, Mana M.

    2015-01-01

    Proper differentiation of placental epithelial cells, called trophoblast, is required for implantation. Early during placentation, trophoblast cell columns help anchor the developing embryo in the uterine wall. Although proximally continuous with villous cytotrophoblast (CTB) distally, these cells differentiate into invasive extravillous trophoblast. We previously reported that p63, a p53 family member, is highly expressed in proliferative villous CTB and required for induction of the trophoblast lineage in human pluripotent stem cells. We now further explore its function in human trophoblast by using both primary CTB from the early placenta and established trophoblast cell lines. We show that p63 is expressed in epidermal growth factor receptor-positive CTB and that its expression decreases with differentiation into HLA-G+ extravillous trophoblast. In trophoblast cell lines, p63 is expressed in JEG3 cells but absent from HTR8 cells. Overexpression of p63 in both cell lines enhances cell proliferation and significantly reduces cell migration; conversely, down-regulation of p63 in JEG3 cells reduces cell proliferation and restores cell migration. Analysis of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, cell adhesion, and matrix degradation pathways shows that p63 blocks epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, promotes a CTB-specific cell adhesion profile, and inhibits expression of matrix metalloproteinases. Taken together, these data show that p63 maintains the proliferative CTB state, at least partially through regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, cell adhesion, and matrix degradation pathways. PMID:25307348

  18. Isolation and transplantation of corneal endothelial cell-like cells derived from in-vitro-differentiated human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Pang, Kunpeng; Wu, Xinyi

    2014-06-15

    The maintenance of corneal dehydration and transparency depends on barrier and pump functions of corneal endothelial cells (CECs). The human CECs have no proliferation capacity in vivo and the ability to divide in vitro under culture conditions is dramatically limited. Thus, the acquisition of massive cells analogous to normal human CECs is extremely necessary whether from the perspective of cellular basic research or from clinical applications. Here we report the derivation of CEC-like cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) through the periocular mesenchymal precursor (POMP) phase. Using the transwell coculture system of hESCs with differentiated human corneal stromal cells, we induced hESCs to differentiate into POMPs. Then, CEC-like cells were derived from POMPs with lens epithelial cell-conditioned medium. Within 1 week, CEC-like cells that expressed the corneal endothelium (CE) differentiation marker N-cadherin and transcription factors FoxC1 and Pitx2 were detectable. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based isolation of the N-cadherin/vimentin dual-positive population enriches for CEC-like cells. The isolated CEC-like cells were labeled with carboxyfluorescein diacetate, succinimidyl ester (CFDA SE) and seeded onto posterior acellular porcine corneal matrix lamellae to construct the CEC-like cell sheets. Pump function parameters of the CEC-like cell sheets approximated those of human donor corneas. Importantly, when the CEC-like cell sheets were transplanted into the eyes of rabbit CE dysfunction models, the corneal transparency was restored gradually. In conclusion, CEC-like cells derived from hESCs displayed characteristics of native human CECs. This renewable source of human CECs offers massive cells for further studies of human CEC biological characteristics and potential applications of replacement therapies as substitution for donor CECs in the future. PMID:24499373

  19. Lin28a is a putative factor in regulating cancer stem cell-like properties in side population cells of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, S.; Tanaka, J.; Okada, S.; Isobe, T.; Yamamoto, G.; Yasuhara, R.; Irie, T.; Akiyama, C.; Kohno, Y.; Tachikawa, T.; Mishima, K.

    2013-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are among the target cells of cancer therapy because they are uniquely involved in both cancer progression and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. We identified side population (SP) cells, which are known to be an enriched population of CSC, in five oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC9, SCC25, TOSCC7, TOSCC17, and TOSCC23). The percentages of SP cells ranged from 0% to 3.3%, with TOSCC23 cells showing the highest percentages of SP cells (3.3% of the total cell population). The SP cells isolated from TOSCC23 cells also showed greater cell proliferation and invasion compared to non-SP (MP) cells. Therefore, our initial findings suggested that SP cells were enriched for CSC-like cells. Furthermore, DNA microarray analysis revealed that the expression of cell proliferation-related and anti-apoptotic genes was greater in SP cells compared to MP cells. We focused on Lin28a, which showed the highest expression (approximately 22-fold) among the upregulated genes. The overexpression of Lin28a in TOSCC23 cells increased their proliferation, colony formation, and invasion. These findings suggest that Lin28a is an appropriate CSC target molecule for OSCC treatment - Highlights: ► Lin28a is a SP cell-specific factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. ► SP cells in OSCC cells show cancer stem cell-like properties. ► Lin28a regulates OSCC proliferative and invasive activities.

  20. miR-942 promotes cancer stem cell-like traits in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma through activation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhimin; Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Ruilei; Zhang, Zhiwei; Li, Zhen; Dong, Suwei; Wang, Ying; Xue, Yuanbo; Yang, Jinyan; Tan, Qinghua; Wang, Ziping; Song, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway is known to play a vital role in the maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are reported to be the origine of malignant cancers, and result in poor prognosis of multiple kinds of cancer. Therefore, it is of great importance to illuminate the mechanism by which the Wnt/β-catenin pathway regulates the cancer stem cell-like traits in cancers. Here, we report that miR-942 is significantly upregulated in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), and miR-942 levels are associated with poor prognosis in ESCC patients. Overexpression of miR-942 promotes, whereas inhibition of miR-942 decreases, the tumor sphere formation, the CD90+ subpopulation cells and the expression of pluripotency associated markers. Moreover, in vivo assay shows that miR-942 overexpressing cells form larger tumors and display higher tumourigenesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-942 upregulates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity via directly targeting sFRP4, GSK3β and TLE1, which are multiple level negative regulators of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade. In addition, our results indicate that c-myc directly binds to the miR-942 promoter and promotes its expression. Taken together, our findings establish an oncogenic role of miR-942 in ESCC and indicate that miR-942 might be an effective therapeutic target for ESCC. PMID:25844602

  1. Glabridin inhibits cancer stem cell-like properties of human breast cancer cells: An epigenetic regulation of miR-148a/SMAd2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; Li, Yuan; Mu, Juan; Hu, Chunyan; Zhou, Ming; Wang, Xingxing; Si, Lu; Ning, Shilong; Li, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    In breast cancer, the cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be the main cause of metastasis and recurrence. Targeting of CSCs or cancer cells with stem cell-like properties has become a new approach for the treatment of breast cancer. Glabridin (GLA), a phytochemical from the root of Glycyrrhiza glabra, exhibited effective antitumor properties in various human cancer cells. However, the roles of GLA in the regulation of CSC-like properties and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we reported that GLA attenuated the CSC-like properties through microRNA-148a (miR-148a)/transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-SMAD2 signal pathway in vitro and in vivo. In MDA-MB-231 and Hs-578T breast cancer cell lines, GLA enhanced the expression of miR-148a through DNA demethylation. By targeting of the SMAD2-3'-UTR, miR-148a blocked the expression/activation of SMAD2, and in turn, restored the epithelial characteristics, adhesive abilities, and CSC-like properties. Furthermore, in mouse xenograft models, we also confirmed that GLA attenuated the tumor growth, mesenchymal characteristics, and CSCs-like properties via demethylation-activated miR-148a. Our findings suggested a potential treatment strategy to reduce the CSCs-like properties, and therefore enhance the effectiveness of breast cancer therapy. PMID:25980823

  2. miR-942 promotes cancer stem cell-like traits in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma through activation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ge, Chunlei; Wu, Shikai; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Zhimin; Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Ruilei; Zhang, Zhiwei; Li, Zhen; Dong, Suwei; Wang, Ying; Xue, Yuanbo; Yang, Jinyan; Tan, Qinghua; Wang, Ziping; Song, Xin

    2015-05-10

    The Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway is known to play a vital role in the maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are reported to be the origin of malignant cancers, and result in poor prognosis of multiple kinds of cancer. Therefore, it is of great importance to illuminate the mechanism by which the Wnt/β-catenin pathway regulates the cancer stem cell-like traits in cancers. Here, we report that miR-942 is significantly upregulated in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), and miR-942 levels are associated with poor prognosis in ESCC patients. Overexpression of miR-942 promotes, whereas inhibition of miR-942 decreases, the tumor sphere formation, the CD90+ subpopulation cells and the expression of pluripotency associated markers. Moreover, in vivo assay shows that miR-942 overexpressing cells form larger tumors and display higher tumourigenesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-942 upregulates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity via directly targeting sFRP4, GSK3β and TLE1, which are multiple level negative regulators of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade. In addition, our results indicate that c-myc directly binds to the miR-942 promoter and promotes its expression. Taken together, our findings establish an oncogenic role of miR-942 in ESCC and indicate that miR-942 might be an effective therapeutic target for ESCC. PMID:25844602

  3. Enhanced SLC34A2 in breast cancer stem cell-like cells induces chemotherapeutic resistance to doxorubicin via SLC34A2-Bmi1-ABCC5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Ge, Guanqun; Zhou, Can; Ren, Yu; Tang, Xiaojiang; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Wei; Niu, Ligang; Zhou, Yuhui; Yan, Yu; He, Jianjun

    2016-04-01

    Even though early detection methods and treatment options are greatly improved, chemoresistance is still a tremendous challenge for breast cancer therapy. Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) represent a subpopulation that is central to chemoresistance. We aim to investigate the relationship between SLC34A2 and chemoresistance in BCSCs and identify the underlying mechanisms by which SLC34A2 regulates chemoresistance in BCSCs. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) analysis showed the presence of a variable fraction of CD44(+)CD24(-) cells in 25 out of 25 breast cancer samples. We cultured primary breast cancer sample cells and breast cancer cell line cells to induce sphere formation in serum-free medium. Following sorting of CD44(+)CD24(-) cells from spheres, we showed that CD44(+)CD24(-) cells displayed stem cell-like features and were resistant to chemotherapy drug doxorubicin. Significantly, enhanced SLC34A2 expression correlated with chemoresponse and survival of breast cancer patients. We subsequently indicated that increased SLC34A2 expression in BCSCs directly contributed to their chemoresistance by a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. Furthermore, we demonstrated that SLC34A2 induced chemoresistance in BCSCs via SLC34A2-Bmi1-ABCC5 signaling. Finally, we showed that ABCC5 was a direct transcriptional target of Bmi1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). In conclusion, our work indicated that decreased SLC34A2 expression sensitized BCSCs to doxorubicin via SLC34A2-Bmi1-ABCC5 signaling and shed new light on understanding the mechanism of chemoresistance in BCSCs. This study not only bridges the missing link between stem cell-related transcription factor (Bmi1) and ABC transporter (ABCC5) but also contributes to development of potential therapeutics against breast cancer. PMID:26546432

  4. Targeting leukemia stem cells: which pathways drive self-renewal activity in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, M.; Hoofd, C.; Weng, A.P.; Giambra, V.

    2016-01-01

    T-Cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (t-all) is a malignancy of white blood cells, characterized by an uncontrolled accumulation of T-cell progenitors. During leukemic progression, immature T cells grow abnormally and crowd into the bone marrow, preventing it from making normal blood cells and spilling out into the bloodstream. Recent studies suggest that only discrete cell populations that possess the ability to recreate the entire tumour might be responsible for the initiation and propagation of t-all. Those unique cells are commonly called “cancer stem cells” or, in the case of hematopoietic malignancies, “leukemia stem cells” (lscs). Like normal hematopoietic stem cells, lscs are thought to be capable of self-renewal, during which, by asymmetrical division, they give rise to an identical copy of themselves as well as to a daughter cell that is no longer capable of self-renewal activity and represents a more “differentiated” progeny. Here, we review the main pathways of self-renewal activity in lscs, focusing on their involvement in the maintenance and development of t-all. New stem cell–directed therapies and lsc-targeted agents are also discussed. PMID:26966402

  5. Bone marrow niche-mediated survival of leukemia stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia: Yin and Yang

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Sheng; Carter, Bing Z.; Andreeff, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by the accumulation of circulating immature blasts that exhibit uncontrolled growth, lack the ability to undergo normal differentiation, and have decreased sensitivity to apoptosis. Accumulating evidence shows the bone marrow (BM) niche is critical to the maintenance and retention of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), including leukemia stem cells (LSC), and an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that crosstalk between LSC and the stromal cells associated with this niche greatly influences leukemia initiation, progression, and response to therapy. Undeniably, stromal cells in the BM niche provide a sanctuary in which LSC can acquire a drug-resistant phenotype and thereby evade chemotherapy-induced death. Yin and Yang, the ancient Chinese philosophical concept, vividly portrays the intricate and dynamic interactions between LSC and the BM niche. In fact, LSC-induced microenvironmental reprogramming contributes significantly to leukemogenesis. Thus, identifying the critical signaling pathways involved in these interactions will contribute to target optimization and combinatorial drug treatment strategies to overcome acquired drug resistance and prevent relapse following therapy. In this review, we describe some of the critical signaling pathways mediating BM niche-LSC interaction, including SDF1/CXCL12, Wnt/β-catenin, VCAM/VLA-4/NF-κB, CD44, and hypoxia as a newly-recognized physical determinant of resistance, and outline therapeutic strategies for overcoming these resistance factors. PMID:27458532

  6. Breast Cancer Stem Cell-Like Cells Are More Sensitive to Ionizing Radiation than Non-Stem Cells: Role of ATM

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seog-Young; Rhee, Juong G.; Song, Xinxin; Prochownik, Edward V.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Lee, Yong J.

    2012-01-01

    There are contradictory observations about the different radiosensitivities of cancer stem cells and cancer non-stem cells. To resolve these contradictory observations, we studied radiosensitivities by employing breast cancer stem cell (CSC)-like MDA-MB231 and MDA-MB453 cells as well as their corresponding non-stem cells. CSC-like cells proliferate without differentiating and have characteristics of tumor-initiating cells [1]. These cells were exposed to γ-rays (1.25–8.75 Gy) and survival curves were determined by colony formation. A final slope, D0, of the survival curve for each cell line was determined to measure radiosensitivity. The D0 of CSC-like and non-stem MDA-MB-453 cells were 1.16 Gy and 1.55 Gy, respectively. Similar results were observed in MDA-MB-231 cells (0.94 Gy vs. 1.56 Gy). After determination of radiosensitivity, we investigated intrinsic cellular determinants which influence radiosensitivity including cell cycle distribution, free-radical scavengers and DNA repair. We observed that even though cell cycle status and antioxidant content may contribute to differential radiosensitivity, differential DNA repair capacity may be a greater determinant of radiosensitivity. Unlike non-stem cells, CSC-like cells have little/no sublethal damage repair, a low intracellular level of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and delay of γ-H2AX foci removal (DNA strand break repair). These results suggest that low DNA repair capacity is responsible for the high radiosensitivity of these CSC-like cells. PMID:23185620

  7. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients harboring T315I BCR-ABL mutated leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Grzegorz W.; Soverini, Simona; Martinelli, Giovanni; Mauro, Michael J.; Müller, Martin C.; Hochhaus, Andreas; Chuah, Charles; Dufva, Inge H.; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; Saglio, Giuseppe; Michallet, Mauricette; Labussière, Hélène; Morisset, Stéphane; Hayette, Sandrine; Etienne, Gabriel; Olavarria, Eduardo; Zhou, Wei; Peter, Senaka; Apperley, Jane F.; Cortes, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    T315I+ Philadelphia chromosome–positive leukemias are inherently resistant to all licensed tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and therapeutic options remain limited. We report the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in 64 patients with documented BCR-ABLT315I mutations. Median follow-up was 52 months from mutation detection and 26 months from transplantation. At transplantation, 51.5% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia were in the chronic phase and 4.5% were in advanced phases. Median overall survival after transplantation was 10.3 months (range 5.7 months to not reached [ie, still alive]) for those with chronic myeloid leukemia in the blast phase and 7.4 months (range 1.4 months to not reached [ie, still alive]) for those with Philadelphia chromosome–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia but has not yet been reached for those in the chronic and accelerated phases of chronic myeloid leukemia. The occurrence of chronic GVHD had a positive impact on overall survival (P = .047). Transplant-related mortality rates were low. Multivariate analysis identified only blast phase at transplantation (hazard ratio 3.68, P = .0011) and unrelated stem cell donor (hazard ratio 2.98, P = .011) as unfavorable factors. We conclude that allogeneic stem cell transplantation represents a valuable therapeutic tool for eligible patients with BCR-ABLT315I mutation, a tool that may or may not be replaced by third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:21926354

  8. Discovery of survival factor for primitive chronic myeloid leukemia cells using induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Suknuntha, Kran; Ishii, Yuki; Tao, Lihong; Hu, Kejin; McIntosh, Brian E; Yang, David; Swanson, Scott; Stewart, Ron; Wang, Jean Y J; Thomson, James; Slukvin, Igor

    2015-11-01

    A definitive cure for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) requires identifying novel therapeutic targets to eradicate leukemia stem cells (LSCs). However, the rarity of LSCs within the primitive hematopoietic cell compartment remains a major limiting factor for their study in humans. Here we show that primitive hematopoietic cells with typical LSC features, including adhesion defect, increased long-term survival and proliferation, and innate resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib, can be generated de novo from reprogrammed primary CML cells. Using CML iPSC-derived primitive leukemia cells, we discovered olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) as a novel factor that contributes to survival and growth of somatic lin(-)CD34(+) cells from bone marrow of patients with CML in chronic phase, but not primitive hematopoietic cells from normal bone marrow. Overall, this study shows the feasibility and advantages of using reprogramming technology to develop strategies for targeting primitive leukemia cells. PMID:26561938

  9. Discovery of survival factor for primitive chronic myeloid leukemia cells using induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Suknuntha, Kran; Ishii, Yuki; Tao, Lihong; Hu, Kejin; McIntosh, Brian E.; Yang, David; Swanson, Scott; Stewart, Ron; Wang, Jean Y.J.; Thomson, James; Slukvin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    A definitive cure for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) requires identifying novel therapeutic targets to eradicate leukemia stem cells (LSCs). However, the rarity of LSCs within the primitive hematopoietic cell compartment remains a major limiting factor for their study in humans. Here we show that primitive hematopoietic cells with typical LSC features, including adhesion defect, increased long-term survival and proliferation, and innate resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib, can be generated de novo from reprogrammed primary CML cells. Using CML iPSC-derived primitive leukemia cells, we discovered olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) as a novel factor that contributes to survival and growth of somatic lin−CD34+ cells from bone marrow of patients with CML in chronic phase, but not primitive hematopoietic cells from normal bone marrow. Overall, this study shows the feasibility and advantages of using reprogramming technology to develop strategies for targeting primitive leukemia cells. PMID:26561938

  10. The Effects of Hemodynamic Shear Stress on Stemness of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, Andrew; Triantafillu, Ursula; Kim, Yonghyun (John)

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have recently been identified as the root cause of tumors generated from cancer cell populations. This is because these CSCs are drug-resistant and have the ability to self-renew and differentiate. Current methods of culturing CSCs require much time and money, so cancer cell culture protocols, which maximize yield of CSCs are needed. It was hypothesized that the quantity of Acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells (LSCs) would increase after applying shear stress to the leukemia cells based on previous studies with breast cancer in bioreactors. The shear stress was applied by pumping the cells through narrow tubing to mimic the in vivo bloodstream environment. In support of the hypothesis, shear stress was found to increase the amount of LSCs in a given leukemia population. This work was supported by NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  11. Altered microenvironmental regulation of leukemic and normal stem cells in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Ho, Yin Wei; Huang, Qin; Maeda, Takahiro; Lin, Allen; Lee, Sung-uk; Hair, Alan; Holyoake, Tessa L.; Huettner, Claudia; Bhatia, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Summary We characterized leukemia stem cells (LSC) in chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) using a transgenic mouse model. LSC were restricted to cells with long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LTHSC) phenotype. CML LTHSC demonstrated reduced homing and retention in the bone marrow (BM), related to decreased CXCL12 expression in CML BM, resulting from increased G-CSF production by leukemia cells. Altered cytokine expression in CML BM was associated with selective impairment of normal LTHSC growth and a growth advantage to CML LTHSC. Imatinib (IM) treatment partially corrected abnormalities in cytokine levels and LTHSC growth. These results were validated using human CML samples and provide improved understanding of microenvironmental regulation of normal and leukemic LTHSC and their response to IM in CML. PMID:22516264

  12. EGFR Kinase Promotes Acquisition of Stem Cell-Like Properties: A Potential Therapeutic Target in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rahimy, Elham; Kuo, Selena Z.; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Lopez, Jay Patrick; Blair, Katherine J.; Yu, Michael Andrew; Haas, Martin; Brumund, Kevin T.; Altuna, Xabier; Patel, Andrew; Weisman, Robert A.; Ongkeko, Weg M.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the EGFR/ErbB family of tyrosine kinases are found to be highly expressed and deregulated in many cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The ErbB family, including EGFR, has been demonstrated to play key roles in metastasis, tumorigenesis, cell proliferation, and drug resistance. Recently, these characteristics have been linked to a small subpopulation of cells classified as cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are believed to be responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. In this study, we investigated the possible role of EGFR as a regulator of “stemness” in HNSCC cells. Activation of EGFR by the addition of EGF ligand or ectopic expression of EGFR in two established HNSCC cell lines (UMSCC-22B and HN-1) resulted in the induction of CD44, BMI-1, Oct-4, NANOG, CXCR4, and SDF-1. Activation of EGFR also resulted in increased tumorsphere formation, a characteristic ability of cancer stem cells. Conversely, treatment with the EGFR kinase inhibitor, Gefinitib (Iressa), resulted in decreased expression of the aforementioned genes, and loss of tumorsphere-forming ability. Similar trends were observed in a 99.9% CD44 positive stem cell culture derived from a fresh HNSCC tumor, confirming our findings for the cell lines. Additionally, we found that these putative cancer stem cells, when treated with Gefitinib, possessed a lower capacity to invade and became more sensitive to cisplatin-induced death in vitro. These results suggest that EGFR plays critical roles in the survival, maintenance, and function of cancer stem cells. Drugs that target EGFR, perhaps administered in combination with conventional chemotherapy, might be an effective treatment for HNSCC. PMID:22384257

  13. Resveratrol Ameliorates the Maturation Process of β-Cell-Like Cells Obtained from an Optimized Differentiation Protocol of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pezzolla, Daniela; López-Beas, Javier; Lachaud, Christian C.; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Smani, Tarik; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Soria, Bernat

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) retain the extraordinary capacity to differentiate into different cell types of an adult organism, including pancreatic β-cells. For this particular lineage, although a lot of effort has been made in the last ten years to achieve an efficient and reproducible differentiation protocol, it was not until recently that this aim was roughly accomplished. Besides, several studies evidenced the impact of resveratrol (RSV) on insulin secretion, even though the mechanism by which this polyphenol potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) is still not clear. The aim of this study was to optimize an efficient differentiation protocol that mimics in vivo pancreatic organogenesis and to investigate whether RSV may improve the final maturation step to obtain functional insulin-secreting cells. Our results indicate that treatment of hESCs (HS-181) with activin-A induced definitive endoderm differentiation as detected by the expression of SOX17 and FOXA2. Addition of retinoic acid (RA), Noggin and Cyclopamine promoted pancreatic differentiation as indicated by the expression of the early pancreatic progenitor markers ISL1, NGN3 and PDX1. Moreover, during maturation in suspension culture, differentiating cells assembled in islet-like clusters, which expressed specific endocrine markers such as PDX1, SST, GCG and INS. Similar results were confirmed with the human induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (hiPSC) line MSUH-001. Finally, differentiation protocols incorporating RSV treatment yielded numerous insulin-positive cells, induced significantly higher PDX1 expression and were able to transiently normalize glycaemia when transplanted in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic mice thus promoting its survival. In conclusion, our strategy allows the efficient differentiation of hESCs into pancreatic endoderm capable of generating β-cell-like cells and demonstrates that RSV improves the maturation process. PMID:25774684

  14. Resveratrol ameliorates the maturation process of β-cell-like cells obtained from an optimized differentiation protocol of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pezzolla, Daniela; López-Beas, Javier; Lachaud, Christian C; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Smani, Tarik; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Soria, Bernat

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) retain the extraordinary capacity to differentiate into different cell types of an adult organism, including pancreatic β-cells. For this particular lineage, although a lot of effort has been made in the last ten years to achieve an efficient and reproducible differentiation protocol, it was not until recently that this aim was roughly accomplished. Besides, several studies evidenced the impact of resveratrol (RSV) on insulin secretion, even though the mechanism by which this polyphenol potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) is still not clear. The aim of this study was to optimize an efficient differentiation protocol that mimics in vivo pancreatic organogenesis and to investigate whether RSV may improve the final maturation step to obtain functional insulin-secreting cells. Our results indicate that treatment of hESCs (HS-181) with activin-A induced definitive endoderm differentiation as detected by the expression of SOX17 and FOXA2. Addition of retinoic acid (RA), Noggin and Cyclopamine promoted pancreatic differentiation as indicated by the expression of the early pancreatic progenitor markers ISL1, NGN3 and PDX1. Moreover, during maturation in suspension culture, differentiating cells assembled in islet-like clusters, which expressed specific endocrine markers such as PDX1, SST, GCG and INS. Similar results were confirmed with the human induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (hiPSC) line MSUH-001. Finally, differentiation protocols incorporating RSV treatment yielded numerous insulin-positive cells, induced significantly higher PDX1 expression and were able to transiently normalize glycaemia when transplanted in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic mice thus promoting its survival. In conclusion, our strategy allows the efficient differentiation of hESCs into pancreatic endoderm capable of generating β-cell-like cells and demonstrates that RSV improves the maturation process. PMID:25774684

  15. Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Juliusson, Gunnar; Hough, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Leukemias are a group of life threatening malignant disorders of the blood and bone marrow. In the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, the acute leukemias are most prevalent, with chronic myeloid leukemia being infrequently seen. Factors associated with more aggressive disease biology tend to increase in frequency with increasing age, whilst tolerability of treatment strategies decreases. There are also challenges regarding the effective delivery of therapy specific to the AYA group, consequences on the unique psychosocial needs of this age group, including compliance. This chapter reviews the current status of epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment strategies and outcomes of AYA leukemia, with a focus on acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27595359

  16. Conversion of Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Neural Stem Cell-Like Cells by a Single Transcription Factor, Sox2

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yiren; Zhou, Chikai; Wang, Nianhong; Yang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adipose tissue is an attractive source of easily accessible adult candidate cells for regenerative medicine. Adipose tissue–derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) have multipotency and strong proliferation and differentiation capabilities in vitro. However, as mesodermal multipotent stem cells, whether the ADSCs can convert into induced neural stem cells (NSCs) has so far not been demonstrated. In this study, we found that normally the naïve ADSCs cultured as either monolayer or spheres in NSC medium did not express Sox2 and Pax6 genes and proteins, and could not differentiate to neuron-like cells. However, when we introduced the Sox2 gene into ADSCs by retrovirus, they exhibited a typical NSC-like morphology, and could be passaged continuously, and expressed NSC specific markers Sox2 and Pax6. In addition, the ADSC-derived NSC-like cells displayed the ability to differentiate into neuron-like cells when switched to the differentiation culture medium, expressing neuronal markers, including Tuj1 and MAP2 genes and proteins. Our results suggest the ADSCs can be converted into induced NSC-like cells with a single transcription factor Sox2. This finding could provide another alternative cell source for cell therapy of neurological disorders. PMID:26053521

  17. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  18. The Perceived Threat in Adults with Leukemia Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Farsi, Zahra; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Negarandeh, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Leukemia and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) create physical, psychological, social, and spiritual distresses in patients. Understanding this threatening situation in adults with leukemia undergoing HSCT will assist health care professionals in providing holistic care to the patients. Objectives: The aim of the present study was exploring the perceived threat in adults with leukemia undergoing HSCT. Patients and Methods: This article is part of a longitudinal qualitative study which used the grounded theory approach and was conducted in 2009-2011. Ten adults with acute leukemia scheduled for HSCT were recruited from the Hematology–Oncology Research Center and Stem Cell Transplantation, Shariati Hospital in Tehran, Iran. A series of pre-transplant and post-transplant in-depth interviews were held in the hospital’s HSCT wards. Totally, 18 interviews were conducted. Three written narratives were also obtained from the participants. The Corbin and Strauss approach was used to analyze the data. Results: Perceived threat was one of the main categories that emerged from the data. This category included four subcategories, "inattention to the signs and symptoms", "doubt and anxiety", "perception of danger and time limitation" and "change of life conditions", which occurred in linear progression over time. Conclusion: Suffering from leukemia and experiencing HSCT are events that are uniquely perceived by patients. This threatening situation can significantly effect perception of patients and cause temporary or permanent alterations in patients' lives. Health care professionals can help these patients by deeper understanding of their experiences and effective interventions. PMID:25414863

  19. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  20. Multipotent adult germ-line stem cells, like other pluripotent stem cells, can be killed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes despite low expression of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules

    PubMed Central

    Dressel, Ralf; Guan, Kaomei; Nolte, Jessica; Elsner, Leslie; Monecke, Sebastian; Nayernia, Karim; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Engel, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Background Multipotent adult germ-line stem cells (maGSCs) represent a new pluripotent cell type that can be derived without genetic manipulation from spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) present in adult testis. Similarly to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), they could provide a source of cellular grafts for new transplantation therapies of a broad variety of diseases. To test whether these stem cells can be rejected by the recipients, we have analyzed whether maGSCs and iPSCs can become targets for cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) or whether they are protected, as previously proposed for embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Results We have observed that maGSCs can be maintained in prolonged culture with or without leukemia inhibitory factor and/or feeder cells and still retain the capacity to form teratomas in immunodeficient recipients. They were, however, rejected in immunocompetent allogeneic recipients, and the immune response controlled teratoma growth. We analyzed the susceptibility of three maGSC lines to CTL in comparison to ESCs, iPSCs, and F9 teratocarcinoma cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules were not detectable by flow cytometry on these stem cell lines, apart from low levels on one maGSC line (maGSC Stra8 SSC5). However, using a quantitative real time PCR analysis H2K and B2m transcripts were detected in all pluripotent stem cell lines. All pluripotent stem cell lines were killed in a peptide-dependent manner by activated CTLs derived from T cell receptor transgenic OT-I mice after pulsing of the targets with the SIINFEKL peptide. Conclusion Pluripotent stem cells, including maGSCs, ESCs, and iPSCs can become targets for CTLs, even if the expression level of MHC class I molecules is below the detection limit of flow cytometry. Thus they are not protected against CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. Therefore, pluripotent cells might be rejected after transplantation by this mechanism if specific antigens are presented and if specific

  1. Coping strategies of adults with leukemia undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Iran: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Farsi, Zahra; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Negarandeh, Reza

    2010-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) causes significant physical, social, psychological, and emotional stress in patients with leukemia. This qualitative study using semi-structured interviews explored the coping strategies of 10 adults with acute leukemia who were undergoing this form of treatment in transplantation units in a major hospital in Tehran, Iran, from 2009 to 2010. A content analysis identified eight themes and 13 subthemes that described the participants' coping strategies. The major themes were: attribution, denial and avoidance, connection with divine purpose, organizing treatment, seeking social support, modifying, reflection, and patience and resignation. A deeper understanding of the coping strategies that are used by patients with leukemia undergoing HSCT can help healthcare providers to encourage patients to use strategies that are likely to be more effective. Such coping strategies also can help patients to achieve a greater sense of empowerment. PMID:21210928

  2. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient. PMID:25674158

  3. CD44, Hyaluronan, the Hematopoietic Stem Cell, and Leukemia-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zöller, Margot

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is an adhesion molecule that varies in size due to glycosylation and insertion of so-called variant exon products. The CD44 standard isoform (CD44s) is highly expressed in many cells and most abundantly in cells of the hematopoietic system, whereas expression of CD44 variant isoforms (CD44v) is more restricted. CD44s and CD44v are known as stem cell markers, first described for hematopoietic stem cells and later on confirmed for cancer- and leukemia-initiating cells. Importantly, both abundantly expressed CD44s as well as CD44v actively contribute to the maintenance of stem cell features, like generating and embedding in a niche, homing into the niche, maintenance of quiescence, and relative apoptosis resistance. This is surprising, as CD44 is not a master stem cell gene. I here will discuss that the functional contribution of CD44 relies on its particular communication skills with neighboring molecules, adjacent cells and, last not least, the surrounding matrix. In fact, it is the interaction of the hyaluronan receptor CD44 with its prime ligand, which strongly assists stem cells to fulfill their special and demanding tasks. Recent fundamental progress in support of this “old” hypothesis, which may soon pave the way for most promising new therapeutics, is presented for both hematopoietic stem cell and leukemia-initiating cell. The contribution of CD44 to the generation of a stem cell niche, to homing of stem cells in their niche, to stem cell quiescence and apoptosis resistance will be in focus. PMID:26074915

  4. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Stem cell niche as a prognostic factor in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga-Young; Kim, Jin-A; Oh, Il-Hoan

    2015-08-01

    Despite high interests on microenvironmental regulation of leukemic cells, little is known for bone marrow (BM) niche in leukemia patients. Our recent study on BMs of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients showed that the mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are altered during leukemic conditions in a clinical course-dependent manner. Leukemic blasts caused reprogramming of transcriptomes in MSCs and remodeling of niche cross-talk, selectively suppressing normal primitive hematopoietic cells while supporting leukemogenesis and chemo- resistance. Notably, differences in BM stromal remodeling were correlated to heterogeneity in subsequent clinical courses of AML, i.e., low numbers of mesenchymal progenitors at initial diagnosis were correlated to complete remission for 5-8 years, and high contents of mesenchymal progenitor or MSCs correlated to early or late relapse, respectively. Thus, stromal remodeling by leukemic cell is an intrinsic part of leukemogenesis that can contribute to the clonal dominance of leukemic cells over normal hematopoietic cells, and can serve as a biomarker for prediction of prognosis. PMID:26198094

  6. Niche-based screening identifies small-molecule inhibitors of leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Kahn, Alissa R; Stewart, Alison L; Logan, David J; Negri, Joseph M; Duvet, Mildred; Järås, Marcus; Puram, Rishi; Dancik, Vlado; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Kindler, Thomas; Tothova, Zuzana; Chattopadhyay, Shrikanta; Hasaka, Thomas; Narayan, Rajiv; Dai, Mingji; Huang, Christina; Shterental, Sebastian; Chu, Lisa P; Haydu, J Erika; Shieh, Jae Hung; Steensma, David P; Munoz, Benito; Bittker, Joshua A; Shamji, Alykhan F; Clemons, Paul A; Tolliday, Nicola J; Carpenter, Anne E; Gilliland, D Gary; Stern, Andrew M; Moore, Malcolm A S; Scadden, David T; Schreiber, Stuart L; Ebert, Benjamin L; Golub, Todd R

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to develop more effective therapies for acute leukemia may benefit from high-throughput screening systems that reflect the complex physiology of the disease, including leukemia stem cells (LSCs) and supportive interactions with the bone-marrow microenvironment. The therapeutic targeting of LSCs is challenging because LSCs are highly similar to normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and are protected by stromal cells in vivo. We screened 14,718 compounds in a leukemia-stroma co-culture system for inhibition of cobblestone formation, a cellular behavior associated with stem-cell function. Among those that inhibited malignant cells but spared HSPCs was the cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin. Lovastatin showed anti-LSC activity in vitro and in an in vivo bone marrow transplantation model. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the effect was on-target, via inhibition of HMGCoA reductase. These results illustrate the power of merging physiologically-relevant models with high-throughput screening. PMID:24161946

  7. Targeting the leukemic stem cell: the Holy Grail of leukemia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Misaghian, N; Ligresti, G; Steelman, LS; Bertrand, FE; Bäsecke, J; Libra, M; Nicoletti, F; Stivala, F; Milella, M; Tafuri, A; Cervello, M; Martelli, AM

    2008-01-01

    Since the discovery of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) over a decade ago, many of their critical biological properties have been elucidated, including their distinct replicative properties, cell surface phenotypes, their increased resistance to chemo-therapeutic drugs and the involvement of growth-promoting chromosomal translocations. Of particular importance is their ability to transfer malignancy to non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice. Furthermore, numerous studies demonstrate that acute myeloid leukemia arises from mutations at the level of stem cell, and chronic myeloid leukemia is also a stem cell disease. In this review, we will evaluate the main characteristics of LSCs elucidated in several well-documented leukemias. In addition, we will discuss points of therapeutic intervention. Promising therapeutic approaches include the targeting of key signal transduction pathways (for example, PI3K, Rac and Wnt) with small-molecule inhibitors and specific cell surface molecules (for example, CD33, CD44 and CD123), with effective cytotoxic antibodies. Also, statins, which are already widely therapeutically used for a variety of diseases, show potential in targeting LSCs. In addition, drugs that inhibit ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins are being extensively studied, as they are important in drug resistance—a frequent characteristic of LSCs. Although the specific targeting of LSCs is a relatively new field, it is a highly promising battleground that may reveal the Holy Grail of cancer therapy. PMID:18800146

  8. Leukemia cell microvesicles promote survival in umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razmkhah, Farnaz; Soleimani, Masoud; Mehrabani, Davood; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Kafi-abad, Sedigheh Amini

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles can transfer their contents, proteins and RNA, to target cells and thereby transform them. This may induce apoptosis or survival depending on cell origin and the target cell. In this study, we investigate the effect of leukemic cell microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells to seek evidence of apoptosis or cell survival. Microvesicles were isolated from both healthy donor bone marrow samples and Jurkat cells by ultra-centrifugation and were added to hematopoietic stem cells sorted from umbilical cord blood samples by magnetic associated cell sorting (MACS) technique. After 7 days, cell count, cell viability, flow cytometry analysis for hematopoietic stem cell markers and qPCR for P53 gene expression were performed. The results showed higher cell number, higher cell viability rate and lower P53 gene expression in leukemia group in comparison with normal and control groups. Also, CD34 expression as the most important hematopoietic stem cell marker, did not change during the treatment and lineage differentiation was not observed. In conclusion, this study showed anti-apoptotic effect of leukemia cell derived microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26862318

  9. A tumor suppressor function of the Msr1 gene in leukemia stem cells of chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaoyu; Sullivan, Con; Peng, Cong; Shan, Yi; Hu, Yiguo; Li, Dongguang

    2011-01-01

    We have shown that Alox5 is a critical regulator of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in a BCR-ABL–induced chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) mouse model, and we hypothesize that the Alox5 pathway represents a major molecular network that regulates LSC function. Therefore, we sought to dissect this pathway by comparing the gene expression profiles of wild type and Alox5−/− LSCs. DNA microarray analysis revealed a small group of candidate genes that exhibited changes in the levels of transcription in the absence of Alox5 expression. In particular, we noted that the expression of the Msr1 gene was upregulated in Alox5−/− LSCs, suggesting that Msr1 suppresses the proliferation of LSCs. Using CML mouse model, we show that Msr1 is downregulated by BCR-ABL and this down-regulation is partially restored by Alox5 deletion, and that Msr1 deletion causes acceleration of CML development. Moreover, Msr1 deletion markedly increases LSC function through its effects on cell cycle progression and apoptosis. We also show that Msr1 affects CML development by regulating the PI3K-AKT pathway and β-Catenin. Together, these results demonstrate that Msr1 suppresses LSCs and CML development. The enhancement of the tumor suppressor function of Msr1 may be of significance in the development of novel therapeutic strategies for CML. PMID:21596859

  10. Allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for standard risk leukemia: experience of Ibni Sina Hospital.

    PubMed

    Arslan, O; Coşkun, H; Arat, M; Celebi, H; Ozcan, M; Gürman, G; Ustün, C; Demirer, T; Akan, H; Ilhan, O; Konuk, N; Beksaç, M; Uysal, A; Koç, H

    2000-06-01

    Fifty-three patients with standard risk leukemia who underwent allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (alloPBSCT) from their HLA-identical siblings were analyzed for engraftment, incidence and severity of GVHD, and relapse rate. Standard risk leukemia was defined as AML in first complete remission or CML in first chronic phase within the first year after diagnosis. The median age was 34.5 years (range 13-47). Stem cells were mobilized by using 10 microg/kg G-CSF subcutaneously for 5 days. A median of 5. 7 (2.1-21.4) x 106/kg CD34+ cells was collected over a median of 2 (range 1-5) apheresis procedures. Cyclosporin A (CsA) plus short-course MTX were used for GVHD prophylaxis. Recovery to granulocytes >0.5 x 109/l and platelets >20 x 109/l occurred at a median of day +13 (range 8-32) and +13 (range 8-51), respectively. Day +100 transplant-related mortality was 13.2% (7/53). Acute GVHD occurred in 20 of 49 (41%) evaluable patients and only six (12.3%) of them had severe disease (grade III-IV). Chronic GVHD occurred in 30 of 42 (71.4%) evaluable patients. Relapse rate at 2 years was 7. 5%. The median overall and leukemia-free survivals were 22 (4-44) and 20 (3-44) months, respectively. Estimated 4 year leukemia-free and overall survival rates were 60% and 62%, respectively. In conclusion, alloPBSCT in standard risk leukemia seems to be associated with a low relapse rate and no increased risk of acute GVHD, but there is a trend for higher incidence of cGVHD. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 1229-1232. PMID:10871726

  11. Functional Niche Competition Between Normal Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells and Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Glait-Santar, Chen; Desmond, Ronan; Feng, Xingmin; Bat, Taha; Chen, Jichun; Heuston, Elisabeth; Mizukawa, Benjamin; Mulloy, James C; Bodine, David M; Larochelle, Andre; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2015-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in a specialized niche that regulates their proliferative capacity and their fate. There is increasing evidence for similar roles of marrow niches on controlling the behavior of leukemic cells; however, whether normal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and leukemic cells reside in or functionally compete for the same marrow niche is unclear. We used the mixed lineage leukemia-AF9 (MLL-AF9) murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a competitive repopulation model to investigate whether normal HSPC and leukemic cells functionally compete for the same marrow niches. Irradiated recipient mice were transplanted with fixed numbers of MLL-AF9 cells mixed with increasing doses of normal syngeneic whole bone marrow (WBM) or with purified HSPC (LSK). Survival was significantly increased and leukemic progression was delayed proportional to increasing doses of normal WBM or normal LSK cells in multiple independent experiments, with all doses of WBM or LSK cells studied above the threshold for rapid and complete hematopoietic reconstitution in the absence of leukemia. Confocal microscopy demonstrated nests of either leukemic cells or normal hematopoietic cells but not both in the marrow adjacent to endosteum. Early following transplantation, leukemic cells from animals receiving lower LSK doses were cycling more actively than in those receiving higher doses. These results suggest that normal HSPC and AML cells compete for the same functional niche. Manipulation of the niche could impact on response to antileukemic therapies, and the numbers of normal HSPC could impact on leukemia outcome, informing approaches to cell dose in the context of stem cell transplantation. PMID:26388434

  12. p27kip1 Maintains a Subset of Leukemia Stem Cells in the Quiescent State in Murine MLL-Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Seet, Christopher; Sun, Clare; Li, Jing; You, Dewen; Volk, Andrew; Breslin, Peter; Li, Xingyu; Wei, Wei; Qian, Zhijian; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J.; Zhang, Zhou; Zhang, Jiwang

    2013-01-01

    MLL (mixed-lineage leukemia)-fusion genes induce the development of leukemia through deregulation of normal MLL target genes, such as HOXA9 and MEIS1. Both HOXA9 and MEIS1 are required for MLL-fusion gene-induced leukemogenesis. Co-expression of HOXA9 and MEIS1 induces acute myeloid leukemia (AML) similar to that seen in mice in which MLL-fusion genes are over-expressed. p27kip1 (p27 hereafter), a negative regulator of the cell cycle, has also been defined as an MLL target, the expression of which is up-regulated in MLL leukemic cells (LCs). To investigate whether p27 plays a role in the pathogenesis of MLL-leukemia, we examined the effects of p27 deletion (p27-/-) on MLL-AF9 (MA9)-induced murine AML development. HOXA9/MEIS1 (H/M)-induced, p27 wild-type (p27+/+) and p27-/- AML were studied in parallel as controls. We found that LCs from both MA9-AML and H/M-AML can be separated into three fractions, a CD117-CD11bhi differentiated fraction as well as CD117+CD11bhi and CD117+CD11blo, two less differentiated fractions. The CD117+CD11blo fraction, comprising only 1-3% of total LCs, expresses higher levels of early hematopoietic progenitor markers but lower levels of mature myeloid cell markers compared to other populations of LCs. p27 is expressed and is required for maintaining the quiescent and drug-resistant states of the CD117+CD11blo fraction of MA9-LCs but not of H/M-LCs. p27 deletion significantly compromises the leukemogenic capacity of CD117+CD11blo MA9-LCs by reducing the frequency of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) but does not do so in H/M-LCs. In addition, we found that p27 is highly expressed and required for cell cycle arrest in the CD117-CD11bhi fraction in both types of LCs. Furthermore, we found that c-Myc expression is required for maintaining LCs in an undifferentiated state independently of proliferation. We concluded that p27 represses the proliferation of LCs, which is specifically required for maintaining the quiescent and drug-resistant states of a

  13. EMT and stem cell-like properties associated with miR-205 and miR-200 epigenetic silencing are early manifestations during carcinogen-induced transformation of human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Carmen S.; Juri, Daniel E.; Do, Kieu; Bernauer, Amanda M.; Thomas, Cindy L.; Damiani, Leah A.; Tessema, Mathewos; Leng, Shuguang; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is strongly associated with cancer progression, but its potential role during premalignant development has not been studied. Here we show that a four-week exposure of immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) to tobacco carcinogens can induce a persistent, irreversible, and multifaceted dedifferentiation program marked by EMT and the emergence of stem cell-like properties. EMT induction was epigenetically driven, initially by chromatin remodeling through H3K27me3 enrichment and later by ensuing DNA methylation to sustain silencing of tumor suppressive microRNAs miR-200b, miR-200c, and miR-205, which were implicated in the dedifferentiation program in HBECs and also in primary lung tumors. Carcinogen-treated HBECs acquired stem-like features characterized by their ability to form spheroids with branching tubules and enrichment of the CD44high/CD24low, CD133, and ALDH1 stem cell-like markers. miRNA overexpression studies indicated that regulation of the EMT, stem-like, and transformed phenotypes in HBECs were distinct events. Our findings extend present concepts of how EMT participates in cancer pathophysiology by showing that EMT induction can participate in cancer initiation to promote the clonal expansion of premalignant lung epithelial cells. PMID:21363915

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from low risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients promote NK cell antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Entrena, Ana; Varas, Alberto; Vázquez, Miriam; Melen, Gustavo J; Fernández-Sevilla, Lidia M; García-Castro, Javier; Ramírez, Manuel; Zapata, Agustín G; Vicente, Ángeles

    2015-07-28

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are key components of the bone marrow microenvironment which contribute to the maintenance of the hematopoietic stem cell niche and exert immunoregulatory functions in innate and adaptive immunity. We analyze the immunobiology of MSCs derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients and their impact on NK cell function. In contrast to the inhibitory effects on the immune response exerted by MSCs from healthy donors (Healthy-MSCs), we demonstrate that MSCs derived from low/intermediate risk ALL patients at diagnosis (ALL-MSCs) promote an efficient NK cell response including cytokine production, phenotypic activation and most importantly, cytotoxicity. Longitudinal studies indicate that these immunostimulatory effects of ALL-MSCs are progressively attenuated. Healthy-MSCs adopt ALL-MSC-like immunomodulatory features when exposed to leukemia cells, acquiring the ability to stimulate NK cell antitumor function. The mechanisms underlying to these functional changes of ALL-MSCs include reduced production of soluble inhibitory factors, differential expression of costimulatory and coinhibitory molecules, increased expression of specific TLRs and Notch pathway activation. Collectively our findings indicate that, in response to leukemia cells, ALL-MSCs could mediate a host beneficial immunomodulatory effect by stimulating the antitumor innate immune response. PMID:25917077

  15. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Hepatoblastoma: Two Cancer Models to Link Metabolism to Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cipolleschi, Maria Grazia; Marzi, Ilaria; Rovida, Elisabetta; Dello Sbarba, Persio

    2016-01-01

    Low oxygen tension is a critical aspect of the stem cell niche where stem cells are long-term maintained. In “physiologically hypoxic” stem cell niches, low oxygen tension restrains the clonal expansion of stem cells without blocking their cycling, thereby contributing substantially to favor their self-renewal. The capacity of stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells in particular, to reside in low oxygen is likely due to their specific metabolic profile. A strong drive to the characterization of this profile emerges from the notion that cancer stem cells (CSC), like normal stem cells, most likely rely on metabolic cues for the balance between self-renewal/maintenance and clonal expansion/differentiation. Accordingly, CSC homing to low oxygen stem cell niches is the best candidate mechanism to sustain the so-called minimal residual disease. Thus, the metabolic profile of CSC impacts long-term cancer response to therapy. On that basis, strategies to target CSC are intensely sought as a means to eradicate neoplastic diseases. Our “metabolic” approach to this challenge was based on two different experimental models: (A) the Yoshida’s ascites hepatoma AH130 cells, a highly homogeneous cancer cell population expressing stem cell features, used to identify, in CSC adapted to oxygen and/or nutrient shortage, metabolic features of potential therapeutic interest; (B) chronic myeloid leukemia, used to evaluate the impact of oxygen and/or nutrient shortage on the expression of an oncogenetic protein, the loss of which determines the refractoriness of CSC to oncogene-targeting therapies. PMID:27148487

  16. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-29

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation for Acute Leukemia in Relapse or Primary Induction Failure

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Michel; Klein, John P.; He, Wensheng; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell; Camitta, Bruce M.; Kamble, Rammurti; Copelan, Edward; de Lima, Marcos; Gupta, Vikas; Keating, Armand; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Litzow, Mark R.; Marks, David I.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Rizzieri, David A.; Schiller, Gary; Schultz, Kirk R.; Tallman, Martin S.; Weisdorf, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patients with acute leukemia refractory to induction or reinduction chemotherapy have poor prognoses if they do not undergo hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). However, HSCT when a patient is not in complete remission (CR) is of uncertain benefit. We hypothesized that pretransplantation variables may define subgroups that have a better prognosis. Patients and Methods Overall, 2,255 patients who underwent transplantation for acute leukemia in relapse or with primary induction failure after myeloablative conditioning regimen between 1995 and 2004 were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. The median follow-up of survivors was 61 months. We performed multivariate analysis of pretransplantation variables and developed a predictive scoring system for survival. Results The 3-year overall survival (OS) rates were 19% for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 16% for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). For AML, five adverse pretransplantation variables significantly influenced survival: first CR duration less than 6 months, circulating blasts, donor other than HLA-identical sibling, Karnofsky or Lansky score less than 90, and poor-risk cytogenetics. For ALL, survival was worse with the following: first refractory or second or greater relapse, ≥ 25% marrow blasts, cytomegalovirus-seropositive donor, and age of 10 years or older. Patients with AML who had a predictive score of 0 had 42% OS at 3 years, whereas OS was 6% for a score ≥ 3. Patients with ALL who had a score of 0 or 1 had 46% 3-year OS but only 10% OS rate for a score ≥ 3. Conclusion Pretransplantation variables delineate subgroups with different outcomes. HSCT during relapse can achieve long-term survival in selected patients with acute leukemia. PMID:20625136

  19. Donor cell leukemia after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Murata, Makoto; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Terakura, Seitaro; Ozeki, Kazutaka; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2008-07-01

    A 49-year-old male developed recurrent acute myeloid leukemia 27 months after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) from an HLA-identical brother. The immunophenotype of the blastic cell population was incompatible with that of the pre-transplant blast cells; a mutation in C/EBPA gene was found in the pre-transplant blast cells that was not present in the post-transplant blast cells, and short tandem repeat analysis of marrow cells, which included 71% blasts, showed complete donor chimera. Thus, this recipient developed donor cell leukemia (DCL). The donor was healthy when DCL developed in the recipient as well as before donation of the peripheral blood stem cells. Only five cases of DCL after PBSCT have been reported in the literature. As a mechanism for the development of DCL, a vigorous proliferative demand on the donor cells, which often correlates with a higher likelihood of replication error or mutation, has been proposed. Peripheral blood stem cells might have an advantage in that they are associated with a low incidence of DCL development because PBSCT recipients receive a higher total cell dose than recipients of bone marrow or cord blood cells. PMID:18470599

  20. S6K1 regulates hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and leukemia maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Joydeep; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Ramdas, Baskar; Chatterjee, Anindya; Ma, Peilin; Mali, Raghuveer Singh; Carlesso, Nadia; Liu, Yan; Plas, David R; Chan, Rebecca J; Kapur, Reuben

    2016-07-01

    Hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway impairs hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) functions and promotes leukemogenesis. mTORC1 and mTORC2 differentially control normal and leukemic stem cell functions. mTORC1 regulates p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding (eIF4E-binding) protein 1 (4E-BP1), and mTORC2 modulates AKT activation. Given the extensive crosstalk that occurs between mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling pathways, we assessed the role of the mTORC1 substrate S6K1 in the regulation of both normal HSC functions and in leukemogenesis driven by the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion oncogene MLL-AF9. We demonstrated that S6K1 deficiency impairs self-renewal of murine HSCs by reducing p21 expression. Loss of S6K1 also improved survival in mice transplanted with MLL-AF9-positive leukemic stem cells by modulating AKT and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results suggest that S6K1 acts through multiple targets of the mTOR pathway to promote self-renewal and leukemia progression. Given the recent interest in S6K1 as a potential therapeutic target in cancer, our results further support targeting this molecule as a potential strategy for treatment of myeloid malignancies. PMID:27294524

  1. NKT cell–dependent leukemia eradication following stem cell mobilization with potent G-CSF analogs

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Edward S.; MacDonald, Kelli P.A.; Rowe, Vanessa; Banovic, Tatjana; Kuns, Rachel D.; Don, Alistair L.J.; Bofinger, Helen M.; Burman, Angela C.; Olver, Stuart D.; Kienzle, Norbert; Porcelli, Steven A.; Pellicci, Daniel G.; Godfrey, Dale I.; Smyth, Mark J.; Hill, Geoffrey R.

    2005-01-01

    NKT cells have pivotal roles in immune regulation and tumor immunosurveillance. We report that the G-CSF and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt-3L) chimeric cytokine, progenipoietin-1, markedly expands the splenic and hepatic NKT cell population and enhances functional responses to α-galactosylceramide. In a murine model of allogeneic stem cell transplantation, donor NKT cells promoted host DC activation and enhanced perforin-restricted CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity against host-type antigens. Following leukemic challenge, donor treatment with progenipoietin-1 significantly improved overall survival when compared with G-CSF or control, attributable to reduced graft-versus-host disease mortality and paradoxical augmentation of graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects. Enhanced cellular cytotoxicity was dependent on donor NKT cells, and leukemia clearance was profoundly impaired in recipients of NKT cell–deficient grafts. Enhanced cytotoxicity and GVL effects were not associated with Flt-3L signaling or effects on DCs but were reproduced by prolonged G-CSF receptor engagement with pegylated G-CSF. Thus, modified G-CSF signaling during stem cell mobilization augments NKT cell–dependent CD8+ cytotoxicity, effectively separating graft-versus-host disease and GVL and greatly expanding the potential applicability of allogeneic stem cell transplantation for the therapy of malignant disease. PMID:16224535

  2. The role of stem cell transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Sawa

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), a treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), has largely replaced curative strategies based on allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Nevertheless, SCT still remains an option for accelerated/blastic-phase and selected chronic-phase CML. Transplant outcomes can be optimized by peritransplant TKIs, conditioning regimen, BCR-ABL monitoring, and relapse management. Controversies exist in transplant timing, pediatric CML, alternative donors, and economics. SCT continues to serve as a platform of “operational cure” for CML with TKIs and immunotherapies. PMID:25852053

  3. STAT3 signaling pathway is necessary for cell survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +} stem cell-like human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Li; Fuchs, James; Li, Chenglong; Olson, Veronica; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Lin, Jiayuh

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 inhibitor, FLLL32 inhibits P-STAT3 and STAT3 target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of STAT3 resulted in decreased cell viability and reduced numbers of tumorspheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 is required for survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting STAT3 in cancer stem-like cells may offer a novel treatment approach for colon cancer. -- Abstract: Persistent activation of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in colon cancer. Increasing evidence suggests the existence of a small population of colon cancer stem or cancer-initiating cells may be responsible for tumor initiation, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Whether STAT3 plays a role in colon cancer-initiating cells and the effect of STAT3 inhibition is still unknown. Flow cytometry was used to isolate colon cancer stem-like cells from three independent human colon cancer cell lines characterized by both aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive and CD133-positive subpopulation (ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +}). The effects of STAT3 inhibition in colon cancer stem-like cells were examined. The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells and was reduced by a STAT3-selective small molecular inhibitor, FLLL32. FLLL32 also inhibited the expression of potential STAT3 downstream target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells including survivin, Bcl-XL, as well as Notch-1, -3, and -4, which may be involved in stem cell function. Furthermore, FLLL32 inhibited cell viability and tumorsphere formation as well as induced cleaved caspase-3 in colon cancer stem-like cells. FLLL32 is more potent than curcumin as evidenced with lower

  4. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for advanced acute promyelocytic leukemia in the ATRA and ATO era

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Safaa M.; Di Veroli, Ambra; Camboni, Agnese; Breccia, Massimo; Iori, Anna Paola; Aversa, Franco; Cupelli, Luca; Papayannidis, Cristina; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Arcese, William; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The role of allogeneic stem cell transplant in advanced acute promyelocytic leukemia patients who received standard first- and second-line therapy is still unknown. We report the outcome of 31 acute promyelocytic leukemia patients (median age 39 years) who underwent allogeneic transplant in second remission (n=15) or beyond (n=16). Sixteen patients were real-time polymerase chain reaction positive and 15 negative for PML/RARA pre-transplant. The 4-year overall survival was 62% and 31% for patients transplanted in second remission and beyond, respectively (P=0.05), and 64% and 27% for patients with pre-transplant negative and positive real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively (P=0.03). The 4-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 32% and 44% for patients transplanted in second remission and beyond, respectively (P=0.37), and 30% and 47% for patients transplanted with negative and positive real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively (P=0.30). Transplant-related mortality was 19.6%. In conclusion, allogeneic transplant is effective in advanced acute promyelocytic leukemia in the all-trans-retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide era, and should be considered once relapse is diagnosed. PMID:22689684

  5. Mobilization of CD34+CD38- hematopoietic stem cells after priming in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Plesa, Adriana; Chelghoum, Youcef; Mattei, Eve; Labussière, Hélène; Elhamri, Mohamed; Cannas, Giovanna; Morisset, Stéphane; Tagoug, Inès; Michallet, Mauricette; Dumontet, Charles; Thomas, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively the different CD34+ cell subsets after priming by chemotherapy granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (± G-CSF) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. METHODS: Peripheral blood and bone marrow samples were harvested in 8 acute myeloid leukemia patients during and after induction chemotherapy. The CD34/CD38 cell profile was analyzed by multi-parameter flow cytometry. Adhesion profile was made using CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) (CD184), VLA-4 (CD49d/CD29) and CD47. RESULTS: Chemotherapy ± G-CSF mobilized immature cells (CD34+CD38− population), while the more mature cells (CD34+CD38low and CD34+CD38+ populations) decreased progressively after treatment. Circulating CD34+ cells tended to be more sensitive to chemotherapy after priming with G-CSF. CD34+ cell mobilization was correlated with a gradual increase in CXCR4 and CD47 expression, suggesting a role in cell protection and the capacity of homing back to the marrow. CONCLUSION: Chemotherapy ± G-CSF mobilizes into the circulation CD34+ bone marrow cells, of which, the immature CD34+CD38– cell population. Further manipulations of these interactions may be a means with which to control the trafficking of leukemia stem cells to improve patients’ outcomes. PMID:24179607

  6. Why do chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells survive allogeneic stem cell transplantation or imatinib: does it really matter?

    PubMed

    Goldman, John; Gordon, Myrtle

    2006-01-01

    It is generally accepted that allogeneic stem cell transplantation can 'cure' chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), although occasional patients relapse more than 10 years after the transplant procedure. Such cures presumably result from the combined effects of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) of the conditioning regimen and the graft-vs.-leukemia (GvL) effect mediated by donor-derived T lymphocytes. The advent of imatinib has revolutionized the management of patients with CML, but much evidence suggests that it does not eradicate all LSCs, which theoretically remain a potential source of relapse to chronic phase or advanced phase disease. Moreover, sub-clones of Philadelphia-positive cells bearing mutations that code for amino-acid substitutions in the Bcr-Abl kinase domain can be identified in patients receiving treatment with imatinib and are associated with varying degrees of resistance to this agent. In the present review, we postulate that LSCs, similar to their normal counterparts, may alternate between cycling and quiescent modes. In the cycling mode, they may express Bcr-Abl protein and be susceptible to the acquisition of additional mutations, whereas, in the quiescent mode, they may express little or no Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, cannot acquire additional mutations and are unaffected by imatinib. Thus, a patient who starts treatment early in the natural history of CML, and who responds to imatinib clinically, may not have had the opportunity to acquire additional mutations in LSCs. In this case, the persistence long-term of quiescent 'non-mutated' LSCs despite imatinib treatment might be consistent with freedom from relapse to chronic or advanced phase disease, provided that they remain vulnerable to imatinib when they are recruited into cycle. Conversely, when imatinib resistant Philadelphia-positive sub-clones predominate, this is likely to be due to the recruitment to hematopoiesis of quiescent stem cells that had been in cycle before administration of imatinib and

  7. Identification of Therapeutic Targets for Quiescent, Chemotherapy-Resistant Human Leukemia Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yoriko; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Hijikata, Atsushi; Tomizawa-Murasawa, Mariko; Tanaka, Satoshi; Takagi, Shinsuke; Uchida, Naoyuki; Suzuki, Nahoko; Sone, Akiko; Najima, Yuho; Ozawa, Hidetoshi; Wake, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Shultz, Leonard D.; Ohara, Osamu; Ishikawa, Fumihiko

    2010-01-01

    Human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) originates from rare leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Because these chemotherapy-resistant LSCs are thought to underlie disease relapse, effective therapeutic strategies specifically targeting these cells may be beneficial. Here, we report identification of a primary human LSC gene signature and functional characterization of human LSC-specific molecules in vivo in a mouse xenotransplantation model. In 32 of 61 (53%) patients with AML, either CD32 or CD25 or both were highly expressed in LSCs. CD32- or CD25-positive LSCs could initiate AML and were cell cycle–quiescent and chemotherapy-resistant in vivo. Normal human hematopoietic stem cells depleted of CD32- and CD25-positive cells maintained long-term multilineage hematopoietic reconstitution capacity in vivo, indicating the potential safety of treatments targeting these molecules. In addition to CD32 and CD25, quiescent LSCs within the bone marrow niche also expressed the transcription factor WT1 and the kinase HCK. These molecules are also promising targets for LSC-specific therapy. PMID:20371479

  8. ADAR1 Activation Drives Leukemia Stem Cell Self-Renewal by Impairing Let-7 Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zipeto, Maria Anna; Court, Angela C; Sadarangani, Anil; Delos Santos, Nathaniel P; Balaian, Larisa; Chun, Hye-Jung; Pineda, Gabriel; Morris, Sheldon R; Mason, Cayla N; Geron, Ifat; Barrett, Christian; Goff, Daniel J; Wall, Russell; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Minden, Mark; Frazer, Kelly A; Marra, Marco A; Crews, Leslie A; Jiang, Qingfei; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2016-08-01

    Post-transcriptional adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA1 (ADAR1) promotes cancer progression and therapeutic resistance. However, ADAR1 editase-dependent mechanisms governing leukemia stem cell (LSC) generation have not been elucidated. In blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia (BC CML), we show that increased JAK2 signaling and BCR-ABL1 amplification activate ADAR1. In a humanized BC CML mouse model, combined JAK2 and BCR-ABL1 inhibition prevents LSC self-renewal commensurate with ADAR1 downregulation. Lentiviral ADAR1 wild-type, but not an editing-defective ADAR1(E912A) mutant, induces self-renewal gene expression and impairs biogenesis of stem cell regulatory let-7 microRNAs. Combined RNA sequencing, qRT-PCR, CLIP-ADAR1, and pri-let-7 mutagenesis data suggest that ADAR1 promotes LSC generation via let-7 pri-microRNA editing and LIN28B upregulation. A small-molecule tool compound antagonizes ADAR1's effect on LSC self-renewal in stromal co-cultures and restores let-7 biogenesis. Thus, ADAR1 activation represents a unique therapeutic vulnerability in LSCs with active JAK2 signaling. PMID:27292188

  9. Reversion to an embryonic alternative splicing program enhances leukemia stem cell self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Holm, Frida; Hellqvist, Eva; Mason, Cayla N; Ali, Shawn A; Delos-Santos, Nathaniel; Barrett, Christian L; Chun, Hye-Jung; Minden, Mark D; Moore, Richard A; Marra, Marco A; Runza, Valeria; Frazer, Kelly A; Sadarangani, Anil; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2015-12-15

    Formative research suggests that a human embryonic stem cell-specific alternative splicing gene regulatory network, which is repressed by Muscleblind-like (MBNL) RNA binding proteins, is involved in cell reprogramming. In this study, RNA sequencing, splice isoform-specific quantitative RT-PCR, lentiviral transduction, and in vivo humanized mouse model studies demonstrated that malignant reprogramming of progenitors into self-renewing blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells (BC LSCs) was partially driven by decreased MBNL3. Lentiviral knockdown of MBNL3 resulted in reversion to an embryonic alternative splice isoform program typified by overexpression of CD44 transcript variant 3, containing variant exons 8-10, and BC LSC proliferation. Although isoform-specific lentiviral CD44v3 overexpression enhanced chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitor replating capacity, lentiviral shRNA knockdown abrogated these effects. Combined treatment with a humanized pan-CD44 monoclonal antibody and a breakpoint cluster region - ABL proto-oncogene 1, nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (BCR-ABL1) antagonist inhibited LSC maintenance in a niche-dependent manner. In summary, MBNL3 down-regulation-related reversion to an embryonic alternative splicing program, typified by CD44v3 overexpression, represents a previously unidentified mechanism governing malignant progenitor reprogramming in malignant microenvironments and provides a pivotal opportunity for selective BC LSC detection and therapeutic elimination. PMID:26621726

  10. Kinetic impairment of haemopoietic stem cells in experimentally induced leukemia and aplastic anemia: an inverse correlation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sumanta; Basak, Pratima; Das, Madhurima; Das, Prosun; Pereira, Jacintha Archana; Dutta, Ranjan Kumar; Chaklader, Malay; Chaudhuri, Samaresh; Law, Sujata

    2009-01-01

    The production of blood cells from bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is regulated by a number of cytokines and growth factors that influence cell survival; differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis in health and supposedly, such mechanisms are deregulated in diseased conditions. As far as cellular kinetics is concerned HSCs are relatively quiescent in adults, have the ability to replicate symmetrically and asymmetrically and predictably exhibit multi-lineage hematopoietic reconstitution potential. HSC drive hematopoiesis and homeostasis by contracting and expanding the pool of hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow. In mouse they can be identified immunophenotypically as Sca1+ c-kit cells. In aplastic anemia a drastic decline in the marrow efficacy to produce mature blood cells leads to bone marrow failure. In contrast, in leukemia hyper stimulated marrow leads to deregulated differentiation of immature hematopoietic stem cells with increased self-proliferation potential. In our experimental set up, we induced aplastic anemia by injecting busulfan and cyclophosphamide and leukemia by N-N' ethylnitrosourea intraperitoneally in inbred swiss albino mice. Indeed, HSCs and haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are vulnerable target for such disease oriented dysregulation which bears close correlation with the bone marrow microenvironmental damage. The present study aims at evaluating the possible mechanism(s) of deregulation in the bone marrow physiology with special reference to HSC surface receptor expression, cellular granularity, cell cycle status and overall marrow architecture. The investigations made so far revealed an interesting correlation between disease initiation and specific cytokinetic involvement of HSC in the BM microenvironment with particular reference to leukemia and aplastic anemia. PMID:20232602

  11. CCL21 Facilitates Chemoresistance and Cancer Stem Cell-Like Properties of Colorectal Cancer Cells through AKT/GSK-3β/Snail Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lin-Lin; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Ge; Liu, Zong-Cai; Wu, Nong; Wang, Hao; Qi, Yi-Fei; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Cai, Shao Hui; Du, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Some evidence indicated that chemoresistance associates with the acquisition of cancer stem-like properties. Recent studies suggested that chemokines can promote the chemoresistance and stem cell properties in various cancer cells, while the underling mechanism is still not completely illustrated. In our study, we found that CCL21 can upregulate the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and stem cell property markers such as Bmi-1, Nanog, and OCT-4 in colorectal cancer (CRC) HCT116 cells and then improve the cell survival rate and mammosphere formation. Our results suggested that Snail was crucial for CCL21-mediated chemoresistance and cancer stem cell property in CRC cells. Further, we observed that CCL21 treatment increased the protein but not mRNA levels of Snail, which suggested that CCL21 upregulates Snail via posttranscriptional ways. The downstream signals AKT/GSK-3β mediated CCL21 induced the upregulation of Snail due to the fact that CCL21 treatment can obviously phosphorylate both AKT and GSK-3β. The inhibitor of PI3K/Akt, LY294002 significantly abolished CCL21 induced chemoresistance and mammosphere formation of HCT116 cells. Collectively, our results in the present study revealed that CCL21 can facilitate chemoresistance and stem cell property of CRC cells via the upregulation of P-gp, Bmi-1, Nanog, and OCT-4 through AKT/GSK-3β/Snail signals, which suggested a potential therapeutic approach to CRC patients. PMID:27057280

  12. CCL21 Facilitates Chemoresistance and Cancer Stem Cell-Like Properties of Colorectal Cancer Cells through AKT/GSK-3β/Snail Signals.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lin-Lin; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Ge; Liu, Zong-Cai; Wu, Nong; Wang, Hao; Qi, Yi-Fei; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Cai, Shao Hui; Du, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Some evidence indicated that chemoresistance associates with the acquisition of cancer stem-like properties. Recent studies suggested that chemokines can promote the chemoresistance and stem cell properties in various cancer cells, while the underling mechanism is still not completely illustrated. In our study, we found that CCL21 can upregulate the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and stem cell property markers such as Bmi-1, Nanog, and OCT-4 in colorectal cancer (CRC) HCT116 cells and then improve the cell survival rate and mammosphere formation. Our results suggested that Snail was crucial for CCL21-mediated chemoresistance and cancer stem cell property in CRC cells. Further, we observed that CCL21 treatment increased the protein but not mRNA levels of Snail, which suggested that CCL21 upregulates Snail via posttranscriptional ways. The downstream signals AKT/GSK-3β mediated CCL21 induced the upregulation of Snail due to the fact that CCL21 treatment can obviously phosphorylate both AKT and GSK-3β. The inhibitor of PI3K/Akt, LY294002 significantly abolished CCL21 induced chemoresistance and mammosphere formation of HCT116 cells. Collectively, our results in the present study revealed that CCL21 can facilitate chemoresistance and stem cell property of CRC cells via the upregulation of P-gp, Bmi-1, Nanog, and OCT-4 through AKT/GSK-3β/Snail signals, which suggested a potential therapeutic approach to CRC patients. PMID:27057280

  13. p-21 activated kinase 4 (PAK4) maintains stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells through activation of STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Nikhil; Marimuthu, Saravanakumar; Bhardwaj, Arun; Deshmukh, Sachin K; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Singh, Ajay P; McClellan, Steven; Carter, James E; Singh, Seema

    2016-01-28

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains a highly lethal malignancy due to its unusual chemoresistance and high aggressiveness. A subpopulation of pancreatic tumor cells, known as cancer stem cells (CSCs), is considered responsible not only for tumor-maintenance, but also for its widespread metastasis and therapeutic failure. Here we investigated the role of p-21 activated kinase 4 (PAK4) in driving PC stemness properties. Our data demonstrate that triple-positive (CD24(+)/CD44(+)/EpCAM(+)) subpopulation of pancreatic CSCs exhibits greater level of PAK4 as compared to triple-negative (CD24(-)/CD44(-)/EpCAM(-)) cells. Moreover, PAK4 silencing in PC cells leads to diminished fraction of CD24, CD44, and EpCAM positive cells. Furthermore, we show that PAK4-silenced PC cells exhibit decreased sphere-forming ability and increased chemosensitivity to gemcitabine toxicity. PAK4 expression is also associated with enhanced levels of stemness-associated transcription factors (Oct4/Nanog/Sox2 and KLF4). Furthermore, our data show decreased nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity of STAT3 in PAK4-silenced PC cells and restitution of its activity leads to restoration of stem cell phenotypes. Together, our findings deliver first experimental evidence for the involvement of PAK4 in PC stemness and support its clinical utility as a novel therapeutic target in PC. PMID:26546043

  14. Rapamycin inhibits FBXW7 loss-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell-like characteristics in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuli; Liu, Yueyong; Lu, Jing; Zhang, Pengju; Wang, Yunshan; Xu, Yangyang; Wang, Zeran; Mao, Jian-Hua; Wei, Guangwei

    2013-01-01

    Increased cell migration and invasion lead to cancer metastasis and are crucial to cancer prognosis. In this study, we explore whether FBXW7 plays any role in metastatic process. We show that depletion of FBXW7 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human colon cancer cells along with the increase in cell migration and invasion. Moreover, FBXW7 deficiency promotes the generation of colon cancer stem-like cells in tumor-sphere culture. mTOR inhibition by rapamycin suppresses FBXW7 loss-driven EMT, invasion and stemness. Our results define the FBXW7/mTOR axis as a novel EMT pathway that mediates cancer invasion. PMID:23558291

  15. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Defining Molecular Phenotypes of Mesenchymal and hematopoietic Stem Cells derived from Peripheral blood of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia patients for regenerative stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Potdar, PD; Subedi, RP

    2011-01-01

    Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) is a clonal myeloid disorder affecting all age groups, characterized by accumulation of immature blast cells in bone marrow and in peripheral blood. Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation is a present treatment for cure of ALL patients, which is very expensive, invasive process and may have possibility of transplantation of malignant stem cells to patients. In the present study, we hypothesized to isolate large number of normal Mesenchymal & Hematopoietic stem cells from peripheral blood of ALL patients, which will be further characterized for their normal phenotypes by using specific molecular stem cell markers. This is the first study, which defines the existing phenotypes of isolated MSCs and HSCs from peripheral blood of ALL patients. We have established three cell lines in which two were Mesenchymal stem cells designated as MSCALL and MSCnsALL and one was suspension cell line designated as HSCALL. The HSCALL cell line was developed from the lymphocyte like cells secreted by MSCALL cells. Our study also showed that MSCALL from peripheral blood of ALL patient secreted hematopoietic stem cells in vitro culture. We have characterized all three-cell lines by 14 specific stem cell molecular markers. It was found that both MSC cell lines expressed CD105, CD13, and CD73 with mixed expression of CD34 and CD45 at early passage whereas, HSCALL cell line expressed prominent feature of hematopoietic stem cells such as CD34 and CD45 with mild expression of CD105 and CD13. All three-cell lines expressed LIF, OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, IL6, and DAPK. These cells mildly expressed COX2 and did not express BCR-ABL. Overall it was shown that isolated MSCs and HSCs can be use as a model system to study the mechanism of leukemia at stem cell level and their use in stem cell regeneration therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia. PMID:24693170

  17. Promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger induction signs mesenchymal stem cell commitment: identification of a key marker for stemness maintenance?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for cartilage and bone tissue engineering given their ability to differentiate into chondrocytes and osteoblasts. However, the common origin of these two specialized cell types raised the question about the identification of regulatory pathways determining the differentiation fate of MSCs into chondrocyte or osteoblast. Methods Chondrogenesis, osteoblastogenesis, and adipogenesis of human and mouse MSC were induced by using specific inductive culture conditions. Expression of promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger (PLZF) or differentiation markers in MSCs was determined by RT-qPCR. PLZF-expressing MSC were implanted in a mouse osteochondral defect model and the neotissue was analyzed by routine histology and microcomputed tomography. Results We found out that PLZF is not expressed in MSCs and its expression at early stages of MSC differentiation is the mark of their commitment toward the three main lineages. PLZF acts as an upstream regulator of both Sox9 and Runx2, and its overexpression in MSC enhances chondrogenesis and osteogenesis while it inhibits adipogenesis. In vivo, implantation of PLZF-expressing MSC in mice with full-thickness osteochondral defects resulted in the formation of a reparative tissue resembling cartilage and bone. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that absence of PLZF is required for stemness maintenance and its expression is an early event at the onset of MSC commitment during the differentiation processes of the three main lineages. PMID:24564963

  18. In vitro differentiation of germ cells from stem cells: a comparison between primordial germ cells and in vitro derived primordial germ cell-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, W; Chen, C; De Felici, M; Shen, W

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are unique cell types capable to proliferate, some of them indefinitely, while maintaining the ability to differentiate into a few or any cell lineages. In 2003, a group headed by Hans R. Schöler reported that oocyte-like cells could be produced from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro. After more than 10 years, where have these researches reached? Which are the major successes achieved and the problems still remaining to be solved? Although during the last years, many reviews have been published about these topics, in the present work, we will focus on an aspect that has been little considered so far, namely a strict comparison between the in vitro and in vivo developmental capabilities of the primordial germ cells (PGCs) isolated from the embryo and the PGC-like cells (PGC-LCs) produced in vitro from different types of stem cells in the mouse, the species in which most investigation has been carried out. Actually, the formation and differentiation of PGCs are crucial for both male and female gametogenesis, and the faithful production of PGCs in vitro represents the basis for obtaining functional germ cells. PMID:26469955

  19. In vitro differentiation of germ cells from stem cells: a comparison between primordial germ cells and in vitro derived primordial germ cell-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, W; Chen, C; De Felici, M; Shen, W

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are unique cell types capable to proliferate, some of them indefinitely, while maintaining the ability to differentiate into a few or any cell lineages. In 2003, a group headed by Hans R. Schöler reported that oocyte-like cells could be produced from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro. After more than 10 years, where have these researches reached? Which are the major successes achieved and the problems still remaining to be solved? Although during the last years, many reviews have been published about these topics, in the present work, we will focus on an aspect that has been little considered so far, namely a strict comparison between the in vitro and in vivo developmental capabilities of the primordial germ cells (PGCs) isolated from the embryo and the PGC-like cells (PGC-LCs) produced in vitro from different types of stem cells in the mouse, the species in which most investigation has been carried out. Actually, the formation and differentiation of PGCs are crucial for both male and female gametogenesis, and the faithful production of PGCs in vitro represents the basis for obtaining functional germ cells. PMID:26469955

  20. Child-rearing and adult leukemia: Epidemiologic evidence in support of competing hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Steven, R.G. ); Severson, R.K. . Japan-Hawaii Cancer Study); Heuser, L. )

    1988-05-01

    The hypothesis that lack of child-rearing increases the risk of acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) in adults was examined in a case-control study in western Washington State. Among 159 study subjects over age 50 in 1985, there were 76 cases of ANLL and 83 controls. The crude odds ratio associated with lack of child-rearing was 1.8, with a 95% confidence range of 0.7 to 5.0. The average total number of children ever living with cases was 2.6 and with controls was 3.1 (p = 0.06). The mean total number of years living with a child, or children, under age 18 was 17.6 in cases and 20.2 in controls (p = 0.05). These results were not materially altered after adjustment for age, smoking, race, income, and sex. The data provide evidence that cases of ANLL were less likely to ever have had children and that fewer years were spent rearing children than were spent by controls. The hypothesis was based on the competing stem cell'' theory of hematopoietic ontogeny. If valid, then exposure to children would increase exposure to infection, leading to increased lymphocytic stem cell turnover, and decreased non-lymphocytic stem cell turnover. This, in turn, may reduce risk of ANLL in adults. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. Human chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells are insensitive to imatinib despite inhibition of BCR-ABL activity

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Amie S.; Agarwal, Anupriya; Loriaux, Marc; Cortes, Jorge; Deininger, Michael W.; Druker, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    Imatinib therapy, which targets the oncogene product BCR-ABL, has transformed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) from a life-threatening disease into a chronic condition. Most patients, however, harbor residual leukemia cells, and disease recurrence usually occurs when imatinib is discontinued. Although various mechanisms to explain leukemia cell persistence have been proposed, the critical question from a therapeutic standpoint — whether disease persistence is BCR-ABL dependent or independent — has not been answered. Here, we report that human CML stem cells do not depend on BCR-ABL activity for survival and are thus not eliminated by imatinib therapy. Imatinib inhibited BCR-ABL activity to the same degree in all stem (CD34+CD38–, CD133+) and progenitor (CD34+CD38+) cells and in quiescent and cycling progenitors from newly diagnosed CML patients. Although short-term in vitro imatinib treatment reduced the expansion of CML stem/progenitors, cytokine support permitted growth and survival in the absence of BCR-ABL activity that was comparable to that of normal stem/progenitor counterparts. Our findings suggest that primitive CML cells are not oncogene addicted and that therapies that biochemically target BCR-ABL will not eliminate CML stem cells. PMID:21157039

  2. Genomic instability may originate from imatinib-refractory chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolton-Gillespie, Elisabeth; Schemionek, Mirle; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Flis, Sylwia; Hoser, Grazyna; Lange, Thoralf; Nieborowska-Skorska, Margaret; Maier, Jacqueline; Kerstiens, Linda; Koptyra, Mateusz; Müller, Martin C.; Modi, Hardik; Stoklosa, Tomasz; Seferynska, Ilona; Bhatia, Ravi; Holyoake, Tessa L.; Koschmieder, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) resulting in BCR-ABL1 mutations encoding resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and/or additional chromosomal aberrations leading to disease relapse and/or malignant progression. TKI-naive and TKI-treated leukemia stem cells (LSCs) and leukemia progenitor cells (LPCs) accumulate high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative DNA damage. To determine the role of TKI-refractory LSCs in genomic instability, we used a murine model of CML-CP where ROS-induced oxidative DNA damage was elevated in LSCs, including quiescent LSCs, but not in LPCs. ROS-induced oxidative DNA damage in LSCs caused clinically relevant genomic instability in CML-CP–like mice, such as TKI-resistant BCR-ABL1 mutations (E255K, T315I, H396P), deletions in Ikzf1 and Trp53, and additions in Zfp423 and Idh1. Despite inhibition of BCR-ABL1 kinase, imatinib did not downregulate ROS and oxidative DNA damage in TKI-refractory LSCs to the levels detected in normal cells, and CML-CP–like mice treated with imatinib continued to accumulate clinically relevant genetic aberrations. Inhibition of class I p21-activated protein kinases by IPA3 downregulated ROS in TKI-naive and TKI-treated LSCs. Altogether, we postulate that genomic instability may originate in the most primitive TKI-refractory LSCs in TKI-naive and TKI-treated patients. PMID:23543457

  3. Hydroquinone induces DNA hypomethylation-independent overexpression of retroelements in human leukemia and hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Conti, Anastasia; Rota, Federica; Ragni, Enrico; Favero, Chiara; Motta, Valeria; Lazzari, Lorenza; Bollati, Valentina; Fustinoni, Silvia; Dieci, Giorgio

    2016-06-10

    Hydroquinone (HQ) is an important benzene-derived metabolite associated with acute myelogenous leukemia risk. Although altered DNA methylation has been reported in both benzene-exposed human subjects and HQ-exposed cultured cells, the inventory of benzene metabolite effects on the epigenome is only starting to be established. In this study, we used a monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from cord blood to investigate the effects of HQ treatment on the expression of the three most important families of retrotransposons in the human genome: LINE-1, Alu and Endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), that are normally subjected to tight epigenetic silencing. We found a clear tendency towards increased retrotransposon expression in response to HQ exposure, more pronounced in the case of LINE-1 and HERV. Such a partial loss of silencing, however, was generally not associated with HQ-induced DNA hypomethylation. On the other hand, retroelement derepression was also observed in the same cells in response to the hypomethylating agent decitabine. These observations suggest the existence of different types of epigenetic switches operating at human retroelements, and point to retroelement activation in response to benzene-derived metabolites as a novel factor deserving attention in benzene carcinogenesis studies. PMID:27154225

  4. Allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplants for patients with relapsed acute leukemia: long-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, A; Lamparelli, T; Gualandi, F; Occhini, D; Bregante, S; Raiola, A M; Ibatici, A; di Grazia, C; Dominietto, A; Piaggio, G; Podesta, M; Bruno, B; Lombardi, A; Frassoni, F; Viscoli, C; Sacchi, N; Van Lint, M T

    2007-03-01

    We assessed the long-term outcome of patients with relapsed acute myeloid (n=86) or acute lymphoid leukemia (n=66), undergoing an allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation in our unit. The median blast count in the marrow was 30%. Conditioning regimen included total body irradiation (TBI) (10-12 Gy) in 115 patients. The donor was a matched donor (n=132) or a family mismatched donor (n=20). Twenty-two patients (15%) survive disease free, with a median follow-up of 14 years: 18 are off medications. The cumulative incidence of transplant related mortality is 40% and the cumulative incidence of relapse related death (RRD) is 45%. In multivariate analysis of survival, favorable predictors were chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) (P=0.0003), donor other than family mismatched (P=0.02), donor age less than 34 years (P=0.02) and blast count less than 30% (P=0.07). Patients with all four favorable predictors had a 54% survival. In multivariate analysis of relapse, protective variables were the use of TBI (P=0.005) and cGvHD (P=0.01). This study confirms that a fraction of relapsed leukemias is cured with an allogeneic transplant: selection of patients with a blast count <30%, identification of young, human leukocyte antigen-matched donors and the use of total body radiation may significantly improve the outcome. PMID:17277788

  5. Naive Donor NK Cell Repertoires Associated with Less Leukemia Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Andreas T; Clancy, Trevor; Goodridge, Jodie P; Béziat, Vivien; Schaffer, Marie; Hovig, Eivind; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Ljungman, Per T; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2016-02-01

    Acute and latent human CMV cause profound changes in the NK cell repertoire, with expansion and differentiation of educated NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors. In this study, we addressed whether such CMV-induced imprints on the donor NK cell repertoire influenced the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Hierarchical clustering of high-resolution immunophenotyping data covering key NK cell parameters, including frequencies of CD56(bright), NKG2A(+), NKG2C(+), and CD57(+) NK cell subsets, as well as the size of the educated NK cell subset, was linked to clinical outcomes. Clusters defining naive (NKG2A(+)CD57(-)NKG2C(-)) NK cell repertoires in the donor were associated with decreased risk for relapse in recipients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (hazard ratio [HR], 0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03-0.27; p < 0.001). Furthermore, recipients with naive repertoires at 9-12 mo after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had increased disease-free survival (HR, 7.2; 95% CI: 1.6-33; p = 0.01) and increased overall survival (HR, 9.3; 95% CI: 1.1-77, p = 0.04). Conversely, patients with a relative increase in differentiated NK cells at 9-12 mo displayed a higher rate of late relapses (HR, 8.41; 95% CI: 6.7-11; p = 0.02), reduced disease-free survival (HR, 0.12; 95% CI: 0.12-0.74; p = 0.02), and reduced overall survival (HR, 0.07; 95% CI: 0.01-0.69; p = 0.02). Thus, our data suggest that naive donor NK cell repertoires are associated with protection against leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26746188

  6. Aldehyde dehydrogenases inhibition eradicates leukemia stem cells while sparing normal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Venton, G; Pérez-Alea, M; Baier, C; Fournet, G; Quash, G; Labiad, Y; Martin, G; Sanderson, F; Poullin, P; Suchon, P; Farnault, L; Nguyen, C; Brunet, C; Ceylan, I; Costello, R T

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) achieve complete remission (CR) after standard induction chemotherapy. However, the majority subsequently relapse and die of the disease. A leukemia stem cell (LSC) paradigm has been invoked to explain this failure of CR to reliably translate into cure. Indeed, LSCs are highly enriched in CD34+CD38- leukemic cells that exhibit positive aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH+) on flow cytometry, these LSCs are resistant to currently existing treatments in AML such as cytarabine and anthracycline that, at the cost of great toxicity on normal cells, are highly active against the leukemic bulk, but spare the LSCs responsible for relapse. To try to combat the LSC population selectively, a well-characterized ALDH inhibitor by the trivial name of dimethyl ampal thiolester (DIMATE) was assessed on sorted CD34+CD38- subpopulations from AML patients and healthy patients. ALDH activity and cell viability were monitored by flow cytometry. From enzyme kinetic studies DIMATE is an active enzyme-dependent, competitive, irreversible inhibitor of ALDH1. On cells in culture, DIMATE is a powerful inhibitor of ALDHs 1 and 3, has a major cytotoxic activity on human AML cell lines. Moreover, DIMATE is highly active against leukemic populations enriched in LSCs, but, unlike conventional chemotherapy, DIMATE is not toxic for healthy hematopoietic stem cells which retained, after treatment, their self-renewing and multi-lineage differentiation capacity in immunodeficient mice, xenografted with human leukemic cells. DIMATE eradicates specifically human AML cells and spares healthy mouse hematologic cells. PMID:27611922

  7. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Dedifferentiation of patient-derived glioblastoma multiforme cell lines results in a cancer stem cell-like state with mitogen-independent growth

    PubMed Central

    Olmez, Inan; Shen, Wangzhen; McDonald, Hayes; Ozpolat, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence shows that glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) originates from cancer stem cells (CSCs). Characterization of CSC-specific signalling pathways would help identify new therapeutic targets and perhaps lead to the development of more efficient therapies selectively targeting CSCs. Here; we successfully dedifferentiated two patient-derived GBM cell lines into CSC-like cells (induced glioma stem cells, iGSCs) through expression of Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog transcription factors. Transformed cells exhibited significant suppression of epidermal growth factor receptor and its downstream pathways. Compared with parental GBM cells, iGSCs formed large neurospheres even in the absence of exogenous mitogens; they exhibited significant sensitivity to salinomycin and chemoresistance to temozolomide. Further characterization of iGSCs revealed induction of NOTCH1 and Wnt/β-catenin signalling and expression of CD133, CD44 and ALDH1A1. Our results indicate that iGSCs may help us understand CSC physiology and lead to development of potential therapeutic interventions aimed at differentiating tumour cells to render them more sensitive to chemotherapy or other standard agents. PMID:25787115

  9. Dedifferentiation of patient-derived glioblastoma multiforme cell lines results in a cancer stem cell-like state with mitogen-independent growth.

    PubMed

    Olmez, Inan; Shen, Wangzhen; McDonald, Hayes; Ozpolat, Bulent

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence shows that glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) originates from cancer stem cells (CSCs). Characterization of CSC-specific signalling pathways would help identify new therapeutic targets and perhaps lead to the development of more efficient therapies selectively targeting CSCs. Here; we successfully dedifferentiated two patient-derived GBM cell lines into CSC-like cells (induced glioma stem cells, iGSCs) through expression of Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog transcription factors. Transformed cells exhibited significant suppression of epidermal growth factor receptor and its downstream pathways. Compared with parental GBM cells, iGSCs formed large neurospheres even in the absence of exogenous mitogens; they exhibited significant sensitivity to salinomycin and chemoresistance to temozolomide. Further characterization of iGSCs revealed induction of NOTCH1 and Wnt/β-catenin signalling and expression of CD133, CD44 and ALDH1A1. Our results indicate that iGSCs may help us understand CSC physiology and lead to development of potential therapeutic interventions aimed at differentiating tumour cells to render them more sensitive to chemotherapy or other standard agents. PMID:25787115

  10. Curcumin Improves the Tumoricidal Effect of Mitomycin C by Suppressing ABCG2 Expression in Stem Cell-Like Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qianmei; Ye, Meina; Lu, Yiyu; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Qilong; Huang, Shuang; Su, Shibing

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells with stem cell–like properties contribute to the development of resistance to chemotherapy and eventually to tumor relapses. The current study investigated the potential of curcumin to reduce breast cancer stem cell (BCSC) population for sensitizing breast cancer cells to mitomycin C (MMC) both in vitro and in vivo. Curcumin improved the sensitivity of paclitaxel, cisplatin, and doxorubicin in breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, as shown by the more than 2-fold decrease in the half-maximal inhibitory concentration of these chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, curcumin sensitized the BCSCs of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 to MMC by 5- and 15-fold, respectively. The BCSCs could not grow to the fifth generation in the presence of curcumin and MMC. MMC or curcumin alone only marginally reduced the BCSC population in the mammospheres; however, together, they reduced the BCSC population in CD44+CD24−/low cells by more than 75% (29.34% to 6.86%). Curcumin sensitized BCSCs through a reduction in the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCG2 and ABCC1. We demonstrated that fumitremorgin C, a selective ABCG2 inhibitor, reduced BCSC survival to a similar degree as curcumin did. Curcumin sensitized breast cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs by reducing the BCSC population mainly through a reduction in the expression of ABCG2. PMID:26305906

  11. Annexin A1 is involved in the acquisition and maintenance of a stem cell-like/aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer cells with acquired resistance to zoledronic acid

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarro, Valentina; Belvedere, Raffaella; Milone, Maria Rita; Pucci, Biagio; Lombardi, Rita; Bruzzese, Francesca; Popolo, Ada; Parente, Luca; Budillon, Alfredo; Petrella, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have characterized the role of annexin A1 (ANXA1) in the acquisition and maintenance of stem-like/aggressive features in prostate cancer (PCa) cells comparing zoledronic acid (ZA)-resistant DU145R80 with their parental DU145 cells. ANXA1 is over-expressed in DU145R80 cells and its down-regulation abolishes their resistance to ZA. Moreover, ANXA1 induces DU145 and DU145R80 invasiveness acting through formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). Also, ANXA1 knockdown is able to inhibit epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and to reduce focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and metalloproteases (MMP)-2/9 expression in PCa cells. DU145R80 show a cancer stem cell (CSC)-like signature with a high expression of CSC markers including CD44, CD133, NANOG, Snail, Oct4 and ALDH7A1 and CSC-related genes as STAT3. Interestingly, ANXA1 knockdown induces these cells to revert from a putative prostate CSC to a more differentiated phenotype resembling DU145 PCa cell signature. Similar results are obtained concerning some drug resistance-related genes such as ATP Binding Cassette G2 (ABCG2) and Lung Resistant Protein (LRP). Our study provides new insights on the role of ANXA1 protein in PCa onset and progression.

  12. Annexin A1 is involved in the acquisition and maintenance of a stem cell-like/aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer cells with acquired resistance to zoledronic acid.

    PubMed

    Bizzarro, Valentina; Belvedere, Raffaella; Milone, Maria Rita; Pucci, Biagio; Lombardi, Rita; Bruzzese, Francesca; Popolo, Ada; Parente, Luca; Budillon, Alfredo; Petrella, Antonello

    2015-09-22

    In this study, we have characterized the role of annexin A1 (ANXA1) in the acquisition and maintenance of stem-like/aggressive features in prostate cancer (PCa) cells comparing zoledronic acid (ZA)-resistant DU145R80 with their parental DU145 cells. ANXA1 is over-expressed in DU145R80 cells and its down-regulation abolishes their resistance to ZA. Moreover, ANXA1 induces DU145 and DU145R80 invasiveness acting through formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). Also, ANXA1 knockdown is able to inhibit epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and to reduce focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and metalloproteases (MMP)-2/9 expression in PCa cells. DU145R80 show a cancer stem cell (CSC)-like signature with a high expression of CSC markers including CD44, CD133, NANOG, Snail, Oct4 and ALDH7A1 and CSC-related genes as STAT3. Interestingly, ANXA1 knockdown induces these cells to revert from a putative prostate CSC to a more differentiated phenotype resembling DU145 PCa cell signature. Similar results are obtained concerning some drug resistance-related genes such as ATP Binding Cassette G2 (ABCG2) and Lung Resistant Protein (LRP). Our study provides new insights on the role of ANXA1 protein in PCa onset and progression. PMID:26312765

  13. Human cancer cells with stem cell-like phenotype exhibit enhanced sensitivity to the cytotoxicity of IL-2 and IL-15 activated natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; Wang, Guoping; He, Sisi; Liu, Qin; Sun, Jianhong; Wang, Yongsheng

    2016-02-01

    Tumors harbor a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) which can drive tumor progression and therapeutical resistance. Nature killer (NK) cells are best known for their ability to directly recognize and kill malignant cells. However, the susceptibility of cancer stem cells to NK cells is not fully understood. Here we demonstrated that human CD44+CD24- breast CSCs were shown enhanced sensitivity to IL-2 and IL-15 activated NK cells. CD44+CD24- CSCs expressed higher levels of NKG2D ligands ULBP1, ULBP2 and MICA. Blockade assay showed that the sensitivity of CSCs to NK cells-mediated lysis was mainly dependent on NKG2D. Furthermore, redox oxygen species (ROS)-low tumor cells were more sensitive to NK cells. The presence of antioxidant enzymes inhibitor L-S,R-buthionine sulfoximine or H2O2 retarded the cytotoxicity of NK cells to CD44+CD24- CSCs. In addition, NK cells could readily target CD133+ colonal CSCs. Our findings provide novel targets for NK cells-based immunotherapy and are of great importance for translational medicine. PMID:26677760

  14. Selective T-Cell Depletion to Reduce GVHD (Patients) Receiving Stem Cell Tx to Treat Leukemia, Lymphoma or MDS

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-09

    Graft vs Host Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Leukemia; Leukemia, Myeloid; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Chronic; Leukemia, Lymphocytic; Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Mantle-cell; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Hodgkin Disease

  15. Mitotic phosphorylation of SOX2 mediated by Aurora kinase A is critical for the stem-cell like cell maintenance in PA-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dandan; Wang, Qianqian; Yu, Min; Lan, Rongfeng; Li, Shuiming; Lu, Fei

    2016-08-01

    Transcription factor SOX2 is multiple phosphorylated. However, the kinase and the timing regulating SOX2 phosphorylation remains poorly understood. Here we reported mitotic phosphorylation of SOX2 by Aurora kinase A (AURKA). AURKA inhibitors (VX680, Aurora kinase Inhibitor I) but not PLK1 inhibitors (BI2536, CBB2001) eliminate the mitotic phosphorylation of SOX2. Consistently, siRNA inhibition of AURKA can eliminate mitotic SOX2 phosphorylation. Ser220 and Ser251 are two sites that identified for mitotic phosphorylation on SOX2. Moreover, SOX2 mutants (S220A and S251A) can promote SOX2 induced OCT4 re-expression in differentiated cells. These findings reveal a novel regulation mechanism of SOX2 phosphorylation mediated by AURKA in mitosis and its function in stem cell pluripotency maintenance in cancer cells. PMID:27249336

  16. The inhibitor of differentiation isoform Id1b, generated by alternative splicing, maintains cell quiescence and confers self-renewal and cancer stem cell-like properties.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Irene; Nguewa, Paul; Bleau, Anne-Marie; Nistal-Villan, Estanislao; Lopez, Ines; Villalba, Maria; Gil-Bazo, Ignacio; Calvo, Alfonso

    2015-01-28

    Id1 has been shown to play a critical role in tumorigenesis and angiogenesis. Moreover, recent reports have involved Id1 in the maintenance of cancer stem cell features in some tumor types. The Id1 gene generates two isoforms through alternative splicing: Id1a and Id1b. We have investigated the role of each isoform in cancer development. Using lentiviral systems we modified the endogenous expression of each of these isoforms in cancer cells and analyzed their biological effect both in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of Id1b in murine CT26 and 3LL cells caused a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and reduced proliferation, clonogenicity and phospho-ERK1/2 levels, while increasing p27 levels. High levels of Id1a had an opposite effect and the proportion of cells in the S phase increased significantly. In vivo models confirmed the inhibitory role of Id1b in primary tumor growth and metastasis. Through microarray analysis we found that the cancer stem cell (CSC) markers ALDH1A1 and Notch-1 were up-regulated specifically in Id1b-overexpressing cells. By using qPCR we also found overexpression of Sca-1, Tert, Sox-2 and Oct-4 in these cells. Increased levels of Id1b promoted self-renewal and CSC-like properties, as shown by their high capacity for developing secondary tumorspheres and retaining the PKH26 dye. The acquisition of CSC phenotype was confirmed in human PC-3 cells that overexpressed Id1b. Our results show that Id1b maintains cells in a quiescent state and promotes self-renewal and CSC-like features. On the contrary, Id1a promotes cell proliferation. PMID:25449776

  17. The bone marrow niche, stem cells, and leukemia: impact of drugs, chemicals, and the environment

    PubMed Central

    Greim, Helmut; Kaden, Debra A.; Larson, Richard A.; Palermo, Christine M.; Rice, Jerry M.; Ross, David; Snyder, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a unique population of somatic stem cells that can both self-renew for long-term reconstitution of HSCs and differentiate into hematopoietic progenitor cells, which in turn give rise, in a hierarchical manner, to the entire myeloid and lymphoid lineages. The differentiation and maturation of these lineages occurs in the bone marrow niche, a microenvironment that regulates self-renewal, survival, differentiation, and proliferation, with interactions among signaling pathways in the HSCs and the niche required to establish and maintain homeostasis. The accumulation of genetic mutations and cytogenetic abnormalities within cells of the partially differentiated myeloid lineage, particularly as a result of exposure to benzene or cytotoxic anticancer drugs, can give rise to malignancies like acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. Better understanding of the mechanisms driving these malignancies and susceptibility factors, both within hematopoietic progenitor cells and cells within the bone marrow niche, may lead to the development of strategies for prevention of occupational and cancer therapy–induced disease. PMID:24495159

  18. Impact of malignant stem cell burden on therapy outcome in newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Mustjoki, S; Richter, J; Barbany, G; Ehrencrona, H; Fioretos, T; Gedde-Dahl, T; Gjertsen, B T; Hovland, R; Hernesniemi, S; Josefsen, D; Koskenvesa, P; Dybedal, I; Markevärn, B; Olofsson, T; Olsson-Strömberg, U; Rapakko, K; Thunberg, S; Stenke, L; Simonsson, B; Porkka, K; Hjorth-Hansen, H

    2013-07-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) stem cells appear resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in vitro, but their impact and drug sensitivity in vivo has not been systematically assessed. We prospectively analyzed the proportion of Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemic stem cells (LSCs, Ph+CD34+CD38-) and progenitor cells (LPCs, Ph+CD34+CD38+) from 46 newly diagnosed CML patients both at the diagnosis and during imatinib or dasatinib therapy (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00852566). At diagnosis, the proportion of LSCs varied markedly (1-100%) between individual patients with a significantly lower median value as compared with LPCs (79% vs 96%, respectively, P=0.0001). The LSC burden correlated with leukocyte count, spleen size, hemoglobin and blast percentage. A low initial LSC percentage was associated with less therapy-related hematological toxicity and superior cytogenetic and molecular responses. After initiation of TKI therapy, the LPCs and LSCs rapidly decreased in both therapy groups, but at 3 months time point the median LPC level was significantly lower in dasatinib group compared with imatinib patients (0.05% vs 0.68%, P=0.032). These data detail for the first time the prognostic significance of the LSC burden at diagnosis and show that in contrast to in vitro data, TKI therapy rapidly eradicates the majority of LSCs in patients. PMID:23328954

  19. Aberrantly expressed miR-582-3p maintains lung cancer stem cell-like traits by activating Wnt/β-catenin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lishan; Cai, Junchao; Chen, Baixue; Wu, Shanshan; Li, Rong; Xu, Xiaonan; Yang, Yi; Guan, Hongyu; Zhu, Xun; Zhang, Le; Yuan, Jie; Wu, Jueheng; Li, Mengfeng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are involved in tumorigenesis, tumour recurrence and therapy resistance and Wnt signalling is essential for the development of the biological traits of CSCs. In non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), unlike in colon cancer, mutations in β-catenin and APC genes are uncommon; thus, the mechanism underlying the constitutive activation of Wnt signalling in NSCLC remains unclear. Here we report that miR-582-3p expression correlates with the overall- and recurrence-free-survival of NSCLC patients, and miR-582-3p has an activating effect on Wnt/β-catenin signalling. miR-582-3p overexpression simultaneously targets multiple negative regulators of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, namely, AXIN2, DKK3 and SFRP1. Consequently, miR-582-3p promotes CSC traits of NSCLC cells in vitro and tumorigenesis and tumour recurrence in vivo. Antagonizing miR-582-3p potently inhibits tumour initiation and progression in xenografted animal models. These findings suggest that miR-582-3p mediates the constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling, likely serving as a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC. PMID:26468775

  20. Activation of MAPK pathways due to DUSP4 loss promotes cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in basal-like breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balko, Justin M.; Schwarz, Luis J.; Bhola, Neil E.; Kurupi, Richard; Owens, Phillip; Miller, Todd W.; Gómez, Henry; Cook, Rebecca S.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2014-01-01

    Basal-like breast cancer (BLBC) is an aggressive disease that lacks a clinically-approved targeting therapy. Traditional chemotherapy is effective in BLBC, but it spares the cancer stem cell (CSC)-like population which is likely to contribute to cancer recurrence after the initial treatment. DUSP4 is a negative regulator of the MAPK pathway that is deficient in highly aggressive BLBCs treated with chemotherapy, leading to aberrant MAPK activation and resistance to taxane-induced apoptosis. Herein, we investigated how DUSP4 regulates the MEK and JNK pathways in modifying CSC-like behavior. DUSP4 loss increased mammosphere formation and the expression of the CSC-promoting cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These effects were caused in part by loss of control of the MEK and JNK pathways and involved downstream activation of the ETS-1 and c-JUN transcription factors. Enforced expression of DUSP4 in reduced the CD44+/CD24- population in multiple BLBC cell lines in a MEK-dependent manner, limiting tumor formation of claudin-low SUM159PT cells in mice. Our findings support the evaluation of MEK and JNK pathway inhibitors as therapeutic agents in BLBC in order to eliminate the CSC population. PMID:23966295

  1. Carbonic anhydrase IX induction defines a heterogeneous cancer cell response to hypoxia and mediates stem cell-like properties and sensitivity to HDAC inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ledaki, Ioanna; McIntyre, Alan; Wigfield, Simon; Buffa, Francesca; McGowan, Simon; Baban, Dilair; Li, Ji-Liang; Harris, Adrian L

    2015-08-14

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is strongly induced by hypoxia and its overexpression is associated with poor therapeutic outcome in cancer. Here, we report that hypoxia promotes tumour heterogeneity through the epigenetic regulation of CAIX. Based on hypoxic CAIX expression we identify and characterize two distinct populations of tumour cells, one that has inducible expression of CAIX and one that does not. The CAIX+ve population is enriched with cells expressing cancer stem cell markers and which have high self-renewal capacity. We show that differential CAIX expression is due to differences in chromatin structure. To further investigate the relationship between chromatin organization and hypoxic induction of CAIX expression we investigated the effect of JQ1 an inhibitor of BET bromodomain proteins and A366 a selective inhibitor of the H3K9 methyltransferase G9a/GLP. We identified that these drugs were able to modulate hypoxic CAIX expression induction. This further highlights the role of epigenetic modification in adaption to hypoxia and also in regulation of heterogeneity of cells within tumours. Interestingly, we identified that the two subpopulations show a differential sensitivity to HDAC inhibitors, NaBu or SAHA, with the CAIX positive showing greater sensitivity to treatment. We propose that drugs modulating chromatin regulation of expression may be used to reduce heterogeneity induced by hypoxia and could in combination have significant clinical consequences. PMID:26305601

  2. Aberrantly expressed miR-582-3p maintains lung cancer stem cell-like traits by activating Wnt/β-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lishan; Cai, Junchao; Chen, Baixue; Wu, Shanshan; Li, Rong; Xu, Xiaonan; Yang, Yi; Guan, Hongyu; Zhu, Xun; Zhang, Le; Yuan, Jie; Wu, Jueheng; Li, Mengfeng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are involved in tumorigenesis, tumour recurrence and therapy resistance and Wnt signalling is essential for the development of the biological traits of CSCs. In non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), unlike in colon cancer, mutations in β-catenin and APC genes are uncommon; thus, the mechanism underlying the constitutive activation of Wnt signalling in NSCLC remains unclear. Here we report that miR-582-3p expression correlates with the overall- and recurrence-free-survival of NSCLC patients, and miR-582-3p has an activating effect on Wnt/β-catenin signalling. miR-582-3p overexpression simultaneously targets multiple negative regulators of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, namely, AXIN2, DKK3 and SFRP1. Consequently, miR-582-3p promotes CSC traits of NSCLC cells in vitro and tumorigenesis and tumour recurrence in vivo. Antagonizing miR-582-3p potently inhibits tumour initiation and progression in xenografted animal models. These findings suggest that miR-582-3p mediates the constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling, likely serving as a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC. PMID:26468775

  3. Upregulation of miR-130b enhances stem cell-like phenotype in glioblastoma by inactivating the Hippo signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guohua; Wang, Yun; Mijiti, Maimaitili; Wang, Zengliang; Wu, Peng-Fei; Jiafu, Dangmuren

    2015-09-18

    The Hippo signaling pathway plays a crucial role in suppressing tumorigenesis. Physiologically, The Hippo signaling largely restricts its two downstream effectors, homologous oncoproteins Yes-associated protein (YAP) and transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), to a low level of activity by the MST1-SAV1 complex-induced kinase cascade. However, how the negative regulation induced by MST1-SAV1 complex is disrupted to exhibit constitutive YAP/TAZ activation in cancer remains unclear. Herein, we reported that miR-130b directly repressed MST1 and SAV1 expression in human glioblastoma cells. Overexpression of miR-130b induced hyperactivation of the YAP/TAZ and enhanced expression of the Hippo signaling downstream genes CTGF and the pluripotency associated markers, including CD133, SOX2, Nanog, MYC and BMI1, leading to promotion of glioblastoma stem cell phenotype. Conversely, inhibition of miR-130b attenuated these effects. These findings provide a novel mechanism for Hippo signaling inactivation in cancer, indicating not only a potentially pivotal role for miR-130b in the progression of glioblastoma, but also may represent a new therapeutic target. PMID:26241672

  4. Carbonic anhydrase IX induction defines a heterogeneous cancer cell response to hypoxia and mediates stem cell-like properties and sensitivity to HDAC inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wigfield, Simon; Buffa, Francesca; McGowan, Simon; Baban, Dilair; Li, Ji-liang; Harris, Adrian L.

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is strongly induced by hypoxia and its overexpression is associated with poor therapeutic outcome in cancer. Here, we report that hypoxia promotes tumour heterogeneity through the epigenetic regulation of CAIX. Based on hypoxic CAIX expression we identify and characterize two distinct populations of tumour cells, one that has inducible expression of CAIX and one that does not. The CAIX+ve population is enriched with cells expressing cancer stem cell markers and which have high self-renewal capacity. We show that differential CAIX expression is due to differences in chromatin structure. To further investigate the relationship between chromatin organization and hypoxic induction of CAIX expression we investigated the effect of JQ1 an inhibitor of BET bromodomain proteins and A366 a selective inhibitor of the H3K9 methyltransferase G9a/GLP. We identified that these drugs were able to modulate hypoxic CAIX expression induction. This further highlights the role of epigenetic modification in adaption to hypoxia and also in regulation of heterogeneity of cells within tumours. Interestingly, we identified that the two subpopulations show a differential sensitivity to HDAC inhibitors, NaBu or SAHA, with the CAIX positive showing greater sensitivity to treatment. We propose that drugs modulating chromatin regulation of expression may be used to reduce heterogeneity induced by hypoxia and could in combination have significant clinical consequences. PMID:26305601

  5. In vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into inner ear hair cell-like cells using stromal cell conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Ouji, Y; Ishizaka, S; Nakamura-Uchiyama, F; Yoshikawa, M

    2012-01-01

    Hearing loss is mainly caused by loss of sensory hair cells (HCs) in the organ of Corti or cochlea. Although embryonic stem (ES) cells are a promising source for cell therapy, little is known about the efficient generation of HC-like cells from ES cells. In the present study, we developed a single-medium culture method for growing embryoid bodies (EBs), in which conditioned medium (CM) from cultures of ST2 stromal cells (ST2-CM) was used for 14-day cultures of 4-day EBs. At the end of the 14-day cultures, up to 20% of the cells in EB outgrowths expressed HC-related markers, including Math1 (also known as Atoh1), myosin6, myosin7a, calretinin, α9AchR and Brn3c (also known as Pou4f3), and also showed formation of stereocilia-like structures. Further, we found that these cells were incorporated into the developing inner ear after transplantation into chick embryos. The present inner ear HC induction method using ST2-CM (HIST2 method) is quite simple and highly efficient to obtain ES-derived HC-like cells with a relatively short cultivation time. PMID:22622133

  6. Oncogenic Fusion Gene CD74-NRG1 Confers Cancer Stem Cell-like Properties in Lung Cancer through a IGF2 Autocrine/Paracrine Circuit.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takahiko; Nakaoku, Takashi; Enari, Masato; Nishimura, Tatsunori; Tominaga, Kana; Nakata, Asuka; Tojo, Arinobu; Sugano, Sumio; Kohno, Takashi; Gotoh, Noriko

    2016-02-15

    The CD74-Neuregulin1 (NRG1) fusion gene was recently identified as novel driver of invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma, a malignant form of lung cancer. However, the function of the CD74-NRG1 fusion gene in adenocarcinoma pathogenesis and the mechanisms by which it may impart protumorigenic characteristics to cancer stem cells (CSC) is still unclear. In this study, we found that the expression of the CD74-NRG1 fusion gene increased the population of lung cancer cells with CSC-like properties. CD74-NRG1 expression facilitated sphere formation not only of cancer cells, but also of nonmalignant lung epithelial cells. Using a limiting dilution assay in a xenograft model, we further show that the CD74-NRG1 fusion gene enhanced tumor initiation. Mechanistically, we found that CD74-NRG1 expression promoted the phosphorylation of ErbB2/3 and activated the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, the expression of the secreted insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and phosphorylation of its receptor, IGF1R, were enhanced in an NF-κB-dependent manner in cells expressing CD74-NRG1. These findings suggest that CD74-NRG1-induced NF-κB activity promotes the IGF2 autocrine/paracrine circuit. Moreover, inhibition of ErbB2, PI3K, NF-κB, or IGF2 suppressed CD74-NRG1-induced tumor sphere formation. Therefore, our study provides a preclinical rationale for developing treatment approaches based on these identified pathways to suppress CSC properties that promote tumor progression and recurrence. PMID:26837769

  7. TMPRSS4 induces cancer stem cell-like properties in lung cancer cells and correlates with ALDH expression in NSCLC patients.

    PubMed

    de Aberasturi, Arrate L; Redrado, Miriam; Villalba, Maria; Larzabal, Leyre; Pajares, Maria J; Garcia, Javier; Evans, Stephanie R; Garcia-Ros, David; Bodegas, Maria Elena; Lopez, Lissett; Montuenga, Luis; Calvo, Alfonso

    2016-01-28

    Metastasis involves a series of changes in cancer cells that promote their escape from the primary tumor and colonization to a new organ. This process is related to the transition from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype (EMT). Recently, some authors have shown that migratory cells with an EMT phenotype share properties of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which allow them to form a new tumor mass. The type II transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS4 is highly expressed in some solid tumors, promotes metastasis and confers EMT features to cancer cells. We hypothesized that TMPRSS4 could also provide CSC properties. Overexpression of TMPRSS4 reduces E-cadherin and induces N-cadherin and vimentin in A549 lung cancer cells, supporting an EMT phenotype. These changes are accompanied by enhanced migration, invasion and tumorigenicity in vivo. TMPRSS4 expression was highly increased in a panel of lung cancer cells cultured as tumorspheres (a typical assay to enrich for CSCs). H358 and H441 cells with knocked-down TMPRSS4 levels were significantly less able to form primary and secondary tumorspheres than control cells. Moreover, they showed a lower proportion of ALDH+ cells (examined by FACS analysis) and lower expression of some CSC markers than controls. A549 cells overexpressing TMPRSS4 conferred the opposite phenotype and were also more sensitive to the CSC-targeted drug salinomycin than control cells, but were more resistant to regular chemotherapeutic drugs (cisplatin, gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil). Analysis of 70 NSCLC samples from patients revealed a very significant correlation between TMPRSS4 expression and CSC markers ALDH (p = 0.0018) and OCT4 (p = 0.0004), suggesting that TMPRSS4 is associated with a CSC phenotype in patients' tumors. These results show that TMPRSS4, in addition to inducing EMT, can also promote CSC features in lung cancer; therefore, CSC-targeting drugs could be an appropriate treatment for TMPRSS4+ tumors. PMID:26546046

  8. MicroRNA profiling of cisplatin-resistant oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines enriched with cancer-stem-cell-like and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-type features

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ruma Dey; Ghuwalewala, Sangeeta; Das, Pijush; Mandloi, Sapan; Alam, Sk Kayum; Chakraborty, Jayanta; Sarkar, Sajal; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Panda, Chinmoy Kumar; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer is of major public health problem in India. Current investigation was aimed to identify the specific deregulated miRNAs which are responsible for development of resistance phenotype through regulating their resistance related target gene expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Cisplatin-resistant OSCC cell lines were developed from their parental human OSCC cell lines and subsequently characterised. The resistant cells exhibited enhanced proliferative, clonogenic capacity with significant up-regulation of P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), c-Myc, survivin, β-catenin and a putative cancer-stem-like signature with increased expression of CD44, whereas the loss of E-cadherin signifies induced EMT phenotype. A comparative analysis of miRNA expression profiling in parental and cisplatin-resistant OSCC cell lines for a selected sets (deregulated miRNAs in head and neck cancer) revealed resistance specific signature. Moreover, we observed similar expression pattern for these resistance specific signature miRNAs in neoadjuvant chemotherapy treated and recurrent tumours compared to those with newly diagnosed primary tumours in patients with OSCC. All these results revealed that these miRNAs play an important role in the development of cisplatin-resistance mainly through modulating cancer stem-cell-like and EMT-type properties in OSCC. PMID:27045798

  9. Autologous stem cell transplantation for adult acute leukemia in 2015: time to rethink? Present status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Gorin, N-C; Giebel, S; Labopin, M; Savani, B N; Mohty, M; Nagler, A

    2015-12-01

    The use of autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) as consolidation therapy for adult patients with acute leukemia has declined over time. However, multiple randomized studies in the past have reported lower relapse rates after autologous transplantation compared with chemotherapy and lower non-relapse mortality rates compared with allogeneic transplantation. In addition, quality of life of long-term survivors is better after autologous transplantation than after allogeneic transplantation. Further, recent developments may improve outcomes of autograft recipients. These include the use of IV busulfan and the busulfan+melphalan combination, better detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) with molecular biology techniques, the introduction of targeted therapies and post-transplant maintenance therapy. Therefore, ASCT may nowadays be reconsidered for consolidation in the following patients if and when they reach a MRD-negative status: good- and at least intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia in first CR, acute promyelocytic leukemia in second CR, Ph-positive acute lymphocytic leukemia. Conversely, patients with MRD-positive status or high-risk leukemia should not be considered for consolidation with ASCT. PMID:26281031

  10. Quantitative Phenotyping-Based In Vivo Chemical Screening in a Zebrafish Model of Leukemia Stem Cell Xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Beibei; Shimada, Yasuhito; Kuroyanagi, Junya; Umemoto, Noriko; Nishimura, Yuhei; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish-based chemical screening has recently emerged as a rapid and efficient method to identify important compounds that modulate specific biological processes and to test the therapeutic efficacy in disease models, including cancer. In leukemia, the ablation of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) is necessary to permanently eradicate the leukemia cell population. However, because of the very small number of LSCs in leukemia cell populations, their use in xenotransplantation studies (in vivo) and the difficulties in functionally and pathophysiologically replicating clinical conditions in cell culture experiments (in vitro), the progress of drug discovery for LSC inhibitors has been painfully slow. In this study, we developed a novel phenotype-based in vivo screening method using LSCs xenotransplanted into zebrafish. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-positive (ALDH+) cells were purified from chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells tagged with a fluorescent protein (Kusabira-orange) and then implanted in young zebrafish at 48 hours post-fertilization. Twenty-four hours after transplantation, the animals were treated with one of eight different therapeutic agents (imatinib, dasatinib, parthenolide, TDZD-8, arsenic trioxide, niclosamide, salinomycin, and thioridazine). Cancer cell proliferation, and cell migration were determined by high-content imaging. Of the eight compounds that were tested, all except imatinib and dasatinib selectively inhibited ALDH+ cell proliferation in zebrafish. In addition, these anti-LSC agents suppressed tumor cell migration in LSC-xenotransplants. Our approach offers a simple, rapid, and reliable in vivo screening system that facilitates the phenotype-driven discovery of drugs effective in suppressing LSCs. PMID:24454867

  11. Inhibition of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway in ovarian cancer results in the loss of cancer stem cell-like characteristics and a reduced tumor burden

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Current treatment of ovarian cancer patients with chemotherapy leaves behind a residual tumor which results in recurrent ovarian cancer within a short time frame. We have previously demonstrated that a single short-term treatment of ovarian cancer cells with chemotherapy in vitro resulted in a cancer stem cell (CSC)-like enriched residual population which generated significantly greater tumor burden compared to the tumor burden generated by control untreated cells. In this report we looked at the mechanisms of the enrichment of CSC-like residual cells in response to paclitaxel treatment. Methods The mechanism of survival of paclitaxel-treated residual cells at a growth inhibitory concentration of 50% (GI50) was determined on isolated tumor cells from the ascites of recurrent ovarian cancer patients and HEY ovarian cancer cell line by in vitro assays and in a mouse xenograft model. Results Treatment of isolated tumor cells from the ascites of ovarian cancer patients and HEY ovarian cancer cell line with paclitaxel resulted in a CSC-like residual population which coincided with the activation of Janus activated kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducer and activation of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway in paclitaxel surviving cells. Both paclitaxel-induced JAK2/STAT3 activation and CSC-like characteristics were inhibited by a low dose JAK2-specific small molecule inhibitor CYT387 (1 μM) in vitro. Subsequent, in vivo transplantation of paclitaxel and CYT387-treated HEY cells in mice resulted in a significantly reduced tumor burden compared to that seen with paclitaxel only-treated transplanted cells. In vitro analysis of tumor xenografts at protein and mRNA levels demonstrated a loss of CSC-like markers and CA125 expression in paclitaxel and CYT387-treated cell-derived xenografts, compared to paclitaxel only-treated cell-derived xenografts. These results were consistent with significantly reduced activation of JAK2 and STAT3 in paclitaxel and CYT387-treated

  12. Family directed umbilical cord blood banking for acute leukemia: usage rate in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Screnci, M; Murgi, E; Tamburini, A; Pecci, M R; Ballatore, G; Cusanno, A; Valle, V; Luciani, P; Corona, F; Girelli, G

    2015-04-01

    Family-directed umbilical cord blood (UCB) collection and banking is indicated in women delivering healthy babies who already have a member of their own family with a disease potentially treatable with an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSCs) transplantation (HSCT). The rapid availability of UCB is an important issue in HSCs procurement particularly for recipients with acute leukemia who urgently need HSCT. The aims of this study were to assess the usage rate of family UCB collections directed to patients with acute leukemia and to investigate the factors influencing the usage rate. A total of 113 families were enrolled, 118 UCB units were successfully collected and one collection failed due to emergency occurred during delivery. Among these, 7 collections were required for children who were in urgent need of a transplant: three HLA-matched units were successfully transplanted, respectively after 2, 5 and 6 months from collection; three collections resulted HLA-mismatched, while HLA-typing is pending for one unit. The remaining collections were mostly required for potential future use, among these units only one was transplanted in a HLA compatible sibling after 3 years and 4 months from collection. After a median time of storage of 8.5 years (range 0.1-20 years) a total of 4/118 (3.4 %) collection has been transplanted. During this time interval, considering only patients who have had the need of a transplant, the main factor influencing low utilization rate of UCB collections was due to HLA disparity, indeed among typed UCB unit mostly (77 %) resulted HLA mismatched with the intended recipient. PMID:25504378

  13. Fenretinide Targets Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Stem/Progenitor Cells by Regulation of Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yanzhi; Xia, Yuan; Pan, Xiaoling; Chen, Zi; Wang, Aihua; Wang, Kankan; Li, Junmin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: We have recently shown that fenretinide preferentially targets CD34+ cells of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and here, we test whether this agent exerts the effect on CD34+ cells of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), which are refractory to imatinib. Results: As tested by colony-forming cell assays using clinical specimens, both number and size of total colonies derived from CD34+ CML cells were significantly reduced by fenretinide, and by combining fenretinide with imatinib. In particular, colonies derived from erythroid progenitors and more primitive pluripotent/multipotent progenitors were highly sensitive to fenretinide/fenretinide plus imatinib. Accordantly, fenretinide appeared to induce apoptosis in CD34+ CML cells, particularly with regard to the cells in the subpopulation of CD34+CD38−. Through cell quiescent assays, including Ki-67 negativity test, we added evidence that nonproliferative CD34+ CML cells were largely eliminated by fenretinide. Transcriptome and molecular data further showed that mechanisms underlying the apoptosis in CD34+ CML cells were highly complex, involving multiple events of oxidative stress responses. Innovation and Conclusion: As compared with CD34+ AML cells, the apoptotic effects of fenretinide on CD34+ CML cells were more prominent whereas less varied among the samples of different patients, and also various stress-responsive events appeared to be more robust in fenretinide-treated CD34+ CML cells. Thus, the combination of fenretinide with imatinib may represent a more sophisticated strategy for CML treatment, in which imatinib mainly targets leukemic blast cells through the intrinsic pathway of apopotosis, whereas fenretinide primarily targets CML stem/progenitor cells through the oxidative/endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated pathway. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1866–1880. PMID:24021153

  14. Antitumor activity and inhibitory effects on cancer stem cell-like properties of Adeno-associated virus (AAV) -mediated Bmi-1 interference driven by Bmi-1 promoter for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xinyang; Huang, Mingzhu; Gan, Lu; Cheng, Yufan; Li, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Bmi-1 is aberrantly activated in various cancers and plays a vital role in maintaining the self-renewal of stem cells. Our previous research revealed that Bmi-1 was overexpressed in gastric cancer (GC) and it's overexpression was an independent negative prognostic factor, suggesting it can be a therapeutic target. The main purpose of this investigation was to explore the antitumor activity of Bmi-1 interference driven by its own promoter (Ad-Bmi-1i) for GC. In this study, we used adenoviral vector to deliver Bmi-1 shRNA driven by its own promoter to treat GC. Our results revealed that Ad-Bmi-1i could selectively silence Bmi-1 in GC cells which overexpress Bmi-1 and suppress the malignant phenotypes and stem-like properties of GC cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, direct injection of Ad-Bmi-1i into xenografts suppressed tumor growth and destroyed cancer cells in vivo. Ad-Bmi-1i inhibited the proliferation of GC cells mainly via inducing senescence in vitro, but it suppressed tumor through inducing senescence and apoptosis, and inhibiting angiogenesis in vivo. Bmi-1 knockdown by Ad-Bmi-1i downregulated VEGF via inhibiting AKT activity. These results suggest that Ad-Bmi-1i not only inhibits tumor growth and stem cell-like phenotype by inducing cellular senescence directly, but also has an indirect anti-tumor activity by anti-angiogenesis effects via regulating PTEN/AKT/VEGF pathway. Transfer of gene interference guided by its own promoter by an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector might be a potent antitumor approach for cancer therapy. PMID:27009837

  15. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Origin of BRAFV600E Mutations in Hairy Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Young Rock; Lito, Piro; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Hu, Wenhuo; Beguelin, Wendy; Monette, Sebastien; Duy, Cihangir; Rampal, Raajit; Telis, Leon; Patel, Minal; Kim, Min Kyung; Huberman, Kety; Bouvier, Nancy; Berger, Michael F.; Melnick, Ari M.; Rosen, Neal; Tallman, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a chronic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by somatic BRAFV600E mutations. The malignant cell in HCL has immunophenotypic features of a mature B cell, but no normal counterpart along the continuum of developing B lymphocytes has been delineated as the cell of origin. We find that the BRAFV600E mutation is present in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in HCL patients, and that these patients exhibit marked alterations in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) frequencies. Quantitative sequencing analysis revealed a mean BRAFV600E-mutant allele frequency of 4.97% in HSCs from HCL patients. Moreover, transplantation of BRAFV600E-mutant HSCs from an HCL patient into immunodeficient mice resulted in stable engraftment of BRAFV600E-mutant human hematopoietic cells, revealing the functional self-renewal capacity of HCL HSCs. Consistent with the human genetic data, expression of BRafV600E in murine HSPCs resulted in a lethal hematopoietic disorder characterized by splenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, increased circulating soluble CD25, and increased clonogenic capacity of B lineage cells—all classic features of human HCL. In contrast, restricting expression of BRafV600E to the mature B cell compartment did not result in disease. Treatment of HCL patients with vemurafenib, an inhibitor of mutated BRAF, resulted in normalization of HSPC frequencies and increased myeloid and erythroid output from HSPCs. These findings link the pathogenesis of HCL to somatic mutations that arise in HSPCs and further suggest that chronic lymphoid malignancies may be initiated by aberrant HSCs. PMID:24871132

  17. Concise review: Blood relatives: formation and regulation of hematopoietic stem cells by the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors stem cell leukemia and lymphoblastic leukemia-derived sequence 1.

    PubMed

    Curtis, David J; Salmon, Jessica M; Pimanda, John E

    2012-06-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are a large family of transcription factors that regulate the formation and fate of tissue stem cells. In hematopoiesis, the two major bHLH factors are stem cell leukemia (SCL) and lymphoblastic leukemia-derived sequence 1 (LYL1), both identified more than 20 years ago in chromosomal translocations occurring in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. SCL was termed the master regulator of hematopoiesis following the observation that SCL knockout mice die from complete lack of blood formation. However, once established, SCL is no longer required for maintenance of hematopoiesis. Pull-down experiments together with add-back experiments in SCL-null embryonic stem cells and generation of mice carrying a germline DNA binding mutation of SCL demonstrates that most of SCL function is mediated through the formation of a large DNA binding multiprotein complex with both repressor and activator potential. Recent genome-wide binding studies in a hematopoietic stem progenitor cell line suggest that SCL and LYL1 preferentially bind target DNA sequences as components of a heptad of transcription factors. LYL1, a paralog of SCL has been the forgotten sibling until recent mouse studies demonstrated that LYL1 replaced the function of SCL in adult hematopoiesis. Why LYL1 can replace the function of SCL for the maintenance but not formation of hematopoiesis remains a fundamental question. This review will compare and contrast the roles of these two transcription factors in hematopoiesis focusing on recent functional and genome-wide binding studies. PMID:22593015

  18. Aurora A kinase expression is increased in leukemia stem cells, and a selective Aurora A kinase inhibitor enhances Ara-C-induced apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Jeong; Jang, Ji Eun; Cheong, June-Won; Eom, Ju-In; Jeung, Hoi-Kyung; Kim, Yundeok; Hwang, Doh Yu

    2012-01-01

    Background The overexpression of Aurora A kinase (AurA) has been reported in various malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the expression of AurA and the effects of AurA inhibition in cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood. We investigated the expression and inhibition of AurA in AML stem cells (CD34+/CD38-). Methods Expression of AurA was investigated in cell lines (NB4 and KG1) that express high levels of CD34 and low levels of CD38. Primary AML cells were harvested from 8 patients. The expression of AurA and cell death induced by inhibition of AurA were analyzed in CD34+/CD38- cells. Results AurA was shown to be overexpressed in both primary AML cells and leukemia stem cells (LSCs) compared to normal hematopoietic stem cells. Inhibition of AurA plus cytarabine treatment in LSCs resulted in increased cytotoxicity compared to cytarabine treatment alone. Additional stimulation with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) increased the cell death caused by AurA inhibition plus cytarabine treatment. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report describing increased expression of AurA in LSCs. Our results suggest that selective AurA inhibition may be used to reduce LSCs, and this reduction may be enhanced by stimulation with G-CSF. Further exploration of relationship between nuclear factor kappa-B and AurA inhibition and the potential of AurA inhibition for use in leukemia treatment is needed. PMID:23071472

  19. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dhédin, Nathalie; Huynh, Anne; Maury, Sébastien; Tabrizi, Reza; Beldjord, Kheira; Asnafi, Vahid; Thomas, Xavier; Chevallier, Patrice; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Coiteux, Valérie; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Hichri, Yosr; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Reman, Oumedaly; Graux, Carlos; Chalandon, Yves; Blaise, Didier; Schanz, Urs; Lhéritier, Véronique; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-04-16

    Because a pediatric-inspired Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL) protocol yielded a markedly improved outcome in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, we aimed to reassess the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients treated in the GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. In all, 522 patients age 15 to 55 years old and presenting with at least 1 conventional high-risk factor were candidates for SCT in first complete remission. Among these, 282 (54%) received a transplant in first complete remission. At 3 years, posttransplant cumulative incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse-free survival (RFS) were estimated at 19.5%, 15.5%, and 64.7%, respectively. Time-dependent analysis did not reveal a significant difference in RFS between SCT and no-SCT cohorts. However, SCT was associated with longer RFS in patients with postinduction minimal residual disease (MRD) ≥10(-3) (hazard ratio, 0.40) but not in good MRD responders. In B-cell precursor ALL, SCT also benefitted patients with focal IKZF1 gene deletion (hazard ratio, 0.42). This article shows that poor early MRD response, in contrast to conventional ALL risk factors, is an excellent tool to identify patients who may benefit from allogeneic SCT in the context of intensified adult ALL therapy. Trial GRAALL-2003 was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027; GRAALL-2005 was registered as #NCT00327678. PMID:25587040

  20. Kaposi's sarcoma following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, B C; Rezuke, W N; Ricci, A; Tsongalis, G; Shen, P U; Bona, R D; Feingold, J M; Edwards, R L; Tutschka, P J; Bilgrami, S

    2000-01-01

    Unlike solid organ transplantation, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) occurs rarely following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In fact, only 5 cases of KS have been reported after allogeneic or autologous HSCT. The usual treatment combines a substantial decrease in, or elimination of, immunosuppressive therapy along with local measures such as surgical excision, cryotherapy or radiation therapy. A 46-year-old woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia who had received an allogeneic HSCT previously from an HLA-identical sibling, presented on day +814 with human herpes virus-8-associated KS involving her left lower extremity. She had been on continuous immunosuppressive therapy since her transplant because of chronic graft-versus-host disease. The intensity of immunosuppressive therapy was decreased once a diagnosis of KS had been established. However, the nodular lesions continued to progress in size and number. Therefore, a course of irradiation was administered to sites of bulk disease on her legs. Furthermore, thalidomide was initiated along with a topical retinoid, alitretinoin 0.1% gel applied twice daily to the nonirradiated lesions. This approach yielded a partial response in both irradiated and nonirradiated lesions over the course of the following 7 months. Both thalidomide and alitretinoin 0.1% gel appear to be beneficial in HSCT-associated KS and exhibit tolerable side effects. PMID:11154986

  1. Clonal evolution of preleukemic hematopoietic stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Stephen M; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Milsom, Michael D; Levine, Ross L; Majeti, Ravindra

    2015-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive blood cancer that results from an abnormal expansion of uncontrollably proliferating myeloid progenitors that have lost the capacity to differentiate. AML encompasses many genetically distinct subtypes that predominantly develop de novo. However, AML can also arise from premalignant myeloid conditions, such as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), or develop as the result of exposure to genotoxic agents used to treat unrelated malignancies. Although numerous distinct cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities associated with AML were discovered prior to the turn of the millennium, recent advances in whole genome sequencing and global genomic approaches have resulted in an explosion of newly identified molecular abnormalities. However, even with these advances, our understanding of how these mutations contribute to the etiology, pathogenesis, and therapeutic responses of AML remains largely unknown. Recently the International Society for Experimental Hematology (ISEH) hosted a webinar entitled "Clonal Evolution of Pre-Leukemic Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) in AML" in which two AML mavens, Ross Levine, MD, and Ravindra Majeti, MD, PhD, discussed some of their recent, groundbreaking studies that have shed light on how many of these newly identified mutations contribute to leukemogenesis and therapy resistance in AML. Here, we provide a brief overview of this webinar and discuss the basic scientific and clinical implications of the data presented. PMID:26455528

  2. Chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells are not dependent on Bcr-Abl kinase activity for their survival

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Ashley; Helgason, G. Vignir; Schemionek, Mirle; Zhang, Bin; Myssina, Svetlana; Allan, Elaine K.; Nicolini, Franck E.; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Bhatia, Ravi; Brunton, Valerie G.; Koschmieder, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) stem cells are insensitive to kinase inhibitors and responsible for minimal residual disease in treated patients. We investigated whether CML stem cells, in a transgenic mouse model of CML-like disease or derived from patients, are dependent on Bcr-Abl. In the transgenic model, after retransplantation, donor-derived CML stem cells in which Bcr-Abl expression had been induced and subsequently shut off were able to persist in vivo and reinitiate leukemia in secondary recipients on Bcr-Abl reexpression. Bcr-Abl knockdown in human CD34+ CML cells cultured for 12 days in physiologic growth factors achieved partial inhibition of Bcr-Abl and downstream targets p-CrkL and p-STAT5, inhibition of proliferation and colony forming cells, but no reduction of input cells. The addition of dasatinib further inhibited p-CrkL and p-STAT5, yet only reduced input cells by 50%. Complete growth factor withdrawal plus dasatinib further reduced input cells to 10%; however, the surviving fraction was enriched for primitive leukemic cells capable of growth in a long-term culture-initiating cell assay and expansion on removal of dasatinib and addition of growth factors. Together, these data suggest that CML stem cell survival is Bcr-Abl kinase independent and suggest curative approaches in CML must focus on kinase-independent mechanisms of resistance. PMID:22184410

  3. Development of donor cell leukemia following peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for severe aplastic anemia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MA, HONGBING; LIU, TING

    2016-01-01

    Donor cell leukemia (DCL) is a rare complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) which occurs in ~5% of all leukemic relapses. In the English literature, >60 cases of DCL have been reported, however, only two cases of DCL following HSCT for the treatment of severe aplastic anemia (SAA) have been described to date. In the present study, the case of a 25 year-old male patient diagnosed with SAA, who underwent a peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) using cells obtained from a sibling with an identical human leukocyte antigen, is presented. The patient developed acute myeloid leukemia with an (8;21)(q22;q22) translocation and an extra copy of the chromosome 8 in donor cells 2.5 years following PBSCT, which was preceded by the development of Graves' disease 1 year following PBSCT. The leukemia achieved complete remission following 1 cycle of priming therapy, 2 cycles of consolidation chemotherapy with daunorubicin and cytarabine and maintenance therapy with interleukin-2 (IL-2). At present, the patient has discontinued IL-2 therapy, and the DCL has been in molecular remission for >3 years. The present case indicates that chemotherapy and IL-2 maintenance therapy are an effective treatment for DCL; hyperthyroidism was relieved following treatment, although hypothyroidism subsequently developed. PMID:27313707

  4. Osteoblast ablation reduces normal long-term hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal but accelerates leukemia development

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Marisa; Zhang, Bin; Ho, Yinwei; Agarwal, Puneet; Chen, Ching-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in regulatory niches in the bone marrow (BM). Although HSC niches have been extensively characterized, the role of endosteal osteoblasts (OBs) in HSC regulation requires further clarification, and the role of OBs in regulating leukemic stem cells (LSCs) is not well studied. We used an OB visualization and ablation mouse model to study the role of OBs in regulating normal HSCs and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) LSCs. OB ablation resulted in increase in cells with a LSK Flt3−CD150+CD48− long-term HSC (LTHSC) phenotype but reduction of a more highly selected LSK Flt3−CD34−CD49b−CD229− LTHSC subpopulation. LTHSCs from OB-ablated mice demonstrated loss of quiescence and reduced long-term engraftment and self-renewal capacity. Ablation of OB in a transgenic CML mouse model resulted in accelerated leukemia development with reduced survival compared with control mice. The notch ligand Jagged-1 was overexpressed on CML OBs. Normal and CML LTHSCs cultured with Jagged-1 demonstrated reduced cell cycling, consistent with a possible role for loss of Jagged-1 signals in altered HSC and LSC function after OB ablation. These studies support an important role for OBs in regulating quiescence and self-renewal of LTHSCs and a previously unrecognized role in modulating leukemia development in CML. PMID:25742698

  5. PD-1hiTIM-3+ T cells associate with and predict leukemia relapse in AML patients post allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Y; Zhang, J; Claxton, D F; Ehmann, W C; Rybka, W B; Zhu, L; Zeng, H; Schell, T D; Zheng, H

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of leukemia relapse post allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is poor and effective new treatments are urgently needed. T cells are pivotal in eradicating leukemia through a graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and leukemia relapse is considered a failure of GVL. T-cell exhaustion is a state of T-cell dysfunction mediated by inhibitory molecules including programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3). To evaluate whether T-cell exhaustion and inhibitory pathways are involved in leukemia relapse post alloSCT, we performed phenotypic and functional studies on T cells from peripheral blood of acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving alloSCT. Here we report that PD-1hiTIM-3+ cells are strongly associated with leukemia relapse post transplantation. Consistent with exhaustion, PD-1hiTIM-3+ T cells are functionally deficient manifested by reduced production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In addition, these cells demonstrate a phenotype consistent with exhausted antigen-experienced T cells by losing TN and TEMRA subsets. Importantly, increase of PD-1hiTIM-3+ cells occurs before clinical diagnosis of leukemia relapse, suggesting their predictive value. Results of our study provide an early diagnostic approach and a therapeutic target for leukemia relapse post transplantation. PMID:26230954

  6. PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) T cells associate with and predict leukemia relapse in AML patients post allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Y; Zhang, J; Claxton, D F; Ehmann, W C; Rybka, W B; Zhu, L; Zeng, H; Schell, T D; Zheng, H

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of leukemia relapse post allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is poor and effective new treatments are urgently needed. T cells are pivotal in eradicating leukemia through a graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and leukemia relapse is considered a failure of GVL. T-cell exhaustion is a state of T-cell dysfunction mediated by inhibitory molecules including programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3). To evaluate whether T-cell exhaustion and inhibitory pathways are involved in leukemia relapse post alloSCT, we performed phenotypic and functional studies on T cells from peripheral blood of acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving alloSCT. Here we report that PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) cells are strongly associated with leukemia relapse post transplantation. Consistent with exhaustion, PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) T cells are functionally deficient manifested by reduced production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In addition, these cells demonstrate a phenotype consistent with exhausted antigen-experienced T cells by losing TN and TEMRA subsets. Importantly, increase of PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) cells occurs before clinical diagnosis of leukemia relapse, suggesting their predictive value. Results of our study provide an early diagnostic approach and a therapeutic target for leukemia relapse post transplantation. PMID:26230954

  7. Clinical activity of azacitidine in patients who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Charles; Labopin, Myriam; Robin, Marie; Finke, Juergen; Chevallier, Patrice; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bourhis, Jean Henri; Sengelov, Henrik; Blaise, Didier; Luft, Thomas; Hallek, Michael; Kröger, Nicolaus; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Disease relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, yet treatment options for such patients remain extremely limited. Azacitidine is an important new therapy in high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia but its role in patients who relapse post allograft has not been defined. We studied the tolerability and activity of azacitidine in 181 patients who relapsed after an allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (n=116) or myelodysplastic syndromes (n=65). Sixty-nine patients received additional donor lymphocyte infusions. Forty-six of 157 (25%) assessable patients responded to azacitidine therapy: 24 (15%) achieved a complete remission and 22 a partial remission. Response rates were higher in patients transplanted in complete remission (P=0.04) and those transplanted for myelodysplastic syndromes (P=0.023). In patients who achieved a complete remission, the 2-year overall survival was 48% versus 12% for the whole population. Overall survival was determined by time to relapse post transplant more than six months (P=0.001) and percentage of blasts in the bone marrow at time of relapse (P=0.01). The concurrent administration of donor lymphocyte infusion did not improve either response rates or overall survival in patients treated with azacitidine. An azacitidine relapse prognostic score was developed which predicted 2-year overall survival ranging from 3%–37% (P=0.00001). We conclude that azacitidine represents an important new therapy in selected patients with acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies to confirm optimal treatment options in this challenging patient population are required. PMID:27081178

  8. The role of Fas-associated phosphatase 1 in leukemia stem cell persistence during tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Luan, C-H; Hjort, E E; Bei, L; Mishra, R; Sakamoto, K M; Platanias, L C; Eklund, E A

    2016-07-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by expression of Bcr-abl, a tyrosine kinase oncogene. Clinical outcomes in CML were revolutionized by development of Bcr-abl-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), but CML is not cured by these agents. CML leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are relatively TKI insensitive and persist even in remission. LSC persistence results in relapse upon TKI discontinuation, or drug resistance or blast crisis (BC) during prolonged treatment. We hypothesize that increased expression of Fas-associated phosphatase 1 (Fap1) in CML contributes to LSC persistence and BC. As Fap1 substrates include Fas and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (Gsk3β), increased Fap1 activity in CML is anticipated to induce Fas resistance and stabilization of β-catenin protein. Resistance to Fas-induced apoptosis may contribute to CML LSC persistence, and β-catenin activity increases during BC. In the current study, we directly tested the role of Fap1 in CML LSC persistence using in an in vivo murine model. In TKI-treated mice, we found that inhibiting Fap1, using a tripeptide or small molecule, prevented TKI resistance, BC and relapse after TKI discontinuation; all events observed with TKI alone. In addition, Fap1 inhibition increased Fas sensitivity and decreased β-catenin activity in CD34(+) bone marrow cells from human subjects with CML. Therapeutic Fap1 inhibition may permit TKI discontinuation and delay in progression in CML. PMID:26984787

  9. Clofarabine and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplasia or Acute Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Comparison of outcomes after unrelated cord blood and unmanipulated haploidentical stem cell transplantation in adults with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, A; Labopin, M; Sanz, G; Piemontese, S; Arcese, W; Bacigalupo, A; Blaise, D; Bosi, A; Huang, H; Karakasis, D; Koc, Y; Michallet, M; Picardi, A; Sanz, J; Santarone, S; Sengelov, H; Sierra, J; Vincent, L; Volt, F; Nagler, A; Gluckman, E; Ciceri, F; Rocha, V; Mohty, M

    2015-09-01

    Outcomes after unmanipulated haploidentical stem cell transplantation (Haplo) and after unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) are encouraging and have become alternative options to treat patients with high-risk acute leukemia without human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched donor. We compared outcomes after UCBT and Haplo in adults with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Median follow-up was 24 months. Analysis was performed separately for patients with AML, n=918 (Haplo=360, UCBT=558) and ALL, n=528 (Haplo=158 and UCBT=370). UCBT was associated with delayed engraftment and higher graft failure in both AML and ALL recipients. In multivariate analysis, UCBT was associated with lower incidence of chronic graft-vs-host disease both in the AML group (hazard ratio (HR)=0.63, P=0.008) and in the ALL group (HR=0.58, P=0.01). Not statistically significant differences were observed between Haplo and UCBT for relapse incidence (HR=0.95, P=0.76 for AML and HR=0.82, P=0.31 for ALL), non-relapse mortality (HR=1.16, P=0.47 for AML and HR=1.23, P=0.23 for ALL) and leukemia-free survival (HR 0.78, P=0.78 for AML and HR=1.00, P=0.84 for ALL). There were no statistically differences on main outcomes after unmanipulated Haplo and UCBT, and both approaches are valid for acute leukemia patients lacking a HLA matched donor. Both strategies expand the donor pool for patients in need. PMID:25882700

  11. Inactivation of SAG E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Blocks Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation and Sensitizes Leukemia Cells to Retinoid Acid

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruiguo; Xi, Ning; Sun, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Sensitive to Apoptosis Gene (SAG), also known as RBX2 (RING box protein-2), is the RING component of SCF (SKP1, Cullin, and F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Our previous studies have demonstrated that SAG is an anti-apoptotic protein and an attractive anti-cancer target. We also found recently that Sag knockout sensitized mouse embryonic stem cells (mES) to radiation and blocked mES cells to undergo endothelial differentiation. Here, we reported that compared to wild-type mES cells, the Sag−/− mES cells were much more sensitive to all-trans retinoic acid (RA)-induced suppression of cell proliferation and survival. While wild-type mES cells underwent differentiation upon exposure to RA, Sag−/− mES cells were induced to death via apoptosis instead. The cell fate change, reflected by cellular stiffness, can be detected as early as 12 hrs post RA exposure by AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). We then extended this novel finding to RA differentiation therapy of leukemia, in which the resistance often develops, by testing our hypothesis that SAG inhibition would sensitize leukemia to RA. Indeed, we found a direct correlation between SAG overexpression and RA resistance in multiple leukemia lines. By using MLN4924, a small molecule inhibitor of NEDD8-Activating Enzyme (NAE), that inactivates SAG-SCF E3 ligase by blocking cullin neddylation, we were able to sensitize two otherwise resistant leukemia cell lines, HL-60 and KG-1 to RA. Mechanistically, RA sensitization by MLN4924 was mediated via enhanced apoptosis, likely through accumulation of pro-apoptotic proteins NOXA and c-JUN, two well-known substrates of SAG-SCF E3 ligase. Taken together, our study provides the proof-of-concept evidence for effective treatment of leukemia patients by RA-MLN4924 combination. PMID:22110742

  12. Discovery of agents that eradicate leukemia stem cells using an in silico screen of public gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Hassane, Duane C.; Guzman, Monica L.; Corbett, Cheryl; Li, Xiaojie; Abboud, Ramzi; Young, Fay; Liesveld, Jane L.; Carroll, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that malignant stem cells are important for the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and represent a reservoir of cells that drive the development of AML and relapse. Therefore, new treatment regimens are necessary to prevent relapse and improve therapeutic outcomes. Previous studies have shown that the sesquiterpene lactone, parthenolide (PTL), ablates bulk, progenitor, and stem AML cells while causing no appreciable toxicity to normal hematopoietic cells. Thus, PTL must evoke cellular responses capable of mediating AML selective cell death. Given recent advances in chemical genomics such as gene expression-based high-throughput screening (GE-HTS) and the Connectivity Map, we hypothesized that the gene expression signature resulting from treatment of primary AML with PTL could be used to search for similar signatures in publicly available gene expression profiles deposited into the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). We therefore devised a broad in silico screen of the GEO database using the PTL gene expression signature as a template and discovered 2 new agents, celastrol and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, that effectively eradicate AML at the bulk, progenitor, and stem cell level. These findings suggest the use of multicenter collections of high-throughput data to facilitate discovery of leukemia drugs and drug targets. PMID:18305216

  13. Genome-wide comparison of the transcriptomes of highly enriched normal and chronic myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cell populations.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Jonathan M; Gucwa, Jessica L; Esopi, David; Gurel, Meltem; Haffner, Michael C; Vala, Milada; Nelson, William G; Jones, Richard J; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2013-05-01

    The persistence leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) despite tyrosine kinase inhibition (TKI) may explain relapse after TKI withdrawal. Here we performed genome-wide transcriptome analysis of highly refined CML and normal stem and progenitor cell populations to identify novel targets for the eradication of CML LSCs using exon microarrays. We identified 97 genes that were differentially expressed in CML versus normal stem and progenitor cells. These included cell surface genes significantly upregulated in CML LSCs: DPP4 (CD26), IL2RA (CD25), PTPRD, CACNA1D, IL1RAP, SLC4A4, and KCNK5. Further analyses of the LSCs revealed dysregulation of normal cellular processes, evidenced by alternative splicing of genes in key cancer signaling pathways such as p53 signaling (e.g. PERP, CDKN1A), kinase binding (e.g. DUSP12, MARCKS), and cell proliferation (MYCN, TIMELESS); downregulation of pro-differentiation and TGF-β/BMP signaling pathways; upregulation of oxidative metabolism and DNA repair pathways; and activation of inflammatory cytokines, including CCL2, and multiple oncogenes (e.g., CCND1). These data represent an important resource for understanding the molecular changes in CML LSCs, which may be exploited to develop novel therapies for eradication these cells and achieve cure. PMID:23651669

  14. Leukemia Stem Cell-Released Microvesicles Promote the Survival and Migration of Myeloid Leukemia Cells and These Effects Can Be Inhibited by MicroRNA34a Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Jing; Dong, Min

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) play the major role in relapse of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recent evidence indicates that microvesicles (MVs) released from cancer stem cells can promote tumor growth and invasion. In this study, we investigated whether LSCs-released MVs (LMVs) can regulate the malignance of AML cells and whether overexpression of tumor suppressive microRNA (miR), miR34a, is able to interrupt this process. LSCs were transfected with miRNA control (miRCtrl) or miR34a mimic for producing LMVs, respectively, defined as LMVsmiRCtrl and LMVsmiR34a. The effect of miR34a transfection on LSC proliferation and the effects of LMVsmiRCtrl or LMVsmiR34a on the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of AML cells (after LSC depletion) were determined. The levels of miR34a targets, caspase-3 and T cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (Tim-3), were analyzed. Results showed that (1) LMVsmiRCtrl promoted proliferation and migration and inhibited apoptosis of AML cells, which were associated with miR34a deficit; (2) transfection of miR34a mimic inhibited LSC proliferation and increased miR34a level in LMVsmiR34a; (3) LMVsmiR34a produced opposite effects as compared with LMVsmiRCtrl, which were associated with the changes of caspase-3 and Tim-3 levels. In summary, LMVs support AML cell malignance and modulating miR34a could offer a new approach for the management of AML. PMID:27127521

  15. Regulation of cancer stem cell properties by CD9 in human B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Hiroto; Wilson Xu, C.; Naito, Motohiko; Nishida, Hiroko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Ghani, Farhana Ishrat; Iwata, Satoshi; Inukai, Takeshi; Sugita, Kanji; Morimoto, Chikao

    2011-05-27

    Highlights: {yields} We performed more detailed analysis of CD9 function for CSC properties in B-ALL. {yields} Leukemogenic fusion/Src family proteins were markedly regulated in the CD9{sup +} cells. {yields} Proliferation of B-ALL cells was inhibited by anti-CD9 monoclonal antibody. {yields} Knockdown of CD9 by RNAi remarkably reduced the leukemogenic potential. {yields} CD9-knockdown affected the expression and phosphorylation of Src family and USP22. -- Abstract: Although the prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved considerably in recent years, some of the cases still exhibit therapy-resistant. We have previously reported that CD9 was expressed heterogeneously in B-ALL cell lines and CD9{sup +} cells exhibited an asymmetric cell division with greater tumorigenic potential than CD9{sup -} cells. CD9{sup +} cells were also serially transplantable in immunodeficient mice, indicating that CD9{sup +} cell possess self-renewal capacity. In the current study, we performed more detailed analysis of CD9 function for the cancer stem cell (CSC) properties. In patient sample, CD9 was expressed in the most cases of B-ALL cells with significant correlation of CD34-expression. Gene expression analysis revealed that leukemogenic fusion proteins and Src family proteins were significantly regulated in the CD9{sup +} population. Moreover, CD9{sup +} cells exhibited drug-resistance, but proliferation of bulk cells was inhibited by anti-CD9 monoclonal antibody. Knockdown of CD9 remarkably reduced the leukemogenic potential. Furthermore, gene ablation of CD9 affected the expression and tyrosine-phosphorylation of Src family proteins and reduced the expression of histone-deubiquitinase USP22. Taken together, our results suggest that CD9 links to several signaling pathways and epigenetic modification for regulating the CSC properties of B-ALL.

  16. Allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arslan, O; Ustün, C; Arat, M; Celebi, H; Akan, H; Beksaç, M; Ilhan, O; Gürman, G; Ozcan, M; Konuk, N; Uysal, A; Koç, H

    1998-12-01

    Unmodified allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (alloPBSCT) was performed in 20 consecutive acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL) patients from their HLA-identical siblings. There were 11 males and 9 females. Median age was 34 years (range 17-43). Donors were primed with 2.5-15 micrograms/kg/day s.c. granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, Neupogen, Roche). Conditioning regimen was Bu (16 mg/kg) + Cy (120 mg/kg) in 19 patients and high dose Ara-C (3 gr/m2 twice daily for 3 days) for one patient who relapsed after bone marrow transplantation. Eighteen patients were in CR1. CsA + short-term MTX (n = 19) or CsA alone (n = 1) were used for graft versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. The median number of apheresis procedures for each patient was 2 (2-4). A median of 6.5 (3.2-38.2) x 10(8)/kg MNC or 9.4 (2.2-12.4) x 10(6)/kg CD34+ cells were given. Median days to reach granulocyte of > 0.5 x 10(9)/l and platelet of > 50 x 10(9)/l were 12 (10-14) and 15 (11-35) respectively. Day 100 transplant-related mortality was 20 per cent (4/20). Grade 2 to 4 AGVHD was seen in 8 out of 17 (47%) evaluable patients. Severe AGVHD occurred in 3 out of 17 (18%). Clinical CGVHD of all grades developed in 12 out of 17 (70%) evaluable patients. The mean disease-free survival and overall survival were 17 (range: 8-33 months) and 18 months (range: 10-34 months), respectively. In conclusion, alloPBSCT in ANLL is associated with a faster engraftment, no greater incidence of AGVHD, but increased risk of CGVHD. PMID:10414235

  17. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Curcumin Enhanced Busulfan-Induced Apoptosis through Downregulating the Expression of Survivin in Leukemia Stem-Like KG1a Cells.

    PubMed

    Weng, Guangyang; Zeng, Yingjian; Huang, Jingya; Fan, Jiaxin; Guo, Kunyuan

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia relapse and nonrecurrence mortality (NRM) due to leukemia stem cells (LSCs) represent major problems following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To eliminate LSCs, the sensitivity of LSCs to chemotherapeutic agents used in conditioning regimens should be enhanced. Curcumin (CUR) has received considerable attention as a result of its anticancer activity in leukemia and solid tumors. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects and underlying mechanisms in leukemia stem-like KG1a cells exposed to busulfan (BUS) and CUR, either alone or in combination. KG1a cells exhibiting BUS-resistance demonstrated by MTT and annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) assays, compared with HL-60 cells. CUR induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in KG1a cells. Apoptosis of KG1a cells was significantly enhanced by treatment with CUR+BUS, compared with either agent alone. CUR synergistically enhanced the cytotoxic effect of BUS. Seven apoptosis-related proteins were modulated in CUR- and CUR+BUS-treated cells analyzed by proteins array analysis. Importantly, the antiapoptosis protein survivin was significantly downregulated, especially in combination group. Suppression of survivin with specific inhibitor YM155 significantly increased the susceptibility of KG1a cells to BUS. These results demonstrated that CUR could increase the sensitivity of leukemia stem-like KG1a cells to BUS by downregulating the expression of survivin. PMID:26557682

  19. Curcumin Enhanced Busulfan-Induced Apoptosis through Downregulating the Expression of Survivin in Leukemia Stem-Like KG1a Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Guangyang; Zeng, Yingjian; Huang, Jingya; Fan, Jiaxin; Guo, Kunyuan

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia relapse and nonrecurrence mortality (NRM) due to leukemia stem cells (LSCs) represent major problems following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To eliminate LSCs, the sensitivity of LSCs to chemotherapeutic agents used in conditioning regimens should be enhanced. Curcumin (CUR) has received considerable attention as a result of its anticancer activity in leukemia and solid tumors. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects and underlying mechanisms in leukemia stem-like KG1a cells exposed to busulfan (BUS) and CUR, either alone or in combination. KG1a cells exhibiting BUS-resistance demonstrated by MTT and annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) assays, compared with HL-60 cells. CUR induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in KG1a cells. Apoptosis of KG1a cells was significantly enhanced by treatment with CUR+BUS, compared with either agent alone. CUR synergistically enhanced the cytotoxic effect of BUS. Seven apoptosis-related proteins were modulated in CUR- and CUR+BUS-treated cells analyzed by proteins array analysis. Importantly, the antiapoptosis protein survivin was significantly downregulated, especially in combination group. Suppression of survivin with specific inhibitor YM155 significantly increased the susceptibility of KG1a cells to BUS. These results demonstrated that CUR could increase the sensitivity of leukemia stem-like KG1a cells to BUS by downregulating the expression of survivin. PMID:26557682

  20. miR-203 inhibits proliferation and self-renewal of leukemia stem cells by targeting survivin and Bmi-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Shu-yan; Yan, Hai-zhao; Xu, Dan-dan; Chen, Hai-xuan; Wang, Xiao-yan; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Yu-ting; Zhang, Li; Wang, Sheng; Zhou, Peng-jun; Fu, Wu-yu; Ruan, Bi-bo; Ma, Dong-lei; Wang, Ying; Liu, Qiu-ying; Ren, Zhe; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Yi-fei

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the leading causes of failed cancer therapy in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. Although the mechanisms of resistance are poorly understood, they may be related to the presence of leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Down-regulation of the miR-203 reportedly contributes to oncogenesis and chemo-resistance in multiple cancers. We found that miR-203 expression was down-regulated in CD34 + AML cells as compared with CD34− cells isolated from patients as well as in LSC-enriched (CD34 + CD38−) cell lines KG-1a or MOLM13. Additionally, re-expression of miR-203 led to decreased cell proliferation, self-renewal, and sphere formation in LSCs. Moreover, miR-203 was found to directly target the 3′un-translated regions of survivin and Bmi-1 mRNAs affecting proliferation and self-renewal in LSCs. In this study, we identified a novel miR-203/survivin/Bmi-1 axis involved in the regulation of biological properties of LSCs. This axis may represent a new therapeutic target for acute myeloid leukemia and a potential prognosis/diagnostic marker for LSCs therapy. PMID:26847520

  1. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without total body irradiation for pediatric acute leukemia: a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yanshun; Qin, Maoquan; Wang, Bin; Li, Sidan; Zhu, Guanghua; Zhou, Xuan; Yang, Jun; Wang, Kai; Lin, Wei; Zheng, Huyong

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a promising method for therapy of pediatric patients with acute leukemia. However, less availability of matched donors limited its wide application. Recently, haploidentical HSCT has become a great resource. Here, we have retrospectively reported our experience of 20 pediatric patients with acute leukemia who underwent haploidentical HSCT without total body irradiation (TBI) myeloablative regimen in our center from November 2007 to June 2014. All the patients attained successful HSCT engraftment in terms of myeloid and platelet recovery. Thirteen patients developed grade I–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (a-GVHD). The incidence of grade I–II a-GVHD, grade III–IV a-GVHD, and chronic GVHD (c-GVHD) was 45%, 20%, and 25%, respectively. The mean myeloid and platelet recovery time was 13.20±2.41 and 19.10±8.37 days. The median follow-up time was 43.95±29.26 months. During the follow-up, three patients died. The overall survival (OS) rate was 85%. The present study indicated that haploidentical HSCT without TBI myeloablative regimen significantly improved the OS rate of pediatric patients with acute leukemia. PMID:27217774

  2. Second Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Leukemia Using a Chemotherapy-Only Cytoreduction with Clofarabine, Melphalan, and Thiotepa.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Barbara; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Kernan, Nancy A; Prockop, Susan E; Zabor, Emily C; Webb, Nicholas; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B; Young, James W; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Kobos, Rachel; Giralt, Sergio A; O'Reilly, Richard J; Boulad, Farid

    2016-08-01

    Relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) remains one of the leading causes of mortality in patients with leukemia. Treatment options in this population remain limited, with concern for both increased toxicity and further relapse. We treated 18 patients with acute leukemia for marrow ± extramedullary relapse after a previous alloHSCT with a myeloablative cytoreductive regimen including clofarabine, melphalan, and thiotepa followed by a second or third transplantation from the same or a different donor. All patients were in remission at the time of the second or third transplantation. All evaluable patients engrafted. The most common toxicity was reversible transaminitis associated with clofarabine. Two patients died from transplantation-related causes. Seven patients relapsed after their second or third transplanation and died of disease. Nine of 18 patients are alive and disease free, with a 3-year 49% probability of overall survival (OS). Patients whose remission duration after initial alloHSCT was >6 months achieved superior outcomes (3-year OS, 74%, 95% confidence interval, 53% to 100%), compared with those relapsing within 6 months (0%) (P < .001). This new cytoreductive regimen has yielded promising results with acceptable toxicity for second or third transplantations in patients with high-risk acute leukemia who relapsed after a prior transplantation, using various graft and donor options. This approach merits further evaluation in collaborative group studies. PMID:27184623

  3. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  4. Mutations in epigenetic regulators are involved in acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapse following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xiaoyu; Li, Caihua; Shi, Jimin; Tan, Yamin; Fu, Shan; Wang, Yebo; Zhu, Ni; He, Jingsong; Zheng, Weiyan; Yu, Xiaohong; Cai, Zhen; Huang, He

    2016-01-01

    Although steady improvements to chemotherapeutic treatments has helped cure 80% of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases, chemotherapy has proven to be less effective in treating the majority of adult patients, leaving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) as the primary adult treatment option. Nevertheless relapse are the leading cause of death following allo-HSCT. The genetic pathogenesis of relapse following allo-HSCT in Philadelphia chromosome- negative ALL (Ph− ALL) remains unexplored. We performed longitudinal whole-exome sequencing analysis in three adult patients with Ph− B-cell ALL (Ph− B-ALL) on samples collected from diagnosis to relapse after allo-HSCT. Based on these data, we performed target gene sequencing on 23 selected genes in 58 adult patients undergoing allo-HSCT with Ph− B-ALL. Our results revealed a significant enrichment of mutations in epigenetic regulators from relapsed samples, with recurrent somatic mutations in SETD2, CREBBP, KDM6A and NR3C1. The relapsed samples were also enriched in signaling factor mutations, including KRAS, PTPN21, MYC and USP54. Furthermore, we are the first to reveal the clonal evolution patterns during leukemia relapse after allo-HSCT. Cells present in relapsed specimens were genetically related to the diagnosed tumor, these cells therefore arose from either an existing subclone that was not eradicated by allo-HSCT therapy, or from the same progenitor that acquired new mutations. In some cases, however, it is possible that leukemia recurrence following allo-HSCT could result from a secondary malignancy with a distinct set of mutations. We identified novel genetic causes of leukemia relapse after allo-HSCT using the largest generated data set to date from adult patients with Ph− B-ALL. PMID:26527318

  5. Peripheral blood stem cell versus bone marrow transplantation: A perspective from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Michael; Savani, Bipin N; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic cells has increased and is now the predominant graft source for related or unrelated adult allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. At the same time, increasing numbers of patients are receiving reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) prior to hematopoietic stem cell infusion. In prior work using smaller patient numbers and limited data, RIC peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation was shown to be noninferior to RIC bone marrow (BM) transplantation for acute leukemia. A recent, large registry analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation showed that peripheral blood grafts result in superior outcomes compared with BM after RIC regimens for acute leukemia. The T-cell-replete PBSC allografts are associated with significant graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) benefits that are important drivers of improved leukemia-free survival and overall survival. However, an increased risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) after peripheral blood grafts is concerning and long-term follow-up comparing peripheral versus BM grafts after RIC regimens is needed. Further assessment of the long-standing risks should be undertaken in an effort to better understand whether the risk of cGVHD among peripheral blood graft recipients translates into continued GVL effects and long-term remissions and cures or if it results in late morbidity and mortality. PMID:27106798

  6. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Combined targeting of BCL-2 and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase eradicates chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Carter, Bing Z; Mak, Po Yee; Mu, Hong; Zhou, Hongsheng; Mak, Duncan H; Schober, Wendy; Leverson, Joel D; Zhang, Bin; Bhatia, Ravi; Huang, Xuelin; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael

    2016-09-01

    BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are effective against chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but they rarely eliminate CML stem cells. Disease relapse is common upon therapy cessation, even in patients with complete molecular responses. Furthermore, once CML progresses to blast crisis (BC), treatment outcomes are dismal. We hypothesized that concomitant targeting of BCL-2 and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase could overcome these limitations. We demonstrate increased BCL-2 expression at the protein level in bone marrow cells, particularly in Lin(-)Sca-1(+)cKit(+) cells of inducible CML in mice, as determined by CyTOF mass cytometry. Further, selective inhibition of BCL-2, aided by TKI-mediated MCL-1 and BCL-XL inhibition, markedly decreased leukemic Lin(-)Sca-1(+)cKit(+) cell numbers and long-term stem cell frequency and prolonged survival in a murine CML model. Additionally, this combination effectively eradicated CD34(+)CD38(-), CD34(+)CD38(+), and quiescent stem/progenitor CD34(+) cells from BC CML patient samples. Our results suggest that BCL-2 is a key survival factor for CML stem/progenitor cells and that combined inhibition of BCL-2 and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase has the potential to significantly improve depth of response and cure rates of chronic-phase and BC CML. PMID:27605552

  8. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) enhances MAP2 + and HUC/D + neurons and influences neurite extension during differentiation of neural progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (L1F), a member of the Interleukin 6 cytokine family, has a role in differentiation of Human Neural Progenitor (hNP) cells in vitro. hNP cells, derived from Human Embryonic Stem (hES) cells, have an unlimited capacity for self-renewal in monolayer cultu...

  9. Lineage Switching in Acute Leukemias: A Consequence of Stem Cell Plasticity?

    PubMed Central

    Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Pelayo, Rosana

    2012-01-01

    Acute leukemias are the most common cancer in childhood and characterized by the uncontrolled production of hematopoietic precursor cells of the lymphoid or myeloid series within the bone marrow. Even when a relatively high efficiency of therapeutic agents has increased the overall survival rates in the last years, factors such as cell lineage switching and the rise of mixed lineages at relapses often change the prognosis of the illness. During lineage switching, conversions from lymphoblastic leukemia to myeloid leukemia, or vice versa, are recorded. The central mechanisms involved in these phenomena remain undefined, but recent studies suggest that lineage commitment of plastic hematopoietic progenitors may be multidirectional and reversible upon specific signals provided by both intrinsic and environmental cues. In this paper, we focus on the current knowledge about cell heterogeneity and the lineage switch resulting from leukemic cells plasticity. A number of hypothetical mechanisms that may inspire changes in cell fate decisions are highlighted. Understanding the plasticity of leukemia initiating cells might be fundamental to unravel the pathogenesis of lineage switch in acute leukemias and will illuminate the importance of a flexible hematopoietic development. PMID:22852088

  10. Monitoring mixed lineage leukemia expression may help identify patients with mixed lineage leukemia--rearranged acute leukemia who are at high risk of relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Xu, Lan-Ping; Liu, Dai-Hong; Qin, Ya-Zhen; Chang, Ying-Jun; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of the expression of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene for predicting the relapse of patients with MLL-rearranged acute leukemia (AL) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), the levels of MLL transcripts in bone marrow (BM) specimens were monitored serially by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) at predetermined time points in 40 patients with MLL-rearranged AL who were treated with allo-HSCT. These patients were followed for a median of 24.5 months (range, 8 to 60 months). A total of 236 BM samples were collected and analyzed. Of these, 230 were monitored concurrently for minimal residual disease (MRD) by flow cytometry (FCM) for leukemia-associated aberrant immune phenotypes and by RQ-PCR for the expression of the Wilms tumor (WT1) gene. The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse in patients who experienced MLL-positive patients (MLL > .0000%) (n = 9) after HSCT was 93.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 87% to 100%) compared with 12.5% (95% CI, 5.6% to 19.4%) for MLL-negative patients (n = 31) (P < .001). For these 2 patient groups, the 3-year overall survival (OS) was 12.5% (95% CI, .8% to 24.2%) and 77.8% (95% CI, 68.4% to 87.2%) (P < .001), respectively, and the 3-year leukemia-free survival (LFS) was 0% and 72.2% (95% CI, 61.1% to 83.3%), respectively (P < .001). MLL positivity was associated with a higher rate of relapse (hazard ratio [HR], 18.643; 95% CI, 3.449 to 57.025; P = .001), lower LFS (HR, 7.267; 95% CI, 2.038 to 25.916; P = .002), and lower OS (HR, 8.259; 95% CI, 2.109 to 32.336; P = .002), as determined by Cox multivariate analysis. The expression of the MLL gene had a higher specificity and sensitivity than WT1 or MRD monitored by FCM for predicting the relapse of the patients with MLL + AL. Our results suggest that monitoring the expression of the MLL gene may help to identify patients with MLL + AL who are at high risk of relapse after allo-HSCT and may

  11. Upregulation of pluripotency markers in adipose tissue-derived stem cells by miR-302 and leukemia inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Taha, Masoumeh Fakhr; Javeri, Arash; Rohban, Sara; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2014-01-01

    The expression pattern of pluripotency markers in adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) is a subject of controversy. Moreover, there is no data about the signaling molecules that regulate these markers in ADSCs. In the present study, we studied the roles of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and miR-302 in this regard. Freshly isolated mouse ADSCs expressed hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and pluripotency markers. One day after plating, ADSCs expressed OCT4 and Sox2 proteins. After three passages, the expression of hematopoietic and pluripotency markers decreased, while the expression of mesenchymal stem cell markers exhibited a striking rise. Both supplementation of culture media with LIF and transfection of the ADSCs with miR-302 family upregulated the expression levels of OCT4, Nanog, and Sox2 mRNAs. These findings showed that mouse adipose tissue contains a population of cells with molecular resemblance to embryonic stem cells, and LIF and miR-302 family positively affect the expression of pluripotency markers. PMID:25147827

  12. T-cell receptor excision circle levels after allogeneic stem cell transplantation are predictive of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uzunel, Mehmet; Sairafi, Darius; Remberger, Mats; Mattsson, Jonas; Uhlin, Michael

    2014-07-15

    In this retrospective study, 209 patients with malignant disease were analyzed for levels of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) for the first 24 months after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. CD3(+) cells were separated by direct antibody-coupled magnetic beads, followed by DNA extraction according to a standard protocol. The δRec-ψJα signal joint TREC was measured with real-time quantitative PCR. Patients were grouped based on malignant disease: chronic myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphatic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients were further subdivided based on TREC levels below (low-TREC) or above (high-TREC) median at each time point. TREC levels were then correlated to relapse incidence and relapse-free survival (RFS). For patients with AML, low TREC levels 2 months post-transplantation were correlated to high relapse incidence at 5 years (P<0.05). In patients with chronic leukemia, high TREC levels were correlated with improved RFS (P<0.05). For patients with MDS, high TREC levels at 9 months post-transplantation were associated with higher RFS at 5 years (P<0.02) and lower relapse incidence (P<0.02). This study shows the potential use of TREC measurement in blood to predict relapse in patients with AML and MDS after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24617310

  13. A pan-BCL2 inhibitor renders bone marrow resident human leukemia stem cells sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Daniel J.; Recart, Angela Court; Sadarangani, Anil; Chun, Hye-Jung; Barrett, Christian L.; Krajewska, Maryla; Leu, Heather; Low-Marchelli, Janine; Ma, Wenxue; Shih, Alice Y.; Wei, Jun; Zhai, Dayong; Geron, Ifat; Pu, Minya; Bao, Lei; Chuang, Ryan; Balaian, Larisa; Gotlib, Jason; Minden, Mark; Martinelli, Giovanni; Rusert, Jessica; Dao, Kim-Hien; Shazand, Kamran; Wentworth, Peggy; Smith, Kristen M.; Jamieson, Christina A. M.; Morris, Sheldon R.; Messer, Karen; Goldstein, Lawrence S.B.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Marra, Marco; Frazer, Kelly A.; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Reed, John C.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Leukemia stem cells (LSC) play a pivotal role in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance and progression to blast crisis (BC), in part, through alternative splicing of self-renewal and survival genes. To elucidate splice isoform regulators of human BC LSC maintenance, we performed whole transcriptome RNA sequencing; splice isoform-specific qRT-PCR, nanoproteomics, stromal co-culture and BC LSC xenotransplantation analyses. Cumulatively, these studies show that alternative splicing of multiple pro-survival BCL2 family genes promotes malignant transformation of myeloid progenitors into BC LSC that are quiescent in the marrow niche and contribute to therapeutic resistance. Notably, a novel pan-BCL2 inhibitor, sabutoclax, renders marrow niche-resident BC LSC sensitive to TKIs at doses that spare normal progenitors. These findings underscore the importance of alternative BCL2 family splice isoform expression in BC LSC maintenance and suggest that combinatorial inhibition of pro-survival BCL2 family proteins and BCR-ABL may eliminate dormant LSC and obviate resistance. PMID:23333150

  14. Control of relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia by clofarabine in preparation for allogeneic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Claudia; Kapp, Markus; Grigoleit, Goetz-Ulrich; Mielke, Stephan; Loeffler, Jürgen; Heuschmann, Peter U; Malzahn, Uwe; Hupp, Elke; Einsele, Hermann; Stuhler, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplant is indicated for patients with refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Since elimination of the leukemic load is thought to be a prerequisite for treatment success, we here investigate toxicity and anti-leukemic activity of a clofarabine-AraC salvage protocol preceding transplant. In this retrospective analysis, we observed induction of objective remissions in 86% of patients receiving clofarabine-AraC as compared to 83% with sequential high dose AraC/mitoxantrone (S-HAM) and 50% after mitoxantrone/topotecane/AraC (MTC) salvage strategies. In addition, clofarabine conferred anti-leukemic activity to some patients who failed initial MTC or S-HAM therapy. For overall and leukemia-free survival, we identified cytogenetically defined adverse risk markers but not response to therapy to be a strong predictor. In summary, the clofarabine-AraC salvage strategy combines pronounced anti-leukemic activity with an acceptable toxicity profile and allows the majority of patients with relapsed or refractory AML to proceed to allo-SCT, even in cytogenetically defined high risk situations. PMID:26014275

  15. Do human leukocyte antigen E polymorphisms influence graft-versus-leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Ehteramolsadat; Schwarer, Anthony P; Ghasemzadeh, Mehran

    2015-03-01

    Hematopoietic-stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is complicated by histocompatibility-dependent immune responses such as graft-versus-host disease, relapse, and graft rejection. The severity of these common adverse effects is directly related to the degree of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility. In addition to the key role of classic HLA matching in influencing HSCT outcome, several lines of evidence suggest an important role for nonclassic major histocompatibility complex class I molecule, HLA-E. The interaction of HLA-E with NKG2A, its main receptor on natural killer cells, modulates cell-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine production, an important role in innate immune responses. In addition, the HLA-E molecule can present peptides to different subtypes of T cells that may either support graft-versus-leukemia effects or be involved in bridging innate and acquired immunity. To date, the role of HLA-E and its polymorphisms in HSCT outcomes such as graft-versus-host disease, transplant-related mortality, and improved survival has been published by a number of groups. In addition, these data suggest an association between HLA-E polymorphisms and relapse. Whether the engagement of the HLA-E molecule in the modulation of donor T cells is involved in the graft-versus-leukemia effect, or whether a different mechanism of HLA-E dependent reduction of relapse is involved, requires further investigation. PMID:25434712

  16. The Superiority of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Over Chemotherapy Alone in the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Huang, Sai; Zhu, Cheng-Ying; Gao, Li; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Lv, Na; Jing, Yu; Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangements always had a very poor prognosis. In this study, we report the incidence of MLL rearrangements in AML patients using gene analysis, as well as the clinical significance and prognostic features of these rearrangements. Material/Methods This retrospective study took place from April 2008 to November 2011 in the People’s Liberation Army General Hospital. A total 433 AML patients were screened by multiple nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine the incidence of the 11 MLL gene rearrangements. There were 68 cases of MLL gene rearrangements, for a positive rate of 15.7%. A total of 24 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT), and 34 patients received at least 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten patients were lost to follow-up. Results The median follow-up was 29 months. The complete remission (CR) rate was 85.4%. The overall survival (OS) was 57.4±5.9 months for the Allo-HSCT group and 21.0±2.1 months for the chemotherapy group. The Allo-HSCT group had superior survival compared with the chemotherapy group (5-year OS: 59±17% vs. 13±8%, P<0.01; 5-year disease-free survival [DFS]: 65±10% vs. 40±16%, P>0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that transplantation, platelets >50×109/L at onset, and CR are associated with a better OS in MLL rearranged AML patients. Patients with thrombocytopenia and extramedullary involvement were prone to relapse. Conclusions Our results suggest that Allo-HSCT is superior to chemotherapy alone for treating MLL rearranged AML patients. Patients treated with Allo-HSCT have a better prognosis and a longer survival. CR is an independent prognostic factor for OS, and extramedullary involvement is an independent prognostic factor for DFS. MLL rearranged AML patients with thrombocytopenia at onset <50×109 had very bad OS and DFS. PMID:27373985

  17. The Superiority of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Over Chemotherapy Alone in the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Huang, Sai; Zhu, Cheng-Ying; Gao, Li; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Lv, Na; Jing, Yu; Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangements always had a very poor prognosis. In this study, we report the incidence of MLL rearrangements in AML patients using gene analysis, as well as the clinical significance and prognostic features of these rearrangements. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective study took place from April 2008 to November 2011 in the People's Liberation Army General Hospital. A total 433 AML patients were screened by multiple nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine the incidence of the 11 MLL gene rearrangements. There were 68 cases of MLL gene rearrangements, for a positive rate of 15.7%. A total of 24 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT), and 34 patients received at least 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten patients were lost to follow-up. RESULTS The median follow-up was 29 months. The complete remission (CR) rate was 85.4%. The overall survival (OS) was 57.4±5.9 months for the Allo-HSCT group and 21.0±2.1 months for the chemotherapy group. The Allo-HSCT group had superior survival compared with the chemotherapy group (5-year OS: 59±17% vs. 13±8%, P<0.01; 5-year disease-free survival [DFS]: 65±10% vs. 40±16%, P>0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that transplantation, platelets >50×10^9/L at onset, and CR are associated with a better OS in MLL rearranged AML patients. Patients with thrombocytopenia and extramedullary involvement were prone to relapse. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that Allo-HSCT is superior to chemotherapy alone for treating MLL rearranged AML patients. Patients treated with Allo-HSCT have a better prognosis and a longer survival. CR is an independent prognostic factor for OS, and extramedullary involvement is an independent prognostic factor for DFS. MLL rearranged AML patients with thrombocytopenia at onset <50×10^9 had very bad OS and DFS. PMID:27373985

  18. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Acute Lymphoid Leukemia Cells with Greater Stem Cell Antigen-1 (Ly6a/Sca-1) Expression Exhibit Higher Levels of Metalloproteinase Activity and Are More Aggressive In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Chiao; Mildenstein, Kurt; Hunter, Kordell; Tkachenko, Olena; Mullen, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell antigen-1 (Ly6a/Sca-1) is a gene that is expressed in activated lymphocytes, hematopoietic stem cells and stem cells of a variety of tissues in mice. Despite decades of study its functions remain poorly defined. These studies explored the impact of expression of this stem cell associated gene in acute lymphoid leukemia. Higher levels of Ly6a/Sca-1 expression led to more aggressive leukemia growth in vivo and earlier death of hosts. Leukemias expressing higher levels of Ly6a/Sca-1 exhibited higher levels of matrix metalloproteinases. The results suggest the hypothesis that the more aggressive behavior of Ly6a/Sca-1 expressing leukemias is due at least in part to greater capacity to degrade microenvironmental stroma and invade tissues. PMID:24586463

  20. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for T-prolymphocytic leukemia: a report from the French society for stem cell transplantation (SFGM-TC).

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Thierry; Beguin, Yves; Tabrizi, Reza; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Blaise, Didier; Deconinck, Eric; Redjoul, Rabah; Cornillon, Jérôme; Guillerm, Gaëlle; Contentin, Nathalie; Sirvent, Anne; Turlure, Pascal; Salmon, Alexandra; Huynh, Anne; François, Sylvie; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-03-01

    T-prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL), a rare aggressive mature T-cell disorder, remains frequently resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Studies have suggested that allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) might possibly serve to consolidate the response to initial chemotherapy. The current report summarizes the outcome of 27 T-PLL cases identified in the registry in French Society for stem cell transplantation (SFGM-TC). Prior to HSCT, 14 patients were in complete remission (CR), 10 in partial response, three refractory, or in progression. Following HSCT, 21 patients achieved CR as best response. With a median follow-up for surviving patients of 33 (range, 6-103) months, 10 patients are still alive in continuous CR. Overall survival and progression-free survival estimates at 3 yr were 36% (95% CI: 17-54%) and 26% (95% CI: 14-45%), respectively. The relapse incidence after HSCT was 47% occurring at a median of 11.7 (range, 2-24) months. Overall cumulative incidence of transplant-related mortality was 31% at 3 yr. These results suggest that HSCT may allow long-term survival in patients with T-PLL following induction treatment; however, it is associated with a significant rate of toxicity. PMID:25130897

  1. DNA Damage: A Sensible Mediator of the Differentiation Decision in Hematopoietic Stem Cells and in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Cary N.; Ito, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    In the adult, the source of functionally diverse, mature blood cells are hematopoietic stem cells, a rare population of quiescent cells that reside in the bone marrow niche. Like stem cells in other tissues, hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew, in order to maintain the stem cell population for the lifetime of the organism, and to differentiate, in order to give rise to the multiple lineages of the hematopoietic system. In recent years, increasing evidence has suggested a role for the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in the decision for hematopoietic stem cells to exit quiescence and to differentiate. In this review, we will examine recent work supporting the idea that detection of cell stressors, such as oxidative and genetic damage, is an important mediator of cell fate decisions in hematopoietic stem cells. We will explore the benefits of such a system in avoiding the development and progression of malignancies, and in avoiding tissue exhaustion and failure. Additionally, we will discuss new work that examines the accumulation of DNA damage and replication stress in aging hematopoietic stem cells and causes us to rethink ideas of genoprotection in the bone marrow niche. PMID:25789504

  2. Isolation and killing of candidate chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells by antibody targeting of IL-1 receptor accessory protein.

    PubMed

    Järås, Marcus; Johnels, Petra; Hansen, Nils; Agerstam, Helena; Tsapogas, Panagiotis; Rissler, Marianne; Lassen, Carin; Olofsson, Tor; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Richter, Johan; Fioretos, Thoas

    2010-09-14

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is genetically characterized by the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, formed through a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 and giving rise to the constitutively active tyrosine kinase P210 BCR/ABL1. Therapeutic strategies aiming for a cure of CML will require full eradication of Ph chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) CML stem cells. Here we used gene-expression profiling to identify IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP) as up-regulated in CML CD34(+) cells and also in cord blood CD34(+) cells as a consequence of retroviral BCR/ABL1 expression. To test whether IL1RAP expression distinguishes normal (Ph(-)) and leukemic (Ph(+)) cells within the CML CD34(+)CD38(-) cell compartment, we established a unique protocol for conducting FISH on small numbers of sorted cells. By using this method, we sorted cells directly into drops on slides to investigate their Ph-chromosome status. Interestingly, we found that the CML CD34(+)CD38(-)IL1RAP(+) cells were Ph(+), whereas CML CD34(+)CD38(-)IL1RAP(-) cells were almost exclusively Ph(-). By performing long-term culture-initiating cell assays on the two cell populations, we found that Ph(+) and Ph(-) candidate CML stem cells could be prospectively separated. In addition, by generating an anti-IL1RAP antibody, we provide proof of concept that IL1RAP can be used as a target on CML CD34(+)CD38(-) cells to induce antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. This study thus identifies IL1RAP as a unique cell surface biomarker distinguishing Ph(+) from Ph(-) candidate CML stem cells and opens up a previously unexplored avenue for therapy of CML. PMID:20805474

  3. The impact of molecularly targeted therapies upon the understanding of leukemogenesis and the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Sumimasa; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2010-12-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a distinct subset of acute myeloid leukemia. An abnormal fusion gene, PML/RARA is detected in approximately 98% of patients with APL. PML/RARA confers long-term self-renewal properties to promyelocytes. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO), which are the major molecularly targeted therapies in APL, affect the PML/RARA fusion protein and cause differentiation and apoptosis of APL cells. Although the leukemia-initiating cells of APL may be present in a myeloid progenitor committed compartment, the precise population of those remains to be elucidated. However, recent studies have demonstrated the effect of ATRA and ATO on APL leukemia-initiating cells. Through these studies, we can understand more deeply how current clinical therapies lead to long-lasting remission of APL. ATRA and ATO have improved the prognosis of APL patients and have changed the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). At present, HSCT is not indicated for patients with APL in first complete remission, and considered for patients with relapsed APL. In this review, we discuss the three main topics as follows: the leukemia-initiating cells in APL, the current state-of-the-art treatment for newly diagnosed and relapsed APL, and the role of HSCT in APL patients. PMID:20528759

  4. STAT3 signaling pathway is necessary for cell survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in ALDH⁺/CD133⁺ stem cell-like human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Fuchs, James; Li, Chenglong; Olson, Veronica; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Lin, Jiayuh

    2011-12-16

    Persistent activation of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in colon cancer. Increasing evidence suggests the existence of a small population of colon cancer stem or cancer-initiating cells may be responsible for tumor initiation, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Whether STAT3 plays a role in colon cancer-initiating cells and the effect of STAT3 inhibition is still unknown. Flow cytometry was used to isolate colon cancer stem-like cells from three independent human colon cancer cell lines characterized by both aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive and CD133-positive subpopulation (ALDH(+)/CD133(+)). The effects of STAT3 inhibition in colon cancer stem-like cells were examined. The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells and was reduced by a STAT3-selective small molecular inhibitor, FLLL32. FLLL32 also inhibited the expression of potential STAT3 downstream target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells including survivin, Bcl-XL, as well as Notch-1, -3, and -4, which may be involved in stem cell function. Furthermore, FLLL32 inhibited cell viability and tumorsphere formation as well as induced cleaved caspase-3 in colon cancer stem-like cells. FLLL32 is more potent than curcumin as evidenced with lower IC50 in colon cancer stem-like cells. In summary, our results indicate that STAT3 is a novel therapeutic target in colon cancer stem-like cells and inhibition of STAT3 in cancer stem-like cells may offer a potential treatment for colorectal cancer. PMID:22074823

  5. Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients with T315I BCR-ABL Mutated Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lan-Ping; Xu, Zheng-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Han, Wei; Chen, Yao; Wang, Feng-Rong; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Wang, Yu; Yan, Chen-Hua; Mo, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is currently the only curative treatment option for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutations. We report the outcome of SCT in 22 patients with T315I(+) CML, most (n = 16) from haploidentical family donors (HID-SCT). At the time the mutation was detected, 8 patients were in the chronic phase (CP), 7 in the accelerated phase (AP), and 7 in the blast phase (BP). At the time of SCT 7 were in the CP, 8 in the AP or returning to the CP post-AP (AP/AP-CPn), and 7 in the BP or returning to CP post-BP (BP/BP-CPn). The cumulative incidence of grades III to IV acute graft-versus-host disease was 9.1%. Chronic graft-versus-host disease was observed in 60.0% of patients, including 25.0% who suffered from severe disease. Four patients died of transplant-related complications at a median interval from SCT of 16.3 months. The estimated 2-year leukemia-free survival rate was 80.0%, 72.9%, and 0% in CP, AP/AP-CPn and BP/BP-CPn groups at the time of SCT, respectively. After a median follow-up of 17.3 months from SCT, 14 patients are alive, including 13 in complete molecular response and 1 with an extramedullary relapse. In conclusion, HID-SCT is a potentially curative treatment for T315I + CML patients. For patients in CP/AP, immediate SCT might result in promising survival. The outcome of patients in BP with T315I(+) mutation remains very poor. PMID:26995693

  6. ABCG2, Cytogenetics, and Age Predict Relapse after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Daniela; Tiribelli, Mario; Geromin, Antonella; Cerno, Michela; Zanini, Francesca; Michelutti, Angela; Fanin, Renato

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that ABGG2 protein overexpression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may be associated with poor response to therapy and increased relapse risk. Few data are available in patients with AML undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), particularly when in complete remission (CR). We analyzed 105 patients with AML who underwent allogeneic SCT in CR evaluating the role of ABCG2 and other pretransplantation features on subsequent transplantation outcomes. Factors negatively associated with leukemia-free survival (LFS) were unfavorable cytogenetics (3-year LFS 48% versus 80%, P = .0035) and ABCG2 positivity (65% versus 80%, P = .045). Three-year cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) in the whole population was 20%; a higher incidence of relapse was associated with adverse cytogenetics (41% versus 16%, P = .018), ABCG2 overexpression (29% versus 15%, P = .04), and, marginally, age > 50 years (30% versus 14%, P = .06). We grouped patients according to the combination of these 3 risk factors: no patient relapsed within 3 years from SCT in the group without risk factors, whereas the 3-year CIR was 12% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2% to 25%) in the group with 1 risk factor and 47% (95% CI, 31% to 70%) in patients with 2 or 3 risk factors (P = .00005). In conclusion, allogeneic SCT does not seem to abrogate the negative prognosis associated with ABCG2 overexpression at diagnosis, specifically in terms of a higher relapse risk. ABCG2, age, and cytogenetics can predict AML relapse after SCT in patients who undergo transplantation while in CR. PMID:27178373

  7. [Reconstitution of NK cells and their receptors in patients with acute leukemia following unrelated cord blood stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie; Sun, Zi-Min; Liu, Hui-Lan; Geng, Liang-Quan; Wang, Xing-Bing

    2009-04-01

    This study was to investigate the reconstitution of NK cells and their receptors after unrelated cord blood stem cell transplantation (UCBT) and its clinical importance. 11 cases of acute leukemia underwent UCBT were enrolled in this study. The reconstitution of NK cells and their surface receptors as well as the the recovery of T and B cells within 90 days after clinical engraftment following UCBT were measured and analysed by flow cytometry. The results indicated that the recovery of NK cells appears to be relatively early. CD3(-)56(+) NK cell count was (35.12 +/- 18.66)% of peripheral blood (PB) lymphocytes on the day of clinical engraftment and higher than that in normal. The peak of the NK cells reached to (37.8 +/- 17.52)% of lymphocyte at 30 days after clinical engraftment. NK count was (30.4 +/- 19.14)% at 60 days after clinical engraftment when the absolute NK cell count reached to the peak (up to 544 cells/microl) in PB. The activated receptor NKG2D was reconstituted fast and high expressed [(79.58 +/- 8.71)%] at the time of clinical engraftment with a tendency of gradual elevation, which reached to peak value (82.55 +/- 9.10)% at day 60. Another activated receptor NKp46 also reconstituted fast, and maintained at a high level even at 90 days after clinical engraftment. The expression of NKG2A was lower than that of the activated receptor of NK cells, which tendency lasted for at least 90 days after clinical engraftment. The reconstitution of T cells in PB after UCBT was relatively slow with lower expression rate. It is concluded that the reconstitution of NK cells in patients with acute leukemia is earlier following UCBT. The earlier recovery of activated receptor of NK cells, especially NKG2D, suggests that the activation of NK cells may play a role in graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect in the early period after UCBT. PMID:19379581

  8. Therapeutic Autologous Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-12

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  10. Residual normal stem cells can be detected in newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia patients by a new flow cytometric approach and predict for optimal response to imatinib.

    PubMed

    Janssen, J J W M; Deenik, W; Smolders, K G M; van Kuijk, B J; Pouwels, W; Kelder, A; Cornelissen, J J; Schuurhuis, G J; Ossenkoppele, G J

    2012-05-01

    Insensitivity of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) hematopoietic stem cells to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) prevents eradication of the disease and may be involved in clinical resistance. For improved treatment results more knowledge about CML stem cells is needed. We here present a new flow cytometric approach enabling prospective discrimination of CML stem cells from their normal counterparts within single-patient samples. In 24 of 40 newly diagnosed CML patients residual normal CD34(+)CD38(-) stem cells could be identified by lower CD34 and CD45 expression, lower forward/sideward light scatter and by differences of lineage marker expression (CD7, CD11b and CD56) and of CD90. fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis on Fluorescence-activated cell sorting sorted cells proved that populations were BCR-ABL positive or negative and long-term liquid culture assays with subsequent colony forming unit assays and FISH analysis proved their stem cell character. Patients with residual non-leukemic stem cells had lower clinical risk scores (Sokal, Euro), lower hematological toxicity of imatinib (IM) and better molecular responses to IM than patients without. This new approach will expand our possibilities to separate CML and normal stem cells, present in a single bone marrow or peripheral blood sample, thereby offering opportunities to better identify new CML stem-cell-specific targets. Moreover, it may guide optimal clinical CML management. PMID:22157734

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia after aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Ayami; Strahm, Brigitte; Baumann, Irith; Furlan, Ingrid; Schwarz, Stephan; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Walther, Joachim-Ulrich; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Göhring, Gudrun; Nöllke, Peter; Führer, Monika; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2014-03-01

    Secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia (sMDS/sAML) are the most serious secondary events occurring after immunosuppressive therapy in patients with aplastic anemia. Here we evaluate the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 17 children and young adults with sMDS/sAML after childhood aplastic anemia. The median interval between the diagnosis of aplastic anemia and the development of sMDS/sAML was 2.9 years (range, 1.2 to 13.0 years). At a median age of 13.1 years (range, 4.4 to 26.7 years), patients underwent HSCT with bone marrow (n = 6) or peripheral blood stem cell (n = 11) grafts from HLA-matched sibling donors (n = 2), mismatched family donors (n = 2), or unrelated donors (n = 13). Monosomy 7 was detected in 13 patients. The preparative regimen consisted of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan in 11 patients and other agents in 6 patients. All patients achieved neutrophil engraftment. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 47%, and that of chronic GVHD was 70%. Relapse occurred in 1 patient. The major cause of death was transplant-related complication (n = 9). Overall survival and event-free survival at 5 years after HSCT were both 41%. In summary, this study indicates that HSCT is a curative therapy for some patients with sMDS/sAML after aplastic anemia. Future efforts should focus on reducing transplantation-related mortality. PMID:24316460

  12. Multi-state analysis illustrates treatment success after stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia followed by donor lymphocyte infusion.

    PubMed

    Eefting, Matthias; de Wreede, Liesbeth C; Halkes, Constantijn J M; von dem Borne, Peter A; Kersting, Sabina; Marijt, Erik W A; Veelken, Hendrik; Putter, Hein; Schetelig, Johannes; Falkenburg, J H Frederik

    2016-04-01

    In the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the common approach is to focus outcome analyses on time to relapse and death, without assessing the impact of post-transplant interventions. We investigated whether a multi-state model would give insight into the events after transplantation in a cohort of patients who were transplanted using a strategy including scheduled donor lymphocyte infusions. Seventy-eight consecutive patients who underwent myeloablative T-cell depleted allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome were studied. We constructed a multi-state model to analyze the impact of donor lymphocyte infusion and graft-versus-host disease on the probabilities of relapse and non-relapse mortality over time. Based on this model we introduced a new measure for outcome after transplantation which we called 'treatment success': being alive without relapse and immunosuppression for graft-versus-host disease. All relevant clinical events were implemented into the multi-state model and were denoted treatment success or failure (either transient or permanent). Both relapse and non-relapse mortality were causes of failure of comparable magnitude. Whereas relapse was the dominant cause of failure from the transplantation state, its rate was reduced after graft-versus-host disease, and especially after donor lymphocyte infusion. The long-term probability of treatment success was approximately 40%. This probability was increased after donor lymphocyte infusion. Our multi-state model helps to interpret the impact of post-transplantation interventions and clinical events on failure and treatment success, thus extracting more information from observational data. PMID:26802054

  13. The in vitro generation of multi-tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell clones: Candidates for leukemia adoptive immunotherapy following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Yehia S; Bashawri, Layla A; Vatte, Chittibabu; Abu-Rish, Eman Y; Cyrus, Cyril; Khalaf, Wafaa S; Browning, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy is a promising approach to manage and maintain relapse-free survival of leukemia patients, especially following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Post-transplant adoptive immunotherapy using cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) of the donor origin provide graft-versus-tumor effects, with or without graft-versus-host disease. Myeloid leukemias express immunogenic leukemia associated antigens (LAAs); such as WT-1, PRAME, MAGE, h-TERT and others, most of them are able to induce specific T cell responses whenever associated with the proper co-stimulation. We investigated the ability of a LAA-expressing hybridoma cell line to induce CTL clones in PBMCs of HLA-matched healthy donors in vitro. The CTL clones were induced by repetitive co-culture with LAAs-expressing, HLA-A*0201(+) hybrid cell line, generated by fusion of leukemia blasts to human immortalized APC (EBV-sensitized B-lymphoblastoid cell line; HMy2). The induced cytotoxic T cell clones were phenotypically and functionally characterized by pentamer analysis, IFN-γ release ELISPOT and cellular cytotoxicity assays. All T cell lines showed robust peptide recognition and functional activity when sensitized with HLA-A*0201-restricted WT-1235-243, hTERT615-624 or PRAME100-108 peptides-pulsed T2 cells, in addition to partially HLA-matched leukemia blasts. This study demonstrates the feasibility of developing multi-tumor antigen-specific T cell lines in allogeneic PBMCs in vitro, using LAA-expressing tumor/HMy2 hybrid cell line model, for potential use in leukemia adoptive immunotherapy in partially matched donor-recipient setting. PMID:27490939

  14. Metabolic syndrome in adults who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute childhood leukemia: an LEA study.

    PubMed

    Oudin, C; Auquier, P; Bertrand, Y; Contet, A; Kanold, J; Sirvent, N; Thouvenin, S; Tabone, M-D; Lutz, P; Ducassou, S; Plantaz, D; Dalle, J-H; Gandemer, V; Beliard, S; Berbis, J; Vercasson, C; Barlogis, V; Baruchel, A; Leverger, G; Michel, G

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated prospectively the incidence and risk factors of the metabolic syndrome (MS) and its components in 170 adult patients (mean age at evaluation: 24.8±5.4 years) who received an hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for childhood ALL, n=119, or AML, n=51. TBI was carried out in 124 cases; a busulfan-based conditioning was done in 30 patients. Twenty-nine patients developed a MS (17.1%, 95% confidence intervals: 11.7-23.6). The cumulative incidence was 13.4% at 25 years of age and 35.5% at 35 years of age. A higher body mass index (BMI) before transplantation and a growth hormone deficiency were associated with increased MS risk (P=0.002 and 0.01, respectively). MS risk was similar for patients who received TBI or busulfan-based conditioning. The TBI use increased the hyperglycemia risk (odds ratio (OR): 4.7, P=0.02). Women were at the risk of developing increased waist circumference (OR: 7.18, P=0.003) and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR: 2.72, P=0.007). The steroid dose was not a risk factor. The MS occurs frequently among transplanted survivors of childhood leukemia. Its incidence increases with age. Both intrinsic (BMI, gender) and extrinsic factors (TBI, alkylating agents) contribute to its etiopathogenesis. PMID:26191949

  15. L-asparaginase-based regimens followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation improve outcomes in aggressive natural killer cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ki Sun; Cho, Su-Hee; Kim, Seok Jin; Ko, Young Hyeh; Kang, Eun-Suk; Kim, Won Seog

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive nature killer cell leukemia (ANKL) is a mature NK-T cell lymphoma with worse prognosis, but optimal treatment is unclear. Therefore, we analyzed the efficacy of L-asparaginase-based regimens for ANKL patients. Twenty-one patients who received dexamethasone, methotrexate, ifosfamide, L-asparaginase, and etoposide (SMILE) or etoposide, ifosfamide, dexamethasone, and L-asparaginase (VIDL) chemotherapy at Samsung Medical Center were selected. The overall response rate for all patients was 33% (7/21); 38% (5/13) in SMILE and 40% (2/5) in VIDL, respectively. The median progression-free survival was 3.9 months (95% CI 0.0-8.1 months) and median overall survival was 7.0 months (95% CI 2.3-11.7 months). Treatment response (P = 0.001), hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) (P = 0.007) and negative conversion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA titer after treatment (P = 0.004) were significantly associated with survival. Thus, L-asparaginase-based regimens followed by allogeneic HSCT seem to improve the outcome for ANKL patients. PMID:27091029

  16. Leukemia cell mobilization with G-CSF plus plerixafor during busulfan-fludarabine conditioning in allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thall, Peter F.; Zeng, Zhihong; Shpall, Elizabeth; Ciurea, Stefan; Kebriaei, Partow; Alousi, Amin; Popat, Uday; Anderlini, Paolo; Nieto, Yago; Parmar, Simrit; Qiao, Wei; Chen, Julianne; Rondon, Gabriela; McMullin, Becky; Wang, Rui-Yu; Lu, Hongbo; Schober, Wendy; Woodworth, Glenda; Gulbis, Alison; Cool, Rita; Andreeff, Michael; Champlin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that during conditioning chemotherapy for allogeneic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT), disruption of stromal-leukemia interactions using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in combination with the CXCR4-specific inhibitor plerixafor, may promote release of leukemic cells from the niche and increase tumor elimination. In a phase 1/2 investigation, we treated 45 AML/MDS/CML patients (34 AML, 7 MDS, and 4 CML) with G-CSF (10 μg/kg daily for 6 days starting on day −9) plus plerixafor (doses of 0, 80, 160 or 240 μg/kg daily for 4 days starting on day −7) along with the busulfan-fludarabine (Bu-Flu) conditioning regimen. In the phase 1 part, we determined that G-CSF plus plerixafor is safe in this setting. We compared clinical effects and outcomes of AML/MDS study patients (n = 40) to 164 patients from a historical data set who received Bu-Flu alone prior to allo-SCT by stratifying on cytogenetics and disease status to correct for bias. Study patients had increased myeloid chimerism and lower rates of GvHD. There was no significant difference in relapse free survival or overall survival. The G-CSF plus plerixafor combination increased circulating white blood cells, CD34+ cells, and CXCR4+ cells, and preferentially mobilized FISH+ leukemic cells. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier is NCT00822770. PMID:25867648

  17. Pretransplant NPM1 MRD levels predict outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kayser, S; Benner, A; Thiede, C; Martens, U; Huber, J; Stadtherr, P; Janssen, J W G; Röllig, C; Uppenkamp, M J; Bochtler, T; Hegenbart, U; Ehninger, G; Ho, A D; Dreger, P; Krämer, A

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the prognostic impact of pre-transplant minimal residual disease (MRD) as determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 67 adult NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Twenty-eight of the 67 patients had a FLT3-ITD (42%). Median age at transplantation was 54.7 years, median follow-up for survival from time of allografting was 4.9 years. At transplantation, 31 patients were in first, 20 in second complete remission (CR) and 16 had refractory disease (RD). Pre-transplant NPM1 MRD levels were measured in 39 CR patients. Overall survival (OS) for patients transplanted in CR was significantly longer as compared to patients with RD (P=0.004), irrespective of whether the patients were transplanted in first or second CR (P=0.74). There was a highly significant difference in OS after allogeneic HSCT between pre-transplant MRD-positive and MRD-negative patients (estimated 5-year OS rates of 40 vs 89%; P=0.007). Multivariable analyses on time to relapse and OS revealed pre-transplant NPM1 MRD levels >1% as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival after allogeneic HSCT, whereas FLT3-ITD had no impact. Notably, outcome of patients with pre-transplant NPM1 MRD positivity >1% was as poor as that of patients transplanted with RD. PMID:27471865

  18. Infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia with MLL gene rearrangements: outcome following intensive chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Kinukawa, Naoko; Wakazono, Yoshihiro; Isoyama, Keiichi; Oda, Takanori; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Ohta, Shigeru; Moritake, Hiroshi; Oda, Megumi; Nagatoshi, Yoshihisa; Kigasawa, Hisato; Ishida, Yasushi; Ohara, Akira; Hanada, Ryouji; Sako, Masahiro; Sato, Takeyuki; Mizutani, Shuki; Horibe, Keizo; Ishii, Eiichi

    2004-12-01

    Forty-four infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) characterized by MLL gene rearrangements were treated on a protocol of intensive chemotherapy followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) between November 1998 and June 2002. The remission induction rate was 91.0%, and the 3-year overall survival and event-free survival (EFS) rates, with 95% confidence intervals, were 58.2% (43.5%-72.9%) and 43.6% (28.5%-58.7%), respectively. Univariate analysis of EFS by presenting features indicated a poorer outcome in patients younger than 6 months of age with high white blood cell counts (>/= 100 x 10(9)/L; EFS rate, 9.4% versus 55.1% for all others, P = .0036) and in those with central nervous system invasion (EFS rate, 10.0% versus 56.9% for all others, P = .0073). The 3-year posttransplantation EFS rate for the 29 patients who underwent HSCT in first remission was 64.4% (46.4%-82.4%). In this subgroup, only the timing of HSCT (first remission versus others) was a significant risk factor by multivariate analysis (P < .0001). These results suggest that early introduction of HSCT, possibly with a less toxic conditioning regimen, may improve the prognosis for infants with MLL(+) ALL. Identification of subgroups or patients who respond well to intensified chemotherapy alone should have a high priority in future investigations. PMID:15297313

  19. Alloreactive Natural Killer Cells for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From Stem Cell Transplantation to Adoptive Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Loredana; Parisi, Sarah; Urbani, Elena; Curti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells express activating and inhibitory receptors, which recognize MHC class-I alleles, termed “Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors” (KIRs). Preclinical and clinical data from haploidentical T-cell-depleted stem cell transplantation have demonstrated that alloreactive KIR-L mismatched NK cells play a major role as effectors against acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Outside the transplantation setting, several reports have proven the safety and feasibility of NK cell infusion in AML patients and, in some cases, provided evidence that transferred NK cells are functionally alloreactive and may have a role in disease control. The aim of the present work is to briefly summarize the most recent advances in the field by moving from the first preclinical and clinical demonstration of donor NK alloreactivity in the transplantation setting to the most recent attempts at exploiting the use of alloreactive NK cell infusion as a means of adoptive immunotherapy against AML. Altogether, these data highlight the pivotal role of NK cells for the development of novel immunological approaches in the clinical management of AML. PMID:26528283

  20. Generation and Characterization of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor-Dependent Equine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Adult Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Sun, Jane; Fortuna, Patrick R.J.; Wolvetang, Ernst J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have reprogrammed dermal fibroblasts from an adult female horse into equine induced pluripotent stem cells (equiPSCs). These equiPSCs are dependent only on leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), placing them in striking contrast to previously derived equiPSCs that have been shown to be co-dependent on both LIF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These equiPSCs have a normal karyotype and have been maintained beyond 60 passages. They possess alkaline phosphatase activity and express eqNANOG, eqOCT4, and eqTERT mRNA. Immunocytochemistry confirmed that they produce NANOG, REX1, SSEA4, TRA1-60, and TRA1-81. While our equiPSCs are LIF dependent, bFGF co-stimulates their proliferation via the PI3K/AKT pathway. EquiPSCs lack expression of eqXIST and immunostaining for H3K27me3, suggesting that during reprogramming the inactive X chromosome has likely been reactivated to generate cells that have two active X chromosomes. EquiPSCs form embryoid bodies and in vitro teratomas that contain derivatives of all three germ layers. These LIF-dependent equiPSCs likely reflect a more naive state of pluripotency than equiPSCs that are co-dependent on both LIF and bFGF and so provide a novel resource for understanding pluripotency in the horse. PMID:24555755

  1. [Alleviation of palmoplantar pustulosis associated with adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Hiroshi; Imaizumi, Kisako; Sakane, Emiko; Tsunemine, Hiroko; Ito, Kiminari; Kodaka, Taiichi; Matsumoto, Mayumi; Matsuoka, Masao; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2012-08-01

    A 68-year-old female with palmoplantar pustulosis was referred to our hospital in July, 2009 because of liver dysfunction, a positive test for HTLV-1, and circulating abnormal lymphocytes with irregularly shaped nuclei. A diagnosis of acute type adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) was made based on generalized lymph node swelling and high levels of serum LDH, in addition to the findings described above. The associated palmoplantar pustulosis responded to some extent to antibiotics, steroid ointment, and narrow band UBV light irradiation. For ATLL, she was serially treated with CHOP chemotherapy, an LSG 15 protocol, and CytaBOM protocol with consequent partial remission. These chemotherapies did not affect the palmoplantar pustulosis. For ATLL in partial remission, we performed allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT) from a related donor (HTLV-1-negative) with a conditioning regimen consisting of fludarabine, melphalan, and total body irradiation with 3 Gy in February, 2010. After the engraftment of donor hematopoietic cells, ATLL cells disappeared and the patient currently (as of April, 2012) remains in complete remission (CR). The residual palmoplantar pustulosis was further improved soon after allo-PBSCT and disappeared on Day 84 after transplantation. This refractory skin disease has also been in CR to date. PMID:22975820

  2. STAT5 is crucial to maintain leukemic stem cells in acute myelogenous leukemias induced by MOZ-TIF2.

    PubMed

    Tam, Winnie F; Hähnel, Patricia S; Schüler, Andrea; Lee, Benjamin H; Okabe, Rachel; Zhu, Nan; Pante, Saskia V; Raffel, Glen; Mercher, Thomas; Wernig, Gerlinde; Bockamp, Ernesto; Sasca, Daniel; Kreft, Andreas; Robinson, Gertraud W; Hennighausen, Lothar; Gilliland, D Gary; Kindler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    MOZ-TIF2 is a leukemogenic fusion oncoprotein that confers self-renewal capability to hematopoietic progenitor cells and induces acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with long latency in bone marrow transplantation assays. Here, we report that FLT3-ITD transforms hematopoietic cells in cooperation with MOZ-TIF2 in vitro and in vivo. Coexpression of FLT3-ITD confers growth factor independent survival/proliferation, shortens disease latency, and results in an increase in the number of leukemic stem cells (LSC). We show that STAT5, a major effector of aberrant FLT3-ITD signal transduction, is both necessary and sufficient for this cooperative effect. In addition, STAT5 signaling is essential for MOZ-TIF2-induced leukemic transformation itself. Lack of STAT5 in fetal liver cells caused rapid differentiation and loss of replating capacity of MOZ-TIF2-transduced cells enriched for LSCs. Furthermore, mice serially transplanted with Stat5(-/-) MOZ-TIF2 leukemic cells develop AML with longer disease latency and finally incomplete penetrance when compared with mice transplanted with Stat5(+/+) MOZ-TIF2 leukemic cells. These data suggest that STAT5AB is required for the self-renewal of LSCs and represents a combined signaling node of FLT3-ITD and MOZ-TIF2 driven leukemogenesis. Therefore, targeting aberrantly activated STAT5 or rewired downstream signaling pathways may be a promising therapeutic option. PMID:23149921

  3. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Human Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cell secretome display antiproliferative effect on leukemia cell line and produce additive cytotoxic effect in combination with doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Hendijani, Fatemeh; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy; Sadeghi-aliabadi, Hojjat

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy moves toward clinic progressively. Recent evidences establish anticancer effect of mesenchymal stem cells. However multiple factors including type of cancer, MSC source, study design, and animal model play role in final outcome. Wharton's jelly - a newly approved source of MSCs - possesses superiorities to bone marrow as the conventional source; therefore investigation of its medical effects can produce beneficial results. In this survey we examined cytotoxic and proapoptotic effect of human Wharton's jelly MSC secretome on K562 human leukemia cells. MSCs were isolated from human Wharton's jelly of umbilical cord by explant culture method, then characterized according to ISCT criteria (morphology and plastic adherence, surface antigenicity and differentiation potential). MSC secretome was collected and its cytotoxic and proapoptotic effects on K562 cells in combination with doxorubicin were evaluated using BrdU cell proliferation assay and Annexin V-PI staining. Our results showed antiproliferative effect of mesenchymal stem cell secretome on K562 cancer cells, the effect was also added to cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin without induction of drug resistance. Human Wharton's jelly derived mesenchymal stem cells exerted cytotoxic effect on leukemia cells. Addition of that effect to anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic agents can leads to cytotoxic drug dose reduction and diminished side effects. PMID:25779671

  5. The Src and c-Kit kinase inhibitor dasatinib enhances p53-mediated targeting of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells by chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Cedric; McDonald, Tinisha; Ho, Yin Wei; Liu, Hongjun; Lin, Allen; Forman, Stephen J.; Kuo, Ya-Huei

    2013-01-01

    The SRC family kinases (SFKs) and the receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit are activated in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. We show here that the SFKs LYN, HCK, or FGR are overexpressed and activated in AML progenitor cells. Treatment with the SFK and c-KIT inhibitor dasatinib selectively inhibits human AML stem/progenitor cell growth in vitro. Importantly, dasatinib markedly increases the elimination of AML stem cells capable of engrafting immunodeficient mice by chemotherapeutic agents. In vivo dasatinib treatment enhances chemotherapy-induced targeting of primary murine AML stem cells capable of regenerating leukemia in secondary recipients. Our studies suggest that enhanced targeting of AML cells by the combination of dasatinib with daunorubicin may be related to inhibition of AKT-mediated human mouse double minute 2 homolog phosphorylation, resulting in enhanced p53 activity in AML cells. Combined treatment using dasatinib and chemotherapy provides a novel approach to increasing p53 activity and enhancing targeting of AML stem cells. PMID:23896410

  6. Biological Analysis of Human CML Stem Cells; Xenograft Model of Chronic Phase Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sheela A

    2016-01-01

    Xenograft mouse models have been instrumental in expanding our knowledge of hematopoiesis and can provide a functional description of stem cells that possess engrafting potential. Here we describe methodology outlining one way of analyzing human malignant cells that are able to engraft immune compromised mice. Using models such as these will allow researchers to gain valuable insight into the primitive leukemic subtypes that evade current therapy regimes and are critical to understand, in order to eradicate malignancy. PMID:27581148

  7. Clinical characteristics and outcome of isolated extramedullary relapse in acute leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a single-center analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ji-Min; Meng, Xiao-Jian; Luo, Yi; Tan, Ya-Min; Zhu, Xiao-Li; Zheng, Gao-Feng; He, Jing-Song; Zheng, Wei-Yan; Xie, Wan-Zhuo; Li, Li; Ye, Xiu-Jin; Zhang, Jie; Cai, Zhen; Lin, Mao-Fang; Huang, He

    2013-04-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapse (EMR) of acute leukemia (AL) is a rare occurrence. However, it appears to be more common after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). To characterize what has been observed in isolated EMR, we investigated 287 consecutive AL patients (144 acute myeloid leukemia; 138 acute lymphocytic leukemia; 5 acute mixed-lineage leukemia) who underwent allo-SCT. Twelve cases experienced relapse at extramedullary sites without concomitant involvement of the bone marrow (BM). The onset to relapse after allo-SCT was longer in extramedullary sites than in the BM (median, 10 months versus 5.5 months). EMR sites varied widely and included the central nervous system, skin, bone, pelvis and breasts. Univariate analysis demonstrated that cytogenetic abnormalities were correlated significantly with the onset of isolated EMR (P=0.001). The prognosis for patients who develop EMR remained poor but was relatively better than that after BM relapse (overall survival, 10 versus 18 months). Compared with local or single therapy, patients treated with systemic treatment in combination with local treatment could yield a favorable prognosis. In conclusion, we observed a significant number of isolated cases of EMR in AL patients after allo-SCT, cytogenetic abnormalities were correlated significantly with the onset of isolated EMR. We found that intensive approaches combining local and systemic therapy could produce favorable responses which may cure a proportion of these patients. PMID:23347901

  8. MLL-AF9– and HOXA9-mediated acute myeloid leukemia stem cell self-renewal requires JMJD1C

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Nan; Chen, Mo; Eng, Rowena; DeJong, Joshua; Sinha, Amit U.; Rahnamay, Noushin F.; Koche, Richard; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Minehart, Janna C.; Chen, Chun-Wei; Deshpande, Aniruddha J.; Xu, Haiming; Chu, S. Haihua; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Roeder, Robert G.; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Self-renewal is a hallmark of both hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and leukemia stem cells (LSCs); therefore, the identification of mechanisms that are required for LSC, but not HSC, function could provide therapeutic opportunities that are more effective and less toxic than current treatments. Here, we employed an in vivo shRNA screen and identified jumonji domain–containing protein JMJD1C as an important driver of MLL-AF9 leukemia. Using a conditional mouse model, we showed that loss of JMJD1C substantially decreased LSC frequency and caused differentiation of MLL-AF9– and homeobox A9–driven (HOXA9-driven) leukemias. We determined that JMJD1C directly interacts with HOXA9 and modulates a HOXA9-controlled gene-expression program. In contrast, loss of JMJD1C led to only minor defects in blood homeostasis and modest effects on HSC self-renewal. Together, these data establish JMJD1C as an important mediator of MLL-AF9– and HOXA9-driven LSC function that is largely dispensable for HSC function. PMID:26878175

  9. Toward a leukemia treatment strategy based on the probability of stem cell death: an essay in honor of Dr. Emil J Freireich.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, E A

    1997-12-01

    Dr. Emil J Freireich is a pioneer in the rational treatment of cancer in general and leukemia in particular. This essay in his honor suggests that the cell kill concept of chemotherapy of acute myeloblastic leukemia be extended to include two additional ideas. The first concept is that leukemic blasts, like normal hemopoietic cells, are organized in hierarchies, headed by stem cells. In both normal and leukemic hemopoiesis, killing stem cells will destroy the system; furthermore, both normal and leukemic cells respond to regulators. It follows that acute myelogenous leukemia should be considered as a dependent neoplasm. The second concept is that cell/drug interaction should be considered as two phases. The first, or proximal phase, consists of the events that lead up to injury; the second, or distal phase, comprises the responses of the cell that contribute to either progression to apoptosis or recovery. Distal responses are described briefly. Regulated drug sensitivity is presented as an example of how distal responses might be used to improve treatment. PMID:10068273

  10. Ibrutinib or Idelalisib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  11. Discontinuation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and new approaches to target leukemic stem cells: treatment-free remission as a new goal in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-05-28

    Only a small fraction of chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients (CP-CML) achieves a very deep reduction of residual disease with imatinib. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors administered as front-line therapy for CP-CML have improved the rates and degree of deeper molecular responses. Owing to this improvement, new standardized definition of complete molecular remission has been provided, which allowed plan of prospective strategies to definitively discontinue therapy in the long-term. In this review, we report the results of several published discontinuation studies and critically discuss the new approaches and tools to monitor residual disease during treatment and new strategies to target leukemic stem cells to reach a potential "operational" cure and persistent long-term leukemia-free survival. PMID:24508029

  12. Reduced Intensity Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With De Novo or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Impact of cytomegalovirus reactivation on relapse and survival in patients with acute leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Lee, Seok; Kim, Hee-Je; Jeon, Young-Woo; Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Byung-Sik; Lee, Dong-Gun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Min, Woo-Sung; Lee, Jong Wook

    2016-03-29

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-reactivation is associated with graft-vs-leukemia (GVL) effect by stimulating natural-killer or T-cells, which showed leukemia relapse prevention after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We enrolled patients with acute myeloid leukemia (n = 197) and acute lymphoid leukemia (n = 192) who underwent allogeneic-HSCT in first remission. We measured RQ-PCR weekly to detect CMV-reactivation and preemptively used ganciclovir (GCV) when the titer increased twice consecutively, but GCV was sometimes delayed in patients without significant graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) by reducing immunosuppressive agents. In the entire group, CMV-reactivation showed poor overall survival (OS). To evaluate subsequent effects of CMV-reactivation, we excluded early relapse and deaths within 100 days, during which most of the CMV-reactivation occurred. Untreated CMV-reactivated group (n = 173) showed superior OS (83.8% vs. 61.7% vs. 74.0%, p < 0.001) with lower relapse rate (10.1% vs 22.1% vs. 25.5%, p = 0.004) compared to GCV-treated CMV-reactivated group (n = 122) and CMV-undetected group (n = 42). After excluding chronic GVHD, untreated CMV-reactivated group still showed lower relapse rate (9.4% vs. 24.1% vs. 30.2%, p = 0.006). Multivariate analysis showed adverse-risk karyotype and patients in other than untreated CMV-reactivated group were independent factors for relapse prediction. Our data showed possible GVL effect of CMV-reactivation and minimizing antiviral therapy may benefit for relapse prevention in acute leukemia. PMID:26883100

  14. Impact of cytomegalovirus reactivation on relapse and survival in patients with acute leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Lee, Seok; Kim, Hee-Je; Jeon, Young-Woo; Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Byung-Sik; Lee, Dong-Gun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Min, Woo-Sung; Lee, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-reactivation is associated with graft-vs-leukemia (GVL) effect by stimulating natural-killer or T-cells, which showed leukemia relapse prevention after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We enrolled patients with acute myeloid leukemia (n = 197) and acute lymphoid leukemia (n = 192) who underwent allogeneic-HSCT in first remission. We measured RQ-PCR weekly to detect CMV-reactivation and preemptively used ganciclovir (GCV) when the titer increased twice consecutively, but GCV was sometimes delayed in patients without significant graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) by reducing immunosuppressive agents. In the entire group, CMV-reactivation showed poor overall survival (OS). To evaluate subsequent effects of CMV-reactivation, we excluded early relapse and deaths within 100 days, during which most of the CMV-reactivation occurred. Untreated CMV-reactivated group (n = 173) showed superior OS (83.8% vs. 61.7% vs. 74.0%, p < 0.001) with lower relapse rate (10.1% vs 22.1% vs. 25.5%, p = 0.004) compared to GCV-treated CMV-reactivated group (n = 122) and CMV-undetected group (n = 42). After excluding chronic GVHD, untreated CMV-reactivated group still showed lower relapse rate (9.4% vs. 24.1% vs. 30.2%, p = 0.006). Multivariate analysis showed adverse-risk karyotype and patients in other than untreated CMV-reactivated group were independent factors for relapse prediction. Our data showed possible GVL effect of CMV-reactivation and minimizing antiviral therapy may benefit for relapse prevention in acute leukemia. PMID:26883100

  15. Could Vitamin D Analogues Be Used to Target Leukemia Stem Cells?

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramírez, Idoia; Martín-Lorenzo, Alberto; González-Herrero, Inés; Rodriguez-Hernández, Guillermo; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) are defined as cells that possess the ability to self-renew and give rise to the differentiated cancer cells that comprise the tumor. These LSCs seem to show chemo-resistance and radio-resistance leading to the failure of conventional cancer therapies. Current therapies are directed at the fast growing tumor mass leaving the LSC fraction untouched. Eliminating LSCs, the root of cancer origin and recurrence, is considered to be a hopeful approach to improve survival or even to cure cancer patients. In order to achieve this, the characterization of LSCs is a prerequisite in order to develop LSC-based therapies to eliminate them. Here we review if vitamin D analogues may allow an avenue to target the LSCs. PMID:27275819

  16. Role of altered growth factor receptor-mediated JAK2 signaling in growth and maintenance of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cook, Amy M; Li, Liang; Ho, Yinwei; Lin, Allen; Li, Ling; Stein, Anthony; Forman, Stephen; Perrotti, Danilo; Jove, Richard; Bhatia, Ravi

    2014-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is sustained by small populations of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) that can resist available treatments and represent important barriers to cure. Although previous studies have shown increased signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 and STAT5 phosphorylation in AML leukemic blasts, the role of Janus kinase (JAK) signaling in primary AML compared with normal stem cells has not been directly evaluated. We show here that JAK/STAT signaling is increased in LSCs, particularly from high-risk AML. JAK2 inhibition using small molecule inhibitors or interference RNA reduced growth of AML LSCs while sparing normal stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Increased JAK/STAT activity was associated with increased expression and altered signaling through growth factor receptors in AML LSCs, including receptor tyrosine kinase c-KIT and FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3). Inhibition of c-KIT and FLT3 expression significantly inhibited JAK/STAT signaling in AML LSCs, and JAK inhibitors effectively inhibited FLT3-mutated AML LSCs. Our results indicate that JAK/STAT signaling represents an important signaling mechanism supporting AML LSC growth and survival. These studies support continued evaluation of strategies for JAK/STAT inhibition for therapeutic targeting of AML LSCs. PMID:24668492

  17. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Effect of Doxorubicin/Pluronic SP1049C on Tumorigenicity, Aggressiveness, DNA Methylation and Stem Cell Markers in Murine Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Pluronic block copolymers are potent sensitizers of multidrug resistant cancers. SP1049C, a Pluronic-based micellar formulation of doxorubicin (Dox) has completed Phase II clinical trial and demonstrated safety and efficacy in patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. This study elucidates the ability of SP1049C to deplete cancer stem cells (CSC) and decrease tumorigenicity of cancer cells in vivo. Experimental Design P388 murine leukemia ascitic tumor was grown in BDF1 mice. The animals were treated with: (a) saline, (b) Pluronics alone, (c) Dox or (d) SP1049C. The ascitic cancer cells were isolated at different passages and examined for 1) in vitro colony formation potential, 2) in vivo tumorigenicity and aggressiveness, 3) development of drug resistance and Wnt signaling activation 4) global DNA methylation profiles, and 5) expression of CSC markers. Results SP1049C treatment reduced tumor aggressiveness, in vivo tumor formation frequency and in vitro clonogenic potential of the ascitic cells compared to drug, saline and polymer controls. SP1049C also prevented overexpression of BCRP and activation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling observed with Dox alone. Moreover, SP1049C significantly altered the DNA methylation profiles of the cells. Finally, SP1049C decreased CD133+ P388 cells populations, which displayed CSC-like properties and were more tumorigenic compared to CD133− cells. Conclusions SP1049C therapy effectively suppresses the tumorigenicity and aggressiveness of P388 cells in a mouse model. This may be due to enhanced activity of SP1049C against CSC and/or altered epigenetic regulation restricting appearance of malignant cancer cell phenotype. PMID:23977261

  20. Role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia: a retrospective analysis of JALSG-APL97.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Asou, Norio; Iwanaga, Masako; Hyo, Rie; Nomura, Shosaku; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Okada, Masaya; Inaguma, Youko; Matsuda, Mitsuhiro; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Ohtake, Shigeki; Izumi, Tohru; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Shinagawa, Katsuji; Takeshita, Akihiro; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2013-10-01

    For patients with relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), all-trans retinoic acid-based salvage regimens can achieve second complete remission (CR2), but the optimal post-remission strategy for APL patients after CR2 remains unclear. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) during CR2 might be effective, but data on the role of HSCT for APL patients after CR2 are limited in Japan. We retrospectively analyzed outcomes for 57 relapsed APL patients who achieved CR2 in the JALSG APL97 study. Of those, six received autologous (auto)-HSCT, 21 received allogeneic (allo)-HSCT, and 30 received various regimens other than HSCT. The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) rate, overall survival (OS) rate and cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) were 50.7%, 77.4% and 51.0% in the non-HSCT group, 41.7%, 83.3% and 58.3% in the auto-HSCT group and 71.1%, 76.2% and 9.8% in the allo-HSCT group, respectively. Both the EFS rate and CIR were significantly better in the allo-HSCT group than in other groups. Allo-HSCT appears effective in APL patients in CR2, with a low relapse rate beyond a relatively early transplantation-related mortality (19%). Among older patients (age ≥40 years), the 5-year OS was significantly better in the non-HSCT group than in the HSCT group (78.0% vs 40.5%; P = 0.04). Further prospective studies with larger patient numbers are required to confirm the impact of HSCT alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide on outcomes for patients with APL in CR2. PMID:23837667

  1. Flow cytometric analysis of the graft-versus-Leukemia-effect after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Felix; Hilger, Nadja; Oelkrug, Christoper; Svanidze, Ellen; Ruschpler, Peter; Eichler, Wolfram; Boldt, Andreas; Emmrich, Frank; Fricke, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Acute Graft-versus-Host-Disease (aGvHD) is one of the major complications following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Although rather helpful, the use of conventional immunosuppressive drugs leads to general immunosuppression and is toxic. The effects of CD4(+) T-cells, in respect to the development of aGvHD, can be altered by administration of antihuman CD4 monoclonal antibodies, here MAX.16H5 IgG1 . This approach must be tested for possible interference with the Graft-versus-Leukemia-Effect (GvL). Thus, in vitro experiments were conducted, exposing P815 leukemic cells to bone marrow and splenocytes from cd4(-/-) -C57Bl/6 mice transgenic for human CD4 and HLA-DR3 (triple transgenic mice, [TTG]) as well as previously irradiated splenocytes from Balb/c(wt) mice. Using flow cytometry, the vitality of the various malignant and graft cells was analyzed over the course of 4 days. The survival rate of P815 cells did not change significantly when exposed to MAX.16H5 IgG1 , neither did the viability of the graft cells. This provides evidence that MAX.16H5 IgG1 does not impair the GvL effect in vitro. Additionally, P815-Balb/c(wt) leukemic mice were transplanted with P815(GFP) cells, bone marrow, and splenocytes from TTG mice with and without MAX.16H5 IgG1 . Without transplantation, P815(GFP) leukemic cells could be detected by flow cytometry in the liver, the bone marrow, and the spleen of recipients. The antibodies prevented aGvHD while leaving the GvL effect intact. These findings indicate no negative effect of MAX.16H5 IgG1 on the GvL effect in vitro and in vivo after HSCT in a murine model. PMID:25717029

  2. Refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Chinese children: bridging to stem cell transplantation with clofarabine, cyclophosphamide and etoposide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anthony P Y; Lee, Vincent; Li, C K; Ha, S Y; Chiang, Alan K S

    2016-02-01

    Refractory or relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (r/r ALL) represents the leading cause of cancer mortality in children. Clofarabine is effective in inducing remission thus enabling bridging to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We report the results in treating Hong Kong Chinese pediatric patients with r/rALL by clofarabine/cyclophosphamide/etoposide (CLO-218) combination therapy. A retrospective review of patients treated between January 2009 and December 2014 in the two tertiary referral pediatric oncology units in Hong Kong. Thirteen patients were identified. All were Chinese and seven were male. Median age at clofarabine treatment was 8 years and the median duration of follow-up was 10 months. Nine patients had B-ALL and four had T-ALL. All were refractory to the preceding regimen(s). The median number of prior treatment regimens was 2; two patients had previous HSCT. Complete remission (CR) was achieved in five patients, Complete remission with incomplete counts (CRi) in two, PR in two, and non-remission (NR) in two. All four patients with T-ALL responded with three patients achieving CR. Eight out of nine patients who responded could be bridged to HSCT. Among those who were transplanted, four remained alive and in remission, three relapsed post-HSCT, and one died from transplant-related mortality. Treatment toxicities were common including febrile neutropenia in all subjects and culture-proven bacteremia in five patients. Hepatotoxicity was mild and reversible with no case of veno-occlusive disease. The clofarabine-based regimen is a promising strategy to induce disease remission in r/rALL and bridge to HSCT. Septic complications are, however, frequent necessitating prompt management with adequate supportive care in specialized centers. PMID:26666536

  3. 5-Azacitidine Monotherapy Followed by Related Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Achieves Durable Remission in a Pediatric Patient With Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia Refractory to High-Dose Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, Veronika; Khazal, Sajad; Berulava, Giorgi; Roth, Michael; Mahadeo, Kris M

    2016-06-01

    Patients with acute leukemias of undifferentiated lineage (AUL) generally have guarded prognosis. Here, we describe the first reported pediatric patient with AUL refractory to high-dose chemotherapy who achieved clinical remission with ALL maintenance therapy and 5-azacitidine. His induction remission was followed by consolidation with reduced toxicity haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). At 9 months post-HSCT, the patient is alive and in remission. This combination therapy of remission induction with ALL maintenance therapy and 5-azacitidine and consolidation with reduced toxicity haploidentical HSCT is novel and promising for patients who lack conventional donors and are not candidates for myeloablative therapy. PMID:26914221

  4. Microenvironmental remodeling as a parameter and prognostic factor of heterogeneous leukemogenesis in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-A; Shim, Jae-Seung; Lee, Ga-Young; Yim, Hyeon Woo; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myungshin; Leem, Sun-Hee; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Chang-Ki; Oh, Il-Hoan

    2015-06-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by clonal proliferation of stem cell-like blasts in bone marrow (BM); however, their unique cellular interaction within the BM microenvironment and its functional significance remain unclear. Here, we assessed the BM microenvironment of AML patients and demonstrate that the leukemia stem cells induce a change in the transcriptional programming of the normal mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). The modified leukemic niche alters the expressions of cross-talk molecules (i.e., CXCL12 and JAG1) in MSCs to provide a distinct cross-talk between normal and leukemia cells, selectively suppressing normal primitive hematopoietic cells while supporting leukemogenesis and chemoresistance. Of note, AML patients exhibited distinct heterogeneity in the alteration of mesenchymal stroma in BM. The distinct pattern of stromal changes in leukemic BM at initial diagnosis was associated with a heterogeneous posttreatment clinical course with respect to the maintenance of complete remission for 5 to 8 years and early or late relapse. Thus, remodeling of mesenchymal niche by leukemia cells is an intrinsic self-reinforcing process of leukemogenesis that can be a parameter for the heterogeneity in the clinical course of leukemia and hence serve as a potential prognostic factor. PMID:25791383

  5. Fludarabine and busulfan as a reduced-toxicity myeloablative conditioning regimen in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    DAI, ZHIMING; LIU, JIE; ZHANG, WANG-GANG; CAO, XINGMEI; ZHANG, YANG; DAI, ZHIJUN

    2016-01-01

    The optimal conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in acute leukemia remains undefined. We evaluated the outcomes in 30 patients with acute leukemia who underwent allo-HSCT from human leukocyte antigen-matched donors after conditioning with busulfan and fludarabine (BuFlu). The regimen comprised injection of busulfan 3.2 mg/kg daily on 4 consecutive days and fludarabine 30 mg/m2 daily for 4 doses. All 30 patients achieved hematopoiesis reconstitution with full donor chimerism confirmed by short tandem repeat DNA analysis. The most common regimen-related toxicity was mucositis (86.7%), followed by cytomegalovirus infection (80%). Serious regimen-related toxicities were rare. Acute graft vs. host disease (aGVHD) was detected in 46.7% of the patients; 33.4% had grade I–II aGVHD and 13.3% had grade III–IV aGVHD. Chronic GVHD (cGVHD) was noted in 20% of the patients. The overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 66.7 and 53%, respectively, with a median follow-up of 25 months for surviving patients. Therefore, BuFlu was an effective conditioning regimen with a low rate of transplant-related adverse effects and increased antileukemic effects in patients with acute leukemia undergoing allo-HSCT. PMID:27073687

  6. Peripheral blood stem cell graft compared to bone marrow after reduced intensity conditioning regimens for acute leukemia: a report from the ALWP of the EBMT.

    PubMed

    Savani, Bipin N; Labopin, Myriam; Blaise, Didier; Niederwieser, Dietger; Ciceri, Fabio; Ganser, Arnold; Arnold, Renate; Afanasyev, Boris; Vigouroux, Stephane; Milpied, Noel; Hallek, Michael; Cornelissen, Jan J; Schwerdtfeger, Rainer; Polge, Emmanuelle; Baron, Frédéric; Esteve, Jordi; Gorin, Norbert C; Schmid, Christoph; Giebel, Sebastian; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2016-02-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are receiving reduced intensity conditioning regimen allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that the use of bone marrow graft might decrease the risk of graft-versus-host disease compared to peripheral blood after reduced intensity conditioning regimens without compromising graft-versus-leukemia effects. Patients who underwent reduced intensity conditioning regimen allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from 2000 to 2012 for acute leukemia, and who were reported to the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation were included in the study. Eight hundred and thirty-seven patients receiving bone marrow grafts were compared with 9011 peripheral blood transplant recipients after reduced intensity conditioning regimen. Median follow up of surviving patients was 27 months. Cumulative incidence of engraftment (neutrophil ≥0.5×10(9)/L at day 60) was lower in bone marrow recipients: 88% versus 95% (P<0.0001). Grade II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease was lower in bone marrow recipients: 19% versus 24% for peripheral blood (P=0.005). In multivariate analysis, after adjusting for differences between both groups, overall survival [Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.90; P=0.05] and leukemia-free survival (HR 0.88; P=0.01) were higher in patients transplanted with peripheral blood compared to bone marrow grafts. Furthermore, peripheral blood graft was also associated with decreased risk of relapse (HR 0.78; P=0.0001). There was no significant difference in non-relapse mortality between recipients of bone marrow and peripheral blood grafts, and chronic graft-versus-host disease was significantly higher after peripheral blood grafts (HR 1.38; P<0.0001). Despite the limitation of a retrospective registry-based study, we found that peripheral blood grafts after reduced intensity conditioning regimens had better overall and leukemia-free survival than bone marrow grafts

  7. Peripheral blood stem cell graft compared to bone marrow after reduced intensity conditioning regimens for acute leukemia: a report from the ALWP of the EBMT

    PubMed Central

    Savani, Bipin N.; Labopin, Myriam; Blaise, Didier; Niederwieser, Dietger; Ciceri, Fabio; Ganser, Arnold; Arnold, Renate; Afanasyev, Boris; Vigouroux, Stephane; Milpied, Noel; Hallek, Michael; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Schwerdtfeger, Rainer; Polge, Emmanuelle; Baron, Frédéric; Esteve, Jordi; Gorin, Norbert C.; Schmid, Christoph; Giebel, Sebastian; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are receiving reduced intensity conditioning regimen allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that the use of bone marrow graft might decrease the risk of graft-versus-host disease compared to peripheral blood after reduced intensity conditioning regimens without compromising graft-versus-leukemia effects. Patients who underwent reduced intensity conditioning regimen allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from 2000 to 2012 for acute leukemia, and who were reported to the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation were included in the study. Eight hundred and thirty-seven patients receiving bone marrow grafts were compared with 9011 peripheral blood transplant recipients after reduced intensity conditioning regimen. Median follow up of surviving patients was 27 months. Cumulative incidence of engraftment (neutrophil ≥0.5×109/L at day 60) was lower in bone marrow recipients: 88% versus 95% (P<0.0001). Grade II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease was lower in bone marrow recipients: 19% versus 24% for peripheral blood (P=0.005). In multivariate analysis, after adjusting for differences between both groups, overall survival [Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.90; P=0.05] and leukemia-free survival (HR 0.88; P=0.01) were higher in patients transplanted with peripheral blood compared to bone marrow grafts. Furthermore, peripheral blood graft was also associated with decreased risk of relapse (HR 0.78; P=0.0001). There was no significant difference in non-relapse mortality between recipients of bone marrow and peripheral blood grafts, and chronic graft-versus-host disease was significantly higher after peripheral blood grafts (HR 1.38; P<0.0001). Despite the limitation of a retrospective registry-based study, we found that peripheral blood grafts after reduced intensity conditioning regimens had better overall and leukemia-free survival than bone marrow grafts. However

  8. Radiolabeled BC8 Antibody, Busulfan, Cyclophosphamide Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in First Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  9. Blockage of TGFβ-SMAD2 by demethylation-activated miR-148a is involved in caffeic acid-induced inhibition of cancer stem cell-like properties in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Jiang, Fei; Chen, Lijun; Yang, Ye; Cao, Shuyuan; Ye, Yuting; Wang, Xingxing; Mu, Juan; Li, Zhong; Li, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Current standard practices for treatment of cancers are less than satisfactory because of recurrence mediated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Caffeic acid (CaA) is a novel anti-tumor agent that inhibits proliferation, migration, and invasion in human cancer cells. However, little is known about the functions of CaA in regulating CSCs-like properties and the potential molecular mechanisms. Here, we found that CaA attenuated the CSCs-like properties by the microRNA-148a (miR-148a)-mediated inhibition of transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-SMAD2 signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo. CaA enhanced the expression of miR-148a by inducing DNA methylation. MiR-148a, which targeted the SMAD2-3′UTR, decreased the expression of SMAD2. Knockdown of miR-148a abolished the CaA-induced inhibition of TGFβ-SMAD2 signal pathway and the CSCs-like properties. Our study found a novel mechanism that CaA inhibits the CSCs-like properties via miR-148a-mediated inhibition of TGFβ-SMAD2 signaling pathway, which may help to identify a new approach for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:26106521

  10. Leukemia -- Eosinophilic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia - Eosinophilic: Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Leukemia - Eosinophilic: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... Platelets that help the blood to clot About leukemia Types of leukemia are named after the specific ...

  11. Wilms Tumor 1 Expression and Pre-emptive Immunotherapy in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing an Allogeneic Hemopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Di Grazia, Carmen; Pozzi, Sarah; Geroldi, Simona; Grasso, Raffaella; Miglino, Maurizio; Colombo, Nicoletta; Tedone, Elisabetta; Luchetti, Silvia; Lamparelli, Teresa; Gualandi, Francesca; Ibatici, Adalberto; Bregante, Stefania; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Raiola, Anna Maria; Dominietto, Alida; Varaldo, Riccardo; Galaverna, Federica; Ghiso, Anna; Sica, Simona; Bacigalupo, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) was monitored by Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) expression in 207 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after an allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) as a trigger to initiate pre-emptive immunotherapy (IT) with cyclosporin discontinuation and/or donor lymphocyte infusion. The trigger for IT was WT1 ≥ 180 copies/10(4) Abelson cells in marrow cells in the first group of 122 patients (WT1-180) and ≥ 100 copies in a subsequent group of 85 patients (WT1-100). Forty patients received IT. The cumulative incidence (CI) of relapse was 76% in WT1-180 (n = 17) versus 29% in WT1-100 patients (n = 23) receiving IT (P = .006); the leukemia-free survival from MRD positivity was 23% versus 74%, respectively (P = .003). We then looked at the entire AML patient population (n = 207). WT1-180 and WT1-100 patients were comparable for disease phase and age. The overall 4-year CI of transplantation-related mortality was 13% in both groups; the CI of leukemia relapse was 38% in the WT1-180 and 28% in the WT1-100 patients (P = .05) and leukemia-free survival was 56% versus 48%, respectively (P = .07). In conclusion, we suggests that WT1-based pre-emptive immunotherapy is feasible in patients with undergoing an allogeneic HSCT. The protective effect on relapse is greater when IT is triggered at lower levels of WT1. PMID:26970379

  12. A TIM-3/Gal-9 Autocrine Stimulatory Loop Drives Self-Renewal of Human Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells and Leukemic Progression.

    PubMed

    Kikushige, Yoshikane; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Yuda, Junichiro; Jabbarzadeh-Tabrizi, Siamak; Shima, Takahiro; Takayanagi, Shin-ichiro; Niiro, Hiroaki; Yurino, Ayano; Miyawaki, Kohta; Takenaka, Katsuto; Iwasaki, Hiromi; Akashi, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Signaling mechanisms underlying self-renewal of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) are poorly understood, and identifying pathways specifically active in LSCs could provide opportunities for therapeutic intervention. T-cell immunoglobin mucin-3 (TIM-3) is expressed on the surface of LSCs in many types of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but not on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Here, we show that TIM-3 and its ligand, galectin-9 (Gal-9), constitute an autocrine loop critical for LSC self-renewal and development of human AML. Serum Gal-9 levels were significantly elevated in AML patients and in mice xenografted with primary human AML samples, and neutralization of Gal-9 inhibited xenogeneic reconstitution of human AML. Gal-9-mediated stimulation of TIM-3 co-activated NF-κB and β-catenin signaling, pathways known to promote LSC self-renewal. These changes were further associated with leukemic transformation of a variety of pre-leukemic disorders and together highlight that targeting the TIM-3/Gal-9 autocrine loop could be a useful strategy for treating myeloid leukemias. PMID:26279267

  13. Epigenetic Perturbations by Arg882-Mutated DNMT3A Potentiate Aberrant Stem Cell Gene-Expression Program and Acute Leukemia Development.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rui; Wang, Ping; Parton, Trevor; Zhou, Yang; Chrysovergis, Kaliopi; Rockowitz, Shira; Chen, Wei-Yi; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Wade, Paul A; Zheng, Deyou; Wang, Gang Greg

    2016-07-11

    DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) is frequently mutated in hematological cancers; however, the underlying oncogenic mechanism remains elusive. Here, we report that the DNMT3A mutational hotspot at Arg882 (DNMT3A(R882H)) cooperates with NRAS mutation to transform hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and induce acute leukemia development. Mechanistically, DNMT3A(R882H) directly binds to and potentiates transactivation of stemness genes critical for leukemogenicity including Meis1, Mn1, and Hoxa gene cluster. DNMT3A(R882H) induces focal epigenetic alterations, including CpG hypomethylation and concurrent gain of active histone modifications, at cis-regulatory elements such as enhancers to facilitate gene transcription. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated ablation of a putative Meis1 enhancer carrying DNMT3A(R882H)-induced DNA hypomethylation impairs Meis1 expression. Importantly, DNMT3A(R882H)-induced gene-expression programs can be repressed through Dot1l inhibition, providing an attractive therapeutic strategy for DNMT3A-mutated leukemias. PMID:27344947

  14. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia: Introduction Request Permissions Print to PDF Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia: Introduction ... Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia Guide ...

  15. Clinical and In Vitro Studies on Impact of High-Dose Etoposide Pharmacokinetics Prior Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on the Risk of Post-Transplant Leukemia Relapse.

    PubMed

    Sobiak, Joanna; Kazimierczak, Urszula; Kowalczyk, Dariusz W; Chrzanowska, Maria; Styczyński, Jan; Wysocki, Mariusz; Szpecht, Dawid; Wachowiak, Jacek

    2015-10-01

    The impact of etoposide (VP-16) plasma concentrations on the day of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) on leukemia-free survival in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was studied. In addition, the in vitro effects of VP-16 on the lymphocytes proliferation, cytotoxic activity and on Th1/Th2 cytokine responses were assessed. In 31 children undergoing allo-HSCT, VP-16 plasma concentrations were determined up to 120 h after the infusion using the HPLC-UV method. For mentioned in vitro studies, VP-16 plasma concentrations observed on allo-HSCT day were used. In 84 % of children, VP-16 plasma concentrations (0.1-1.5 μg/mL) were quantifiable 72 h after the end of the drug infusion, i.e. when allo-HSCT should be performed. In 20 (65 %) children allo-HSCT was performed 4 days after the end of the drug infusion, and VP-16 was still detectable (0.1-0.9 μg/mL) in plasma of 12 (39 %) of them. Post-transplant ALL relapse occurred in four children, in all of them VP-16 was detectable in plasma (0.1-0.8 μg/mL) on allo-HSCT day, while there was no relapse in children with undetectable VP-16. In in vitro studies, VP-16 demonstrated impact on the proliferation activity of stimulated lymphocytes depending on its concentration and exposition time. The presence of VP-16 in plasma on allo-HSCT day may demonstrate an adverse effect on graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) reaction and increase the risk of post-transplant ALL relapse. Therefore, if 72 h after VP-16 administration its plasma concentration is still above 0.1 μg/mL then the postponement of transplantation for next 24 h should be considered to protect GvL effector cells from transplant material. PMID:26040247

  16. Phase II Trial of Reduced-Intensity Busulfan/Clofarabine Conditioning with Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, and Acute Lymphoid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    El-Jawahri, Areej; Li, Shuli; Ballen, Karen K; Cutler, Corey; Dey, Bimalangshu R; Driscoll, Jessica; Hunnewell, Chrisa; Ho, Vincent T; McAfee, Steven L; Poliquin, Cathleen; Saylor, Meredith; Soiffer, Robert J; Spitzer, Thomas R; Alyea, Edwin; Chen, Yi-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Clofarabine has potent antileukemia activity and its inclusion in reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for acute leukemia could potentially improve outcomes. We conducted a phase II study of busulfan (.8 mg/kg i.v. twice daily on days -5, -4, -3, and -2) with clofarabine (40 mg/m(2) i.v. daily on days -5, -4, -3, and -2) conditioning before allogeneic 8/8 HLA-matched related or unrelated HSCT. The primary endpoint was donor neutrophil engraftment by day +40. Secondary endpoints included nonrelapse mortality (NRM), acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Thirty-four patients (acute myeloid leukemia [AML], n = 25; myelodysplastic syndromes, n = 5; and acute lymphoid leukemia, n = 4) were enrolled. Day 40+ engraftment with donor chimerism was achieved in 33 of 34 patients with 1 patient dying before count recovery. Day 100 and 1-year NRM were 5.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0 to 17.4) and 24% (95% CI, 11 to 39), respectively. The 2-year relapse rate was 26% (95% CI, 13 to 42). Cumulative incidences of acute and chronic GVHD were 21% and 44%, respectively. The 2-year PFS was 50% (95% CI, 32 to 65) and OS was 56% (95% CI, 38 to 71). For patients with AML in first complete remission, 2-year PFS and OS were both 82% (95% CI, 55 to 94). RIC with busulfan and clofarabine leads to successful engraftment with acceptable rates of NRM and GVHD. PMID:26260679

  17. Recombinant Rabbit Leukemia Inhibitory Factor and Rabbit Embryonic Fibroblasts Support the Derivation and Maintenance of Rabbit Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Fei; Ma, Yinghong; Chen, Y. Eugene; Zhang, Jifeng; Lin, Tzu-An; Chen, Chien-Hong; Lin, Wei-Wen; Roach, Marsha; Ju, Jyh-Cherng; Yang, Lan; Du, Fuliang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The rabbit is a classical experimental animal species. A major limitation in using rabbits for biomedical research is the lack of germ-line-competent rabbit embryonic stem cells (rbESCs). We hypothesized that the use of homologous feeder cells and recombinant rabbit leukemia inhibitory factor (rbLIF) might improve the chance in deriving germ-line-competent rbES cells. In the present study, we established rabbit embryonic fibroblast (REF) feeder layers and synthesized recombinant rbLIF. We derived a total of seven putative rbESC lines, of which two lines (M5 and M23) were from culture Condition I using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as feeders supplemented with human LIF (hLIF) (MEF+hLIF). Another five lines (R4, R9, R15, R21, and R31) were derived from Condition II using REFs as feeder cells supplemented with rbLIF (REF+rbLIF). Similar derivation efficiency was observed between these two conditions (8.7% vs. 10.2%). In a separate experiment with 2×3 factorial design, we examined the effects of feeder cells (MEF vs. REF) and LIFs (mLIF, hLIF vs. rbLIF) on rbESC culture. Both Conditions I and II supported satisfactory rbESC culture, with similar or better population doubling time and colony-forming efficiency than other combinations of feeder cells with LIFs. Rabbit ESCs derived and maintained on both conditions displayed typical ESC characteristics, including ESC pluripotency marker expression (AP, Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and SSEA4) and gene expression (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, c-Myc, Klf4, and Dppa5), and the capacity to differentiate into three primary germ layers in vitro. The present work is the first attempt to establish rbESC lines using homologous feeder cells and recombinant rbLIF, by which the rbESCs were derived and maintained normally. These cell lines are unique resources and may facilitate the derivation of germ-line-competent rbESCs. PMID:22775411

  18. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  19. Application of Recombinant Human Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) Produced in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) for Maintenance of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Youngblood, Bradford A.; Alfano, Randall; Pettit, Steve C.; Zhang, Deshui; Dallmann, H. Garry; Huang, Ning; MacDonald, Clinton C.

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into any somatic cell type, and thus have potential to treat a number of diseases that are currently incurable. Application of these cells for clinical or industrial uses would require an increase in production to yield adequate numbers of viable cells. However, the relatively high costs of cytokines and growth factors required for maintenance of stem cells in the undifferentiated state have the potential to limit translational research. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a member of the IL-6 cytokine family, is a key regulator in the maintenance of naïve states for both human and mouse stem cells. In this study, we describe a new recombinant human LIF (rhLIF) using a plant-based (rice) expression system. We found that rice-derived rhLIF possessed the same specific activity as commercial E. coli-derived LIF and was capable of supporting mouse embryonic stem cell proliferation in the undifferentiated state as evidenced from pluripotency marker level analysis. Retention of the pluripotent state was found to be indistinguishable between rice-derived rhLIF and other recombinant LIF proteins currently on the market. PMID:24380819

  20. MicroRNA-125a influences breast cancer stem cells by targeting leukemia inhibitory factor receptor which regulates the hippo signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Sushmita Bose; Arumugam, Arunkumar; Subramani, Ramadevi; Pedroza, Diego; Hernandez, Keziah; Saltzstein, Edward; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are the main driving force behind cancer initiation and progression. The molecular mechanisms that regulate CSC properties are poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a significant role in normal and cancer tissues. Here, we show that miRNA-125a indirectly regulates TAZ, an effector molecule in the Hippo pathway, through the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR). The miR-125a→LIFR axis affected the homeostasis of nonmalignant and malignant breast epithelial stem cells through the Hippo signaling pathway. Inhibition of miR-125a in breast cancer cells led to a significant reduction in the CSC pool. In contrast, enhanced expression of miR-125a in nonmalignant breast epithelial cells resulted in significant expansion of the stem cell pool. Gain of function and loss of function of LIFR directly correlated with the inhibition and overexpression of miR-125a, respectively. Modulation of miR-125a led to a change in the activity of TAZ and its subcellular localization. We further demonstrated that miR-125a influenced stem cells by regulating Hippo signaling through LIFR in human primary breast cancer cells confirming the data obtained from established cell lines. We suggest that miR-125a could be a potential target against CSCs that maybe used along with the existing conventional therapies. PMID:25962054

  1. MicroRNA-125a influences breast cancer stem cells by targeting leukemia inhibitory factor receptor which regulates the Hippo signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Sushmita Bose; Arumugam, Arunkumar; Subramani, Ramadevi; Pedroza, Diego; Hernandez, Keziah; Saltzstein, Edward; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar

    2015-07-10

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are the main driving force behind cancer initiation and progression. The molecular mechanisms that regulate CSC properties are poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a significant role in normal and cancer tissues. Here, we show that miRNA-125a indirectly regulates TAZ, an effector molecule in the Hippo pathway, through the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR). The miR-125a→LIFR axis affected the homeostasis of nonmalignant and malignant breast epithelial stem cells through the Hippo signaling pathway. Inhibition of miR-125a in breast cancer cells led to a significant reduction in the CSC pool. In contrast, enhanced expression of miR-125a in nonmalignant breast epithelial cells resulted in significant expansion of the stem cell pool. Gain of function and loss of function of LIFR directly correlated with the inhibition and overexpression of miR-125a, respectively. Modulation of miR-125a led to a change in the activity of TAZ and its subcellular localization. We further demonstrated that miR-125a influenced stem cells by regulating Hippo signaling through LIFR in human primary breast cancer cells confirming the data obtained from established cell lines. We suggest that miR-125a could be a potential target against CSCs that maybe used along with the existing conventional therapies. PMID:25962054

  2. Modulating the Growth and Imatinib Sensitivity of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Stem/Progenitor Cells with Pullulan/MicroRNA Nanoparticles In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenjuan; Liu, Jian; Xie, Jundan; Zhang, Xiuyan; Zhou, Haixia; Yao, Hong; Zhang, Weiqi; Guo, Dawei; Zhu, Lingying; Xiao, Lun; Wu, Depei; Xu, Haiyan; Chen, Suning; Zhao, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) originates from normal hematopoietic stem cells acquiring Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) to generate BCR-ABL fusion gene whose protein product has deregulated tyrosine kinase activity. Specific inhibitors against BCR-ABL, such as Imatinib mesylate (IM), have greatly improved CML management; however, no single agent is a cure yet. Delivery of microRNA (miRNA) using non-viral vectors has been utilized to inhibit various cancer cells; however, the efficacy of this approach to target CML stem/progenitor cells has not been elucidated. In this study, we firstly validated that spermine-introduced pullulan (Ps) was a robust non-viral vector for delivery of miRNA to CML cells, including the CD34+ cells from clinical isolates. We then found that the miR-181a/RALA (V-ral simian leukemia viral oncogene homolog A) axis was aberrantly expressed in the CML CD34+ cells. The delivery of miR-181a specifically inhibited the growth of CML CD34+ cells, possibly via the inhibition of RALA. In contrast, miR-181a did not evidently affect the normal hematopoietic CD34+ cells. In addition, miR-181a increased IM sensitivity of the CD34+ CML cells. Taken together, we have therefore demonstrated that the delivery of miR-181a using Ps to CML stem/progenitor cells leads to their growth inhibition and enhancement of IM sensitivity, which will possibly be beneficial to CML treatment. PMID:26554155

  3. Immunotherapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nirali N.; Dave, Hema; Wayne, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of leukemia in childhood. Despite this, leukemia remains a leading cause of pediatric cancer-related mortality and the prognosis is guarded for individuals with relapsed or refractory disease. Standard therapies are associated with a wide array of acute and long-term toxicities and further treatment intensification may not be tolerable or beneficial. The curative potential of allogeneic stem cell transplantation is due in part to the graft-versus-leukemia effect, which provides evidence for the therapeutic capacity of immune-based therapies. In recent years there have been significant advances in the development and application of immunotherapy in the treatment of leukemias, including the demonstration of activity in chemotherapy-resistant cases. This review summarizes immunotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of pediatric leukemia including current results and future directions. PMID:23847759

  4. Different immune reconstitution in multiple myeloma, chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia patients after allogeneic transplantation of peripheral blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, D; Re, F; Bandini, G; Raspadori, D; Arpinati, M; Senese, B; Stanzani, M; Bonifazi, F; Falcioni, S; Chirumbolo, G; Tura, S

    2000-12-01

    In this study we compared the lymphocyte reconstitution in 13 multiple myeloma (MM), nine acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 10 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients after allogeneic G-CSF-mobilized PBSC transplantation from HLA-identical siblings. Conditioning regimens included standard total body irradiation + cyclophosphamide (CY), or busulphan + CY, whereas VP-16 was added in patients with advanced disease. Overall comparable numbers of mononuclear cells, CD34+ cells and CD3+ T cells were infused in each group. A significantly higher CD3+ T cell number was observed in MM and AML than in CML patients 1 month after transplant. However, MM patients showed a faster and better recovery of CD4+ T cells than both AML and CML patients at 3 months (P = 0.01 and P = 0.01, respectively) and 12 months (P = 0.01 vs AML, while P = NS vs CML) after transplant, and had a CD4:CD8 ratio > 1 with a median CD4+ T cell value > 400/microl 1 year after transplant. Development of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) did not affect CD4:CD8 ratios but patients who experienced acute GVHD > grade I had lower CD4+ and CD8+ T cell numbers at all time points. However, after excluding patients with GVHD > grade I, MM patients still showed a significantly higher CD4+ T cell value than patients with myeloproliferative diseases 1 year after transplant. These findings suggest that although allogeneic PBSC transplantation induces rapid immune reconstitution, different kinetics may occur among patients with hematological malignancies. In particular, the rapid reconstitution of CD4+ T cells in MM patients may contribute to the low transplant-related mortality achieved in this disease. PMID:11223973

  5. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

  6. Small-molecule inhibition of BRD4 as a new potent approach to eliminate leukemic stem- and progenitor cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Harald; Blatt, Katharina; Shi, Junwei; Gleixner, Karoline V.; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Müllauer, Leonhard; Vakoc, Christopher R.; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Horny, Hans-Peter; Bradner, James E.; Zuber, Johannes; Valent, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a life-threatening stem cell disease characterized by uncontrolled proliferation and accumulation of myeloblasts. Using an advanced RNAi screen-approach in an AML mouse model we have recently identified the epigenetic ‘reader’ BRD4 as a promising target in AML. In the current study, we asked whether inhibition of BRD4 by a small-molecule inhibitor, JQ1, leads to growth-inhibition and apoptosis in primary human AML stem- and progenitor cells. Primary cell samples were obtained from 37 patients with freshly diagnosed AML (n=23) or refractory AML (n=14). BRD4 was found to be expressed at the mRNA and protein level in unfractionated AML cells as well as in highly enriched CD34+/CD38− and CD34+/CD38+ stem- and progenitor cells in all patients examined. In unfractionated leukemic cells, submicromolar concentrations of JQ1 induced major growth-inhibitory effects (IC50 0.05-0.5 μM) in most samples, including cells derived from relapsed or refractory patients. In addition, JQ1 was found to induce apoptosis in CD34+/CD38− and CD34+/CD38+ stem- and progenitor cells in all donors examined as evidenced by combined surface/Annexin-V staining. Moreover, we were able to show that JQ1 synergizes with ARA-C in inducing growth inhibition in AML cells. Together, the BRD4-targeting drug JQ1 exerts major anti-leukemic effects in a broad range of human AML subtypes, including relapsed and refractory patients and all relevant stem- and progenitor cell compartments, including CD34+/CD38− and CD34+/CD38+ AML cells. These results characterize BRD4-inhibition as a promising new therapeutic approach in AML which should be further investigated in clinical trials. PMID:23249862

  7. Generation of leukemia inhibitory factor and basic fibroblast growth factor-dependent induced pluripotent stem cells from canine adult somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiesi; Suhr, Steven T; Chang, Eun Ah; Wang, Kai; Ross, Pablo J; Nelson, Laura L; Venta, Patrick J; Knott, Jason G; Cibelli, Jose B

    2011-10-01

    For more than thirty years, the dog has been used as a model for human diseases. Despite efforts made to develop canine embryonic stem cells, success has been elusive. Here, we report the generation of canine induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs) from canine adult fibroblasts, which we accomplished by introducing human OCT4, SOX2, c-MYC, and KLF4. The ciPSCs expressed critical pluripotency markers and showed evidence of silencing the viral vectors and normal karyotypes. Microsatellite analysis indicated that the ciPSCs showed the same profile as the donor fibroblasts but differed from cells taken from other dogs. Under culture conditions favoring differentiation, the ciPSCs could form cell derivatives from the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. Further, the ciPSCs required leukemia inhibitory factor and basic fibroblast growth factor to survive, proliferate, and maintain pluripotency. Our results demonstrate an efficient method for deriving canine pluripotent stem cells, providing a powerful platform for the development of new models for regenerative medicine, as well as for the study of the onset, progression, and treatment of human and canine genetic diseases. PMID:21495906

  8. Generation of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor and Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor-Dependent Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Canine Adult Somatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiesi; Suhr, Steven T.; Chang, Eun Ah; Wang, Kai; Ross, Pablo J.; Nelson, Laura L.; Venta, Patrick J.; Knott, Jason G.

    2011-01-01

    For more than thirty years, the dog has been used as a model for human diseases. Despite efforts made to develop canine embryonic stem cells, success has been elusive. Here, we report the generation of canine induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs) from canine adult fibroblasts, which we accomplished by introducing human OCT4, SOX2, c-MYC, and KLF4. The ciPSCs expressed critical pluripotency markers and showed evidence of silencing the viral vectors and normal karyotypes. Microsatellite analysis indicated that the ciPSCs showed the same profile as the donor fibroblasts but differed from cells taken from other dogs. Under culture conditions favoring differentiation, the ciPSCs could form cell derivatives from the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. Further, the ciPSCs required leukemia inhibitory factor and basic fibroblast growth factor to survive, proliferate, and maintain pluripotency. Our results demonstrate an efficient method for deriving canine pluripotent stem cells, providing a powerful platform for the development of new models for regenerative medicine, as well as for the study of the onset, progression, and treatment of human and canine genetic diseases. PMID:21495906

  9. Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder of recipient origin in a boy with acute T-cell leukemia with detection of B-cell clonality 3 months before stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kontny, Udo; Boppana, Sridhar; Jung, Andreas; Goebel, Heike; Strahm, Brigitte; Peters, Anke; Dormann, Sabine; Werner, Martin; Bader, Peter; Fisch, Paul; Niemeyer, Charlotte

    2005-11-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder is an infrequent complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is hypothesized that lack of T-cell surveillance following transplantation permits reactivation of latent EBV leading to polyclonal B-cell expansion and finally outgrowth of a predominant clone. Most cases are of donor origin. Here, we describe an 8-year old boy with early onset post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder following matched-unrelated stem cell transplantation for high-risk T-cell leukemia whose disease was unusual for two reasons. First, his B-cell clone was of host origin and, in contrast to the few PTLD of host origin described so far, not associated with autologous reconstitution. Secondly, using clonal analysis, we could retrospectively show that the B-cell clone emerged during consolidation chemotherapy for T-cell leukemia, 3 months before stem cell transplantation. PMID:16266918

  10. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation with reduced conditioning intensity as a novel immunotherapy and antiviral therapy for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Jun; Utsunomiya, Atae; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Uike, Naokuni; Sonoda, Shunro; Kannagi, Mari; Tomonaga, Masao; Harada, Mine; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Masuda, Masato; Kawano, Fumio; Yufu, Yuji; Hattori, Hiroyoshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Saburi, Yoshio

    2005-05-15

    Sixteen patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) who were all over 50 years of age underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation with reduced-conditioning intensity (RIST) from HLA-matched sibling donors after a conditioning regimen consisting of fludarabine (180 mg/m2), busulfan (8 mg/kg), and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (5 mg/kg). The observed regimen-related toxicities and nonhematologic toxicities were all found to be acceptable. Disease relapse was the main cause of treatment failure. Three patients who had a relapse subsequently responded to a rapid discontinuation of the immunosuppressive agent and thereafter achieved another remission. After RIST, the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load became undetectable in 8 patients. RIST is thus considered to be a feasible treatment for ATL. Our data also suggest the presence of a possible graft-versus-ATL effect; an anti-HTLV-1 activity was also found to be associated with this procedure. PMID:15665110

  11. Impacts of graft-versus-host disease on outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: A nationwide retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Itonaga, Hidehiro; Iwanaga, Masako; Aoki, Kazunari; Aoki, Jun; Ishiyama, Ken; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Sakura, Toru; Fukuda, Takahiro; Najima, Yuho; Yujiri, Toshiaki; Mori, Takehiko; Kurokawa, Mineo; Nawa, Yuichiro; Uchida, Naoyuki; Morishita, Yoshihisa; Hashimoto, Hisako; Eto, Tetsuya; Hirokawa, Makoto; Morishima, Yasuo; Nagamura-Inoue, Tokiko; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is a therapeutic option that may lead to improved outcomes in patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). However, few studies have examined the impact of the grade of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) on post-transplant outcomes for CMML. We retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of 141 patients with CMML who underwent allo-HSCT between 1987 and 2010, and achieved neutrophil engraftment. The effects of acute GVHD (aGVHD) or chronic GVHD (cGVHD) on overall survival (OS), leukemia-associated mortality (LAM), and transplant-related mortality were evaluated by hazards regression models, in which the onset date of aGVHD or cGVHD was treated as a time-dependent covariate. Grade I aGVHD was associated with better OS and lower LAM (P=0.042, P=0.033, respectively) than no GVHD in univariate analyses, but not in the multivariate analyses. The multivariate analyses demonstrated that extensive cGVHD significantly associated with better OS (Hazard Ratio [HR] 0.35 [95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.16-0.74]; P=0.007) and lower LAM (HR 0.36 [95% CI, 0.14-0.92]; P=0.033) in patients who were not in complete remission at transplantation. In conclusion, the occurrence of cGVHD may be an important factor affecting the outcomes of CMML patients who received transplantation. PMID:26754557

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) Regulate Activation of Granulocyte-Like Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (G-MDSC) in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; La Cava, Piera; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Stagno, Fabio; Vigneri, Paolo; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Palumbo, Giuseppe Alberto; Tibullo, Daniele; Di Raimondo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have a role in promotion of tumor growth, survival and drug-resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Recent reports indicated that a subpopulation of myeloid cells, defined as granulocyte-like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSC) is increased in these patients. So far, the role of MSC in MDSC expansion and activation into the BM microenvironment remains unexplored. To address this question, here we use a specific experimental model in vitro, co-culturing MSC with peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC) from normal individuals, in order to generate MSC-educated G-MDSC. Although MSC of healthy donors (HD) and CML patients were able to generate the same amount of MDSC, only CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC exhibited suppressive ability on autologous T lymphocytes. In addition, compared with HD-MSC, CML-MSC over-expressed some immunomodulatory factors including TGFβ, IL6 and IL10, that could be involved in MDSC activation. CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC expressed higher levels of ARG1, TNFα, IL1β, COX2 and IL6 than G-MDSC isolated from co-culture with HD-MSC. Our data provide evidence that CML-MSC may play a critical role in tumor microenvironment by orchestrating G-MDSC activation and regulating T lymphocytes-mediated leukemia surveillance, thus contributing to CML immune escape. PMID:27391078

  13. SIRT1 activation by a c-MYC oncogenic network promotes the maintenance and drug resistance of human FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Osdal, Tereza; Ho, Yinwei; Chun, Sookhee; McDonald, Tinisha; Agarwal, Puneet; Lin, Allen; Chu, Su; Qi, Jing; Li, Liang; Hsieh, Yao-Te; Dos Santos, Cedric; Yuan, Hongfeng; Ha, Trung-Quang; Popa, Mihaela; Hovland, Randi; Bruserud, Oystein; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Kuo, Ya-Huei; Chen, Wenyong; Lain, Sonia; McCormack, Emmet; Bhatia, Ravi

    2014-10-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is frequently observed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is associated with poor prognosis. In such patients, FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are only partially effective and do not eliminate the leukemia stem cells (LSCs) that are assumed to be the source of treatment failure. Here, we show that the NAD-dependent SIRT1 deacetylase is selectively overexpressed in primary human FLT3-ITD AML LSCs. This SIRT1 overexpression is related to enhanced expression of the USP22 deubiquitinase induced by c-MYC, leading to reduced SIRT1 ubiquitination and enhanced stability. Inhibition of SIRT1 expression or activity reduced the growth of FLT3-ITD AML LSCs and significantly enhanced TKI-mediated killing of the cells. Therefore, these results identify a c-MYC-related network that enhances SIRT1 protein expression in human FLT3-ITD AML LSCs and contributes to their maintenance. Inhibition of this oncogenic network could be an attractive approach for targeting FLT3-ITD AML LSCs to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:25280219

  14. SIRT1 Activation by a c-MYC Oncogenic Network Promotes the Maintenance and Drug Resistance of Human FLT3-ITD Acute Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Osdal, Tereza; Ho, Yinwei; Chun, Sookhee; McDonald, Tinisha; Agarwal, Puneet; Lin, Allen; Chu, Su; Qi, Jing; Li, Liang; Hsieh, Yao-Te; Santos, Cedric Dos; Yuan, Hongfeng; Ha, Trung-Quang; Popa, Mihaela; Hovland, Randi; Bruserud, Øystein; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Kuo, Ya-Huei; Chen, Wenyong; Lain, Sonia; McCormack, Emmet; Bhatia, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The FLT3-ITD mutation is frequently observed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is associated with poor prognosis. In such patients, FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are only partially effective and do not eliminate the leukemia stem cells (LSCs) that are assumed to be the source of treatment failure. Here, we show that the NAD-dependent SIRT1 de-acetylase is selectively overexpressed in primary human FLT3-ITD AML LSCs. This SIRT1 overexpression is related to enhanced expression of the USP22 deubiquitinase induced by c-MYC, leading to reduced SIRT1 ubiquitination and enhanced stability. Inhibition of SIRT1 expression or activity reduced the growth of FLT3-ITD AML LSCs and significantly enhanced TKI-mediated killing of the cells. Therefore, these results identify a c-MYC-related network that enhances SIRT1 protein expression in human FLT3-ITD AML LSCs and contributes to their maintenance. Inhibition of this oncogenic network could be an attractive approach for targeting FLT3-ITD AML LSCs to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:25280219

  15. Multiple isolated extramedullary relapse of acute promyelocytic leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Shalin; Herzig, Geoffrey; Slone, Stephen; Herzig, Roger

    2013-12-01

    Isolated extramedullary disease (EMD) is uncommon, especially in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We review the literature and present a 32 year old woman with APL who developed multiple EMDs after allogeneic HSCT within the calvarium, and later found to have various isolated lesions including femur, humerus and thoraco lumbar vertebrae. She was treated with local radiotherapy (XRT) to EMD lesions, all-trans retinoic acid, arsenic trioxide and donor lymphocyte infusion at different time points in her clinical course, without success. Out of reported cases in clinical setting as ours, average onset of isolated EMD is 25 months and median survival 14 months. Effective treatment of isolated EMD after HSCT is not yet clear, but ATO in combination with local XRT, tamibarotene and second HSCT have shown good results in some reported cases, but accumulation of more cases is needed to elucidate optimal therapy in such setting. PMID:23476896

  16. [The efficacy of sorafenib to prevent relapse in patients with FLT3-ITD mutation positive acute myeloid leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Zu, Y L; Zhang, Y L; Zhou, J; Han, L J; Zhao, H F; Gui, R R; Hou, Y J; Song, Y P

    2016-08-01

    To study the efficacy of sorafenib to prevent relapse in patients with FLT3-ITD mutation positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). A total of 7 cases with FLT3-ITD positive AML have received allo-HSCT in our department from May 2013 to January 2015. Six cases were administrated with sorafenib after hematopoietic reconstruction. Another patient relapsed on day 192 past allo-HSCT, then she started to use sorafenib after remission of re-induction regimens. Five patients survived. The median progression free survival was 280(126-366)day. This study suggests that sorafenib might prevent relapse past allo-HSCT and improve survival in patients with FLT3-ITD positive AML. PMID:27480560

  17. LMO2 Oncoprotein Stability in T-Cell Leukemia Requires Direct LDB1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Layer, Justin H.; Alford, Catherine E.; McDonald, W. Hayes

    2015-01-01

    LMO2 is a component of multisubunit DNA-binding transcription factor complexes that regulate gene expression in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development. Enforced expression of LMO2 causes leukemia by inducing hematopoietic stem cell-like features in T-cell progenitor cells, but the biochemical mechanisms of LMO2 function have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we systematically dissected the LMO2/LDB1-binding interface to investigate the role of this interaction in T-cell leukemia. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the LIM interaction domain of LDB1 revealed a discrete motif, R320LITR, required for LMO2 binding. Most strikingly, coexpression of full-length, wild-type LDB1 increased LMO2 steady-state abundance, whereas coexpression of mutant proteins deficient in LMO2 binding compromised LMO2 stability. These mutant LDB1 proteins also exerted dominant negative effects on growth and transcription in diverse leukemic cell lines. Mass spectrometric analysis of LDB1 binding partners in leukemic lines supports the notion that LMO2/LDB1 function in leukemia occurs in the context of multisubunit complexes, which also protect the LMO2 oncoprotein from degradation. Collectively, these data suggest that the assembly of LMO2 into complexes, via direct LDB1 interaction, is a potential molecular target that could be exploited in LMO2-driven leukemias resistant to existing chemotherapy regimens. PMID:26598604

  18. Fludarabine Phosphate, Radiation Therapy, and Rituximab in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Rituximab for High-Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  19. Possible Role of Minor H Antigens in the Persistence of Donor Chimerism after Stem Cell Transplantation; Relevance for Sustained Leukemia Remission

    PubMed Central

    van der Torren, Cornelis R.; van Hensbergen, Yvette; Luther, Susanne; Aghai, Zohara; Rychnavská, Zuzana Stachová; Slot, Manon; Scherjon, Sicco; Kröger, Nicolaus; Ganser, Arnold; Weissinger, Eva M.; Goulmy, Els; Hambach, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Persistent complete donor chimerism is an important clinical indicator for remissions of hematological malignancies after HLA-matched allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). However, the mechanisms mediating the persistence of complete donor chimerism are poorly understood. The frequent coincidence of complete donor chimerism with graft-versus-leukemia effects and graft-versus-host disease suggests that immune responses against minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags) are playing an important role in suppressing the host hematopoiesis after allogeneic SCT. Here, we investigated a possible relationship between donor immune responses against the hematopoiesis-restricted mHag HA-1 and the long-term kinetics of host hematopoietic chimerism in a cohort of 10 patients after allogeneic HLA-matched, HA-1 mismatched SCT. Functional HA-1 specific CTLs (HA-1 CTLs) were detectable in 6/10 patients lysing host-type hematopoietic cells in vitro. Presence of HA-1 CTLs in the peripheral blood coincided with low host hematopoiesis levels quantified by highly sensitive mHag specific PCR. Additionally, co-incubation of host type CD34+ cells with HA-1 CTLs isolated after allogeneic SCT prevented progenitor and cobblestone area forming cell growth in vitro and human hematopoietic engraftment in immunodeficient mice. Conversely, absence or loss of HA-1 CTLs mostly coincided with high host hematopoiesis levels and/or relapse. In summary, in this first study, presence of HA-1 CTLs paralleled low host hematopoiesis levels. This coincidence might be supported by the capacity of HA-1 CTLs isolated after allogeneic SCT to specifically eliminate host type hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Additional studies involving multiple mismatched mHags in more patients are required to confirm this novel characteristic of mHag CTLs as factor for the persistence of complete donor chimerism and leukemia remission after allogeneic SCT. PMID:25774796

  20. Curcumin reduces the expression of survivin, leading to enhancement of arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yingjian; Weng, Guangyang; Fan, Jiaxin; Li, Zhangqiu; Wu, Jianwei; Li, Yuanming; Zheng, Rong; Xia, Pingfang; Guo, Kunyuan

    2016-09-01

    Low response, treatment-related complications and relapse due to the low sensitivity of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and leukemia stem cells (LSCs) or pre‑LSCs to arsenic trioxide (ATO), represent the main problems following treatment with ATO alone in patients with MDS. To solve these problems, a chemosensitization agent can be applied to increase the susceptibility of these cells to ATO. Curcumin (CUR), which possesses a wide range of anticancer activities, is a commonly used chemosensitization agent for various types of tumors, including hematopoietic malignancies. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects and potential mechanisms in MDS-SKM-1 and leukemia stem-like KG1a cells treated with CUR and ATO alone or in combination. CUR and ATO exhibited growth inhibition detected by MTT assays and apoptosis analyzed by Annexin V/PI analyses in both SKM-1 and KG1a cells. Apoptosis of SKM-1 and KG1a cells determined by Annexin V/PI was significantly enhanced in the combination groups compared with the groups treated with either agent alone. Further evaluation was performed by western blotting for two hallmark markers of apoptosis, caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP. Co-treatment of the cells with CUR and ATO resulted in significant synergistic effects. In SKM-1 and KG1a cells, 31 and 13 proteins analyzed by protein array assays were modulated, respectively. Notably, survivin protein expression levels were downregulated in both cell lines treated with CUR alone and in combination with ATO, particularly in the latter case. Susceptibility to apoptosis was significantly increased in SKM-1 and KG1a cells treated with siRNA-survivin and ATO. These results suggested that CUR increased the sensitivity of SKM-1 and KG1a cells to ATO by downregulating the expression of survivin. PMID:27430728

  1. T cells recognizing leukemic CD34+ progenitor cells mediate the antileukemic effect of donor lymphocyte infusions for relapsed chronic myeloid leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Willem M.; Rijnbeek, Marion; van Bergen, Cornelis A. M.; Fibbe, Willem E.; Willemze, Roel; Falkenburg, J. H. Frederik

    1998-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) is an effective treatment for relapsed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. To identify the effector and target cell populations responsible for the elimination of the leukemic cells in vivo we developed an assay to measure the frequency of T lymphocyte precursor cells capable of suppressing leukemic progenitor cells. Target cells in this assay were CML cells that were cultured in the presence of stem cell factor, interleukin 3, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and erythropoietin. [3H]thymidine incorporation at day 7 represented the proliferation of the progeny of the CD34+ CML progenitor cells, and not of the more mature CD34− CML cells. Effector cells were mononuclear cells, which were used in a limiting dilution analysis to measure the frequencies of CML progenitor cell-inhibitory lymphocyte precursors (PCILp) in peripheral blood of seven patients before and after DLI for relapsed CML. In the six patients who entered complete remission, a 5- to 100-fold increase of PCILp was found during the clinical response. In the patient with resistant relapse the frequency of PCILp was <10 per ml before and after DLI. Leukemia-reactive helper T lymphocyte precursor frequencies remained unchanged after DLI. A significant increase in cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursor frequency against more mature leukemic cells was found in only two responding patients. These results indicate that T cells specifically directed against CD34+ CML progenitor cells mediate the antileukemic effect of DLI. PMID:9707616

  2. Risk assessment of relapse by lineage-specific monitoring of chimerism in children undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Preuner, Sandra; Peters, Christina; Pötschger, Ulrike; Daxberger, Helga; Fritsch, Gerhard; Geyeregger, Rene; Schrauder, André; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Bader, Peter; Ebell, Wolfram; Eckert, Cornelia; Lang, Peter; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Schrum, Johanna; Kremens, Bernhard; Ehlert, Karoline; Albert, Michael H.; Meisel, Roland; Lawitschka, Anita; Mann, Georg; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Güngör, Tayfun; Holter, Wolfgang; Strahm, Brigitte; Gruhn, Bernd; Schulz, Ansgar; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Lion, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is required as rescue therapy in about 20% of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the relapse rates are considerable, and relapse confers a poor outcome. Early assessment of the risk of relapse is therefore of paramount importance for the development of appropriate measures. We used the EuroChimerism approach to investigate the potential impact of lineage-specific chimerism testing for relapse-risk analysis in 162 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a multicenter study based on standardized transplantation protocols. Within a median observation time of 4.5 years, relapses have occurred in 41/162 patients at a median of 0.6 years after transplantation (range, 0.13–5.7 years). Prospective screening at defined consecutive time points revealed that reappearance of recipient-derived cells within the CD34+ and CD8+ cell subsets display the most significant association with the occurrence of relapses with hazard ratios of 5.2 (P=0.003) and 2.8 (P=0.008), respectively. The appearance of recipient cells after a period of pure donor chimerism in the CD34+ and CD8+ leukocyte subsets revealed dynamics indicative of a significantly elevated risk of relapse or imminent disease recurrence. Assessment of chimerism within these lineages can therefore provide complementary information for further diagnostic and, potentially, therapeutic purposes aiming at the prevention of overt relapse. This study was registered at clinical.trials.gov with the number NC01423747. PMID:26869631

  3. Curcumin reduces the expression of survivin, leading to enhancement of arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yingjian; Weng, Guangyang; Fan, Jiaxin; Li, Zhangqiu; Wu, Jianwei; Li, Yuanming; Zheng, Rong; Xia, Pingfang; Guo, Kunyuan

    2016-01-01

    Low response, treatment-related complications and relapse due to the low sensitivity of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and leukemia stem cells (LSCs) or pre-LSCs to arsenic trioxide (ATO), represent the main problems following treatment with ATO alone in patients with MDS. To solve these problems, a chemosensitization agent can be applied to increase the susceptibility of these cells to ATO. Curcumin (CUR), which possesses a wide range of anticancer activities, is a commonly used chemosensitization agent for various types of tumors, including hematopoietic malignancies. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects and potential mechanisms in MDS-SKM-1 and leukemia stem-like KG1a cells treated with CUR and ATO alone or in combination. CUR and ATO exhibited growth inhibition detected by MTT assays and apoptosis analyzed by Annexin V/PI analyses in both SKM-1 and KG1a cells. Apoptosis of SKM-1 and KG1a cells determined by Annexin V/PI was significantly enhanced in the combination groups compared with the groups treated with either agent alone. Further evaluation was performed by western blotting for two hallmark markers of apoptosis, caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP. Co-treatment of the cells with CUR and ATO resulted in significant synergistic effects. In SKM-1 and KG1a cells, 31 and 13 proteins analyzed by protein array assays were modulated, respectively. Notably, survivin protein expression levels were downregulated in both cell lines treated with CUR alone and in combination with ATO, particularly in the latter case. Susceptibility to apoptosis was significantly increased in SKM-1 and KG1a cells treated with siRNA-survivin and ATO. These results suggested that CUR increased the sensitivity of SKM-1 and KG1a cells to ATO by downregulating the expression of survivin. PMID:27430728

  4. Comparison of reduced-intensity and myeloablative conditioning regimens for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahid, S Fadilah; Ismail, Nor-Azimah; Mohd-Idris, Mohd-Razif; Jamaluddin, Fariza Wan; Tumian, NorRafeah; Sze-Wei, Ernie Yap; Muhammad, Norasiah; Nai, Ming Lai

    2014-11-01

    Currently, the indications to perform reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (RIC-HCT) are based on data derived mainly from large registry and single-centre retrospective studies. Thus, at the present time, there is limited direct evidence supporting the current practice in selecting patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) for RIC versus myeloablative conditioning (MAC) transplants. To determine the relationship between dose intensity of conditioning regimen and survival outcomes after allografting in AML/ALL patients, we performed a meta-analysis of 23 clinical trials reported between 1990 and 2013 involving 15,258 adult patients that compare survival outcomes after RIC-HCT versus MAC-HCT. RIC-HCT resulted in comparable <2-year and 2-6 year overall survival (OS) rates post-transplantation even though the RIC-HCT recipients were older and had more active disease than MAC-HCT recipients. The 2-6 year progression-free survival (PFS), nonrelapse mortality, acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and chronic GvHD rates were reduced after RIC-HCT, but relapse rate was increased. Similar outcomes were observed regardless of disease type and status at transplantation. Odds ratio for all outcomes remained comparable with or without performing separate analyses for the year of HCT and for retrospective versus prospective studies. Among RIC-HCT recipients, survival rates were superior if patients were in CR at transplantation. Significant inter-study heterogeneity for aGvHD data and publication bias for PFS data were observed. This meta-analysis showed no OS benefit of MAC-HCT over RIC-HCT across the entire cohort of patients suggesting that RIC-HCT could be an effective therapeutic option for AML/ALL patients who are ineligible for MAC-HCT and CR status is preferred before RIC-HCT. PMID:25072307

  5. Comparison of Reduced-Intensity and Myeloablative Conditioning Regimens for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Nor-Azimah; Mohd-Idris, Mohd-Razif; Jamaluddin, Fariza Wan; Tumian, NorRafeah; Sze-Wei, Ernie Yap; Muhammad, Norasiah; Nai, Ming Lai

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the indications to perform reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (RIC-HCT) are based on data derived mainly from large registry and single-centre retrospective studies. Thus, at the present time, there is limited direct evidence supporting the current practice in selecting patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) for RIC versus myeloablative conditioning (MAC) transplants. To determine the relationship between dose intensity of conditioning regimen and survival outcomes after allografting in AML/ALL patients, we performed a meta-analysis of 23 clinical trials reported between 1990 and 2013 involving 15,258 adult patients that compare survival outcomes after RIC-HCT versus MAC-HCT. RIC-HCT resulted in comparable <2-year and 2–6 year overall survival (OS) rates post-transplantation even though the RIC-HCT recipients were older and had more active disease than MAC-HCT recipients. The 2–6 year progression-free survival (PFS), nonrelapse mortality, acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and chronic GvHD rates were reduced after RIC-HCT, but relapse rate was increased. Similar outcomes were observed regardless of disease type and status at transplantation. Odds ratio for all outcomes remained comparable with or without performing separate analyses for the year of HCT and for retrospective versus prospective studies. Among RIC-HCT recipients, survival rates were superior if patients were in CR at transplantation. Significant inter-study heterogeneity for aGvHD data and publication bias for PFS data were observed. This meta-analysis showed no OS benefit of MAC-HCT over RIC-HCT across the entire cohort of patients suggesting that RIC-HCT could be an effective therapeutic option for AML/ALL patients who are ineligible for MAC-HCT and CR status is preferred before RIC-HCT. PMID:25072307

  6. Outcomes in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Treated With or Without Autologous or Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pemmaraju, Naveen; Tanaka, Maria Florencia; Ravandi, Farhad; Lin, Heather; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Rondon, Gabriela; Giralt, Sergio A.; Chen, Julianne; Pierce, Sherry; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop; Champlin, Richard E.; De Lima, Marcos; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H.

    2014-01-01

    Outcomes in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia have improved; however, a subset of patients relapse despite receiving all-trans-retinoic acid and/or arsenic-based therapies. Among 40 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia who were treated at our institution (1980–2010), 24 received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) (autologous HCT, 7; allogeneic HCT, 14; both, 3); 16 received chemotherapy only. All 3 strategies (autologous HCT, allogeneic HCT, chemotherapy) were feasible in patients with relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia and result in long-term disease control in selected patients. Background Outcomes in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) have improved; however, a significant number of patients still relapse despite receiving all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic-based therapies. Patients and Methods Outcomes of patients with relapsed APL who were treated at our institution (1980–2010) and who received HCT were compared with those who received chemotherapy (CT) only. Results Among 40 patients, 24 received HCT (autologous [auto] HCT, 7; allogeneic [allo] HCT, 14; both, 3); 16 received CT only. The median age at diagnosis was 36 years (range, 13–50 years), 31 years (range, 16–58 years), and 44 years (range, 24–79 years) for the auto-HCT, allo-HCT, and CT groups, respectively. Ten (100%) patients who received auto-HCT and 12 (71%) who received allo-HCT were in complete remission at the time of the HCT. The median follow-ups in the auto-HCT, allo-HCT, and CT groups were 74 months (range, 26–135 months), 118 months (range, 28–284 months), and 122 months (range, 32–216 months), respectively. Transplantation-related mortality (1 year) after auto-HCT and allo-HCT were 10% and 29%, respectively. The 7-year event-free survival after auto-HCT and allo-HCT was 68.6% and 40.6%, respectively (P = .45). The 7-year overall survival was 85.7%, 49.4%, and 40% in the auto-HCT, allo-HCT, and CT groups, respectively (P

  7. High rate of hematological responses to sorafenib in FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia relapsed after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    De Freitas, Tiago; Marktel, Sarah; Piemontese, Simona; Carrabba, Matteo G; Tresoldi, Cristina; Messina, Carlo; Lupo Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Assanelli, Andrea; Corti, Consuelo; Bernardi, Massimo; Peccatori, Jacopo; Vago, Luca; Ciceri, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Relapse represents the most significant cause of failure of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for FLT3-ITD-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and available therapies are largely unsatisfactory. In this study, we retrospectively collected data on the off-label use of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, either alone or in association with hypomethylating agents and adoptive immunotherapy, in 13 patients with post-transplantation FLT3-ITD-positive AML relapses. Hematological response was documented in 12 of 13 patients (92%), and five of 13 (38%) achieved complete bone marrow remission. Treatment was overall manageable in the outpatient setting, although all patients experienced significant adverse events, especially severe cytopenias (requiring a donor stem cell boost in five patients) and typical hand-foot syndrome. None of the patients developed graft-vs.-host disease following sorafenib alone, whereas this was frequently observed when this was given in association with donor T-cell infusions. Six patients are alive and in remission at the last follow-up, and four could be bridged to a second allogeneic HSCT, configuring a 65 ± 14% overall survival at 100 d from relapse. Taken together, our data suggest that sorafenib might represent a valid treatment option for patients with FLT3-ITD-positive post-transplantation relapses, manageable also in combination with other therapeutic strategies. PMID:26260140

  8. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Treatment in Adults (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and returned by IV infusion. Because the transplanted stem cells do not come from another person, there is no "graft versus ... leukemia (AML) (The Basics) Patient information: Leukemia in adults (The ... (bone marrow transplantation) (Beyond the Basics) Professional ...

  9. Sensitization of Chemo-Resistant Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Stem-Like Cells to Hsp90 Inhibitor by SIRT1 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak-Bong; Lee, Su-Hoon; Um, Jee-Hyun; Kim, Mi-Ju; Hyun, Suh-Kyung; Gong, Eun-Ji; Oh, Won Keun; Kang, Chi-Dug; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Development of effective therapeutic strategies to eliminate cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), which play a major role in drug resistance and disease recurrence, is critical to improve cancer treatment outcomes. The current investigation was undertaken to examine the effectiveness of the combination treatment of Hsp90 inhibitor and SIRT1 inhibitor in inhibiting the growth of chemo-resistant stem-like cells isolated from human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells. Inhibition of SIRT1 by use of SIRT1 siRNA or SIRT1 inhibitors (amurensin G and EX527) effectively potentiated sensitivity of Hsp90 inhibitors (17-AAG and AUY922) in CD44high K562 stem-like cells expressing high levels of CSC-related molecules including Oct4, CD34, β-catenin, c-Myc, mutant p53 (mut p53), BCRP and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) as well as CD44. SIRT1 depletion caused significant down-regulation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)/heat shock proteins (Hsps) as well as these CSC-related molecules, which led to the sensitization of CD44high K562 cells to Hsp90 inhibitor by SIRT1 inhibitor. Moreover, 17-AAG-mediated activation of HSF1/Hsps and P-gp-mediated efflux, major causes of Hsp90 inhibitor resistance, was suppressed by SIRT1 inhibitor in K562-CD44high cells. Our data suggest that combined treatment with Hsp90 inhibitor and SIRT1 inhibitor could be an effective therapeutic approach to target CSCs that are resistant to current therapies. PMID:26157347

  10. Piecing Together Cell-like Systems.

    PubMed

    Torino, Domenica; Martini, Laura; Mansy, Sheref S

    2013-08-01

    Several laboratories are pursuing the synthesis of cellular systems from different directions, including those that begin with simple chemicals to those that exploit existing cells. The methods that begin with nonliving components tend to focus on mimicking specific features of life, such as genomic replication, protein synthesis, sensory systems, and compartment formation, growth, and division. Conversely, the more prevalent synthetic biology approaches begin with something that is already alive and seek to impart new behavior on existing cells. Here we discuss advances in building cell-like systems that mimic key features of life with defined components. PMID:24348089

  11. Persistence of Cytogenetic Abnormalities at Complete Remission After Induction in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Prognostic Significance and the Potential Role of Allogeneic Stem-Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiming; Cortes, Jorge; Estrov, Zeev; Faderl, Stefan; Qiao, Wei; Abruzzo, Lynne; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Pierce, Sherry; Huang, Xuelin; Kebriaei, Partow; Kadia, Tapan; De Lima, Marcos; Kantarjian, Hagop; Ravandi, Farhad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prognostic impact of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at complete remission (CR) on relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to examine the potential role of allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (SCT) in this setting. Patients and Methods Data from 254 adult patients with AML (excluding acute promyelocytic leukemia) who achieved CR after induction chemotherapy on various first-line protocols were examined. Results Median follow-up for surviving patients was 43 months. Patients with cytogenetic abnormalities at CR (n = 71) had significantly shorter RFS (P = .001) and OS (P < .001) compared with patients with normal cytogenetics at CR (n = 183); 3-year RFS was 15% and 45%, and 3-year OS was 15% and 56%, respectively. Among the patients with persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at CR, those who underwent SCT in first CR (CR1; n = 15) had better RFS and OS compared to those without SCT (n = 56; P = .04 and .06, respectively). In multivariate analysis, persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at CR was an independent predictor for RFS (P < .001) and OS (P = .001), but among patients with persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at CR, no significant differences in OS (P = .25) was observed between those who did or did not receive SCT with a trend favoring SCT for RFS (P = .08). Conclusion Persistent cytogenetically abnormal cells at CR predict a significantly shorter RFS and OS. SCT in CR1 may improve the clinical outcome of patients lacking cytogenetic remission after induction although this depends on patient selection. PMID:21555694

  12. Alteration of classical and hematopoiesis specific p53 pathway in the bone marrow hematopoietic stem/progenitor compartment facilitates leukemia progression in experimental mice.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ritam; Chattopadhyay, Sukalpa; Law, Sujata

    2016-08-01

    Downregulation of p53 is associated with most of the neoplasms, however it claims additional significance for hematopoietic malignancy due to its supplementary role during hematopoiesis. Apart from the classical role as tumor suppressor, p53 during steady state hematopoiesis is associated with the maintenance of quiescent cell population in bone marrow by upregulating necdin (Ndn) and Gfi-1. We felt, it is necessary to delineate its attribution towards malignant conversion of hematopoietic system during leukemogenesis from all the possible angles. The present study deals with the characterization of N-N' Ethylnitrosourea (ENU) induced mouse model of leukemia by peripheral blood hemogram, bone marrow cytology, histology, cytochemical staining (MPO) and scanning electron microscopic study. We further investigated the alteration of conventional and hematopoiesis specific p53 pathways by flowcytometric expressional analysis of ATM, Chk-2, p53, p21, Ndn, Gfi-1 and Tie-2. The disruption of classical p53 pathway was observed in leukemic hematopoietic stem/progenitor population which involved downregulation of ATM, Chk-2, p53 and p21. Moreover, the expressional decline of Ndn and Gfi-1 hinted towards the mechanism of hindrance of hematopoietic quiescency in leukemic bone marrow. Increased expression of Tie-2 due to reverse correlation with p53 was found to be responsible for pathological angiogenesis in bone marrow together with increased blast burden in bone marrow during leukemia. The study presents the mechanistic scenario of the alteration of both classical as well as hematopoiesis specific p53 pathways in HSPC compartment triggering leukemic pathophysiology. PMID:27280487

  13. HLA haploidentical peripheral blood stem cell transplantation using reduced dose of posttransplantation cyclophosphamide for poor-prognosis or refractory leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakamae, Hirohisa; Koh, Hideo; Katayama, Takako; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Nakane, Takahiko; Nakamae, Mika; Hirose, Asao; Hino, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Nonmyeloablative, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haploidentical, T-cell-replete bone marrow transplantation followed by high-dose posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PT/Cy) has recently been developed. This transplantation milieu has resulted in favorable outcomes with low transplantation-related mortality, owing to a low incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), without increased infectious complications. However, the high relapse rate remains a major concern. We therefore performed a prospective pilot study of HLA haploidentical peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) with intensified conditioning, followed by two lower doses of PT/Cy. A total of 20 patients with refractory or poor-prognosis myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and leukemia were enrolled in the study. A trend toward a lower incidence of grade III-IV acute GVHD at day 100 in the group receiving 25 mg/kg × 2 doses of PT/Cy, compared with the group receiving 25 mg/kg of PT/Cy (9.1% vs. 33%, p = 0.20), was noted. However, the cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was low, at 10% irrespective of PT/Cy dose. The number of infused CD34(+) cells significantly correlated with the grade of acute GVHD (p = 0.004). In addition, the occurrence of BK virus hemorrhagic cystitis was significantly more common in the double-dose PT/Cy group (25% vs. 0%, p = 0.043), especially when combined with busulfan. The probability of overall survival at 1 year in the double-dose group tended to be better compared with that in the single-dose group (64% vs. 44%, respectively; p = 0.20). In conclusion, HLA haploidentical, T-cell-replete PBSCT with 25 mg/kg × 2 doses of PT/Cy might be a feasible option for treating high-risk leukemia and MDS. PMID:26284307

  14. Academic difficulties and occupational outcomes of adult survivors of childhood leukemia who have undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and fractionated total body irradiation conditioning.

    PubMed

    Freycon, Fernand; Trombert-Paviot, Béatrice; Casagranda, Léonie; Frappaz, Didier; Mialou, Valérie; Armari-Alla, Corinne; Gomez, Frederic; Faure-Conter, Cécile; Plantaz, Dominique; Berger, Claire

    2014-04-01

    We studied academic and employment outcomes in 59 subjects who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (a-HSCT) with fractionated total body irradiation (fTBI) for childhood leukemia, comparing them with, first, the general French population and, second, findings in 19 who underwent a-HSCT with chemotherapy conditioning. We observed an average academic delay of 0.98 years among the 59 subjects by Year 10 of secondary school (French class Troisième), which was higher than the 0.34-year delay in the normal population (P < .001) but not significantly higher than the delay of 0.68 years in our cohort of 19 subjects who underwent a-HSCT with chemotherapy. The delay was dependent on age at leukemia diagnosis, but not at fTBI. This delay increased to 1.32 years by the final year of secondary school (Year 13, Terminale) for our 59 subjects versus 0.51 years in the normal population (P = .0002), but did not differ significantly from the 1.08-year delay observed in our cohort of 19 subjects. The number of students who received their secondary school diploma (Baccalaureate) was similar to the expected rate in the general French population for girls (observed/expected = 1.02) but significantly decreased for boys (O/E = 0.48; CI: 95%[0.3-0.7]). Compared with 13.8% of the general population, 15.3% of the cancer survivors received no diploma (P = NS). Reported job distribution did not differ significantly between our cohort of childhood cancer survivors and the general population except that more female survivors were employed in intermediate-level professional positions. Academic difficulties after fTBI are common and their early identification will facilitate educational and professional achievement. PMID:24087985

  15. Tacrolimus and Methotrexate With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Young Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-23

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Graft Versus Host Disease; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Monosomal karyotype as an adverse prognostic factor in patients with acute myeloid leukemia treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in first complete remission: a retrospective survey on behalf of the ALWP of the EBMT

    PubMed Central

    Brands-Nijenhuis, Angelique V.M.; Labopin, Myriam; Schouten, Harry C.; Volin, Liisa; Socié, Gérard; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Huynh, Anne; Ljungman, Per; Malard, Florent; Esteve, Jordi; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Despite the overall benefit from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation observed in patients with poor cytogenetic risk acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission, the precise effect of this procedure for different poor-risk subtypes has not been fully analyzed. This retrospective analysis was performed to investigate whether allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation performed in first complete remission in patients with monosomal karyotype can overcome the adverse prognosis associated with these patients. Of the 4635 patients included in the study, 189 (4%) harbored a monosomal karyotype. The presence of a monosomal karyotype was associated with a worse outcome, with an inferior leukemia-free survival and overall survival (5-year leukemia-free survival and overall survival: 24±3% and 26±3% vs. 53±1% and 57±1% in monosomal-karyotype and non-monosomal-karyotype, respectively; P<0.0001) and higher relapse risk after transplantation (cumulative incidence of relapse at 5 years: 56±4% in monosomal-karyotype vs. 28±1% in non-monosomal-karyotype; P<0.0001). The adverse negative impact of monosomal karyotype cytogenetics was confirmed in the entire cohort in a multivariate analysis [Hazard Ratio (HR): 1.88, 95% Confidence Interval (CI):1.29–2.73, P=0.001 for relapse incidence; HR:1.71, 95%CI:1.27–2.32, P<0.0001 for leukemia-free survival; HR:1.81, 95%CI:1.32–2.48, P=0.0002 for overall survival], and was independent of the presence of other poor-risk cytogenetic subtypes. In summary, monosomal karyotype arises as a strong negative prognostic feature in acute myeloid leukemia also in patients who undergo allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first complete remission, stressing the need to develop additional pre- and post-transplantation strategies aimed at improving overall results. Nonetheless, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in early phase is currently the best therapy for this very poor-risk acute

  17. Brachial Plexopathy due to Myeloid Sarcoma in a Patient With Acute Myeloid Leukemia After Allogenic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Yumi; Sung, Duk Hyun; Park, Yoonhong; Kim, Du Hwan

    2013-04-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a solid, extramedullary tumor comprising of immature myeloid cells. It may occur in any organ; however, the invasion of peripheral nervous system is rare. Herein, we report the case of myeloid sarcoma on the brachial plexus. A 37-year-old woman with acute myelogenous leukemia achieved complete remission after chemotherapy. One year later, she presented right shoulder pain, progressive weakness in the right upper extremity and hypesthesia. Based on magnetic resonance images (MRI) and electrophysiologic study, a provisional diagnosis of brachial plexus neuritis was done and hence steroid pulse therapy was carried out. Three months later the patient presented epigastric pain. After upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, myeloid sarcoma of gastrointestinal tract was confirmed pathologically. Moreover, 18-fluoride fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed a fusiform shaped mass lesion at the brachial plexus overlapping with previous high signal lesion on the MRI. Therefore, we concluded the final diagnosis as brachial plexopathy due to myeloid sarcoma. PMID:23705126

  18. Comparison of outcomes after umbilical cord blood and unmanipulated haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Bao-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zheng, Chang-Cheng; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhu, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Yu; Liu, Hui-Lan; Yan, Chen-Hua; Chu, Xian-Deng; Chen, Huan; Geng, Liang-Quan; Liu, Kai-Yan; Sun, Zi-Min; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-11-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an effective therapy for children with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical HSCT (haplo-HSCT) or umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) are both important alternative sources of stem cells for those without an HLA-identical sibling donor or unrelated matched donor. We aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of single UCBT and unmanipulated haplo-HSCT in high-risk ALL children (n = 129). Hematopoietic recovery was significantly faster in haplo-HSCT recipients than in UCBT recipients. The 2-year cumulative incidences of relapse in the haplo-HSCT and UCBT groups were 16.1% and 24.1%, respectively (p = 0.169). The 2-year cumulative incidences of non-relapse mortality in the haplo-HSCT and UCBT groups were 12.8% and 18.8%, respectively (p = 0.277). The 2-year probabilities of overall survival in the haplo-HSCT and UCBT groups were 82.0% and 69.6%, respectively (p = 0.071), and the 2-year probability of disease-free survival in the haplo-HSCT group was higher than in the UCBT group (71.0% vs. 57.2%, p = 0.040). However, several variables (such as leukocyte count and cytogenetics at diagnosis) were different between the groups, and a possible center effect should also be considered. In addition, only mild and moderate chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was associated with significantly improved survival compared to those without chronic GVHD in multivariate analysis. Thus, our results show that both unmanipulated haplo-HSCT and UCBT are valid for high-risk ALL children lacking a HLA matched donor, and both strategies expand the donor pool for children in need. PMID:27356906

  19. Imatinib use immediately before stem cell transplantation in children with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Results from Japanese Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (JPLSG) Study Ph+ALL04

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Hirohide; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Itaru; Kodama, Yuichi; Sato, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Kato, Keisuke; Yabe, Hiromasa; Kudo, Kazuko; Kato, Motohiro; Saito, Tomohiro; Saito, Akiko M; Tsurusawa, Masahito; Horibe, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    Incorporation of imatinib into chemotherapeutic regimens has improved the prognosis of children with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ALL). We investigated a role of imatinib immediately before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Children with Ph+ALL were enrolled on JPLSG Ph+ALL 04 Study within 1 week of initiation of treatment for ALL. Treatment regimen consisted of Induction phase, Consolidation phase, Reinduction phase, 2 weeks of imatinib monotherapy phase, and HSCT phase (Etoposide+CY+TBI conditioning). Minimal residual disease (MRD), the amount of BCR–ABL transcripts, was measured with the real-time PCR method. The study was registered in UMIN-CTR: UMIN ID C000000290. Forty-two patients were registered and 36 patients (86%) achieved complete remission (CR). Eight of 17 patients (47%) who had detectable MRD at the beginning of imatinib monotherapy phase showed disappearance or decrease in MRD after imatinib treatment. Consequently, 26 patients received HSCT in the first CR and all the patients had engraftment and no patients died because of complications of HSCT. The 4-year event-free survival rates and overall survival rates among all the 42 patients were 54.1 ± 7.8% and 78.1 ± 6.5%, respectively. Four of six patients who did achieve CR and three of six who relapsed before HSCT were salvaged with imatinib-containing chemotherapy and subsequently treated with HSCT. The survival rate was excellent in this study although all patients received HSCT. A longer use of imatinib concurrently with chemotherapy should eliminate HSCT in a subset of patients with a rapid clearance of the disease. PMID:25641907

  20. Imatinib use immediately before stem cell transplantation in children with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Results from Japanese Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (JPLSG) Study Ph(+) ALL04.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Hirohide; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Itaru; Kodama, Yuichi; Sato, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Kato, Keisuke; Yabe, Hiromasa; Kudo, Kazuko; Kato, Motohiro; Saito, Tomohiro; Saito, Akiko M; Tsurusawa, Masahito; Horibe, Keizo

    2015-05-01

    Incorporation of imatinib into chemotherapeutic regimens has improved the prognosis of children with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph(+) ALL). We investigated a role of imatinib immediately before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Children with Ph(+) ALL were enrolled on JPLSG Ph(+) ALL 04 Study within 1 week of initiation of treatment for ALL. Treatment regimen consisted of Induction phase, Consolidation phase, Reinduction phase, 2 weeks of imatinib monotherapy phase, and HSCT phase (Etoposide+CY+TBI conditioning). Minimal residual disease (MRD), the amount of BCR-ABL transcripts, was measured with the real-time PCR method. The study was registered in UMIN-CTR: UMIN ID C000000290. Forty-two patients were registered and 36 patients (86%) achieved complete remission (CR). Eight of 17 patients (47%) who had detectable MRD at the beginning of imatinib monotherapy phase showed disappearance or decrease in MRD after imatinib treatment. Consequently, 26 patients received HSCT in the first CR and all the patients had engraftment and no patients died because of complications of HSCT. The 4-year event-free survival rates and overall survival rates among all the 42 patients were 54.1 ± 7.8% and 78.1 ± 6.5%, respectively. Four of six patients who did achieve CR and three of six who relapsed before HSCT were salvaged with imatinib-containing chemotherapy and subsequently treated with HSCT. The survival rate was excellent in this study although all patients received HSCT. A longer use of imatinib concurrently with chemotherapy should eliminate HSCT in a subset of patients with a rapid clearance of the disease. PMID:25641907

  1. Intrathecal donor lymphocyte infusion for isolated leukemia relapse in the central nervous system following allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Ryu; Nakazawa, Yozo; Sakashita, Kazuo; Saito, Shoji; Tanaka, Miyuki; Shiohara, Masaaki; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Koike, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy with a bone marrow relapse of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia underwent stem-cell transplantation from a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical mother. Five months later, he relapsed with central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Systemic chemotherapy and repeated intrathecal chemotherapy induced consciousness disturbances and frequent arrhythmia, prompting us to discontinue the chemotherapy. He had already received an 18-Gy prophylactic cranial irradiation, an 8-Gy total body irradiation, and a 15-Gy local irradiation for pituitary gland involvement. We therefore performed five intrathecal donor lymphocyte infusions (IDLIs) in escalating doses from 1 × 10(4) up to 1 × 10(6) cells/kg. All IDLIs were safe without infusion reactions or graft-versus-host disease. After the second and later IDLIs, donor mononuclear cells were continuously detected in cerebrospinal fluid; however, he did not achieve donor-dominant chimerism. Based on our case and four cases reported in the literature, the efficacy of IDLI therapy is limited for CNS relapse of hematological malignancies. However, we suggest that IDLI remains a feasible and safe option, as no GVHD or other adverse effects occurred, even in the HLA-haploidentical setting. We will make further efforts to increase the efficacy. PMID:26586462

  2. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in FLT3-ITD-Positive Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: The Role for FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Post-Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Gary J; Tuttle, Pamela; Desai, Pinkal

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) has become increasingly common in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) due to improved donor availability and the use of nonmyeloablative regimens. However, despite the potential clinical gains with allo-HSCT, the post-transplantation outcomes for many patients, especially those with high-risk disease, remain dismal. Patients with AML who have internal tandem duplication mutations in the tyrosine kinase receptor FLT3 (FLT3-ITD) face particularly poor outcomes, even after allo-HSCT, which appears to only partially mitigate the poor prognosis associated with this mutation. Experimental treatments to reduce the likelihood of relapse and improve survival following allo-HSCT include maintenance with FLT3-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), several of which are currently being evaluated in clinical studies. Preliminary data and case reports suggest that FLT3 TKIs can be effective in the post-transplantation setting, particularly for patients with FLT3-ITD mutations. Improvements in donor matching, transplantation procedures, and supportive care have allowed a greater number of patients to undergo allo-HSCT than ever before. For these patients, it is essential to identify effective post-transplantation therapies to reduce the risk of relapse and improve disease-free survival. PMID:26785334

  3. Splenic irradiation before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia: long-term follow-up of a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Gratwohl, Alois; Iacobelli, Simona; Bootsman, Natalia; van Biezen, Anja; Baldomero, Helen; Arcese, William; Arnold, Renate; Bron, Dominique; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ernst, Peter; Ferrant, Augustin; Frassoni, Francesco; Gahrton, Gösta; Richard, Carlos; Kolb, Hans Jochem; Link, Hartmut; Niederwieser, Dietger; Ruutu, Tapani; Schattenberg, Anton; Schmitz, Norbert; Torres-Gomez, Antonio; Zwaan, Ferry; Apperley, Jane; Olavarria, Eduardo; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2016-05-01

    In the context of discussions on the reproducibility of clinical studies, we reanalyzed a prospective randomized study on the role of splenic irradiation as adjunct to the conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Between 1986 and 1989, a total of 229 patients with CML were randomized; of these, 225 (98 %; 112 with, 113 without splenic irradiation) could be identified in the database and their survival updated. Results confirmed the early findings with no significant differences in all measured endpoints (overall survival at 25 years: 42.7 %, 32.0-52.4 % vs 52.9 %, 43.2-62.6 %; p = 0.355, log rank test). Additional splenic irradiation failed to reduce relapse incidence. It did not increase non-relapse mortality nor the risk of late secondary malignancies. Comforting are the long-term results from this predefined consecutive cohort of patients: more than 60 % were alive at plus 25 years when they were transplanted with a low European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) risk sore. This needs to be considered today when treatment options are discussed for patients who failed initial tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy and have an available low risk HLA-identical donor. PMID:26994010

  4. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation as initial salvage for patients with acute myeloid leukemia refractory to high-dose cytarabine-based induction chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Elias; Daver, Naval; Champlin, Richard; Mathisen, Michael; Oran, Betul; Ciurea, Stefan; Khouri, Issa; Cornelison, A Megan; Ghanem, Hady; Cardenas-Turanzas, Marylou; Popat, Uday; Ravandi, Farhad; Giralt, Sergio; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop; de Lima, Marcos

    2014-04-01

    Outcomes of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are refractory to high-dose Cytarabine (HiDAC)-based induction are dismal. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) as initial salvage may be effective and potentially superior to conventional salvage chemotherapy. Eighteen percent (285 of 1597) of AML patients were primary refractory to HiDAC-based regimens at the MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1995 and 2009. AHSCT was the initial salvage in 28 cases. These patients were compared against 149 patients who received salvage chemotherapy, but never received AHSCT. Patients receiving salvage chemotherapy were older, had higher bone marrow blasts percentage, and higher incidence of unfavorable cytogenetics (P < 0.001). Median time from induction to AHSCT was 76 days. Objective response was achieved in 23 of 28 patients (82%) undergoing AHSCT. The incidence of grade III/IV acute and chronic graft versus-host-disease was 11% and 29%, respectively. Median follow up for living patients is 80 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 15.7 months and 2.9 months for AHSCT and chemotherapy, respectively (P < 0.001); the 3-year OS rates were 39% and 2%, respectively. ASHCT as initial salvage therapy was identified as an independent prognostic factor for survival in multivariate analysis (HR = 3.03; P < 0.001). Initial salvage therapy with AHSCT in patients with primary HiDAC refractory AML is feasible and may yield superior outcomes to salvage chemotherapy. PMID:24375514

  5. Allogeneic Stem Cell transplantation as Initial Salvage for Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Refractory to High-Dose Cytarabine-Based Induction Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Elias; Daver, Naval; Champlin, Richard; Mathisen, Michael; Oran, Betul; Ciurea, Stefan; Khouri, Issa; Cornelison, A Megan; Ghanem, Hady; Cardenas-Turanzas, Marylou; Popat, Uday; Ravandi, Farhad; Giralt, Sergio; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kantarjian, Hagop; de Lima, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Outcomes of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are refractory to high-dose Cytarabine (HiDAC)-based induction are dismal. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) as initial salvage may be effective and potentially superior to conventional salvage chemotherapy. Methods Eighteen percent (285 of 1597) of AML patients were primary refractory to HiDAC-based regimens at the MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1995 and 2009. AHSCT was the initial salvage in 28 cases. These patients were compared against 149 patients who received salvage chemotherapy, but never received AHSCT. Results Patients receiving salvage chemotherapy were older, had higher bone marrow blasts percentage, and higher incidence of unfavorable cytogenetics (P<0.001). Median time from induction to AHSCT was 76 days. Objective response was achieved in 23 of 28 patients (82%) undergoing AHSCT. The incidence of grade III/IV acute and chronic graft versus-host-disease was 11% and 29%, respectively. Median follow up for living patients is 80 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 15.7 months and 2.9 months for AHSCT and chemotherapy, respectively (P<0.001); the 3-year OS rates were 39% and 2%, respectively. ASHCT as initial salvage therapy was identified as an independent prognostic factor for survival in multivariate analysis (HR = 3.03; P < 0.001). Conclusion Initial salvage therapy with AHSCT in patients with primary HiDAC refractory AML is feasible and may yield superior outcomes to salvage chemotherapy. PMID:24375514

  6. The role of pattern-recognition receptors in graft-versus-host disease and graft-versus-leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Simon; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Haas, Tobias; Poeck, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is the only treatment with curative potential for certain aggressive hematopoietic malignancies. Its success is limited by acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a life-threatening complication that occurs when allo-reactive donor T cells attack recipient organs. There is growing evidence that microbes and innate pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) such as toll-like receptors (TLR) and nod-like receptors (NLR) are critically involved in the pathogenesis of acute GVHD. Currently, a widely accepted model postulates that intensive chemotherapy and/or total-body irradiation during pre-transplant conditioning results in tissue damage and a loss of epithelial barrier function. Subsequent translocation of bacterial components as well as release of endogenous danger molecules stimulate PRRs of host antigen-presenting cells to trigger the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (cytokine storm) that modulate T cell allo-reactivity against host tissues, but eventually also the beneficial graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. Given the limitations of existing immunosuppressive therapies, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern GVHD versus GVL is urgently needed. This may ultimately allow to design modulators, which protect from GvHD but preserve donor T-cell attack on hematologic malignancies. Here, we will briefly summarize current knowledge about the role of innate immunity in the pathogenesis of GVHD and GVL following allo-HSCT. PMID:25101080

  7. Radioimmunotherapy with [188Re]-labelled anti-CD66 antibody in the conditioning for allogeneic stem cell transplantation for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Koenecke, Christian; Hofmann, Michael; Bolte, Oliver; Gielow, Peter; Dammann, Elke; Stadler, Michael; Franzke, Anke; Boerner, Anne Rose; Eder, Matthias; Ganser, Arnold; Knapp, Wolfram; Hertenstein, Bernd

    2008-05-01

    Between July 2000 and June 2003 a total of 21 patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 14), AML after myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 6) or advanced MDS (n = 1) were treated with an 188-Re labelled anti-CD66 antibody in the conditioning regimen for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) was followed by standard full-dose conditioning with busulfan and high-dose cyclophosphamide in 11 patients and reduced intensity conditioning regimen in 10 patients. All patients received an unmanipulated allogeneic graft from alternative donors (n = 15) or a HLA-identical familiy donor (n = 6). With a median follow up of 42 months (23-60) disease free survival for all patients was 43%. Nine patients are still alive and in ongoing complete hematological remission. The treatment related mortality was 28.6% (n = 6) and an equal number of patients died of relapsing disease within 30-385 days after transplantation. Late organ toxicity, monitored for more than 1 year, was mild and not clinically relevant. The combination of RIT with chemotherapeutic conditioning seems to be a therapy with an acceptable risk of treatment related morbidity and mortality as well as occurrence of severe acute GvHD. PMID:18415659

  8. Long-term outcome of patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia: a randomized comparison of stem cell transplantation with drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gratwohl, A; Pfirrmann, M; Zander, A; Kröger, N; Beelen, D; Novotny, J; Nerl, C; Scheid, C; Spiekermann, K; Mayer, J; Sayer, H G; Falge, C; Bunjes, D; Döhner, H; Ganser, A; Schmidt-Wolf, I; Schwerdtfeger, R; Baurmann, H; Kuse, R; Schmitz, N; Wehmeier, A; Th Fischer, J; Ho, A D; Wilhelm, M; Goebeler, M-E; Lindemann, H W; Bormann, M; Hertenstein, B; Schlimok, G; Baerlocher, G M; Aul, C; Pfreundschuh, M; Fabian, M; Staib, P; Edinger, M; Schatz, M; Fauser, A; Arnold, R; Kindler, T; Wulf, G; Rosselet, A; Hellmann, A; Schäfer, E; Prümmer, O; Schenk, M; Hasford, J; Heimpel, H; Hossfeld, D K; Kolb, H-J; Büsche, G; Haferlach, C; Schnittger, S; Müller, M C; Reiter, A; Berger, U; Saußele, S; Hochhaus, A; Hehlmann, R

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors represent today's treatment of choice in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is regarded as salvage therapy. This prospective randomized CML-study IIIA recruited 669 patients with newly diagnosed CML between July 1997 and January 2004 from 143 centers. Of these, 427 patients were considered eligible for HSCT and were randomized by availability of a matched family donor between primary HSCT (group A; N=166 patients) and best available drug treatment (group B; N=261). Primary end point was long-term survival. Survival probabilities were not different between groups A and B (10-year survival: 0.76 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.69–0.82) vs 0.69 (95% CI: 0.61–0.76)), but influenced by disease and transplant risk. Patients with a low transplant risk showed superior survival compared with patients with high- (P<0.001) and non-high-risk disease (P=0.047) in group B; after entering blast crisis, survival was not different with or without HSCT. Significantly more patients in group A were in molecular remission (56% vs 39% P=0.005) and free of drug treatment (56% vs 6% P<0.001). Differences in symptoms and Karnofsky score were not significant. In the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, HSCT remains a valid option when both disease and transplant risk are considered. PMID:26464170

  9. Total body irradiation in a patient with fragile X syndrome for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in preparation for stem cell transplantation: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Collins, D T; Mannina, E M; Mendonca, M

    2015-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a congenital disorder caused by expansion of CGG trinucleotide repeat at the 5' end of the fragile X mental retardation gene 1 (FMR1) on the X chromosome that leads to chromosomal instability and diminished serum levels of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Afflicted individuals often have elongated features, marfanoid habitus, macroorchidism and intellectual impairment. Evolving literature suggests the condition may actually protect from malignancy while chromosomal instability would presumably elevate the risk. Increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation should also be predicted by unstable sites within the DNA. Interestingly, in this report, we detail a patient with FXS diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with induction followed by subsequent cycles of hyper-CVAD (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone) with a complete response who then was recommended to undergo peripheral stem cell transplantation. The patient underwent total body irradiation (TBI) as a component of his conditioning regimen and despite the concern of his clinicians, developed minimal acute toxicity and successful engraftment. The pertinent literature regarding irradiation of patients with FXS is also reviewed. PMID:26097012

  10. Sustaining integrating imatinib and interferon-α into maintenance therapy improves survival of patients with Philadelphia positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia ineligible for allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Pu; Liu, Ting; Pan, Ling; Zhu, Huanling; Wu, Yu; Ye, Yuanxin; Xiang, Bing; Ma, Hongbing; Chang, Hong; Niu, Ting; Cui, Xu; He, Chuan; Li, Jianjun; Ji, Jie; Huang, Jie; Dong, Tian; Dai, Yang; Lu, Xiaojun; Qing, Shenglan; Wu, Huaxin; Liang, Xiaogong; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Chunnong

    2016-10-01

    We report the clinical results of sustainedly integrating imatinib and interferon-α into maintenance therapy in the patients ineligible for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Maintenance therapy lasted for 5 years with imatinib 400 mg daily, interferon-α 3 million units, 2∼3 doses per week, and chemotherapy including vindesine and dexamethasone scheduled monthly in first year, once every 2 months in second year, and once every 3 months in third year. The chemotherapy was discontinued after 3 years and the imatinib and interferon-α continued for another 2 years. For 41 patients without allo-HSCT with a median follow-up of 32 months, the 3-year DFS and OS were 42.7  ± 8.6% and 57.9  ± 8.4%, respectively. Our study suggests that sustaining maintenance with low-dose chemotherapy, imatinib and interferon-α improved survival of adult Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph + ALL) patients ineligible for allo-HSCT, and even provided an opportunity for cure. BCR/ABL persistent negativity at 6 and 9 months may have benefit to choose suitable patients for the imatinib/interferon-α maintenance strategy. PMID:26879808

  11. Advanced flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle targeting to rare leukemic stem cells in peripheral human blood in a defined model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christy L.; Leary, James F.

    2015-03-01

    Leukemia stem cells are both stem-like and leukemic-like. This complicates their detection as rare circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of leukemia patients. Since leukemic stem cells are also resistant to standard chemotherapeutic regimens, new therapeutic strategies need to be designed to kill the leukemic stem cells without killing normal stem cells. In these initial targeting studies we utilized a bioinformatics approach to design an antibodyfluorescent nanoparticle conjugate for targeting to these leukemic stem cells and to minimize targeting to normal stemprogenitor cells. Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were performed on a BD FACS Aria III. Human leukemic stem cell-like cell RS4;11 (with putative immunophenotype CD133+/CD24+/-, CD34+/-, CD38+, CD10-/Flt3+) was spiked into normal hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells obtained from a "buffy coat" prep (with putative immunophenotype CD133- /CD34+/CD38-/CD10-/Flt-3-) to be used as a model human leukemia patient. To analyze the model system, digital data mixtures of the two cell types were first created and assigned classifiers in order to create truth sets. ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) and multidimensional cluster analyses were used to evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of the immunophenotyping panel and for automated cell population identification, respectively. Costs of misclassification (false targeting) were also accounted for by this analysis scheme. Ultimately, this analysis scheme will be applied to use of nanoparticle-antibody conjugates at therapeutic doses for targeted killing of leukemia stem cells preferentially to normal stem -progenitor cells.

  12. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePlus

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  13. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  14. [Cytomegalovirus reactivation after allogeneic stem cell transplantation reduces the risk of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Katsuto

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is still a major infectious complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Recently, CMV reactivation was reported to be associated with a decreased risk of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We herein retrospectively evaluated the impact of early CMV reactivation on the incidence of disease relapse after allo-HCT using the database of the Transplant Registry Unified Management Program (TRUMP) at the JSHCT. Patients who underwent their first allo-HCT from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors between 2000 and 2009, and who survived without disease relapse until day 100 after transplantation, were analyzed. CMV reactivation was associated with a decreased cumulative incidence of relapse among patients with AML, but not in patients with other hematological malignancies in our study. However, this benefit was nullified by the increased rate of non-relapse mortality. The underlying mechanism is unclear, but the immunological reaction against CMV reactivation plays an essential role in this association. Thus, immune augmentation treatment options including vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer might be useful for taking advantage of the efficacy of CMV reactivation while minimizing the increase in non-relapse mortality. PMID:26251145

  15. Comparison of outcomes in mixed phenotype acute leukemia patients treated with chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation versus chemotherapy alone.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hong; Xu, Yang; Liu, Liming; Yan, Lingzhi; Jin, Zhengming; Tang, Xiaowen; Han, Yue; Fu, Zhengzheng; Qiu, Huiying; Sun, Aining; Wu, Depei

    2016-06-01

    The optimal treatment approach for mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) remains unknown, and prognostic factors for treatment outcomes need to be identified. In this study, 66 patients diagnosed with MPAL according to criteria published by the WHO in 2008 were retrospectively assessed to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment and identify predictive variables. Five patients died of severe infection after the first induction chemotherapy, 29 received alloHSCT after induction (HSCT group), and 32 received only chemotherapy (chemotherapy group). The 3-year OS and DFS estimates for the entire cohort were 45% and 38%, respectively, and the 3-year OS differed significantly between the HSCT and chemotherapy-only groups (77% versus 16%). Using multivariate analyses, we identified disease burden as a prognostic factor for transplantation outcome, with the 3-year OS being 80% among patients who achieved remission and only 45% among patients in cases of nonremission. Our results indicate that alloHSCT after chemotherapy offers a survival advantage compared with chemotherapy only, and patients in remission before transplantation may experience a better outcome. PMID:27088964

  16. Survival and Neurocognitive Outcomes After Cranial or Craniospinal Irradiation Plus Total-Body Irradiation Before Stem Cell Transplantation in Pediatric Leukemia Patients With Central Nervous System Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hiniker, Susan M.; Agarwal, Rajni; Modlin, Leslie A.; Gray, Christine C.; Harris, Jeremy P.; Million, Lynn; Kiamanesh, Eileen F.; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival and neurocognitive outcomes in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with central nervous system (CNS) involvement treated according to an institutional protocol with stem cell transplantation (SCT) and a component of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in addition to total-body irradiation (TBI) as preparative regimen. Methods and Materials: Forty-one pediatric ALL patients underwent SCT with TBI and received additional cranial irradiation or CSI because of CNS leukemic involvement. Prospective neurocognitive testing was performed before and after SCT in a subset of patients. Cox regression models were used to determine associations of patient and disease characteristics and treatment methods with outcomes. Results: All patients received a cranial radiation boost; median total cranial dose was 24 Gy. Eighteen patients (44%) received a spinal boost; median total spinal dose for these patients was 18 Gy. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) for all patients was 67%. Those receiving CSI had a trend toward superior DFS compared with those receiving a cranial boost alone (hazard ratio 3.23, P=.14). Patients with isolated CNS disease before SCT had a trend toward superior DFS (hazard ratio 3.64, P=.11, 5-year DFS 74%) compared with those with combined CNS and bone marrow disease (5-year DFS 59%). Neurocognitive testing revealed a mean post-SCT overall intelligence quotient of 103.7 at 4.4 years. Relative deficiencies in processing speed and/or working memory were noted in 6 of 16 tested patients (38%). Pre- and post-SCT neurocognitive testing revealed no significant change in intelligence quotient (mean increase +4.7 points). At a mean of 12.5 years after transplant, 11 of 13 long-term survivors (85%) had completed at least some coursework at a 2- or 4-year college. Conclusion: The addition of CSI to TBI before SCT in pediatric ALL with CNS involvement is effective and well-tolerated. Craniospinal irradiation plus TBI is worthy

  17. Biosimilar Filgrastim (Tevagrastim, XMO2) for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization and Transplantation in Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia/Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Danylesko, Ivetta; Sareli, Rina; Bloom-Varda, Nira; Yerushalmi, Ronit; Shem-Tov, Noga; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon

    2016-02-01

    Human recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), filgrastim (Neupogen; Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA), has been widely used for the mobilization of CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) from healthy donors. The experience with biosimilar G-CSF agents in this area is limited. We performed a prospective study assessing Tevagrastim (biosimilar filgrastim, XMO2; Teva, Israel) for mobilization of CD34(+) peripheral blood HSC in HLA-matched healthy sibling donors for transplantation in 24 patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) (NCT01542944). Results were compared to a historical control group of sibling donors who received filgrastim for stem cell mobilization for allogeneic stem cell transplantations in patients with AML and MDS. The healthy donors received Tevagrastim or filgrastim in a dose of 10 μg/kg body weight (BW) subcutaneously for 4 days. The target yields of CD34(+) cells was 5 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg BW of the recipient. A median 10.2 × 10(6) (range, 2.52 to 35.4) and 9.35 × 10(6) (range, 3.7 to 30.6) CD34(+) cells per kg BW were collected in the Tevagrastim and filgrastim groups, respectively. All patients promptly engrafted with a median day of absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of >.5 × 10(9)/L and >1 × 10(9)/L of 13 days (range, 10 to 21) and 13.5 days (range, 10 to 22), respectively in the Tevagrastim group and 12 days (range, 10 to 18) and 13 days (range, 10 to 18) in the filgrastim group, respectively. Platelets reached counts of >20 × 10(9)/L and >50 × 10(9)/L within a median of 14 days (range, 11 to 33) and 17 days (range, 12 to 33) in the Tevagrastim group and 13 (range, 10 to 29) and 15 (range, 10 to 32) days in the filgrastim group, respectively. The donors developed only mild and transient side effects, which were not different between the Tevagrastim study group and the filgrastim historical control group. Similarly, the transplantation-related toxicities

  18. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-14

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  19. Leukemia and Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Excessive exposure to benzene has been known for more than a century to damage the bone marrow resulting in decreases in the numbers of circulating blood cells, and ultimately, aplastic anemia. Of more recent vintage has been the appreciation that an alternative outcome of benzene exposure has been the development of one or more types of leukemia. While many investigators agree that the array of toxic metabolites, generated in the liver or in the bone marrow, can lead to traumatic bone marrow injury, the more subtle mechanisms leading to leukemia have yet to be critically dissected. This problem appears to have more general interest because of the recognition that so-called “second cancer” that results from prior treatment with alkylating agents to yield tumor remissions, often results in a type of leukemia reminiscent of benzene-induced leukemia. Furthermore, there is a growing literature attempting to characterize the fine structure of the marrow and the identification of so called “niches” that house a variety of stem cells and other types of cells. Some of these “niches” may harbor cells capable of initiating leukemias. The control of stem cell differentiation and proliferation via both inter- and intra-cellular signaling will ultimately determine the fate of these transformed stem cells. The ability of these cells to avoid checkpoints that would prevent them from contributing to the leukemogenic response is an additional area for study. Much of the study of benzene-induced bone marrow damage has concentrated on determining which of the benzene metabolites lead to leukemogenesis. The emphasis now should be directed to understanding how benzene metabolites alter bone marrow cell biology. PMID:23066403

  20. Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Vaccines as consolidation therapy for myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Alatrash, Gheath; Molldrem, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-01

    Immunotherapy for myeloid leukemias remains a cornerstone in the management of this highly aggressive group of malignancies. Allogeneic (allo) stem cell transplantation (SCT), which can be curative in acute and chronic myeloid leukemias, exemplifies the success of immunotherapy for cancer management. However, because of its nonspecific immune response against normal tissue, allo-SCT is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, secondary to graft-versus-host disease, which can occur in up to 50% of allo-SCT recipients. Targeted immunotherapy using leukemia vaccines has been heavily investigated, as these vaccines elicit specific immune responses against leukemia cells while sparing normal tissue. Peptide and cellular vaccines have been developed against tumor-specific and leukemia-associated self-antigens. Although not yet considered the standard of care, leukemia vaccines continue to show promising results in the management of the myeloid leukemias. PMID:21322777

  2. Posaconazole oral suspension primary prophylaxis in acute leukemia and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients: can it be used without measurement of plasma concentration?

    PubMed

    Girmenia, Corrado; Annino, Luciana; Mariotti, Benedetta; Fanci, Rosa; Minotti, Clara; Spadea, Antonio; Carotti, Alessandra; Piedimonte, Monica; Chierichini, Anna; Cerchiara, Elisabetta; Caselli, Desiree; Cupelli, Luca; Arcioni, Francesco; Bertaina, Alice; Ribersani, Michela; Proia, Anna; Mengarelli, Andrea; Perriello, Vincenzo; Torelli, Giovanni Fernando; Di Gioia, Massimo; Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Cassetta, Maria Iris; Fallani, Stefania; Novelli, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Posaconazole oral suspension (PCZ-susp) can display a variable degree of inter and intra-individual absorption. However, there is no agreement on the need of plasma-posaconazole-concentration (PPC) monitoring as a routine practice in patients receiving PCZ-susp. In this prospective, multicenter study we evaluated the variability of PPCs in hematologic patients receiving PCZ-susp prophylaxis with the aim to define conditions at different risk of subtherapeutic PPCs. Overall, 103 acute leukemia (AL) patients submitted to intensive chemotherapy (115 courses) and 46 allogeneic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT) recipients (47 courses) receiving PCZ-susp prophylaxis were considered. The adequacy of PPC pattern after the steady state (≥day 7 of treatment) in courses with two or more PPC measurements was defined as follows: inadequate pattern: PPC < 0.5 mcg/ml at least once; borderline pattern: PPC always ≥0.5mcg/ml but < 0.7 mcg/ml at least once; adequate pattern: PPC always ≥0.7 mcg/ml. The PPC pattern was evaluable in 83 and 37 AL and allo-SCT patients, respectively. It was adequate, borderline and inadequate in 63.9%, 14.5%, and 21.7% of courses, respectively, in AL, and in 62.2%, 10.8%, and 27.0% of courses, respectively, in allo-SCT. In both groups, an inadequate PPC pattern was associated with the development of diarrhea. In absence of diarrhea, the probability of an inadequate PPC pattern was 11.9% in AL and 17.2% in allo-SCT patients. PCZ-susp might be used without stringent need of PPC monitoring in patients without diarrhea. PMID:26868905

  3. Interferon-α: A Potentially Effective Treatment for Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Leukemia/Myelodysplastic Syndrome after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Xu, Lan-Ping; Wang, Yu; Yan, Chen-Hua; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Han, Wei; Wang, Feng-Rong; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-11-01

    In this prospective clinical study, the safety and efficacy of preemptive interferon-α (IFN-α) treatment were investigated and compared with preemptive donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) in patients who were minimal residual disease (MRD)-positive after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT were eligible if they had acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome and were MRD-positive after HSCT. Patients who were able to receive DLI were assigned to a preemptive DLI group (n = 45); patients who could not or did not agree to receive DLI after HSCT received preemptive IFN-α. A total of 22 patients received preemptive IFN-α; the median treatment duration was 35 days (range, 4 to 180 days). Seven patients relapsed, and 1 patient died from severe pneumonia. The 1-year cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) after intervention was 90.9% for the IFN-α group and 62.9% for the DLI group (P < .001). MRD status after preemptive intervention was comparable in the 2 groups, and the 1-year cumulative incidence of relapse after intervention was 27.3% for the IFN-α group and 35.6% for the DLI group (P = .514). The 1-year cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality after intervention was 4.5% for the IFN-α group and 4.4% for the DLI group (P = .985). The 1-year probability of disease-free survival after intervention was 68.2% for the IFN-α group and 60.0% for the DLI group (P = .517). In multivariate analysis, early-onset MRD, persistent MRD after intervention, and absence of cGVHD after intervention were significantly associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Thus, preemptive IFN-α may be a potential alternative for MRD-positive patients who cannot receive preemptive DLI after HSCT. PMID:26116088

  4. All-trans retinoic acid synergizes with FLT3 inhibition to eliminate FLT3/ITD+ leukemia stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hayley S; Greenblatt, Sarah M; Shirley, Courtney M; Duffield, Amy S; Bruner, J Kyle; Li, Li; Nguyen, Bao; Jung, Eric; Aplan, Peter D; Ghiaur, Gabriel; Jones, Richard J; Small, Donald

    2016-06-01

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3)-mutant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) portends a poor prognosis, and ineffective targeting of the leukemic stem cell (LSC) population remains one of several obstacles in treating this disease. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been used in several clinical trials for the treatment of nonpromyelocytic AML with limited clinical activity observed. FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) used as monotherapy also achieve limited clinical responses and are thus far unable to affect cure rates in AML patients. We explored the efficacy of combining ATRA and FLT3 TKIs to eliminate FLT3/internal tandem duplication (ITD)(+) LSCs. Our studies reveal highly synergistic drug activity, preferentially inducing apoptosis in FLT3/ITD(+) cell lines and patient samples. Colony-forming unit assays further demonstrate decreased clonogenicity of FLT3/ITD(+) cells upon treatment with ATRA and TKI. Most importantly, the drug combination depletes FLT3/ITD(+) LSCs in a genetic mouse model of AML, and prolongs survival of leukemic mice. Furthermore, engraftment of primary FLT3/ITD(+) patient samples is reduced in mice following treatment with FLT3 TKI and ATRA in combination, with evidence of cellular differentiation occurring in vivo. Mechanistically, we provide evidence that the synergism of ATRA and FLT3 TKIs is at least in part due to the observation that FLT3 TKI treatment upregulates the antiapoptotic protein Bcl6, limiting the drug's apoptotic effect. However, cotreatment with ATRA reduces Bcl6 expression to baseline levels through suppression of interleukin-6 receptor signaling. These studies provide evidence of the potential of this drug combination to eliminate FLT3/ITD(+) LSCs and reduce the rate of relapse in AML patients with FLT3 mutations. PMID:27103744

  5. Impact of age on outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with reduced intensity conditioning in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Jun; Kanamori, Heiwa; Tanaka, Masatsugu; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Iwato, Koji; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Okumura, Hirokazu; Onizuka, Makoto; Maesako, Yoshitomo; Teshima, Takanori; Kobayashi, Naoki; Morishima, Yasuo; Hirokawa, Makoto; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Yano, Shingo; Takami, Akiyoshi

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have repeatedly reported that increasing age is a significant risk factor for worse outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) among patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, more recent studies reported conflicting results regarding the association between age and outcomes in elderly patients. Therefore, we conducted a large-scale, nationwide retrospective study to examine the impact of age on outcomes of allo-HSCT with reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) for AML patients who were older than 50 years. Of the 757 patients, 89 patients (11.8%) were 50-54, 249 patients (32.9%) were 55-59, 301 patients (39.8%) were 60-64 and 118 patients (15.6%) were ≥65 years old. The 3-year overall survival (OS) (47.8, 45.2, 37.9, and 36.6% for patients aged 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, and ≥65 years, respectively, P = 0.24) and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) (24.0, 22.8, 29.2, and 27.6% for patients aged 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, and ≥65 years, respectively, P = 0.49) were not significantly different among the four age groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that increased age had no significant effect on OS or NRM after adjusting for covariates. These results suggested that advanced patient age is not a contraindication for RIC allo-HSCT in elderly AML patients. PMID:26663096

  6. 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-Prostaglandin J{sub 2} regulates leukemia inhibitory factor signaling through JAK-STAT pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasingh, Johnson; Bright, John J. . E-mail: jbright1@clarian.org

    2006-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are genetically normal, pluripotent cells, capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all cell lineages. While leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) maintains pluripotency in mouse ES cells, retinoic acid and other nuclear hormones induce neuro-glial differentiation in mouse and human ES cells in culture. Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent nuclear receptor transcription factors that regulate cell growth and differentiation in many cell types. However, the role of PPARs in the regulation of ES cell growth and differentiation is not known. In this study, we show that LIF induces proliferation and self-renewal of mouse D3-ES cells in culture. However, treatment with 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-Prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ2), a natural ligand for PPAR{gamma}, or all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) results in a dose-dependent decrease in proliferation and self-renewal in D3-ES cells. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses showed that LIF induces tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK1, TYK2 and STAT3 in 30 min and treatment with 15d-PGJ2 or ATRA results in a dose-dependent decrease in LIF-induced phosphorylation of JAK1 and STAT3 in D3-ES cells. However, treatment of D3-ES cells with Ciglitazone or 15d-PGJ2 for 48 h in culture resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PPAR{gamma} protein expression. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} agonists regulate LIF signaling through JAK-STAT pathway leading to growth and self-renewal of ES cells.

  7. STEM?!?!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Jen

    2012-01-01

    The author's son has been an engineer since birth. He never asked "why" as a toddler, it was always "how's it work?" So that he wanted a STEM-based home education was no big surprise. In this article, the author considers what kind of curricula would work best for her complex kid.

  8. Multiple extramedullary relapses without bone marrow involvement after second allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang Woo; Chung, Eun Jin; Kim, Sun Young; Ko, Jeong Hee; Baek, Hey Sung; Lee, Hyun Ju; Oh, Sung Hee; Jeon, Seok Cheol; Lee, Woong Soo; Park, Chan Kum; Lee, Chul Hoon

    2012-06-01

    EMR without BM involvement after allogeneic HSCT is extremely rare, especially in children; only a few cases have been reported. A two-yr-old boy was diagnosed with AML (M4) and underwent allogeneic HSCT in first complete remission with BM from HLA-matched unrelated donor without GVHD. Four yr later, he had a BM relapse and after induction and consolidation chemotherapy, he received a second HSCT from an unrelated donor using peripheral blood stem cells. His second post-transplant course was complicated by extensive chronic GVHD involving the skin, oral cavity, and lungs, which was treated with tacrolimus and corticosteroid. Two yr later, he noticed a mild swelling in the right cheek area. The BM showed a complete remission marrow and a soft tissue biopsy was compatible with granulocytic sarcoma. PET-CT showed multifocal bone involvements. He received chemotherapy, and the chloromas decreased in size. We report a case of diffuse EMR of AML without BM involvement after a second allogeneic HSCT. PMID:21923886

  9. Lenalidomide With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Prolymphocytic Leukemia, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  10. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  11. Efficacy and Pharmacologic Data of Second-Generation Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Nilotinib in BCR-ABL-Positive Leukemia Patients with Central Nervous System Relapse after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reinwald, Mark; Schleyer, Eberhard; Kiewe, Philipp; Blau, Igor Wolfgang; Burmeister, Thomas; Pursche, Stefan; Neumann, Martin; Notter, Michael; Thiel, Eckhard; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Burdach, Stefan; Bender, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is a severe complication of BCR-ABL-positive leukemia after allogenic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) associated with fatal outcome. Although second-generation tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKI) such as nilotinib have shown activity in systemic BCR-ABL+ disease, little data exists on their penetration and efficacy within the CNS. Four patients (3 male, 1 female; age 15–49) with meningeal relapse after alloSCT and subsequent treatment with nilotinib were identified. A total of 17 cerebrospinal fluid (csf) and serum samples were assessed for nilotinib concentration and patient outcome was recorded. Nilotinib concentrations showed a low median csf/plasma ratio of 0.53% (range 0.23–1.5%), yet pronounced clinical efficacy was observed with long-lasting responses (>1 year) in three patients. Comparison with historical data showed a trend towards superior efficacy of nilotinib versus imatinib. Despite poor csf penetration, nilotinib showed significant clinical activity in CNS relapse of BCR-ABL+ leukemias. As nilotinib has a high protein-binding affinity, the low-protein concentration in csf could translate into a relatively higher amount of free and therefore active nilotinib in csf as compared to blood, possibly explaining the observed efficacy. Thus, treatment with a 2nd generation TKI warrants further investigation and should be considered in cases of CNS relapse of BCR-ABL-positive leukemia after alloSCT. PMID:25025064

  12. Murine acute leukemia cell line with megakaryocytic differentiation (MK-8057) induced by whole-body irradiation in C sup 3 H/He mice: Cytological properties and kinetics of its leukemic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirabayashi, Y.; Inoue, T.; Yoshida, K.; Sasaki, H.; Kubo, S.; Kanisawa, M.; Seki, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Five cases of murine leukemia with megakaryocytic differentiation were observed among the 417 cases of radiation-induced leukemias which developed in 30% of C{sup 3}H/HeMs mice exposed at 8 to 10 weeks to 0.5 to 5 gy total body irradiation. Cells from individual leukemic colonies in the spleen of the irradiated mice, and cells from colonies in methylcellulose (MC) culture in vitro, derived from one of these leukemias, MK-8057, were injected into mice; both types of cells caused the deaths of the recipient mice by inducing the same type of leukemia. MK-8057 can be maintained in Dexter-type liquid culture with a feeder layer of irradiated bone marrow cells. There was a linear reciprocal relationship between the increasing number of MK-8057 cells injected versus the survival of the recipient mice. A reciprocal relationship also was seen between an increasing number of leukemic stem cells, corresponding to the number of MK-8057 cells, and the survival of mice injected with MK-8057. Giant nuclear megakaryocytes developed during the course of colony growth in the spleen as they did in the MC culture. Such megakaryocytes were acetylcholinesterase positive, whereas leukemic cells in the peripheral blood showed no sign of platelet production nor of a positive reaction to acetylcholinesterase. Cells maintained in culture were entirely positive in platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa when anti-human antibody was used. The larger cells in a splenic cell suspension derived from a moribund mouse were separated and enriched by velocity sedimentation using centrifugal elutriation (CE), and then subjected to flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. Cells with up to 32N-DNA content were detected. After separating MK-8057 by counter-flow CE, the larger cell fraction produced more leukemic colonies when injected into irradiated mice than did the small cell fraction.

  13. Alkylator-Induced and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms Model Clinical Disease and Suggest the Presence of Multiple Cell Subpopulations with Leukemia Stem Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carl; Gratzinger, Dita; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive bone marrow cancers arising from transformed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Therapy-related AML and MDS (t-AML/MDS) comprise a subset of AML cases occurring after exposure to alkylating chemotherapy and/or radiation and are associated with a very poor prognosis. Less is known about the pathogenesis and disease-initiating/leukemia stem cell (LSC) subpopulations of t-AML/MDS compared to their de novo counterparts. Here, we report the development of mouse models of t-AML/MDS. First, we modeled alkylator-induced t-AML/MDS by exposing wild type adult mice to N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU), resulting in several models of AML and MDS that have clinical and pathologic characteristics consistent with human t-AML/MDS including cytopenia, myelodysplasia, and shortened overall survival. These models were limited by their inability to transplant clinically aggressive disease. Second, we established three patient-derived xenograft models of human t-AML. These models led to rapidly fatal disease in recipient immunodeficient xenografted mice. LSC activity was identified in multiple HSPC subpopulations suggesting there is no canonical LSC immunophenotype in human t-AML. Overall, we report several new t-AML/MDS mouse models that could potentially be used to further define disease pathogenesis and test novel therapeutics. PMID:27428079

  14. Alkylator-Induced and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms Model Clinical Disease and Suggest the Presence of Multiple Cell Subpopulations with Leukemia Stem Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Brian A; Johnson, Carl; Gratzinger, Dita; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive bone marrow cancers arising from transformed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Therapy-related AML and MDS (t-AML/MDS) comprise a subset of AML cases occurring after exposure to alkylating chemotherapy and/or radiation and are associated with a very poor prognosis. Less is known about the pathogenesis and disease-initiating/leukemia stem cell (LSC) subpopulations of t-AML/MDS compared to their de novo counterparts. Here, we report the development of mouse models of t-AML/MDS. First, we modeled alkylator-induced t-AML/MDS by exposing wild type adult mice to N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU), resulting in several models of AML and MDS that have clinical and pathologic characteristics consistent with human t-AML/MDS including cytopenia, myelodysplasia, and shortened overall survival. These models were limited by their inability to transplant clinically aggressive disease. Second, we established three patient-derived xenograft models of human t-AML. These models led to rapidly fatal disease in recipient immunodeficient xenografted mice. LSC activity was identified in multiple HSPC subpopulations suggesting there is no canonical LSC immunophenotype in human t-AML. Overall, we report several new t-AML/MDS mouse models that could potentially be used to further define disease pathogenesis and test novel therapeutics. PMID:27428079

  15. Efficacy of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Intermediate-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia Adult Patients in First Complete Remission: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Honghu; Dou, Liping; Liu, Daihong; Fu, Lin; Ma, Cong; Ma, Xuebin; Yao, Yushi; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Qian; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yu; Jing, Yu; Wang, Lili; Li, Yonghui; Yu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and consolidation chemotherapy have been used to treat intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients in first complete remission (CR1). However, it is still unclear which treatments are most effective for these patients. The aim of our study was to analyze the relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) benefit of allogeneic HSCT (alloHSCT) for intermediate-risk AML patients in CR1. A meta-analysis of prospective trials comparing alloHSCT to non-alloHSCT (autologous HSCT [autoHSCT] and/or chemotherapy) was undertaken. We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library though October 2014, using keywords and relative MeSH or Emtree terms, ‘allogeneic’; ‘acut*’ and ‘leukem*/aml/leukaem*/leucem*/leucaem*’; and ‘nonlympho*’ or ‘myelo*’. A total of 7053 articles were accessed. The primary outcomes were RFS and OS, while the secondary outcomes were treatment-related mortality (TRM) and relapse rate (RR). Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for each outcome. The primary outcomes were RFS and OS, while the secondary outcomes were TRM and RR. We included 9 prospective controlled studies including 1950 adult patients. Patients with intermediate-risk AML in CR1 who received either alloHSCT or non-alloHSCT were considered eligible. AlloHSCT was found to be associated with significantly better RFS, OS, and RR than non-alloHSCT (HR, 0.684 [95% CI: 0.48, 0.95]; HR, 0.76 [95% CI: 0.61, 0.95]; and HR, 0.58 [95% CI: 0.45, 0.75], respectively). TRM was significantly higher following alloHSCT than non-alloHSCT (HR, 3.09 [95% CI: 1.38, 6.92]). However, subgroup analysis showed no OS benefit for alloHSCT over autoHSCT (HR, 0.99 [95% CI: 0.70, 1.39]). In conclusion, alloHSCT is associated with more favorable RFS, OS, and RR benefits (but not TRM outcomes) than non-alloHSCT generally, but does not have an OS advantage over autoHSCT specifically, in

  16. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation could improve survival of cytogenetically normal adult acute myeloid leukemia patients with DNMT3A mutations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Sun, Yanjun; Shen, Hongjie; Ding, Lin; Yang, Zhen; Qiu, Huiying; Sun, Aining; Chen, Suning; Wu, Depei

    2015-11-01

    DNMT3A mutations are frequent in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (cn-AML) patients and associated with poor survival. The role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in DNMT3A(mut) cn-AML patients remains unclear. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the prognostic impact of DNMT3A mutations and explored the role of allo-HSCT in 308 cn-AML patients who received consolidation of intensive chemotherapy or allo-HSCT in our center from March 2005 to May 2014. In the whole cohort, 63 patients (20.5%) were identified with DNMT3A exon 23 mutations and R882H was the most frequent variant. DNMT3A(mut) patients had shorter overall survival (3-year OS: 31.9% vs. 52.0%, P = 0.009) and disease-free survival (3-year DFS: 21.8% vs. 40.1%, P = 0.004) compared with DNMT3A(wt) patients. Based on FLT3/NPM1/CEBPA mutations, 308 cn-AML patients were divided into favorable/intermediate group (n = 262) and unfavorable group (n = 46). There were no significant differences in 3-year OS and 3-year DFS between DNMT3A(mut) and DNMT3A(wt) patients in both favorable/intermediate and unfavorable groups. Additionally, in multivariate analysis, DNMT3A mutation remained an independent adverse prognostic factor for the survival. In the DNMT3A(mut) cohort, 23 complete remission (CR) patients received allo-HSCT consolidation and 32 CR patients received chemotherapy consolidation, dramatic differences were observed in 3-year OS (51.7% vs. 28.9%, P = 0.048) and 3-year DFS (41.6% vs. 14.9%, P = 0.024) between allo-HSCT group and chemotherapy group. Collectively, DNMT3A mutation is a poor prognostic factor for cn-AML patients and allo-HSCT could improve survival of cn-AML patients with DNMT3A mutations. PMID:26223865

  17. Chemotherapy versus Hypomethylating Agents for the Treatment of Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Motabi, Ibraheem H; Ghobadi, Armin; Liu, Jingxia; Schroeder, Mark; Abboud, Camille N; Cashen, Amanda F; Stockler-Goldstein, Keith E; Uy, Geoffrey L; Vij, Ravi; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F

    2016-07-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is a potentially curative treatment for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). For patients with relapsed disease after transplantation, intensive chemotherapy followed by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) or a second allo-SCT may result in a durable response in some patients. High-intensity chemotherapy and less aggressive therapy with hypomethylating agents (HAs) with and without DLI are often used for relapse after allo-SCT. Here we compared the treatment outcomes of intensive chemotherapy with that of HAs in relapsed AML and MDS after allo-SCT. Patients who had received a second SCT within 90 days of the relapse date were excluded. The primary endpoints were overall response rate (ORR) and overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints were complete remission (CR) rate and progression-free survival (PFS). One hundred patients were included: 73 patients received chemotherapy and 27 patients received an HA. Fifty-six percent of patients in the chemotherapy group and 33% of patients in the HA group received at least 1 DLI after treatment. Treatment with chemotherapy resulted in a higher ORR (51% versus 19%, P = .004) and a higher CR rate (40% versus 7%, P = .002). The median OS (6 versus 3.9 months, P = .01) and PFS (4.9 versus 3.8 months, P = .02) were longer in the chemotherapy group. Similar benefit of chemotherapy over HAs was maintained in all treatment outcomes after controlling for the use of DLI. The use of chemotherapy followed by DLI offered the greatest benefit (ORR, 68%; CR, 59%, 1-year OS, 44%; and median OS, 9.8 months). In conclusion, in our hands, with limited numbers, the use of more conventional salvage chemotherapy, with DLI when possible, for the treatment of relapsed AML and MDS after allo-SCT is associated with better outcomes than nonchemotherapy (HA) options. PMID:27026249

  18. Superiority of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to nilotinib and dasatinib for adult patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in the accelerated phase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lanping; Zhu, Huanling; Hu, Jianda; Wu, Depei; Jiang, Hao; Jiang, Qian; Huang, Xiaojun

    2015-09-01

    In the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) era, imatinib is the first-line therapy for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic or accelerated phase. Although second-generation TKIs (TKI2), including dasatinib and nilotinib, are appropriate treatment regimens for patients with disease that progressed to accelerated phase following imatinib therapy, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is the only curative therapy. This study retrospectively analyzed the efficacy of TKI2 and HSCT for treatment of CML in accelerated phase. Ninety-three patients with CML registered in the Chinese CML alliance database from February 2001 to February 2014 were enrolled and divided into the TKI2 (n = 33) and allo-HSCT (n = 60) groups. In the TKI2 group, 26 and 7 patients received nilotinib and dasatinib, respectively, as initial TKI2 and 11 patients transferred to the alternative TKI2 after failure to one TKI2. In the allo-HSCT group, 22 (36.7%), 35 (58.3%), and 3 (10%) patients underwent allo-HSCT from an HLA-matched sibling donor, HLA mismatched/haploidentical donor, and unrelated donor, respectively. All patients in the HSCT group were engrafted. Overall, 69.7%, 48.5%, and 45.5% of patients presented hematological, cytogenetic, and major molecular responses, respectively, to at least one of TKI2. All 60 patients (100%) achieved CHR and cytogenetic response in the HSCT group. Patients in the TKI2 group exhibited lower 5-year overall survival rate (42.9% vs. 86.4%, P = 0.002), 5-year event-free survival rate (14.3% vs. 76.1%, P < 0.001), and 5-year progression-free survival (28.6% vs. 78.1%, P < 0.001) than those in the allo-HSCT group. Multivariate analysis showed that male sex and TKI2 therapy were predictors of poor overall survival, whereas hemoglobin < 100 g/L and TKI2 therapy were predictors of poor event-free survival and progression-free survival. These results indicated that allo-HSCT may be superior to nilotinib and dasatinib for adult

  19. Lymphoma stem cells: enough evidence to support their existence?

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Climent, Jose A.; Fontan, Lorena; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Siebert, Reiner; Prosper, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    While leukemia-originating stem cells are critical in the initiation and maintenance of leukemias, the existence of similar cell populations that may generate B-cell lymphoma upon mutation remains uncertain. Here we propose that committed lymphoid progenitor/precursor cells with an active V-D-J recombination program are the initiating cells of follicular lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma when targeted by immunoglobulin (IG)- gene translocations in the bone marrow. However, these pre-malignant lymphoma-initiating cells cannot drive complete malignant transformation, requiring additional cooperating mutations in specific stem-cell programs to be converted into the lymphoma-originating cells able to generate and sustain lymphoma development. Conversely, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and sporadic Burkitt’s lymphoma derive from B lymphocytes that acquire translocations through IG-hyper-mutation or class-switching errors within the germinal center. Although secondary reprogramming mutations are generally required, some cells such as centroblasts or memory B cells that have certain stem cell-like features, or lymphocytes with MYC rearrangements that deregulate self-renewal pathways, may bypass this need and directly function as the lymphoma-originating cells. An alternative model supports an aberrant epigenetic modification of gene sets as the first occurring hit, which either leads to retaining stem-cell features in hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells, or reprograms stemness into more committed lymphocytes, followed by secondary chromosomal translocations that eventually drive lymphoma development. Isolation and characterization of the cells that are at the origin of the different B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas will provide critical insights into the disease pathogenesis and will represent a step towards the development of more effective therapies. PMID:20139392

  20. The graft-versus-leukemia effect using matched unrelated donors is not superior to HLA-identical siblings for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pavletic, Steven Z.; Anasetti, Claudio; Barrett, A. John; Wang, Tao; Wang, Dan; Antin, Joseph H.; Di Bartolomeo, Paolo; Bolwell, Brian J.; Bredeson, Christopher; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Gale, Robert P.; Gupta, Vikas; Hahn, Theresa; Hale, Gregory A.; Halter, Jorg; Jagasia, Madan; Litzow, Mark R.; Locatelli, Franco; Marks, David I.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Cowan, Morton J.; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Russell, James A.; Schiller, Gary J.; Schouten, Harry; Spellman, Stephen; Verdonck, Leo F.; Wingard, John R.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Arora, Mukta

    2009-01-01

    Do some patients benefit from an unrelated donor (URD) transplant because of a stronger graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect? We analyzed 4099 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) undergoing a myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) from an URD (8/8 human leukocyte antigen [HLA]–matched, n = 941) or HLA-identical sibling donor (n = 3158) between 1995 and 2004 reported to the CIBMTR. In the Cox regression model, acute and chronic GVHD were added as time-dependent variables. In multivariate analysis, URD transplant recipients had a higher risk for transplantation-related mortality (TRM; relative risk [RR], 2.76; P < .001) and relapse (RR, 1.50; P < .002) in patients with AML, but not ALL or CML. Chronic GVHD was associated with a lower relapse risk in all diagnoses. Leukemia-free survival (LFS) was decreased in patients with AML without acute GVHD receiving a URD transplant (RR, 2.02; P < .001) but was comparable to those receiving HLA-identical sibling transplants in patients with ALL and CML. In patients without GVHD, multivariate analysis showed similar risk of relapse but decreased LFS for URD transplants for all 3 diagnoses. In conclusion, risk of relapse was the same (ALL, CML) or worse (AML) in URD transplant recipients compared with HLA-identical sibling transplant recipients, suggesting a similar GVL effect. PMID:19059878

  1. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Plasma Cell Leukemia; Progression of Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  2. What Is Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics for childhood leukemia? What is childhood leukemia? Cancer starts when cells start to grow out ... start making antibodies to fight them. Types of leukemia in children Leukemia is often described as being ...

  3. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute types. Symptoms include Infections Fever Loss of appetite Tiredness Easy bruising or bleeding Swollen lymph nodes Night sweats Shortness of breath Pain in the bones or joints Risk factors for childhood leukemia include having a brother ...

  4. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  5. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P.; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  6. Maternal immunoglobulin E and childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeffrey S; Buffler, Patricia A; Metayer, Catherine; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Patoka, Joe; Kronish, Daniel; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2009-08-01

    Childhood leukemia, particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), has long been hypothesized to be affected by abnormal immune responses to microbial challenges stemming from a lack of immune modulation in early childhood. Studies of allergies suggest that a child's immune development may be modulated by maternal immune status. We conducted a study to explore the relationship between maternal immunoglobulin E (IgE) and childhood leukemia and to investigate whether maternal immune status can influence childhood leukemia risk. Serum total and specific IgE (respiratory and food) were measured in biological mothers of 352 children (193 healthy controls and 159 leukemia cases, including 139 ALL cases) ages <8 years who were enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study. Odds ratios associated with maternal IgE were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for child's age, sex, race/ethnicity, and annual household income. A positive association between childhood leukemia or ALL and elevated levels of maternal serum total IgE was observed, especially among Hispanics. In addition, a positive association was observed between childhood leukemia or ALL and maternal respiratory or food IgE status. These results suggest that maternal immune function may play a crucial role in the etiology of childhood leukemia, although additional studies need to be conducted to confirm the results of this study and provide a perspective on mechanisms. PMID:19622720

  7. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  8. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. High-speed flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle targeting to rare leukemic stem cells in peripheral human blood: preliminary in-vitro studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christy L.; Leary, James F.

    2014-03-01

    Leukemic cancer stem cells are both stem-like and leukemic-like. This complicates their detection as rare circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of leukemia patients. The leukemic stem cells are also highly resistant to standard chemotherapeutic regimens so new therapeutic strategies need to be designed to kill the leukemic stem cells without killing normal stem cells. In these initial studies we have designed an antibody-targeted and fluorescent (Cy5.5) nanoparticle for targeting these leukemic stem cells and then introducing new strategies for killing them. Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were performed on a BD FACS Aria III. Human leukemic stem cell-like cell line RS4;11 (with putative immunophenotype CD123+/CD24+/CD38-/CD10-/Flt-3-) was used as a model human leukemic stem cell systems and were spiked into normal human peripheral blood cells containing normal blood stem-progenitor cells (immunophenotype CD123-/CD34+/CD38-) and Cy5.5-labeled nanoparticles with targeting molecule anti-CD123 antibody. An irrelevant antibody (CD71) which should not bind to any live leukemic stem cell or normal stem cell (binds erythrocytes) was used as a way of distinguishing between true-positive live and false-positive damaged/dead cells, the latter occurring at much higher frequencies than the very rare (e.g. 0.001 to 0.0001 percent frequency true leukemic stem cells). These studies are designed to measure the targeting sensitivity and specificity of the fluorescent nanoparticles to the putative rare leukemic stem cells with the eventual design to use the nanoparticles to direct killing therapeutic doses to the leukemic stem cells but not to the normal stem-progenitor cells.

  10. Novel drug therapies in myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Horne, Gillian A; Kinstrie, Ross; Copland, Mhairi

    2015-01-01

    Both acute myeloid leukemia and chronic myeloid leukemia are thought to arise from a subpopulation of primitive cells, termed leukemic stem cells that share properties with somatic stem cells. Leukemic stem cells are capable of continued self-renewal, and are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and are considered to be responsible for disease relapse. In recent years, improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms of myeloid leukemia biology has led to the development of novel and targeted therapies. This review focuses on clinically relevant patent applications and their relevance within the known literature in two areas of prevailing therapeutic interest, namely monoclonal antibody therapy and small molecule inhibitors in disease-relevant signaling pathways. PMID:26030080

  11. New Strategies in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Leukemogenesis and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gojo, Ivana; Karp, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular technology have unraveled the complexity of leukemogenesis and provided the opportunity to design more personalized and pathophysiology-targeted therapeutic strategies. Despite the use of intensive chemotherapy, relapse remains the most common cause for therapeutic failure in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The interactions between leukemia stem cells (LSC) and marrow microenvironment appear to be critical in promoting therapeutic resistance through progressive acquisition of genetic and epigenetic changes within leukemia cells and immune evasion, resulting in leukemia cell survival. With advances in genomic sequencing efforts, epigenetic and phenotypic characterization, personalized therapeutic strategies aimed at critical leukemia survival mechanisms may be feasible in the near future. Here, we review select novel approaches to therapy of AML such as targeting LSC, altering leukemia/marrow microenvironment interactions, inhibiting DNA repair or cell cycle checkpoints, and augmenting immune-based anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25324141

  12. A novel technology for hematopoietic stem cell expansion using combination of nanofiber and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingwei; Aggarwal, Reeva; Pompili, Vincent J; Das, Hiranmoy

    2010-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been applied as a standard procedure of treatment for hematological disorders like multiple myeloma and leukemia for several decades. Various sources of stem cells like bone marrow, peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood are used for the transplantation. Among these umbilical cord blood is currently preferred due to the primitiveness of the derived stem cells and minimal possibilities of graft versus host disease or development of graft induced tumors. One of the problems for these sources is the procurement of sufficient number of donor stem cells. Inadequate number of cells may lead to delayed recovery and decrease survivability of the patient. Thus to overcome the limitation of stem cell number, development of an ex-vivo expansion technology is critically important. The recent emerging technology using nanofiber in combination with growth factors has made a significant improvement to the field of regenerative medicine and a couple of patents have been filed. In this review, we will focus on factors regulating hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and expansion emphasizing on nanofiber as a supporting matrix. PMID:20420564

  13. Understanding Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a second cancer, including melanoma, sarcoma, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, basal cell cancer, squamous cell skin cancer or myeloma. {{ See your primary care doctor to keep up with other healthcare needs. Understanding Leukemia I page 21 {{ Talk with family and friends about how ...

  14. FR901228 in Treating Children With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  15. Idarubicin-intensified BUCY2 conditioning regimen improved survival in high-risk acute myeloid, but not lymphocytic leukemia patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A retrospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jun; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Huafang; Hong, Mei; Wu, Qiuling; Nie, Dimin; You, Yong; Zhong, Zhaodong; Li, Weiming; Hu, Yu; Xia, Linghui

    2016-07-01

    The intensity of conditioning regimen is highly correlated with outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We have previously reported that idarubicin (IDA) intensified BUCY2 regimen could reduce relapse and improve survival for high-risk hematological malignancies undergoing allo-HSCT. However, there is no published study comparing the efficacy of IDA-BUCY2 regimen for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) versus acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). We further retrospectively compared therapeutic outcomes of intensified conditioning regimen on 140 high-risk AML and ALL patients in the data analyses. IDA 15mg/m(2)/d was administered by continuous infusion from day -11 to -9, followed by intravenous injection of busulfan (BU) (3.2mg/kg/d) from day -6 to -4, and intravenous injection of cyclophosphamide (CY) (1.8g/m(2)/d) from day -3 to -2 in IDA-BUCY2 regimen. For high-risk AML, cumulative probabilities of 3-year relapse rates in IDA-BUCY2 and traditional BUCY2 regimens were 16.9%, 43.3% (P=0.016). Cumulative probabilities of 3-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 69.2% vs 44.0% (P=0.024), and 66.9% vs 38.2% (P=0.01). However, two regimens showed no significant differences for high-risk ALL. Multivariate analysis also indicated that IDA intensified BUCY2 conditioning was the favorable variable to reduce relapse and elevate survival for high-risk AML patients. In conclusion, IDA-BUCY2 regimen reduces relapse and improves survival for high-risk AML undergoing allo-HSCT, but not presenting uniform therapeutic effects for high-risk ALL. PMID:27131062

  16. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Tuthill, Mark

    2010-01-01

    More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs) are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Before transplantation, patients receive intensive myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by stem cell “rescue.” Autologous HSCT is performed using the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells, which are harvested before transplantation and reinfused after myeloablation. Allogeneic HSCT uses human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched stem cells derived from a donor. Survival after allogeneic transplantation depends on donor–recipient matching, the graft-versus-host response, and the development of a graft versus leukemia effect. This article reviews the biology of stem cells, clinical efficacy of HSCT, transplantation procedures, and potential complications. PMID:24198516

  17. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  18. Multiscale molecular simulations of proteins in cell-like conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiotakis, Antonios

    Proteins are the workhorses of all living organisms, performing a broad range of functions in the crowded cellular interior. However, little is known about how proteins function in cell-like conditions since most studies focus in dilute aqueous environments. In order to address this problem we incorporated molecular simulations and coarse-grained models that capture the protein dynamics in the cellular interior. We study the macromolecular crowding effects of cell-like environments on protein Borrelia Burgdorferi VlsE (variable major protein-like sequence-expressed), an aspherical membrane protein, and the enzyme Phosphoglycerate kinase. We show that protein conformation can be significantly perturbed under crowded cell-like conditions which, in turn, can have dramatic effects to the proteins' function. In addition, we look into the effects of mutations in the folding pathways of the topologically frustrated protein apoflavodoxin while correlation with experiments is also achieved. We further developed a multiscale simulation scheme that combines the sampling efficiency of low-resolution models with the detail of all-atomistic simulations. An algorithm that reconstructs all-atomistic conformations from coarse-grained representations was developed, in addition to an energy function that accounts for chemical interference based on the Boltzamn inversion method. The multiscale simulation scheme manages to sample all-atomistic structures of the protein Trp-cage that match very well with experiments. The folding kinetic behavior of Trp-cage was also studied in the combined presence of urea denaturant and macromolecular crowding.

  19. Clearance of donor cell leukemia by means of graft versus leukemia effect: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; León Peña, Andrés A; Gómez-de-León, Andrés; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2016-09-01

    Donor cell leukemia (DCL) is a rare complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Its incidence has been reported between 0.12 and 5%, although the majority of cases are anecdotal. The mechanisms of leukemogenesis in DCL may be distinct from other types of leukemia. Here we describe a case of a 27-year-old woman with a diagnosis of biphenotypic acute leukemia who received a HSCT and developed a DCL. We briefly discuss the possible pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of DCL. PMID:26914843

  20. Philadelphia Chromosome-positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Lymphoid Blast Crisis.

    PubMed

    Kolenova, Alexandra; Maloney, Kelly W; Hunger, Stephen P

    2016-08-01

    The clinical characteristics of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in lymphoid blast crisis (BC) can resemble those of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph ALL). Because of this, there can be concern as to whether a patient with newly diagnosed Ph leukemia has Ph ALL or CML in lymphoid BC. This distinction has significant potential therapeutic implications because most children with Ph ALL are now treated with chemotherapy plus a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, whereas allogeneic stem cell transplant is usually recommended for any patient with CML that presents in or later develops BC. PMID:27164534

  1. In search of "stemness".

    PubMed

    Cai, Jingli; Weiss, Mark L; Rao, Mahendra S

    2004-07-01

    Stem cells have been identified and characterized in a variety of tissues. In this review we examine possible shared properties of stem cells. We suggest that irrespective of their lineal origin, stem cells have to respond in similar ways to regulate self-renewal and differentiation and it is likely that cell-cycle control, asymmetry/differentiation controls, cellular protective and DNA repair mechanisms, and associated apoptosis/senescence signaling pathways all might be expected to be more highly regulated in stem cells, likely by similar mechanisms. We review the literature to suggest a set of candidate stemness genes that may serve as universal stem cell markers. While we predict many similarities, we also predict that differences will exist between stem cell populations and that when transdifferentiation is considered genes expected to be both similar and different need to be examined. PMID:15246154

  2. Rapamycin interacts synergistically with idarubicin to induce T-leukemia cell apoptosis in vitro and in a mesenchymal stem cell simulated drug-resistant microenvironment via Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin and extracellular signal-related kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kang-Ni; Zhao, Yan-Min; He, Ying; Wang, Bin-Sheng; Du, Kai-Li; Fu, Shan; Hu, Kai-Min; Zhang, Li-Fei; Liu, Li-Zhen; Hu, Yong-Xian; Wang, Ying-Jia; Huang, He

    2014-03-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) are clonal lymphoid malignancies with a poor prognosis, and still a lack of effective treatment. Here we examined the interactions between the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin and idarubicin (IDA) in a series of human T-ALL cell lines Molt-4, Jurkat, CCRF-CEM and CEM/C1. Co-exposure of cells to rapamycin and IDA synergistically induced T-ALL cell growth inhibition and apoptosis mediated by caspase activation via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway and extrinsic pathway. Combined treatment with rapamycin and IDA down-regulated Bcl-2 and Mcl-1, and inhibited the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/mTOR and extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK). They also played synergistic pro-apoptotic roles in the drug-resistant microenvironment simulated by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a feeder layer. In addition, MSCs protected T-ALL cells from IDA cytotoxicity by up-regulating ERK phosphorylation, while rapamycin efficiently reversed this protective effect. Taken together, we confirm the synergistic antitumor effects of rapamycin and IDA, and provide an insight into the potential future clinical applications of combined rapamycin-IDA regimens for treating T-cell malignancies. PMID:23741975

  3. Targeted therapy against multi-resistant bacteria in leukemic and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients: guidelines of the 4th European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-4, 2011)

    PubMed Central

    Averbuch, Diana; Cordonnier, Catherine; Livermore, David M.; Mikulska, Małgorzata; Orasch, Christina; Viscoli, Claudio; Gyssens, Inge C.; Kern, Winfried V.; Klyasova, Galina; Marchetti, Oscar; Engelhard, Dan; Akova, Murat

    2013-01-01

    The detection of multi-resistant bacterial pathogens, particularly those to carbapenemases, in leukemic and stem cell transplant patients forces the use of old or non-conventional agents as the only remaining treatment options. These include colistin/polymyxin B, tigecycline, fosfomycin and various anti-gram-positive agents. Data on the use of these agents in leukemic patients are scanty, with only linezolid subjected to formal trials. The Expert Group of the 4th European Conference on Infections in Leukemia has developed guidelines for their use in these patient populations. Targeted therapy should be based on (i) in vitro susceptibility data, (ii) knowledge of the best treatment option against the particular species or phenotype of bacteria, (iii) pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic data, and (iv) careful assessment of the risk-benefit balance. For infections due to resistant Gram-negative bacteria, these agents should be preferably used in combination with other agents that remain active in vitro, because of suboptimal efficacy (e.g., tigecycline) and the risk of emergent resistance (e.g., fosfomycin). The paucity of new antibacterial drugs in the near future should lead us to limit the use of these drugs to situations where no alternative exists. PMID:24323984

  4. Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Palifermin in Children and Adolescents with Acute Leukemias Undergoing Myeloablative Therapy and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium Trial.

    PubMed

    Morris, Joan; Rudebeck, Mattias; Neudorf, Steven; Moore, Theodore; Duerst, Reggie; Shah, Ami J; Graham, Michael; Aquino, Victor; Morris, Christopher; Olsson, Birgitta

    2016-07-01

    Currently, effective pharmacologic treatment to reduce severe oral mucositis (OM) resulting from high-dose myeloablative cytotoxic therapy in the pediatric population is not available. Palifermin has been proven to decrease the incidence and duration of severe OM in adults with hematologic malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In the pediatric population, however, data on palifermin treatment are limited. A phase I dose-escalation study of palifermin in pediatric patients with acute leukemias undergoing myeloablative HSCT with total body irradiation, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide was performed to determine a safe and tolerable dose and to characterize the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile and efficacy of palifermin. Twenty-seven patients in 3 age groups (1 to 2, 3 to 11, and 12 to 16 years) and 3 dose levels (40, 60, and 80 μg/kg/day) were studied. There were no deaths, dose-limiting toxicities, or treatment-related serious adverse events. Long-term safety outcomes did not differ from what would be expected in this population. PK data showed no differences between the 3 age groups. Exposure did not increase with increase in dose. The maximum severity of OM (WHO grade 4) occurred in 6 patients (22%), none of whom was in the 80-μg/kg/day dosing group. This study showed that all doses were well tolerated and a good safety profile in all 3 pediatric age groups was seen. PMID:26968792

  5. Improved relapse-free survival after autologous stem cell transplantation does not translate into better quality of life in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: lessons from the randomized European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation-Intergroup study.

    PubMed

    de Wreede, Liesbeth C; Watson, Maggie; van Os, Marleen; Milligan, Donald; van Gelder, Michel; Michallet, Mauricette; Dreger, Peter; Dearden, Claire E; Homewood, Janis; Dupuis, Jehan; Leporrier, Michel; Karas, Michal; Corront, Bernadette; Baerlocher, Gabriela M; Herr, Wolfgang; Choquet, Sylvain; Niederwieser, Dietger W; Sutton, Laurent; Kröger, Nicolaus; de Witte, Theo M; Schetelig On Behalf Of The Chronic Malignancies Working Party Of The Ebmt And The Uk Medical Research Council, Johannes

    2014-02-01

    In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) medical progress is driven by clinical studies with relapse-free survival (RFS) as the primary endpoint. The randomized EBMT-Intergroup trial compared high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) to observation and demonstrated a substantial improvement of RFS without showing improved overall survival for the transplant arm. Here we report quality of life (QoL) information of the first 3 years following randomization from that study. The main objective was to assess the impact of treatment on QoL over time. Two secondary analyses were performed to further investigate the impact of ASCT and relapse on QoL. In the primary analysis, we demonstrate an adverse impact of ASCT on QoL which was largest at 4 months and continued throughout the first year after randomization. Further, we demonstrated a sustained adverse impact of relapse on QoL which worsened over time. Despite better disease control by ASCT the side effects thus turned the net effect towards inferior QoL in the first year and comparable QoL in the following 2 years after randomization. This study emphasizes the importance of information concerning QoL impacts when patients are counseled about treatments aimed at improving RFS in the absence of a survival benefit. PMID:24123244

  6. Therapeutic Implications of Leukemic Stem Cell Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chumsri, Saranya; Matsui, William; Burger, Angelika M.

    2008-01-01

    An emerging concept in cancer biology is that a rare population of cancer stem cells exists among the heterogeneous cell mass that constitutes a tumor. This concept is best understood in human myeloid leukemia. Normal and malignant hematopoietic stem cell functions are defined by a common set of critical stemness genes that regulate self-renewal and developmental pathways. Several stemness factors, such as Notch or telomerase, show differential activation in normal hematopoietic versus leukemia stem cells. These differences could be exploited therapeutically even with drugs that are already in clinical use for the treatment of leukemia. The translation of novel and existing leukemic stem cell – directed therapies into clinical practice, however, will require changes in clinical trial design and the inclusion of stem cell biomarkers as correlative end points. PMID:18006753

  7. Leukemia revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E P

    1980-01-01

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately.

  8. The leukemias: Epidemiologic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Linet, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Particularly geared to physicians and cancer researchers, this study of the epidemiology and etiology of leukemia analyzes the four major leukemia subtypes in terms of genetic and familial determinant factors and examines the incidence, distribution and frequency of reported leukemia clusters. Linet discusses the connection between other types of malignancies, their treatments, and the subsequent development of leukemia and evaluates the impact on leukemia onset of such environmental factors as radiation therapy, drugs, and occupational hazards.

  9. Adoptive T-cell therapy for Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Garber, Haven R; Mirza, Asma; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Alatrash, Gheath

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is the most robust form of adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) and has been tremendously effective in the treatment of leukemia. It is one of the original forms of cancer immunotherapy and illustrates that lymphocytes can specifically recognize and eliminate aberrant, malignant cells. However, because of the high morbidity and mortality that is associated with alloSCT including graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), refining the anti-leukemia immunity of alloSCT to target distinct antigens that mediate the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect could transform our approach to treating leukemia, and possibly other hematologic malignancies. Over the past few decades, many leukemia antigens have been discovered that can separate malignant cells from normal host cells and render them vulnerable targets. In concert, the field of T-cell engineering has matured to enable transfer of ectopic high-affinity antigen receptors into host or donor cells with greater efficiency and potency. Many preclinical studies have demonstrated that engineered and conventional T-cells can mediate lysis and eradication of leukemia via one or more leukemia antigen targets. This evidence now serves as a foundation for clinical trials that aim to cure leukemia using T-cells. The recent clinical success of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) cells for treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia displays the potential of this new therapeutic modality. In this review, we discuss some of the most promising leukemia antigens and the novel strategies that have been implemented for adoptive cellular immunotherapy of lymphoid and myeloid leukemias. It is important to summarize the data for ACT of leukemia for physicians in-training and in practice and for investigators who work in this and related fields as there are recent discoveries already being translated to the patient setting and numerous accruing clinical trials. We

  10. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Differential Effect of MyD88 Signal in Donor T Cells on Graft-versus-Leukemia Effect and Graft-versus-Host Disease after Experimental Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji-Young; Ryu, Da-Bin; Lee, Sung-Eun; Park, Gyeongsin; Choi, Eun Young; Min, Chang-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Despite the presence of toll like receptor (TLR) expression in conventional TCRαβ T cells, the direct role of TLR signaling via myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) within T lymphocytes on graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains unknown. In the allo-SCT model of C57BL/6 (H-2b) → B6D2F1 (H-2b/d), recipients received transplants of wild type (WT) T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) and splenic T cells from either WT or MyD88 deficient (MyD88KO) donors. Host-type (H-2d) P815 mastocytoma or L1210 leukemia cells were injected either subcutaneously or intravenously to generate a GVHD/GVL model. Allogeneic recipients of MyD88KO T cells demonstrated a greater tumor growth without attenuation of GVHD severity. Moreover, GVHD-induced GVL effect, caused by increasing the conditioning intensity was also not observed in the recipients of MyD88KO T cells. In vitro, the absence of MyD88 in T cells resulted in defective cytolytic activity to tumor targets with reduced ability to produce IFN-γ or granzyme B, which are known to critical for the GVL effect. However, donor T cell expansion with effector and memory T-cell differentiation were more enhanced in GVHD hosts of MyD88KO T cells. Recipients of MyD88KO T cells experienced greater expansion of Foxp3- and IL4-expressing T cells with reduced INF-γ producing T cells in the spleen and tumor-draining lymph nodes early after transplantation. Taken together, these results highlight a differential role for MyD88 deficiency on donor T-cells, with decreased GVL effect without attenuation of the GVHD severity after experimental allo-SCT. PMID:26552489

  12. Differential Effect of MyD88 Signal in Donor T Cells on Graft-versus-Leukemia Effect and Graft-versus-Host Disease after Experimental Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Young; Ryu, Da-Bin; Lee, Sung-Eun; Park, Gyeongsin; Choi, Eun Young; Min, Chang-Ki

    2015-11-01

    Despite the presence of toll like receptor (TLR) expression in conventional TCRαβ T cells, the direct role of TLR signaling via myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) within T lymphocytes on graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains unknown. In the allo-SCT model of C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) → B6D2F1 (H-2(b/d)), recipients received transplants of wild type (WT) T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) and splenic T cells from either WT or MyD88 deficient (MyD88KO) donors. Host-type (H-2(d)) P815 mastocytoma or L1210 leukemia cells were injected either subcutaneously or intravenously to generate a GVHD/GVL model. Allogeneic recipients of MyD88KO T cells demonstrated a greater tumor growth without attenuation of GVHD severity. Moreover, GVHD-induced GVL effect, caused by increasing the conditioning intensity was also not observed in the recipients of MyD88KO T cells. In vitro, the absence of MyD88 in T cells resulted in defective cytolytic activity to tumor targets with reduced ability to produce IFN-γ or granzyme B, which are known to critical for the GVL effect. However, donor T cell expansion with effector and memory T-cell differentiation were more enhanced in GVHD hosts of MyD88KO T cells. Recipients of MyD88KO T cells experienced greater expansion of Foxp3- and IL4-expressing T cells with reduced INF-γ producing T cells in the spleen and tumor-draining lymph nodes early after transplantation. Taken together, these results highlight a differential role for MyD88 deficiency on donor T-cells, with decreased GVL effect without attenuation of the GVHD severity after experimental allo-SCT. PMID:26552489

  13. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukemia? Next Topic Normal bone marrow and blood What is chronic myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... their treatment is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  14. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  15. Targeting Mitochondria with Avocatin B Induces Selective Leukemia Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric A; Angka, Leonard; Rota, Sarah-Grace; Hanlon, Thomas; Mitchell, Andrew; Hurren, Rose; Wang, Xiao Ming; Gronda, Marcela; Boyaci, Ezel; Bojko, Barbara; Minden, Mark; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Datti, Alessandro; Wrana, Jeffery L; Edginton, Andrea; Pawliszyn, Janusz; Joseph, Jamie W; Quadrilatero, Joe; Schimmer, Aaron D; Spagnuolo, Paul A

    2015-06-15

    Treatment regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continue to offer weak clinical outcomes. Through a high-throughput cell-based screen, we identified avocatin B, a lipid derived from avocado fruit, as a novel compound with cytotoxic activity in AML. Avocatin B reduced human primary AML cell viability without effect on normal peripheral blood stem cells. Functional stem cell assays demonstrated selectivity toward AML progenitor and stem cells without effects on normal hematopoietic stem cells. Mechanistic investigations indicated that cytotoxicity relied on mitochondrial localization, as cells lacking functional mitochondria or CPT1, the enzyme that facilitates mitochondria lipid transport, were insensitive to avocatin B. Furthermore, avocatin B inhibited fatty acid oxidation and decreased NADPH levels, resulting in ROS-dependent leukemia cell death characterized by the release of mitochondrial proteins, apoptosis-inducing factor, and cytochrome c. This study reveals a novel strategy for selective leukemia cell eradication based on a specific difference in mitochondrial function. PMID:26077472

  16. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF).

    PubMed

    Nicola, Nicos A; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is the most pleiotropic member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. It utilises a receptor that consists of the LIF receptor β and gp130 and this receptor complex is also used by ciliary neurotrophic growth factor (CNTF), oncostatin M, cardiotrophin1 (CT1) and cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC). Despite common signal transduction mechanisms (JAK/STAT, MAPK and PI3K) LIF can have paradoxically opposite effects in different cell types including stimulating or inhibiting each of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. While LIF can act on a wide range of cell types, LIF knockout mice have revealed that many of these actions are not apparent during ordinary development and that they may be the result of induced LIF expression during tissue damage or injury. Nevertheless LIF does appear to have non-redundant actions in maternal receptivity to blastocyst implantation, placental formation and in the development of the nervous system. LIF has also found practical use in the maintenance of self-renewal and totipotency of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26187859

  17. Comparison of allogeneic stem cell transplantation from familial-mismatched/haploidentical donors and from unrelated donors in adults with high-risk acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung-Sik; Yoon, Jae-Ho; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Lee, Sung-Eun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung; Park, Chong-Won; Kim, Hee-Je

    2012-10-01

    To weigh the pros and cons of familial-mismatched/haploidentical transplantation (FMT) in patients with high-risk acute myelogenous leukemia, we assessed outcomes of 23 patients who underwent FMT, using reduced-intensity conditioning with total body irradiation 800 cGy/busulfan/fludarabine/antithymocyte globulin without ex vivo T cell depletion, compared to 33 patients who underwent well-matched unrelated donor transplantation (WM-UDT) and 13 who underwent partially matched unrelated donor transplantation (PM-UDT) during the same period. The FMT patients had not only a similar pattern of engraftment and immune reconstitution as the WM-UDT and PM-UDT patients but also comparable incidences and severity of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The FMT patients did not experience any form of engraftment failure. However, the cumulative incidence of cytomegalovirus DNAemia was significantly higher in the FMT group compared with the other groups (P = .036). After a median follow-up of 28 months, overall survival, disease-free survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality were 83%, 74%, 20%, and 7%, respectively, for WM-UDT; 51%, 51%, 31%, and 18% for PM-UDT; and 66%, 64%, 26%, and 10% for FMT. This demonstrates a trend for favorable survival outcomes of WM-UDT over FMT and of FMT over PM-UDT. However, we found no significant statistical differences in survival according to donor type. These data need to be interpreted cautiously because of limited power calculations due to the small number of each donor group. This pilot study suggests the feasibility of FMT using our novel regimen with careful evaluation of CMV DNAemia compared with WM-UDT and PM-UDT. Further trials with larger numbers of patients, comparing FMT directly with transplantation with other donor types, are needed. PMID:22516055

  18. Normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia patients with CEBPA double mutation have a favorable prognosis but no survival benefit from allogeneic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Jae-Young; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Lee, Seung-Shin; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Lee, Je-Jung; Kim, Nan Young; Choi, Seung Hyun; Minden, Mark D; Jung, Chul Won; Jang, Jun-Ho; Kim, Hee Je; Moon, Joon Ho; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Won, Jong-Ho; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Dennis Dong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia (NK-AML) with CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (CEBPA) mutations is known to have a more favorable prognosis. However, direct comparison of the clinical significance according to consolidation therapy has not been widely performed in patients with NK-AML. A total of 404 patients with NK-AML who received intensive induction chemotherapy were included in the present study. Diagnostic samples from the patients were evaluated for CEBPA mutations by direct sequencing. CEBPA single (sm) or double mutation (dm) was observed in 27 (6.7 %) and 51 (12.6 %) patients, respectively. CEBPA (dm) was associated with GATA2 (mut), and it was less frequently associated with FLT3-ITD(pos), NPM1 (mut), and DNMT3A (mut) in comparison with CEBPA (wild) or CEBPA (sm) (all p values <0.05). On multivariate analysis, CEBPA (dm) (p = 0.007, OR 39.593) was an independent risk factor for achievement of complete remission (CR). With a median follow-up of 40.1 months, CEBPA (dm) showed a favorable overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and lower relapse incidence (RI) in comparison with CEBPA (wild) (all p values <0.005). Comparison of clinical outcome analyses (consolidation chemotherapy vs. allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT)) demonstrated the role of consolidation treatment in patients with CEBPA (dm). Allogeneic HCT was associated with lower EFS and RI and a trend of higher non-relapse mortality. However, there was no statistically significant difference in OS. In conclusion, CEBPA (dm) was associated with other molecular mutations. Consolidation chemotherapy alone may overcome higher relapse rates by reducing the treatment mortality and increasing survival after relapse events in patients with CEBPA (dm) in NK-AML. PMID:26537612

  19. Quantification of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Clonotypes in Leukapheresed Peripheral Blood Progenitor Cells Predicts Relapse Risk after Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mannis, Gabriel N; Martin, Thomas G; Damon, Lloyd E; Andreadis, Charalambos; Olin, Rebecca L; Kong, Katherine A; Faham, Malek; Hwang, Jimmy; Ai, Weiyun Z; Gaensler, Karin M L; Sayre, Peter H; Wolf, Jeffrey L; Logan, Aaron C

    2016-06-01

    Since the incorporation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors into the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the notion that all patients with "high-risk" ALL uniformly require allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has received increasing scrutiny. Although multiple studies have shown superiority of alloHCT over autologous (auto) hematopoietic cell transplantation for high-risk patients, these findings may be explained, in part, by contamination of the peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) leukapheresis product by residual leukemic cells in patients undergoing autoHCT. We retrospectively evaluated minimal residual disease (MRD) using next-generation sequencing (NGS) in the PBPC leukapheresis product of 32 ALL patients who underwent autoHCT. Twenty-eight patients (88%) had diagnostic samples with quantifiable immunoreceptor rearrangements to follow for MRD. Twelve (38%) patients had Ph+ B-ALL, 12 (38%) had Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph-) B-ALL, and 4 (14%) had T cell ALL. With a median follow-up of 41 months (range, 3 to 217), median relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival for the entire cohort were 3.2 and 4.2 years, respectively; at 5 years after transplantation, 42% of patients remain alive and relapse free. Using MRD detection at a threshold of ≥ 1 × 10(-6), median RFS for patients with detectable MRD was 6.5 months and was not reached for patients without detectable disease (P = .0005). In multivariate analysis, the only factor significantly associated with relapse was the presence of MRD ≥1 × 10(-6) (odds ratio, 23.8; confidence interval, 1.8 to 312.9; P = .0158). Our findings suggest that NGS for MRD detection can predict long-term RFS in patients undergoing autoHCT for high-risk ALL. PMID:26899561

  20. Acute myelogenous leukemia cells with the MLL-ELL translocation convert morphologically and functionally into adherent myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Haruko; Mizutani-Noguchi, Mitsuho; Shirasaki, Ryosuke

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow-myofibroblasts, a major component of bone marrow-stroma, are reported to originate from hematopoietic stem cells. We show in this paper that non-adherent leukemia blasts can change into myofibroblasts. When myeloblasts from two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with a fusion product comprising mixed lineage leukemia and RNA polymerase II elongation factor, were cultured long term, their morphology changed to that of myofibroblasts with similar molecular characteristics to the parental myeloblasts. The original leukemia blasts, when cultured on the leukemia blast-derived myofibroblasts, grew extensively. Leukemia blasts can create their own microenvironment for proliferation.

  1. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for pediatric mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with non-L3 morphology and MLL-AF9 gene fusion: three case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sarashina, Takeo; Iwabuchi, Haruko; Miyagawa, Naoyuki; Sekimizu, Masahiro; Yokosuka, Tomoko; Fukuda, Kunio; Hamanoue, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Fuminori; Goto, Shoko; Shiomi, Masae; Imai, Chihaya; Goto, Hiroaki

    2016-07-01

    Mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is typically associated with French-American-British (FAB)-L3 morphology and MYC gene rearrangement. However, rare cases of mature B-ALL with non-L3 morphology and MLL-AF9 fusion have been reported, and such cases are characterized by a rapid and aggressive clinical course. We here report three such cases of pediatric mature B-ALL in female patients respectively aged 15 months, 4 years, and 4 months. Bone marrow smears at diagnosis showed FAB-L1 morphology in all patients. Immunophenotypically, they were positive for cluster of differentiation (CD)10, CD19, CD20 (or CD22), Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR, and surface immunoglobulin λ. No evidence of MYC rearrangement was detected in any of the cases by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. However, MLL rearrangement was detected by FISH, and MLL-AF9 fusion was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. All patients achieved complete remission after conventional chemotherapy and subsequently underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as high-risk ALL; patient 3 for infantile ALL with MLL rearrangement and the others for ALL with MLL rearrangement and hyperleukocytosis (white blood cell count at diagnosis >50 × 10(9)/L). At the latest follow-up for each case (12-98 months post-transplantation), complete remission was maintained. Moreover, we discuss the clinical, genetic, and immunophenotypic features of this rare disease. PMID:27084248

  2. Prediction of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Related Mortality- Lessons Learned from the In-Silico Approach: A European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Acute Leukemia Working Party Data Mining Study

    PubMed Central

    Shouval, Roni; Labopin, Myriam; Unger, Ron; Giebel, Sebastian; Ciceri, Fabio; Schmid, Christoph; Esteve, Jordi; Baron, Frederic; Gorin, Norbert Claude; Savani, Bipin; Shimoni, Avichai; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2016-01-01

    Models for prediction of allogeneic hematopoietic stem transplantation (HSCT) related mortality partially account for transplant risk. Improving predictive accuracy requires understating of prediction limiting factors, such as the statistical methodology used, number and quality of features collected, or simply the population size. Using an in-silico approach (i.e., iterative computerized simulations), based on machine learning (ML) algorithms, we set out to analyze these factors. A cohort of 25,923 adult acute leukemia patients from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) registry was analyzed. Predictive objective was non-relapse mortality (NRM) 100 days following HSCT. Thousands of prediction models were developed under varying conditions: increasing sample size, specific subpopulations and an increasing number of variables, which were selected and ranked by separate feature selection algorithms. Depending on the algorithm, predictive performance plateaued on a population size of 6,611–8,814 patients, reaching a maximal area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.67. AUCs’ of models developed on specific subpopulation ranged from 0.59 to 0.67 for patients in second complete remission and receiving reduced intensity conditioning, respectively. Only 3–5 variables were necessary to achieve near maximal AUCs. The top 3 ranking variables, shared by all algorithms were disease stage, donor type, and conditioning regimen. Our findings empirically demonstrate that with regards to NRM prediction, few variables “carry the weight” and that traditional HSCT data has been “worn out”. “Breaking through” the predictive boundaries will likely require additional types of inputs. PMID:26942424

  3. Changes in Caspase-3, B Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma-2, Interleukin-6, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene Expression after Human Umbilical Cord Blood Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transfusion in Pulmonary Hypertension Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwan Chang; Lee, Jae Chul; Lee, Hyeryon; Cho, Min-Sun; Choi, Soo Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Failure of vascular smooth muscle apoptosis and inflammatory response in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a current research focus. The goals of this study were to determine changes in select gene expressions in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH rat models after human umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) transfusion. Materials and Methods The rats were separated into 3 groups i.e., control group (C group), M group (MCT 60 mg/kg), and U group (hUCB-MSCs transfusion) a week after MCT injection. Results TUNEL assay showed that the U group had significantly lowered positive apoptotic cells in the lung tissues, as compared with the M group. mRNA of caspase-3, B cell leukemia/lymphoma (Bcl)-2, interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the lung tissues were greatly reduced at week 4 in the U group. Immunohistochemical staining of the lung tissues also demonstrated a similar pattern, with the exception of IL-6. The protein expression of caspase-3, Bcl-2 VEGF, IL-6, TNF-α and brain natriuretic peptide in the heart tissues were significantly lower in the U group, as compared with the M group at week 2. Furthermore, the protein expression of VEGF, IL-6 and BNP in the heart tissues were significantly lower in the U group at week 4. Collagen content in the heart tissues was significantly lower in the U group, as compared with M group at weeks 2 and 4, respectively. Conclusion hUCB-MSCs could prevent inflammation, apoptosis and remodeling in MCT-induced PAH rat models. PMID:26798389

  4. Prediction of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Related Mortality- Lessons Learned from the In-Silico Approach: A European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Acute Leukemia Working Party Data Mining Study.

    PubMed

    Shouval, Roni; Labopin, Myriam; Unger, Ron; Giebel, Sebastian; Ciceri, Fabio; Schmid, Christoph; Esteve, Jordi; Baron, Frederic; Gorin, Norbert Claude; Savani, Bipin; Shimoni, Avichai; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2016-01-01

    Models for prediction of allogeneic hematopoietic stem transplantation (HSCT) related mortality partially account for transplant risk. Improving predictive accuracy requires understating of prediction limiting factors, such as the statistical methodology used, number and quality of features collected, or simply the population size. Using an in-silico approach (i.e., iterative computerized simulations), based on machine learning (ML) algorithms, we set out to analyze these factors. A cohort of 25,923 adult acute leukemia patients from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) registry was analyzed. Predictive objective was non-relapse mortality (NRM) 100 days following HSCT. Thousands of prediction models were developed under varying conditions: increasing sample size, specific subpopulations and an increasing number of variables, which were selected and ranked by separate feature selection algorithms. Depending on the algorithm, predictive performance plateaued on a population size of 6,611-8,814 patients, reaching a maximal area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.67. AUCs' of models developed on specific subpopulation ranged from 0.59 to 0.67 for patients in second complete remission and receiving reduced intensity conditioning, respectively. Only 3-5 variables were necessary to achieve near maximal AUCs. The top 3 ranking variables, shared by all algorithms were disease stage, donor type, and conditioning regimen. Our findings empirically demonstrate that with regards to NRM prediction, few variables "carry the weight" and that traditional HSCT data has been "worn out". "Breaking through" the predictive boundaries will likely require additional types of inputs. PMID:26942424

  5. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  7. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  8. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)

    MedlinePlus

    CLL; Leukemia - chronic lymphocytic (CLL) ... Byrd JC, Flynn JM. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  9. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Leukemia This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... not listed here. Drugs Approved for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Arranon (Nelarabine) Asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi ...

  10. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  11. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  12. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate in the treatment of intractable chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaoyu; Li, Shaoguang

    2014-01-01

    In a significant proportion of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, resistance to BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors develops due to acquisition of BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations and insensitivity of leukemia stem cells to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate (formerly called homoharringtonine) is a natural alkaloid that inhibits protein synthesis and induces cell death. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat patients with chronic myeloid leukemia who failed to respond to multiple tyrosine kinase inhibitors and/or acquired the BCR-ABL-T315I mutation. In this review, we discuss the use and effectiveness of omacetaxine mepesuccinate in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia, with coverage of its pharmacology, mode of action, and pharmacokinetics. We believe that omacetaxine mepesuccinate will be beneficial to many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia who do not respond well to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:24516334

  13. A Safety and Tolerability Study of CDX-301 With or Without Plerixafor for Stem Cell Mobilization in Matched Related Allogeneic Donor/Recipient Sibling Transplant Pairs

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-23

    For Donors:; Related Donors Giving Peripheral Blood Stem Cells (PBSC) to a Sibling; For Recipients:; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkins Disease (HD); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  14. [The infant with leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kamps, W A; Sjamsoedin-Visser, E J; van Wering, E R

    1988-04-01

    Infant leukemia is rare and especially in newborn leukemoid reactions should be excluded by careful cytogenetic analysis before starting cytotoxic therapy. Infants have either acute lymphoblastic leukemia, monoblastic leukemia or acute undifferentiated leukemia. At present they have a bad outlook due to many coinciding unfavorable initial disease characteristics: high leukocyte count, liver and spleen enlargement, meningeal involvement, no expression of common ALL antigen, and a high frequency of pseudodiploid cells, that is with a translocation 4;II. The immaturity of organs and systems makes it difficult to treat these infants, and requires optimal supportive care. Therapeutic protocols for prospective clinical trials for leukemia in this age group are urgently needed. PMID:3287687

  15. Association of acute myeloid leukemia's most immature phenotype with risk groups and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Jonathan M; Zeidner, Joshua F; Morse, Sarah; Blackford, Amanda L; Perkins, Brandy; Yanagisawa, Breann; Zhang, Hao; Morsberger, Laura; Karp, Judith; Ning, Yi; Gocke, Christopher D; Rosner, Gary L; Smith, B Douglas; Jones, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    The precise phenotype and biology of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells remain controversial, in part because the "gold standard" immunodeficient mouse engraftment assay fails in a significant fraction of patients and identifies multiple cell-types in others. We sought to analyze the clinical utility of a novel assay for putative leukemia stem cells in a large prospective cohort. The leukemic clone's most primitive hematopoietic cellular phenotype was prospectively identified in 109 newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients, and analyzed against clinical risk groups and outcomes. Most (80/109) patients harbored CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells. The CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells in 47 of the 80 patients displayed intermediate aldehyde dehydrogenase expression, while normal CD34(+)CD38(-) hematopoietic stem cells expressed high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase. In the other 33/80 patients, the CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells exhibited high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and most (28/33, 85%) harbored poor-risk cytogenetics or FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem translocations. No CD34(+) leukemia cells could be detected in 28/109 patients, including 14/21 patients with nucleophosmin-1 mutations and 6/7 acute promyelocytic leukemia patients. The patients with CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity manifested a significantly lower complete remission rate, as well as poorer event-free and overall survivals. The leukemic clone's most immature phenotype was heterogeneous with respect to CD34, CD38, and ALDH expression, but correlated with acute myeloid leukemia risk groups and outcomes. The strong clinical correlations suggest that the most immature phenotype detectable in the leukemia might serve as a biomarker for "clinically-relevant" leukemia stem cells. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01349972. PMID:26819054

  16. Low calcium culture condition induces mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in normal human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Murakami, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Okano, Teruo

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Normal human epidermal keratinocytes serially cultured under low calcium concentration were cytokeratin and vimentin double positive cells. {yields} The human keratinocytes expressed some epithelial stem/progenitor cell makers, mesenchymal cell markers, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. {yields} Mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in the keratinocytes was suppressed under high-calcium condition. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular phenomenon in organ developments, cancer invasions, and wound healing, and many types of transformed cell lines are used for investigating for molecular mechanisms of EMT. However, there are few reports for EMT in normal human epithelial cells, which are non-transformed or non-immortalized cells, in vitro. Therefore, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) serially cultured in low-calcium concentration medium (LCM) were used for investigating relations between differentiation and proliferation and mesenchymal-like phenotype in the present study, since long-term cultivation of NHEK is achieved in LCM. Interestingly, NHEK serially cultured in LCM consisted essentially of cytokeratin-vimentin double positive cells (98%), although the NHEK exhibited differentiation under high-calcium culture condition with 3T3 feeder layer. The vimentin expression was suppressed under high-calcium condition. These results may indicate the importance of mesenchymal-like phenotype for serially cultivation of NHEK in vitro.

  17. A Case of Congenital Leukemia Cutis

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jae; Kim, Yong Seok; Yu, Hee Joon

    2008-01-01

    Congenital leukemia is a rare condition diagnosed at birth to 6 weeks of life with an estimated incidence of 4.7 per million live births. In a review, about 25~30% of cases were well documented as leukemia cutis. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant presented with asymptomatic multiple erythematous to bluish patches and nodules, which had developed about two months ago. Biopsy of the cutaneous lesions revealed immature cells which are overall monotonous with large kidney shaped nucleus, prominent nucleoli and moderate cytoplasm. These atypical cells stained positive for leukocyte common antigen, lysozyme and CD68. With this result, a congenital leukemia cutis was diagnosed. Six months later, she underwent cord blood stem cell transplantation. Seven months after the cord blood stem cell transplantation, the bone marrow examination revealed a normal result. Leukemia can be presented in the skin, the eruption may be nonspecific and it may precede systemic involvement. The recognition is important because early diagnosis can lead to appropriate treatment, followed by better prognosis. PMID:27303164

  18. Chronic myeloid leukemia: reminiscences and dreams

    PubMed Central

    Mughal, Tariq I.; Radich, Jerald P.; Deininger, Michael W.; Apperley, Jane F.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Harrison, Christine J.; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cortes, Jorge; Daley, George Q.

    2016-01-01

    With the deaths of Janet Rowley and John Goldman in December 2013, the world lost two pioneers in the field of chronic myeloid leukemia. In 1973, Janet Rowley, unraveled the cytogenetic anatomy of the Philadelphia chromosome, which subsequently led to the identification of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene and its principal pathogenetic role in the development of chronic myeloid leukemia. This work was also of major importance to support the idea that cytogenetic changes were drivers of leukemogenesis. John Goldman originally made seminal contributions to the use of autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation from the late 1970s onwards. Then, in collaboration with Brian Druker, he led efforts to develop ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the late 1990s. He also led the global efforts to develop and harmonize methodology for molecular monitoring, and was an indefatigable organizer of international conferences. These conferences brought together clinicians and scientists, and accelerated the adoption of new therapies. The abundance of praise, tributes and testimonies expressed by many serve to illustrate the indelible impressions these two passionate and affable scholars made on so many people’s lives. This tribute provides an outline of the remarkable story of chronic myeloid leukemia, and in writing it, it is clear that the historical triumph of biomedical science over this leukemia cannot be considered without appreciating the work of both Janet Rowley and John Goldman. PMID:27132280

  19. Chronic myeloid leukemia: reminiscences and dreams.

    PubMed

    Mughal, Tariq I; Radich, Jerald P; Deininger, Michael W; Apperley, Jane F; Hughes, Timothy P; Harrison, Christine J; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cortes, Jorge; Daley, George Q

    2016-05-01

    With the deaths of Janet Rowley and John Goldman in December 2013, the world lost two pioneers in the field of chronic myeloid leukemia. In 1973, Janet Rowley, unraveled the cytogenetic anatomy of the Philadelphia chromosome, which subsequently led to the identification of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene and its principal pathogenetic role in the development of chronic myeloid leukemia. This work was also of major importance to support the idea that cytogenetic changes were drivers of leukemogenesis. John Goldman originally made seminal contributions to the use of autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation from the late 1970s onwards. Then, in collaboration with Brian Druker, he led efforts to develop ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the late 1990s. He also led the global efforts to develop and harmonize methodology for molecular monitoring, and was an indefatigable organizer of international conferences. These conferences brought together clinicians and scientists, and accelerated the adoption of new therapies. The abundance of praise, tributes and testimonies expressed by many serve to illustrate the indelible impressions these two passionate and affable scholars made on so many people's lives. This tribute provides an outline of the remarkable story of chronic myeloid leukemia, and in writing it, it is clear that the historical triumph of biomedical science over this leukemia cannot be considered without appreciating the work of both Janet Rowley and John Goldman. PMID:27132280

  20. Risk factors for relapse after allogeneic transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Janssen, Jeroen J.W.M.; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a clonal neoplasm derived from myeloid progenitor cells with a varying outcome. The initial goal of treatment is the achievement of complete remission, defined for over 40 years by morphology. However, without additional post-remission treatment the majority of patients relapse. In many cases of acute myeloid leukemia, allogeneic stem cell transplantation offers the best prospects of cure. In 2013, 5608 stem cell transplantations in acute myeloid leukemia were performed in Europe (5228 allogeneic and 380 autologous stem cell transplantations). Most stem cell transplantations are performed in first complete remission. However, despite a considerable reduction in the chance of relapse, in most studies, overall survival benefit of allogeneic stem cell transplantation is modest due to substantial non-relapse mortality. Here we discuss the many factors related to the risk of relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:26721801

  1. PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

  2. More Chemotherapy May Help after Initial Treatment for Childhood Leukemia Fails

    Cancer.gov

    A study suggests that at least some children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who respond poorly to initial chemotherapy may do better if they receive additional chemotherapy rather than a stem cell transplant.

  3. Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia: Focus on Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Mrinal M; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2016-02-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a clonal stem cell disorder with features that overlap those of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia often results in peripheral blood monocytosis and has an inherent tendency to transform to acute myeloid leukemia. Clonal cytogenetic changes are seen in approximately 30% of patients, and molecular abnormalities are seen in more than 90%. Gene mutations involving TET2 (∼60%), SRSF2 (∼50%), ASXL1 (∼40%), and RAS (∼30%) are frequent, with nonsense and frameshift ASXL1 mutations being the only mutations identified thus far to have an independent negative prognostic effect on overall survival. Contemporary molecularly integrated prognostic models (inclusive of ASXL1 mutations) include the Molecular Mayo Model and the Groupe Français des Myélodysplasies model. Given the lack of formal treatment and response criteria, management of CMML is often extrapolated from MDS and MPN, with allogeneic stem cell transplant being the only curative option. Hydroxyurea and other cytoreductive agents have been used to control MPN-like features, while epigenetic modifiers such as hypomethylating agents have been used for MDS-like features. Given the relatively poor response to these agents and the inherent risks associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplant, newer drugs exploiting molecular and epigenetic abnormalities in CMML are being developed. The creation of CMML-specific response criteria is a much needed step in order to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:26848006

  4. NUP98-PHF23 is a chromatin-modifying oncoprotein that causes a wide array of leukemias sensitive to inhibition of PHD histone reader function.

    PubMed

    Gough, Sheryl M; Lee, Fan; Yang, Fan; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yeulin J; Pineda, Marbin; Onozawa, Masahiro; Chung, Yang Jo; Bilke, Sven; Wagner, Elise K; Denu, John M; Ning, Yi; Xu, Bowen; Wang, Gang Greg; Meltzer, Paul S; Aplan, Peter D

    2014-05-01

    In this report, we show that expression of a NUP98-PHF23 (NP23) fusion, associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in humans, leads to myeloid, erythroid, T-cell, and B-cell leukemia in mice. The leukemic and preleukemic tissues display a stem cell-like expression signature, including Hoxa, Hoxb, and Meis1 genes. The PHF23 plant homeodomain (PHD) motif is known to bind to H3K4me3 residues, and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the NP23 protein binds to chromatin at a specific subset of H3K4me3 sites, including at Hoxa, Hoxb, and Meis1. Treatment of NP23 cells with disulfiram, which inhibits the binding of PHD motifs to H3K4me3, rapidly and selectively killed NP23-expressing myeloblasts; cell death was preceded by decreased expression of Hoxa, Hoxb, and Meis1. Furthermore, AML driven by a related fusion gene, NUP98-JARID1A (NJL), was also sensitive to disulfiram. Thus, the NP23 mouse provides a platform to evaluate compounds that disrupt binding of oncogenic PHD proteins to H3K4me3. PMID:24535671

  5. What You Need to Know about Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Leukemia This booklet is about leukemia. Leukemia is cancer of the blood and bone marrow ( ... This book covers: Basics about blood cells and leukemia Types of doctors who treat leukemia Treatments for ...

  6. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood, and lymphoid tissue What is chronic lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in the ...

  7. A Phase I Study of Reduced-Intensity Conditioning and Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Followed by Dose Escalation of Targeted Consolidation Immunotherapy with Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Children and Adolescents with CD33(+) Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zahler, Stacey; Bhatia, Monica; Ricci, Angela; Roy, Sumith; Morris, Erin; Harrison, Lauren; van de Ven, Carmella; Fabricatore, Sandra; Wolownik, Karen; Cooney-Qualter, Erin; Baxter-Lowe, Lee Ann; Luisi, Paul; Militano, Olga; Kletzel, Morris; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2016-04-01

    Myeloablative conditioning and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (alloHSCT) in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1) may be associated with significant acute toxicity and late effects. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and alloHSCT in children is safe, feasible, and may be associated with less adverse effects. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) induces a response in 30% of patients with CD33(+) relapsed/refractory AML. The dose of GO is significantly lower when combined with chemotherapy. We examined the feasibility and toxicity of RIC alloHSCT followed by GO targeted immunotherapy in children with CD33(+) AML in CR1/CR2. Conditioning consisted of fludarabine 30 mg/m(2) × 6 days, busulfan 3.2 to 4 mg/kg × 2 days ± rabbit antithymocyte globulin 2 mg/kg × 4 days followed by alloHSCT from matched related/unrelated donors. GO was administered ≥60 days after alloHSCT in 2 doses (8 weeks apart), following a dose-escalation design (4.5, 6, 7.5, and 9 mg/m(2)). Fourteen patients with average risk AML received RIC alloHSCT and post-GO consolidation: median age 13.5 years at transplant (range, 1 to 21), male-to-female 8:6, and disease status at alloHSCT 11 CR1 and 3 CR2. Eleven patients received alloHSCT from 5-6/6 HLA-matched family donors: 8 received peripheral blood stem cells, 2 received bone marrow, and 1 received related cord blood transplantation. Three patients received an unrelated allograft (two 4-5/6 and one 9/10) from unrelated cord blood unit and bone marrow, respectively. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment was observed in all assessable patients (100%), achieved at median 15.5 days (range, 7 to 31) and 21 days (range, 10 to 52), respectively. Three patients received GO at dose level 1 (4.5 mg/m(2) per dose), 5 at dose level 2 (6 mg/m(2) per dose), 3 at dose level 3 (7.5 mg/m(2) per dose), and 3 at dose level 4 (9 mg/m(2) per dose). Three of 14 patients received only 1 dose of GO after

  8. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Burning Fat Fuels Leukemic Stem Cell Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-07-01

    Obese leukemia patients exhibit reduced survival after chemotherapy, suggesting an important role of adipose tissue in disease progression. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Ye et al. (2016) reveal metabolic heterogeneity in leukemic stem cell (LSC) subpopulations and show that chemotherapy-resistant CD36+ LSCs co-opt gonadal adipose tissue to support their metabolism and survival. PMID:27392217

  10. [Hairy cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, S; Andrulis, M; Zenz, T

    2015-04-01

    Hairy cell leukemia was initially described as a distinct entity in 1958. It is rare B-cell malignancy characterized by an indolent course. Advances in the treatment and understanding of the biology of hairy cell leukemia have made the disease exquisitely amenable to treatment. This review summarizes the present understanding of hairy cell leukemia with a particular focus on the development of novel and targeted approaches to treatment. PMID:25787322

  11. Neuroimaging in Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Stein, Joel; Mohan, Suyash

    2016-08-01

    Leukemias are a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies that results from uncontrolled neoplastic proliferation of undifferentiated or partially differentiated hematopoietic cells. Patients with acute leukemia can have a variety of craniocerebral complications, which can result from direct leukemic involvement, secondary to cerebrovascular or infectious complications of leukemia, or can be treatment related. Imaging plays a central role in evaluating the central nervous system during treatment in patients with leukemia. CT scan is usually considered an effective initial imaging modality to evaluate for cerebrovascular complications. MRI is considered the imaging modality of choice due to its versatility. PMID:27443999

  12. Peruvoside, a Cardiac Glycoside, Induces Primitive Myeloid Leukemia Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qian; Leong, Wa Seng; Liu, Liang; Chan, Wai-In

    2016-01-01

    Despite the available chemotherapy and treatment, leukemia remains a difficult disease to cure due to frequent relapses after treatment. Among the heterogeneous leukemic cells, a rare population referred as the leukemic stem cell (LSC), is thought to be responsible for relapses and drug resistance. Cardiac glycosides (CGs) have been used in treating heart failure despite its toxicity. Recently, increasing evidence has demonstrated its new usage as a potential anti-cancer drug. Ouabain, one of the CGs, specifically targeted CD34⁺CD38(-) leukemic stem-like cells, but not the more mature CD34⁺CD38⁺ leukemic cells, making this type of compounds a potential treatment for leukemia. In search of other potential anti-leukemia CGs, we found that Peruvoside, a less studied CG, is more effective than Ouabain and Digitoxin at inducing cell death in primitive myeloid leukemia cells without obvious cytotoxicity on normal blood cells. Similar to Ouabain and Digitoxin, Peruvoside also caused cell cycle arrest at G₂/M stage. It up-regulates CDKN1A expression and activated the cleavage of Caspase 3, 8 and PARP, resulting in apoptosis. Thus, Peruvoside showed potent anti-leukemia effect, which may serve as a new anti-leukemia agent in the future. PMID:27110755

  13. Optimizing Management of Patients with Adult T Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yared, Jean A.; Kimball, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma is a rare disease with a high mortality rate, and is challenging for the clinician. Early allogeneic stem cell transplant can confer durable remission. As novel therapeutic agents become available to treat T cell malignancies, it is increasingly important that medical oncologists, hematologists, and hematopathologists recognize and accurately diagnose adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. There is no uniform standard of treatment of adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma, and clinical trials remain critical to improving outcomes. Here we present one management approach based on the recent advances in treatment for adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma patients. PMID:26610571

  14. Paneth cell-like change in benign prostate can account for P504S (AMACR) reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Iczkowski, Kenneth A

    2014-01-01

    Paneth cell-like neuroendocrine metaplasia of benign and cancerous prostate was described in 1992. Here, we note that P504S (AMACR), the cytoplasmic marker for prostate cancer used alone or in concert with basal cell markers, can be strongly reactive in benign prostatic acini with Paneth cell-like change. PMID:25031776

  15. [Research Progress on the Role of Chromatin Remodeling Factor BRG1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia].

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuo; Xu, Xue-Jing; Zhang, Kui

    2016-06-01

    BRG1 (Brahma-related gene 1, BRG1) is the ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes, which plays an important role in cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and tumor development. Unlike the evidence as tumor suppressor genes in the past reports, latest researches show that BRG1 plays an important role in sustaining the growth of leukemia cells in acute myeloid leukemia, and these effects on normal hematopoietic stem cells are dispensable. Further studies of the role and mechanism of BRG1 in acute myeloid leukemia will contribute to the development of a new and promising targeted therapy strategy. This article reviews the role of BRG1 on leukemia cells and leukemia stem cells in AML and discusses the related mechanism, which providing some reference for the targeted treatment strategy of AML. PMID:27342536

  16. Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2005-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies have become part of standard cancer treatment. Chimeric and humanized antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumors. Although the humanized anti-CD33 antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with b-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45, and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukemic therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conversely, a-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumor cell kill while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33- calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions in relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. T-cell recognition of peptide antigens presented on the cell surface in combination with major histocompatibility complex antigen provides another potentially promising approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:16091194

  17. The Family Leukemia Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Eleanor

    1976-01-01

    An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

  18. The leukemic stem cell

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Craig T.

    2007-01-01

    Malignant stem cells have recently been described as the source of several types of human cancer. These unique cell types are typically rare and possess properties that are distinct from most other tumor cells. The properties of leukemic stem cells indicate that current chemotherapy drugs will not be effective. The use of current cytotoxic agents is not effective in leukemia because the agents target both the leukemic and normal stem cell populations. Consequently, new strategies are required that specifically and preferentially target the malignant stem cell population, while sparing normal stem cells. Several well known agents are lethal for the leukemic stem cell in preclinical testing. They include parthenolide, commonly known as feverfew, and TDZD-8. They have undergone various levels of preclinical development, but have not been used in patients as yet in the cancer setting. These drugs and combinations of existing therapies that target the leukemic stem cell population may provide a cure in this disease. This article summarizes recent findings in the leukemic stem cell field and discusses new directions for therapy. PMID:17336250

  19. Novel Therapies for Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fullmer, Amber; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of salvage therapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor. Salvage therapy mimics regimens with activity in newly diagnosed ALL. Novel strategies under investigation as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy improve the treatment of relapsed disease. For some ALL subsets, specific therapies are indicated. The addition of targeted therapy in Philadelphia chromosome–positive ALL has improved responses in relapsed patients without resistance to available tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Nelarabine demonstrates activity as monotherapy in T-cell ALL and is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Clofarabine, a second-generation purine analogue approved in pediatric leukemia, has shown activity in adult acute leukemias including ALL and acute myeloid leukemia. The role of pegaspargase in adult ALL requires further investigation. The benefit of matched related-donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation is significant for standard-risk ALL but not for high-risk ALL. Development of new drugs and agents tailored to subset-specific cytogenetic-molecular characteristics remains vital to success in treating adult ALL. PMID:20425428

  20. Eliminating Cancer Stem Cells in CML with Combination Transcriptional Therapy.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Luis A; Steidl, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are resistant to current therapies used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Abraham et al. (2016) have identified a molecular network critical for CML LSC survival and propose that simultaneously targeting two of their major transcriptional regulators, p53 and c-Myc, may facilitate their eradication. PMID:27392220

  1. Induction of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haojian; Li, Shaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder derived from a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), harboring Philadelphia chromosome (Ph chromosome). Formation of the Ph chromosome is caused by a reciprocal translocation between the chromosomes 9 and 22 t(9;22)(q34;q11), resulting in a fusion protein known as BCR-ABL which has constitutive tyrosine kinase activity and promotes the proliferation of leukemia cells via multiple mechanisms. Studies on CML have led to the identification of the first cancer-associated chromosomal abnormality and the subsequent development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that inhibit BCR-ABL kinase activity in CML. It has become clear that leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in CML are insensitive to inhibition by TKIs, and eradication of LSCs appears to be difficult. Therefore, some of the major issues in current CML therapy are to understand the biology of LSCs and to investigate why LSCs are insensitive to TKIs for developing curative therapeutic strategies. In this regard, application of mouse models recapitulating human CML disease will be critical. In this chapter, we describe methods for induction of CML in mice with BCR-ABL. PMID:27581135

  2. Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-30

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. STEM, STEM Education, STEMmania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Mark

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author introduces integrative STEM (science, technology, engineering, and/or mathematics) education and discusses the importance of the program. The notion of integrative STEM education includes approaches that explore teaching and learning between/among any two or more of the STEM subject areas, and/or between a STEM subject…

  5. Leukemia inhibitory factor protects cholangiocarcinoma cells from drug-induced apoptosis via a PI3K/AKT-dependent Mcl-1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Brivio, Simone; Vismara, Marta; Stecca, Tommaso; Massani, Marco; Bassi, Nicolò; Furlanetto, Alberto; Joplin, Ruth Elizabeth; Floreani, Annarosa; Fabris, Luca; Strazzabosco, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is an aggressive, strongly chemoresistant liver malignancy. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), an IL-6 family cytokine, promotes progression of various carcinomas. To investigate the role of LIF in cholangiocarcinoma, we evaluated the expression of LIF and its receptor (LIFR) in human samples. LIF secretion and LIFR expression were assessed in established and primary human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines. In cholangiocarcinoma cells, we tested LIF effects on proliferation, invasion, stem cell-like phenotype, chemotherapy-induced apoptosis (gemcitabine+cisplatin), expression levels of pro-apoptotic (Bax) and anti-apoptotic (Mcl-1) proteins, with/without PI3K inhibition, and of pSTAT3, pERK1/2, pAKT. LIF effect on chemotherapy-induced apoptosis was evaluated after LIFR silencing and Mcl-1 inactivation. Results show that LIF and LIFR expression were higher in neoplastic than in control cholangiocytes; LIF was also expressed by tumor stromal cells. LIF had no effects on cholangiocarcinoma cell proliferation, invasion, and stemness signatures, whilst it counteracted drug-induced apoptosis. Upon LIF stimulation, decreased apoptosis was associated with Mcl-1 and pAKT up-regulation and abolished by PI3K inhibition. LIFR silencing and Mcl-1 blockade restored drug-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, autocrine and paracrine LIF signaling promote chemoresistance in cholangiocarcinoma by up-regulating Mcl-1 via a novel STAT3- and MAPK-independent, PI3K/AKT-dependent pathway. Targeting LIF signaling may increase CCA responsiveness to chemotherapy. PMID:26296968

  6. [Chronic myelogenous leukemia: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Demeter, Judit; Poros, Anna; Bödör, Csaba; Horváth, Laura; Masszi, Tamás

    2016-09-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasm caused by reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes 9 and 22 resulting in the expression of a constitutively activated BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase that leads to the malignant transformation of the hematopoietic stem cells. The condition was previously known as a relentlessly progressive disease, but the treatment was revolutionalized by the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Therapeutic success is thus currently determined by the depth of molecular response achieved on therapy. Multiple tyrosine kinase agents are available even for the first line treatment. This guideline summarizes current focal points of the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia specific to Hungary and provides definitions for optimal molecular responses in this condition. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(37), 1459-1468. PMID:27615196

  7. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Induction of Functional Hair-Cell-Like Cells from Mouse Cochlear Multipotent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quanwen; Shen, Yi; Chen, Jiarong; Ding, Jie; Tang, Zihua; Zhang, Cui; Chen, Jianling; Li, Liang; Chen, Ping; Wang, Jinfu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we developed a two-step-induction method of generating functional hair cells from inner ear multipotent cells. Multipotent cells from the inner ear were established and induced initially into progenitor cells committed to the inner ear cell lineage on the poly-L-lysine substratum. Subsequently, the committed progenitor cells were cultured on the mitotically inactivated chicken utricle stromal cells and induced into hair-cell-like cells containing characteristic stereocilia bundles. The hair-cell-like cells exhibited rapid permeation of FM1-43FX. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to measure the membrane currents of cells differentiated for 7 days on chicken utricle stromal cells and analyze the biophysical properties of the hair-cell-like cells by recording membrane properties of cells. The results suggested that the hair-cell-like cells derived from inner ear multipotent cells were functional following differentiation in an enabling environment. PMID:27057177

  9. Dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashri, Nahid Y.; Ajlan, Sumaiah A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors. PMID:26620980

  10. Advances in immunotherapy of chronic myeloid leukemia CML.

    PubMed

    Held, Stefanie Andrea Erika; Heine, Annkristin; Mayer, Karin Tina; Kapelle, Mario; Wolf, Dominik Georg Friedrich; Brossart, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors induce sustained disease remissions in chronic myeloid leukemia by exploiting the addiction of this type of leukemia to the activity of the fusion oncogene BCR-ABL. However, these agents fail to eradicate CML stem cells which are ultimately responsible for disease relapses upon treatment discontinuation. Evidence that the immune system can effectively reject CML stem cells potentially leading to patient cure is provided by the experience with patients receiving allogeneic bone marrow transplantations. Compelling evidence indicates that more modern, antigen-specific immunotherapeutic approaches are also feasible and hold strong potential to be clinically effective. Amongst these, particularly promising is the use of autologous dendritic cells pulsed with antigens or direct application of in vitro transcribed RNA encoding for leukemia-associated antigens, since this approach allows to circumvent HLA-restriction of the leukemia-associated T cell epitopes that have been eventually identified. Combining these strategies with monoclonal antibodies, such as anti-CTLA-4 or anti-PD-1, may help to obtain even stronger immune responses and better clinical results. This narrative review addresses this topic by focusing in particular on the cell-based immunotherapeutic strategies for CML and on the issue of the leukemia-associated antigens to be selected for targeting. PMID:23906051

  11. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... leukemias). The rest of this document focuses on acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults. For information on ALL in ...

  12. Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  13. Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. They serve as a repair ... body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  14. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... some patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). One theory that scientists propose about why this switch occurs ... a result called “graft-versus-tumor effect”). The theory being tested with a reduced-intensity transplant is ...

  15. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    MedlinePlus

    ... WBC) count Platelet count Bone marrow biopsy Lumbar puncture (spinal tap) to check for leukemia cells in ... home Managing your pets during chemotherapy Bleeding problems Dry mouth Eating enough calories Safe eating during cancer ...

  16. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  17. Hairy cell leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Updated by: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Also reviewed ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  18. Acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a low number of platelets. A white blood cell count ( WBC ) can be high, low, or normal. Bone ... and overall health How high your white blood cell count was Certain genetic changes in the leukemia cells ...

  19. CT findings in leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1984-12-01

    Review of 84 computed tomographic (CT) scans in leukemic patients demonstrate a wide spectrum of abnormalities. Findings caused by leukemia were lymphadenopathy, visceral enlargement, focal defects, and tissue infiltration. Hemorrhage was by far the most common complication and could usually be characterized on the noncontrast CT scan. The distinction between old hematomas, foci of infection, and leukemia infiltration could not be made with certainty without CT-guided aspiration. Unusual instances of sepsis, such as microabscesses of the liver and typhlitis, were seen.

  20. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-16

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  1. MLL leukemia induction by genome editing of human CD34+ hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Buechele, Corina; Breese, Erin H.; Schneidawind, Dominik; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Jeong, Johan; Duque-Afonso, Jesus; Wong, Stephen H. K.; Smith, Kevin S.; Negrin, Robert S.; Porteus, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene occur in primary and treatment-related leukemias and confer a poor prognosis. Studies based primarily on mouse models have substantially advanced our understanding of MLL leukemia pathogenesis, but often use supraphysiological oncogene expression with uncertain implications for human leukemia. Genome editing using site-specific nucleases provides a powerful new technology for gene modification to potentially model human disease, however, this approach has not been used to re-create acute leukemia in human cells of origin comparable to disease observed in patients. We applied transcription activator-like effector nuclease–mediated genome editing to generate endogenous MLL-AF9 and MLL-ENL oncogenes through insertional mutagenesis in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood. Engineered HSPCs displayed altered in vitro growth potentials and induced acute leukemias following transplantation in immunocompromised mice at a mean latency of 16 weeks. The leukemias displayed phenotypic and morphologic similarities with patient leukemia blasts including a subset with mixed phenotype, a distinctive feature seen in clinical disease. The leukemic blasts expressed an MLL-associated transcriptional program with elevated levels of crucial MLL target genes, displayed heightened sensitivity to DOT1L inhibition, and demonstrated increased oncogenic potential ex vivo and in secondary transplant assays. Thus, genome editing to create endogenous MLL oncogenes in primary human HSPCs faithfully models acute MLL-rearranged leukemia and provides an experimental platform for prospective studies of leukemia initiation and stem cell biology in a genetic subtype of poor prognosis leukemia. PMID:26311362

  2. Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins.