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Sample records for leukocyte antigen antibody

  1. Methodological aspects of anti-human leukocyte antigen antibody analysis in solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lobashevsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Donor human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-specific antibodies (DSA) play an important role in solid organ transplantation. Preexisting IgG isotype DSA are considered a risk factor for antibody mediated rejection, graft failure or graft loss. The post-transplant development of DSA depends on multiple factors including immunogenicity of mismatched antigens, HLA class II typing of the recipient, cytokine gene polymorphisms, and cellular immunoregulatory mechanisms. De novo developed antibodies require special attention because not all DSA have equal clinical significance. Therefore, it is important for transplant clinicians and transplant immunologists to accurately characterize DSA. In this review, the contemporary immunological techniques for detection and characterization of anti-HLA antibodies and their pitfalls are described. PMID:25346888

  2. Human Leukocyte Antigens Influence the Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jafarzadeh, Abdollah; Bagheri-Jamebozorgi, Masoome; Nemati, Maryam; Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Shokri, Fazel

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and its sequelae such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma has remained a serious public health problem throughout the world. The WHO strategy for effective control of HBV infection and its complications is mass vaccination of neonates and children within the framework of Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Vaccination with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) induces protective antibody response (anti-HBs ≥ 10 IU/L) in 90-99% of vaccinees. The lack of response to HBsAg has been attributed to a variety of immunological mechanisms, including defect in antigen presentation, defect in HBsAg-specific T and/or B cell repertoires, T-cell suppression, increase in the regulatory T cell count, lack of necessary help of T-cells for production of anti-HBs by B cells, defect in Th1 and/or Th2 cytokine production and selective killing of HBsAg-specific B-cells by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The HLA complex plays an important role in many of these immunological processes. A variety of HLA class I, II, and III alleles and antigens have been reported to be associated with antibody response to HBsAg vaccination in different ethnic populations. Moreover, some HLA haplotypes were also associated with responsiveness to HBsAg. In this review the association of the HLA specificities with antibody response to hepatitis B (HB) vaccine is discussed. PMID:26546891

  3. Clinical significance of donor-specific human leukocyte antigen antibodies in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado, Antonio; San Segundo, David; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Crespo, Javier; Fábrega, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) caused by donor-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies (DSA) is widely accepted to be a risk factor for decreased graft survival after kidney transplantation. This entity also plays a pathogenic role in other solid organ transplants as it appears to be an increasingly common cause of heart graft dysfunction and an emerging issue in lung transplantation. In contrast, the liver appears relatively resistant to DSA-mediated injury. This “immune-tolerance” liver property has been sustained by a low rate of liver graft loss in patients with preformed DSA and by the intrinsic liver characteristics that favor the absorption and elimination of DSA; however, alloantibody-mediated adverse consequences are increasingly being recognized, and several cases of acute AMR after ABO-compatible liver transplant (LT) have been reported. Furthermore, the availability of new solid-phase assays, allowing the detection of low titers of DSA and the refinement of objective diagnostic criteria for AMR in solid organ transplants and particularly in LT, have improved the recognition and management of this entity. A cost-effective strategy of DSA monitoring, avoidance of class II human leukocyte antigen mismatching, judicious immunosuppression attached to a higher level of clinical suspicion of AMR, particularly in cases unresponsive to conventional anti-rejection therapy, can allow a rational approach to this threat. PMID:26494958

  4. Low risk of anti-human leukocyte antigen antibody sensitization after combined kidney and islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari-Lacraz, Sylvie; Berney, Thierry; Morel, Philippe; Marangon, Nicola; Hadaya, Karine; Demuylder-Mischler, Sandrine; Pongratz, Gilles; Pernin, Nadine; Villard, Jean

    2008-07-27

    Anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibody could lead to humoral rejection and a decrease in graft survival after kidney transplantation. A recent report has suggested that islet transplantation alone is associated with a high rate of sensitization. The withdrawal of the immunosuppressive therapy because of the progressive nonfunction of the islets could explain the high rate of sensitization. Because the specific risk of immunization of multiple islet infusions remains unknown, we studied the immunization rate in our cohort of multiple islet infusions transplant recipients. De novo anti-HLA antibodies were analyzed in 37 patients after islets alone (n=8), islet-after-kidney (n=13), and simultaneous islet-kidney (n=16) transplantation by solid phase assays over time. The rate of immunization was 10.8% that is comparable with the risk of immunization after kidney transplantation alone. Multiple islet infusions do not represent a specific risk for the development of anti-HLA antibodies after combined kidney-islets transplantation. PMID:18645502

  5. Limited proteolysis of human leukocyte interferon-. cap alpha. 2 and localization of the monoclonal antibody-binding antigenic determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Kostrov, S.V.; Chernovskaya, T.V.; Khodova, O.M.; Borukhov, S.I.; Ryzhavskaya, A.S.; Izotova, L.S.; Strongin, A.Ya.

    1986-05-20

    Large peptide fragments of human leukocyte interferon-..cap alpha..2 (INF-..cap alpha..2) were produced by limited proteolysis with trypsin, pepsin, thermolysin, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens serine proteinase, and the ability of the fragments to react with murine monoclonal antibodies NK2, directed toward INF-..cap alpha..2, was studied by the immunoblotting technique. The region of the sequence 110-149 is the most sensitive to proteinase attack and evidently is exposed on the surface of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule. The INF-..cap alpha..2 fragments 1-139, 1-147, and 1-149 react with antibodies, whereas the fragments 1-109 and 1-112 do not bind NK2 antibodies. A comparison of the primary structure of the families of human leukocyte and murine leukocyte INF in the region of the sequence 110-139 and an analysis of the ability of human INF differing in amino acid sequence to interact with NK2 antibodies suggested that the antigenic determinant that binds monoclonal antibodies NK2 is the sequence Glu/sub 114/-Asp/sub 115/-Ser/sub 116/-He/sub 117/ of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule.

  6. Single antigen flow beads for identification of human leukocyte antigen antibody specificities in hypersensitized patients with chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Kılıçaslan-Ayna, Tülay; Özkızılcık-Koçyiğit, Aslı; Güleç, Derya; Pirim, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Aims of this study Aims of this study were to identify class I and class II antibodies in highly sensitized patients by flow cytometry single antigen bead (FC-SAB) assay and to evaluate according to donor HLA type in order to increase their kidney transplantation chance. Material and methods We analyzed 60 hypersensitive patients of 351 individuals, who applied to our laboratory for PRA test in November 2013-December 2014. Flow cytometric PRA screening and single antigen bead commercial kits were used for these analyses. Results In our study group, 19 (31.7%) of these patients were male while 41 (68.3%) patients were female. The most common acceptable antigens were A*02 (10.11%), HLA-A*23 (10.11%), HLA-B*38 (8.79%) and HLA-DRB1*03 (7.83%) in hypersensitive patients. The highest antibody reactivity on SAB was observed against HLA-A*25, HLA-B*45, HLA-DRB1*04 and HLA-DRB1*08 antigens. Conclusions The determination of these acceptable and unacceptable antigens may increase their transplantation chance. Pre-transplant HLA antibody identifications provide prognostic information with respect to the determination of patients who are at increased risk of graft loss. PMID:27095928

  7. Demonstration of cross-reactivity between bacterial antigens and class I human leukocyte antigens by using monoclonal antibodies to Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K M; Raybourne, R B

    1990-01-01

    Bacterial envelope proteins which share immunodeterminants with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I histocompatibility antigen HLA-B27 may invoke spondyloarthritic disease through the process of molecular mimicry in patients expressing this phenotype. Monoclonal antibodies generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with envelope proteins of Shigella flexneri type 2a were tested for reactivity against cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines of defined HLA phenotype. As measured by flow microfluorometry, four immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibodies reacted preferentially with HLA-B27-positive lymphocytes (HOM-2, MM) as compared with a B27-loss mutant line (1065) or cells lacking major histocompatibility complex class I antigen (Daudi, K562). Monoclonal antibodies also reacted with mouse EL-4 cells transfected with and expressing the HLA-B7 gene. Western immunoblot analysis of isolated enterobacterial envelopes demonstrated that the reactive epitope was present on bacterial proteins with an apparent relative molecular mass of 36 and 19 kilodaltons. The structural basis for the cross-reactivity of bacterial antigen and HLA-B27 appeared to reside in the portion of the HLA molecule that is responsible for allotypic specificity (amino acids 63 through 83), since monoclonal antibodies were positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with synthetic polypeptides corresponding to this segment. Images PMID:2187807

  8. [Antibodies, human leukocyte antigens, and biomodulators in transfusion-related acute adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Martínez Álvarez, Julio César

    2013-01-01

    With the onset of the AIDS epidemic, major changes occurred in blood banking and transfusion medicine. These changes occurred mainly in donor selection and screening tests for infectious diseases, blood centers modified their organizational philosophy regarding quality. Transfusion of blood products are procedures that allow us to correct the haematology deficiencies for which was indicated. But today, despite the strict controls that precede transfusion,recipients may have undesirable effects, which are known as adverse effects or adverse reactions to transfusion. Antibodies and antigens of the HLA system plays a role in a series of events related to transfusion, such as immunological platelet refractoriness, febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions, transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. The determination of anti-HLA antibodies is evidence that in most developed countries is used on a daily basis in the regular assessment of patients multitransfused or waiting lists for organs from deceased donors. The biomodulators are able to modify biological responses which act in sequence to lead to the differentiation of T lymphocytes. These agents may subcategorizes those which facilitate a normal immune response, those stimulates the immune response, those are capable of inducing immunosuppression not cytotoxic, and those enhancing the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic treatment (transfusion or transplant). PMID:23435079

  9. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody recognizing an epitope designated as canine leukocyte-associated antigen.

    PubMed

    Yang, W C; Esquenazi, V; Carreno, M; Vallone, T; Fuller, L; Roth, D; Nery, J; Burke, G; Miller, J

    1994-07-27

    An IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), designated as 15F1.5, was generated against surface determinants of a dog peripheral blood-derived PHA-induced IL-2-dependent T cell line. It reacted with 65-80% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), 90-95% of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs), 65-70% of thymocytes, 85-95% of Thy-1 positive cells and 85-95% of IL-2-dependent T lymphoid cells in flow cytometry. It was nonreactive with peripheral blood red cells and platelets. It immunoprecipitated 95 and 150 Kd proteins derived from detergent solubilized lymphocyte membranes. Indirect immunofluorescent and immunoperoxidase staining of frozen tissue sections demonstrated positive reactivity to cells in lymphoid but not nonlymphoid tissues. The 15F1.5 antibody was not directly mitogenic for PBMC's. It caused significant decrease (P < or = 0.05) in the lymphoproliferative response to T-dependent B cell mitogens, such as pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and staphage lysate (SPL), without significant effects on responses to the T cell mitogens, phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and concanavalin A (Con A). The mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response and both the proliferative and effector arms of the cell-mediated cytotoxicity reactions (CMC) were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. The mAb also inhibited the auto- and allolymphoproliferative reactivity of mixed lymphocyte kidney or islet cell cultures (MLKC and MLIC), and the adhesion of T lymphoblasts and PMA-treated PMNs to endothelial cells. In vivo administration of the 15F1.5 (20 mg/day for 5 days) caused an immediate and prolonged reduction in MLC responses, associated with cell binding of the mAb to PBMC and epitope modulation during the course of treatment, as indicated by flow cytometry. These results suggest that 15F1.5 is an immunomodulating antibody reacting with canine LFA-1. Thus, this mAb would be useful in studying the role of LFA-1/ICAM-1 in graft rejection as well as other inflammatory responses. It would also allow the use of

  10. Rapid Reduction in Donor-Specific Anti-Human Leukocyte Antigen Antibodies and Reversal of Antibody-Mediated Rejection With Bortezomib in Pediatric Heart Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, William Robert; Frazier, Elizabeth A.; Mahle, William T.; Harville, Terry O.; Pye, Sherry E.; Knecht, Kenneth R.; Howard, Emily L.; Smith, R. Neal; Saylors, Robert L.; Garcia, Xiomara; Jaquiss, Robert D.B.; Woodle, E. Steve

    2013-01-01

    Background High titer donor-specific antibodies (DSA) and positive crossmatch in cardiac transplant recipients is associated with increased mortality from antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Although treatment to reduce antihuman leukocyte antigen antibodies using plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab has been reported to be beneficial, in practice these are often ineffective. Moreover, these interventions do not affect the mature antibody producing plasma cell. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor active against plasma cells, has been shown to reduce DSA in renal transplant patients with AMR. We report here the first use of bortezomib for cardiac transplant recipients in four pediatric heart recipients with biopsy-proven AMR, hemodynamic compromise, positive crossmatch, and high titer class I DSA. Methods Patients received four intravenous dose of bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2) over 2 weeks with plasmapheresis and rituximab. DSA specificity and strength (mean fluorescence intensity) was determined with Luminex. All had received previous treatment with plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab that was ineffective. Results AMR resolved in all patients treated with bortezomib with improvement in systolic function, conversion of biopsy to C4d negative in three patients and IgG negative in one patient, and a prompt, precipitous reduction in DSAs. In three patients who received plasmapheresis before bortezomib, plasmapheresis failed to reduce DSA. In one case, DSA increased after bortezomib but decreased after retreatment. Conclusions Bortezomib reduces DSA and may be an important adjunct to treatment of AMR in cardiac transplant recipients. Bortezomib may also be useful in desensitization protocols and in prevention of AMR in sensitized patients with positive crossmatch and elevated DSA. PMID:22179403

  11. The Leukocyte Antibody Prevalence Study-II (LAPS-II): a retrospective cohort study of transfusion-related acute lung injury in recipients of high-plasma-volume human leukocyte antigen antibody–positive or –negative components

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Steven H.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Murphy, Edward L.; Carey, Patricia M.; Gottschall, Jerome L.; Roback, John D.; Carrick, Danielle; Mathew, Sunitha; Wright, David J.; Cable, Ritchard; Ness, Paul; Gajic, Ognjen; Hubmayr, Rolf D.; Looney, Mark R.; Kakaiya, Ram M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND We used a multicenter retrospective cohort study design to evaluate whether human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibody donor screening would reduce the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) or possible TRALI. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS In the Leukocyte Antibody Prevalence Study-II (LAPS-II), we evaluated pulmonary outcomes in recipients of 2596 plasma-rich blood components (transfusable plasma and plateletpheresis) sent to participating hospitals; half of the components were collected from anti-HLA–positive donors (study arm) and half from anti-HLA–negative donors (control arm) matched by sex, parity, and blood center. A staged medical record review process was used. Final recipient diagnosis was based on case review by a blinded expert panel of pulmonary or critical care physicians. RESULTS TRALI incidence was 0.59% (seven cases) in study arm recipients versus 0.16% (two cases) in control arm recipients for an odds ratio (OR) of 3.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7–17.4; p = 0.10). For possible TRALI cases (nine study arm, eight control arm), the OR was 1.2 (95% CI, 0.4–3.0; p = 0.81), and for TRALI and possible TRALI aggregated together, it was 1.7 (95% CI, 0.7–3.7; p = 0.24). Transfusion-associated circulatory overload incidence was identical in the two arms (1.17 and 1.22%, respectively; OR, 1.0; p = 1.0). CONCLUSIONS TRALI incidence in recipients of anti-HLA–positive components was relatively low for a look-back study (1 in 170) and was higher than in the control arm, but did not reach significance. Based on this trend, the data are consistent with the likelihood that TRALI risk is decreased by selecting high-volume plasma components for transfusion from donors at low risk of having HLA antibodies. PMID:21446938

  12. Production of monoclonal antibodies against canine leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Palis; Borges dos Santos, Roberto Robson; Lima, Carla Andrade; Rios de Sousa Gomes, Hilton; Larangeira, Daniela Farias; Santos, Patrícia Meira; Barrouin-Melo, Stella Maria; Conrado dos-Santos, Washington Luis; Pontes-de-Carvalho, Lain

    2004-04-01

    A panel of anti-canine leukocyte monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was produced by immunizing BALB/c mice with canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), either resting or stimulated with concanavalin A (ConA). Three out of 28 clones-IH1, AB6, and HG6-screened by ELISA and producing antibody with the highest specificity for canine cell immunostaining, were subjected to three subsequent subcloning steps by limiting dilution, and selected for further characterization. These MAbs belonged to IgG1 (HG6 and IH1) and IgG2a (AB6) isotypes. The distribution of cell populations expressing the antigen recognized by the antibodies was identified by indirect immunoflorescence on canine PBMC and on tissue sections of lymph node, spleen, liver and skin. The possible crossreactivity with human PBMC was also examined in immunocytochemistry. One of the antibodies specifically recognized macrophages. The MAbs presented here can be foreseen as possible valuable diagnostic and research tools to study immune functions in dogs. PMID:15165486

  13. Specific acceptance of fetal bowel allograft in mice after combined treatment with anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Y; Yamataka, A; Yagita, H; Okumura, K; Fujiwara, T; Miyano, T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to see whether tolerance could be induced by simultaneous administration of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) after transplantation of fetal small bowel between fully incompatible mice strains. METHODS: Fetal small bowel from either BALB/c (H-2d) or C3H/He (H-2k) mice was transplanted into the space between the peritoneum and rectus abdominis of adult C3H/He recipient mice. Syngeneic (n = 6) and two allogeneic transplant groups were made. In one of the allogeneic groups (n = 8), no immunosuppressant was given. In the other allogeneic group (n = 13), both anti-LFA-1 and anti-ICAM-1 MoAbs (50 micrograms each/mouse/day) were given intraperitoneally after transplantation for the first 4 weeks. In the syngeneic and untreated allogeneic groups, all mice were killed 4 weeks after transplantation. In the treated allogeneic group, eight mice were killed 6 weeks after cessation of the MoAb treatment. At the time the mice were killed, the bowel graft as well as the recipient spleen were taken for histologic analysis and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) assay, respectively. Each mouse in the remaining treated five mice was transplanted with BALB/c and C57BL/6 (as third-party) full-thickness skin simultaneously 8 weeks after cessation of the MoAb treatment. RESULTS: All grafts in the syngeneic group survived with normally developing villi, whereas all grafts in the untreated allogeneic group disappeared. In the treated allogeneic group, all allografts developed normal mucosa without any sign of rejection. Splenocytes from the recipient mice in the untreated allogeneic group showed increased CTL induction against donor-type alloantigen (p < 0.005), compared with that in the syngeneic group. Suppressed CTL induction against donor-type alloantigen was observed in the treated allografted recipient (p < 0.001), whereas CTL induction against third

  14. Mechanisms of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): anti-leukocyte antibodies.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R; McFarland, Janice G

    2006-05-01

    There is abundant evidence that leukocyte antibodies in blood donor products are somehow involved in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, HLA class II, and neutrophil-specific antibodies in the plasma of both blood donors and recipients have been implicated in the pathogenesis of TRALI. The case for a relationship between leukocyte antibodies and TRALI is more compelling if concordance between the antigen specificity of the leukocyte antibodies in the donor plasma and the corresponding antigen on the cells of the affected recipient is demonstrated. Such antibody-antigen concordance can be investigated by typing the recipient for the cognate leukocyte antigens or by cross-matching the donor plasma against the recipient's leukocytes. Two proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms for TRALI have received the most attention: the antibody hypothesis and the two-event hypothesis. The final common pathway in all of the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of TRALI is increased pulmonary capillary permeability, which results in movement of plasma into the alveolar space causing pulmonary edema. A typical TRALI serologic workup consists of tests for HLA class I and II and neutrophil-specific antibodies. The use of flow cytometry and HLA-coated microbeads is recommended for detection of HLA antibodies in plasma of implicated blood donors and a combination of the granulocyte agglutination test and granulocyte immunofluorescence test for detection of neutrophil-specific antibodies. Genotyping for class I and II HLA and for a limited number of neutrophil antigens may also be helpful in establishing antibody-antigen concordance. PMID:16617255

  15. [Detection and typing for swine leukocyte antigen].

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Luo, Huai-Rong; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Qiu, Xiang-Pin; Ye, Chun

    2004-03-01

    Traditionally the cluster of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) was typed by serological, cytological and biochemical methods. Many special molecular typing methods have been developed with the progress of molecular biological technology, such as PCR-RFLP, PCR-SSCP , MS and DNA sequencing. Here we discussed the advantages and disadvantages of each method based on the polymorphic and conservative (from the functional aspect, such as supertype and supermotif) characteristics of SLA, and illustrated the development of typing for SLA in the future. In addition, we pointed out the editorial mistakes about the serological haplotype of SLA in reference book and emphasized that the accurate polymorphism of SLA-DQB gene must be based on the cloning sequencing. PMID:15639990

  16. Alloantibody Generation and Effector Function Following Sensitization to Human Leukocyte Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Michelle J.; Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2016-01-01

    Allorecognition is the activation of the adaptive immune system to foreign human leukocyte antigen (HLA) resulting in the generation of alloantibodies. Due to a high polymorphism, foreign HLA is recognized by the immune system following transplant, transfusion, or pregnancy resulting in the formation of the germinal center and the generation of long-lived alloantibody-producing memory B cells. Alloantibodies recognize antigenic epitopes displayed by the HLA molecule on the transplanted allograft and contribute to graft damage through multiple mechanisms, including (1) activation of the complement cascade resulting in the formation of the MAC complex and inflammatory anaphylatoxins, (2) transduction of intracellular signals leading to cytoskeletal rearrangement, growth, and proliferation of graft vasculature, and (3) immune cell infiltration into the allograft via FcγR interactions with the FC portion of the antibody. This review focuses on the generation of HLA alloantibody, routes of sensitization, alloantibody specificity, and mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft damage. PMID:26870045

  17. Chimeric antigen receptors and bispecific antibodies to retarget T cells in pediatric oncology

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Maya; Curran, Kevin J.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy using antigen-specific T cells has broad therapeutic potential. Chimeric antigen receptors and bispecific antibodies can redirect T cells to kill tumors without human leukocyte antigens (HLA) restriction. Key determinants of clinical potential include the choice of target antigen, antibody specificity, antibody affinity, tumor accessibility, T cell persistence, and tumor immune evasion. For pediatric cancers, additional constraints include their propensity for bulky metastatic disease and the concern for late toxicities from treatment. Nonetheless, the recent preclinical and clinical developments of these T cell based therapies are highly encouraging. PMID:25832831

  18. Human Leukocyte Antigen Diversity: A Southern African Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tshabalala, Mqondisi; Mellet, Juanita; Pepper, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasingly well-documented evidence of high genetic, ethnic, and linguistic diversity amongst African populations, there is limited data on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) diversity in these populations. HLA is part of the host defense mechanism mediated through antigen presentation to effector cells of the immune system. With the high disease burden in southern Africa, HLA diversity data is increasingly important in the design of population-specific vaccines and the improvement of transplantation therapeutic interventions. This review highlights the paucity of HLA diversity data amongst southern African populations and defines a need for information of this kind. This information will support disease association studies, provide guidance in vaccine design, and improve transplantation outcomes. PMID:26347896

  19. Human Leukocyte Antigen Diversity: A Southern African Perspective.

    PubMed

    Tshabalala, Mqondisi; Mellet, Juanita; Pepper, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasingly well-documented evidence of high genetic, ethnic, and linguistic diversity amongst African populations, there is limited data on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) diversity in these populations. HLA is part of the host defense mechanism mediated through antigen presentation to effector cells of the immune system. With the high disease burden in southern Africa, HLA diversity data is increasingly important in the design of population-specific vaccines and the improvement of transplantation therapeutic interventions. This review highlights the paucity of HLA diversity data amongst southern African populations and defines a need for information of this kind. This information will support disease association studies, provide guidance in vaccine design, and improve transplantation outcomes. PMID:26347896

  20. Influence of human leukocyte antigen matching on liver allograft survival and rejection: "the dualistic effect".

    PubMed

    Donaldson, P; Underhill, J; Doherty, D; Hayllar, K; Calne, R; Tan, K C; O'Grady, J; Wight, D; Portmann, B; Williams, R

    1993-06-01

    To date only one published large series of human leukocyte antigen matching and liver allograft survival exists, and considerable confusion has arisen about the advantage or disadvantage of human leukocyte antigen matching. In the present study we have reinvestigated the relationship between human leukocyte antigen mismatch and graft survival in 466 first liver allografts, seeking to clarify the relationship between human leukocyte antigen and both acute rejection and the vanishing bile duct syndrome. In view of current criticism regarding the accuracy of serological tissue typing for human leukocyte antigen-DR, we have used both classic serology and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis to ensure the accurate assignment of recipient DR types. In addition, we have used polymerase chain reaction amplification and allele-specific and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes to retest the hypothesis that human leukocyte antigen class II matching may increase susceptibility to the vanishing bile duct syndrome. One-year graft survival was significantly lower in patients with zero or two human leukocyte antigen-A mismatches (52% and 63%, respectively) than in those with one human leukocyte antigen--A mismatch (69%) (p = 0.016 and p = 0.018). A similar effect of B mismatching was observed, with a 1-yr graft survival of 73% for those with one compared with 60% for those with two human leukocyte antigen-B mismatches. In contrast no correlation was found between DR mismatch and graft survival. Human leukocyte antigen class I matching appears to influence graft survival largely through the occurrence of acute rejection and the development of the vanishing bile duct syndrome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8514248

  1. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J.; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments. PMID:27602020

  2. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments. PMID:27602020

  3. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response. PMID:27129972

  4. Human Leukocyte Antigen Alleles and Cytomegalovirus Infection After Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Futohi, Farzaneh; Saber, Azadeh; Nemati, Eglim; Einollahi, Behzad; Rostami, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have been conducted on the relationship between a number of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and cytomegalovirus infection (CMV), in kidney transplant recipients, after transplantation. However, only a limited number of HLAs have been investigated, so far, and the results have been contradictory. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between 59 HLA alleles and the CMV infection, in transplant recipients, after kidney transplantation. Patients and Methods: This retrospective cohort study was conducted on 200 patients, receiving a kidney transplant, in Baqiyatallah Hospital, in Tehran, during 2013. Throughout a one-year follow-up of kidney transplant recipients, in case of detecting the CMV antigen in patients’ blood, at any time, they were placed in the group of patients with CMV infection, whereas, if no CMV-specific antigen was developed, over a year, patients were placed in the group of patients without CMV infection, after transplantation. This study investigated the relationship between CMV infection in kidney transplant recipients and 59 HLA alleles, including 14 HLA-A, 28 HLA-B, and 17 HLA-DRB1 cases. Results: Of all participants, 104 patients (52%) were diagnosed with CMV infection. There was no significant difference between the two groups, with and without CMV infection, in terms of patient’s characteristics. The CMV infection, in patients receiving a transplanted organ from deceased donor, was significantly more prevalent than in those receiving kidney transplant from living donor (63% vs. 39%, respectively, P = 0.001). Recipients with HLA-B44 were more infected with CMV compared with patients without this allele (80% vs. 50%, respectively, P = 0.024); on the contrary, kidney recipients with HLA-DRB1-1 were less infected with CMV than patients without this allele (31% vs. 55%, respectively, P = 0.020). There was no significant relationship between CMV infection and other HLA alleles. Results of

  5. Prospective study of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to influenza and antibodies to human T lymphotropic virus-III in homosexual men. Selective loss of an influenza-specific, human leukocyte antigen-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in human T lymphotropic virus-III positive individuals with symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, G M; Salahuddin, S Z; Markham, P D; Joseph, L J; Payne, S M; Kriebel, P; Bernstein, D C; Biddison, W E; Sarngadharan, M G; Gallo, R C

    1985-01-01

    Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from 18 homosexual men who did not have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and from 9 heterosexual men were repetitively tested for their ability to generate HLA self-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to influenza virus (flu-self) over a 2-yr period. The sera of the same donors were tested for antibodies to human T lymphotropic virus-III (HTLV-III). Six of the homosexual and none of the heterosexual donors consistently generated weak cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to flu-self. Seven of the homosexual and none of the heterosexual donors were seropositive for antibodies to HTLV-III. No obvious correlation was detected between weak flu-self cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses and antibodies to HTLV-III. However, one homosexual donor generated no detectable cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to flu-self, although he was a strong responder to HLA-alloantigens. This donor had an OKT4:OKT8 ratio of 0.4 and was seropositive for HTLV-III antigens; HTLV-III virus was identified in his PBL; and he developed AIDS during the course of this study. A second donor with lymphadenopathy and who was seropositive for HTLV-III antigens exhibited marginal cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to flu-self which he subsequently lost. PBL from two patients, one with Kaposi's sarcoma and one with generalized lymphadenopathy, were also tested for cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to flu-self and to alloantigens. Both donors failed to generate cytotoxic T lymphocyte to flu-self, but generated strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to alloantigens. The selective loss of an HLA-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response without loss of HLA alloantigenic cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity may be an important functional immunologic characteristic in the development of AIDS. PMID:2997287

  6. Imputing amino acid polymorphisms in human leukocyte antigens.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaoming; Han, Buhm; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Patrick J; Rich, Stephen S; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2013-01-01

    DNA sequence variation within human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes mediate susceptibility to a wide range of human diseases. The complex genetic structure of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) makes it difficult, however, to collect genotyping data in large cohorts. Long-range linkage disequilibrium between HLA loci and SNP markers across the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region offers an alternative approach through imputation to interrogate HLA variation in existing GWAS data sets. Here we describe a computational strategy, SNP2HLA, to impute classical alleles and amino acid polymorphisms at class I (HLA-A, -B, -C) and class II (-DPA1, -DPB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, and -DRB1) loci. To characterize performance of SNP2HLA, we constructed two European ancestry reference panels, one based on data collected in HapMap-CEPH pedigrees (90 individuals) and another based on data collected by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC, 5,225 individuals). We imputed HLA alleles in an independent data set from the British 1958 Birth Cohort (N = 918) with gold standard four-digit HLA types and SNPs genotyped using the Affymetrix GeneChip 500 K and Illumina Immunochip microarrays. We demonstrate that the sample size of the reference panel, rather than SNP density of the genotyping platform, is critical to achieve high imputation accuracy. Using the larger T1DGC reference panel, the average accuracy at four-digit resolution is 94.7% using the low-density Affymetrix GeneChip 500 K, and 96.7% using the high-density Illumina Immunochip. For amino acid polymorphisms within HLA genes, we achieve 98.6% and 99.3% accuracy using the Affymetrix GeneChip 500 K and Illumina Immunochip, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate how imputation and association testing at amino acid resolution can facilitate fine-mapping of primary MHC association signals, giving a specific example from type 1 diabetes. PMID:23762245

  7. Position 156 influences the peptide repertoire and tapasin dependency of human leukocyte antigen B*44 allotypes

    PubMed Central

    Badrinath, Soumya; Saunders, Philippa; Huyton, Trevor; Aufderbeck, Susanne; Hiller, Oliver; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Doeding, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Background Polymorphic differences between donor and recipient human leukocyte antigen class I molecules can result in graft-versus-host disease due to distinct peptide presentation. As part of the peptide-loading complex, tapasin plays an important role in selecting peptides from the pool of potential ligands. Class I polymorphisms can significantly alter the tapasin-mediated interaction with the peptide-loading complex and although most class I allotypes are highly dependent upon tapasin, some are able to load peptides independently of tapasin. Several human leukocyte antigen B*44 allotypes differ exclusively at position 156 (B*44:02156Asp, 44:03156Leu, 44:28156Arg, 44:35156Glu). From these alleles, only the high tapasin-dependency of human leukocyte antigen B*44:02 has been reported. Design and Methods We investigated the influence of position 156 polymorphisms on both the requirement of tapasin for efficient surface expression of each allotype and their peptide features. Genes encoding human leukocyte antigen B*44 variants bearing all possible substitutions at position 156 were lentivirally transduced into human leukocyte antigen class I-negative LCL 721.221 cells and the tapasin-deficient cell line LCL 721.220. Results Exclusively human leukocyte antigen B*44:28156Arg was expressed on the surface of tapasin-deficient cells, suggesting that the remaining B*44/156 variants are highly tapasin-dependent. Our computational analysis suggests that the tapasin-independence of human leukocyte antigen B*44:28156Arg is a result of stabilization of the peptide binding region and generation of a more peptide receptive state. Sequencing of peptides eluted from human leukocyte antigen B*44 molecules by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap) demonstrated that both B*44:02 and B*44:28 share the same overall peptide motif and a certain percentage of their individual peptide repertoires in the presence and/or absence of tapasin

  8. Lensfree Holographic Imaging of Antibody Microarrays for High-Throughput Detection of Leukocyte Numbers and Function

    PubMed Central

    Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Mudanyali, Onur; Seo, Sungkyu; Silangcruz, Jaime; Macal, Monica; Ramanculov, Erlan; Dandekar, Satya; Erlinger, Anthony; Ozcan, Aydogan; Revzin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of leukocytes is an integral part of blood analysis and blood-based diagnostics. In the present paper we combine lensless holographic imaging with antibody microarrays for rapid and multiparametric analysis of leukocytes from human blood. Monoclonal antibodies (Abs) specific for leukocyte surface antigens (CD4 and CD8) and cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-2) were printed in an array so as to juxtapose cell capture and cytokine detection Ab spots. Integration of Ab microarrays into a microfluidic flow chamber (4 μl volume) followed by incubation with human blood resulted in capture of CD4 and CD8 T-cells on specific Ab spots. On-chip mitogenic activation of these cells induced release of cytokine molecules that were subsequently captured on neighboring anti-cytokine Ab spots. The binding of IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ molecules on their respective Ab spots was detected using HRP-labeled anti-cytokine Abs and a visible color reagent. Lensfree holographic imaging was then used to rapidly (∼4 sec) enumerate CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes captured on Ab spots and to quantify the cytokine signal emanating from IL-2, TNF-α, and IFN-γ spots on the same chip. To demonstrate the utility of our approach for infectious disease monitoring, blood samples of healthy volunteers and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients were analyzed to determine CD4/CD8 ratio – an important HIV/AIDS diagnostic marker. The ratio obtained by lensfree on-chip imaging of CD4 and CD8 T-cells captured on Ab spots was in close agreement with conventional microscopy-based cell counting. The present paper, describing tandem use of Ab microarrays and lensfree holographic imaging, paves the way for future development of miniature cytometry devices for multiparametric blood analysis at the point of care or in a resource-limited setting. PMID:20359168

  9. Human leukocyte antigen E contributes to protect tumor cells from lysis by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Lo Monaco, Elisa; Tremante, Elisa; Cerboni, Cristina; Melucci, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Zingoni, Alessandra; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2011-09-01

    The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK) cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3) of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D). Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network. PMID:21969815

  10. Human Leukocyte Antigen E Contributes to Protect Tumor Cells from Lysis by Natural Killer Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Elisa Lo; Tremante, Elisa; Cerboni, Cristina; Melucci, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Zingoni, Alessandra; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2011-01-01

    The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK) cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3) of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D). Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network. PMID:21969815

  11. Natural micropolymorphism in human leukocyte antigens provides a basis for genetic control of antigen recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Archbold, Julia K.; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Gras, Stephanie; Ely, Lauren K.; Miles, John J.; Bell, Melissa J.; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Clements, Craig S.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2009-07-10

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene polymorphism plays a critical role in protective immunity, disease susceptibility, autoimmunity, and drug hypersensitivity, yet the basis of how HLA polymorphism influences T cell receptor (TCR) recognition is unclear. We examined how a natural micropolymorphism in HLA-B44, an important and large HLA allelic family, affected antigen recognition. T cell-mediated immunity to an Epstein-Barr virus determinant (EENLLDFVRF) is enhanced when HLA-B*4405 was the presenting allotype compared with HLA-B*4402 or HLA-B*4403, each of which differ by just one amino acid. The micropolymorphism in these HLA-B44 allotypes altered the mode of binding and dynamics of the bound viral epitope. The structure of the TCR-HLA-B*4405EENLLDFVRF complex revealed that peptide flexibility was a critical parameter in enabling preferential engagement with HLA-B*4405 in comparison to HLA-B*4402/03. Accordingly, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism can alter the dynamics of the peptide-MHC landscape, resulting in fine-tuning of T cell responses between closely related allotypes.

  12. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  13. Calcium-dependent antigen binding as a novel modality for antibody recycling by endosomal antigen dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Hironiwa, N; Ishii, S; Kadono, S; Iwayanagi, Y; Mimoto, F; Habu, K; Igawa, T; Hattori, K

    2016-01-01

    The pH-dependent antigen binding antibody, termed a recycling antibody, has recently been reported as an attractive type of second-generation engineered therapeutic antibody. A recycling antibody can dissociate antigen in the acidic endosome, and thus bind to its antigen multiple times. As a consequence, a recycling antibody can neutralize large amounts of antigen in plasma. Because this approach relies on histidine residues to achieve pH-dependent antigen binding, which could limit the epitopes that can be targeted and affect the rate of antigen dissociation in the endosome, we explored an alternative approach for generating recycling antibodies. Since calcium ion concentration is known to be lower in endosome than in plasma, we hypothesized that an antibody with antigen-binding properties that are calcium-dependent could be used as recycling antibody. Here, we report a novel anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibody, identified from a phage library that binds to IL-6R only in the presence of a calcium ion. Thermal dynamics and a crystal structure study revealed that the calcium ion binds to the heavy chain CDR3 region (HCDR3), which changes and possibly stabilizes the structure of HCDR3 to make it bind to antigen calcium dependently (PDB 5AZE). In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that this calcium-dependent antigen-binding antibody can dissociate its antigen in the endosome and accelerate antigen clearance from plasma, making it a novel approach for generating recycling antibody. PMID:26496237

  14. Determination of an unrelated donor pool size for human leukocyte antigen-matched platelets in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bub, Carolina Bonet; Torres, Margareth Afonso; Moraes, Maria Elisa; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Kutner, José Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Background Successful transfusion of platelet refractory patients is a challenge. Many potential donors are needed to sustain human leukocyte antigen matched-platelet transfusion programs because of the different types of antigens and the constant needs of these patients. For a highly mixed population such as the Brazilian population, the pool size required to provide adequate platelet support is unknown. Methods A mathematical model was created to estimate the appropriate size of an unrelated donor pool to provide human leukocyte antigen-compatible platelet support for a Brazilian population. A group of 154 hematologic human leukocyte antigen-typed patients was used as the potential patient population and a database of 65,500 human leukocyte antigen-typed bone marrow registered donors was used as the donor population. Platelet compatibility was based on the grading system of Duquesnoy. Results Using the mathematical model, a pool containing 31,940, 1710 and 321 donors would be necessary to match more than 80% of the patients with at least five completely compatible (no cross-reactive group), partial compatible (one cross-reactive group) or less compatible (two cross-reactive group) donors, respectively. Conclusion The phenotypic diversity of the Brazilian population has probably made it more difficulty to find completely compatible donors. However, this heterogeneity seems to have facilitated finding donors when cross-reactive groups are accepted as proposed by the grading system of Duquesnoy. The results of this study may help to establish unrelated human leukocyte antigen-compatible platelet transfusions, a procedure not routinely performed in most Brazilian transfusion services. PMID:26969768

  15. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 is a receptor for Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin in bovine leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Jeyaseelan, S; Hsuan, S L; Kannan, M S; Walcheck, B; Wang, J F; Kehrli, M E; Lally, E T; Sieck, G C; Maheswaran, S K

    2000-01-01

    Pasteurella (Mannheimia) haemolytica leukotoxin (Lkt) causes cell type- and species-specific effects in ruminant leukocytes. Recent studies indicate that P. haemolytica Lkt binds to bovine CD18, the common subunit of all beta2 integrins. We designed experiments with the following objectives: to identify which member of the beta2 integrins is a receptor for Lkt; to determine whether Lkt binding to the receptor is target cell (bovine leukocytes) specific; to define the relationships between Lkt binding to the receptor, calcium elevation, and cytolysis; and to determine whether a correlation exists between Lkt receptor expression and the magnitude of target cell cytolysis. We compared Lkt-induced cytolysis in neutrophils from control calves and from calves with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), because neutrophils from BLAD-homozygous calves exhibit reduced beta2 integrin expression. The results demonstrate for the first time that Lkt binds to bovine CD11a and CD18 (lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 [LFA-1]). The binding was abolished by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (MAb). Lkt-induced calcium elevation in bovine alveolar macrophages (BAMs) was inhibited by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 MAb (65 to 94% and 37 to 98%, respectively, at 5 and 50 Lkt units per ml; P < 0.05). Lkt-induced cytolysis in neutrophils and BAMs was also inhibited by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 MAb in a concentration-dependent manner. Lkt bound to porcine LFA-1 but did not induce calcium elevation or cytolysis. In neutrophils from BLAD calves, Lkt-induced cytolysis was decreased by 44% compared to that of neutrophils from control calves (P < 0.05). These results indicate that LFA-1 is a Lkt receptor, Lkt binding to LFA-1 is not target cell specific, Lkt binding to bovine LFA-1 correlates with calcium elevation and cytolysis, and bovine LFA-1 expression correlates with the magnitude of Lkt-induced target cell cytolysis. PMID:10603370

  16. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF SWINE LEUKOCYTE ANTIGEN (SLA) CLASS I GENES IN OUTBRED PIG POPULATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The highly polymorphic swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) genes are one of the most important determinants in swine immune responses to infectious diseases, vaccines, and in transplantation. Study of SLA influence requires accurate and effective typing methods. We developed a simple and rapid method to t...

  17. Molecular characterization of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class II genes in outbred pig populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The highly polymorphic swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) genes are one of the most important determinants in swine immune, disease and vaccine responses. Thus, understanding how SLA gene polymorphism affects immunity, especially in outbred pig populations with a diverse genetic background, requires accu...

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of the swine leukocyte antigen - 2 gene for Korean native pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate genetic distances of the SLA-2 gene, to characterize SLA-2 alleles, and to provide basic genetic information of Korean pigs. The swine leukocyte antigen - 2 (SLA-2) gene in the MHC classical region was cloned with spleen tissues from Korean native pigs ...

  19. Equine leukocyte antigens: relationships with sarcoid tumors and laminitis in two pure breeds.

    PubMed

    Meredith, D; Elser, A H; Wolf, B; Soma, L R; Donawick, W J; Lazary, S

    1986-01-01

    Frequencies of equine leukocyte antigen distribution were determined by complement-mediated cytotoxicity testing among populations of Thoroughbred and Standardbred horses, including animals affected with equine sarcoid and laminitis. A highly significant association is described between the presence or history of sarcoid lesions in Thoroughbreds and the expression of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded antigens, W3 and B1. No association was found between antigenic expression frequencies and laminitis in either breed. These findings suggest that a strong relationship exists between the equine MHC and a predisposition to sarcoid. PMID:3699852

  20. Endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 mediates antigen-induced acute airway inflammation and late-phase airway obstruction in monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Gundel, R H; Wegner, C D; Torcellini, C A; Clarke, C C; Haynes, N; Rothlein, R; Smith, C W; Letts, L G

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the role of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1) in the development of the acute airway inflammation (cell influx) and late-phase airway obstruction in a primate model of extrinsic asthma. In animals sensitive to antigen, a single inhalation exposure induced the rapid expression of ELAM-1 (6 h) exclusively on vascular endothelium that correlated with the influx of neutrophils into the lungs and the onset of late-phase airway obstruction. In contrast, basal levels of ICAM-1 was constitutively expressed on vascular endothelium and airway epithelium before antigen challenge. After the single antigen exposure, changes in ICAM-1 expression did not correlate with neutrophil influx or the change in airway caliber. This was confirmed by showing that pretreatment with a monoclonal antibody to ICAM-1 did not inhibit the acute influx of neutrophils associated with late-phase airway obstruction, whereas a monoclonal antibody to ELAM-1 blocked both the influx of neutrophils and the late-phase airway obstruction. This study demonstrates a functional role for ELAM-1 in the development of acute airway inflammation in vivo. We conclude that, in primates, the late-phase response is the result of an ELAM-1 dependent influx of neutrophils. Therefore, the regulation of ELAM-1 expression may provide a novel approach to controlling the acute inflammatory response, and thereby, affecting airway function associated with inflammatory disorders, including asthma. Images PMID:1717514

  1. Mapping Epitopes on a Protein Antigen by the Proteolysis of Antigen-Antibody Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemmerson, Ronald; Paterson, Yvonne

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody bound to a protein antigen decreases the rate of proteolytic cleavage of the antigen, having the greatest effect on those regions involved in antibody contact. Thus, an epitope can be identified by the ability of the antibody to protect one region of the antigen more than others from proteolysis. By means of this approach, two distinct epitopes, both conformationally well-ordered, were characterized on horse cytochrome c.

  2. Reactions of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of camels with monoclonal antibodies against ruminant leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ungar-Waron, H; Yagil, R; Brenner, J; Paz, R; Partosh, N; Van Creveld, C; Lubashevsky, E; Trainin, Z

    2003-03-01

    The particular immune system of the camel has been but little investigated. In this work circulating camel peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were studied by flow cytometry. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against ruminant leukocytes were used for the detection of cell surface antigens. Monoclonals to T-cell markers, CD4 (CACT138A) and CD8 (CACT80C), exhibited no reactivity towards camel PBMC in contrast to their reactivity to PBMC of other ruminant species and those of cattle in particular. A relatively high percentage (29.1+/-8.9%) of camel PBMC reacted with a non-immunoglobulin cell surface marker, B-B2, comparable to the reactivity of bovine PBMC. The B-B7 cell marker revealed 22.4+/-10.0% of reactive camel PBMC while the CD45 leukocyte common antigen was identified only on 19.4+/-3.1% of camel PBMC as compared to 74.7+/-4.9% for bovine PBMC. IgM (PIg45A) was detected on 9.1+/-1.4% of camel PBMC and on 46.6+/-19.5% of the bovine PBMC. Double fluorescent labeling with two B-cell markers and an anti-ruminant lambda light-chain mAb revealed 7-9% of cells bearing both B and lambda L-chain markers. Light chain reactivity was also assessed using an anti-goat F(ab')(2) antiserum. The values obtained, 14.3+/-5.8% for the camel and 47.8+/-2.7% for the cattle, are close to the values observed for surface IgM. These data suggest that camels, like other ruminants, possess L-chain bearing cells of the B-cell lineage. However, in the camel, Igs are different in that in addition to regular four chain Igs, about 65% of them possess two heavy chain Igs devoid of light chains. Because different sets of V(H) gene segments are used by four and two chain Igs, it is possible that there might be two lineages of B-cells each secreting a different form of antibodies. PMID:12493494

  3. The anti-human leukocyte antigen-DR monoclonal antibody 1D09C3 activates the mitochondrial cell death pathway and exerts a potent antitumor activity in lymphoma-bearing nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Di Nicola, Massimo; Turco, Maria Caterina; Cleris, Loredana; Lavazza, Cristiana; Longoni, Paolo; Milanesi, Marco; Magni, Michele; Ammirante, Massimo; Leone, Arturo; Nagy, Zoltan; Gioffrè, Walter R; Formelli, Franca; Gianni, Alessandro M

    2006-02-01

    The fully human anti-HLA-DR antibody 1D09C3 has been shown to delay lymphoma cell growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. The present study was aimed at (a) investigating the mechanism(s) of 1D09C3-induced cell death and (b) further exploring the therapeutic efficacy of 1D09C3 in nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID mice. The chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell line JVM-2 and the mantle cell lymphoma cell line GRANTA-519 were used. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane depolarization were measured by flow cytometry following cell incubation with dihydroethidium and TMRE, respectively. Western blot analysis was used to detect c-Jun-NH(2)-kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). NOD/SCID mice were used to investigate the activity of 1D09C3 in early- or advanced-stage tumor xenografts. In vitro, 1D09C3-induced cell death involves a cascade of events, including ROS increase, JNK activation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and AIF release from mitochondria. Inhibition of JNK activity significantly reduced 1D09C3-induced apoptosis, indicating that 1D09C3 activity involves activation of the kinase. In vivo, 1D09C3 induces long-term disease-free survival in a significant proportion of tumor-bearing mice treated at an early stage of disease. Treatment of mice bearing advanced-stage lymphoma results in a highly significant prolongation of survival. These data show that 1D09C3 (a) exerts a potent antitumor effect by activating ROS-dependent, JNK-driven cell death, (b) cures the great majority of mice treated at an early-stage of disease, and (c) significantly prolongs survival of mice with advanced-stage disease. PMID:16452241

  4. Human leukocyte Antigen-DM polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Eliot; Wieczorek, Marek; Sticht, Jana; Freund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Classical MHC class II (MHCII) proteins present peptides for CD4+ T-cell surveillance and are by far the most prominent risk factor for a number of autoimmune disorders. To date, many studies have shown that this link between particular MHCII alleles and disease depends on the MHCII's particular ability to bind and present certain peptides in specific physiological contexts. However, less attention has been paid to the non-classical MHCII molecule human leucocyte antigen-DM, which catalyses peptide exchange on classical MHCII proteins acting as a peptide editor. DM function impacts the presentation of both antigenic peptides in the periphery and key self-peptides during T-cell development in the thymus. In this way, DM activity directly influences the response to pathogens, as well as mechanisms of self-tolerance acquisition. While decreased DM editing of particular MHCII proteins has been proposed to be related to autoimmune disorders, no experimental evidence for different DM catalytic properties had been reported until recently. Biochemical and structural investigations, together with new animal models of loss of DM activity, have provided an attractive foundation for identifying different catalytic efficiencies for DM allotypes. Here, we revisit the current knowledge of DM function and discuss how DM function may impart autoimmunity at the organism level. PMID:27534821

  5. Discovery of internalizing antibodies to tumor antigens from phage libraries

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Marks, James D

    2014-01-01

    Phage antibody technology can be used to generate human antibodies to essentially any antigen. Many therapeutic target antigens are cell surface receptors, which can be challenging targets for antibody generation. In addition, for many therapeutic applications, one needs antibodies that not only bind the cell surface receptor but that also are internalized into the cell upon binding. This allows use of the antibody to deliver a range of payloads into the cell to achieve a therapeutic effect. In this chapter we describe how human phage antibody libraries can be selected directly on tumor cell lines to generate antibodies that bind cell surface receptors and which upon binding are rapidly internalized into the cell. Specific protocols show how to: 1) directly select cell binding and internalizing antibodies from human phage antibody libraries; 2) screen the phage antibodies in a high throughput flow cytometry assay for binding to the tumor cell line used for selection; 3) identify the antigen bound by the phage antibody using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry; and 4) direct cell binding and internalizing selections to a specific tumor antigen by sequential selection on a tumor cell line followed by selection on yeast displaying the target tumor antigen on the yeast surface. PMID:22208981

  6. CD Nomenclature 2015: Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshops as a Driving Force in Immunology.

    PubMed

    Engel, Pablo; Boumsell, Laurence; Balderas, Robert; Bensussan, Armand; Gattei, Valter; Horejsi, Vaclav; Jin, Bo-Quan; Malavasi, Fabio; Mortari, Frank; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard; Stockinger, Hannes; van Zelm, Menno C; Zola, Heddy; Clark, Georgina

    2015-11-15

    CD (cluster of differentiation) Ags are cell surface molecules expressed on leukocytes and other cells relevant for the immune system. CD nomenclature has been universally adopted by the scientific community and is officially approved by the International Union of Immunological Societies and sanctioned by the World Health Organization. It provides a unified designation system for mAbs, as well as for the cell surface molecules that they recognize. This nomenclature was established by the Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens Workshops. In addition to defining the CD nomenclature, these workshops have been instrumental in identifying and determining the expression and function of cell surface molecules. Over the past 30 y, the data generated by the 10 Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens Workshops have led to the characterization and formal designation of more than 400 molecules. CD molecules are commonly used as cell markers, allowing the identification and isolation of leukocyte populations, subsets, and differentiation stages. mAbs against these molecules have proven to be essential for biomedical research and diagnosis, as well as in biotechnology. More recently, they have been recognized as invaluable tools for the treatment of several malignancies and autoimmune diseases. In this article, we describe how the CD nomenclature was established, present the official updated list of CD molecules, and provide a rationale for their usefulness in the 21st century. PMID:26546687

  7. Monoclonal antibody specific for a pigmentation associated antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, T.M.; Mattes, M.J.; Old, L.J.; Lloyd, K.O

    1989-01-17

    Monoclonal antibody TA99, which specifically binds to a pigmentation associated antigen present on melanoma cells is described. Additionally, the hybridoma cell line deposited with the ATCC under Accession Number HB 8704 from which the antibody is derived, as well as methods for using the antibody are described.

  8. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies. PMID:26862167

  9. Human leukocyte antigen haplotypes in the genetic control of immune response to measles-mumps-rubella vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Pankratz, V Shane; Vierkant, Robert A; Jacobson, Robert M; Poland, Gregory A

    2006-03-01

    To elucidate the contribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes and their genotypic combinations to immune status after measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination, 346 children 12-18 years of age were studied. The class I A*29-Cw*16-B*44 haplotype was associated with lower levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody to both measles (P=.08) and mumps (P=.03) viral antigens. The A*26-Cw*12-B*38 haplotype was associated with higher cellular immune responses to measles (P=.02) and mumps (P=.01) vaccine viruses. Subjects with the class II DRB1*03-DQB1*02-DPB1*04 haplotype had higher lymphoproliferative responses to measles virus (P=.01) and mumps virus (P=.006). The DRB1*15/16-DQB1*06-DPB1*03 haplotype was associated with high levels of IgG antibody to measles virus (P=.09) but low levels of IgG antibody to rubella virus (P=.02), whereas DRB1*04-DQB1*03-DPB1*03 was associated with high lymphoproliferative responses to both measles (P=.01) and rubella (P=.002) vaccine viruses. A*26-Cw*12-B*38 was associated with both mumps virus-specific humoral (P=.007) and cell-mediated (P=.01) immune responses after 2 doses of MMR vaccine. Haplotype DRB1*04-DQB1*03-DPB1*03 was associated with both lower rubella virus IgG antibody levels (P=.02) and higher rubella virus-specific lymphoproliferation (P=.002). Better characterization of such HLA profiles could inform and improve the design of novel epitope-rich vaccines and help to predict protective immune responses at the individual and population level. PMID:16453260

  10. Effects of cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria on the leukocyte function-associated antigen 1/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 pathway in gingival fibroblasts in adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, J; Saito, I; Ishikawa, I; Miyasaka, N

    1994-12-01

    We investigated the effects of inflammatory cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria on expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and E-selectin (endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1) in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cell surface ICAM-1 was upregulated on HGF under transcriptional control by exposure not only to interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and gamma interferon but also to sonic extracts prepared from Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia (nigrescens) and lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli. However, these stimuli induced only minimal expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and E-selectin on HGF. Binding assays using HGF and Molt 4, the human T-cell leukemia cell line, showed induced ICAM-1 to be functional, and the increased binding was blocked by a combination of monoclonal antibodies against ICAM-1 and leukocyte function-associated antigen 1. Furthermore, gingival tissues from adult periodontitis patients showed increased mRNA expression of ICAM-1 compared with that in tissues from normal healthy donors. In immunohistological analysis, we also observed in vivo that the expression of ICAM-1 on fibroblasts in adult periodontitis tissues was greater than that in normal gingiva. Thus, the overexpression of ICAM-1 on gingival fibroblasts induced by cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria is speculated to be deeply involved in the accumulation and retention of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1-bearing leukocytes in adult periodontitis lesions. PMID:7525481

  11. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W.; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D.; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.   PMID:26982805

  12. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Alison E; Jennewein, Madeleine F; Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H; Alter, Galit

    2016-03-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  . PMID:26982805

  13. Genotyping of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ancestral haplotypes as prognostic marker in cancer using PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Villabona, Lisa; Andersson, Emilia; Marchesi, Maddalena; Masucci, Giuseppe V

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) comprises a set of genes that are essential to immunity and surveillance against neoplastic transformation. MHC antigens not only regulate antitumor immune responses in experimental animal models but also directly correlate with survival and prognosis of patients with various types of cancers. Effective recognition of tumor cells by effector T cells may be affected by the genotype and the extent of expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-peptide complexes. Therefore, MHC antigens may serve as potential biomarkers for prognosis and allow selection of cancer patients for specific therapy. We describe PCR-based method to determine the HLA genotype in healthy individuals and patients using blood and tumor tissue as DNA source. PMID:24258987

  14. Specificity of antibodies to immunodominant mycobacterial antigens in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Jackett, P S; Bothamley, G H; Batra, H V; Mistry, A; Young, D B; Ivanyi, J

    1988-01-01

    A serological survey was performed in groups of patients with active sputum smear-positive or smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis, healthy household contacts, and controls. Sera were tested for titers of antibodies which bound to each of five purified mycobacterial antigens by enzyme immunoassay and for competition of binding to single epitopes, using six radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies directed toward corresponding molecules. The evaluation of diagnostic specificity was based on a positive score represented by titers above the cutoff point of 2 standard deviations above the mean titer of a control group. For smear-positive samples, the best sensitivity (83%) was achieved by exclusive use of the 38-kilodalton (kDa) antigen or its corresponding monoclonal antibodies. For smear-negative samples, levels of antibodies binding to the 19-kDa antigen showed a lower sensitivity of 62% compared with the control group or 38% compared with the contact group. Titers of antibody binding to the 14-kDa antigen were raised in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated contacts, indicating that the greatest potential of this antigen may be in the detection of infection in a population for which tuberculin testing is unreliable. The results demonstrated the differing antibody responses to each of the tested antigens and distinct associations with the stage of infection or disease. PMID:2466869

  15. Genome-wide genetic and transcriptomic investigation of variation in antibody response to dietary antigens.

    PubMed

    Rubicz, Rohina; Yolken, Robert; Alaedini, Armin; Drigalenko, Eugene; Charlesworth, Jac C; Carless, Melanie A; Severance, Emily G; Krivogorsky, Bogdana; Dyer, Thomas D; Kent, Jack W; Curran, Joanne E; Johnson, Matthew P; Cole, Shelley A; Almasy, Laura; Moses, Eric K; Blangero, John; Göring, Harald H H

    2014-07-01

    Increased immunoglobulin G (IgG) response to dietary antigens can be associated with gastrointestinal dysfunction and autoimmunity. The underlying processes contributing to these adverse reactions remain largely unknown, and it is likely that genetic factors play a role. Here, we estimate heritability and attempt to localize genetic factors influencing IgG antibody levels against food-derived antigens using an integrative genomics approach. IgG antibody levels were determined by ELISA in >1,300 Mexican Americans for the following food antigens: wheat gliadin; bovine casein; and two forms of bovine serum albumin (BSA-a and BSA-b). Pedigree-based variance components methods were used to estimate additive genetic heritability (h(2) ), perform genome-wide association analyses, and identify transcriptional signatures (based on 19,858 transcripts from peripheral blood lymphocytes). Heritability estimates were significant for all traits (0.15-0.53), and shared environment (based on shared residency among study participants) was significant for casein (0.09) and BSA-a (0.33). Genome-wide significant evidence of association was obtained only for antibody to gliadin (P = 8.57 × 10(-8) ), mapping to the human leukocyte antigen II region, with HLA-DRA and BTNL2 as the best candidate genes. Lack of association of known celiac disease risk alleles HLA-DQ2.5 and -DQ8 with antigliadin antibodies in the studied population suggests a separate genetic etiology. Significant transcriptional signatures were found for all IgG levels except BSA-b. These results demonstrate that individual genetic differences contribute to food antigen antibody measures in this population. Further investigations may elucidate the underlying immunological processes involved. PMID:24962563

  16. Monoclonal antibody blockade of L-selectin inhibits mononuclear leukocyte recruitment to inflammatory sites in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Pizcueta, P.; Luscinskas, F. W.

    1994-01-01

    L-selectin interacting with inducible endothelial counterreceptors mediates in part the initial adhesive interactions, termed rolling, between circulating blood leukocytes and vascular endothelium. While blockade of L-selectin function in in vivo models of inflammation reduces both neutrophil and lymphocyte influx at early times, little is known concerning the role of L-selectin in leukocyte recruitment at later times (> 24 hours). Using an in vivo murine model of experimentally induced inflammation of the peritoneum, the role of L-selectin in recruitment of mononuclear leukocytes to chronic sites of inflammation (48 hours) was investigated. Saturating levels of function blocking anti-L-selectin monoclonal antibody (MEL-14) or control rat IgG were maintained for 48 hours using surgically implanted mini-osmotic pumps; this treatment did not alter the circulating leukocyte cell count or differential. In animals receiving MEL-14 monoclonal antibody (MAb), macrophage and lymphocyte accumulation in response to thioglycollate was reduced by 60% (P < or = 0.0002) and > 90% (P < 0.001), respectively, at 48 hours as compared with animals implanted with pumps containing saline. Similarly, MEL-14 MAb dramatically inhibited granulocyte influx by 80% (P < 0.03) at 6 hours; recruitment at 24 and 48 hours was reduced by 50%. In contrast, the effects of purified rat IgG was not significantly different from saline. Our results suggest L-selectin, interacting with its inducible endothelial counterreceptor(s), plays an important role in circulating mononuclear leukocyte extravasation at sites of inflammation. PMID:7519828

  17. Antibody and blood leukocyte response in Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) tick-infested dogs and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Matias P J; Aoki, Vanessa L; Sanches, Françoise P S; Aquino, Lúcia P T C T; Garcia, Marcos V; Machado, Rosângela Z; Bechara, Gervásio H

    2003-07-10

    The dog is considered to be the natural host of Rhipicephalus sanguineus and is unable to develop appreciable resistance even after repeated feedings. The guinea pig develops strong resistance after one infestation with adult ticks. Antibody (IgG) titres against tick salivary gland antigens (SGAs) and blood leukocyte numbers in dogs and guinea pigs undergoing experimental R. sanguineus tick infestations were measured to detect a possible correlation with susceptibility or resistance of hosts. Since infested dogs develop an immediate hypersensitivity reaction to R. sanguineus antigens, total and anti-R. sanguineus SGA IgE levels were also measured in this host species. IgG and IgE antibody levels were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) along three consecutive infestations of both hosts. Most dogs and guinea pigs displayed low IgG levels against R. sanguineus SGAs, though marked differences in individual response were observed. Although dog's total serum IgE levels increased significantly after infestations, no change in the amount of anti-salivary gland IgE was detected. Total and differential blood cell counts were determined in dogs and guinea pigs during primary and secondary infestation. In dogs, a tertiary infestation and a subsequent higher infestation level were also evaluated. Infested dogs did not display any alteration in blood leukocyte counts throughout the experiment. Guinea pigs, on the other hand, developed a significant basophilia during primary infestation which increased further during secondary infestation. These data reveal similarities and differences in the reactions of resistant and non-resistant hosts to ticks. They contribute for the understanding of such host-parasite relationships and will hopefully aid in the development of immune control of ticks. PMID:12860067

  18. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    PubMed Central

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 PMID:7389197

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, T; Díaz, A M; Zlotnik, H

    1990-01-01

    Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis whole-cell extracts were used as antigens to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Six stable hybrid cell lines secreting anti-Nocardia spp. MAbs were obtained. These were characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot (immunoblot), and immunofluorescence assay. Although all the MAbs exhibited different degrees of cross-reactivity with N. asteroides and N. brasiliensis antigens as well as with culture-filtrate antigens from Mycobacteria spp., they have the potential for use as reagents in the purification of Nocardia antigens. Images PMID:2405017

  20. Nephropathia epidemica in Norway: antigen and antibodies in rodent reservoirs and antibodies in selected human populations.

    PubMed Central

    Traavik, T.; Sommer, A. I.; Mehl, R.; Berdal, B. P.; Stavem, K.; Hunderi, O. H.; Dalrymple, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Nephropathia epidemica (NE) antigen was detected by IFAT (indirect fluorescent antibody technique) in the lungs of 14 of 97 bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) collected in three endemic areas. The distribution of antigen positive voles within an endemic location was scattered. Antibodies to Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) virus antigens were detected by IFAT in 12 of 14 NE antigen positive bank voles and in 15 of 83 that were antigen negative. NE antigen positive voles exhibited higher antibody titres. Antibodies to KHF were demonstrated in sera from C. rutilus and C. rufocanus collected more than 200 km north of the distribution area for C. glareolus. It appears likely that these vole species can serve as virus vectors for NE cases occurring north of the bank vole area. NE antibodies cross-reacting with KHF virus seem to diminish with time after infection in some NE patients, while for others such cross-reacting antibodies were detected up to 12 years after the disease. Antibodies to KHF were detected in eight of 106 healthy forestry workers with no clinical history of NE. No serological cross-reactions were detected between NE/KHF antigens and representative Bunyaviridae present in Norway. NE/KHF-like viruses appear widespread in Norway, both within and outside of the distribution area of the bank vole. PMID:6146649

  1. Enhancement of antigen-induced leukocyte histamine release by a mononuclear cell--derived factor.

    PubMed

    Bamzai, A K; Kretschmer, R R

    1978-09-01

    Supernatant fluids of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated mononuclear cells from ragweed-sensitive patients significantly enhanced the release of histamine from antigen-triggered leukocytes of ragweed-sensitive as well as control individuals. Supernatants of mononuclear cells from control individuals did not reveal this enhancing effect, nor was it found with the use of supernatants of unstimulated mononuclear cells of ragweed-sensitive patients or culture media with PHA alone. Supernatant fluids of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated mononuclear cells of patients sensitive to trees and grass also revealed this enhancing effect. The factor(s) responsible for the enhancement of antigen-induced histamine is heat labile and has a molecular weight of less than 10,000 daltons. The mechanism and site of action of the enhancing factor could involve initiating and/or modulating steps of the leukocyte histamine release reaction. This factor, presumably a lymphokine or a monokine, may constitute a regulating link between cell-mediated immunity and histamine-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in allergic patients. PMID:79584

  2. PK/PD analysis of a novel pH-dependent antigen-binding antibody using a dynamic antibody-antigen binding model.

    PubMed

    Haraya, Kenta; Tachibana, Tatsuhiko; Iwayanagi, Yuki; Maeda, Atsuhiko; Ozeki, Kazuhisa; Nezu, Junichi; Ishigai, Masaki; Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2016-04-01

    Previously, we have reported novel engineered antibody with pH-dependent antigen-binding (recycling antibody), and with both pH-dependent antigen-binding and increased FcRn-binding at neutral pH (sweeping antibody). The purpose of this study is to perform PK/PD predictions to better understand the potential applications of the antibodies as therapeutics. To demonstrate the applicability of recycling and sweeping antibodies over conventional antibodies, PK/PD analyses were performed. PK/PD parameters for antibody and antigen dynamics were estimated from the results of a pharmacokinetic study in human FcRn transgenic mice. A simulation study was performed using the estimated PK/PD parameters with various target antigen profiles. In comparison to conventional antibody, recycling antibody enhanced antibody-antigen complex clearance by 3 folds, while sweeping antibody accelerated antigen clearance by 10 folds in a pharmacokinetic study. Simulation results showed that recycling and sweeping antibodies can improve dosage frequency and reduce the required dose for target antigens with various clearances, plasma concentrations or binding kinetics. Moreover, importance of the association rate constant to enhance the beneficial effect of antibodies was shown. These results support the conclusion that recycling and sweeping antibodies can be applied to various target antigens with different profiles, and expand the number of antigens that antibodies can target. PMID:26944099

  3. Identification of mutant monoclonal antibodies with increased antigen binding.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, R R; French, D L; Gefter, M L; Scharff, M D

    1988-01-01

    Sib selection and an ELISA have been used to isolate hybridoma subclones producing mutant antibodies that bind antigen better than the parental monoclonal antibody. Such mutants arise spontaneously in culture at frequencies of 2.5-5 X 10(-5). The sequences of the heavy and light chain variable regions of the mutant antibodies are identical to that of the parent and the Ka values of the mutants and the parent are the same. The increase in binding is associated with abnormalities of the constant region polypeptide and probably reflect changes in avidity of these antibodies. Images PMID:3267219

  4. An evaluation of the utility of anti-granulocyte and anti-leukocyte monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Dorfman, R. F.; Gatter, K. C.; Pulford, K. A.; Mason, D. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The immunoreactivity of six different monoclonal antigranulocyte antibodies (Leu M1, TG1, 3C4, BY/87a, BY/37a, and 3CD1) has been evaluated in 23 cases of Hodgkin's disease (7 lymphocyte predominant, 12 nodular sclerosing, and 5 mixed cellularity); in a variety of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and in a series of reactive and benign lesions of lymph nodes. Applying a monoclonal antibody (PD7/26) to leukocyte common antigen (T200), we have also investigated reports that the L&H variants in nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin's disease are strongly immunoreactive for leukocyte common antigen in contrast to the lack of reactivity of Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells and variants thereof in other forms of Hodgkin's disease. All six monoclonal anti-granulocyte antibodies reacted against RS cells and "Hodgkin's cells" in the nodular sclerosing (NSHD) and mixed cellularity (MCHD) types, with strong cell membrane and juxtanuclear (Golgi) staining. In contrast an anti-leukocyte antibody PD7/26 was unreactive with RS cells and variants thereof in NSHD and MCHD. On the other hand, RS cells and L&H variants thereof in the nodular L&H form of Hodgkin's disease (nodular lymphocyte predominant type) showed reactivity with PD7/26 but not with the anti-granulocyte markers. Rare L&H cells in 2 cases of diffuse lymphocyte predominant type showed reactivity with some, but not all, of the anti-granulocyte antibodies. These findings provide further support for the concept that the nodular L&H type of Hodgkin's disease represents an entity distinct from other forms of this disorder. Our studies also demonstrate the usefulness of these immunoperoxidase techniques when applied to formalinfixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5A and B Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:3717303

  5. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  6. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  7. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  8. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  9. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  10. Human leukocyte antigens in indigenous (mapuche) people in a regional renal transplantation program in chile.

    PubMed

    Droguett, M A; Oyarzún, M J; Alruiz, P; Jerez, V; Mezzano, S; Ardiles, L

    2005-10-01

    An active regional transplantation program established in the southern region of Chile has allowed the incorporation of ethnic minorities particularly Mapuche living in this geographic area in the development of a histocompatibility database. To identify possible differences in the human leukocyte (HLA) antigen distribution in Chilean Mapuche compared with non-Mapuche, we reviewed 442 HLA tissue-typing studies. Seventy-eight of 309 recipients (25%) and 18 of 133 donors (13%) were Mapuche. Among recipients, Mapuche people showed a significantly higher frequency of the HLA antigens, A28, B16, DR4, and DR8, and a lower one for A19, B15, and DR1 (P < .05) compared with non-Mapuche individuals. A particularly higher frequency of the haplotype A28, -B16, -DR4 was also evidenced in Mapuche. Besides, these recipients showed a higher frequency of the allele -DR4 when compared with Mapuche donors. A greater frequency of some histocompatibility antigens in patients with chronic renal disease might be attributed to allelic concentration due to a high index of endogamy, but a possible association with the development of progressive renal disease cannot be ignored, especially when a higher prevalence of DR4 was observed among Mapuche recipients. PMID:16298598

  11. Identification of two antigenic determinants in pseudomurein by monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Conway de Macario, E.; Macario, A.J.L.; Kandler, O.; Wolin, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Pseudomurein is a unique peptidoglycan found only in the wall of methanogenic bacteria (MB) of the family Methanobacteriaceae. Although its chemical composition has recently been determined, its immunologic properties have not been elucidated. Methanobacteriaceae elicit antibodies in rabbits and mice. The authors have produced monoclonal antibodies against the bacteria. Antigenic determinants on the MB's surface were resolved with the monoclonal antibodies by means of inhibition-blocking procedures combined with immunoenzymatic assays devised for the structural analysis of bacterial antigens. One monoclonal antibody against Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus DHl recognized a determinant involving the ..gamma..-Glu-Ala end of the pseudomurein peptide. A second antibody did not react with the above determinant but with another involving N-acetylglucosamine. The latter antibody reacted with the immunizing MB, i.e. Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum ..delta..H and with another strain of this species, GGl, but it did not react with the rest of the pseudomurein-containing bacteria. The data show that pseudomurein possess at least two different determinants, one in the C-terminus of the peptide moiety and the other in the backbone structure and indicate that the spatial arrangement of the peptidoglycan components is distinctive for the species examined and plays a role in antigenicity.

  12. The colonization of the Pacific: the story according to human leukocyte antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Serjeantson, S W; Ryan, D P; Thompson, A R

    1982-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) distributions in 16 Pacific populations have been collated from published and unpublished reports. Gene frequency and linkage disequilibrium relationships among groups show that Australians and Papuans share a common ancestry, that coastal Melanesia has about 16% Austronesian admixture, and that Fiji is truly intermediate between Melanesia and Polynesia. In Polynesia, Cook Islanders show closer affinity with populations of Western Polynesia than with Maoris and Easter Islanders, in contrast to their linguistic affiliations, but otherwise HLA distributions show a clear division between the populations of Eastern and Western Polynesia. This study emphasizes the contribution the HLA system can make to anthropological studies and has provided a version of colonization of the Pacific compatible with theories based on prodigious efforts in many disciplines. PMID:7180847

  13. Appropriate clinical use of human leukocyte antigen typing for coeliac disease: an Australasian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tye-Din, J A; Cameron, D J S; Daveson, A J; Day, A S; Dellsperger, P; Hogan, C; Newnham, E D; Shepherd, S J; Steele, R H; Wienholt, L; Varney, M D

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing emerge as a remarkably popular test for the diagnostic work-up of coeliac disease with high patient acceptance. Although limited in its positive predictive value for coeliac disease, the strong disease association with specific HLA genes imparts exceptional negative predictive value to HLA typing, enabling a negative result to exclude coeliac disease confidently. In response to mounting evidence that the clinical use and interpretation of HLA typing often deviates from best practice, this article outlines an evidence-based approach to guide clinically appropriate use of HLA typing, and establishes a reporting template for pathology providers to improve communication of results. PMID:25827511

  14. Expression of a Chimeric Antigen Receptor in Multiple Leukocyte Lineages in Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Yong, Carmen S M; Westwood, Jennifer A; Schröder, Jan; Papenfuss, Anthony T; von Scheidt, Bianca; Moeller, Maria; Devaud, Christel; Darcy, Phillip K; Kershaw, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified CD8+ T lymphocytes have shown significant anti-tumor effects in the adoptive immunotherapy of cancer, with recent studies highlighting a potential role for a combination of other immune subsets to enhance these results. However, limitations in present genetic modification techniques impose difficulties in our ability to fully explore the potential of various T cell subsets and assess the potential of other leukocytes armed with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). To address this issue, we generated a transgenic mouse model using a pan-hematopoietic promoter (vav) to drive the expression of a CAR specific for a tumor antigen. Here we present a characterization of the immune cell compartment in two unique vav-CAR transgenic mice models, Founder 9 (F9) and Founder 38 (F38). We demonstrate the vav promoter is indeed capable of driving the expression of a CAR in cells from both myeloid and lymphoid lineage, however the highest level of expression was observed in T lymphocytes from F38 mice. Lymphoid organs in vav-CAR mice were smaller and had reduced cell numbers compared to the wild type (WT) controls. Furthermore, the immune composition of F9 mice differed greatly with a significant reduction in lymphocytes found in the thymus, lymph node and spleen of these mice. To gain insight into the altered immune phenotype of F9 mice, we determined the chromosomal integration site of the transgene in both mouse strains using whole genome sequencing (WGS). We demonstrated that compared to the 7 copies found in F38 mice, F9 mice harbored almost 270 copies. These novel vav-CAR models provide a ready source of CAR expressing myeloid and lymphoid cells and will aid in facilitating future experiments to delineate the role for other leukocytes for adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:26505904

  15. Expression of a Chimeric Antigen Receptor in Multiple Leukocyte Lineages in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Carmen S. M.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; Schröder, Jan; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; von Scheidt, Bianca; Moeller, Maria; Devaud, Christel

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified CD8+ T lymphocytes have shown significant anti-tumor effects in the adoptive immunotherapy of cancer, with recent studies highlighting a potential role for a combination of other immune subsets to enhance these results. However, limitations in present genetic modification techniques impose difficulties in our ability to fully explore the potential of various T cell subsets and assess the potential of other leukocytes armed with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). To address this issue, we generated a transgenic mouse model using a pan-hematopoietic promoter (vav) to drive the expression of a CAR specific for a tumor antigen. Here we present a characterization of the immune cell compartment in two unique vav-CAR transgenic mice models, Founder 9 (F9) and Founder 38 (F38). We demonstrate the vav promoter is indeed capable of driving the expression of a CAR in cells from both myeloid and lymphoid lineage, however the highest level of expression was observed in T lymphocytes from F38 mice. Lymphoid organs in vav-CAR mice were smaller and had reduced cell numbers compared to the wild type (WT) controls. Furthermore, the immune composition of F9 mice differed greatly with a significant reduction in lymphocytes found in the thymus, lymph node and spleen of these mice. To gain insight into the altered immune phenotype of F9 mice, we determined the chromosomal integration site of the transgene in both mouse strains using whole genome sequencing (WGS). We demonstrated that compared to the 7 copies found in F38 mice, F9 mice harbored almost 270 copies. These novel vav-CAR models provide a ready source of CAR expressing myeloid and lymphoid cells and will aid in facilitating future experiments to delineate the role for other leukocytes for adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:26505904

  16. Focused antibody response to influenza linked to antigenic drift

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuan-Ying A.; Rijal, Pramila; Schimanski, Lisa; Powell, Timothy J.; Lin, Tzou-Yien; McCauley, John W.; Daniels, Rodney S.; Townsend, Alain R.

    2015-01-01

    The selective pressure that drives antigenic changes in influenza viruses is thought to originate from the human immune response. Here, we have characterized the B cell repertoire from a previously vaccinated donor whose serum had reduced neutralizing activity against the recently evolved clade 6B H1N1pdm09 viruses. While the response was markedly polyclonal, 88% of clones failed to recognize clade 6B viruses; however, the ability to neutralize A/USSR/90/1977 influenza, to which the donor would have been exposed in childhood, was retained. In vitro selection of virus variants with representative monoclonal antibodies revealed that a single amino acid replacement at residue K163 in the Sa antigenic site, which is characteristic of the clade 6B viruses, was responsible for resistance to neutralization by multiple monoclonal antibodies and the donor serum. The K163 residue lies in a part of a conserved surface that is common to the hemagglutinins of the 1977 and 2009 H1N1 viruses. Vaccination with the 2009 hemagglutinin induced an antibody response tightly focused on this common surface that is capable of selecting current antigenic drift variants in H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses. Moreover, amino acid replacement at K163 was not highlighted by standard ferret antisera. Human monoclonal antibodies may be a useful adjunct to ferret antisera for detecting antigenic drift in influenza viruses. PMID:26011643

  17. Focused antibody response to influenza linked to antigenic drift.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Ying A; Rijal, Pramila; Schimanski, Lisa; Powell, Timothy J; Lin, Tzou-Yien; McCauley, John W; Daniels, Rodney S; Townsend, Alain R

    2015-07-01

    The selective pressure that drives antigenic changes in influenza viruses is thought to originate from the human immune response. Here, we have characterized the B cell repertoire from a previously vaccinated donor whose serum had reduced neutralizing activity against the recently evolved clade 6B H1N1pdm09 viruses. While the response was markedly polyclonal, 88% of clones failed to recognize clade 6B viruses; however, the ability to neutralize A/USSR/90/1977 influenza, to which the donor would have been exposed in childhood, was retained. In vitro selection of virus variants with representative monoclonal antibodies revealed that a single amino acid replacement at residue K163 in the Sa antigenic site, which is characteristic of the clade 6B viruses, was responsible for resistance to neutralization by multiple monoclonal antibodies and the donor serum. The K163 residue lies in a part of a conserved surface that is common to the hemagglutinins of the 1977 and 2009 H1N1 viruses. Vaccination with the 2009 hemagglutinin induced an antibody response tightly focused on this common surface that is capable of selecting current antigenic drift variants in H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses. Moreover, amino acid replacement at K163 was not highlighted by standard ferret antisera. Human monoclonal antibodies may be a useful adjunct to ferret antisera for detecting antigenic drift in influenza viruses. PMID:26011643

  18. Differential effects of volatile anesthetics on leukocyte integrin macrophage-1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungeun; Yuki, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage-1 antigen (Mac-1, αMβ2) is a leukocyte adhesion molecule that plays a significant role in leukocyte crawling and phagocytosis, and is homologous to its sister protein leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1, αLβ2). The authors have previously demonstrated that volatile anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane bound to and inhibited LFA-1. Here, the hypothesis tested was that isoflurane and sevoflurane would inhibit Mac-1. A binding assay of Mac-1 to its ligand inter-cellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) using V-bottom plates was established. The effect of isoflurane and sevoflurane on Mac-1 was examined using this ICAM-1 binding assay and by probing exposure of activation-sensitive epitopes. The docking program Glide was used to predict anesthetic binding site(s) on Mac-1. The functional role of this predicted binding site was then assessed by introducing point mutations in this region. Lastly, the effect of anesthetic on activating mutants was evaluated. The results indicated that isoflurane inhibited binding of Mac-1 to ICAM-1, but sevoflurane did not. Isoflurane also attenuated the exposure of the activation-sensitive epitopes. The docking simulation predicted the isoflurane binding site to be at the cavity underneath the α7 helix of the ligand binding domain (the αM I domain). Point mutants at this predicted binding site contained both activating and deactivating mutants, suggesting its functional significance. The binding of activating mutants αM-Y267A β2-WT and αM-L312A β2-WT to ICAM-1 was not affected by isoflurane, but binding of another activating mutant αM-WT β2-L132A was inhibited supporting the binding of isoflurane to this cavity. The conclusion reached from these findings was that isoflurane inhibited Mac-1 binding to ICAM-1 by binding to the cavity underneath the α7 helix of the αM I domain, but sevoflurane did not. Thus, because these common clinical volatile anesthetics demonstrated different effects on Mac-1, this

  19. Characterization of Tritrichomonas foetus antigens by use of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, J L; Jones, D W; Widders, P R; Corbeil, L B

    1990-01-01

    The specificity for and function of monoclonal antibodies against Tritrichomonas foetus were characterized. Four monoclonal antibodies generated by immunization of mice with live T. foetus were selected on the basis of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay reactions. The approximate molecular masses of the predominant proteins were determined by Western blotting (immunoblotting). Monoclonal antibody TF3.8 recognized a predominant band at approximately 155 kilodaltons, whereas TF3.2 reacted with several bands. Monoclonal antibodies TF1.17 and TF1.15 recognized broad bands between 45 and 75 kilodaltons. The first two antibodies (TF3.8 and TF3.2) did not react with the surface of T. foetus, as determined by live-cell immunofluorescence, agglutination, and immobilization, whereas two other monoclonal antibodies (TF1.17 and TF1.15) did react with surface epitopes, as determined by these criteria. The latter two monoclonal antibodies also mediated complement-dependent killing of T. foetus and prevented of adherence of organisms to bovine vaginal epithelial cells. One antibody, TF1.15, also killed in the absence of complement. Since these functions are in vitro correlates of protection, the antigens recognized by these monoclonal antibodies may induce protective immunity. Images PMID:2201645

  20. Virus-specific antibodies interfere with avian influenza infection in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes from young or aged chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) infection was examined in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocyte cultures (PBMC) that were collected from 1-day-old chicks or from 52-week-old chickens. Virus-specific antibodies were incubated with AIV to model maternal antibody interference in vitro. Interferon-alpha (I...

  1. Human tumor antigens identified with monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    AlSedairy, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    MoAbLc1 (IgM) and MoAbLc2 (IgG/sub 2a/) were produced against human lung carcinoma cell line (ChaGo). Lc1 recognizes a approx. = 330-kd/approx. = 310-kd glycoprotein complexes, and Lc2 recognizes a approx. = 60-kd/approx. = 47-kd protein complex. With a panel of cell lines of different tissue origin, Lc1 showed a more restricted reactivity to ChaGo; it cross-reacted with another lung carcinoma cell line (SK-Lc-2) and two breast carcinoma cell lines, but failed to react with cell lines of fetal lung, of colon, esophageal, prostate, stomach, and ovarian carcinomas, of B and T lymphoblastoid cells, neuroblastomas, glioblastoma, astrocytoma, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes. New and improved methods were developed for the production of indium-111-labeled MoAbs for tumor imaging. To facilitate the application of bicyclic anhydride diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (BADTPA) to In-111 labeling of antibodies, we have modified the original method by using C-14-labeled BADTPA, which allows precise quantitation of DTPA molecules incorporated. A new heterobifunctional reagent, 2,6-dioxo-N-(carboxyl)morpholine (DCM) was synthesized for chelating In-111 to MoAbs, and demonstrated higher retention of immunoreactivity of the labeled antibody.

  2. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M. Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M.; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S.; Gaston, J. S. Hill; Deery, Michael J.; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  3. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules.

    PubMed

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S; Gaston, J S Hill; Deery, Michael J; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  4. Increased soluble human leukocyte antigen-G levels in peripheral blood from climbers on Mount Everest.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Michel; Yaghi, Layale; Flajollet, Sébastien; Radanne-Krawice, Irène; Rouas-Freiss, Nathalie; Lugrin, Didier; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Carosella, Edgardo D; Moreau, Philippe

    2010-11-01

    Soluble human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is involved in maternal-fetal tolerance, transplant acceptance, and tumor escape from immunosurveillance, operating by inhibiting activity of T, antigen presenting cells (APC), and natural killer (NK) cells. HLA-G gene expression is modulated in vitro after hypoxic conditions, a situation evidenced during pregnancy and tumor progression. In extreme altitude, mountaineers are in hypoxic conditions that generate physiologic adaptative responses, some of them giving rise to pathologic signs. We performed measurements of plasma soluble HLA-G in six climbers before departure of the expedition and during their ascent to and descent from summit of Mount Everest, and in 3 Sherpas at 5300-6400 m. We found that HLA-G levels are upregulated during the ascent with a unique pattern in comparison with angiogenic/lymphangiogenic factors. Our data suggest that HLA-G has to be taken into account in the mechanisms participating in adaptation to high altitudes and reinforce hypoxia as an important factor in the regulation of HLA-G expression. PMID:20732367

  5. Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    An antigen is any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it. This means your immune ... and is trying to fight it off. An antigen may be a substance from the environment, such ...

  6. Antigenic heterogeneity in Mycoplasma iowae demonstrated with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Panangala, V S; Gresham, M M; Morsy, M A

    1992-01-01

    Western blots of proteins of 14 Mycoplasma iowae strains and isolates resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were probed with three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), MI6, MI7, and MI8. MAb MI6 reacted with one or more antigens with apparent molecular weights of 60,000, 70,000, and 94,000. In three strains (N-PHN-D13, R-D2497, and K 1805), antigens located on a single peptide band were recognized, while in others additional epitopes at different molecular-weight positions were revealed. A similar pattern was observed with MAb MI7, although it reacted with fewer antigens than did MAb MI6 and failed to recognize antigens in strains N-PHN-D13 and R-D2497. MAb MI8 reacted with an antigen at an apparent molecular-weight position of 28,000 in four of the 14 strains and isolates. The diverse reaction patterns observed with the MAbs in the 14 M. iowae strains and isolates confirms the occurrence of antigenic variation within this species. Antigenic variation in M. iowae may be pivotal in determining host-parasite interactions, pathogenesis, and the outcome of disease. PMID:1373600

  7. Trade-offs in antibody repertoires to complex antigens

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Lauren M.; Baskerville, Edward B.; Cobey, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens vary in their antigenic complexity. While some pathogens such as measles present a few relatively invariant targets to the immune system, others such as malaria display considerable antigenic diversity. How the immune response copes in the presence of multiple antigens, and whether a trade-off exists between the breadth and efficacy of antibody (Ab)-mediated immune responses, are unsolved problems. We present a theoretical model of affinity maturation of B-cell receptors (BCRs) during a primary infection and examine how variation in the number of accessible antigenic sites alters the Ab repertoire. Naive B cells with randomly generated receptor sequences initiate the germinal centre (GC) reaction. The binding affinity of a BCR to an antigen is quantified via a genotype–phenotype map, based on a random energy landscape, that combines local and distant interactions between residues. In the presence of numerous antigens or epitopes, B-cell clones with different specificities compete for stimulation during rounds of mutation within GCs. We find that the availability of many epitopes reduces the affinity and relative breadth of the Ab repertoire. Despite the stochasticity of somatic hypermutation, patterns of immunodominance are strongly shaped by chance selection of naive B cells with specificities for particular epitopes. Our model provides a mechanistic basis for the diversity of Ab repertoires and the evolutionary advantage of antigenically complex pathogens. PMID:26194759

  8. Role of Metalloproteases in Vaccinia Virus Epitope Processing for Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP)-independent Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-B7 Class I Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Elena; García, Ruth; Mir, Carmen; Barriga, Alejandro; Lemonnier, François A.; Ramos, Manuel; López, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates the viral proteolytic peptides generated by the proteasome and other proteases in the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. There, they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules, which are subsequently recognized by the CD8+ lymphocyte cellular response. However, individuals with nonfunctional TAP complexes or tumor or infected cells with blocked TAP molecules are able to present HLA class I ligands generated by TAP-independent processing pathways. Herein, using a TAP-independent polyclonal vaccinia virus-polyspecific CD8+ T cell line, two conserved vaccinia-derived TAP-independent HLA-B*0702 epitopes were identified. The presentation of these epitopes in normal cells occurs via complex antigen-processing pathways involving the proteasome and/or different subsets of metalloproteinases (amino-, carboxy-, and endoproteases), which were blocked in infected cells with specific chemical inhibitors. These data support the hypothesis that the abundant cellular proteolytic systems contribute to the supply of peptides recognized by the antiviral cellular immune response, thereby facilitating immunosurveillance. These data may explain why TAP-deficient individuals live normal life spans without any increased susceptibility to viral infections. PMID:22298786

  9. A Study of Human Leukocyte D Locus Related Antigens in Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Farid, Nadir R.; Sampson, Laura; Noel, Elke P.; Barnard, John M.; Mandeville, Robert; Larsen, Bodil; Marshall, William H.; Carter, Nicholas D.

    1979-01-01

    An association between Graves' disease and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system has previously been reported. The disease was more strongly associated with the HLA D locus antigen Dw3 than with HLA B8. Products of the HLA D locus are determined by the interaction of test cells with standard typing lymphocytes, a technically difficult procedure. Recently, it has been possible to type serologically for D locus related (DRw) specificities on peripheral bone marrow-derived (B) lymphocytes. Blood B lymphocytes from 50 unrelated controls and 41 patients with Graves' disease were typed for seven HLA DRw specificities. 28 patients with Graves' disease (68%) were positive for DRw3, in contrast to 14 controls (28%); whereas only 21 patients (50%) were HLA B8 positive, compared with 13 (26%) controls. Thus, positivity for DRw3 afforded a relative risk for Graves' disease of 5.5, whereas that for HLA B8 amounted to 3.0. Additionally, a family with multiple cases of Graves' disease in which the disease was previously shown to be inherited with the haplotype, was linked to DRw2, which suggests that the susceptibility to the disease was inherited in association with that antigen. Two HLA B/glyoxalase recombination events were observed in this family; in both instances HLA DRw followed HLA B. This study thus demonstrates that the disease susceptibility gene for Graves' disease is in strong linkage disequilibrium with DRw3; however, it may be associated with other DRw specificities and inherited within family units in association with them. PMID:105012

  10. Approach for Identifying Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-DR Bound Peptides from Scarce Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Heyder, Tina; Kohler, Maxie; Tarasova, Nataliya K; Haag, Sabrina; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Rivera, Natalia V; Sandin, Charlotta; Mia, Sohel; Malmström, Vivianne; Wheelock, Åsa M; Wahlström, Jan; Holmdahl, Rikard; Eklund, Anders; Zubarev, Roman A; Grunewald, Johan; Ytterberg, A Jimmy

    2016-09-01

    Immune-mediated diseases strongly associating with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles are likely linked to specific antigens. These antigens are presented to T cells in the form of peptides bound to HLA molecules on antigen presenting cells, e.g. dendritic cells, macrophages or B cells. The identification of HLA-DR-bound peptides presents a valuable tool to investigate the human immunopeptidome. The lung is likely a key player in the activation of potentially auto-aggressive T cells prior to entering target tissues and inducing autoimmune disease. This makes the lung of exceptional interest and presents an ideal paradigm to study the human immunopeptidome and to identify antigenic peptides.Our previous investigation of HLA-DR peptide presentation in the lung required high numbers of cells (800 × 10(6) bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells). Because BAL from healthy nonsmokers typically contains 10-15 × 10(6) cells, there is a need for a highly sensitive approach to study immunopeptides in the lungs of individual patients and controls.In this work, we analyzed the HLA-DR immunopeptidome in the lung by an optimized methodology to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low cell numbers. We used an Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) immortalized B cell line and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells obtained from patients with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory T cell driven disease mainly occurring in the lung. Specifically, membrane complexes were isolated prior to immunoprecipitation, eluted peptides were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS and processed using the in-house developed ClusterMHCII software. With the optimized procedure we were able to identify peptides from 10 × 10(6) cells, which on average correspond to 10.9 peptides/million cells in EBV-B cells and 9.4 peptides/million cells in BAL cells. This work presents an optimized approach designed to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low numbers of cells, enabling the investigation of the BAL immunopeptidome from individual patients

  11. Antigenic mosaic of Methanosarcinaceae: partial characterization of Methanosarcina barkeri 227 surface antigens by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Garberi, J C; Macario, A J; De Macario, E C

    1985-01-01

    Hybridomas were constructed with spleen cells from mice immunized against Methanosarcina barkeri 227. The reaction with the resulting monoclonal antibodies identified two antigenic determinants. Determinant 8A is present in M. barkeri 227, where it is accessible to antibody on whole bacterial cells. 8A is undetectable in (or absent from) M. barkeri R1M3, an immunologically closely related strain. Determinant 8C is present in both strains, but with M. barkeri 227 it is found only in extracts and cannot be demonstrated in whole cells. It therefore appears to be hidden. A soluble form of antigen 8A (antigen 227) was obtained treating whole M. barkeri 227 cells with absolute methanol. This antigen was further purified by affinity chromatography with antibody 8A. Chemical and immunochemical analyses of these preparations showed that antigen 227 is a high-molecular-weight (4 X 10(5)) structure composed mainly of one carbohydrate, glucose, and small amounts of amino acids. Its solubility properties suggest that this molecule is associated with a lipid moiety. PMID:2413005

  12. Antibodies to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Potentiate the Response of Human T Lymphocyte Clones to the Same Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, Esteban; Chang, Tse Wen

    1984-04-01

    Human T-helper lymphocyte clones specific for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) proliferate on stimulation with HBsAg in vitro. Antibodies specific for HBsAg, but no other antibodies, augment this proliferative response. In the presence of antibodies to HBsAg, the maximum response could be achieved at HBsAg concentrations that were 1 percent of those required in the absence of the antibodies. These findings suggest that antigen-specific antibodies exert regulatory controls on T cells that recognize the same antigens.

  13. Effects of radiolabelled monoclonal antibody infusion on blood leukocytes in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gridley, D.S.; Slater, J.M.; Stickney, D.R. )

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of a single infusion of radiolabelled murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) on peripheral blood leukocytes in cancer patients. Eleven patients with disseminated colon cancer, malignant melanoma, or lung adenocarcinoma were infused with 111In-labelled anti-ZCE 025, anti-p97 type 96.5c, or LA 20207 MAb, respectively. Blood samples were obtained before infusion, immediately after infusion (1 hr), and at 4 and 7 days postinfusion. Flow cytometry analysis of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, and CD19+ lymphocytes showed increasing CD4:CD8 ratios in seven patients after infusion. This phenomenon was not restricted to antibody subclass or to type of cancer. Two of the remaining patients exhibited a marked post-infusion increase in CD8+ cells. In all three patients with malignant melanoma, decreasing levels of CD16+ lymphocytes were noted after infusion and natural killer cell cytotoxicity showed fluctuations which paralleled the changes in the CD16+ subpopulation. Oxygen radical production by phagocytic cells was markedly affected in three subjects. These results suggest that a single infusion of radiolabelled murine MAb may alter the balance of critical lymphocyte subpopulations and modulate other leukocyte responses in cancer patients.

  14. Electron Microscopic Studies of the Antigen-Antibody Complex

    PubMed Central

    Easty, G. C.; Mercer, E. H.

    1958-01-01

    Electron micrographs of the ferritin antibody (rabbit) and ferritin (horse) complex have been obtained. The high iron content of the ferritin molecule (23 per cent Fe) allows its molecules to be recognized within the particles of precipitate. Three methods of visualizing the molecular distribution have been developed: (a) small particles of the precipitated complex have been dried on to electron microscope grids and either examined directly or first shadowed with metal and then examined, (b) the precipitate has been centrifuged to a plug which was embedded and thin sections cut from it for examination, (c) the bands formed by allowing antibody and antigen to diffuse together in agar gels have been fixed, embedded and sectioned. All methods have yielded pictures of the distribution of the ferritin within the complex which are broadly similar to what might have been expected from a somewhat irregular lattice as pictured in the Marrack-Heidelberger Lattice Theory. The antibody molecules are not clearly defined but appear as a halo of low density enveloping the ferritin clusters. The distance, centre to centre, between the ferritin molecules is variable, but is, on the average, in the range 200–400 Å. This is greater than the ferritin-ferritin contact distance (100 Å) and is thought to mean that the ferritin molecules are bridged by antibody molecules as pictured in the Lattice Theory. The bands produced in the gel-diffusion test contain islands of ferritin-antibody complex. When equivalent concentrations of reagents are used a single band of precipitate is formed. When excess of either antigen or antibody is used multiple bands of precipitate are formed which contain islands of ferritin antibody complex indistinguishable from those formed in the single band at equivalent concentrations, providing direct evidence for the formation of multiple bands from a single antigen. Ferritin-ferritin contacts have been observed within the complex. Under all the conditions of

  15. Antigen binding properties of highly purified bispecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Allard, W J; Moran, C A; Nagel, E; Collins, G; Largen, M T

    1992-10-01

    A panel of three bispecific monoclonal antibodies (bsMAbs) binding to follitropin (FSH) and to beta-galactosidase have been prepared by fusion of hybridoma cell lines resistant to oubain and neomycin. One of these bispecific antibodies contains heavy chains of the same IgG subclass, and two are composed of heavy chains of different IgG subclasses. We have investigated methods for the purification of bispecific antibodies from hybrid hybridoma supernatant fluids grown in serum-free medium. Following ammonium sulfate precipitation, bispecific antibodies can be purified in a single step by mixed mode ion-exchange HPLC on Bakerbond Abx columns. In one case, three species were resolved by ion-exchange HPLC and functional analysis showed that two peaks contained parental antibodies, and the third contained the bispecific. Ion-exchange HPLC purification of serum-free preparations from two other hybrid hybridomas resolved seven protein-containing peaks, only one of which was active in a bispecific ELISA. The equilibrium affinity constants for each of the parental antibodies for both FSH and beta-galactosidase were determined and found to be similar to those of the purified bsMAbs. Further, the association of FSH to one binding site on a bispecific antibody was shown to have no effect on the equilibrium binding constant for beta-galactosidase binding to the other site. Our results suggest that bsMAbs can be readily purified from hybrid hybridomas by a simple and rapid method, and the binding of antigen to one binding site on a bsMAb is independent of antigen binding to the second site. PMID:1528192

  16. Experimental Immunization Based on Plasmodium Antigens Isolated by Antibody Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Ali N.; Marín-García, Patricia; Azcárate, Isabel G.; Puyet, Antonio; Diez, Amalia; Bautista, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines blocking malaria parasites in the blood-stage diminish mortality and morbidity caused by the disease. Here, we isolated antigens from total parasite proteins by antibody affinity chromatography to test an immunization against lethal malaria infection in a murine model. We used the sera of malaria self-resistant ICR mice to lethal Plasmodium yoelii yoelii 17XL for purification of their IgGs which were subsequently employed to isolate blood-stage parasite antigens that were inoculated to immunize BALB/c mice. The presence of specific antibodies in vaccinated mice serum was studied by immunoblot analysis at different days after vaccination and showed an intensive immune response to a wide range of antigens with molecular weight ranging between 22 and 250 kDa. The humoral response allowed delay of the infection after the inoculation to high lethal doses of P. yoelii yoelii 17XL resulting in a partial protection against malaria disease, although final survival was managed in a low proportion of challenged mice. This approach shows the potential to prevent malaria disease with a set of antigens isolated from blood-stage parasites. PMID:26539558

  17. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  18. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  19. Reduced Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Protection in Gulf War Illness (GWI)

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.; James, Lisa M.; Mahan, Margaret Y.; Joseph, Jasmine; Georgopoulos, Angeliki; Engdahl, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gulf War Illness (GWI) is a disease of unknown etiology with symptoms suggesting the involvement of an immune process. Here we tested the hypothesis that Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) composition might differ between veterans with and without GWI. Methods We identified 144 unique alleles of Class I and II HLA genes in 82 veterans (66 with and 16 without GWI). We tested the hypothesis that a subset of HLA alleles may classify veterans in their respective group using a stepwise linear discriminant analysis. In addition, each participant rated symptom severity in 6 domains according to established GWI criteria, and an overall symptom severity was calculated. Findings We found 6 Class II alleles that classified participants 84.1% correctly (13/16 control and 56/66 GWI). The number of copies of the 6 alleles was significantly higher in the control group, suggesting a protective role. This was supported by a significant negative dependence of overall symptom severity on the number of allele copies, such that symptom severity was lower in participants with larger numbers of allele copies. Interpretation These results indicate a reduced HLA protection (i.e. genetic susceptibility) in veterans with GWI. Funding University of Minnesota and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. PMID:26870819

  20. Dissecting the genetic complexity of the association between human leukocyte antigens and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jawaheer, Damini; Li, Wentian; Graham, Robert R; Chen, Wei; Damle, Aarti; Xiao, Xiangli; Monteiro, Joanita; Khalili, Houman; Lee, Annette; Lundsten, Robert; Begovich, Ann; Bugawan, Teodorica; Erlich, Henry; Elder, James T; Criswell, Lindsey A; Seldin, Michael F; Amos, Christopher I; Behrens, Timothy W; Gregersen, Peter K

    2002-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease with a complex genetic component. An association between RA and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex has long been observed in many different populations, and most studies have focused on a direct role for the HLA-DRB1 "shared epitope" in disease susceptibility. We have performed an extensive haplotype analysis, using 54 markers distributed across the entire HLA complex, in a set of 469 multicase families with RA. The results show that, in addition to associations with the DRB1 alleles, at least two additional genetic effects are present within the major histocompatibility complex. One of these lies within a 497-kb region in the central portion of the HLA complex, an interval that excludes DRB1. This genetic risk factor is present on a segment of a highly conserved ancestral A1-B8-DRB1*03 (8.1) haplotype. Additional risk genes may also be present in the HLA class I region in a subset of DRB1*0404 haplotypes. These data emphasize the importance of defining haplotypes when trying to understand the HLA associations with disease, and they clearly demonstrate that such associations with RA are complex and cannot be completely explained by the DRB1 locus. PMID:12181776

  1. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Haplotypes in Yucatan Miniature Pigs Used as Biomedical Model Animal

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nu-Ri; Seo, Dong-Won; Choi, Ki-Myung; Ko, Na-Young; Kim, Ji-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Il; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2016-01-01

    The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is called swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), which controls immune responses and transplantation reactions. The SLA is mapped on pig chromosome 7 (SSC7) near the centromere. In this study, 3 class I (SLA-1, SLA-3, and SLA-2) and 3 class II (DRB1, DQB1, and DQA) genes were used for investigation of SLA haplotypes in Yucatan miniature pigs in Korea. This pig breed is a well-known model organism for biomedical research worldwide. The current study indicated that Korean Yucatan pig population had 3 Class I haplotypes (Lr-4.0, Lr-6.0, and Lr-25.0) and 3 class II haplotypes (Lr-0.5, Lr-0.7, and Lr-0.25). The combinations of SLA class I and II haplotype together, 2 homozygous (Lr-4.5/4.5 and Lr-6.7/6.7) and 3 heterozygous (Lr-4.5/6.7, Lr-4.5/25.25, and Lr-6.7/25.25) haplotypes were identified, including previously unidentified new heterozygous haplotypes (Lr-4.5/4.7). In addition, a new SLA allele typing method using Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer was developed that permitted more rapid identification of SLA haplotypes. These results will facilitate the breeding of SLA homozygous Yucatan pigs and will expedite the possible use of these pigs for the biomedical research, especially xenotransplantation research. PMID:26950861

  2. Dissecting the Genetic Complexity of the Association between Human Leukocyte Antigens and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jawaheer, Damini; Li, Wentian; Graham, Robert R.; Chen, Wei; Damle, Aarti; Xiao, Xiangli; Monteiro, Joanita; Khalili, Houman; Lee, Annette; Lundsten, Robert; Begovich, Ann; Bugawan, Teodorica; Erlich, Henry; Elder, James T.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Seldin, Michael F.; Amos, Christopher I.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Gregersen, Peter K.

    2002-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease with a complex genetic component. An association between RA and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex has long been observed in many different populations, and most studies have focused on a direct role for the HLA-DRB1 “shared epitope” in disease susceptibility. We have performed an extensive haplotype analysis, using 54 markers distributed across the entire HLA complex, in a set of 469 multicase families with RA. The results show that, in addition to associations with the DRB1 alleles, at least two additional genetic effects are present within the major histocompatibility complex. One of these lies within a 497-kb region in the central portion of the HLA complex, an interval that excludes DRB1. This genetic risk factor is present on a segment of a highly conserved ancestral A1-B8-DRB1*03 (8.1) haplotype. Additional risk genes may also be present in the HLA class I region in a subset of DRB1*0404 haplotypes. These data emphasize the importance of defining haplotypes when trying to understand the HLA associations with disease, and they clearly demonstrate that such associations with RA are complex and cannot be completely explained by the DRB1 locus. PMID:12181776

  3. Association of human leukocyte antigen with outcomes of infectious diseases: the streptococcal experience.

    PubMed

    Kotb, M; Norrby-Teglund, A; McGeer, A; Green, K; Low, D E

    2003-01-01

    The role of host genetic factors in determining susceptibility to infections has become more evident. Certain individuals appear to be predisposed to certain infections, whereas others are protected. By studying the immune response and the genetic makeup of susceptible and resistant individuals a better understanding of the disease process can be achieved. Infections caused by group A streptococci offer an excellent model to study host-pathogen interactions and how the host genetic variation can influence the infection outcome. These studies showed that the same clone of these bacteria can cause severe or non-severe invasive disease. This difference was largely related to the human leukocyte antigen class 11 type of the patient. Certain class II haplotypes present the streptococcal superantigens in a way that results in responses, whereas others present the same superantigens in a way that elicits very potent inflammatory responses that can lead to organ failure and shock. These findings underscore the role of host genetic factors in determining the outcome of serious infections and warrants further investigations into how the same or different genetic factors affect susceptibility to other emerging and re-emerging pathogens. PMID:14620152

  4. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Haplotypes in Yucatan Miniature Pigs Used as Biomedical Model Animal.

    PubMed

    Choi, Nu-Ri; Seo, Dong-Won; Choi, Ki-Myung; Ko, Na-Young; Kim, Ji-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Il; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2016-03-01

    The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is called swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), which controls immune responses and transplantation reactions. The SLA is mapped on pig chromosome 7 (SSC7) near the centromere. In this study, 3 class I (SLA-1, SLA-3, and SLA-2) and 3 class II (DRB1, DQB1, and DQA) genes were used for investigation of SLA haplotypes in Yucatan miniature pigs in Korea. This pig breed is a well-known model organism for biomedical research worldwide. The current study indicated that Korean Yucatan pig population had 3 Class I haplotypes (Lr-4.0, Lr-6.0, and Lr-25.0) and 3 class II haplotypes (Lr-0.5, Lr-0.7, and Lr-0.25). The combinations of SLA class I and II haplotype together, 2 homozygous (Lr-4.5/4.5 and Lr-6.7/6.7) and 3 heterozygous (Lr-4.5/6.7, Lr-4.5/25.25, and Lr-6.7/25.25) haplotypes were identified, including previously unidentified new heterozygous haplotypes (Lr-4.5/4.7). In addition, a new SLA allele typing method using Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer was developed that permitted more rapid identification of SLA haplotypes. These results will facilitate the breeding of SLA homozygous Yucatan pigs and will expedite the possible use of these pigs for the biomedical research, especially xenotransplantation research. PMID:26950861

  5. Genetic screening for human leukocyte antigen alleles prior to carbamazepine treatment.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeremy C K; Murrell, Dedee F; Hersch, Mark I

    2015-12-01

    We describe a 28-year-old Malaysian Australian man of Han Chinese descent with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), occurring 2 weeks after commencing carbamazepine. He was subsequently found to be positive for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*1502. Carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/TEN is strongly associated with the HLA-B*1502 allele, which is highly prevalent in Han Chinese, Malay, Thai and Indian populations. Prospective screening for the allele may prevent this cutaneous adverse drug reaction from occurring, but many neurologists and other medical practitioners are still unaware of the medico-legal risks of prescribing carbamazepine in susceptible populations and the availability of HLA-B*1502 testing. Performing HLA-B*1502 genotyping and avoiding carbamazepine in at-risk individuals has been proven to decrease incidences of drug-induced TEN. This test is widely available at most large pathology services in Australia, with results available within 2 weeks. The recommendation by regulatory bodies should be strengthened to ensure that the broad medical community is made more aware of this pertinent issue. PMID:26319500

  6. Effect of Genetic Diversity in Swine Leukocyte Antigen-DRA Gene on Piglet Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Qiaoli; Yuan, Junhu; Liu, Lixia; Sun, Wenyang; Jiang, Yingdi; Zhao, Shengguo; Zhang, Shengwei; Huang, Wangzhou; Gun, Shuangbao

    2016-01-01

    The swine leukocyte antigens (SLAs) are the multigene families related to immune responses. Little is known about the effect of the DRA gene on diarrheal disease. This study reported the genetic diversity of the DRA gene in exons 1, 3 and 4 in 290 Chinese Yantai black pigs. No variation was identified in exon 3. In exon 1, three genotypes and two alleles were identified, generated by two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In exon 4, there were eight genotypes and five alleles containing seven SNPs were detected with four SNPs being novel SNPs. The low polymorphism found in swine DRA is consistent with the concept that the DRA gene is highly conserved among all mammalian species. Statistical analyses indicated that the genotypes of exon 1 were not significantly associated with piglet diarrhea (p > 0.05); however, genotypes C4C4 (1.80 ± 0.33) and A4E4 (1.66 ± 0.25) of exon 4 were significantly susceptible to diarrhea (p < 0.01). These indicate that the particular genotypes of the DRA gene are susceptible to diarrheal disease, which provides valuable information for disease-resistance breeding in swine. PMID:27429004

  7. Effect of Genetic Diversity in Swine Leukocyte Antigen-DRA Gene on Piglet Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Qiaoli; Yuan, Junhu; Liu, Lixia; Sun, Wenyang; Jiang, Yingdi; Zhao, Shengguo; Zhang, Shengwei; Huang, Wangzhou; Gun, Shuangbao

    2016-01-01

    The swine leukocyte antigens (SLAs) are the multigene families related to immune responses. Little is known about the effect of the DRA gene on diarrheal disease. This study reported the genetic diversity of the DRA gene in exons 1, 3 and 4 in 290 Chinese Yantai black pigs. No variation was identified in exon 3. In exon 1, three genotypes and two alleles were identified, generated by two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In exon 4, there were eight genotypes and five alleles containing seven SNPs were detected with four SNPs being novel SNPs. The low polymorphism found in swine DRA is consistent with the concept that the DRA gene is highly conserved among all mammalian species. Statistical analyses indicated that the genotypes of exon 1 were not significantly associated with piglet diarrhea (p > 0.05); however, genotypes C₄C₄ (1.80 ± 0.33) and A₄E₄ (1.66 ± 0.25) of exon 4 were significantly susceptible to diarrhea (p < 0.01). These indicate that the particular genotypes of the DRA gene are susceptible to diarrheal disease, which provides valuable information for disease-resistance breeding in swine. PMID:27429004

  8. Effect of extreme conditions of Antarctica on human leukocyte antigen-G in Indian expeditioners

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, K.P.; Yadav, A.P.; Sharma, Y.K.; Ganju, Lilly; Singh, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Immune activation and inflammation play critical roles in the stressful environmental conditions like high altitude, extreme cold, etc. Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non classical major histocompatiblity complex class I (MHC class- I) protein, upregulated in the context of transplantation, malignancy and inflammation. We hypothesized serum HLA-G as a possible stress biomarker and studied levels of soluble form of HLA-G (sHLA-G) in Indian Antarctic expeditioners. Methods: sHLA-G ELISA was performed in the serum of summer (n=27) and winter (n=22) Indian Antarctic expeditioners. The summer expeditioners were evaluated at three different time points, i.e. before leaving India, after one month ship borne journey, and after staying one month at Indian research base, Maitri in Antarctica, while winter expeditioners were evaluated at five different time points, i.e. before leaving India, and in the month of March, May, August and November at Antarctica. Results: One month ship borne journey did not cause any significant change in the sHLA-G level as compared to the baseline level of the summer expeditioners. sHLA-G levels were not changed significantly in the months of March, May, August and November as compared to the baseline level of the winter expeditioners. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results indicated that the extreme conditions of Antarctica did not cause any significant change in the sHLA-G level in both summer and winter expeditioners. PMID:25488446

  9. Antibodies to Citrullinated Protein Antigens (ACPAs): Clinical and Pathophysiologic Significance

    PubMed Central

    Demoruelle, M. Kristen; Deane, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies to citrullinated protein antigens (ACPAs) are highly specific for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are useful in the diagnosis of RA as well as the prediction of the course and outcomes of disease. Multiple methodologies exist for measuring ACPAs, including the widely available tests for anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies and for antibodies to mutated/modified citrullinated vimentin. These methodologies overall have similar diagnostic accuracies for RA, although there is some variability. The discovery of ACPAs and the biology of citrullination have also led to important advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and development of RA, especially regarding the relationship between potential genetic and environmental risk factors for RA. Going forward, research into autoimmunity to citrullinated proteins may help identify the specific etiology of RA and provide approaches for the prediction of future risk of disease, and ultimately prevention of RA. PMID:21713412

  10. Effect of heparin on antigen-induced airway responses and pulmonary leukocyte accumulation in neonatally immunized rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Janet M H; Page, Clive P

    2000-01-01

    The effect of single administrations of aerosolized heparin, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and the linear polyanionic molecule, polyglutamic acid (PGA) were examined on antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and leukocyte accumulation in neonatally immunized rabbits.Adult litter-matched NZW rabbits immunized within 24 h of birth with Alternaria tenuis antigen were treated with heparin, LMWH or PGA prior to or following antigen challenge (Alternaria tenuis). For each drug-treated group, a parallel group of rabbits were treated with the appropriate vehicle. In all groups, airway responsiveness to inhaled histamine and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 24 h prior to and following antigen challenge.Basal lung function in terms of resistance (RL) and dynamic compliance (Cdyn) and acute bronchoconstriction was unaltered by pre-treatment with heparin, LMWH or PGA compared to their respective vehicles 24 h prior to or following antigen challenge.In vehicle-treated animals, airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled histamine was indicated by an increase in the maximal responses of the cumulative concentration-effect curves to histamine and reductions in RLPC50 and CdynPC35 values 24 h following antigen challenge.Heparin and LMWH given prior to antigen challenge significantly inhibited the development of airway hyperresponsiveness, whereas PGA did not. When given following antigen challenge, all three drugs failed to inhibit the development of airway hyperresponsiveness.Eosinophil and neutrophil cell numbers in BAL fluid increased significantly 24 h following antigen challenge. Heparin, LMWH and PGA failed to inhibit the increase in cell numbers following antigen challenge whether given prior to or following antigen challenge. PMID:10780962

  11. Human leukocyte antigen-DRB1 polymorphism in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    EL ANSARY, MERVAT M.; MOHAMMED, LAMIAA A.; HASSAN, TAMER H.; BARAKA, AHMED; AHMED, ALSHYMAA A.

    2015-01-01

    Similar to autoimmune diseases, there are clear associations between resistance or susceptibility to cancer and the classic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profile of an individual. HLA-associated susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may provide clues to leukemogenesis in general and to the role of other risk factors. The present study aimed to determine the association between the HLA-DRB1 genotype and susceptibility to ALL in children and to assess the prognostic value of HLA-DRB1 alleles in these patients. This study included 50 ALL patients who were consecutively admitted to the Pediatric Oncology Unit of Zagazig University Hospital and 50 gender-matched healthy volunteers as a control group. The patients were subjected to full clinical history, thorough clinical examination and routine laboratory investigations. Molecular HLA-DRB1 typing for patients and controls using the reverse sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe technique was performed. HLA-DRB1*04 allele frequency was significantly higher in female patients compared to that in female controls (P=0.03) and in patients aged <10 years compared to those aged ≥10 years at the time of diagnosis (P=0.01). HLA-DRB1*11 allele frequency was significantly higher in high-risk compared to standard-risk patients (P=0.01) and in refractory patients compared to those who achieved remission (P=0.02). In conclusion, the HLA-DRB1*04 allele appears to be a female-specific susceptibility factor for the acquisition of childhood ALL and it may affect the age of onset of ALL. In addition, the HLA-DRB1*11 allele may be of prognostic significance in childhood ALL. However, further larger studies are required to support the conclusions drawn from this study. PMID:25798280

  12. Human leukocyte antigen DQ2/8 prevalence in non-celiac patients with gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    DiGiacomo, Daniel; Santonicola, Antonella; Zingone, Fabiana; Troncone, Edoardo; Caria, Maria Cristina; Borgheresi, Patrizia; Parrilli, Gianpaolo; Ciacci, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ2/8 alleles in Southern Italians with liver and gastrointestinal (GI) diseases outside of celiac disease. METHODS: HLA DQ2/8 status was assessed in 443 patients from three ambulatory gastroenterology clinics in Southern Italy (University of Federico II, Naples, Loreto Crispi Hospital, Ruggi D’Aragona Hospital, Salerno). Patients were grouped based on disease status [pre-post transplant liver disease, esophageal/gastric organic and functional diseases, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)] and DQ2/8 alleles, which correspond to a celiac disease genetic risk gradient. Subject allele frequencies were compared to healthy Italian controls. RESULTS: One hundred and ninety-six out of four hundred and forty-three (44.2%) subjects, median age 56 years and 42.6% female, were DQ2/8 positive. When stratifying by disease we found that 86/188 (45.7%) patients with liver disease were HLA DQ2/8 positive, 39/73 (53.4%) with functional upper GI diseases and 19/41 (46.3%) with organic upper GI diseases were positive. Furthermore, 38/105 (36.2%) patients with IBS and 14/36 (38.9%) with IBD were HLA DQ2/8 positive (P = 0.21). Compared to healthy controls those with functional upper GI diseases disorders had a 1.8 times higher odds of DQ2/8 positivity. Those with liver disease had 1.3 times the odds, albeit not statistically significant, of DQ2/8 positivity. Both those with IBS and IBD had a lower odds of DQ2/8 positivity compared to healthy controls. CONCLUSION: The proportion of individuals HLA DQ2/8 positive is higher in those with liver/upper functional GI disease and lower in IBS/IBD as compared to general population estimates. PMID:23674852

  13. The Association between Human Leukocyte Antigens and Hypertensive End-Stage Renal Failure among Yemeni Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Mogahid Y.; Al-Shamahy, Hassan A.; Masood, Haitham A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Many studies have attempted to locate a connection between various genetic factors and the pathogenesis of certain diseases. A number of these have found human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) to be the most significant genetic factors affecting the susceptibility of an individual to a certain disease. The present case-control study aimed to determine the connection between class I and class II HLAs and cases of hypertensive end-stage renal failure (HESRF), as contrasted with healthy controls, in Yemen. Methods: The study was carried out between March 2013 and March 2014 and included 50 HESRF patients attending the Urology & Nephrology Center at Al-Thawra University Hospital in Sana’a, Yemen, and 50 healthy controls visiting the same centre for kidney donation. Among both patients and controls, HLA class I (A, B and C) and class II (DRB1) genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reactions. Results: There was an association (odds ratio: 4.0) with HLA-A9(24) and HESRF, although this was not statistically significant. A significant protective function was found for the HLA-CW3 and DRB1-8 genes against the development of HESRF. Although HLA-B14 was present in some patients (0.06) and not in the controls, this difference was not statistically significant enough to conclude that HLA-B14 plays a role in the genetic predisposition for end-stage renal disease development. There was a high frequency of HLA-A2, B5, CW6, DRB1-3, DRB1-4 and DRB1-13 in both patients and controls. Conclusion: Although no HLAs were found to play a highly significant role in genetic predisposition to HESRF, certain HLA genes could be considered as protective genes against HESRF development. PMID:26052458

  14. Human leukocyte antigen-B27 alleles in Xinjiang Uygur patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Zou, H-Y; Yu, W-Z; Wang, Z; He, J; Jiao, M

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 subtypes in Uygur ankylosing spondylitis patients in Xinjiang. B27-positive patients with ankylosing spondylitis were subtyped by using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing. The HLA-B27 subtype frequencies of Uygur patients were compared with those in Han patients in Xinjiang and the other areas of China. B*2705 was the predominant subtype in Uygur patients with a frequency of 58.95%, which was much higher than that in Han patients in Xinjiang (31.58%, P < 0.05) and the other areas of China (excluding the Shandong region, which was 63.89%). The frequency of B*2704 (27.37%) in Uygur patients was the lowest and significantly lower than that in Han patients (61.18%, P < 0.05) and in 8 other areas of China. B*2710 has not been previously reported in Uygur ankylosing spondylitis patients; B*2704 was the main (61.18%) subtype in Han patients in Xinjiang, followed by B*2705 (31.58%) and was similar to the characteristics of Han patients in the other areas of China. B*2724 in Han ankylosing spondylitis patients has not been previously reported. Additionally, the B*2702/B*2705 homozygote was identified in Uygur patients. B*2702/B*2704, B*2704/B*2705, and B*2705/B*2705 homozygotes were identified in 3 Han patients. The distribution of HLAB27 subtypes in Uygur ankylosing spondylitis patients in Xinjiang significantly differed from that in Han patients. Understanding the distribution of HLAB27 subtypes in ethnic minority populations of Xinjiang is important for anthropological genetic studies and for analyzing the impact of genetic background on ankylosing spondylitis susceptibility. PMID:26125763

  15. Effects of donor/recipient human leukocyte antigen mismatch on human cytomegalovirus replication following liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, RW; Mattes, FM; Rolando, N; Rolles, K; Smith, C; Shirling, G; Atkinson, C; Burroughs, AK; Milne, RSB; Emery, VC; Griffiths, PD

    2015-01-01

    Background Natural immunity against cytomegalovirus (CMV) can control virus replication after solid organ transplantation; however, it is not known which components of the adaptive immune system mediate this protection. We investigated whether this protection requires human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching between donor and recipient by exploiting the fact that, unlike transplantation of other solid organs, liver transplantation does not require HLA matching, but some donor and recipient pairs may nevertheless be matched by chance. Methods To further investigate this immune control, we determined whether chance HLA matching between donor (D) and recipient (R) in liver transplants affected a range of viral replication parameters. Results In total, 274 liver transplant recipients were stratified according to matches at the HLA A, HLA B, and HLA DR loci. The incidence of CMV viremia, kinetics of replication, and peak viral load were similar between the HLA matched and mismatched patients in the D+/R+ and D−/R+ transplant groups. D+/R− transplants with 1 or 2 mismatches at the HLA DR locus had a higher incidence of CMV viremia >3000 genomes/mL blood compared to patients matched at this locus (78% vs. 17%; P = 0.01). Evidence was seen that matching at the HLA A locus had a small effect on peak viral loads in D+/R− patients, with median peak loads of 3540 and 14,706 genomes/mL in the 0 and combined (1 and 2) mismatch groups, respectively (P = 0.03). Conclusion Overall, our data indicate that, in the setting of liver transplantation, prevention of CMV infection and control of CMV replication by adaptive immunity is minimally influenced by HLA matching of the donor and recipient. Our data raise questions about immune control of CMV in the liver and also about the cells in which the virus is amplified to give rise to CMV viremia. PMID:25572799

  16. Matching for Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) in corneal transplantation - to do or not to do.

    PubMed

    van Essen, T H; Roelen, D L; Williams, K A; Jager, M J

    2015-05-01

    As many patients with severe corneal disease are not even considered as candidates for a human graft due to their high risk of rejection, it is essential to find ways to reduce the chance of rejection. One of the options is proper matching of the cornea donor and recipient for the Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA), a subject of much debate. Currently, patients receiving their first corneal allograft are hardly ever matched for HLA and even patients undergoing a regraft usually do not receive an HLA-matched graft. While anterior and posterior lamellar grafts are not immune to rejection, they are usually performed in low risk, non-vascularized cases. These are the cases in which the immune privilege due to the avascular status and active immune inhibition is still intact. Once broken due to infection, sensitization or trauma, rejection will occur. There is enough data to show that when proper DNA-based typing techniques are being used, even low risk perforating corneal transplantations benefit from matching for HLA Class I, and high risk cases from HLA Class I and probably Class II matching. Combining HLA class I and class II matching, or using the HLAMatchmaker could further improve the effect of HLA matching. However, new techniques could be applied to reduce the chance of rejection. Options are the local or systemic use of biologics, or gene therapy, aiming at preventing or suppressing immune responses. The goal of all these approaches should be to prevent a first rejection, as secondary grafts are usually at higher risk of complications including rejections than first grafts. PMID:25601193

  17. Bacterial surface antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies: the methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Conway de Macario, E.; Macario, A.J.L.; Magarinos, M.C.; Jovell, R.J.; Kandler, O.

    1982-01-01

    The methanogens (MB) are unique microbes of great evolutionary interest with applications in biotechnology-bioengineerings and are important in digestive processes. Their cell-wall composition is distinctively different from that of Eubacteria, e.g. the Methanobacteriaceae possess the peptidoglycan pseudomurein rather than murein. The range of cell-wall compositions among MB and their evolutionary and functional significance is not well known. The authors undertook a systematic study of the MB's surface structure using monoclonal antibodies through the following steps: (1) generation of hybridomas that produce antibody to several MB from 3 of their 4 families; (2) development of immunoenzymatic assays for MB's antigens and antibodies; (3) determination of the fine specificity of monoclonal antibodies by inhibition-blocking tests using cell-wall extracts and compounds of known structure; thus a set of monoclonal probes of predetermined specificity was assembled; and (4) resolution of surface determinants of MB representative of the Methanobacteriaceae using the monoclonal probes. Specific markers of MB strains were characterized. Two epitopes were identified within the pseudomurein molecule.

  18. [Partially automated antigen determination and antibody detection with microtiter plates].

    PubMed

    Rapp, C; Weisshaar, C

    1993-01-01

    In addition to several conventional methods for the detection of red cell antigens, the use of microplates has various advantages either as a solid-phase assay (enzyme immunoassay) or as native microplate. Microplates may also be used for the detection of red cell antibodies in 'pooled-cell solid-phase assays' of the second generation and for antibody screening. Blood donors and patients are the two main fields which are to be examined in immunohematology. There are various advantages in using the microplate in blood group serology: (i) if there is hardware already available, like sample processors and microplate readers, the use of microplates in blood group serology reduces the costs even if the equipment has to be purchased for this purpose only; (ii) low quantities of reagents are used in microplate assays; (iii) the application of bar codes on tubes and microplates guarantees the most security in sample identification; (iv) it is possible to investigate blood samples selectively depending on the available software if antibody detection is done as the sixth test beside anti-HIV, anti-HCV, HBsAG, lues antibodies and ALT, and (v) recording of data will be easy if electronic data processing is used. PMID:7693246

  19. Novel Antibodies Reactive with Sialyl Lewis X in Both Humans and Mice Define Its Critical Role in Leukocyte Trafficking and Contact Hypersensitivity Responses*

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Ryuji; Hirakawa, Jotaro; Sato, Kaori; Ikeda, Toshiaki; Nagai, Motoe; Fukuda, Minoru; Imai, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Hiroto

    2015-01-01

    Sialyl Lewis X (sLex) antigen functions as a common carbohydrate determinant recognized by all three members of the selectin family. However, its expression and function in mice remain undefined due to the poor reactivity of conventional anti-sLex monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with mouse tissues. Here, we developed novel anti-sLex mAbs, termed F1 and F2, which react well with both human and mouse sLex, by immunizing fucosyltransferase (FucT)-IV and FucT-VII doubly deficient mice with 6-sulfo-sLex-expressing cells transiently transfected with an expression vector encoding CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase. F1 and F2 specifically bound both the N-acetyl and the N-glycolyl forms of sLex as well as 6-sulfo-sLex, a major ligand for L-selectin expressed in high endothelial venules, and efficiently blocked physiological lymphocyte homing to lymph nodes in mice. Importantly, both of the mAbs inhibited contact hypersensitivity responses not only when administered in the L-selectin-dependent sensitization phase but also when administered in the elicitation phase in mice. When administered in the latter phase, F1 and F2 efficiently blocked rolling of mouse leukocytes along blood vessels expressing P- and E-selectin in the auricular skin in vivo. Consistent with these findings, the mAbs blocked P- and E-selectin-dependent leukocyte rolling in a flow chamber assay. Taken together, these results indicate that novel anti-sLex mAbs reactive with both human and mouse tissues, with the blocking ability against leukocyte trafficking mediated by all three selectins, have been established. These mAbs should be useful in determining the role of sLex antigen under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25944902

  20. Human leukocyte antigen-G overexpression predicts poor clinical outcomes in low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing; Wang, Yinyan; Zhang, Chuanbao; Liu, Xing; Qian, Zenghui; Jiang, Tao

    2016-05-15

    Overexpression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G), a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class-I molecule associated with immunosuppression, has been reported in various human malignancies. In the present study, we examined the role of HLA-G in gliomas. Clinical characteristics, mRNA expression microarrays and follow-up data pertaining to 293 patients with histologically confirmed gliomas were analyzed. The expression levels of HLA-G were compared between different grades of gliomas and correlated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) to evaluate its prognostic value. We found that HLA-G was overexpressed in gliomas as compared to that in normal brain tissue samples (-1.288±0.265). The highest expression levels were in glioblastomas (GBMs), anaplastic gliomas (AGs) and low-grade gliomas (LGGs), in that order (0.328±0.778, 0.176±0.881, -0.388±0.686, respectively). Significant inter-group differences were observed between low-grade and high-grade glioma tissues (p<0.001 and p<0.001, t-test, AGs and GBMs, respectively). More astrocytoma patients exhibited increased HLA-G expression as compared to other LGG patients (p=0.004, Chi-square test). Significant differences were observed with respect to PFS and OS (p=0.009 and 0.032, log-rank test, for PFS and OS, respectively) between the high- and low-expression subgroups in patients with LGGs. On Cox regression analysis, overexpression of HLA-G appeared to be an independent predictor of clinical outcomes (p=0.007 and 0.026, for PFS and OS, respectively). Our results suggest that HLA-G expression may serve as a potential biomarker for predicting aggressive tumor grades of gliomas and for histological subtype of LGGs. Elevated HLA-G expression could serve as an independent predictor of poor clinical outcomes in patients with low-grade gliomas. PMID:27138095

  1. Anti-CD antibody microarray for human leukocyte morphology examination allows analyzing rare cell populations and suggesting preliminary diagnosis in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Khvastunova, Alina N.; Kuznetsova, Sofya A.; Al-Radi, Liubov S.; Vylegzhanina, Alexandra V.; Zakirova, Anna O.; Fedyanina, Olga S.; Filatov, Alexander V.; Vorobjev, Ivan A.; Ataullakhanov, Fazly

    2015-01-01

    We describe a method for leukocyte sorting by a microarray of anti-cluster-of-differentiation (anti-CD) antibodies and for preparation of the bound cells for morphological or cytochemical examination. The procedure results in a “sorted” smear with cells positive for certain surface antigens localised in predefined areas. The morphology and cytochemistry of the microarray-captured normal and neoplastic peripheral blood mononuclear cells are identical to the same characteristics in a smear. The microarray permits to determine the proportions of cells positive for the CD antigens on the microarray panel with high correlation with flow cytometry. Using the anti-CD microarray we show that normal granular lymphocytes and lymphocytes with radial segmentation of the nuclei are positive for CD3, CD8, CD16 or CD56 but not for CD4 or CD19. We also show that the described technique permits to obtain a pure leukemic cell population or to separate two leukemic cell populations on different antibody spots and to study their morphology or cytochemistry directly on the microarray. In cases of leukemias/lymphomas when circulating neoplastic cells are morphologically distinct, preliminary diagnosis can be suggested from full analysis of cell morphology, cytochemistry and their binding pattern on the microarray. PMID:26212756

  2. Anti-CD antibody microarray for human leukocyte morphology examination allows analyzing rare cell populations and suggesting preliminary diagnosis in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khvastunova, Alina N; Kuznetsova, Sofya A; Al-Radi, Liubov S; Vylegzhanina, Alexandra V; Zakirova, Anna O; Fedyanina, Olga S; Filatov, Alexander V; Vorobjev, Ivan A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly

    2015-01-01

    We describe a method for leukocyte sorting by a microarray of anti-cluster-of-differentiation (anti-CD) antibodies and for preparation of the bound cells for morphological or cytochemical examination. The procedure results in a "sorted" smear with cells positive for certain surface antigens localised in predefined areas. The morphology and cytochemistry of the microarray-captured normal and neoplastic peripheral blood mononuclear cells are identical to the same characteristics in a smear. The microarray permits to determine the proportions of cells positive for the CD antigens on the microarray panel with high correlation with flow cytometry. Using the anti-CD microarray we show that normal granular lymphocytes and lymphocytes with radial segmentation of the nuclei are positive for CD3, CD8, CD16 or CD56 but not for CD4 or CD19. We also show that the described technique permits to obtain a pure leukemic cell population or to separate two leukemic cell populations on different antibody spots and to study their morphology or cytochemistry directly on the microarray. In cases of leukemias/lymphomas when circulating neoplastic cells are morphologically distinct, preliminary diagnosis can be suggested from full analysis of cell morphology, cytochemistry and their binding pattern on the microarray. PMID:26212756

  3. Radioimmunoassay for detecting antibodies against murine malarial parasite antigens: monoclonal antibodies recognizing Plasmodium yoelii antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Taylor, D.W.; Evans, C.B.; Asofsky, R.

    1980-12-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) in microtiter wells was established for detecting antibodies against Plasmodium yoelii Ag. The SPRIA was found (1) to require as little as 5 ..mu..g of crude parasite Ag per well, (2) to be able to detect 0.5 ng of monoclonal Ab, and (3) to be 10/sup 4/ times more sensitive than the indirect fluorescent Ab staining technique. In a modification of the above assay using intact RBC as an Ag, hyperimmune serum showed significant binding to the surface of erythrocytes of mice infected with P. yoelii parasites but not to RBC of normal mice. Hybridomas were prepared by fusing infected mouse spleen cells with myeloma cells. Using the SPRIA, hybrids secreting Ab against P. yoelii 17XL Ag were detected.

  4. Development of monoclonal antibodies suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Chander, Vishal; Singh, R P; Verma, P C

    2012-12-01

    The control of an infectious viral disease as rabies is made easier by rapid and accurate diagnosis. Successful rabies prophylaxis is dependent upon the active immunization with vaccine along with passive administration of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies which together clear the virus before widespread infection of central nervous system occurs. The present study aimed at the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection. For the production of rabies specific MAbs, immunization of Swiss albino mice with a commercially available vaccine was done and Polyethylene glycol mediated fusion of spleenocytes with myeloma cells was performed. The positive clones were selected on the basis of distinct reactivity by cell Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence in Indirect Fluorescent antibody test. The positive clones obtained were subjected to single cell cloning by limiting dilution method. The reactive clones were further titrated and employed for virus titration and virus neutralization. The neutralizing activity was evaluated using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter technique. Three MAb clones showed a distinct percent inhibition in the presence of positive serum. One of the MAb clone No. 5C3 was relatively more specific in detecting rabies antibodies and also found suitable for competitive ELISA to assess the antibody level in vaccinated subjects. PMID:24293819

  5. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen and antibody, and antigen subtypes in atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Neriishi, K.; Kodama, K.; Akiba, S. |

    1995-11-01

    On the basis of previous studies showing an association between hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity and radiation exposure in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, we investigated further the active state of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by incorporating tests of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) and HBsAg subtypes into our biennial health examinations. Among 6548 A-bomb survivors for whom HBsAg was assayed between July 1979 and July 1981, 129 persons were HBsAg positive. HBeAg and anti-HBe were measured in 104 of these persons and subtypes of HBsAg in 98 persons. Among those exposed to radiation (average liver dose 0.58 Sv), the odds ratio of HBsAg positivity tended to increase with radiation dose (P for trend = 0.024). The P values for association between the prevalence of HB e antigen and radiation dose were 0.094 and 0.17, respectively. The HB antigen subtype adr was predominant over other subtypes in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the distribution of subtypes did not seem to differ in relation to radiation dose. These results suggested that A-bomb survivors remain in active state of HBV infection and that the mechanism(s) of seroconversion may be impaired. 29 refs., 6 tabs.

  6. High-resolution, three-dimensional modeling of human leukocyte antigen class I structure and surface electrostatic potential reveals the molecular basis for alloantibody binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Dafforn, Timothy R; Chaudhry, Afzal N; Halsall, David J; Bradley, J Andrew; Taylor, Craig J

    2011-11-01

    The potential of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) to stimulate humoral alloimmunity depends on the orientation, accessibility and physiochemical properties of polymorphic amino acids. We have generated high-resolution structural and physiochemical models of all common HLA class I alleles and analyzed the impact of amino acid polymorphisms on surface electrostatic potential. Atomic resolution three-dimensional structural models of HLA class I molecules were generated using the MODELLER computer algorithm. The molecular surface electrostatic potential was calculated using the DelPhi program. To confirm that electrostatic surface topography reflects known HLA B cell epitopes, we examined Bw4 and Bw6 and ascertained the impact of amino acid polymorphisms on their tertiary and physiochemical composition. The HLA protein structures generated performed well when subjected to stereochemical and energy-based testing for structural integrity. The electrostatic pattern and conformation of Bw4 and Bw6 epitopes are maintained among HLA molecules even when expressed in a different structural context. Importantly, variation in epitope amino acid composition does not always translate into a different electrostatic motif, providing an explanation for serologic cross-reactivity. Mutations of critical amino acids that abrogate antibody binding also induce distinct changes in epitope electrostatic properties. In conclusion, high-resolution structural modeling provides a physiochemical explanation for serologic patterns of antibody binding and provides novel insights into HLA immunogenicity. PMID:21840357

  7. Anti-Leukocyte Function-Associated Antigen 1 Therapy in a Nonhuman Primate Renal Transplant Model of Costimulation Blockade-Resistant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D J; Lo, D J; Leopardi, F; Song, M; Turgeon, N A; Strobert, E A; Jenkins, J B; Wang, R; Reimann, K A; Larsen, C P; Kirk, A D

    2016-05-01

    Costimulation blockade with the fusion protein belatacept provides a desirable side effect profile and improvement in renal function compared with calcineurin inhibition in renal transplantation. This comes at the cost of increased rates of early acute rejection. Blockade of the integrin molecule leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) has been shown to be an effective adjuvant to costimulation blockade in a rigorous nonhuman primate (NHP) model of islet transplantation; therefore, we sought to test this combination in an NHP renal transplant model. Rhesus macaques received belatacept maintenance therapy with or without the addition of LFA-1 blockade, which was achieved using a murine-derived LFA-1-specific antibody TS1/22. Additional experiments were performed using chimeric rhesus IgG1 (TS1/22R1) or IgG4 (TS1/22R4) variants, each engineered to limit antibody clearance. Despite evidence of proper binding to the target molecule and impaired cellular egress from the intravascular space indicative of a therapeutic effect similar to prior islet studies, LFA-1 blockade failed to significantly prolong graft survival. Furthermore, evidence of impaired protective immunity against cytomegalovirus was observed. These data highlight the difficulties in translating treatment regimens between organ models and suggest that the primarily vascularized renal model is more robust with regard to belatacept-resistant rejection than the islet model. PMID:26602755

  8. The effect of pH dependence of antibody-antigen interactions on subcellular trafficking dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Devanaboyina, Siva Charan; Lynch, Sandra M; Ober, Raimund J; Ram, Sripad; Kim, Dongyoung; Puig-Canto, Alberto; Breen, Shannon; Kasturirangan, Srinath; Fowler, Susan; Peng, Li; Zhong, Haihong; Jermutus, Lutz; Wu, Herren; Webster, Carl; Ward, E Sally; Gao, Changshou

    2013-01-01

    A drawback of targeting soluble antigens such as cytokines or toxins with long-lived antibodies is that such antibodies can prolong the half-life of the target antigen by a “buffering” effect. This has motivated the design of antibodies that bind to target with higher affinity at near neutral pH relative to acidic endosomal pH (~pH 6.0). Such antibodies are expected to release antigen within endosomes following uptake into cells, whereas antibody will be recycled and exocytosed in FcRn-expressing cells. To understand how the pH dependence of antibody-antigen interactions affects intracellular trafficking, we generated three antibodies that bind IL-6 with different pH dependencies in the range pH 6.0–7.4. The behavior of antigen in the presence of these antibodies has been characterized using a combination of fixed and live cell fluorescence microscopy. As the affinity of the antibody:IL-6 interaction at pH 6.0 decreases, an increasing amount of antigen dissociates from FcRn-bound antibody in early and late endosomes, and then enters lysosomes. Segregation of antibody and FcRn from endosomes in tubulovesicular transport carriers (TCs) into the recycling pathway can also be observed in live cells, and the extent of IL-6 association with TCs correlates with increasing affinity of the antibody:IL-6 interaction at acidic pH. These analyses result in an understanding, in spatiotemporal terms, of the effect of pH dependence of antibody-antigen interactions on subcellular trafficking and inform the design of antibodies with optimized binding properties for antigen elimination. PMID:24492341

  9. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, Madhukar L.

    1990-01-01

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents.

  10. Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni antigens with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kosunen, T U; Bång, B E; Hurme, M

    1984-01-01

    To develop monoclonal reagents for antigenic analysis and serotyping of Campylobacter spp., hybridoma cell lines were produced by fusion of mouse myeloma cells and spleen cells from mice immunized with Formalin-treated Campylobacter jejuni organisms. An enzyme immunoassay was used for preliminary screening of the cell culture supernatants and ascites. Twenty-nine clones which reacted with the immunogen were obtained. Seven of these clones were positive in passive hemagglutination tests with sheep erythrocytes coated with boiled saline extract of whole bacteria; four of these reacted with the purified polysaccharide preparation and with the autoclaved saline extract, but not with lipopolysaccharide prepared from the immunogen strain. Two of the antipolysaccharide clones agglutinated live bacteria in slide tests. Four additional clones gave positive slide agglutination tests with live bacteria, but in tube testing no clones agglutinated Formalin-treated bacteria. No cross-reactions with unrelated bacteria were seen, but several clones reacted in the enzyme immunoassay with many of the 24 Campylobacter strains studied. The clone which gave the highest mean enzyme immunoassay values with Campylobacter coli and C. jejuni strains also reacted with Campylobacter fetus subsp. veneralis and C. fetus subsp. fetus strains. This clone also gave the highest enzyme immunoassay value with an acid glycine extract of the immunogen, which indicates the presence of common antigens in the extract. The results suggest that monoclonal antibodies may be used to devise serotyping schemes for Campylobacter spp. PMID:6365954

  11. Antigenicity and Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Antibody-Based Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Leopold; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2012-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can protect from infection by immunodeficiency viruses. However, the induction by active vaccination of antibodies that can potently neutralize a broad range of circulating virus strains is a goal not yet achieved, despite more than 2 decades of research. Here we review progress made in the field, from early empirical studies to today’s rational structure-based vaccine antigen design. We discuss the existence of broadly neutralizing antibodies, their implications for epitope discovery and recent progress made in antigen design. Finally, we consider the relationship between antigenicity and immunogenicity for B cell recognition and antibody production, a major hurdle for rational vaccine design to overcome. PMID:23227445

  12. Sequential Antigen Panning for Selection of Broadly Cross-Reactive HIV-1-Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei-Yun; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Many phage display techniques drive selection toward the isolation of highly specific antibodies. However, the identification of monoclonal antibodies that are cross-reactive has implications for the development of diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines against pathogens or cancer cells that are able to rapidly generate variants and escape mutants. To identify human monoclonal antibodies with high activity against HIV and broad-spectrum activity, we developed a technique termed sequential antigen panning. This methodology could be used to isolated recombinant antibodies against any antigen that shares epitopes with other antigens. PMID:19554293

  13. Lung injury mediated by antibodies to endothelium. II. Study of the effect of repeated antigen-antibody interactions in rabbits tolerant to heterologous antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G.; Caldwell, P. R.; Andres, G.; Brentjens, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of repeated interactions of antibodies with cell surface antigens have been examined in in vitro, but not in in vivo systems. In this study are described the results of multiple antibody-cell surface antigen interactions in vivo. Rabbits were given repeated intravenous injections of goat antibodies to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), an antigen expressed on the surface of lung endothelial cells. For prevention of anaphylactic reactions, which would have been induced by multiple injections of heterologous immune or nonimmune IgG, the rabbits were made neonatally tolerant to goat IgG. Divalent immune IgG given daily for 21 days induced chronic antigenic modulation (antigen disappearance) with resistance to antibody-mediated inflammatory lesions. The rabbits, however, developed degenerative changes of alveolar endothelial and epithelial cells. Administration of immune IgG every other day for 43 days allowed partial reexpression of ACE and was associated with intravascular, but not interstitial, inflammatory changes. In contrast, repeated administration of monovalent immune Fab did not induce antigenic modulation but caused severe, lethal, interstitial pneumonitis. Thus, in this experimental model the development of acute interstitial inflammatory changes correlates with persistence of antigen and is abrogated by disappearance of antigen induced by divalent antibodies. Further, repeated endothelial antigen antibody interactions fail to induce chronic inflammatory or sclerosing lung lesions. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:3034065

  14. Evaluation of the siemens HIV antigen-antibody immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Vallefuoco, Luca; Aden Abdi, Fatima; Sorrentino, Rosanna; Spalletti-Cernia, Daniela; Mazzarella, Claudia; Barbato, Sara; Perna, Enzo; Buffolano, Wilma; Di Nicuolo, Giuseppe; Portella, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Fourth-generation assays for the simultaneous detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen and antibodies are available on the international market and are currently used for blood donor screening and for HIV diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the performance of the novel automated fourth-generation ADVIA Centaur® HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay. The assay detected seroconversion at the same bleed or at least one bleed earlier in panels with respect to other assays and showed a detection efficacy equal to those of other assays in a low-titer panel. Samples obtained from blood donors (n = 2,778) or from HIV-positive patients (HIV-1 B subtype, n = 82; non-B subtype, n = 71) were also tested, showing a good correlation with other fourth-generation assays. We assessed the performance of 3 fourth-generation assays for detecting in utero transmitted anti-HIV antibodies and found a more specific detection efficiency with the ADVIA Centaur HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay compared to the other fourth-generation assays. PMID:24557036

  15. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-binding epitopes dataset for the newly identified T-cell antigens of Mycobacterium immunogenum.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Harish; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2016-09-01

    The dataset described herein is related to our article entitled "T-cell antigens of Mycobacterium immunogenum (MI), an etiological agent of occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis'' (Chandra and Yadav, 2016) [1]. The data include in silico-predicted T-cell epitopes of the T-cell antigens AgA and AgD of MI predicted to bind to HLA-I or HLA-II alleles. Data on two reference T-cell antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv are included for comparison. The data for each antigen include the predicted epitope׳s amino acid sequence, its first amino acid position, and its ability to bind HLA-I or HLA-II allele(s). PMID:27508266

  16. Quantitative Assessment of the Effects of Oxidants on Antigen-Antibody Binding In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuang; Wang, Guanyu; Xu, Naijin; Liu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We quantitatively assessed the influence of oxidants on antigen-antibody-binding activity. Methods. We used several immunological detection methods, including precipitation reactions, agglutination reactions, and enzyme immunoassays, to determine antibody activity. The oxidation-reduction potential was measured in order to determine total serum antioxidant capacity. Results. Certain concentrations of oxidants resulted in significant inhibition of antibody activity but had little influence on total serum antioxidant capacity. Conclusions. Oxidants had a significant influence on interactions between antigen and antibody, but minimal effect on the peptide of the antibody molecule. PMID:27313823

  17. Separation of uncompromised whole blood mixtures for single source STR profiling using fluorescently-labeled human leukocyte antigen (HLA) probes and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Dean, Lee; Kwon, Ye Jin; Philpott, M Katherine; Stanciu, Cristina E; Seashols-Williams, Sarah J; Dawson Cruz, Tracey; Sturgill, Jamie; Ehrhardt, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of biological mixtures is a significant problem for forensic laboratories, particularly when the mixture contains only one cell type. Contributions from multiple individuals to biologic evidence can complicate DNA profile interpretation and often lead to a reduction in the probative value of DNA evidence or worse, its total loss. To address this, we have utilized an analytical technique that exploits the intrinsic immunological variation among individuals to physically separate cells from different sources in a mixture prior to DNA profiling. Specifically, we applied a fluorescently labeled antibody probe to selectively bind to one contributor in a mixture through allele-specific interactions with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins that are expressed on the surfaces of most nucleated cells. Once the contributor's cells were bound to the probe, they were isolated from the mixture using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS)-a high throughput technique for separating cell populations based on their optical properties-and then subjected to STR analysis. We tested this approach on two-person and four-person whole blood mixtures where one contributor possessed an HLA allele (A*02) that was not shared by other contributors to the mixture. Results showed that hybridization of the mixture with a fluorescently-labeled antibody probe complimentary to the A*02 allele's protein product created a cell population with a distinct optical profile that could be easily differentiated from other cells in the mixture. After sorting the cells with FACS, genetic analysis showed that the STR profile of this cell population was consistent with that of the contributor who possessed the A*02 allele. Minor peaks from the A*02 negative contributor(s) were observed but could be easily distinguished from the profile generated from A*02 positive cells. Overall, this indicates that HLA antibody probes coupled to FACS may be an effective approach for generating STR profiles of

  18. Activation of clones producing self-reactive antibodies by foreign antigen and antiidiotype antibody carrying the internal image of the antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, N C; Fidanza, V; Mayer, R; Mazza, G; Fougereau, M; Bona, C

    1989-01-01

    Because we found in previous work that a high fraction of antibodies exhibiting various specificities bound to glutamic acid 50-tyrosine50 homopolymer (GT) and expressed pGAT cross-reactive idiotype (IdX), we studied the activation of clones producing multireactive antibodies in 1-mo-old MRL/lpr and C3H/HeJ mice bearing VHJ haplotype. The activation of such clones was studied after mice were immunized with GT in CFA, HP20 (an anti-Id MAb carrying the internal image of GT in the D region), and a synthetic peptide corresponding to the D segment of HP20. Our results indicate that immunized mice produced both GT- and self-reactive antibodies. Study of the immunochemical properties of MAb showed that they exhibit multispecific properties and bind with similar-affinity constants to GT or self-antigens such as DNA, Smith antigen (Sm), and IgG2a. An important fraction of antibodies obtained from MRL/lpr mice immunized with HP20 expressed pGAT IdX and some of these antibodies share IdX expressed on anti-DNA, Sm, and rheumatoid factor (RFs) antibodies. The hybridomas producing multispecific autoantibodies use heavy-chain- (VH) and light-chain-variable region (VK) genes from various V gene families, suggesting that they do not derive from the pool of GAT precursors. Sequencing of VH and VK genes of two antibodies show that they can use closely related VHJ558, unmutated VK1, or different VK genes than those used by anti-GT antibodies. Our data demonstrate that clones producing antibodies binding to GT and self-antigens with similar-affinity constants can be activated by foreign or anti-Id antibodies carrying the internal image of the antigen or even by a synthetic peptide corresponding to the D segment of anti-Id antibodies. Images PMID:2760212

  19. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia caused by human leucocyte antigen-B27 antibody.

    PubMed

    Thude, H; Schorner, U; Helfricht, C; Loth, M; Maak, B; Barz, D

    2006-04-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) occurs when maternal alloantibodies to antigens presented on foetal platelets cause their immune destruction. Whether human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies can cause NAIT is controversial. Here, a patient was described who suffered from a NAIT caused by an HLA-B27 antibody. Sera from the mother and the newborn were tested for human platelet antigen antibodies and HLA antibodies by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) assay, solid phase-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), lymphocytotoxicity assay (LCT) and flow cytometric analysis. No antibodies against cluster designation (CD)109 and platelet glycoproteins of the father were found in patient's and mother's serum. However, HLA ELISA was used to identify HLA antibody in both sera. The antibody was specified as HLA-B27 antibody. Typing results showed that the father descended HLA-B27 antigen on patient and his brother. The mother was HLA-B27 negative. It is most conceivable that the previous pregnancy of the mother induced the production of anti-HLA-B27 antibody, which crossed the placenta and subsequently caused an NAIT in the case presented. PMID:16623921

  20. Exploring the antigenic relatedness of influenza virus haemagglutinins with strain-specific polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    García-Barreno, Blanca; Delgado, Teresa; Benito, Sonia; Casas, Inmaculada; Pozo, Francisco; Melero, José A

    2014-10-01

    Alternative methods to the standard haemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization tests to probe the antigenic properties of the influenza virus haemagglutinin (HA) were developed in this study. Vaccinia virus recombinants expressing reference HAs were used to immunize rabbits from which polyclonal antibodies were obtained. These antibodies were subtype specific but showed limited intra-subtype strain specificity in ELISA. The discriminatory capacity of these antibodies was, however, markedly increased after adsorption to cells infected with heterologous influenza viruses, revealing antigenic differences that were otherwise undistinguishable by standard HI and neutralization tests. Furthermore, the unadsorbed antibodies could be used to select escape mutants of the reference strain, which after sequencing unveiled amino acid changes responsible of the noted antigenic differences. These procedures therefore provide alternative methods for the antigenic characterization of influenza HA and might be useful in studies of HA antigenic evolution. PMID:25000959

  1. Impaired Antigen-Specific Immune Response to Vaccines in Children with Antibody Production Defects.

    PubMed

    Szczawinska-Poplonyk, Aleksandra; Breborowicz, Anna; Samara, Husam; Ossowska, Lidia; Dworacki, Grzegorz

    2015-08-01

    The impaired synthesis of antigen-specific antibodies, which is indispensable for an adaptive immune response to infections, is a fundamental pathomechanism that leads to clinical manifestations in children with antibody production defects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the synthesis of antigen-specific antibodies following immunization in relation to peripheral blood B cell subsets in young children with hypogammaglobulinemia. Twenty-two children, aged from 8 to 61 months, with a deficiency in one or more major immunoglobulin classes participated in the study. Postvaccination antibodies against tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, the surface antigen of the hepatitis B virus, and the capsular Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide antigen were assessed along with an immunophenotypic evaluation of peripheral blood B lymph cell maturation. A deficiency of antibodies against the tetanus toxoid was assessed in 73% of cases and that against the diphtheria toxoid was assessed in 68% of cases, whereas a deficiency of antibodies against the surface antigen of the hepatitis B virus was revealed in 59% of the children included in the study. A defective response to immunization with a conjugate vaccine with the Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide antigen was demonstrated in 55% of hypogammaglobulinemic patients. Increased proportions of transitional B lymph cells and an accumulation of plasmablasts accompanied antibody deficiencies. The defective response to vaccine protein and polysaccharide antigens is a predominating disorder of humoral immunity in children with hypogammaglobulinemia and may result from a dysfunctional state of the cellular elements of the immune system. PMID:26018535

  2. Immunoradiometric assay for examination and quantitation of Brucella abortus-specific antibodies reactive with the antigen(s) used in the indirect hemolysis test.

    PubMed Central

    Tedder, T F; Hoffmann, E M

    1981-01-01

    An immunoradiometric assay was designed to quantitate antibodies which bind to Brucella abortus antigens adsorbed to bovine erythrocytes. This allowed examination of antibodies specific for B. abortus antigens detectable in the indirect hemolysis test for bovine brucellosis. Assay parameters were optimized for measuring antigen-specific immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), IgG2, and IgM antibodies. The immunoradiometric assay allowed examination of binding interactions which occur during the indirect hemolysis test. Affinity-purified antibovine IgG1, IgG2, and IgM were used to detect specific bovine antibodies of these classes (and subclasses). The binding of the anti-immunoglobulins was linear as a function of immunoglobulin concentration. However, the binding of bovine antibodies of the different classes and subclasses to B. abortus antigen was nonlinear. Since B. abortus-specific antibodies of all classes and subclasses were present in the "standard serum" during the immunoradiometric assays, it is possible that the non-linearity was due to competition between antibodies for antigenic sites. IgG2 and IgM antibodies specific for B. abortus antigen(s) appeared to be capable of binding independently to antigen(s). However, the binding efficiencies of IgG1 antibodies changed as the ratio of antigenic sites to antibodies was increased. PMID:6793625

  3. Preventing the infiltration of leukocytes by monoclonal antibody blocks the development of progressive ischemia in rat burns.

    PubMed

    Choi, M; Rabb, H; Arnaout, M A; Ehrlich, H P

    1995-10-01

    Tissue loss as a consequence of thermal trauma occurs in two stages. There is immediate necrosis in tissues directly killed by the thermal energy, followed by a delayed secondary necrosis in neighboring tissues. The infiltration of neutrophils into traumatized tissues is a hallmark of the inflammatory response. Neutrophils have the machinery to kill invading microorganisms, but these same weapons have the capacity to destroy the host's viable tissues as well. Leukocyte infiltration requires their adherence to the vascular endothelial cell surface. Masking these adhesion sites on neutrophils will block the adhesion of neutrophils to the endothelium. A monoclonal antibody (mAb) was developed to guinea pig leukocyte adhesion sites CD11b/ CD18, and this mAb cross-reacts with rat leukocytes, blocking their adherence. Rats received a "comb burn" composed of four rectangular full-thickness burns placed in a row and separated by three areas left unburned. The four individual burns convert into a single large wound because the blood flow to the interspaces was terminated, blood vessels were occluded, and leukocytes were present in the extravascular space. The systemic administration of the mAb (50 to 150 microliters) immediately following a comb burn promoted the survival of the interspace, demonstrated by the prevention of loss of blood flow by laser Doppler monitoring, maintained patent vessels by latex vascular casts, blocked extravascular migration of neutrophils histologically at 2 hours, and limited the tissue loss to the original four burns. PMID:7568496

  4. Intestinal immunization of mice with antigen conjugated to anti-MHC class II antibodies.

    PubMed

    Estrada, A; McDermott, M R; Underdown, B J; Snider, D P

    1995-07-01

    We have explored a new technique for immunization of the intestinal tract of mice, using protein antigens bound to antibodies with specificity for murine MHC class II molecules (MHC-II). Either of two protein antigens, hen avidin (AV) or hen egg lysozyme (HEL) were covalently conjugated to anti-MHC-II antibodies and the purified conjugates were given orally (p.o.) or by direct intraduodenal (i.d.) injection into the intestinal lumen of mice. A secondary immunization p.o. with the same conjugate or with the non-conjugated antigen in the presence of cholera toxin (CTX) resulted in production of both intestinal secretory IgA and serum IgA antibody by those mice. In addition, serum IgG antibodies were produced. Conjugates with appropriate MHC-II specificity targeted the antigen because they induced more IgA and IgG antibody than conjugates with irrelevant antibody specificity or antigen alone, and because they induced antibody in mice that were genetic low responders to antigen. The results indicate the feasibility of oral subunit type vaccines with antibody targeting technology. PMID:7483762

  5. Construction and Screening of Antigen Targeted Immune Yeast Surface Display Antibody Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Keith D.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Baird, Cheryl L.

    2008-07-01

    These protocols describe a yeast surface display-based process for the rapid selection of antibodies from immunized mice, eliminating the need for creating and screening hybridoma fusions. A yeast surface display library of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) is created from antigen-binding B cells from the splenocytes of immunized mice. The antigen targeted library is then screened for antigen specific scFv by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Library construction and screening can be accomplished in as little as 2 weeks resulting in a panel of scFvs specific for the target antigen.

  6. Construction and Screening of Antigen Targeted Immune Yeast Surface Display Antibody Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Keith D.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Baird, Cheryl L.

    2009-08-02

    These protocols describe a yeast surface display-based process for the rapid selection of antibodies from immunized mice, eliminating the need for creating and screening hybridoma fusions. A yeast surface display library of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) is created from antigen-binding B cells from the splenocytes of immunized mice. The antigen targeted library is then screened for antigen specific scFv by magneticactivated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Library construction and screening can be accomplished in as little as 2 weeks, resulting in a panel of scFvs specific for the target antigen.

  7. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  8. Constitutive and cytokine-induced expression of human leukocyte antigens and cell adhesion molecules by human myotubes.

    PubMed Central

    Michaelis, D.; Goebels, N.; Hohlfeld, R.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the immunobiology of muscle is relevant to muscular autoimmune diseases and to gene therapies based on myoblast transfer. We have investigated the constitutive and cytokine-induced intra- and extracellular expression of histocompatibility human leukocyte antigens (HLA) and cell adhesion molecules by multinucleated human myotubes using immunofluorescence microscopy. Myotubes constitutively expressed HLA class I but not HLA class II. Exposure to interferon-gamma, but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha, induced HLA-DR in the cytoplasm and on the surface membrane of approximately 40 to 95% of cultured myotubes. Surface expression was strongest in perinuclear membrane areas, and cytoplasmic expression was strongest at branching points and at the tips of myotubes. HLA-DP and HLA-DQ were not expressed in detectable amounts. Both interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (CD54) in the cytoplasm and on the surface of nearly all myotubes. The distribution of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and HLA-DR was similar but not identical in double-positive myotubes. The leukocyte function-associated (LFA) adhesion molecules LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18), LFA-2 (CD2), and LFA-3 (CD58) could not be detected in the cytoplasm or on the surface. Our results indicate that cytokine-induced myotubes can participate in immune interactions with T lymphocytes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8214008

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigen Typing Using a Knowledge Base Coupled with a High-Throughput Oligonucleotide Probe Array Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guang Lan; Keskin, Derin B.; Lin, Hsin-Nan; Lin, Hong Huang; DeLuca, David S.; Leppanen, Scott; Milford, Edgar L.; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Brusic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are important biomarkers because multiple diseases, drug toxicity, and vaccine responses reveal strong HLA associations. Current clinical HLA typing is an elimination process requiring serial testing. We present an alternative in situ synthesized DNA-based microarray method that contains hundreds of thousands of probes representing a complete overlapping set covering 1,610 clinically relevant HLA class I alleles accompanied by computational tools for assigning HLA type to 4-digit resolution. Our proof-of-concept experiment included 21 blood samples, 18 cell lines, and multiple controls. The method is accurate, robust, and amenable to automation. Typing errors were restricted to homozygous samples or those with very closely related alleles from the same locus, but readily resolved by targeted DNA sequencing validation of flagged samples. High-throughput HLA typing technologies that are effective, yet inexpensive, can be used to analyze the world’s populations, benefiting both global public health and personalized health care. PMID:25505899

  10. Association of human leukocyte antigen class II alleles with severe Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Hajeer, Ali H.; Balkhy, Hanan; Johani, Sameera; Yousef, Mohammed Z.; Arabi, Yaseen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a disease of the lower respiratory tract and is characterized by high mortality. It is caused by a beta coronavirus (CoV) referred to as MERS-CoV. Majority of MERS-CoV cases have been reported from Saudi Arabia. AIM: We investigated the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) Class II alleles in patients with severe MERS who were admitted in our Intensive Care Unit. METHODS: A total of 23 Saudi patients with severe MERS-CoV infection were typed for HLA class II, results were compared with those of 161 healthy controls. RESULTS: Two HLA class II alleles were associated with the disease; HLA-DRB1*11:01 and DQB1*02:02, but not with the disease outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the HLA-DRB1*11:01 and DQB1*02:02 may be associated with susceptibility to MERS. PMID:27512511

  11. Discordance at human leukocyte antigen-DRB3 and protection from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Hader, Shannon L; Hodge, Thomas W; Buchacz, Kate A; Bray, Robert A; Padian, Nancy S; Rausa, Alfio; Slaviniski, Sally A; Holmberg, Scott D

    2002-06-15

    Host human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) integrated into the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 envelope could theoretically determine, as in tissue transplants, whether HIV-1 is "rejected" by exposed susceptible persons, preventing transmission. HLA discordance (mismatch) was examined among 45 heterosexual partner pairs in which at least 1 partner was HIV-1 infected and exposure or transmission between partners had occurred. Immunologic discordance at class II HLA-DRB3 (present in the HIV donor partner but absent in the recipient partner) was associated with lack of transmission of HIV-1. Eight (35%) of 23 partner pairs in which HIV-1 transmission did not occur were immunologically discordant at HLA-DRB3, compared with 0 of 11 partner pairs in which HIV-1 transmission did occur (P=.027). Further investigation of the roles of class II HLAs in HIV-1 transmission and as possible components of HIV-1 vaccines should be pursued. PMID:12085318

  12. In vitro antigen-induced antibody responses to hepatitis B surface antigen in man. Kinetic and cellular requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Cupps, T R; Gerin, J L; Purcell, R H; Goldsmith, P K; Fauci, A S

    1984-01-01

    In this report we define the parameters of the human immune response after immunization with hepatitis B vaccine. 2 wk after booster immunization, there is significant spontaneous secretion of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs IgG), which is not further augmented by stimulation with antigen or pokeweed mitogen (PWM). By 4 wk there is little spontaneous secretion of specific antibody, and low doses of antigen or PWM produce significant increases in the amount of anti-HBs IgG produced. By 8 wk the peripheral blood mononuclear cells are refractory to stimulation by antigen, but anti-HBs IgG is produced in response to PWM. 0.5 yr or more after the last immunization, some individuals will manifest an antigen-induced specific antibody response. This induction of anti-HBs IgG by hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is monocyte- and T cell-dependent. Note that there is a dichotomy in the T cell response to HBsAg. The specific antibody response is clearly T cell dependent, but no in vitro T cell proliferative response to HBsAG could be demonstrated in the immunized individuals. Although the precise reason for the absent proliferative response to HBsAg despite well-established humoral immunity has not been determined, there was no evidence to suggest nonspecific suppression by HBsAg or the presence of an adherent suppressor cell population. The ability to evaluate antigen-induced, antigen-specific responses to HBsAg will be useful in defining the unique interaction between the human immune response and this clinically important viral agent. PMID:6332826

  13. Association of the bovine leukocyte antigen major histocompatibility complex class II DRB3*4401 allele with host resistance to the Lone Star Tick, Amblyomma americanum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The MHC of cattle, known as the bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) complex, plays an integral role in disease and parasite susceptibility, and immune responsiveness of the host. While susceptibility to tick infestation in cattle is believed to be heritable, genes that may be responsible for the manife...

  14. Development of Recombinant Antigen Array for Simultaneous Detection of Viral Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Yu, Fengling; Huang, Haiyan; Han, Jinxiang

    2013-01-01

    Protein microarrays have been developed to study antibody reactivity against a large number of antigens, demonstrating extensive perspective for clinical application. We developed a viral antigen array by spotting four recombinant antigens and synthetic peptide, including glycoprotein G of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and 2, phosphoprotein 150 of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Rubella virus (RV) core plus glycoprotein E1 and E2 as well as a E1 peptide with the optimal concentrations on activated glass slides to simultaneously detect IgG and IgM against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and RV in clinical specimens of sera and cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs). The positive reference sera were initially used to measure the sensitivity and specificity of the array with the optimal conditions. Then clinical specimens of 144 sera and 93 CSFs were tested for IgG and IgM antibodies directed against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and RV by the antigen array. Specificity of the antigen array for viral antibodies detection was satisfying compared to commercial ELISA kits but sensitivity of the array varied relying on quality and antigenic epitopes of the spotting antigens. In short, the recombinant antigen array has potential to simultaneous detect multiple viral antibodies using minute amount (3 µl) of samples, which holds the particularly advantage to detect viral antibodies in clinical CSFs being suspicious of neonatal meningitis and encephalitis. PMID:24058498

  15. Proteomic identification of sperm antigens using serum samples from individuals with and without antisperm antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nowicka-Bauer, K; Kamieniczna, M; Cibulka, J; Ulcova-Gallova, Z; Kurpisz, M

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to identify human sperm antigens reacting with polyclonal antisperm antibodies. Protein sperm extracts were subjected to electrofocusing, and next immune reactions (immunoblotting) were carried out with positive for antisperm antibodies and control (not containing antisperm antibodies) serum samples. Proteomic analysis of human sperm proteins resulted in identification of 80 sperm antigens that could be divided into three groups: antigens specific for patients with antisperm antibodies (32), antigens recognised by both infertile patients and control sera (35) and antigens detected by control serum samples only (13). Among antigens specific for infertile patients, there were 12 sperm entities known to be involved in fertilisation process. We have also characterised three protein entities identified only by sera of infertile women. Altogether, the proteomic analysis resulted in identification of 27 sperm entities not reported previously in human sperm proteome. Identified proteins are sperm antigens that could be potentially responsible for immunological infertility. The study also sheds new light on the sperm antigens in aspect of gender specificity. The investigation of human sperm proteome by the use of antisperm antibodies-containing sera of infertile individuals not only may indicate new proteins but also can draft their immunological nature. PMID:26659478

  16. Hepatitis B Virus DNA in Blood Samples Positive for Antibodies to Core Antigen and Negative for Surface Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, C.; León, G.; Loureiro, C. L.; Uzcátegui, N.; Liprandi, F.; Pujol, F. H.

    1999-01-01

    Anti-hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg)-positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative plasma samples from blood donors were tested by nested PCR. DNA positivity was more significantly associated with high levels of anti-HBcAg than with low levels of anti-HBsAg antibodies. Analysis of a dilution of anti-HBcAg antibodies might result in a more rational exclusion of anti-HBcAg-positive HBsAg-negative samples, reducing the number of donations discarded and enabling more countries to incorporate anti-HBcAg testing. PMID:10473534

  17. Rapid profiling of the antigen regions recognized by serum antibodies using massively parallel sequencing of antigen-specific libraries.

    PubMed

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; D'Aliberti, Deborah; Venza, Mario; Borgogni, Erica; Castellino, Flora; Biondo, Carmelo; D'Andrea, Daniel; Grassi, Luigi; Tramontano, Anna; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for techniques capable of identifying the antigenic epitopes targeted by polyclonal antibody responses during deliberate or natural immunization. Although successful, traditional phage library screening is laborious and can map only some of the epitopes. To accelerate and improve epitope identification, we have employed massive sequencing of phage-displayed antigen-specific libraries using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This enabled us to precisely identify the regions of a model antigen, the meningococcal NadA virulence factor, targeted by serum antibodies in vaccinated individuals and to rank hundreds of antigenic fragments according to their immunoreactivity. We found that next generation sequencing can significantly empower the analysis of antigen-specific libraries by allowing simultaneous processing of dozens of library/serum combinations in less than two days, including the time required for antibody-mediated library selection. Moreover, compared with traditional plaque picking, the new technology (named Phage-based Representation OF Immuno-Ligand Epitope Repertoire or PROFILER) provides superior resolution in epitope identification. PROFILER seems ideally suited to streamline and guide rational antigen design, adjuvant selection, and quality control of newly produced vaccines. Furthermore, this method is also susceptible to find important applications in other fields covered by traditional quantitative serology. PMID:25473968

  18. DEMONSTRATION OF MULTIPLE ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS ON 'MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE' ATTACHMENT PROTEIN BY MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distinct multiple antigenic determinants of the attachment protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been identified by limited proteolytic cleavage using specific monoclonal antibodies. Western blots prepared from the gels containing the cleaved fragments were probed with antiserum ...

  19. Human cord blood contains an IGM antibody to the 41KD flagellar antigen of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Cooke, W D; Orr, A S; Wiseman, B L; Rouse, S B; Murray, W C; Ranck, S G

    1993-10-01

    Natural antibodies are the IgM products of fetal and neonatal B cells. These are germline encoded low affinity antibodies with multiple specificities to self and exogenous antigens. Lyme borreliosis is the disease resulting from infection with the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. The humoral response to this organism is brisk, directed at multiple proteins, and persistent. Antibody to the 41kd flagellar antigen is found early in disease, but may also be found in non-exposed individuals. These properties suggest that the anti-41kd antibody may be a natural antibody. We report here the finding of an IgM anti-41kd reactivity in 29% of cord blood samples from patients in an area non-endemic for Lyme disease. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that antibody to flagellin may be a germline encoded natural antibody, and could be important in the immunopathogenesis of Lyme arthritis and other arthritides. PMID:8211003

  20. Serological survey of normal humans for natural antibody to cell surface antigens of melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, A N; Taormina, M C; Ikeda, H; Watanabe, T; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1980-01-01

    Sera of 106 normal adult men were tested for antibodies reacting with cell surface antigens of three established lines of cultured malignant melanoma. Positive reactions with a protein A assay for IgG antibodies were extremely rare (1-2%). The frequency of positive reactions with assays for IgM antibodies was higher: 5-15% in immune adherence assays and 55-82% in anti-C3 mixed hemadsorption assays. After low-titered sera and sera reacting with fetal calf serum components, conventional alloantigens, and widely distributed class 3 antigens were excluded, sera from seven individuals (one with IgG antibody and six with IgM antibodies) were selected for detailed analysis. The serum containing the IgG antibody came from a healthy 65-year-old Caucasian man; titers of antibody in his serum ranged from < 1/10 to 1/40,000 in tests with different melanoma cell lines. This IgG antibody identifies a differentiation antigen of melanocytes, provisionally designated Mel 1, that distinguishes two classes of melanomas: 22 melanoma cell lines typed Mel 1+ and 17 types Mel 1-. Mel 1 is expressed by fetal fibroblasts but not adult fibroblasts and can be found on a proportion of cultured epithelial cancer cell lines (5 out of 23) but not on glioma or B-cell lines. The melanoma antigens detected by the naturally occurring IgM antibodies are serologically unrelated to Mel 1 but, like Mel 1, appear to be differentiation antigens that distinguish subsets of melanoma. These IgM antibodies detect antigens that are identical or closely related to the AH antigen, a melanoma surface antigen that was initially defined by autologous antibody in a patient with melanoma. In view of the immunogenicity of both Mel 1 and the AH antigens in humans and their occurrence on more than 50% of melanomas, it remains to be seen whether antibody to these antigens can be elicited by specific vaccination of seronegative melanoma patients and whether this will have an influence on the clinical course of the disease

  1. Serum antibodies to whole-cell and recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi in cottontail rabbits.

    PubMed

    Magnarelli, Louis A; Norris, Steven J; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-01-01

    Archived serum samples, from 95 eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) captured in New York, New York, USA and Millbrook, New York, USA, during 1985-86, were analyzed in solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for total and class-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibodies to whole-cell or recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. Using a polyvalent conjugate, rabbit sera contained antibodies to whole-cell and recombinant antigens (protein [p]35, p37, or VlsE) during different seasons, but there was no reactivity to outer surface protein (Osp)A or OspB. Seventy-six of the 102 sera (75%) analyzed were reactive with one or more of the antigens; 61 of the positive samples (80%) reacted to whole-cell antigens, followed by results for the p35 (58%, 44/76), VlsE (43%, 33/76), and p37 (29%, 22/ 76) antigens. Fifty-eight sera (76%) contained antibodies to the VlsE or p35 antigens with or without reactivity to whole-cell antigens. High antibody titers (≥1:2,560) recorded for 52 sera indicate robust antibody production. In analyses for IgM antibodies in an ELISA containing whole-cell antigens, there were 30 positive sera; titers ranged from 1:160 to 1:640. There was minimal cross-reactivity when rabbit antisera to Treponema pallidum or four serovars of Leptospira interrogans were screened against B. burgdorferi antigens. Based on more-specific results, VlsE and p35 antigens appear to be useful markers for detecting possible B. burgdorferi infections. PMID:22247369

  2. SERUM ANTIBODIES TO WHOLE-CELL AND RECOMBINANT ANTIGENS OF BORRELIA BURGDORFERI IN COTTONTAIL RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Magnarelli, Louis A.; Norris, Steven J.; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Archived serum samples, from 95 eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) captured in New York, New York, USA and Millbrook, New York, USA, during 1985–86, were analyzed in solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for total and class-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibodies to whole-cell or recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. Using a polyvalent conjugate, rabbit sera contained antibodies to whole-cell and recombinant antigens (protein [p]35, p37, or VlsE) during different seasons, but there was no reactivity to outer surface protein (Osp)A or OspB. Seventy-six of the 102 sera (75%) analyzed were reactive with one or more of the antigens; 61 of the positive samples (80%) reacted to whole-cell antigens, followed by results for the p35 (58%, 44/76), VlsE (43%, 33/76), and p37 (29%, 22/76) antigens. Fifty-eight sera (76%) contained antibodies to the VlsE or p35 antigens with or without reactivity to whole-cell antigens. High antibody titers (≥1:2,560) recorded for 52 sera indicate robust antibody production. In analyses for IgM antibodies in an ELISA containing whole-cell antigens, there were 30 positive sera; titers ranged from 1:160 to 1:640. There was minimal cross-reactivity when rabbit antisera to Treponema pallidum or four serovars of Leptospira interrogans were screened against B. burgdorferi antigens. Based on more-specific results, VlsE and p35 antigens appear to be useful markers for detecting possible B. burgdorferi infections. PMID:22247369

  3. Natural antibodies to treponemal antigens in four strains of guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowski, A; Wicher, V; Gruhn, R; Wicher, K

    1987-01-01

    A total of 185 serum samples obtained from healthy male and female guinea-pigs of inbred strains 2 and 13 and outbred strains C4D and Hartley A were examined for natural antibodies to treponemal antigens by ELISA using Treponema pallidum (TP), T. phagedenis biotype Reiter (TR) and T. vincentii (TV) antigens and by the FTA test. The prevalence and titres of natural antibodies depended on the age and strain of guinea-pig and the treponemal antigen used. One- and 7-day-old guinea-pigs contained significantly (P less than 0.001) higher levels of natural antibodies than did animals 1 or 3-6 months old. The similar high levels of natural antibodies in newborn guinea-pigs and their mothers (12-30 months old) and the sharp drop observed at the age of 1 month suggested maternal transfer as the mechanism of acquisition. In young adults 3-6 months old, the age group most susceptible to TP infection, antibodies to TP and TR were at their lowest levels, but antibodies reacting to TV had already begun to rise. Natural antibodies were of the IgG1 and IgG2 but not of the IgM class. The highest levels of natural antibodies were in the C4D guinea-pigs; the lowest were in the Hartley A strain. Natural antibody activity was inhibited or adsorbed by TR antigens. PMID:3546103

  4. Monitoring human leukocyte antigen class I molecules by micro-Raman spectroscopy at single-cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Gobind; La Rocca, Rosanna; Lakshmikanth, Tadepally; Gentile, Francesco; Tallerico, Rossana; Zambetti, Lia P.; Devitt, J.; Candeloro, Patrizio; de Angelis, Francesco; Carbone, Ennio; di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2010-03-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules are formed by three immunoglobulin-like domains (α1, α2, and α3) once folded by peptide and β2-microglobulin show the presence of two α-helix streams and one β-sheet limiting the pocket for the antigenic peptide. The loss of HLA class I expression in tumors and virus-infected cells, on one hand, prevents T cell recognition, while on the other hand, it leads to natural killer (NK) cell mediated cytotoxicity. We propose the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to measure the relative expression of HLA class I molecules at the single-cell level. Raman spectra are recorded for three cell lines (K562, T2, and T3) and monomers (HLA class I folded, unfolded and peptide+β2-microlobulin refolded) using 830 nm laser line. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that in the Raman spectra, ranging from 1600 to 1800 cm-1, the intensity variation of cells associated with HLA class I molecules could be measured.

  5. The association of human leukocyte antigen polymorphisms with disease severity and latency period in patients with silicosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Denim sandblasting may cause silicosis as a result of free crystalline silica inhalation. Its pathogenesis remains unclear, but autoimmunity may play a role in the development of silicosis. The present study aimed to investigate the relationships between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and the severity and latency period of silicosis. Methods 48 silicotic patients in the Eastern part of Turkey were classified according to their latency period and disease severity. The distribution of HLAs according to disease severity and latency period was assessed. Results A23 (7.5%), B49 (7.5%), and B51 (25%) were more common in the mild group than in the severe group, and B55 (8.9%) and DR4 (17.9%) were more common in the severe group than in the mild one. Only B51 was significantly more common in the mild group than in the severe one (25%, n = 10 vs. 7.1%, n = 4; p = 0.016). Conclusions This study suggests that HLA antigens may play a particular role in the severity of silica-induced lung disease, but there was no association between HLA and progression time of the disease. PMID:24646632

  6. The Structural Basis of Antibody-Antigen Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Sela-Culang, Inbal; Kunik, Vered; Ofran, Yanay

    2013-01-01

    The function of antibodies (Abs) involves specific binding to antigens (Ags) and activation of other components of the immune system to fight pathogens. The six hypervariable loops within the variable domains of Abs, commonly termed complementarity determining regions (CDRs), are widely assumed to be responsible for Ag recognition, while the constant domains are believed to mediate effector activation. Recent studies and analyses of the growing number of available Ab structures, indicate that this clear functional separation between the two regions may be an oversimplification. Some positions within the CDRs have been shown to never participate in Ag binding and some off-CDRs residues often contribute critically to the interaction with the Ag. Moreover, there is now growing evidence for non-local and even allosteric effects in Ab-Ag interaction in which Ag binding affects the constant region and vice versa. This review summarizes and discusses the structural basis of Ag recognition, elaborating on the contribution of different structural determinants of the Ab to Ag binding and recognition. We discuss the CDRs, the different approaches for their identification and their relationship to the Ag interface. We also review what is currently known about the contribution of non-CDRs regions to Ag recognition, namely the framework regions (FRs) and the constant domains. The suggested mechanisms by which these regions contribute to Ag binding are discussed. On the Ag side of the interaction, we discuss attempts to predict B-cell epitopes and the suggested idea to incorporate Ab information into B-cell epitope prediction schemes. Beyond improving the understanding of immunity, characterization of the functional role of different parts of the Ab molecule may help in Ab engineering, design of CDR-derived peptides, and epitope prediction. PMID:24115948

  7. Involvement of human leukocyte antigen class I molecules in human immunodeficiency virus infection of CD4-positive cells.

    PubMed Central

    Benkirane, M; Blanc-Zouaoui, D; Hirn, M; Devaux, C

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the putative roles of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated and cell surface-expressed major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules in the course of the HIV life cycle by the combined use of MHC-I molecule-positive and MHC-I molecule-negative virus particles and MHC-I molecule-positive and MHC-I molecule-negative CD4+ human cells. We found (i) that several anti-MHC-I monoclonal antibodies neutralize cell infection by direct interaction with HIV-associated MHC-I antigens, (ii) that these HIV-associated MHC-I antigens are however dispensable for cell infection, and (iii) that the cell surface-expressed MHC-I molecules are unnecessary for productive infection of CD4+ human cells. These results clarify further the functions of MHC-I molecules during the HIV life cycle. PMID:7916059

  8. The Dynamics of the Human Leukocyte Antigen Head Domain Modulates Its Recognition by the T-Cell Receptor

    PubMed Central

    García-Guerrero, Estefanía; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; De la Rosa, Miguel A.; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Generating the immune response requires the discrimination of peptides presented by the human leukocyte antigen complex (HLA) through the T-cell receptor (TCR). However, how a single amino acid substitution in the antigen bonded to HLA affects the response of T cells remains uncertain. Hence, we used molecular dynamics computations to analyze the molecular interactions between peptides, HLA and TCR. We compared immunologically reactive complexes with non-reactive and weakly reactive complexes. MD trajectories were produced to simulate the behavior of isolated components of the various p-HLA-TCR complexes. Analysis of the fluctuations showed that p-HLA binding barely restrains TCR motions, and mainly affects the CDR3 loops. Conversely, inactive p-HLA complexes displayed significant drop in their dynamics when compared with its free versus ternary forms (p-HLA-TCR). In agreement, the free non-reactive p-HLA complexes showed a lower amount of salt bridges than the responsive ones. This resulted in differences between the electrostatic potentials of reactive and inactive p-HLA species and larger vibrational entropies in non-elicitor complexes. Analysis of the ternary p-HLA-TCR complexes also revealed a larger number of salt bridges in the responsive complexes. To summarize, our computations indicate that the affinity of each p-HLA complex towards TCR is intimately linked to both, the dynamics of its free species and its ability to form specific intermolecular salt-bridges in the ternary complexes. Of outstanding interest is the emerging concept of antigen reactivity involving its interplay with the HLA head sidechain dynamics by rearranging its salt-bridges. PMID:27124285

  9. The Dynamics of the Human Leukocyte Antigen Head Domain Modulates Its Recognition by the T-Cell Receptor.

    PubMed

    García-Guerrero, Estefanía; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Generating the immune response requires the discrimination of peptides presented by the human leukocyte antigen complex (HLA) through the T-cell receptor (TCR). However, how a single amino acid substitution in the antigen bonded to HLA affects the response of T cells remains uncertain. Hence, we used molecular dynamics computations to analyze the molecular interactions between peptides, HLA and TCR. We compared immunologically reactive complexes with non-reactive and weakly reactive complexes. MD trajectories were produced to simulate the behavior of isolated components of the various p-HLA-TCR complexes. Analysis of the fluctuations showed that p-HLA binding barely restrains TCR motions, and mainly affects the CDR3 loops. Conversely, inactive p-HLA complexes displayed significant drop in their dynamics when compared with its free versus ternary forms (p-HLA-TCR). In agreement, the free non-reactive p-HLA complexes showed a lower amount of salt bridges than the responsive ones. This resulted in differences between the electrostatic potentials of reactive and inactive p-HLA species and larger vibrational entropies in non-elicitor complexes. Analysis of the ternary p-HLA-TCR complexes also revealed a larger number of salt bridges in the responsive complexes. To summarize, our computations indicate that the affinity of each p-HLA complex towards TCR is intimately linked to both, the dynamics of its free species and its ability to form specific intermolecular salt-bridges in the ternary complexes. Of outstanding interest is the emerging concept of antigen reactivity involving its interplay with the HLA head sidechain dynamics by rearranging its salt-bridges. PMID:27124285

  10. Examining Variable Domain Orientations in Antigen Receptors Gives Insight into TCR-Like Antibody Design

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, James; Knapp, Bernhard; Fuchs, Angelika; Shi, Jiye; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2014-01-01

    The variable domains of antibodies and T-Cell receptors (TCRs) share similar structures. Both molecules act as sensors for the immune system but recognise their respective antigens in different ways. Antibodies bind to a diverse set of antigenic shapes whilst TCRs only recognise linear peptides presented by a major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The antigen specificity and affinity of both receptors is determined primarily by the sequence and structure of their complementarity determining regions (CDRs). In antibodies the binding site is also known to be affected by the relative orientation of the variable domains, VH and VL. Here, the corresponding property for TCRs, the Vβ-Vα orientation, is investigated and compared with that of antibodies. We find that TCR and antibody orientations are distinct. General antibody orientations are found to be incompatible with binding to the MHC in a canonical TCR-like mode. Finally, factors that cause the orientation of TCRs and antibodies to be different are investigated. Packing of the long Vα CDR3 in the domain-domain interface is found to be influential. In antibodies, a similar packing affect can be achieved using a bulky residue at IMGT position 50 on the VH domain. Along with IMGT VH 50, other positions are identified that may help to promote a TCR-like orientation in antibodies. These positions should provide useful considerations in the engineering of therapeutic TCR-like antibodies. PMID:25233457

  11. Antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi detected by different classes and subclasses of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Araujo, F G; Heilman, B; Tighe, L

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of the appearance of specific IgM and of subclasses of IgG antibodies following infection of mice with Trypanosoma cruzi and the antigens of amastigotes and epimastigotes recognized by these antibodies were investigated by using the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test and the protein transfer technique. IgM and IgG2 antibodies were detected almost at the same time and peaked on day 30 and 40 of infection respectively. On day 150 of infection IgM antibodies were barely detectable whereas IgG2 antibodies were still at a high titre. IgG3 and IgG1 antibodies were first detected on days 20 and 30, peaked on days 30 and 50 respectively, and were still detected at low titres on day 150 of infection. The immunofluorescent test with each antibody revealed differences in the patterns of the fluorescent staining of the organisms, particularly with amastigotes. These differences were most striking with IgG3 antibodies. Fluorescent staining with IgM or IgG1 was localized mostly on one or two poles of the amastigotes; with IgG2 it was over the entire body of either amastigotes or epimastigotes; and with IgG3 it was in the form of very small spots over the entire body of organisms of both stages. The Western blots revealed that each antibody apparently recognized the same antigens in both the epimastigote and amastigote antigen preparations. The 90 Kd MW antigen of epimastigotes as well as two antigens of MW 92 Kd and 90 Kd of amastigotes were recognized by each of the antibodies examined. PMID:6438837

  12. Monoclonal Lym-1 antibody-dependent lysis of B-lymphoblastoid tumor targets by human complement and cytokinine-exposed mononuclear and neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Morone, P; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    1996-06-15

    Lym-1 is a murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a polymorphic variant of HLA-DR antigens on malignant B cells, with minimal cross-reactivity with normal tissues. Because it can be safely administered in vivo, a detailed knowledge of its ability to recruit and trigger the antitumor immune effector systems is required to optimize potential serotherapeutic approaches in B-lymphoma patients. By using Raji cells as a model of B-lymphoma targets, we found that Lym-1 activates complement-mediated lysis efficiently. Moreover, Lym-1 was capable of triggering the antibody-dependent cellular cytolysis (ADCC) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs). On the contrary, it failed to trigger neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-mediated ADCC activity. In an attempt to enhance Lym-1 ADCC by MNCs and PMNs, nine biologic response modifiers were tested. MNC-mediated Lym-1 ADCC was significantly stimulated by interleukin-2 (IL-2) and unaffected by other mediators, including gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN), tumor necrosis factor a (TNFalpha), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). On the other hand, PMN-mediated Lym-1 ADCC was induced or significantly augmented by various cytokines, such as GM-CSF, TNFalpha, and gamma-IFN, and chemotaxins, such as formyl peptides (FMLP), complement fragment C5a, and IL-8. Both MNC- and PMN-mediated ADCC was unaffected by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G- CSF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Finally, only GM-CSF and TNFalpha augmented the number of PMNs actually engaged in the binding of Raji target cells. The findings presented here, in particular those showing stimulatory activity of biologic response modifiers, may inspire new attempts for developing Lym-1 antibody-based approaches to the therapy of B lymphomas. PMID:8652830

  13. An antibody profile of systemic lupus erythematosus detected by antigen microarray

    PubMed Central

    Fattal, Ittai; Shental, Noam; Mevorach, Dror; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Livneh, Avi; Langevitz, Pnina; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Pauzner, Rachel; Lerner, Miriam; Blank, Miri; Hincapie, Maria-Eugenia; Gafter, Uzi; Naparstek, Yaakov; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Domany, Eytan; Cohen, Irun R

    2010-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) produce antibodies to many different self-antigens. Here, we investigated antibodies in SLE sera using an antigen microarray containing many hundreds of antigens, mostly self-antigens. The aim was to detect sets of antibody reactivities characteristic of SLE patients in each of various clinical states – SLE patients with acute lupus nephritis, SLE patients in renal remission, and SLE patients who had never had renal involvement. The analysis produced two novel findings: (i) an SLE antibody profile persists independently of disease activity and despite long-term clinical remission, and (ii) this SLE antibody profile includes increases in four specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) reactivities to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and hyaluronic acid; the profile also includes decreases in specific IgM reactivities to myeloperoxidase (MPO), CD99, collagen III, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) and cardiolipin. The reactivities together showed high sensitivity (> 93%) and high specificity for SLE (> 88%). A healthy control subject who had the SLE antibody profile was later found to develop clinical SLE. The present study did not detect antibody reactivities that differentiated among the various subgroups of SLE subjects with statistical significance. Thus, SLE is characterized by an enduring antibody profile irrespective of clinical state. The association of SLE with decreased IgM natural autoantibodies suggests that these autoantibodies might enhance resistance to SLE. PMID:20201986

  14. Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 65 and Islet Cell Antigen 512/IA-2 Autoantibodies in Relation to Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II DR and DQ Alleles and Haplotypes in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stayoussef, Mouna; Benmansour, Jihen; Al-Jenaidi, Fayza A.; Said, Hichem B.; Rayana, Chiheb B.; Mahjoub, Touhami; Almawi, Wassim Y.

    2011-01-01

    The frequencies of autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and islet cell antigen (ICA) 512/IA-2 (512/IA-2) are functions of the specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). We investigated the association of HLA class II (DR and DQ) alleles and haplotypes with the presence of GAD and IA-2 autoantibodies in T1D. Autoantibodies were tested in 88 Tunisian T1D patients and 112 age- and gender-matched normoglycemic control subjects by enzyme immunoassay. Among T1D patients, mean anti-GAD antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*030101 allele (P < 0.001), together with the DRB1*030101/DQB1*0201 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.002) haplotypes, while lower anti-GAD titers were associated with the DRB1*070101 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) alleles and DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.001) haplotypes. Mean anti-IA-2 antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*040101 allele (P = 0.007) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.001) haplotypes but were lower in the DRB1*110101 allele (P = 0.010) and the DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.025) haplotypes. Multinomial regression analysis confirmed the positive association of DRB1*030101 and the negative association of DRB1*110101 and DQB1*030101, along with the DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 haplotypes, with anti-GAD levels. In contrast, only the DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 haplotype was positively associated with altered anti-IA-2 titers. Increased GAD65 and IA-2 antibody positivity is differentially associated with select HLA class II alleles and haplotypes, confirming the heterogeneous nature of T1D. PMID:21490167

  15. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and islet cell antigen 512/IA-2 autoantibodies in relation to human leukocyte antigen class II DR and DQ alleles and haplotypes in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Stayoussef, Mouna; Benmansour, Jihen; Al-Jenaidi, Fayza A; Said, Hichem B; Rayana, Chiheb B; Mahjoub, Touhami; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2011-06-01

    The frequencies of autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and islet cell antigen (ICA) 512/IA-2 (512/IA-2) are functions of the specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). We investigated the association of HLA class II (DR and DQ) alleles and haplotypes with the presence of GAD and IA-2 autoantibodies in T1D. Autoantibodies were tested in 88 Tunisian T1D patients and 112 age- and gender-matched normoglycemic control subjects by enzyme immunoassay. Among T1D patients, mean anti-GAD antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*030101 allele (P < 0.001), together with the DRB1*030101/DQB1*0201 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.002) haplotypes, while lower anti-GAD titers were associated with the DRB1*070101 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) alleles and DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.001) haplotypes. Mean anti-IA-2 antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*040101 allele (P = 0.007) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.001) haplotypes but were lower in the DRB1*110101 allele (P = 0.010) and the DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.025) haplotypes. Multinomial regression analysis confirmed the positive association of DRB1*030101 and the negative association of DRB1*110101 and DQB1*030101, along with the DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 haplotypes, with anti-GAD levels. In contrast, only the DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 haplotype was positively associated with altered anti-IA-2 titers. Increased GAD65 and IA-2 antibody positivity is differentially associated with select HLA class II alleles and haplotypes, confirming the heterogeneous nature of T1D. PMID:21490167

  16. The antigenic structure of the influenza B virus hemagglutinin: operational and topological mapping with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Berton, M T; Webster, R G

    1985-06-01

    We have probed the antigenic structure of the influenza B virus hemagglutinin (HA) with monoclonal antibodies specific for the HA of influenza B virus, B/Oregon/5/80. Seventeen laboratory-selected antigenic variants of this virus were analyzed by hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assays or ELISA and an operational antigenic map was constructed. In addition, the monoclonal antibodies were tested in a competitive binding assay to construct a topological map of the antigenic sites. In contrast to the influenza A virus HA, only a single immunodominant antigenic site composed of several overlapping clusters of epitopes was defined by the HI-positive antibodies. Three variants could be distinguished from the parental virus with polyclonal antisera by HI and infectivity reduction assays suggesting that changes in this antigenic site may be sufficient to provide an epidemiological advantage to influenza B viruses in nature. In addition, two nonoverlapping epitopes of unknown biological significance were identified in the competitive binding analysis by two monoclonal antibodies with no HI activity and little or no neutralizing activity. We previously identified single amino acid substitutions in the HAs of the antigenic variants used in this study (M. T. Berton, C. W. Naeve, and R. G. Webster (1984), J. Virol. 52, 919-927). These changes occurred in regions of the molecule which, by amino acid sequence alignment, appeared to correspond to proposed antigenic sites A and B on the H3 HA of influenza A virus. Correlation with the antigenic map established in this report, however, demonstrates that the amino acid residues actually contribute to a single antigenic site on the influenza B virus HA and suggests significant differences in the antigenic structures of the influenza A and B virus HAs. PMID:2414911

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of antigen--antibody complexes.

    PubMed

    Chitarra-Guillon, V; Souchon, H; Boulot, G; Riottot, M M; Mariuzza, R; Tello, D; Poljak, R J

    1988-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity have been purified and crystallized as single components or complexed with their specific antigens. The intersegmental flexibility of antibody molecules has imposed the strategy of attempting to crystallize their Fab fragments separately. Intrasegmental mobility in Fabs has rarely been an obstacle to their crystallization. The immune system, however, provides a large functional and structural diversity of antibody molecules suitable for crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies. PMID:3147699

  18. A novel agglutination test for antigen-specific detection of platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Oliver; Agaylan, Ashraf; Borchert, Hans-Hubert; Aslan, Tunay; Bombard, Stéphane; Kiesewetter, Holger; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2006-10-15

    A simple and rapid antigen-specific assay for the identification antibodies to platelets is lacking, yet. Red-dyed polystyrene microbeads were coated with monoclonal antibodies to various platelet glycoprotein complexes, and used for the detection of platelet autoantibodies and alloantibodies. The results were largely identical with those obtained by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigen assay (MAIPA). The new test is reliable yet less complex and time-consuming than the currently available assays, and it can be implemented in any routine laboratory. PMID:16933262

  19. Large-scale sequence and structural comparisons of human naive and antigen-experienced antibody repertoires.

    PubMed

    DeKosky, Brandon J; Lungu, Oana I; Park, Daechan; Johnson, Erik L; Charab, Wissam; Chrysostomou, Constantine; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ellington, Andrew D; Ippolito, Gregory C; Gray, Jeffrey J; Georgiou, George

    2016-05-10

    Elucidating how antigen exposure and selection shape the human antibody repertoire is fundamental to our understanding of B-cell immunity. We sequenced the paired heavy- and light-chain variable regions (VH and VL, respectively) from large populations of single B cells combined with computational modeling of antibody structures to evaluate sequence and structural features of human antibody repertoires at unprecedented depth. Analysis of a dataset comprising 55,000 antibody clusters from CD19(+)CD20(+)CD27(-) IgM-naive B cells, >120,000 antibody clusters from CD19(+)CD20(+)CD27(+) antigen-experienced B cells, and >2,000 RosettaAntibody-predicted structural models across three healthy donors led to a number of key findings: (i) VH and VL gene sequences pair in a combinatorial fashion without detectable pairing restrictions at the population level; (ii) certain VH:VL gene pairs were significantly enriched or depleted in the antigen-experienced repertoire relative to the naive repertoire; (iii) antigen selection increased antibody paratope net charge and solvent-accessible surface area; and (iv) public heavy-chain third complementarity-determining region (CDR-H3) antibodies in the antigen-experienced repertoire showed signs of convergent paired light-chain genetic signatures, including shared light-chain third complementarity-determining region (CDR-L3) amino acid sequences and/or Vκ,λ-Jκ,λ genes. The data reported here address several longstanding questions regarding antibody repertoire selection and development and provide a benchmark for future repertoire-scale analyses of antibody responses to vaccination and disease. PMID:27114511

  20. Detection with monoclonal antibody of Salmonella typhi antigen 9 in specimens from patients.

    PubMed Central

    Chaicumpa, W; Thin-Inta, W; Khusmith, S; Tapchaisri, P; Echeverria, P; Kalambaheti, T; Chongsa-Nguan, M

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against Barber antigen (Ba) of Salmonella typhi 0901. Antibodies produced to antigen 9 of group D salmonellae were used in double- and triple-sandwich antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for detecting antigen 9 in urine and plasma specimens from three groups of patients and 49 controls. The triple-antibody ELISA detected the antigen in urine samples from 11 of 18 (65%) patients with hemoculture-proven typhoid (group 1) and 12 of 39 (31%) patients with clinical features compatible with typhoid but whose hemocultures were negative (group 2). This ELISA was negative in three patients from whom Salmonella paratyphi A, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (group 3) were isolated by hemoculture and in all healthy controls. The double-antibody sandwich ELISA was positive in 41 and 15% of urine samples from patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively, and was negative with samples from two patients from group 3 and all controls. The sensitivity and specificity compared with those for healthy controls were 65 and 100%, respectively, for the triple-antibody ELISA. Although as little as 7.8 ng of homologous lipopolysaccharide could be detected, background in clinical specimens prevented accurate interpretation of the detection of this antigen in serum. Results were best with urine specimens. Images PMID:3183027

  1. Method to conjugate polysaccharide antigens to surfaces for the detection of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Boas, Ulrik; Lind, Peter; Riber, Ulla

    2014-11-15

    A new generic method for the conjugation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-derived polysaccharide antigens from gram-negative bacteria has been developed using Salmonella as a model. After removal of lipid A from the LPS by mild acidolysis, the polysaccharide antigen was conjugated to polystyrene microbeads modified with N-alkyl hydroxylamine and N-alkyl-O-methyl hydroxylamine surface groups by incubation of antigen and beads for 16 h at 40 °C without the need for coupling agents. The efficiency of the new method was evaluated by flow cytometry in model samples and serum samples containing antibodies against Salmonella typhimurium and Salmonella dublin. The presented method was compared with a similar method for conjugation of Salmonella polysaccharide antigens to surfaces. Here, the new method showed higher antigen coupling efficiency by detecting low concentrations of antibodies. Furthermore, the polysaccharide-conjugated beads showed preserved bioactivity after 1 year of use. PMID:25076184

  2. Estimation of Recent and Long-Term Malaria Transmission in a Population by Antibody Testing to Multiple Plasmodium falciparum Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ondigo, Bartholomew N.; Hodges, James S.; Ireland, Kathleen F.; Magak, Ng'wena G.; Lanar, David E.; Dutta, Sheetij; Narum, David L.; Park, Gregory S.; Ofulla, Ayub V.; John, Chandy C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tools that estimate recent and long-term malaria transmission in a population would be highly useful for malaria elimination programs. Methods. The prevalence of antibodies to 11 Plasmodium falciparum antigens was assessed by cytometric bead assay or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 1000 people in a highland area of Kenya over 14 months, during a period of interrupted malaria transmission. Results. Antibodies differed by antigen in acquisition with age: rapid (>80% antibody positive by age 20 years, 5 antigens), moderate (>40% positive by age 20 years, 3 antigens), or slow (<40% positive by age 20 years, 3 antigens). Antibody seroreversion rates in the 14 months between samples decreased with age rapidly (7 antigens), slowly (3 antigens), or remained high at all ages (schizont extract). Estimated antibody half-lives in individuals >10 years of age were long (40 to >80 years) for 5 antigens, moderate (5–20 years) for 3 antigens, and short (<1 year) for 3 antigens. Conclusions. Antibodies to P. falciparum antigens in malaria-endemic areas vary by age, antigen, and time since last exposure to P. falciparum. Multiplex P. falciparum antibody testing could provide estimates of long-term and recent malaria transmission and potentially of a population's susceptibility to future clinical malaria. PMID:24737801

  3. Design, engineering, and production of human recombinant t cell receptor ligands derived from human leukocyte antigen DR2.

    PubMed

    Chang, J W; Mechling, D E; Bächinger, H P; Burrows, G G

    2001-06-29

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are membrane-anchored heterodimers on the surface of antigen-presenting cells that bind the T cell receptor, initiating a cascade of interactions that results in antigen-specific activation of clonal populations of T cells. Susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is associated with certain MHC class II haplotypes, including human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR2. Two DRB chains, DRB5*0101 and DRB1*1501, are co-expressed in the HLA-DR2 haplotype, resulting in the formation of two functional cell surface heterodimers, HLA-DR2a (DRA*0101, DRB5*0101) and HLA-DR2b (DRA*0101, DRB1*1501). Both isotypes can present an immunodominant peptide of myelin basic protein (MBP-(84-102)) to MBP-specific T cells from multiple sclerosis patients. We have previously demonstrated that the peptide binding/T cell recognition domains of rat MHC class II (alpha1 and beta1 domains) could be expressed as a single exon for structural and functional characterization; Burrows, G. G., Chang, J. W., Bächinger, H.-P., Bourdette, D. N., Wegmann, K. W., Offner, H., and Vandenbark A. A. (1999) Protein Eng. 12, 771-778; Burrows, G. G., Adlard, K. L., Bebo, B. F., Jr., Chang, J. W., Tenditnyy, K., Vandenbark, A. A., and Offner, H. (2000) J. Immunol. 164, 6366-6371). Single-chain human recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTLs) of approximately 200 amino acid residues derived from HLA-DR2b were designed using the same principles and have been produced in Escherichia coli with and without amino-terminal extensions containing antigenic peptides. Structural characterization using circular dichroism predicted that these molecules retained the antiparallel beta-sheet platform and antiparallel alpha-helices observed in the native HLA-DR2 heterodimer. The proteins exhibited a cooperative two-state thermal unfolding transition, and DR2-derived RTLs with a covalently linked MBP peptide (MBP-(85-99)) showed increased stability to thermal unfolding relative to the

  4. Characteristics of 26 kDa antigen of H. Pylori by Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Ghahremani, Hossein; Farshad, Shohreh; Amini Najafabadi, Hossein; Kashanian, Susan; Momeni Moghaddam, Mohammad Amin; Moradi, Nariman; Paknejad, Maliheh

    2015-02-01

    Alkylhydroperoxide reductase (AhpC, the 26 kDa antigen) is one of the abundant antioxidant enzymes in Helicobacter pylori and seems to have a good potential for use in development of immunoassays to detect H. pylori infection in clinical specimens. This study aimed to investigate some properties of this antigen by the produced monoclonal antibodies. Five established hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against 26 kDa antigen of H. pylori were cultivated and MAbs were purified by affinity chromatography. Subsequently, MAbs were conjugated with biotin, and different combinations of capture and tracer antibodies used in sandwich ELISA. Immunoblotting of bacterial extracts were performed to estimate aggregation status of the antigen. Release of antigen from the cultivated bacteria on solid media was examined by sandwich ELISA, and also, existence of interference in fecal extract was investigated by immunoblotting and sandwich ELISA. Our findings showed that the MAbs against 26 kDa antigen of H. pylori could recognize three bands of nearly 25 kDa, 50 kDa, and 75 kDa in immunoblotting. This study also indicated presence of more antigens in the culture medium around the bacteria than the bacterial extract itself. The results of sandwich ELISA and immunoblotting on fecal extracts suggest the presence of interfering agents that prevent detection of antigen by antibody in ELISA but not in immunoblotting. In this study the oligomerization of the 26 kDa antigen, presence of interfering agents in stool matrix, and release of antigen to outside of bacteria, were demonstrated. PMID:25530147

  5. Goat serums for fluorescent antibody conjugates to chlamydial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Tessler, J

    1984-01-01

    Serums from goats hyperimmunized with Chlamydia psittaci consistently produce antichlamydial fluorescent antibody conjugate of high titer. The titer of the fluorescent antibody conjugate prepared from a given serum correlated well with the titer obtained by agar gel precipitin, but not with the complement fixation. The agar gel precipitin test can be used to predict whether a given serum is satisfactory for use in production of a conjugate for direct fluorescent antibody tests. Serums with an agar gel precipitin titer of 1/8 or higher generally produce a usable fluorescent antibody conjugate. Labeling gamma globulins with fluorescein isothiocyanate at a ratio of 1/150 resulted in satisfactory fluorescent antibody conjugates. Cultures of Vero cells infected with chlamydiae were found to be suitable for titration of the fluorescent antibody conjugates. PMID:6372973

  6. Demonstration of immunoglobulin M class antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii antigenic component p35000 by enzyme-linked antigen immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Lindenschmidt, E G

    1986-01-01

    On the basis that 89% of 48 acute-phase toxoplasmosis patients showed immunoglobulin M (IgM) class antibodies to the 35,000-molecular-weight antigenic component (p35000) of Toxoplasma gondii, as demonstrated by IgM immunoblotting, the antigen was purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation and enzyme labeled for use in an enzyme-linked antigen immunosorbent assay (ELA) for the demonstration of IgM class antibodies to the p35000 component. The ELA showed a specificity of 96% with 139 serum specimens at a serum dilution of only 1:5. The test serologically detected 73 symptomatic acute-phase toxoplasmosis patients; 64 were positive in the 19S IgM indirect immunofluorescent-antibody test, and 9 were negative, although they showed IgM antibodies to p35000, as demonstrated by IgM immunoblotting. Also, the ELA turned out to be independent of IgM rheumatoid factors in six acute-phase toxoplasmosis serum specimens. PMID:3536996

  7. Tumor cell lysis by activated human neutrophils: analysis of neutrophil-delivered oxidative attack and role of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Dallegri, F; Ottonello, L; Ballestrero, A; Dapino, P; Ferrando, F; Patrone, F; Sacchetti, C

    1991-02-01

    The lysis of tumor cells, and other nucleated mammalian cells, by neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) triggered by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) represents a widely used model system to dissect the PMN cytolytic armamentarium, potentially responsible for the cell damage at tissue sites of PMN activation. Although oxidants are generally considered to be instrumental in the target lysis by PMNs, the mediators actually involved remain a matter of controversy. Moreover, other factors potentially crucial to the lysis have not been clearly identified. In order to reexamine the determinants of the cytolytic process, we studied the events underlying the PMA-triggered PMN-delivered attack against two different targets, selected on the basis of preliminary experiments (B lymphoblastoid Daudi cells and erythroleukemic K 562 cells). The results suggest that the lysis is promoted by hypochlorous acid (HOCl) or a compound with characteristics very similar to HOCl itself. No evidence was obtained for the intervention or contribution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl (OH.) radicals, and the major HOCl-derived chloramines. PMNs appeared to use 35% of the generated H2O2 to produce HOCl, while the remainder appears to be consumed by PMNs themselves and target cells as well. Moreover, PMNs and target cells coaggregated at an early step of the cytolytic reaction, through a process efficiently prevented by a monoclonal antibody (MoAb J-90) directed against leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1). The inhibition of the PMN-target aggregation by the MoAb J-90 resulted in the impairment of the lysis, despite a normal generation of HOCl. Thus, the data demonstrate that the PMA-triggered lysis of tumor target cells by PMNs requires at least two events, occurring simultaneously: the LFA-1-mediated effector-target adherence and the PMN production of HOCl. The intervention of the LFA-1-mediated PMN-target adherence in the PMA-triggered lysis is likely to allow PMNs to

  8. Sampling From the Proteome to the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR (HLA-DR) Ligandome Proceeds Via High Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Mommen, Geert P. M.; Marino, Fabio; Meiring, Hugo D.; Poelen, Martien C. M.; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A. M.; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J. R.; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the complex nature of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II ligandome is of utmost importance to understand the basis for CD4+ T cell mediated immunity and tolerance. Here, we implemented important improvements in the analysis of the repertoire of HLA-DR-presented peptides, using hybrid mass spectrometry-based peptide fragmentation techniques on a ligandome sample isolated from matured human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The reported data set constitutes nearly 14 thousand unique high-confident peptides, i.e. the largest single inventory of human DC derived HLA-DR ligands to date. From a technical viewpoint the most prominent finding is that no single peptide fragmentation technique could elucidate the majority of HLA-DR ligands, because of the wide range of physical chemical properties displayed by the HLA-DR ligandome. Our in-depth profiling allowed us to reveal a strikingly poor correlation between the source proteins identified in the HLA class II ligandome and the DC cellular proteome. Important selective sieving from the sampled proteome to the ligandome was evidenced by specificity in the sequences of the core regions both at their N- and C- termini, hence not only reflecting binding motifs but also dominant protease activity associated to the endolysosomal compartments. Moreover, we demonstrate that the HLA-DR ligandome reflects a surface representation of cell-compartments specific for biological events linked to the maturation of monocytes into antigen presenting cells. Our results present new perspectives into the complex nature of the HLA class II system and will aid future immunological studies in characterizing the full breadth of potential CD4+ T cell epitopes relevant in health and disease. PMID:26764012

  9. Crystallographic Structure of the Human Leukocyte Antigen DRA, DRB3*0101: Models of a Directional Alloimmune Respone and Autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Parry,C.; Gorski, J.; Stern, L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe structural studies of the human leukocyte antigen DR52a, HLA-DRA/DRB3*0101, in complex with an N-terminal human platelet integrin {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III glycoprotein peptide which contains a Leu/Pro dimorphism. The 33:Leu dimorphism is the epitope for the T cell directed response in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and post-transfusion purpura in individuals with the {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III 33:Pro allele, and defines the unidirectional alloimmune response. This condition is always associated with DR52a. The crystallographic structure has been refined to 2.25 {angstrom}. There are two {alpha}{beta} heterodimers to the asymmetric unit in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The molecule is characterized by two prominent hydrophobic pockets at either end of the peptide binding cleft and a deep, narrower and highly charged P4 opening underneath the beta 1 chain. Further, the peptide in the second molecule displays a sharp upward turn after pocket P9. The structure reveals the role of pockets and the distinctive basic P4 pocket, shared by DR52a and DR3, in selecting their respective binding peptide repertoire. We observe an interesting switch in a residue from the canonically assigned pocket 6 seen in prior class II structures to pocket 4. This occludes the P6 pocket helping to explain the distinctive '1-4-9' peptide binding motif. A {beta}57 Asp {yields} Val substitution abrogates the salt-bridge to {alpha}76 Arg and along with a hydrophobic {beta}37 is important in shaping the P9 pocket. DRB3*0101 and DRB1*0301 belong to an ancestral haplotype and are associated with many autoimmune diseases linked to antigen presentation, but whereas DR3 is susceptible to type 1 diabetes DR52a is not. This dichotomy is explored for clues to the disease.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Reveals the Selective Binding of Human Leukocyte Antigen Alleles Associated with Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kongkaew, Sirilak; Yotmanee, Pathumwadee; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Kaiyawet, Nopporn; Meeprasert, Arthitaya; Kaburaki, Toshikatsu; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Fujio; Kungwan, Nawee; Hannongbua, Supot

    2015-01-01

    Behçet’s disease (BD), a multi-organ inflammatory disorder, is associated with the presence of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) HLA-B*51 allele in many ethnic groups. The possible antigen involvement of the major histocompatibility complex class I chain related gene A transmembrane (MICA-TM) nonapeptide (AAAAAIFVI) has been reported in BD symptomatic patients. This peptide has also been detected in HLA-A*26:01 positive patients. To investigate the link of BD with these two specific HLA alleles, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were applied on the MICA-TM nonapeptide binding to the two BD-associated HLA alleles in comparison with the two non-BD-associated HLA alleles (B*35:01 and A*11:01). The MD simulations were applied on the four HLA/MICA-TM peptide complexes in aqueous solution. As a result, stabilization for the incoming MICA-TM was found to be predominantly contributed from van der Waals interactions. The P2/P3 residue close to the N-terminal and the P9 residue at the C-terminal of the MICA-TM nonapeptide served as the anchor for the peptide accommodated at the binding groove of the BD associated HLAs. The MM/PBSA free energy calculation predicted a stronger binding of the HLA/peptide complexes for the BD-associated HLA alleles than for the non-BD-associated ones, with a ranked binding strength of B*51:01 > B*35:01 and A*26:01 > A*11:01. Thus, the HLAs associated with BD pathogenesis expose the binding efficiency with the MICA-TM nonapeptide tighter than the non-associated HLA alleles. In addition, the residues 70, 73, 99, 146, 147 and 159 of the two BD-associated HLAs provided the conserved interaction for the MICA-TM peptide binding. PMID:26331842

  11. Polymorphism in human cytomegalovirus UL40 impacts on recognition of human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Heatley, Susan L; Pietra, Gabriella; Lin, Jie; Widjaja, Jacqueline M L; Harpur, Christopher M; Lester, Sue; Rossjohn, Jamie; Szer, Jeff; Schwarer, Anthony; Bradstock, Kenneth; Bardy, Peter G; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Sullivan, Lucy C; Brooks, Andrew G

    2013-03-22

    Natural killer (NK) cell recognition of the nonclassical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecule HLA-E is dependent on the presentation of a nonamer peptide derived from the leader sequence of other HLA molecules to CD94-NKG2 receptors. However, human cytomegalovirus can manipulate this central innate interaction through the provision of a "mimic" of the HLA-encoded peptide derived from the immunomodulatory glycoprotein UL40. Here, we analyzed UL40 sequences isolated from 32 hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients experiencing cytomegalovirus reactivation. The UL40 protein showed a "polymorphic hot spot" within the region that encodes the HLA leader sequence mimic. Although all sequences that were identical to those encoded within HLA-I genes permitted the interaction between HLA-E and CD94-NKG2 receptors, other UL40 polymorphisms reduced the affinity of the interaction between HLA-E and CD94-NKG2 receptors. Furthermore, functional studies using NK cell clones expressing either the inhibitory receptor CD94-NKG2A or the activating receptor CD94-NKG2C identified UL40-encoded peptides that were capable of inhibiting target cell lysis via interaction with CD94-NKG2A, yet had little capacity to activate NK cells through CD94-NKG2C. The data suggest that UL40 polymorphisms may aid evasion of NK cell immunosurveillance by modulating the affinity of the interaction with CD94-NKG2 receptors. PMID:23335510

  12. Detection of antibodies and antigens of human parvovirus B19 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, L J; Tsou, C; Parker, R A; Chorba, T L; Wulff, H; Tattersall, P; Mortimer, P P

    1986-01-01

    Acute-phase serum from a patient with aplastic crisis provided sufficient human parvovirus B19 to make a monoclonal antibody against B19 and to develop antigen and immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibody detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). The indirect capture antibody method was used for all three assays. Antigen was detected in 8 of 29 sera drawn within 2 days of onset of illness from patients with aplastic crisis. These sera had high titers of virus by electron microscopy and DNA hybridization and had no detectable B19 antibody. Antigen was not detected in serum specimens that had low titers of B19 DNA and had B19 antibody. With the IgM ELISA, we detected B19 IgM in over 85% of clinical cases of aplastic crisis and fifth disease and less than 2% of controls. The prevalence of B19 IgG antibodies increased with age. Approximately 2% of children less than 5 years of age and 49% of adults greater than 20 years of age had B19 IgG antibodies. The B19 antibody ELISAs are sensitive and specific tests to detect B19 infections. PMID:3021807

  13. Specific Antibodies Reacting with SV40 Large T Antigen Mimotopes in Serum Samples of Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tognon, Mauro; Corallini, Alfredo; Manfrini, Marco; Taronna, Angelo; Butel, Janet S.; Pietrobon, Silvia; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Bononi, Ilaria; Vaccher, Emanuela; Barbanti-Brodano, Giuseppe; Martini, Fernanda; Mazzoni, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Simian Virus 40, experimentally assayed in vitro in different animal and human cells and in vivo in rodents, was classified as a small DNA tumor virus. In previous studies, many groups identified Simian Virus 40 sequences in healthy individuals and cancer patients using PCR techniques, whereas others failed to detect the viral sequences in human specimens. These conflicting results prompted us to develop a novel indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides, mimicking Simian Virus 40 capsid viral protein antigens, named mimotopes. This immunologic assay allowed us to investigate the presence of serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 and to verify whether Simian Virus 40 is circulating in humans. In this investigation two mimotopes from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen, the viral replication protein and oncoprotein, were employed to analyze for specific reactions to human sera antibodies. This indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen was used to assay a new collection of serum samples from healthy subjects. This novel assay revealed that serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 large T antigen mimotopes are detectable, at low titer, in healthy subjects aged from 18–65 years old. The overall prevalence of reactivity with the two Simian Virus 40 large T antigen peptides was 20%. This new ELISA with two mimotopes of the early viral regions is able to detect in a specific manner Simian Virus 40 large T antigen-antibody responses. PMID:26731525

  14. Specific Antibodies Reacting with SV40 Large T Antigen Mimotopes in Serum Samples of Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Tognon, Mauro; Corallini, Alfredo; Manfrini, Marco; Taronna, Angelo; Butel, Janet S; Pietrobon, Silvia; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Bononi, Ilaria; Vaccher, Emanuela; Barbanti-Brodano, Giuseppe; Martini, Fernanda; Mazzoni, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Simian Virus 40, experimentally assayed in vitro in different animal and human cells and in vivo in rodents, was classified as a small DNA tumor virus. In previous studies, many groups identified Simian Virus 40 sequences in healthy individuals and cancer patients using PCR techniques, whereas others failed to detect the viral sequences in human specimens. These conflicting results prompted us to develop a novel indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides, mimicking Simian Virus 40 capsid viral protein antigens, named mimotopes. This immunologic assay allowed us to investigate the presence of serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 and to verify whether Simian Virus 40 is circulating in humans. In this investigation two mimotopes from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen, the viral replication protein and oncoprotein, were employed to analyze for specific reactions to human sera antibodies. This indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen was used to assay a new collection of serum samples from healthy subjects. This novel assay revealed that serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 large T antigen mimotopes are detectable, at low titer, in healthy subjects aged from 18-65 years old. The overall prevalence of reactivity with the two Simian Virus 40 large T antigen peptides was 20%. This new ELISA with two mimotopes of the early viral regions is able to detect in a specific manner Simian Virus 40 large T antigen-antibody responses. PMID:26731525

  15. Internalization and re-expression of antigens of human melanoma cells following exposure to monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.S.; Lumanglas, A.L.; Silva, J.; Ruszala-Mallon, V.; Durr, F.E.

    1987-04-15

    Modulation of the surface membrane of human Sk-Mel-28 melanoma cells by monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 96.5 recognizing p97 determinants was examined using direct radioimmunoassay and indirect fluorescent antibody-staining techniques. It was determined that the majority of /sup 111/In-labeled antibody that remained associated with cells after a 24-hr incubation at 37 degrees C had been internalized because MoAb 96.5 was no longer visible on the cell surface. A second treatment of these cells with the same antibody 24 hr later not only increased the cell-associated radioactivity, reflecting an increase of total antibody bound, but also rendered these cells membrane immunofluorescent again, indicating the re-expression of surface antigens. Autoradiographs of the electrophoretically analyzed membrane components of Sk-Mel-28 cells further demonstrated the appearance of newly synthesized 97-kDa proteins that were immunoprecipitable with MoAb 96.5. Taken together, the present findings suggest that p97 antigens undergo endocytosis in Sk-Mel-28 cells following exposure to MoAb 96.5. However, the same antigens were regenerated and expressed on the cell surface within a period of 24 hr. The re-expression of tumor cell surface antigen following initial internalization of the MoAb-antigen complex may have implications for diagnosis and therapy.

  16. Development and Characterization of a New Antipeptide Monoclonal Antibody Directed to Human CD20 Antigen.

    PubMed

    Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Behdani, Mahdi; Hajizadeh-Saffar, Ensiyeh; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2015-09-01

    The rapid expansion of immunotherapeutic approaches for treatment of various diseases, including cancers, has been greatly facilitated by the invention of new generation of antibodies. Clinical studies have indicated that anti-CD20 mAb-based therapies represent an effective treatment for various diseases with overexpression of CD20 on their cell surface, such as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, hemolytic anemia, as well as autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. Technically, due to a short extra membrane domain, the recombinant CD20 protein is a difficult antigen to raise immune responses. In search for new monoclonal antibodies, the authors used an antigenic polypeptide, which yielded numbers of new binders that may lead to production of anti-CD20 antibodies, with improved diagnostic or clinical attributes. Mice were immunized with extra membrane loop of human CD20 (exCD20) polypeptide. The exCD20 antigen showed a desired immune response and was able to develop a monoclonal antibody, 3B4C10, which reacted well with peptide antigen as well as native antigen on the surface of Raji B-cell line. The antibody 3B4C10 with a balanced K(on) and K(off) may be applicable in the construction of affinity columns or beads for isolation and purification of CD20-positive cells and cancer stem cells. PMID:26352927

  17. Development and Evaluation of Single Domain Antibodies for Vaccinia and the L1 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Walper, Scott A.; Liu, Jinny L.; Zabetakis, Daniel; Anderson, George P.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2014-01-01

    There is ongoing interest to develop high affinity, thermal stable recognition elements to replace conventional antibodies in biothreat detection assays. As part of this effort, single domain antibodies that target vaccinia virus were developed. Two llamas were immunized with killed viral particles followed by boosts with the recombinant membrane protein, L1, to stimulate the immune response for envelope and membrane proteins of the virus. The variable domains of the induced heavy chain antibodies were selected from M13 phage display libraries developed from isolated RNA. Selection via biopanning on the L1 antigen produced single domain antibodies that were specific and had affinities ranging from 4×10−9 M to 7.0×10−10 M, as determined by surface plasmon resonance. Several showed good ability to refold after heat denaturation. These L1-binding single domain antibodies, however, failed to recognize the killed vaccinia antigen. Useful vaccinia binding single domain antibodies were isolated by a second selection using the killed virus as the target. The virus binding single domain antibodies were incorporated in sandwich assays as both capture and tracer using the MAGPIX system yielding limits of detection down to 4×105 pfu/ml, a four-fold improvement over the limit obtained using conventional antibodies. This work demonstrates the development of anti-vaccinia single domain antibodies and their incorporation into sandwich assays for viral detection. It also highlights the properties of high affinity and thermal stability that are hallmarks of single domain antibodies. PMID:25211488

  18. Human Leukocyte Antigen-DQ8 Transgenic Mice: a Model To Examine the Toxicity of Aerosolized Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Chad J.; Warfield, Kelly L.; Welcher, Brent C.; Gonzales, Raoul F.; Larsen, Tom; Hanson, Julie; David, Chella S.; Krakauer, Theresa; Bavari, Sina

    2005-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) belong to a large group of bacterial exotoxins that cause severe immunopathologies, especially when delivered as an aerosol. SEs elicit the release of lethal amounts of cytokines by binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and cross-linking susceptible T-cell receptors. Efforts to develop effective therapeutic strategies to protect against SEs delivered as an aerosol have been hampered by the lack of small animal models that consistently emulate human responses to these toxins. Here, we report that human leukocyte antigen-DQ8 (HLA-DQ8) transgenic (Tg) mice, but not littermate controls, succumbed to lethal shock induced by SEB aerosols without potentiation. Substantial amounts of perivascular edema and inflammatory infiltrates were noted in the lungs of Tg mice, similar to the pathology observed in nonhuman primates exposed by aerosol to SEB. Furthermore, the observed pathologies and lethal shock correlated with an upsurge in proinflammatory cytokine mRNA gene expression in the lungs and spleens, as well as with marked increases in the levels of proinflammatory circulating cytokines in the Tg mice. Unlike the case for littermate controls, telemetric evaluation showed significant hypothermia in Tg mice exposed to lethal doses of SEB. Taken together, these results show that this murine model will allow for the examination of therapeutics and vaccines developed specifically against SEB aerosol exposure and possibly other bacterial superantigens in the context of human MHC class II receptors. PMID:15784591

  19. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Region Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms are Associated with Leprosy Susceptibility in Vietnam and India

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Andrea; Huong, Nguyen Thu; Singh, Meenakshi; Orlova, Marianna; Van Thuc, Nguyen; Katoch, Kiran; Gao, Xiaojiang; Thai, Vu Hong; Ba, Nguyen Ngoc; Carrington, Mary; Abel, Laurent; Mehra, Narinder; Alcaïs, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggested the existence of unidentified leprosy susceptibility loci in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex. To identify such genetic risk factors, a high-density association scan of a 1.9-mega-base (Mb) region in the HLA complex was performed. Among 682 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 59 were associated with leprosy (P <.01) in 198 Vietnamese single-case leprosy families. Genotyping of these SNPs in an independent sample of 292 Vietnamese single-case leprosy families replicated the association of 12 SNPs (P <.01). Multivariate analysis of these 12 SNPs showed that the association information could be captured by 2 intergenic HLA class I region SNPs (P = 9.4 × 10−9)—rs2394885 and rs2922997 (marginal multivariate P = 2.1 × 10−7 and P = .0016, respectively). SNP rs2394885 tagged the HLA-C*15:05 allele in the Vietnamese population. The identical associations were validated in a third sample of 364 patients with leprosy and 371 control subjects from North India. These results implicated class I alleles in leprosy pathogenesis. PMID:21459816

  20. Human leukocyte antigen-G allele polymorphisms have evolved following three different evolutionary lineages based on intron sequences.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Isabel; Herraiz, Miguel Angel; Peñaloza, Jorge; Barbolla, Maria Luz; Jurado, Maria Luisa; Macedo, Jacqueline; Vidart, José Antonio; Martinez-Laso, Jorge

    2010-11-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G alleles follow a different pattern of polymorphism generation from those of the HLA classical I alleles. These polymorphisms have been defined as a result of random permitted point mutations in exons. However, this polymorphism maintenance could have an evolutionary specific pathways based on noncoding regions as introns, 14-bp deletion/insertion (exon 8), or promoter regions. Therefore a systematic sequencing study of HLA-G alleles was done obtaining the complete genomic sequence of 16 different HLA-G alleles: nine alleles were intron and exon confirmatory sequences, four were exon confirmatory and new intron described sequences, and three were new alleles. A 14-bp deletion/insertion polymorphism was also sequenced in these alleles. These sequences, together with those previously published, were compared, and phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analyses were performed. Results showed the presence of three major specific evolutionary patterns, tentatively named lineages, and the other four as minor lineages (only one allele). The relative age of the major lineages could also be established based on the number of lineage-specific positions and the number of alleles of each lineage. Two main mechanisms are clearly defined in the generation of the lineages (introns), gene conversion, and/or convergent evolution following specific patterns. PMID:20650296

  1. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Mendrick, Donna L.; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. This algorithm can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system. PMID:27558848

  2. Genetic determinants of antithyroid drug-induced agranulocytosis by human leukocyte antigen genotyping and genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Lung; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Wang, Pei-Wen; Lin, Ying-Chao; Chu, Chen-Chung; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chi; Chang, Ching-Chung; Huang, Tien-Shang; Tsai, Keh Sung; Tseng, Fen-Yu; Wang, Chih-Yuan; Lu, Jin-Ying; Chiu, Wei-Yih; Chang, Chien-Ching; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Fann, Cathy Shen-Jang; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Chang, Tien-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Graves' disease is the leading cause of hyperthyroidism affecting 1.0–1.6% of the population. Antithyroid drugs are the treatment cornerstone, but may cause life-threatening agranulocytosis. Here we conduct a two-stage association study on two separate subject sets (in total 42 agranulocytosis cases and 1,208 Graves' disease controls), using direct human leukocyte antigen genotyping and SNP-based genome-wide association study. We demonstrate HLA-B*38:02 (Armitage trend Pcombined=6.75 × 10−32) and HLA-DRB1*08:03 (Pcombined=1.83 × 10−9) as independent susceptibility loci. The genome-wide association study identifies the same signals. Estimated odds ratios for these two loci comparing effective allele carriers to non-carriers are 21.48 (95% confidence interval=11.13–41.48) and 6.13 (95% confidence interval=3.28–11.46), respectively. Carrying both HLA-B*38:02 and HLA-DRB1*08:03 increases odds ratio to 48.41 (Pcombined=3.32 × 10−21, 95% confidence interval=21.66–108.22). Our results could be useful for antithyroid-induced agranulocytosis and potentially for agranulocytosis caused by other chemicals. PMID:26151496

  3. Human Leukocyte Antigen Profiles of Latin American Populations: Differential Admixture and Its Potential Impact on Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta-Bolaños, Esteban; Madrigal, J. Alejandro; Shaw, Bronwen E.

    2012-01-01

    The outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is shaped by both clinical and genetic factors that determine its success. Genetic factors including human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genetic variants are believed to influence the risk of potentially fatal complications after the transplant. Moreover, ethnicity has been proposed as a factor modifying the risk of graft-versus-host disease. The populations of Latin America are a complex array of different admixture processes with varying degrees of ancestral population proportions that came in different migration waves. This complexity makes the study of genetic risks in this region complicated unless the extent of this variation is thoroughly characterized. In this study we compared the HLA-A and HLA-B allele group profiles for 31 Latin American populations and 61 ancestral populations from Iberia, Italy, Sub-Saharan Africa, and America. Results from population genetics comparisons show a wide variation in the HLA profiles from the Latin American populations that correlate with different admixture proportions. Populations in Latin America seem to be organized in at least three groups with (1) strong Amerindian admixture, (2) strong Caucasian component, and (3) a Caucasian-African gradient. These results imply that genetic risk assessment for HSCT in Latin America has to be adapted for different population subgroups rather than as a pan-Hispanic/Latino analysis. PMID:23213535

  4. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) Expression in Cancers: Roles in Immune Evasion, Metastasis and Target for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Aifen; Yan, Wei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant induction of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) expression has been observed in various malignancies and is strongly associated with tumor immune escape, metastasis and poor prognosis. To date, great achievements have been made in understanding the underlying mechanisms of HLA-G involved in tumor progression. HLA-G could lead to tumor evasion by inhibition of immune cell cytolysis, differentiation and proliferation and inhibition of cytokine production, induction of immune cell apoptosis, generation of regulatory cells and expansion of myeloid-derived suppressive cells and by impairment of chemotaxis. Moreover, HLA-G could arm tumor cells with a higher invasive and metastatic potential with the upregulation of tumor-promoting factor expression such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), indicating that ectopic HLA-G expression could render multiple effects during the progression of malignancies. In this review, we summarized the mechanisms of HLA-G involved in promoting tumor cell immune escaping, metastasis and disease progression. Special attention will be paid to its significance as an attractive therapeutic target in cancers. PMID:26322846

  5. Structural Identity of Human Histocompatibility Leukocyte Antigen-B27 Molecules from Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis and Normal Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Karr, Robert W.; Hahn, Yaffa; Schwartz, Benjamin D.

    1982-01-01

    Although the association between human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) B27 and ankylosing spondylitis is the prototype of HLA-disease association, the mechanism underlying these associations has not been determined. We have investigated the possibility that the B27 molecules from patients with ankylosing spondylitis are different from those of normals, and only the “different” molecules predispose the individual to disease. Biosynthetically radiolabeled HLA-B27 molecules from patients with ankylosing spondylitis and normal individuals were compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tryptic peptide mapping with high pressure liquid chromatography. Extensive charge heterogeneity in the 45,000-dalton heavy chain was detected when B27 molecules were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis; the charge heterogeneity was reduced, but not eliminated, when the B27 molecules were treated with neuraminidase to remove sialic acid residues before analysis. No structural difference in the B27 molecules from an ankylosing spondylitis patient and a normal individual were detected by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Analysis of [3H]leucine-labeled and [3H]arginine-labeled tryptic peptides and chymotryptic peptides of the trypsin insoluble material by reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography revealed identity of the B27 molecules from ankylosing spondylitis patients and normal individuals. These studies indicate that development of akylosing spondylitis in only some B27 positive individuals is not attributable to those individuals possessing variant B27 molecules. Images PMID:7056855

  6. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides.

    PubMed

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Mendrick, Donna L; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. This algorithm can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system. PMID:27558848

  7. Key role of human leukocyte antigen in modulating human immunodeficiency virus progression: An overview of the possible applications.

    PubMed

    Grifoni, Alba; Montesano, Carla; Colizzi, Vittorio; Amicosante, Massimo

    2015-05-12

    Host and viral factors deeply influence the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression. Among them human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus plays a key role at different levels. In fact, genes of the HLA locus have shown the peculiar capability to modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses. In particular, HLA class I molecules are recognized by CD8(+) T-cells and natural killers (NK) cells towards the interaction with T cell receptor (TCR) and Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor (KIR) 3DL1 respectively. Polymorphisms within the different HLA alleles generate structural changes in HLA class I peptide-binding pockets. Amino acid changes in the peptide-binding pocket lead to the presentation of a different set of peptides to T and NK cells. This review summarizes the role of HLA in HIV progression toward acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome and its receptors. Recently, many studies have been focused on determining the HLA binding-peptides. The novel use of immune-informatics tools, from the prediction of the HLA-bound peptides to the modification of the HLA-receptor complexes, is considered. A better knowledge of HLA peptide presentation and recognition are allowing new strategies for immune response manipulation to be applied against HIV virus. PMID:25964877

  8. Do human leukocyte antigen E polymorphisms influence graft-versus-leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Ehteramolsadat; Schwarer, Anthony P; Ghasemzadeh, Mehran

    2015-03-01

    Hematopoietic-stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is complicated by histocompatibility-dependent immune responses such as graft-versus-host disease, relapse, and graft rejection. The severity of these common adverse effects is directly related to the degree of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility. In addition to the key role of classic HLA matching in influencing HSCT outcome, several lines of evidence suggest an important role for nonclassic major histocompatibility complex class I molecule, HLA-E. The interaction of HLA-E with NKG2A, its main receptor on natural killer cells, modulates cell-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine production, an important role in innate immune responses. In addition, the HLA-E molecule can present peptides to different subtypes of T cells that may either support graft-versus-leukemia effects or be involved in bridging innate and acquired immunity. To date, the role of HLA-E and its polymorphisms in HSCT outcomes such as graft-versus-host disease, transplant-related mortality, and improved survival has been published by a number of groups. In addition, these data suggest an association between HLA-E polymorphisms and relapse. Whether the engagement of the HLA-E molecule in the modulation of donor T cells is involved in the graft-versus-leukemia effect, or whether a different mechanism of HLA-E dependent reduction of relapse is involved, requires further investigation. PMID:25434712

  9. Reassembly and reconstitution of separate alpha and beta chains of human leukocyte antigen DR4 molecule isolated from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kang, J H; Maeng, C Y; Park, J H; Hahm, K S; Han, B D; Kim, K L

    1997-04-30

    The class II major histocompatibility complex molecules play a major role in presentation of exogenous antigenic peptides to the CD4 positive helper T cell. These are heterodimeric cell surface glycoproteins consisting of alpha- and beta-chains. In the present study, we cloned and expressed the alpha- and beta-chain of HLA-DR4 lacking the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain separately in Escherichia coli using the pET-5a expression vector system. The expressed alpha- and beta-chains were purified in a denaturing condition by an ion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and a gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-200, respectively. The recombinant proteins were refolded and reassembled by removing the denaturing agent and concomitant reoxidation of the disulfide bond. The refolded heterodimeric rDR4 molecule was resolved by 12.5% SDS-PAGE in a nonreducing condition and confirmed by Western blot using polyclonal antibody against DR-alpha and the monoclonal antibody (L243) for the conformationally correct DR molecule. The rDR4 molecules were reconstituted with a 50-fold molar excess biot-HA (307-319), and the bound peptides to the heterodimer complex were determined by a microplate assay coated with L243 antibody using Extravidin-HRP conjugate. PMID:9163739

  10. Topographic antigenic determinants recognized by monoclonal antibodies on human choriogonadotropin beta-subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Bidart, J.M.; Troalen, F.; Salesse, R.; Bousfield, G.R.; Bohuon, C.J.; Bellet, D.H.

    1987-06-25

    We describe a first attempt to study the antibody-combining sites recognized by monoclonal antibodies raised against the beta-subunit of human choriogonadotropin (hCG). Two groups of antibodies were first defined by their ability to recognize only the free beta-subunit or the free and combined subunit. Antibodies FBT-11 and FBT-11-L bind only to hCG beta-subunit but not to hCG, whereas antibodies FBT-10 and D1E8 bind to both the beta-subunit and the hormone. In both cases, the antigenic determinants were localized to the core of the protein (residues 1-112), indicating the weak immunogenicity of the specific carboxyl-terminal extension of hCG-beta. Nine synthetic peptides spanning different regions of hCG-beta and lutropin-beta were assessed for their capacity to inhibit antibody binding. A synthetic peptide inclusive of the NH2-terminal region (residues 1-7) of the hCG beta-subunit was found to inhibit binding to the radiolabeled subunit of a monoclonal antibody specific for free hCG-beta (FBT-11). Further delineation of the antigenic site recognized by this antibody provided evidence for the involvement of fragment 82-92. Moreover, monoclonal antibody FBT-11 inhibited the recombination of hCG-beta to hCG-alpha, indicating that its antigenic determinant might be located nearby or in the hCG-beta portion interacting with the alpha-subunit. Binding of monoclonal antibody FBT-10, corresponding to the second antigenic determinant, was weakly inhibited by fragment 82-105 and did not impair the recombination of the hCG beta-subunit to the hCG alpha-subunit. Its combining site appeared to be located in a region of the intact native choriogonadotropin present at the surface of the hormone-receptor complex.

  11. Relationship between tumour morphology, antigen and antibody distribution measured by fusion of digital phosphor and photographic images.

    PubMed

    Flynn, A A; Boxer, G M; Begent, R H; Pedley, R B

    2001-04-01

    Antibody-directed cancer therapy has achieved encouraging responses despite poor localisation in tumour. This discrepancy may be attributed to heterogeneity of antibody delivery within tumours: preferential localisation in the better perfused and more radio- and chemosensitive areas provides a therapeutic advantage. Antibody distribution depends upon the interactions of many complex mechanisms. We have started to investigate this by studying the single and combined influence of two tumour-associated parameters, morphology and antigen, on antibody distribution. Tumours were taken from mice at 24 and 48 h after 125I-labeled anti-CEA antibody injection. Images of antibody distribution, antigen distribution and tumour morphology were acquired by radioluminography, radioimmunoluminography and digitisation of morphology, respectively. Image registration allowed correlation of pixel values of antibody distribution with corresponding values of antigen distribution and morphology. At 24 h there was little correlation between antibody and antigen distribution, but strong positive correlation between antibody distribution and morphology, with preferential localisation in viable tumour areas. Correlation between antibody distribution and morphology fell significantly between 24 and 48 h, while that between antibody and antigen distribution remained low. However, the combination of morphology and antigen distribution showed the largest influence on antibody distribution. This novel technique demonstrates potential for combining multi-factor information in order to provide a greater understanding of antibody distribution in tumours, facilitating the optimisation of clinical treatments. PMID:11401028

  12. Targeting endogenous nuclear antigens by electrotransfer of monoclonal antibodies in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Guillaume; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Desplancq, Dominique; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Vigneron, Marc; Gannon, Julian; Van Regenmortel, Marc H.; Weiss, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are valuable tools for functional studies in vitro, but their use in living cells remains challenging because they do not naturally cross the cell membrane. Here, we present a simple and highly efficient method for the intracytoplasmic delivery of any antibody into cultured cells. By following the fate of monoclonal antibodies that bind to nuclear antigens, it was possible to image endogenous targets and to show that inhibitory antibodies are able to induce cell growth suppression or cell death. Our electrotransfer system allowed the cancer cells we studied to be transduced without loss of viability and may have applications for a variety of intracellular immuno-interventions. PMID:23765067

  13. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, M.L.

    1990-04-17

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents. No Drawings

  14. Regulation of T-cell function by antibodies: enhancement of the response of human T-cell clones to hepatitis B surface antigen by antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Celis, E; Zurawski, V R; Chang, T W

    1984-01-01

    Eight mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) were examined for their effects on the antigen-induced proliferative response and lymphokine production of human HBsAg-specific T-cell clones in vitro. While all specifically enhanced the T-cell proliferative response, antibodies of the IgG class were generally more effective than those of the IgM class. Both the divalent F(ab')2 and the monovalent Fab fragments of an IgG monoclonal antibody had no effects, indicating that the Fc portion of the antibody molecules was required. Since antigen-presenting cells bear surface receptors for the Fc of IgGs and fewer or none for that of IgMs, the above results also suggest that antibodies enhance the capture of antigens by antigen-presenting cells as a result of the binding of antigen-antibody complexes to the Fc receptors on these cells. In addition to potentiating the proliferation of the T-cell clones, antibodies also increased the antigen-induced production of interferon-gamma by these cells. The present in vitro studies suggest that antibodies may regulate immune responses and do so by enhancing antigen presentation and thus augmenting antigen-induced activation and clonal expansion of T cells. PMID:6436821

  15. The impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) micropolymorphism on ligand specificity within the HLA-B*41 allotypic family

    SciTech Connect

    Bade-Döding, Christina; Theodossis, Alex; Gras, Stephanie; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Seltsam, Axel; Huyton, Trevor; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2011-09-28

    Polymorphic differences between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules affect the specificity and conformation of their bound peptides and lead to differential selection of the T-cell repertoire. Mismatching during allogeneic transplantation can, therefore, lead to immunological reactions. We investigated the structure-function relationships of six members of the HLA-B*41 allelic group that differ by six polymorphic amino acids, including positions 80, 95, 97 and 114 within the antigen-binding cleft. Peptide-binding motifs for B*41:01, *41:02, *41:03, *41:04, *41:05 and *41:06 were determined by sequencing self-peptides from recombinant B*41 molecules by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 bound to a natural 16-mer self-ligand (AEMYGSVTEHPSPSPL) and HLA-B*41:04 bound to a natural 11-mer self-ligand (HEEAVSVDRVL) were solved. Peptide analysis revealed that all B*41 alleles have an identical anchor motif at peptide position 2 (glutamic acid), but differ in their choice of C-terminal p{Omega} anchor (proline, valine, leucine). Additionally, B*41:04 displayed a greater preference for long peptides (>10 residues) when compared to the other B*41 allomorphs, while the longest peptide to be eluted from the allelic group (a 16mer) was obtained from B*41:03. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 and HLA-B*41:04 revealed that both alleles interact in a highly conserved manner with the terminal regions of their respective ligands, while micropolymorphism-induced changes in the steric and electrostatic properties of the antigen-binding cleft account for differences in peptide repertoire and auxiliary anchoring. Differences in peptide repertoire, and peptide length specificity reflect the significant functional evolution of these closely related allotypes and signal their importance in allogeneic transplantation, especially B*41:03 and B*41:04, which accommodate longer peptides, creating structurally distinct peptide

  16. Granulocyte antigen systems and antibodies and their clinical significance

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, J.

    1983-03-01

    Granulocyte alloantibodies and autoantibodies have a key role in the pathophysiology of several clinical problems. These include febrile transfusion reactions, severe pulmonary reactions to transfusion, isoimmune neonatal neutropenia, failure of effective granulocyte transfusion, autoimmune neutropenia, drug-induced neutropenia, and neutropenias secondary to many other diseases. Although many techniques are available for detecting granulocyte antibodies, the optimal in-vitro tests for predicting the antibodies' clinical effects are not established. Use of indium-111-labeled granulocytes may provide valuable information regarding the in-vivo effects of different granulocyte antibodies. Granulocyte transfusions continue to be used for a limited number of severely infected neutropenic patients who do not respond to antibiotic therapy.

  17. Enhancing Blockade of Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Invasion: Assessing Combinations of Antibodies against PfRH5 and Other Merozoite Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kazutoyo; Illingworth, Joseph J.; Choudhary, Prateek; Murungi, Linda M.; Furze, Julie M.; Diouf, Ababacar; Miotto, Olivo; Crosnier, Cécile; Wright, Gavin J.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Long, Carole A.; Draper, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    No vaccine has yet proven effective against the blood-stages of Plasmodium falciparum, which cause the symptoms and severe manifestations of malaria. We recently found that PfRH5, a P. falciparum-specific protein expressed in merozoites, is efficiently targeted by broadly-neutralizing, vaccine-induced antibodies. Here we show that antibodies against PfRH5 efficiently inhibit the in vitro growth of short-term-adapted parasite isolates from Cambodia, and that the EC50 values of antigen-specific antibodies against PfRH5 are lower than those against PfAMA1. Since antibody responses elicited by multiple antigens are speculated to improve the efficacy of blood-stage vaccines, we conducted detailed assessments of parasite growth inhibition by antibodies against PfRH5 in combination with antibodies against seven other merozoite antigens. We found that antibodies against PfRH5 act synergistically with antibodies against certain other merozoite antigens, most notably with antibodies against other erythrocyte-binding antigens such as PfRH4, to inhibit the growth of a homologous P. falciparum clone. A combination of antibodies against PfRH4 and basigin, the erythrocyte receptor for PfRH5, also potently inhibited parasite growth. This methodology provides the first quantitative evidence that polyclonal vaccine-induced antibodies can act synergistically against P. falciparum antigens and should help to guide the rational development of future multi-antigen vaccines. PMID:23144611

  18. Antigen nature and complexity influence human antibody light chain usage and specificity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth; Shah, Hemangi; Muther, Jennifer J; Duke, Angie L; Haley, Kathleen; James, Judith A

    2016-05-27

    Human antibodies consist of a heavy chain and one of two possible light chains, kappa (κ) or lambda (λ). Here we tested how these two possible light chains influence the overall antibody response to polysaccharide and protein antigens by measuring light chain usage in human monoclonal antibodies from antibody secreting cells obtained following vaccination with Pneumovax23. Remarkably, we found that individuals displayed restricted light chain usage to certain serotypes and that lambda antibodies have different specificities and modes of cross-reactivity than kappa antibodies. Thus, at both the monoclonal (7 kappa, no lambda) and serum levels (145μg/mL kappa, 2.82μg/mL lambda), antibodies to cell wall polysaccharide were nearly always kappa. The pneumococcal reference serum 007sp was analyzed for light chain usage to 12 pneumococcal serotypes for which it is well characterized. Similar to results at the monoclonal level, certain serotypes tended to favor one of the light chains (14 and 19A, lambda; 6A and 23F, kappa). We also explored differences in light chain usage at the serum level to a variety of antigens. We examined serum antibodies to diphtheria toxin mutant CRM197 and Epstein-Barr virus protein EBNA-1. These responses tended to be kappa dominant (average kappa-to-lambda ratios of 4.52 and 9.72 respectively). Responses to the influenza vaccine were more balanced with kappa-to-lambda ratio averages having slight strain variations: seasonal H1N1, 1.1; H3N2, 0.96; B, 0.91. We conclude that antigens with limited epitopes tend to produce antibodies with restricted light chain usage and that in most individuals, antibodies with lambda light chains have specificities different and complementary to kappa-containing antibodies. PMID:27113164

  19. Antibody repertoire deep sequencing reveals antigen-independent selection in maturing B cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaplinsky, Joseph; Li, Anthony; Sun, Amy; Coffre, Maryaline; Koralov, Sergei B.; Arnaout, Ramy

    2014-01-01

    Antibody repertoires are known to be shaped by selection for antigen binding. Unexpectedly, we now show that selection also acts on a non–antigen-binding antibody region: the heavy-chain variable (VH)–encoded “elbow” between variable and constant domains. By sequencing 2.8 million recombined heavy-chain genes from immature and mature B-cell subsets in mice, we demonstrate a striking gradient in VH gene use as pre-B cells mature into follicular and then into marginal zone B cells. Cells whose antibodies use VH genes that encode a more flexible elbow are more likely to mature. This effect is distinct from, and exceeds in magnitude, previously described maturation-associated changes in heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3, a key antigen-binding region, which arise from junctional diversity rather than differential VH gene use. Thus, deep sequencing reveals a previously unidentified mode of B-cell selection. PMID:24927543

  20. Diagnostic value of antibody responses to multiple antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in active and latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Senoputra, Muhammad Andrian; Shiratori, Beata; Hasibuan, Fakhrial Mirwan; Koesoemadinata, Raspati Cundarani; Apriani, Lika; Ashino, Yugo; Ono, Kenji; Oda, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Makoto; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Hattori, Toshio

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the antibody responses to 10 prospective Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) antigens and evaluated their ability to discriminate between latent (LTBI) and active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Our results indicate that plasma levels of anti-α-crystallin (ACR), antilipoarabinomannan, anti-trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate, and anti-tubercular-glycolipid antigen antibodies were higher in patients with active TB, compared to those in the LTBI and control subjects. No differences in the antibodies were observed between the control and LTBI subjects. Antibodies against the glycolipid antigens could not distinguish between Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC)-negative TB patients and MAC-infected LTBI individuals. The most useful serological marker was antibodies to ACR, with MAC-negative TB patients having higher titers than those observed in MAC-positive LTBI and control subjects. Our data indicate that antibody to ACR is a promising target for the serological diagnosis of patients with active TB patients. When dealing with antiglycolipid antibodies, MAC coinfection should always be considered in serological studies. PMID:26307672

  1. Reactivity of monoclonal antibodies to species-specific antigens of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, H; Kobayashi, S; Nagakura, K; Kaneda, Y; Takeuchi, T

    1991-01-01

    Twenty monoclonal antibodies were produced against trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica strains HK-9 and HM-1: IMSS. When reactivity to various enteric protozoa was examined by an indirect fluorescence antibody test, 15 of the monoclonal antibodies were strongly reactive with E. histolytica trophozoites. Species-specific antigens recognized by these monoclonal antibodies were located on the plasma membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, and cytoskeletal structures of the trophozoites. Two of the remaining five monoclonals reacted strongly with trophozoites of the E. histolytica-like Laredo strain. The determinant antigen was located in the cytoplasm. The three remaining monoclonal antibodies were found to recognize cross-reactive antigens between E. histolytica and E. histolytica-like Laredo, E. hartmanni, E. coli, Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia lamblia, and Trichomonas hominis. These three antibodies were also reactive with T. vaginalis and mammalian cells such as HeLa cells. Thus, the combined use of monoclonal antibodies seems capable of distinguishing E. histolytica and/or E. histolytica-like Laredo from other enteric protozoa. PMID:1724012

  2. A peptide mimic blocks the cross-reaction of anti-DNA antibodies with glomerular antigens.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Eryilmaz, E; Der, E; Pawar, R D; Guo, X; Cowburn, D; Putterman, C

    2016-03-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with renal antigens. Previously, we demonstrated that the binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to self-antigens is isotype-dependent. Furthermore, significant variability in renal pathogenicity was seen among a panel of anti-DNA isotypes [derived from a single murine immunoglobulin (Ig)G3 monoclonal antibody, PL9-11] that share identical variable regions. In this study, we sought to select peptide mimics that effectively inhibit the binding of all murine and human anti-DNA IgG isotypes to glomerular antigens. The PL9-11 panel of IgG anti-DNA antibodies (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3) was used for screening a 12-mer phage display library. Binding affinity was determined by surface plasmon resonance. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), flow cytometry and glomerular binding assays were used for the assessment of peptide inhibition of antibody binding to nuclear and kidney antigens. We identified a 12 amino acid peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP, or 'ALW') which binds to all PL9-11 IgG isotypes. Preincubation with the ALW peptide reduced the binding of the PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies to DNA, laminin, mesangial cells and isolated glomeruli significantly. Furthermore, we confirmed the specificity of the amino acid sequence in the binding of ALW to anti-DNA antibodies by alanine scanning. Finally, ALW inhibited the binding of murine and human lupus sera to dsDNA and glomeruli significantly. In conclusion, by inhibiting the binding of polyclonal anti-DNA antibodies to autoantigens in vivo, the ALW peptide (or its derivatives) may potentially be a useful approach to block anti-DNA antibody binding to renal tissue. PMID:26482679

  3. Antibodies: At The Nexus of Antigens and Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Steplewski, Zenon; Thurin, Magdalena; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the development of monoclonal antibodies and the inception of their use in cancer therapy, their impact on defining cancer biomarkers, and their structural utility in new cancer vaccine development. PMID:26116735

  4. Immunoglobulin A antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi antigens in digestive forms of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Primavera, K S; Hoshino-Shimizu, S; Umezawa, E S; Peres, B A; Manigot, D A; Camargo, M E

    1988-01-01

    In an attempt to find a serological marker for the diagnosis of chronic digestive forms of Chagas' disease, we compared amastigote and trypomastigote antigens obtained from immunosuppressed mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (Y strain) with conventional epimastigote antigens to search for immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies. A total of 255 serum samples from patients with acute and chronic (indeterminate, digestive, and cardiac) forms of Chagas' disease and with nonchagasic diseases and from healthy individuals were studied. Amastigote antigens proved to be the most adequate for our purpose, since IgA antibodies could be detected in 23 of 25 serum samples from patients with digestive forms, with relative indices of sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of 0.920, 0.911, and 0.912, respectively. These antigens also showed high reactivity with IgA antibodies, with a geometric mean titer of 16,635 (12.7 log2). IgA antibodies were detected in 16 of 28 serum samples from patients with the acute form as well, but this clinical form is easily distinguished from the chronic form by the demonstration of IgM antibodies. Poor results were seen with trypomastigote and epimastigote antigens. The finding of IgA antibodies in about 20% of indeterminate forms and 20% of cardiac forms, although in low titers, requires further investigation to ascertain their role as an early signal of gastrointestinal lesions. In addition, the amastigote antigens described here seem more convenient for use in endemic areas than those obtained from cell cultures because of their lower cost. PMID:3141458

  5. Transcription analysis, physical mapping, and molecular characterization of a nonclassical human leukocyte antigen class I gene.

    PubMed Central

    Chorney, M J; Sawada, I; Gillespie, G A; Srivastava, R; Pan, J; Weissman, S M

    1990-01-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex contains approximately 20 class I genes, pseudogenes, and gene fragments. These include the genes for the three major transplantation antigens, HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C, as well as a number of other genes or pseudogenes of unknown biological significance. Most of the latter have C + G-rich sequences in their 5' ends that are unmethylated in the B-lymphoblastoid cell line 3.1.0. We investigated one of these genes, HLA-H, in more detail. The gene is, overall, strongly homologous in sequence to HLA-A but differs in several potentially significant ways, including changes in conserved promoter sequences, a single-base deletion producing a translation termination codon in exon 4, and a region of sequence divergence downstream of the transcribed portion of the gene. Nevertheless, mouse L cells transfected with the gene accumulated small amounts of apparently full-length polyadenylated RNA. A portion of this RNA begins at the transcription site predicted by analogy to certain class I cDNA clones, while another portion appears to begin shortly upstream. L cells transfected with a hybrid gene containing the first three exons of HLA-H and the last five exons of HLA-B27 accumulated full-length HLA transcripts at the same level as cells transfected with an HLA-B27 gene; both levels are at least 15- to 20-fold higher than that directed by HLA-H alone. In addition, we isolated a cDNA clone for HLA-H that contains a portion of intron 3 attached to a normally spliced sequence comprising exons 4 through 8. These results suggest that low levels of translatable mRNA for the truncated class I heavy chain encoded by HLA-H are produced under physiologic circumstances and that sequences 3' of intron 3 decrease the levels of stable transcripts. Images PMID:2294403

  6. Use of antibody gene library for the isolation of specific single chain antibodies by ampicillin-antigen conjugates.

    PubMed

    Neumann-Schaal, Meina; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Grenz, Nicole; Heilmann, Katja

    2013-03-01

    Isolation of recombinant antibodies from antibody libraries is commonly performed by different molecular display formats including phage display and ribosome display or different cell-surface display formats. We describe a new method which allows the selection of Escherichia coli cells producing the required single chain antibody by cultivation in presence of ampicillin conjugated to the antigen of interest. The method utilizes the neutralization of the conjugate by the produced single chain antibody which is secreted to the periplasm. Therefore, a new expression system based on the pET26b vector was designed and a library was constructed. The method was successfully established first for the selection of E. coli BL21 Star (DE3) cells expressing a model single chain antibody (anti-fluorescein) by a simple selection assay on LB-agar plates. Using this selection assay, we could identify a new single chain antibody binding biotin by growing E. coli BL21 Star (DE3) containing the library in presence of a biotin-ampicillin conjugate. In contrast to methods as molecular or cell surface display our selection system applies the soluble single chain antibody molecule and thereby avoids undesired effects, e.g. by the phage particle or the yeast fusion protein. By selecting directly in an expression strain, production and characterization of the selected single chain antibody is possible without any further cloning or transformation steps. PMID:23453960

  7. Antibody response to low-molecular-weight antigens of Aspergillus fumigatus in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, V P; Greenberger, P A; Fink, J N

    1989-01-01

    Sera from patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) or aspergilloma and normal sera were analyzed for specific antibodies by Western (immuno-) blotting with Aspergillus fumigatus antigens transferred electrophoretically onto polyvinylidene difluoride membranes. Western blot analysis demonstrated consistent reactivity of low-molecular-weight A. fumigatus antigens against ABPA sera but not against uncomplicated aspergilloma or normal sera. None of these low-molecular-weight components had any lectin-binding activity. Sera from patients with aspergilloma, however, frequently reacted with high-molecular-weight components of A. fumigatus. The majority of these high-molecular-weight antigenic components demonstrated concanavalin A-binding activity. The low-molecular-weight bands were discernible in Western blots with sera from all ABPA patients irrespective of disease activities, such as relapse, flare, or treatment. Antibodies detected by methods such as immunodiffusion or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays demonstrated total antibody responses to most or all antigenic components, while Western blots demonstrated the reactivities of the individual components with the specific antibodies. Western blot analysis thus provided more information for immunodiagnosis of ABPA than other methods, especially when only crude antigens were available. Images PMID:2666440

  8. Immunochemistry of sea anemone toxins: structure-antigenicity relationships and toxin-receptor interactions probed by antibodies specific for one antigenic

    SciTech Connect

    Ayeb, M.E.; Bahraoui, E.M.; Granier, C.; Beress, L.; Rochat, H.

    1986-11-04

    Two antibody subpopulations directed against Anemonia sulcata toxin I or II have been purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. These antibodies are specific for a single antigenic region and were used in a structure-antigenicity relationship study using homologous toxins and chemically modified derivatives of A. sulcata toxin II. Asp-7 and/or Asp=9 and Gln-47 of toxin II were found to be implicated in the antigenic region recognized by the two antibody subpopulations. On the contrary, Arg-14, Lys-35, -36, and -46, and ..cap alpha..-NH/sub 2/ of the glycine residue of A. sulcata toxin II are not involved in the corresponding antigenic region. When assayed for interaction with the sodium channel, the antigenic region of toxin II, including Asp-9 and Gln-47, appeared fully accessible to its specific antibodies, suggesting that it is not involved in the binding of the toxin to its receptor.

  9. The use of monoclonal antibodies for the antigenic analysis of influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, M. S.; Chakraverty, P.; Cunningham, P.; Webster, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been found to provide useful additional information for the antigenic analysis of influenza A viruses of the H3N2 and H1N1 subtypes. They have been particularly useful in the interpandemic period when multiple variants circulate concurrently. Apparently heterogeneous isolates can be placed in fairly clear-cut groups on the basis of their reactivity with certain monoclonal antibody preparations. It is thought likely that variants reacting with the least number of monoclones are the most different antigenically from the fully reactive strains. PMID:2410156

  10. Development of a monoclonal antibody against a tumor-associated antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, W.W.; Bressler, J.P.; Tiffany-Castiglioni, E.; De Vellis, J.

    1982-02-26

    A monoclonal antibody-producing hybrid cell line was obtained by fusing mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from a mouse immunized with C6 glioma cells. This antibody binds to a specific cell-surface antigen that is present on C6 rat glioma cells, tranformed astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, and a human glioma cell line but is absent on a normal glial cell line, fibroblasts, and primary cultures of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The antigen also appears on tumor tissue of transformed oligodendrocytes but not on normal brain tissue.

  11. Development of a Monoclonal Antibody against a Tumor-Associated Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, W. W.; Bressler, J. P.; Tiffany-Castiglioni, E.; de Vellis, J.

    1982-02-01

    A monoclonal antibody-producing hybrid cell line was obtained by fusing mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from a mouse immunized with C6 glioma cells. This antibody binds to a specific cell-surface antigen that is present on C6 rat glioma cells, transformed astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, and a human glioma cell line but is absent on a normal glial cell line, fibroblasts, and primary cultures of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The antigen also appears on tumor tissue of transformed oligodendrocytes but not on normal brain tissue.

  12. Procedures for Sxs antigen detection by antibody-mediated cytotoxicity tests. A comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, A; Jiménez, R; Burgos, M; Díaz de la Guardia, R

    1994-11-01

    Biological reagents used in the serological detection of Sxs antigen by antibody-mediated cytotoxicity tests were compared in order to optimize the method. Our analyses showed that: (a) red cell-free spleen cells are the best target cells, (b) rabbit serum used as the complement source should be obtained from females, and absorbed with female spleen cells before use, (c) antiserum obtained by immunizing females with repeated injections of syngenic male spleen cells provides the highest anti-Sxs antibody titer, and (d) of the different biological fluids investigated, testis supernatant has highest concentration of Sxs antigen. PMID:7836542

  13. Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin Antibody Escape Promotes Neuraminidase Antigenic Variation and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Scott E.; Das, Suman R.; Gibbs, James S.; Bailey, Adam L.; Schmidt, Loren M.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2011-01-01

    Drugs inhibiting the influenza A virus (IAV) neuraminidase (NA) are the cornerstone of anti-IAV chemotherapy and prophylaxis in man. Drug-resistant mutations in NA arise frequently in human isolates, limiting the therapeutic application of NA inhibitors. Here, we show that antibody-driven antigenic variation in one domain of the H1 hemagglutinin Sa site leads to compensatory mutations in NA, resulting in NA antigenic variation and acquisition of drug resistance. These findings indicate that influenza A virus resistance to NA inhibitors can potentially arise from antibody driven HA escape, confounding analysis of influenza NA evolution in nature. PMID:21364978

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to antigens on human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemia blast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miterev, G.Yu.; Burova, G.F.; Puzhitskaya, M.S.; Danilevich, S.V.; Bulycheva, T.I.

    1987-11-01

    The authors describe the production of two mouse hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies to antigenic determinants of the surface membranes of human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemic blast cells. The degree of lymphocyte stimulation was estimated from incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine with parallel microculture. Monoclonal antibodies of supernatants of hybridoma cultures shown here reacted in both immunofluorescence test and cytotoxicity test with surface membrane antigens on the majority of neutrophils and PHA-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects, but did not give positive reactions with unactivated lymphocytes, adherent monocytes, erythrocytes, and alloantigen-stimulated lymphocytes.

  15. Antibodies to a nuclear/nucleolar antigen in patients with polymyositis overlap syndromes.

    PubMed

    Reichlin, M; Maddison, P J; Targoff, I; Bunch, T; Arnett, F; Sharp, G; Treadwell, E; Tan, E M

    1984-01-01

    A precipitating antigen-antibody system has been characterized that occurs in patients with polymyositis. At least half of the patients not only have polymyositis but also have scleroderma. The proposed name for this antigen found in calf thymus extract (CTE) is PM-Scl, to indicate the almost universal presence of polymyositis and the frequent occurrence of scleroderma in the patients who make antibodies to this antigen. The antigen is probably nucleolar since all sera which precipitate with the PM-Scl antigen stain the nucleoli of Hep2 cells by indirect immunofluorescence. The PM-Scl immune system is a distinctive one different from the other known precipitins that occur in patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis including Jo1, nRNP, and Mi. This PM-Scl antigen and its antibody represent one system which constitutes part of the reactions previously designated as PM1. Interlaboratory exchange of sera and extracts have established the unique nature of this reaction which occurs in patients with inflammatory myopathy. PMID:6699138

  16. Double-antigen sandwich ELISA for the detection of anti-hepatitis C virus antibodies.

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Xiu, Bingshui; Wang, Guohua; Chen, Kun; Feng, Xiaoyan; Song, Xiaoguo; Zhu, Cuixia; Ling, Shigan; Zhang, Heqiu

    2011-01-01

    A double-antigen sandwich ELISA was developed a detection of HCV antibodies by a recombinant multi-epitope HCV antigen and a biotin-streptavidin amplification system. Three plasma specimens from 1708 individuals who were suspected previously to be HCV-positive using an HCV antibody diagnostic kit (Chuangxin, Xiamen, China) displayed negative results when using the ELISA. These results were validated by a recombinant immunoblotting assay (two were negative, and one was indeterminate). Among 889 blood specimens donated for clinical evaluation, 246 were positive and 630 were negative using the ELISA. The sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA were 98.7% and 100%, respectively. In 43 donors and 14 patients with chronic hepatitis C, the detectable rates for HCV IgM by both ELISA and the HCV anti-IgM detection reagents (Huimin, Shenyang, China) were 100%, and the detectable rate for HCV IgG using an indirect HCV-antibody detection kit (GWK, Beijing, China) was 98.3%. Thus, the double-antigen sandwich ELISA exhibits strong specificity and sensitivity and has been approved by the China State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA). The performance of the double-antigen sandwich ELISA was similar to the Ortho ELISA 3.0. It did not give false-negative results otherwise IgM was undetectable using an indirect HCV-antibody detection kit. This ELISA provides another method for the detection of HCV antibodies. PMID:21029749

  17. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I Restricted Epitope Discovery in Yellow Fewer and Dengue Viruses: Importance of HLA Binding Strength

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Maciel, Milton; Nielsen, Morten; Voldby Larsen, Mette; Lundegaard, Claus; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper; Buus, Søren; Salmon, Jérôme; August, Thomas J.; Marques, Ernesto T. A.

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV epitopes were selected using the EpiSelect algorithm to allow for optimal coverage of viral strains. The selected predicted epitopes were synthesized and approximately 75% were found to bind the predicted restricting HLA molecule with an affinity, KD, stronger than 500 nM. The immunogenicity of 25 HLA-A*02:01, 28 HLA-A*24:02 and 28 HLA-B*07:02 binding peptides was tested in three HLA-transgenic mice models and led to the identification of 17 HLA-A*02:01, 4 HLA-A*2402 and 4 HLA-B*07:02 immunogenic peptides. The immunogenic peptides bound HLA significantly stronger than the non-immunogenic peptides. All except one of the immunogenic peptides had KD below 100 nM and the peptides with KD below 5 nM were more likely to be immunogenic. In addition, all the immunogenic peptides that were identified as having a high functional avidity had KD below 20 nM. A*02:01 transgenic mice were also inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding in shaping the immune response. PMID:22039500

  18. Frequency of null allele of Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) locus in subjects to recurrent miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Nazila; Mosaferi, Elnaz; Farzadi, Laya; Majidi, Jafar; Monfaredan, Amir; Yousefi, Bahman; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class I molecule highly expressed by extravillous cytotrophoblast cells. Due to a single base pair deletion, its function can be compensated by other isoforms. Investigating the frequency of null allele in Recurrent Miscarriage (RM) subjects could be useful in understanding the relationship between frequency of this allele and RM in a given population. Objective: This study aimed to determine the frequency of HLA-G*0105N null allele and its potential association with down-regulation of HLA-G in subjects with RM. Materials and Methods: Western blotting was used to assess the level of HLA-G protein expression. For investigating the frequency of HLA-G*0105N null allele in RM subjects, PCR-RFLP method was used. Exon 3 of HLA-G gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequently, PpuM-1 enzyme was employed to digest the PCR products and fragments were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Results: Digestion using restriction enzyme showed the presence of heterozygous HLA-G*0105N null allele in 10% of the test population. Western blotting results confirmed the decrease in expression of HLA-G in the placental tissue of subjects with RM compared to subjects who could give normal birth. Conclusion: The frequency of heterozygous HLA-G*0105N null allele was high to some extent in subjects with RM. The mutation rate in subjects suggested that there is a significant association between RM and frequency of mutations in this allele. PMID:27525330

  19. Complex preimplantation genetic diagnosis for beta-thalassaemia, sideroblastic anaemia, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing.

    PubMed

    Kakourou, Georgia; Vrettou, Christina; Kattamis, Antonis; Destouni, Aspasia; Poulou, Myrto; Moutafi, Maria; Kokkali, Georgia; Pantos, Konstantinos; Davies, Stephen; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sophia; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to select histocompatible siblings to facilitate curative haematopoeitic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is now an acceptable option in the absence of an available human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatible donor. We describe a case where the couple who requested HLA-PGD, were both carriers of two serious haematological diseases, beta-thalassaemia and sideroblastic anaemia. Their daughter, affected with sideroblastic anaemia, was programmed to have HSCT. A multiplex-fluorescent-touchdown-PCR protocol was optimized for the simultaneous amplification of: the two HBB-gene mutated regions (c.118C> T, c.25-26delAA), four short tandem repeats (STRs) in chr11p15.5 linked to the HBB gene, the SLC25A38 gene mutation (c.726C > T), two STRs in chr3p22.1 linked to the SLC25A38 gene, plus eleven informative STRs for HLA-haplotyping (chr6p22.1-21.3). This was followed by real-time nested PCR and high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) for the detection of HBB and SLC25A38 gene mutations, as well as the analysis of all STRs on an automatic genetic analyzer (sequencer). The couple completed four clinical in vitro fertilization (IVF)/PGD cycles. At least one matched unaffected embryo was identified and transferred in each cycle. A twin pregnancy was established in the fourth PGD cycle and genotyping results at all loci were confirmed by prenatal diagnosis. Two healthy baby girls were delivered at week 38 of pregnancy. The need to exclude two familial disorders for HLA-PGD is rarely encountered. The methodological approach described here is fast, accurate, clinically-validated, and of relatively low cost. PMID:26636621

  20. Polymorphisms and Tissue Expression of the Feline Leukocyte Antigen Class I Loci FLAI-E, -H and -K

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Jennifer C.; Holmer, Savannah G.; Ross, Peter; Buntzman, Adam S.; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.; Hess, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Cytotoxic CD8+ T-cell immunosurveillance for intracellular pathogens, such as viruses, is controlled by classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ia molecules, and ideally, these antiviral T-cell populations are defined by the specific peptide and restricting MHC allele. Surprisingly, despite the utility of the cat in modeling human viral immunity, little is known about the Feline Leukocyte Antigen class I complex (FLAI). Only a few coding sequences with uncertain locus origin and expression patterns have been reported. Of 19 class I genes, 3 loci - FLAI-E, -H and -K – are predicted to encode classical molecules, and our objective was to evaluate their status by analyzing polymorphisms and tissue expression. Using locus-specific, PCR-based genotyping, we amplified 33 FLAI-E, -H, and -K alleles from 12 cats of various breeds, identifying, for the first time, alleles across 3 distinct loci in a feline species. Alleles shared the expected polymorphic and invariant sites in the α1/α2 domains, and full-length cDNA clones possessed all characteristic class Ia exons. Alleles could be assigned to a specific locus with reasonable confidence, although there was evidence of potentially confounding interlocus recombination between FLAI-E and -K. Only FLAI-E, -H and -K-origin alleles were amplified from cDNAs of multiple tissue types. We also defined hypervariable regions across these genes, which permitted the assignment of names to both novel and established alleles. As predicted, FLAI-E, -H, and -K fulfill the major criteria of class Ia genes. These data represent a necessary prerequisite for studying epitope-specific antiviral CD8+ T-cell responses in cats. PMID:23812210

  1. Diagnostic implications of antigen-induced gamma interferon production by blood leukocytes from Mycobacterium bovis-infected reindeer (Rangifer tarandus).

    PubMed

    Waters, W R; Palmer, M V; Slaughter, R E; Jones, S L; Pitzer, J E; Minion, F C

    2006-01-01

    The only approved method of tuberculosis (TB) surveillance of reindeer within the United States is tuberculin skin testing; however, skin testing has an apparent lack of specificity, since numerous reindeer are classified as reactors, yet Mycobacterium bovis is not isolated from tissues upon necropsy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of an in vitro assay (the Cervigam assay) to detect gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) produced by blood leukocytes in response to mycobacterial antigens from M. bovis-infected reindeer. Thirteen male reindeer approximately 9 months of age were inoculated with 10(5) CFU M. bovis in their tonsillar crypts. Stimulation of whole-blood cultures with a mitogen resulted in significant production of IFN-gamma compared to that by nonstimulated samples. Responses by infected reindeer to M. bovis purified protein derivative (PPD) were as much as 3.5-fold higher than those by noninfected reindeer (n = 4). Despite differences in responses to PPD by the two groups, reindeer within the noninfected group had responses of >0.1 change in optical density (DeltaOD) (a level generally considered positive) to PPD. Mean responses by infected reindeer to a rESAT-6-CFP-10 fusion protein (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex specific) were as much as 20-fold higher than respective responses by noninfected reindeer at all time points. Additionally, responses by 3/4 noninfected reindeer were <0.1 DeltaOD (considered negative) at each time point. To further evaluate the specificity of the assay, samples were collected from reindeer in a TB-free herd. All reindeer had responses to mitogen; however, only 1 of 38 had a response to PPD, and none of the reindeer responded to rESAT-6-CFP-10. Together, these findings indicate that IFN-gamma-based tests may prove useful for TB surveillance of reindeer. PMID:16425998

  2. Lack of an independent association between the human leukocyte antigen allele DQA1*0501 and Graves` disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cuddihy, R.M.; Bahn, R.S.

    1996-02-01

    The association between the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) serotype DR3 and Graves` disease (GD) in Caucasian populations is well known. However, an even stronger association has been reported recently, especially in the male population, between the closely linked HLA allele DQA1*0501 and GD. We postulated that the reported association between DQA1*0501 and GD may be a result of the linkage of this allele with DR3 and may not represent an independent association. Accordingly, we screened a population of North American Caucasians (n=218), including patients with GD (n=101, 32 males, 69 females) and individuals with documented normal thyroid function (n=117, 51 males, 66 females), for the presence of the DQA1*0501 allele and those alleles corresponding to the DR3 serotype (DRB1*03). Screening was accomplished using sequence specific PCR. A significant association was documented in the total study population between DR3 positivity and GD (P=0.0002), but not between DQA1*0501 positivity and GD(P=0.06). After gender stratification, significant associations were found only in the female population (DR3, P=0.0004; DQA1*0501, P=0.012) and not in the male population (DR3, P=1.0;DQA1*0501,P=.0). Additionally, in those DR3 negative female subjects (n=100), there was no independent association between DQA1*0501 positivity (n=26) and GD (P=0.82). P-values were corrected, where appropriate, for gender stratification and/or the number of HLA alleles tested. In conclusion, our results demonstrated a lack of independent association between the presence of the HLA allele DAQ1*0501 and GD. We suggest that the apparent association between this allele and GD in the female population may be the result of its` close linkage to DR3. 21 refs., 7 tabs.

  3. Lack of radioimmunodetection and complications associated with monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen antibody cross-reactivity with an antigen on circulating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.; Beauregard, J.C.; Sobol, R.E.; Royston, I.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Hagan, P.S.; Halpern, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Characterization of several high-affinity murine monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies suggested good specificity except for cross-reactivity with an antigen on granulocytes and erythrocytes which was different from the previously described normal cross-reacting antigen of granulocytes. In vivo studies in athymic mice using an indium conjugate of an anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (MoAb) revealed excellent specific uptake in colorectal carcinoma xenografts. Studies were conducted in humans to determine the limitations produced by the cross-reactivity with granulocytes and erythrocytes. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer received 3 to 6 mg of anti-CEA MoAb over 10 min or 2 hr. In five of six trials, the MoAb infusion was associated with a 40 to 90% decrease in circulating granulocytes and systemic toxicity including fever, rigors, and emesis. One patient had no change in cell count and had no toxicity. Radionuclide scans with /sup 111/In-anti-CEA MoAb showed marked uptake in the spleen when cells were eliminated, and in the liver, especially when pretreatment CEA levels were high. Metastatic tumor sites failed to concentrate the isotope. This study emphasizes the potential limitations for radioimmunodetection and/or radioimmunotherapy imposed by reactivity with circulating cells, and suggests that certain toxic reactions associated with MoAb infusions are related to destruction of circulating cells rather than allergic reactions to mouse protein. It also emphasizes how variables such as dose and binding affinity of antibody, radioisotope used, and assessment at different observation points can obscure lack of antibody specificity.

  4. Trichinella spiralis: monoclonal antibody against the muscular larvae for the detection of circulating and fecal antigens in experimentally infected rats.

    PubMed

    Zumaquero-Ríos, José-Lino; García-Juarez, Jazmín; de-la-Rosa-Arana, Jorge-Luis; Marcet, Ricardo; Sarracent-Pérez, Jorge

    2012-12-01

    In this work we search for antigens of Trichinella spiralis in sera and stool of rats experimentally infected. The kinetic of antibodies to excretory and secretory (ES) antigens of muscle larvae (ML) was also determined. Wistar rats were infected with 15 ML per gram of body weight and blood samples were collected weekly for 10 weeks. Antibodies were studied using an indirect ELISA. For detection of circulating antigens and coproantigens, a sandwich ELISA was developed with the use of polyclonal rabbit antibodies obtained against the total extract of ML and an IgM monoclonal antibody (Mab) against ES antigens of ML. No reactivity was observed between Mab and the total worm antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Ascaris suum, Echinococcus granulosus, Fasciola hepatica, Strongyloides stercoralis, Taenia solium, Toxocara canis and Trichuris trichiura. The IgM Mab recognized antigens of 45, 49, and 55 kDa in ES antigens and was unable to bind ES antigens deglycosylated with trifluoromethanesulphonic acid (TFMS) indicating that a glycan structure is present in the epitope recognized by this Mab. The sensitivity of sandwich ELISA was 1 ng/mL. Circulating antigens were detected in all infected rats between 3 and 8 weeks post infection and coproantigens were found during the first two days post infection. Antibodies were detected since the third week post infection through the end of experiment. These results suggested that antigen detection by our sandwich ELISA could be a useful complementary laboratory test for antibody detection. PMID:23026455

  5. Antibodies against Food Antigens in Patients with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    de Magistris, Laura; Picardi, Annarita; Siniscalco, Dario; Sapone, Anna; Cariello, Rita; Abbadessa, Salvatore; Medici, Nicola; Lammers, Karen M.; Schiraldi, Chiara; Iardino, Patrizia; Marotta, Rosa; Tolone, Carlo; Fasano, Alessio; Pascotto, Antonio; Bravaccio, Carmela

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Immune system of some autistic patients could be abnormally triggered by gluten/casein assumption. The prevalence of antibodies to gliadin and milk proteins in autistic children with paired/impaired intestinal permeability and under dietary regimen either regular or restricted is reported. Methods. 162 ASDs and 44 healthy children were investigated for intestinal permeability, tissue-transglutaminase (tTG), anti-endomysium antibodies (EMA)-IgA, and total mucosal IgA to exclude celiac disease; HLA-DQ2/-DQ8 haplotypes; total systemic antibodies (IgA, IgG, and IgE); specific systemic antibodies: α-gliadin (AGA-IgA and IgG), deamidated–gliadin-peptide (DGP-IgA and IgG), total specific gliadin IgG (all fractions: α, β, γ, and ω), β-lactoglobulin IgG, α-lactalbumin IgG, casein IgG; and milk IgE, casein IgE, gluten IgE, -lactoglobulin IgE, and α-lactalbumin IgE. Results. AGA-IgG and DPG-IgG titers resulted to be higher in ASDs compared to controls and are only partially influenced by diet regimen. Casein IgG titers resulted to be more frequently and significantly higher in ASDs than in controls. Intestinal permeability was increased in 25.6% of ASDs compared to 2.3% of healthy children. Systemic antibodies production was not influenced by paired/impaired intestinal permeability. Conclusions. Immune system of a subgroup of ASDs is triggered by gluten and casein; this could be related either to AGA, DPG, and Casein IgG elevated production or to impaired intestinal barrier function. PMID:23984403

  6. [Use of leukocyte-filtered, cytomegalovirus-antibody negative and irradiated cellular blood products].

    PubMed

    Solheim, B G; Albrechtsen, D H; Evensen, S A; Leivestad, T

    1990-01-10

    This paper presents both quality requirements and indications for use of leucocyte-filtered, cytomegalovirus antibody negative and irradiated cellular blood products at Rikshospitalet. Emphasis is placed on the use of standardized buffycoat depleted red cells or platelet concentrates for filtration, and the selection of leucocyte filters with high capacity and ease of bedside application. Leucocyte counts as low as 1-2 10(5) per unit are recommended after filtration in order to avoid HLA-antibody production. For bedside filtration, our choice was RC100 and PL100 (Pall) for red cells and platelets respectively. For laboratory use we prefer, for economic reasons, to use Sepacell R500 (Asahi) and Imugard IG500 (Terumo) for red cells and platelets respectively. Leucocyte-filtered blood products are considered indicated in all pre-transplant transfusions, in post-transplant HLA-sensitized patients, in other patients with febrile transfusion reactions, and in patients with an expected protracted platelet requirement. CMV antibody negative products are recommended for all immuno-deficient patients and pregnant women negative for CMV antibody. Irradiated blood products are used in the treatment of immuno-deficient patients receiving large amounts of blood, and in all severely immuno-compromised patients. In emergency situations where CMV antibody negative and/or irradiated blood products cannot be supplied, leucocyte filtration is suggested. PMID:2154061

  7. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Peter J.; O’Shaughnessy, Colette M.; Siggins, Matthew K.; Bobat, Saeeda; Kingsley, Robert A.; Goulding, David A.; Crump, John A.; Reyburn, Hugh; Micoli, Francesca; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F.; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies. PMID:26741681

  8. Production of a recombinant antibody specific for i blood group antigen, a mesenchymal stem cell marker.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, Tia; Suila, Heli; Tiitinen, Sari; Natunen, Suvi; Laukkanen, Marja-Leena; Kotovuori, Annika; Reinman, Mirka; Satomaa, Tero; Alfthan, Kaija; Laitinen, Saara; Takkinen, Kristiina; Räbinä, Jarkko; Valmu, Leena

    2013-10-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) offer great promise for future regenerative and anti-inflammatory therapies. Panels of functional and phenotypical markers are currently used in characterization of different therapeutic stem cell populations from various sources. The i antigen (linear poly-N-acetyllactosamine) from the Ii blood group system has been suggested as a marker for MSCs derived from umbilical cord blood (UCB). However, there are currently no commercially available antibodies recognizing the i antigen. In the present study, we describe the use of antibody phage display technology to produce recombinant antibodies recognizing a structure from the surface of mesenchymal stem cells. We constructed IgM phage display libraries from the lymphocytes of a donor with an elevated serum anti-i titer. Antibody phage display technology is not dependent on immunization and thus allows the generation of antibodies against poorly immunogenic molecules, such as carbohydrates. Agglutination assays utilizing i antigen-positive red blood cells (RBCs) from UCB revealed six promising single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies, three of which recognized epitopes from the surface of UCB-MSCs in flow cytometric assays. The amino acid sequence of the VH gene segment of B12.2 scFv was highly similar to the VH4.21 gene segment required to encode anti-i specificities. Further characterization of binding properties revealed that the binding of B12.2 hyperphage was inhibited by soluble linear lactosamine oligosaccharide. Based on these findings, we suggest that the B12.2 scFv we have generated is a prominent anti-i antibody that recognizes i antigen on the surface of both UCB-MSCs and RBCs. This binder can thus be utilized in UCB-MSC detection and isolation as well as in blood group serology. PMID:24083089

  9. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies recognize antigenic variants among isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.; Arakawa, C.N.; Lannan, C.N.; Fryer, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    eutralizing monoclonal antibodies were developed against strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from steelhead trout Salmo gairdneri in the Deschutes River of Oregon, chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Sacramento River of California, and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri reared in the Hagerman Valley of Idaho, USA. These antibodies were tested for neutralization of 12 IHNV isolates obtained from salmonids in Japan, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, and Idaho. The antibodies recognized antigenic variants among the isolates and could be used to separate the viruses into 4 groups. The members of each group tended to be related by geographic area rather than by source host species, virulence, or date of isolation.

  10. Ultrastructural study of Chlamydia trachomatis surface antigens by immunogold staining with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, C C; Chi, E Y

    1987-01-01

    Surface antigens of Chlamydia trachomatis were studied by immunogold staining with monoclonal antibodies and by electron microscopy. The serovar- and subspecies-specific epitopes were the most surface accessible. The species- and genus-specific epitopes were the least surface exposed. Similar serological specificity as that in the microimmunofluorescence test was demonstrated by immunogold staining. Images PMID:2437035