Science.gov

Sample records for levator anguli oris

  1. Levator Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abscess Anorectal Fistula Foreign Objects in the Rectum Hemorrhoids Levator Syndrome Pilonidal Disease Proctitis Rectal Prolapse Levator ... out other painful rectal conditions (such as thrombosed hemorrhoids, fissures, or abscesses). The physical examination is often ...

  2. Anguli Parimana in Ayurveda and its association with adiposity and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shirodkar, Jyoti A.; Sayyad, Mehmood G.; Nanal, Vilas M.; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have shown the association of disproportionate body size measurements with noncommunicable diseases like diabetes. This concept is described in Ayurveda (1500 BC), which uses Anguli Parimana (the breadth of one's own finger as 1 unit) to measure the body proportions. Excessive tallness or shortness (deviation from the reference value of Anguli Parimana) indicated deranged meda dhaatu (mainly adipose tissue). Deranged meda dhatu was associated with Prameha (diabetes). Objectives: To find association of Anguli Parimana with modern parameters of adiposity and diabetes. Materials and Methods: We studied 192 village residents representing the whole population (94 men and 98 women) to measure height, arm span, facial structures and limbs and expressed them in Anguli pariman (ratio of each measure as: Length or height of the body part [cm]/anguli, i.e. average finger breadth [cm]). The Anguli measurements were associated with body mass index, body fat percentage by DEXA, glucose and fasting insulin levels. Results: The volunteers were adults between 20 and 40 years age. Their mean fasting and 2 h plasma glucose concentrations were 91.6 mg% and 102.8 mg%, respectively. Of all, only 6 subjects had impaired glucose tolerance, while 3 were diabetic (WHO 1999). When compared with reference Anguli measurements mentioned by Charaka Samhita and Sushruta Samhita, the participants had smaller height, facial structures, and lower limbs. Those, who had proportionately smaller facial, neck and limb structures, had higher obesity, adiposity, plasma glucose, insulin and insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment [HOMA]-R) indicating higher metabolic risk. In contrast, those who had proportionately larger forehead and face had higher beta cell function measured as HOMA-B indicating lower risk for diabetes (r = 0.20 both P < 0.05 all, adjusted for age and gender). Conclusion: Compared with ancient Indian Anguli reference, our subjects were proportionately smaller in most of the measurements except fingers and upper arm. Relative smallness of body parts was predictive of increased risk of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25336850

  3. Levator plate upward lift and levator muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    Rostaminia, Ghazaleh; Peck, Jennifer; Quiroz, Lieschen; Shobeiri, S. Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of study was to compare digital palpation with the levator plate lift measured by endovaginal and transperineal dynamic ultrasound. Methods Dynamic transperineal and endovaginal ultrasound were performed as part of multicompartmental pelvic floor functional assessment. Patients were instructed to perform Kegels while a probe captured the video clip of the levator plate movement at rest and during contraction in 2D mid-sagittal posterior view. We measured the distance between the levator plate and the probe on endovaginal ultrasound as well as the distance between the levator plate and the gothic arch of the pubis in transperineal ultrasound. The change in diameter (lift) and a levator plate lift ratio (lift / rest) x 100) were calculated. Pelvic floor muscle strength was assessed by digital palpation and divided into functional and non-functional groups using the Modified Oxford Scale (MOS). Mean differences in levator plate upward lifts were compared by MOS score using student t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results 74 women were available for analysis. The mean age was 55 (SD±11.9). When measured by vaginal dynamic ultrasound, mean values of the lift and lift/rest ratio increased with increasing MOS score (ANOVA p=0.09 and p=0.04, respectively). When MOS scores were categorized to represent non-functional (MOS 0-1) and functional (MOS 2-5) muscle strength groups, the mean values of the lift (3.2 mm vs. 4.6 mm, p=0.03) and lift/rest ratio (13% vs 20%, p=0.01) were significantly higher in women with functional muscle strength. All patients with ≥ 30% lift detected by vaginal ultrasound had functional muscle strength. Conclusions Greater levator plate lift ratio detected by dynamic endovaginal ultrasound was associated with higher muscle strength as determined by MOS. This novel measurement can be incorporated into ultrasound evaluation of the levator ani function. PMID:26333568

  4. Scientific study of Charakokta Anguli Pramana in reference to human height.

    PubMed

    Muley, Shashikant K; Surve, Ajit A; Bhingare, Swati D

    2013-10-01

    Ayurveda has dynamic and creative view on health and gives importance to the individual while managing his health and also during treating the diseases. Ayurveda is a system of health science which not only includes the knowledge of body and diseases but also includes the way of living healthy i.e., "Swastha". The concept of Maana-Pramana is one of the significant contributions of Ayurveda. This study was undertaken to evaluate the Charakokta Sutra (verse) which implies that "Height (Aayama) of human being is 84 fingers (Anguli) and is equal to Arm Span (Vistaara)". In the present study, anthropometric measurements by finger were taken and exact site of particular finger in a manner to execute "Anguli Sthana Nishchiti" was determined. The data of Aayama and Vistaara of the 100 volunteers was recorded and statistically analysed. After comparing the Anguli Pramana (Measurement through finger) obtained at 78 different sites of both hands, it was established that measurement of Anguli Pramana at the site of medio-lateral proximal interphalangeal joint of middle finger of right and left hand, would be most accurate in estimating Anguli Pramana. PMID:24696571

  5. The levator syndrome and its variant.

    PubMed

    Salvati, E P

    1987-03-01

    The levator syndrome is an entity characterized by pain high in the rectal area that can be elicited by pressure applied to the levator ani. The etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of this disorder are described. Its importance lies in its misdiagnosis or in the failure to diagnose. PMID:3298056

  6. Levator syndrome. A treatment that works.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, J F; Abcarian, H

    1985-06-01

    Forty-five patients with levator syndrome were treated by high voltage electrogalvanic stimulation of the levator ani by means of an intra-anal probe. Voltage varied from 150 to 400 volts, depending on patient tolerance. Negative electrodes and 80 cycles per second were used for 20 minutes every other day. An average of five treatments was needed for complete pain relief. Excellent results (total pain relief) were obtained in 36 patients, good results in five, fair results in two, and poor results (no relief) in two. High voltage electrogalvanic stimulation is the treatment of choice for levator syndrome because it can be standardized, is well tolerated, and is over 90 percent effective. PMID:3874049

  7. Evaluation of the levator ani and pelvic wall muscles in levator ani syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hull, Margaret; Corton, Marlene M

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a difficult problem to evaluate and treat. Knowledge of the pelvic floor and pelvic wall muscles may enable the provider to identify levator ani spasm syndrome, a possible cause of chronic pelvic pain. PMID:19718937

  8. Blepharoptosis correction: repositioning the levator aponeurosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il Jae; Park, Myong Chul; Lim, Hyoseob; Kim, Joo Hyoung; Lee, Seung Hun

    2011-11-01

    Blepharoplasty remains one of the most popular surgical procedures in Asia. The most common patient complaint leading to a blepharoplasty is limited eye opening causing a narrowing of the palpebral fissure. The typical Asian eye is characterized by puffiness, lack of a supratarsal fold in the upper eyelid, and a narrow palpebral fissure, exhibiting a tired and sleepy appearance. Almost all such patients believe that a simple double-eyelid operation is able to make the eye look bigger with eversion of the eyelashes into a more charming configuration. Some of these patients actually have mild to moderate blepharoptosis, which can present both functional and aesthetic problems. Numerous surgical procedures have been developed to correct ptosis because proper correction can be difficult to achieve. The authors found abnormal lateral deviation of the levator aponeurosis in patients with blepharoptosis and suggest that this abnormality is a major cause of blepharoptosis, particularly in Asians. The authors assessed the effectiveness of a levator aponeurosis medial repositioning technique rather than levator resection or levator plication for mild or moderate ptosis. No disadvantage was attributed to this technique when it was used to correct 87 patients with mild ptosis. Eighty of the 87 patients achieved a good result with the first operation. Undercorrection was observed in 6 patients, and a hematoma was corrected in 1 patient. However, no other major complications related to the technique were encountered. Herein the authors describe their operative technique and present the long-term follow-up results. The authors propose that anatomic repositioning of a laterally deviated levator aponeurosis using the described repositioning technique is highly effective for correcting mild ptosis and can be applied during most surgical blepharoptosis procedures in Asian patients. PMID:22075834

  9. Study of the levator ani muscle in the multipara: role of levator dysfunction in defecation disorders.

    PubMed

    Shafik, A; El-Sibai, O

    2002-03-01

    The levator ani muscle (LAM) shares in the mechanism of defecation and urination as well as in visceral support. Levator dysfunction occurs in conditions of chronic straining or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Studies have shown that the gravid uterus, by virtue of its weight and associated increased intraabdominal pressure, might disturb the levator function. It is postulated that this effect is augmented with repeated pregnancies. The current study investigated the functional activity of the LAM in 50 multipara, 30 primipara and 20 nullipara (controls). The 50 multipara (age 46.4 years, 4-7 deliveries) were divided into group A (28 women with normal deliveries) and group B (22 women with a prolonged 2nd stage of labour). Of the 30 primipara (age 44.2 years) 18 had normal delivery (group A) and 12 prolonged 2nd stage of labour (group B). The mean age of the nullipara was 45.3+/-7.6. The LAM activity at rest and on contraction was recorded. The rectal and anal canal pressure response to LAM stimulation was also registered. In group A of the multipara, the LAM EMG activity at rest was similar to (P>0.05), and on contraction lower (P<0.05) than the LAM EMG of the controls (nullipara). Group B exhibited a lower activity at rest and on contraction (P<0.01, both). Primipara group A had a resting and contractile EMG activity similar to the controls, while group B showed diminished activity in both conditions (P<0.05, both) which was significantly higher (P<0.05, P<0.01, respectively) than that of group B multipara. The rectal pressure in the multipara and primipara did not differ from the nullipara (P>0.05, both). In groups A and B of multiparous women, the anal canal pressure at rest was significantly lower and on LAM contraction significantly higher than that of nullipara. Group A of the primipara showed no significant difference against the controls, while group B exhibited a decline at rest (P<0.05) and no difference on LAM contraction (P>0.05). In conclusion, levator dysfunction might occur in the parous women. It was more common in the multipara than the primipara and in particular those with a history of a prolonged 2nd stage of labour. Levator dysfunction may lead to constipation and faecal or urinary incontinence as a result of pudendal neuropathy and the development of pudendal canal syndrome. PMID:12521706

  10. Minimal incision posterior approach levator plication for aponeurotic ptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, D S; Chan, E; Ko, S T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the efficacy and predictability of a minimal incision posterior approach levator plication technique for correction of involutional ptosis. Method Retrospective chart review of patients with involutional aponeurotic ptosis underwent minimal incision posterior approach levator plication technique between August 2013 and June 2014 by a single surgeon. The upper lid was double everted, and the conjunctiva and Muller's muscle layers were incised vertically until the levator aponeurosis could be identified. The incision(s) was similar to performing incision and curettage of chalazion, except that the site was above the tarsal plate and extended towards the fornix. Then insertion of aponeurosis was dissected away from the anterior tarsal surface, and the more superiorly located levator was plicated on it with double arm suture(s). No tissue was excised in this procedure. Surgical success was defined as a postoperative margin reflex distance (MRD)>2 mm and<4.5 mm, interlid height<1 mm and satisfactory contour. Results Forty-four lids of 27 patients were included. Preoperative mean MRD was 0.48 +/− 0.56 mm. Severe ptosis of MRD<1 mm was present in 34/44 patients (77.3%). The postoperative mean MRD was 2.49 +/− 0.53 mm, and mean improvement was 2.02 +/− 0.61 mm, which was statistically significant (P<0.001). The overall success rate was 38/44 (86.4%). Conclusions Minimal incision posterior approach to levator plication was effective for the correction of aponeurotic ptosis with moderate to good levator function. PMID:25613849

  11. The Levator Claviculae Muscle Presenting as a Neck Mass.

    PubMed

    Schlarb, Haley C; Williams, Daniel W; Schlarb, Alexander C; Judhan, Rudy; Schlarb, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    The levator claviculae muscle is an uncommonly encountered muscle variant, occurring in 1% to 2% of the human population. Most accounts of the levator claviculae muscle have been reported in association with routine cadaveric examination and as an incidental finding by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We report a case of this variant muscle presenting as a soft-tissue mass within the neck of a young male. Furthermore, we discuss the embryologic origin, imaging features and clinical implication. PMID:27025118

  12. An anatomical study of the junction of the orbital septum and the levator aponeurosis in Orientals.

    PubMed

    Hwang, K; Kim, D J; Chung, R S; Lee, S I; Hiraga, Y

    1998-12-01

    The anatomical relationships of the orbital septum and levator aponeurosis has been studied in 40 eyelids subjected to blepharoplasty and corrective ptosis surgery by dissection in 10 cadavers and in histological sections. The orbital septum originates from the arcus marginalis of the frontal bone and consists of two layers. The whitish outer (superficial) layer, containing vertically running vessels, descends just inside the orbicularis oculi muscle to interdigitate with the levator aponeurosis with loose connective tissue, then disperses inferiorly. The inner (deep) layer follows the superficial one initially, then reflects at the levator aponeurosis and continues posteriorly with the levator sheath. We reconfirmed Whitnall's original description that the levator sheath thickens to form the superior transverse ligament runs continuously inferiorly anterior to the levator aponeurosis and forms the inner layer of the orbital septum. This detailed anatomical analysis should assist in performing upper eyelid surgery such as the Oriental double fold operation or levator resection. PMID:10209461

  13. Unusual origin of the levator scapulae muscle from mastoid process.

    PubMed

    Chotai, Pranit N; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2015-12-01

    Anatomic variations of the neck musculature are uncommon and incidentally found during cadaveric dissection. The levator scapulae muscle is found in the floor of the posterior cervical triangle. It connects the axial skeleton with the superior appendicular skeleton and acts as a scapular elevator. Normally, it originates from the transverse processes of first four cervical vertebrae and inserts into the superomedial border of the scapula. During a routine cadaveric dissection, we encountered an additional slip of the left levator scapulae originating from the left mastoid process. This muscle is frequently implicated in the etiopathology of neck and shoulder pain. Knowledge of this variation is not only interesting to anatomists, but also to surgeons operating on the posterior neck and physicians managing patients with cervical or shoulder pain. PMID:26074045

  14. Levator ani deformation during the second stage of labour.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Mario; Martinez-Romero, Oscar; Elías-Zúñiga, Alex; Rodríguez, Mauricio; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Fiorentino, Antonio; Donzella, Giorgio; Avanzini, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    A very important medical problem for females is urinary incontinence, sometimes associated with faecal incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. One of the most common reasons these issues are increasing is clearly the muscle damage during childbirth. This article focusses on understanding the complex behaviour of the levator ani muscles involved in the second stage of labour. A geometrical model obtained from a 23-year-old nulliparous woman was used to simulate childbirth. Several assumptions were introduced in order to simplify the problem without significantly affecting the global response of the system. An anisotropic hyperelastic model was used to characterize the material behaviour; the muscle fibres were assumed to be mostly orientated circumferentially. In addition, particular attention was also put to the boundary conditions of the model. The introduction of the constraints imposed by the coccyx bone in the central area of the levator ani group represents one the most important improvement compared to previous computational models. The maximum deformation and stress were found in the pubococcygeus muscle of the levator ani group. A stretch value close to 2.2 was determined by considering different material parameters. The results seem convincing with respect to medical observation and previous analysis. However, there are still some limitations concerning the material definition and the geometry and trajectory of the head that can be further improved. PMID:24793220

  15. The anterior fibres of the levator ani muscle in man.

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, S F

    1979-01-01

    The anatomy of the anterior portion of the levator ani muscle in studied in 26 adult human cadavers of both sexes. This portion of the muscle is found to consist of three layers of muscle fibres. The three layers are: 1. The pelvic layer. Its fibres (1) are attached to the capsule of the prostate or adventitia of the lateral wall of vagina, (2) intermingle with and supplement the longitudinal muscle layer of the anal canal, and (3) are continuous with the fibres of the opposite side behind the recto-anal junction. 2. The middle layer. The most anterior fibres are twisted on themselves to form the round free border of the muscle that bounds the levator hiatus. The majority of the muscle fibres of this layer proceed backwards to cover and blend with the deep part of the external anal shincter, partly joining the anococcygeal ligament. 3. The perineal layer. These fibres surround the superficial part of the external anal sphincter. A respectable bundle of muscles fibres unites with that of the opposite side in from of the lower part of the anal canal. Remaining fibres terminate in perianal skin or anococcygeal ligament. The role of the anterior portion of the levator ani in fixation and prevention of prolapse of the pelvic viscera is stressed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:468708

  16. Sexual dimorphism of the levator veli palatini muscle: an imaging study.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jamie L; Kuehn, David P; Sutton, Bradley P; Gamage, Jinadasa K

    2014-09-01

    Objective : Magnetic resonance imaging studies of the levator veli palatini muscle have used small numbers of subjects and have not consistently controlled for sex, race, or age. The purpose of this study was to conduct a structural assessment using a large homogeneous sample to examine the sex differences in the levator muscle morphology. Methods : Thirty white adult subjects (15 men and 15 women) were imaged using a 3 Tesla MRI system. A high-resolution SPACE (sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolution) sequence was used to acquire images of the velopharyngeal anatomy. Levator muscle measurements were obtained. Results : Men displayed significantly greater levator extravelar segment length (P = .003), levator intravelar segment muscle length (P < .001), greater distance between levator insertion points (P < .001), and greater angles of origin (P = .008) compared with women. There was no statistically significant variation between men and women in the distance between points of origin at the base of the skull. Conclusions : This study provides normative data to improve understanding of levator dysmorphology such as that in cleft palate muscle anatomy. Results of the study demonstrate significant differences between white men and women across several levator muscle measures. Variations in the relative size of the cranium or height of the individual were not proportionate to the variations observed in the levator muscle. PMID:23782419

  17. [Treatment of levator ani syndrome: update and future developments].

    PubMed

    Chiarioni, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    Chronic proctalgia is defined by chronic or recurrent episodes of rectal pain or aching lasting at least 20 minutes in the absence of structural or systemic disease explanation for the pain syndrome. Digital rectal examination distinguishes between levator ani syndrome where the patient reports tenderness on palpation of the pubo-rectalis muscle and unspecified functional anorectal pain where no pain can be elicited. There is no consensus on its etiology, but chronic tension of the pelvic floor muscles is the most common view. Diagnosis is focused on excluding organic diseases potentially responsible for the pain. A number of small sized, non-controlled trials have evaluated different treatments for chronic proctalgia with frustrating results for both patients and physicians. A recent well designed, prospective, randomized, controlled trial has evaluated the three most commonly prescribed treatments to relax pelvic floor muscles in chronic proctalgia: biofeedback, electrogalvanic stimulations and digital massage of the levator ani. The study has provided unequivocal evidence that biofeedback is effective treatment for chronic proctalgia, but its efficacy is limited to levator ani syndrome. In these patients a paradoxical contraction of the pelvic floor muscles on attempted defecation has been documented in most cases and its therapeutic reversal do correlate with clinical benefit. Similar data have been also reported in constipation secondary to obstructed defecation. Electrogalvanic stimulation is somewhat effective and may be considered where high biofeedback expertise is not available. No treatment has been proven effective in unspecified functional anorectal pain where analgesic and antidepressant drugs retain a role in the absence of randomized, controlled trials. PMID:21607003

  18. Prolonged Second Stage of Labor and Levator Ani Muscle Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Marsoosi, Vajihe; Jamal, Ashraf; Eslamian, Laleh; Oveisi, Sonia; Abotorabi, Shokohossadat

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of pregnancy and vaginal delivery on the pelvic floor and levatorani morphology and function. Methods: Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. Tertiary care teaching hospital. Population. 75 primigravid women were recruited for assessment at 6 weeks postpartum compared with 25 nulliparous women. Hiatal morphology and levator ani muscle avulsion were assessed by 4-dimensional translabial ultrasound examination. The volume achievement obtained by ultrasound was performed in supine position with empty bladder at rest, on maximum Valsalva maneuver, and on maximum pelvic floor muscle contraction. Main Outcome Measures. Hiatal diameter and area were measured at the plane of minimal hiatal dimension as defined in the midsagittal plane and Levator avulsion was assessed. Results: There were significant differences in hiatal area morphology at rest, on Valsalva maneuver and during contraction of muscles among the study groups, but there was no difference in pelvic diameter at rest, on Valsalva maneuver, and during contraction. There were 21 cases of puborectalis avulsion (42%) with no significant difference between non-progressive labor (8 cases) and Normal Vaginal Delivery (NVD) (13 cases) groups. Conclusions: The results of the present study showed that non-progressive labor is the main risk factor for pelvic muscle injuries, indicating the necessity of a better management and timely cesareans in women with prolonged second stage of labor. PMID:25560352

  19. A case of atypical insertion of the levator scapulae.

    PubMed

    Loukas, M; Louis, R G; Merbs, W

    2006-08-01

    Anatomical variations in the musculature of the spine have the potential to cause functional and postural abnormalities, which in turn could lead to chronic myofascial and skeletal pain. We present a unilateral case of a 71-year-old Caucasian female in which the left levator scapulae muscle gave rise to an accessory head that inserted, by way of a flat aponeurotic band, to the ligamentum nuchae, the tendon of the rhomboideus major and the superior aspect of the serratus posterior superior muscle. The innervation was provided by a branch of the dorsal scapular nerve. By exerting unilateral traction on the vertebrae and surrounding musculature, this unusual variation might have resulted in clinical consequences including scoliosis and movement abnormalities of the head and neck as well as myofascial pain syndrome. PMID:16988922

  20. Fine mapping of replication origins (ori A and ori B) in Nicotiana tabacum chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kunnimalaiyaan, M; Nielsen, B L

    1997-01-01

    Using a partially purified replication complex from tobacco chloroplasts, replication origins have been localized to minimal sequences of 82 (pKN8, positions 137 683-137 764) and 243 bp (pKN3, positions 130 513-130 755) for ori A and ori B respectively. Analysis of in vitro replication products by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis showed simple Y patterns for single ori sequence-containing clones, indicative of rolling circle replication. Double Y patterns were observed when a chloroplast DNA template containing both ori s (pKN9) was tested. Dpn I analysis and control assays with Escherichia coli DNA polymerase provide a clear method to distinguish between true replication and DNA repair synthesis. These controls also support the reliability of this in vitro chloroplast DNA replication system. EM analysis of in vitro replicated products showed rolling circle replication intermediates for single ori clones (ori A or ori B), whereas D loops were observed for a clone (pKN9) containing both ori s. The minimal ori regions contain sequences which are capable of forming stem-loop structures with relatively high free energy and other sequences which interact with specific protein(s) from the chloroplast replication fraction. Apparently the minimal ori sequences reported here contain all the necessary elements for support of chloroplast DNA replication in vitro. PMID:9278490

  1. Blepharoptosis correction by excision of levator muscle and tarsus in Asians.

    PubMed

    Tianyi, Liu; Haiyan, Shen; Fei, Liu; Qun, Yang; Yunliang, Qian; Jiasheng, Dong; Jun, Yang

    2010-05-01

    To establish a technique for moderate and severe blepharoptosis to exert the function of residual levator muscle, 30 patients (38 eyes) who had moderate and severe blepharoptosis were treated, and the results including complications were followed up and valued. Operation was performed via anterior transcutaneous incision. After separating levator muscle and tarsus, the amount excision of levator muscle and tarsus was accurately estimated. Part of levator muscle associated with tarsus was excised. The position and contour of the upper lid margin, uncovering of the pupils, and symmetry of the palpebral fissures were assessed. Incidence of postoperative complications, including infection, was also considered. Among the 38 eyes, all had a good or fair outcome except for 2 eyes. Eyelid was raised to normal level by this technique with a natural eyelid contour. Some cases presented slight neuropathies in the early stage after operation. We concluded that excision of levator muscle and tarsus could be applied to correct moderate and severe blepharoptosis with some residual levator function, which could achieve good aesthetic results ultimately. PMID:20485024

  2. Delayed synapse elimination in mouse levator palpebrae superioris muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Michael A.; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Lichtman, Jeff W.

    2012-01-01

    At birth, synaptic sites in developing rodent muscles are innervated by numerous motor axons. During subsequent weeks, this multiple innervation disappears as one terminal strengthens and all the others are eliminated. Experimental perturbations that alter neuromuscular activity affect the rate of synaptic refinement with more activity accelerating the time to single innervation and neuromuscular blockade retarding it. But it remains unclear whether patterns of muscle use (driven by endogenous neuronal activity) contribute to the rate of synapse elimination. For this reason we examined the timing of supernumerary nerve terminal elimination at synapses in extraocular muscles (EOMs), a specialized set of muscles that control eye movements. On the basis of their exceptionally high patterns of activity, we hypothesized that synaptic refinement would be greatly accelerated at these synapses. We found, however, that rates of synaptic refinement were only modestly accelerated in rectus and oblique EOMs compared with synapses in somite-derived skeletal muscle. In contrast to these results, we observed a dramatic delay in the elimination of supernumerary nerve terminals from synapses in the levator palpebrae superioris (LPS) muscle, a specialized EOM that initiates and maintains eye-lid elevation. In mice, natural eye-opening occurs at the end of the second postnatal week of development. Thus, while synapse elimination is occurring in most EOMs and somite-derived skeletal muscles it appears dramatically delayed in a set of specialized eyelid muscles that remain immobile during early postnatal development. PMID:21681746

  3. Mild dystrophic damage in the androgen-sensitive levator ani muscle of the mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Souccar, Caden; Gonçalo, Maria Do Carmo; Buck, Hudson De Sousa; Lima-Landman, Maria Teresa R; Lapa, Antonio José

    2005-01-01

    The time course of muscular dystrophy on the androgen-sensitive levator ani muscle was compared to that of the diaphragm of dystrophic (mdx) mice aged 1-20 months. Muscle growth, isometric contractile properties and caffeine-induced contractures were determined to assess the hormone myotrophic effect, muscle strength and sarcoplasmic reticulum function, respectively, of both control and dystrophic muscles. Histological analysis of mdx muscles showed variable fiber size, centronucleated cells, infiltration of connective tissue, and necrosis which was less severe in the levator ani than in the diaphragm muscle. Tetanic tension per unit weight in the mdx levator ani was reduced (29%) after aging, while the contraction time remained unchanged. The tetanic tension of the mdx diaphragm muscle decreased with age from 3 to 20 months (20-64%), and the relaxation time was prolonged after aging (22%). Gonadectomy of young adult mdx mice caused atrophy of the levator ani muscle, accelerated muscle wasting, reduced the tetanic force (31%), but it did not affect the contraction time and caffeine responses. The results showed that testosterone does not prevent the progress of muscle disease in the mdx levator ani, but androgen withdrawal accelerates muscle wasting suggesting a normonal beneficial effect. PMID:15639121

  4. Androgen-estrogen synergy in rat levator ani muscle Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of castration and hormone administration on the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the rat levator ani muscle were studied. Castration caused a decrease in enzyme activity and in wet weight of the levator ani muscle. Chronic administration of testosterone propionate increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the levator ani muscle of castrated rats; the magnitude of the recovery of enzyme activity was related to the length of time of exposure to testosterone propionate after castration as well as to the length of time the animals were castrated. The longer the period of castration before exposure to testosterone propionate, the greater the effect. This result may be related to previously reported castration-mediated increases in androgen receptor binding in muscle. Dihydrotestosterone was less effective than testosterone propionate in enhancing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the levator ani muscle from castrated rats; estradiol-17-beta alone was ineffective. Combined treatment with estradiol-17-beta and dihydrotestosterone, however, was as effective as testosterone alone. Thus, androgens and estrogens may exert synergistic effects on levator ani muscle.

  5. Influences of swallowing volume and viscosity on regulation of levator veli palatini muscle activity during swallowing.

    PubMed

    Okuno, K; Tachimura, T; Sakai, T

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the aspect of the regulation of velum movement in the transition from the oral to pharyngeal phases of swallowing in relation to changes in the swallowing volume and viscosity by means of measurment of levator veli palatini muscle activity. The subjects were nine normal adults, ranging in age from 24 to 30 years. The swallowing volume was set at 1/4, 1/2 and 1 volume of the optimum volume of green tea for swallowing determined in each subject, and the viscosity was adjusted to 0, 2·0 and 4·6 Pa·s by mixing with thickener. Nine test foods were prepared in total. The electromyographic activity of the levator veli palatini muscle was monitored using bipolar hooked wire electrodes. The levator veli palatini muscle activity was defined as the integrated electromyographic wave. The mean in swallowing each test food was determined in each subject. The levator veli palatini muscle activity increased with the swallowing volume for all subjects (P < 0·05) and decreased inversely with the viscosity for six subjects (P < 0·05), but no change with the increase in the viscosity was noted for three subjects. This study clarified the aspect of the regulation of velar movement with regard to the involvement of the levator veli palatini muscle in swallowing activity with changes in the swallowing volume and viscosity. PMID:23692071

  6. [Anatomy of the levator ani muscle and implications for obstetrics and gynaecology].

    PubMed

    Nyangoh Timoh, K; Bessede, T; Zaitouna, M; Peschaud, F; Chevallier, J-M; Fauconnier, A; Benoit, G; Moszkowicz, D

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders include urogenital and anorectal prolapse, urinary and faecal incontinence. These diseases affect 25% of patients. Most of time, treatment is primarily surgical with a high post-operative risk of recurrence, especially for pelvic organ prolapse. Vaginal delivery is the major risk factor for pelvic floor disorders through levator ani muscle injury or nerve damage. After vaginal delivery, 20% of patients experiment elevator ani trauma. These injuries are more common in case of instrumental delivery by forceps, prolonged second phase labor, increased neonatal head circumference and associated anal sphincter injuries. Moreover, 25% of patients have temporary perineal neuropathy. Recently, pelvic three-dimensional reconstructions from RMI data allowed a better understanding of detailed levator ani muscle morphology and gave birth to a clear new nomenclature describing this muscle complex to be developed. Radiologic and anatomic studies have allowed exploring levator ani innervation leading to speculate on the muscle and nerve damage mechanisms during delivery. We then reviewed the levator ani muscle anatomy and innervation to better understand pelvic floor dysfunction observed after vaginal delivery. PMID:25544728

  7. Pelvic Floor Ultrasound Imaging: Are Physiotherapists Interchangeable in the Assessment of Levator Hiatal Biometry?

    PubMed Central

    Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; Auchincloss, Cindy; McLean, Linda

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate inter-examiner reliability in the ultrasound (US) assessment of levator hiatal dimensions when different physiotherapists perform independent data acquisition and analysis. Methods: In this cross-sectional observational study, 14 asymptomatic nulliparous women were imaged at rest, during pelvic floor muscle contraction, and during Valsalva manoeuvre by two physiotherapists using three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) transperineal US. Examiners each measured the dimensions of the levator hiatus (area and antero-posterior and transverse diameters) from the US volumes they respectively acquired. Inter-examiner reliability was determined using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs), and inter-examiner agreement was determined using Bland–Altman analyses. Results: The ICC results demonstrated very good inter-examiner reliability (ICC=0.84–0.98); Bland–Altman results showed high inter-examiner agreement across all measurements. Conclusions: Trained examiners may be considered interchangeable in the US assessment of levator hiatal biometry. Overall, trained physiotherapists using transperineal US imaging to assess levator hiatal biometry can be confident when comparing their own clinical findings to those of their colleagues and to findings published in the literature. PMID:25922555

  8. Anorectal pain and irritation: anal fissure, levator syndrome, proctalgia fugax, and pruritus ani.

    PubMed

    Vincent, C

    1999-03-01

    Anal fissures, proctalgia fugax, levator ani syndrome, and pruritus ani are common causes of anorectal pain and irritation. The clinician who obtains a thorough history and performs a complete examination can accurately diagnose these disorders. Ancillary tests seldom are helpful and rarely are necessary. Most patients suffering from these conditions readily respond to conservative therapy provided in the primary care practitioner's office. PMID:9922294

  9. Variation of the Infrahyoid Muscle: Duplicated Omohyoid and Appearance of the Levator Glandulae Thyroideae Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-Im; Kim, Ho-Jeong; Park, Jae-Young

    2010-01-01

    The embryologic origin of the omohyoid muscle is different from that of the other neck muscles. A number of variations such as the absence of muscle, variable sites of origin and insertion, and multiple bellies have been reported. However, variations in the inferior belly of the omohyoid muscle are rare. There have been no reports of the combined occurrence of the omohyoid muscle variation with the appearance of the levator glandulase thyroideae muscle. Routine dissection of a 51-year-old female cadaver revealed a duplicated omohyoid muscle and the appearance of the levator glandulae thyroideae muscle. In this case, the two inferior bellies of the omohyoid muscle were found to originate inferiorly from the superior border of the scapula. One of the inferior bellies generally continued to the superior belly with the tendinous intersection. The other inferior belly continued into the sternohyoid muscle without the tendinous intersection. In this case, the levator glandulae thyroideae muscle appeared on the left side, which attached from the upper border of the thyroid gland to the inferior border of the thyroid cartilage. These variations are significant for clinicians during endoscopic diagnosis and surgery because of the arterial and nervous damage due to iatrogenic injuries. The embryologic origins of the omohyoid and levator glandulae thyroideae muscles may be similar based on the descriptions in the relevant literature. PMID:20879073

  10. Morphology of the Levator Veli Palatini Muscle Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Jamie L.; Kuehn, David P.; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2015-01-01

    Background No studies have reported the circumference and diameter of the levator veli palatini muscle at multiple points along its length and from both views (frontal and lateral). The purpose of this study was to provide quantitative data regarding the levator muscle morphology along the length of the muscle using magnetic resonance imaging and advanced three-dimensional computer technology. Methods Ten Caucasian male subjects participated in the study. Subjects were scanned using a Siemens 3 T Trio. Levator muscle measures were obtained using a two-dimensional image plane. A three-dimensional model was used to measure the circumference and muscle diameter (in two directions) at six points along the length of the levator muscle. Results Levator muscle length ranged from 41.67 mm to 52.85 mm across all subjects. Mean extravelar muscle length was 30.55 mm (SD, 2.8 mm) and 30.01 mm (SD, 2.9 mm) for right and left muscles. The mean circumference at the origin was 18.90 mm (SD, 2.6 mm). At the second point, the muscle circumference mean increased slightly (mean, 22.40 mm; SD, 4.9 mm). The means for the remainder of the measures (points 3, 4, 5, and 6) were consistent, showing little to no change. Conclusion Circumference and diameter values were similar to those reported in previous literature. The muscle did diverge at the point where the muscle bundle entered the velum, as it has been previously described. Instead, the muscle diverges near the midline insertion becoming sparser (smaller superior-to-inferior diameter). PMID:22023112

  11. [Isaac Newton's Anguli Contactus method].

    PubMed

    Wawrzycki, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the geometrical method for calculating the curvature of a class of curves from the third Book of Isaac Newton's Principia. The method involves any curve which is generated from an elementary curve (actually from any curve whose curvature we known of) by means of transformation increasing the polar angular coordinate in a constant ratio, but unchanging the polar radial angular coordinate. PMID:25033525

  12. Modified lip repositioning: A surgical approach to treat the gummy smile.

    PubMed

    Rao, Aditya Gopinath; Koganti, Vijay Prasad; Prabhakar, Ashok Kodangala; Soni, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Gummy smile has been an esthetic concern for many patients. This clinical report describes a successful surgical coverage obtained by modified lip repositioning, thus surgically treating the gummy smile. The technique was performed to limit the retraction of elevator muscles (e.g., zygomaticus minor, orbicularis oris, leviator anguli oris and levator labi oris.) The technique is fulfilled by removing two strips of mucosa from maxillary buccal vestibule on both the sides leaving the frenum untouched and creating a partial thickness flap between mucogingival junction and upper lip musculature, and suturing the lip mucosa with mucogingival junction, resulting in a narrow vestibule and restricted muscle pull, thereby reducing gingival display. This technique is different from the conventional surgical lip repositioning as labial frenum is left untouched over here as it helps in maintain Litton the midline for lip repositioning and reduces the morbidity associated with it. PMID:26229285

  13. The circumstellar environment of UX ORI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natta, A.; Prusti, T.; Neri, R.; Thi, W. F.; Grinin, V. P.; Mannings, V.

    1999-10-01

    This paper presents new observations of UX Ori obtained with the millimeter interferometer of Plateau de Bure and with ISO. UX Ori is the prototype of a group of pre-main-sequence, intermediate-mass stars, often indicated as precursors of beta Pic. The interferometry observations at 1.2 and 2.6 mm show that UX Ori has a circumstellar disk, with outer radius ~ less 100 AU. We determine the spectral index between these two wavelengths to be 2.1+/-0.2, consistent with the disk being optically thick at mm wavelengths. Alternatively, the disk solid matter can be in the form of ``pebbles" (radius ~ 10 cm). In both cases most of the disk mass must be in gas form, and small grains must be present, at least in the disk atmosphere. In both cases also, the disk must be rather massive ( ~ great 0.1 M_sun). The existence of a circumstellar disk supports the model of the UXOR phenomenon in terms of a star+disk system. Self-consistent models of almost edge-on disks account well for the observed emission at all wavelengths longer than about 8mu m, if we include the emission of the optically thin, superheated layers that enshroud the disk. These rather simple disk models fail to account for the strong emission observed in the near-IR (i.e., between ~ 2 and 7 mu m), and we suggest a number of possible explanations. Based in part on observations obtained with ISO. ISO is an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  14. A Geometric Capacity-Demand Analysis of Maternal Levator Muscle Stretch Required for Vaginal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Paige V; DeLancey, John O; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2016-02-01

    Because levator ani (LA) muscle injuries occur in approximately 13% of all vaginal births, insights are needed to better prevent them. In Part I of this paper, we conducted an analysis of the bony and soft tissue factors contributing to the geometric "capacity" of the maternal pelvis and pelvic floor to deliver a fetal head without incurring stretch injury of the maternal soft tissue. In Part II, we quantified the range in demand, represented by the variation in fetal head size and shape, placed on the maternal pelvic floor. In Part III, we analyzed the capacity-to-demand geometric ratio, g, in order to determine whether a mother can deliver a head of given size without stretch injury. The results of a Part I sensitivity analysis showed that initial soft tissue loop length (SL) had the greatest effect on maternal capacity, followed by the length of the soft tissue loop above the inferior pubic rami at ultimate crowning, then subpubic arch angle (SPAA) and head size, and finally the levator origin separation distance. We found the more caudal origin of the puborectal portion of the levator muscle helps to protect it from the stretch injuries commonly observed in the pubovisceral portion. Part II fetal head molding index (MI) and fetal head size revealed fetal head circumference values ranging from 253 to 351 mm, which would increase up to 11 mm upon face presentation. The Part III capacity-demand analysis of g revealed that, based on geometry alone, the 10th percentile maternal capacity predicted injury for all head sizes, the 25th percentile maternal capacity could deliver half of all head sizes, while the 50th percentile maternal capacity could deliver a head of any size without injury. If ultrasound imaging could be operationalized to make measurements of ratio g, it might be used to usefully inform women on their level of risk for levator injury during vaginal birth. PMID:26746116

  15. Evidence of ancillary trigeminal innervation of levator palpebrae in the general population.

    PubMed

    Lehman, A M; Dong, C C; Harries, A M; Patel, A; Honey, C R; Patel, M S

    2014-02-01

    The cranial synkineses are a group of disorders encompassing a variety of involuntary co-contractions of the facial, masticatory, or extraocular muscles that occur during a particular volitional movement. The neuroanatomical pathways for synkineses largely remain undefined. Our studies explored a normal synkinesis long observed in the general population - that of jaw opening during efforts to open the eyelids widely. To document this phenomenon, we observed 186 consecutive participants inserting or removing contact lenses to identify jaw opening. Seeking electrophysiological evidence, in a second study we enrolled individuals undergoing vascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm, without a history of jaw-winking, ptosis, or strabismus, to record any motor responses in levator palpebrae superioris (LPS) upon stimulation of the trigeminal motor root. Stimulus was applied to the trigeminal motor root while an electrode in levator recorded the response. We found that 37 participants (20%) opened their mouth partially or fully during contact lens manipulation. In the second study, contraction of LPS with trigeminal motor stimulation was documented in two of six patients, both undergoing surgery for trigeminal neuralgia. We speculate these results might provide evidence of an endogenous synkinesis, indicating that trigeminal-derived innervation of levator could exist in a significant minority of the general population. Our observations demonstrate plasticity in the human cranial nerve innervation pattern and may have implications for treating Marcus Gunn jaw-winking. PMID:24120706

  16. The role of the levator ani muscle in evacuation, sexual performance and pelvic floor disorders.

    PubMed

    Shafik, A

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of the levator ani muscle (LAM) in evacuation, sexual performance and pelvic floor disorders. The LAM fixes the vesical neck, anorectal junction and vaginal fornices to the side wall of the pelvis by means of the suspensory sling and hiatal ligament. On contraction it shares in the mechanism of evacuation (urination, defecation). During the sexual act vaginal distension by the erect penis evokes the vaginolevator and vaginopuborectalis reflexes, with a resulting LAM contraction. The LAM also contracts upon stimulation of the clitoris or cervix uteri, an action mediated through clitoromotor and cervicomotor reflexes. LAM contraction leads to upper vagina ballooning, which acts as receptacle for semen collection, to uterine elevation and straightening and to elongation and narrowing of the vagina. These actions enhance the sexual response and prepare the uterus and vagina for the reproductive process. During ejaculation LAM contraction facilitates semen ejection. Levator subluxation and sagging leads to levator dysfunction syndrome, which may present as pudendal canal syndrome. PMID:11147745

  17. A possible role for endogenous glucocorticoids in orchiectomy-induced atrophy of the rat levator ani muscle: Studies with RU38486, a potent and selective antiglucocorticoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konagaya, M.; Max, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    RU38486, a potent and selective antiglucocorticoid, was employed to study a possible role for endogenous glucocorticoids in atrophy of the levator ani muscle secondary to castration of male rats. RU38486 was shown to block (3H) triamcinolone acetonide binding to cytosol from levator ani muscle. Daily oral administration of RU38486 to castrated rats partially prevented atrophy of the levator ani muscle, as well as a decrease in RNA concentration. In a control group receiving RU38486 alone, the levator ani underwent significant (20%) hypertrophy. Administration of exogenous dexamethasone also caused pronounced atrophy of the levator ani muscle. This atrophy was prevented, to a significant degree, by simultaneous oral administration of RU38486. It is concluded that endogenous glucocorticoids, the actions of which are blocked by RU38486, may be involved in regulation of the mass of the levator ani muscle in intact rats.

  18. A possible role for endogenous glucocorticoids in orchiectomy-induced atrophy of the rat levator ani muscle - Studies with RU 38486, a potent and selective antiglucocorticoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Max, Stephen R.

    1986-01-01

    RU38486, a potent and selective antiglucocorticoid, was employed to study a possible role for endogenous glucocorticoids in atrophy of the levator ani muscle secondary to castration of male rats. RU38486 was shown to block (3H) triamcinolone acetonide binding to cytosol from levator ani muscle. Daily oral administration of RU38486 to castrated rats partially prevented atrophy of the levator ani muscle, as well as a decrease in RNA concentration. In a control group receiving RU38486 alone, the levator ani underwent significant 20 percent hypertrophy. Administration of exogenous dexamethasone also caused pronounced atrophy of the levator ani muscle. This atrophy was prevented, to a significant degree, by simultaneous oral administration of Ru38486. It is concluded that endogenous glucocorticoids, the actions of which are blocked by RU38486, may be involved in regulation of the mass of the levator ani muscle in intact rats.

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in New Zealand Adults: Prevalence and Risk Factors Among Māori and Non-Māori

    PubMed Central

    Mihaere, Kara M.; Harris, Ricci; Gander, Philippa H.; Reid, Papaarangi M.; Purdie, Gordon; Robson, Bridget; Neill, Alister

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: Examine the distribution of symptoms and risk factors, and estimate the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among Māori and non-Māori New Zealanders. Design: Mail-out survey to a stratified random sample from the electoral roll of 10,000 people aged 30-59 y, and overnight MESAM IV monitoring during sleep of a similarly aged stratified random sample of 364 people from the Wellington electoral roll. Setting: Nationwide survey of OSA symptoms (71% response rate) and regional home-based measurement of respiratory disturbance index (RDI, 4% oxygen desaturations/h of sleep, plus bursts of snoring or ≥ 10/min increase in heart rate). Participants: Sample designs aimed for equal numbers of Māori and non-Māori participants, men and women, and participants in each decade of age. Interventions: N/A Measurements and results: Māori were more likely than non-Māori to report OSAS risk factors and symptoms. After controlling for sex and age, Māori were 4.3 times more likely to have RDI ≥ 15 (95% CI = 1.3–13.9). Ethnicity was not an independent risk factor after controlling for body mass index (BMI) and neck circumference. The prevalence of OSAS (RDI ≥ 5 and ESS > 10) was conservatively estimated to be 4.4% for Māori men, 4.1% for non-Māori men, 2.0% for Māori women, and 0.7% for non-Māori women. Conclusions: The national survey and the regional monitoring study indicate a higher prevalence of OSA among Māori and among men. The higher prevalence among Māori appears to be attributable to recognized risk factors, notably body habitus. In addition to increased prevention and treatment services, strategies are needed to reduce ethnic disparities in OSAS prevalence. Citation: Mihaere KM; Harris R; Gander PH; Reid PM; Purdie G; Robson B; Neill A. Obstructive sleep apnea in New Zealand adults: prevalence and risk factors among māori and non-māori. SLEEP 2009;32(7):949-956. PMID:19639758

  20. 42 CFR 93.402 - ORI allegation assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... involve PHS supported biomedical or behavior research, research training or activities related to that... RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.402 ORI allegation assessments. (a) When ORI receives an allegation of...

  1. 42 CFR 93.402 - ORI allegation assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... involve PHS supported biomedical or behavior research, research training or activities related to that... RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.402 ORI allegation assessments. (a) When ORI receives an allegation of...

  2. 42 CFR 93.402 - ORI allegation assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... involve PHS supported biomedical or behavior research, research training or activities related to that... RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.402 ORI allegation assessments. (a) When ORI receives an allegation of...

  3. 42 CFR 93.402 - ORI allegation assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... involve PHS supported biomedical or behavior research, research training or activities related to that... RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.402 ORI allegation assessments. (a) When ORI receives an allegation of...

  4. 42 CFR 93.402 - ORI allegation assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... involve PHS supported biomedical or behavior research, research training or activities related to that... RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.402 ORI allegation assessments. (a) When ORI receives an allegation of...

  5. Modified technique of levator plication for the correction of Marcus Gunn jaw-winking ptosis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Mandeep Singh; Angmo, Dewang; Pushker, Neelam; Hada, Maya

    2015-08-01

    To conduct a study on ptotic eyelids with Marcus Gunn jaw-winking ptosis operated via a technique of modified levator plication, prospective interventional case series. Ten ptotic eyelids with Marcus Gunn jaw-winking phenomenon (MGJWP) underwent modified levator plication surgery. Postoperatively, all cases were followed up for at least 6 months. Outcome parameters included amount of ptosis correction, amount of MGJWP correction, palpebral aperture height, lid lag, and lagophthalmos. The mean amount of ptosis was 4.25 ± 0.79 mm (range of 3-6 mm), mean amount of MGJWP was 5.10 ± 2.27 mm (range 2-9 mm), and the mean levator function was 8.3 ± 2.27 mm (range of 4-12 mm). At 6 months follow-up, good correction of ptosis was seen in nine out of ten patients. Resolution of MGJWP (≤1 mm of excursion of upper eyelid with synkinetic mouth movement) was seen in three patients. Improvement in MGJWP (>1 mm of excursion of upper eyelid with synkinetic mouth movement) was seen in seven patients. The mean post-operative lagophthalmos was 0.80 ± 0.88 mm. The modified levator plication technique was effective in the treatment of MGJWP. This modified technique of levator plication is anatomically less destructive and hence more acceptable, with the added advantages of less post-operative lagophthalmos and no lid contour defects. PMID:25813374

  6. The magnetic field of the supergiant star ζ Ori A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escolano, C.; Bouret, J.-C.; Donati, J.-F.; Martins, F.; Lanz, T.; Marcolino, W.; Howarth, I.

    2008-11-01

    We present the results obtained on the O9.7 supergiant ζ Ori with the spectropolarimeter NARVAL at the 2M Telescope Bernard Lyot atop Pic du Midi (France). We detected the presence of a weak magnetic field of about 50-100G, making ζ Ori the third O star known to host a magnetic field and the first magnetic O star with a 'normal' rotationnal velocity. The magnetic field of Zeta Ori is the weakest magnetic field ever detected on a massive star and is lower than the thermal equipartition limit (about 100 G). By fitting synthetic spectra (obtained from NLTE stellar atmosphere models), we derived the physical properties of ζ Ori. This lattest is a 40 M_{⊙} star, with a radius of 25 R_{⊙} and appears quite evolved with an age of 5-6Myr. Despite its evolutionnary status, ζ Ori does not show signs of nitrogen surface enrichment. Concerning the wind of ζ Ori, we estimated a mass loss rate of about 2×10^{-6} M_{⊙}.yr^{-1}. The magnetic topology of ζ Ori is apparently more complex than a simple dipole and involves two main magnetic polarities located on both sides of the northern hemisphere. Our data also suggest that ζ Ori rotates in about 7.0 days and is about 40 degrees away from pole-on to an Earth-based observer. Despite its weakness, the detected field appears sufficient to affect significantly the wind structure: the corresponding Alfvén radius is however very close to the surface of the star, thus generating a rotational modulation in wind lines different than that reported on the two other known magnetic O stars. Finally, the rapid rotation of ζ Ori with respect to θ^{1} Ori C is surprising since both stars have similar unsigned magnetic fluxes (once rescaled to the same radius). This may indicate that the field of ζ Ori is not a fossil remnant (as opposed to that of θ^{1} Ori C and HD191612) but rather the result of exotic dynamo processes produced through MHD instabilities.

  7. Breast cancer inequities between Māori and non-Māori women in Aotearoa/New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, R; Seneviratne, S; Scott, N; Peni, T; Brown, C; Campbell, I

    2016-03-01

    ori women have one of the highest incidences of breast cancer in the world. This high incidence is generally unexplained although higher rates of obesity and alcohol intake are modifiable risk factors that may be important. Māori women are less likely to attend mammographic breast screening and are likely to be diagnosed with more advanced disease. This is one of the reasons for the excess mortality. Another factor is differences in the treatment pathway. Māori women are more likely to experience delay in receiving treatment, are less likely to receive radiotherapy, are more likely to be treated with a mastectomy and are less likely to adhere to long-term adjuvant endocrine therapy. However, genetic factors in Māori women do not seem to impact significantly on mortality. This review looks at the inequity between Māori and non-Māori women and addresses the causes. It proposes ways of reducing inequity through primary prevention, increased participation in breast screening and greater standardisation of the treatment pathway for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. We believe that health system improvements will decrease barriers to health care participation for Māori women and suggest that further research into identifying and modifying obstacles within health systems is required. PMID:26918687

  8. Management of morderate-to-severe Marcus-Gunn syndrome by anastomosis of levator and frontal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Nan; Hu, Wei-Kun; Li, Bin; Liu, Rong

    2010-01-01

    AIM To study the effect of clinical management of moderate-to-severe Marcus-Gunn syndrome (MGS) by anastomosis of levator and frontal muscles. METHODS The medical records of 13 patients with moderate-to-severe MGS who underwent surgeries in our institute between 2000 and 2007 were reviewed retrospectively. They underwent unilateral anastomosis of levator and frontal muscles under local anesthesia. RESULTS Postoperative follow-up periods ranged from 6 to 36 months, with an average of 12 months. All eyelids (100%) showed complete resolution of jaw-winking, ten eyelids (76.9%) had good correction of ptosis, with equal plapebral apertures and symmetrical contours, three (23.1%) showed residual mild ptosis (<2mm). CONCLUSION For moderate-to-severe MGS, unilateral anastomosis of levator and frontal muscles provides satisfied correction of jaw-winking and ptosis. PMID:22553588

  9. Possible Reasons for the Slow Rotation of BF Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulman, S. G.

    2016-03-01

    Possible reasons for the very low projected rotation velocity of BF Ori compared to other UX Ori stars are discussed. The hypothesis of a close companion that slows down the star's rotation by a tidal interaction is examined. Based on a theory of synchronization and modern models of evolution, the interaction is calculated numerically for different masses of the companion and values of the semi-major axis. It is shown that in order to obtain the projected velocity observed for BF Ori, the companion must have a mass greater than 0.5M⊙ . Such a large companion should have been discovered observationally. It is suggested that the low rotation velocity of BF Ori is more likely to be related to the distribution of the angular momentum of a protostellar cloud between the angular momentum of the star and the orbital angular momentum of a low-mass companion.

  10. Use of high voltage pulsed galvanic stimulation for patients with levator ani syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morris, L; Newton, R A

    1987-10-01

    Levator ani syndrome is characterized by brief, intermittent pain and discomfort in the perirectal or rectal region that can be aggravated by sitting. Physical therapists are beginning to receive referrals for pain reduction in this patient population. The purpose of the study was to examine the use of high voltage pulsed galvanic stimulation (HVPGS) for reducing symptoms in patients with levator ani syndrome. A descriptive research design was used. Treatment consisted of one hour of HVPGS at a frequency of 120 Hz and at an intensity to the patient's maximum tolerance applied through a rectal probe. Results on 28 patients indicate that 50% had pain or symptom relief, or both, after an average of eight treatments. Those patients who were unresponsive to treatment had a primary diagnosis of irritable colon or were postsurgical. We are continuing to examine this treatment and will conduct follow-up examinations on those patients who obtained pain relief. Based on these preliminary results, we believe that HVPGS is an effective treatment for selected patients in this population. PMID:3310051

  11. In vivo visualization of the levator ani muscle subdivisions using MR fiber tractography with diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rousset, Pascal; Delmas, Vincent; Buy, Jean-Noël; Rahmouni, Alain; Vadrot, Dominique; Deux, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the levator ani complex architecture is of major clinical relevance. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) fiber tractography with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) as a tool for the three-dimensional (3D) representation of normal subdivisions of the levator ani. Ten young nulliparous female volunteers underwent DTI at 1.5 T MR imaging. Diffusion-weighted axial sequence of the pelvic floor was performed with additional T2-weighted multiplanar sequences for anatomical reference. Fiber tractography for visualization of each Terminologia Anatomica-listed major levator ani subdivision was performed. Numeric muscular fibers extracted after tractography were judged as accurate when localized within the boundaries of the muscle, and inaccurate when projecting out of the boundaries of the muscle. From the fiber tracking of each subdivision the number of numeric fibers (inaccurate and accurate) and a score (from 3 to 0) of the adequacy of the 3D representation were calculated. All but two volunteers completed the protocol. The mean number of accurate fibers was 17 ± 2 for the pubovisceralis, 14 ± 6 for the puborectalis and 1 ± 1 for the iliococcygeus. The quality of the 3D representation was judged as good (score = 2) for the pubovisceralis and puborectalis, and inaccurate (score = 0) for the iliococcygeus. Our study is the first step to a 3D visualization of the three major levator ani subdivisions, which could help to better understand their in vivo functional anatomy. PMID:22757638

  12. Comparison of muscle fiber directions between different levator ani muscle subdivisions: in vivo MRI measurements in women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinyong; Miller, Janis M.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; DeLancey, John O. L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis This study describes a technique to quantify muscle fascicle directions in the levator ani (LA) and tests the null hypothesis that the in vivo fascicle directions for each LA subdivision subtend the same parasagittal angle relative to a horizontal reference axis. Methods Visible muscle fascicle direction in the each of the three LA muscle subdivisions, the pubovisceral (PVM; synonymous with pubococcygeal), puborectal (PRM), and iliococcygeal (ICM) muscles, as well as the external anal sphincter (EAS), were measured on 3-T sagittal MRI images in a convenience sample of 14 healthy women in whom muscle fascicles were visible. Mean ± standard deviation (SD) angle values relative to the horizontal were calculated for each muscle subdivision. Repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t tests were used to compare muscle groups. Results Pubovisceral muscle fiber inclination was 41±8.0°, PRM was −19±10.1°, ICM was 33±8.8°, and EAS was −43±6.4°. These fascicle directions were statistically different (p<0.001). Pairwise comparisons among levator subdivisions showed angle differences of 60° between PVM and PRM, and 52° between ICM and PRM. An 84° difference existed between PVM and EAS. The smallest angle difference between levator divisions was between PVM and ICM 8°. The difference between PRM and EAS was 24°. All pairwise comparisons were significant (p<0.001). Conclusions The null hypothesis that muscle fascicle inclinations are similar in the three subdivisions of the levator ani and the external anal sphincter was rejected. The largest difference in levator subdivision inclination, 60°, was found between the PVM and PRM. PMID:24832855

  13. oRis: multiagents approach for image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Vincent; Harrouet, Fabrice; Ballet, Pascal; Tisseau, Jacques

    1998-09-01

    In this article, we present a parallel image processing system based on the concept of reactive agents. This means that, in our system, each agent has a very simple behavior which allows it to take a decision (find out an edge, a region, ...) according to its position in the image and to the information enclosed in it. Our system lies in the oRis language, which allows to describe very finely and simply the agents' behaviors. In fact, oRis is an interpreted and dynamic multiagent language. First of all, oRis is an object language with the use of classes regrouping attributes and methods. The syntax is close to the C++ language and includes notions of multiple inheritance, oRis is also an agent language: every object with a method `main()' becomes an agent. This method is cyclically executed by the system scheduler and corresponds to the agent behavior. We also present an application made with oRis. This application allows to detect concentric striae located on different natural `objects' (age-rings of tree, fish otolith growth rings, striae of some minerals, ...). The stopping of the multiagent system is implemented through a technique issued from immunology: the apoptosis.

  14. Levator ani muscle activity in pregnancy and the postpartum period: a myoelectric study.

    PubMed

    Shafik, A; El-Sibai, O

    2000-01-01

    The levator ani (LA) is a muscle of evacuation and acts as well to support the pelvic viscera. An increase of the intra-abdominal pressure beyond the physiologic limits and visceral overload are speculated to interfere with LA functional activity. This consideration was a stimulus to study the effect of pregnancy on the LA muscle. The EMG activity of the LA muscle was recorded before and during pregnancy and after delivery in 36 women (mean age 27.2+/-3.1 years, 20 multigravida, 16 primigravida). A needle electrode was inserted into the muscle and LA activity was recorded at rest, and on squeezing and straining in both the erect and recumbent position. In the erect position, the resting and squeezing EMG activity during the first 8 weeks of pregnancy, showed no significant difference (p>0.05) from that before pregnancy, and after that, increased progressively and significantly until delivery. On straining, the EMG activity showed no significant difference from that before pregnancy in the first 8 weeks, and after that, decreased progressively and significantly till delivery. In the recumbent position, the LA EMG registered similar activity to that in the erect position but with significantly lower values (p<0.05). The reduction in the LA EMG activity was more evident in the multi-than in the primigravida. In the postpartum period, no LA EMG activity was recorded in the first month; the activity increased progressively after that time to reach the pre-pregnancy level in the forth postpartum month. In conclusion, pregnancy interferes with EMG and functional activity of the LA from the 8th week onwards due to the progressively increasing size and weight of the uterus. This effect was most marked in the last 12 weeks. Delivery seems to maximally inhibit the LA activity in the first postpartum month. Excessive LA traumatization may eventually lead to levator dysfunction syndrome. PMID:10968354

  15. Apsidal motion in eclipsing binaries: FT Ori and MZ Lac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulut, A.; Bulut, I.; ćiçek, C.; Erdem, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the apsidal motion analysis of two eccentric eclipsing binaries, FT Ori (P = 3.150 days, e = 0.397) and MZ Lac (P = 3.158 days, e = 0.399), have been presented. Their O - C diagrams were studied using all reliable times of minima found in the literature and new values for the elements of the apsidal motion for two systems have been computed. We found long periods of apsidal motion of 538 ± 12 years and 424 ± 6 years for FT Ori and MZ Lac, respectively.

  16. Rapid variability of the EXor star NY Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzetti, D.; Arkharov, A. A.; Efimova, N.; Giannini, T.; Antoniucci, S.; Di Paola, A.; Larionov, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    We report on a rapid brightness variability of the classical EXor star NY Ori observed with the AZT24 1m IR telescope (Campo Imperatore, Italy), as a part of our program EXORCISM (EXOR OptiCal and Infrared Systematic Monitoring - Antoniucci et al. 2013 PPVI; Lorenzetti et al. 2009 ApJ 693, 1056).

  17. OriDB: a DNA replication origin database.

    PubMed

    Nieduszynski, Conrad A; Hiraga, Shin-ichiro; Ak, Prashanth; Benham, Craig J; Donaldson, Anne D

    2007-01-01

    Replication of eukaryotic chromosomes initiates at multiple sites called replication origins. Replication origins are best understood in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where several complementary studies have mapped their locations genome-wide. We have collated these datasets, taking account of the resolution of each study, to generate a single list of distinct origin sites. OriDB provides a web-based catalogue of these confirmed and predicted S.cerevisiae DNA replication origin sites. Each proposed or confirmed origin site appears as a record in OriDB, with each record comprising seven pages. These pages provide, in text and graphical formats, the following information: genomic location and chromosome context of the origin site; time of origin replication; DNA sequence of proposed or experimentally confirmed origin elements; free energy required to open the DNA duplex (stress-induced DNA duplex destabilization or SIDD); and phylogenetic conservation of sequence elements. In addition, OriDB encourages community submission of additional information for each origin site through a User Notes facility. Origin sites are linked to several external resources, including the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) and relevant publications at PubMed. Finally, a Chromosome Viewer utility allows users to interactively generate graphical representations of DNA replication data genome-wide. OriDB is available at www.oridb.org. PMID:17065467

  18. The Herbig Be Star V1818 Ori and Its Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Reipurth, Bo; Hillenbrand, Lynne

    2015-03-01

    The little-studied Herbig Be star V1818 Ori is located in the direction of the southern L1641 cloud and the Mon R2 star-forming complex, and is most likely associated with the latter at a distance of ˜900 pc. A high-resolution spectrum is consistent with a spectral type around B7 V, with lines of Hα, the red Ca ii triplet, and several forbidden lines in emission. An All Sky Automated Survey V-band light curve spanning 9 yr reveals major variability with deep absorption episodes reminiscent of the UX Orionis stars. We have searched for additional young stars clustering around V1818 Ori using grism images and the 2MASS and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer catalogs, and have found almost two dozen fainter stars with evidence of youth. Direct images show that the bright star IRAS 05510-1025, only about 3 arcmin from V1818 Ori, is surrounded by a reflection nebula, indicating its association with a molecular cloud. A spectrum of the star shows no emission-lines, and it is found to be a close binary with late B and early G type components. Its radial velocity indicates that it is an interloper, accidentally passing through the cloud and not physically associated with V1818 Ori.

  19. 42 CFR 93.318 - Notifying ORI of special circumstances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... need to protect human or animal subjects. (b) HHS resources or interests are threatened. (c) Research... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notifying ORI of special circumstances. 93.318 Section 93.318 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  20. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) origin of DNA replication oriS influences origin-dependent DNA replication and flanking gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Sommer, Marvin H; Hay, John; Ruyechan, William T; Arvin, Ann M

    2015-07-01

    The VZV genome has two origins of DNA replication (oriS), each of which consists of an AT-rich sequence and three origin binding protein (OBP) sites called Box A, C and B. In these experiments, the mutation in the core sequence CGC of the Box A and C not only inhibited DNA replication but also inhibited both ORF62 and ORF63 expression in reporter gene assays. In contrast the Box B mutation did not influence DNA replication or flanking gene transcription. These results suggest that efficient DNA replication enhances ORF62 and ORF63 transcription. Recombinant viruses carrying these mutations in both sites and one with a deletion of the whole oriS were constructed. Surprisingly, the recombinant virus lacking both copies of oriS retained the capacity to replicate in melanoma and HELF cells suggesting that VZV has another origin of DNA replication. PMID:25795313

  1. Study of uterine prolapse by magnetic resonance imaging: topographical changes involving the levator ani muscle and the vagina.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, H; Mori, T; Togashi, K

    1992-01-01

    Alternations of the pelvic structure with an emphasis on those of the levator ani muscle, associated with uterine prolapse, were studied using sagittal magnetic resonance images obtained from 19 subjects without and 14 with uterine or vaginal prolapse of varied degree and 3 patients with Rokitansky syndrome who had undergone a McIndoe operation. Two additional patients with a grade III uterine prolapse were also studied before and 2-3 months after corrective surgery consisting of vaginal hysterectomy combined with anterior colporrhaphy and posterior colpoperineorrhaphy. Absence or presence of prolapse, irrespective of its grade, was found to be related to whether or not a reference line extrapolated from the levator plate crossed the pubis on sagittal images. This was the case as well in patients with Rokitansky syndrome with a neovagina and loss of such crossings was restored in patients with prolapse after surgery. Backward bending of the upper vagina noted in nonprolapse conditions was usually absent in patients with uterine prolapse. These results document that topographical changes involving the levator ani muscle and the vagina occur in association with uterine prolapse. PMID:1526530

  2. The Urethral Rhabdosphincter, Levator Ani Muscle, and Perineal Membrane: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hinata, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Gen

    2014-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the anatomy of the rhabdosphincter and adjacent tissues is mandatory during urologic surgery to ensure reliable oncologic and functional outcomes. To characterize the levator ani (LA) function for the urethral sphincter, we described connective tissue morphology between the LA and urethral rhabdosphincter. The interface tissue between the LA and rhabdosphincter area in males contained abundant irregularly arrayed elastic fibers and smooth muscles. The male rhabdosphincter was positioned alongside the LA to divide the elevation force and not in-series along the axis of LA contraction. The male perineal membrane was thin but solid and extends along the inferior margin or bottom of the rhabdosphincter area. In contrast, the female rhabdosphincter, including the compressor urethrae and urethrovaginal sphincter muscles, was embedded in the elastic fiber mesh that is continuous with the thick, multilaminar perineal membrane. The inferomedial edge of the female LA was attached to the upper surface of the perineal membrane and not directly attached to the rhabdosphincter. We presented new diagrams showing the gender differences in topographical anatomy of the LA and rhabdosphincter. PMID:24877147

  3. Abnormal eye movements in blepharospasm and involuntary levator palpebrae inhibition. Clinical and pathophysiological considerations.

    PubMed

    Aramideh, M; Bour, L J; Koelman, J H; Speelman, J D; Ongerboer de Visser, B W

    1994-12-01

    We report on four patients with involuntary eyelid closure and eye movement disorders. Three were healthy until the onset of their illness and one had a mild generalized choreoathetosis and dystonia due to kernicterus. Electromyographic recording revealed solely blepharospasm in two patients and blepharospasm in combination with involuntary levator palpebrae inhibition in the other two. The eye movement abnormalities were clinically characterized by inability to fix gaze and short or prolonged episodes of uncontrollable eye deviations accompanied, in two patients, by diplopia in horizontal or vertical directions. These episodes occurred independently of a disorder of eyelid movement. Eye movement recordings with a double magnetic induction technique showed saccadic intrusions in horizontal directions. They consisted of highly frequent square wave jerks in three and sporadic macro-square wave jerks in two patients. There were also episodes of extraocular muscle dystonia, commonly known as oculogyric crises, resulting in involuntary upward eye deviation in all patients and lateral deviation in three patients. In one patient, nasal-ward deviations were sometimes restricted to one eye. We conclude that these abnormal eye movements do not necessarily point to a symptomatic form of dystonia and that they may limit the beneficial effect of botulinum toxin or surgical intervention in the therapeutic management of involuntary eyelid closure. We suggest that either basal ganglia, especially substantia nigra pars reticularis and the brainstem structures, especially the paramedian pontine reticular formation, or both, may be involved in the pathogenesis of these abnormal movements. PMID:7820580

  4. Iron-dependent gene expression in Actinomyces oris

    PubMed Central

    Mulé, Matthew P.; Giacalone, David; Lawlor, Kayla; Golden, Alexa; Cook, Caroline; Lott, Thomas; Aksten, Elizabeth; O'Toole, George A.; Bergeron, Lori J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Actinomyces oris is a Gram-positive bacterium that has been associated with healthy and diseased sites in the human oral cavity. Most pathogenic bacteria require iron to survive, and in order to acquire iron in the relatively iron-scarce oral cavity A. oris has been shown to produce iron-binding molecules known as siderophores. The genes encoding these siderophores and transporters are thought to be regulated by the amount of iron in the growth medium and by the metal-dependent repressor, AmdR, which we showed previously binds to the promoter of proposed iron-regulated genes. Objective The purpose of this study was to characterize siderophore and associated iron transport systems in A. oris. Design We examined gene expression of the putative iron transport genes fetA and sidD in response to low- and high-iron environments. One of these genes, sidD, encoding a putative Fe ABC transporter protein, was insertionally inactivated and was examined for causing growth defects. To gain a further understanding of the role of iron metabolism in oral diseases, clinical isolates of Actinomyces spp. were examined for the presence of the gene encoding AmdR, a proposed global regulator of iron-dependent gene expression in A. oris. Results When A. oris was grown under iron-limiting conditions, the genes encoding iron/siderophore transporters fetA and sidD showed increased expression. One of these genes (sidD) was mutated, and the sidD::Km strain exhibited a 50% reduction in growth in late log and stationary phase cells in media that contained iron. This growth defect was restored when the sidD gene was provided in a complemented strain. We were able to isolate the AmdR-encoding gene in seven clinical isolates of Actinomyces. When these protein sequences were aligned to the laboratory strain, there was a high degree of sequence similarity. Conclusions The growth of the sidD::Km mutant in iron-replete medium mirrored the growth of the wild-type strain grown in iron-limiting medium, suggesting that the sidD::Km mutant was compromised in iron uptake. The known iron regulator AmdR is well conserved in clinical isolates of A. oris. This work provides additional insight into iron metabolism in this important oral microbe. PMID:26685151

  5. Functional anatomy of the levator palpebrae superioris muscle and its connective tissue system.

    PubMed Central

    Ettl, A; Priglinger, S; Kramer, J; Koornneef, L

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: The connective tissue system of the levator palpebrae superioris muscle (LPS) consists of the septa surrounding its muscle sheath, the superior transverse ligament (STL) commonly referred to as 'Whitnall's ligament' and the common sheath which is the fascia between the LPS and the superior rectus muscle (SRM). The anterior band-like component of the common sheath is called transverse superior fascial expansion (TSFE) of the SRM and LPS. It mainly extends from the connective tissue of the trochlea to the fascia of the lacrimal gland. A detailed description of the relation between the LPS and its connective tissue is presented. Furthermore, the course of the LPS in the orbit is described. The study was conducted to provide a morphological basis for biomechanical and clinical considerations regarding ptosis surgery. METHODS: Postmortem dissections were performed in 16 orbits from eight cadavers. The microscopical anatomy was demonstrated in six formalin preserved orbits from six cadavers which had been sectioned in the frontal and sagittal plane and stained with haematoxylin and azophloxin. Surface coil magnetic resonance imaging in the sagittal and coronal plane was performed in five orbits from five normal volunteers using a T1 weighted spin echo sequence. RESULTS: The STL and the TSFE surround the LPS to form a fascial sleeve around the muscle which has attachments to the medial and lateral orbital wall. The TSFE, which is thicker than the STL, blends with Tenon's capsule. The STL and the fascial sheath of the LPS muscle are suspended from the orbital roof by a framework of radial connective tissue septa. MR images show that the TSFE is located between the anterior third of the superior rectus muscle and the segment of the LPS muscle where it changes its course from upwards to downwards. In this area, the LPS reaches its highest point in the orbit (culmination point). The culmination point is located a few millimetres posterior to the equator and superior to the globe. CONCLUSION: Whitnall's ligament can be considered to consist of two distinct parts--the TSFE inferior to the LPS and the STL superior to the LPS. Since the medial and lateral main attachments of Whitnall's ligament are situated inferior to the level of the culmination point of the LPS, the ligament itself is unlikely to suspend the levator muscle. However, a suspension of the LPS may be achieved by the radial connective tissue septa of the superior orbit. The TSFE in connection with the globe may have an additional supporting function. The elasticity of Whitnall's ligament and its connections with highly elastic structures including Tenon's capsule, may provide the morphological substrate for the previously proposed passive (that is, without orbicularis action) lowering of the lid during downward saccades. Images PMID:8949713

  6. A review of Māori astronomy in Aotearoa-New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Pauline; Matamua, Rangi; Smith, Takirirangi; Kerr, Hoturoa; Waaka, Toa

    2013-11-01

    Across the world indigenous people are seeking to reclaim their traditional knowledge. Within the last fifty years the Māori of Aotearoa-New Zealand have made significant efforts to reclaim their language, arts and science. Part of this renaissance includes a growing Māori movement to reclaim their astronomical knowledge. Māori astronomical understanding was infused throughout much of pre-colonial Māori life, culture and belief. The Sun, Moon and stars were an integral part of practices pertaining to agriculture, architecture, fishing, calendrical systems and exploration. Although early ethnographers attempted to record this knowledge, their works seem to only reflect a somewhat superficial level of understanding. Thus this paper highlights some of the current research being conducted on Māori astronomy, which seeks a greater understanding of how the ancestors of the Māori perceived the heavens.

  7. Rossiter-mclaughlin effect in emission from UX Ori stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinin, V. P.; Potravnov, I. S.

    2013-03-01

    The possibility of detecting changes in the radial velocities of UX Ori stars during eclipses by circumstellar dust clouds is examined. Calculations show that, despite the large sizes of the clouds, this effect may actually be observable and, perhaps, has already been observed during spectral studies of stars of this kind. Monitoring of events of this kind can provide important information about the motion of matter in close proximity to young stars, as well as about the structure of gas-dust clouds shielding a star.

  8. [The morphology and innervation of the levator muscles of the ribs in the dog, cat, horse, and pig].

    PubMed

    Frewein, J; Buff, E

    1987-01-01

    In the anatomical literature there are inconsistencies in the description of the levatores costarum muscles in man and in the domestic animals, and their innervation either by the dorsal or the ventral branches of the thoracic nerves. Therefore we studied the form, structure and, with the aid of the dissecting microscope, the innervation of these muscles in 7 dogs, 8 cats, 5 horses and 12 pigs. In the dog, cat and horse, mm. levatores costarum are present from the second to the last rib. In the pig, these muscles are present from the second to the 15th rib, even in individuals with 16 pairs of ribs. Mm. levatores costarum longi and a levator of the first rib could not be found in the domestic animals although these muscles are described in man. All mm. levatores costarum are innervated by branches of the lateral branch of the ramus dorsalis of the respective thoracic nerve. An additional branch of the r. muscularis proximalis of the intercostal nerves 1-3 innervates the lateral part of the levator muscles of the second to the fourth rib. PMID:3630603

  9. Mid-IR Photometry and Near-IR Spectroscopy of the FU Ori Protostar V2775 Ori (HOPS 223)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, William J.; Safron, Emily J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Terebey, Susan; Soto, Edith; Wilson, Thomas L.; Adams, Joseph D.

    2016-02-01

    On 2015 November 20.39, we obtained mid-IR photometry of V2775 Ori (HOPS 223) with the FORCAST instrument aboard SOFIA. This is a low-mass embedded young stellar object that was reported to have undergone a luminosity outburst by Caratti o Garatti et al. (2011, A & A, 526, L1). Fischer et al. (2012, ApJ, 756, 99) dated the beginning of the outburst to between 2005 April and 2007 March and discussed the similarity of its near-IR spectrum to that of FU Orionis.

  10. Hot gas distribution in the wind of ? Pup and ? Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herve, A.; Rauw, G.; Naze, Y.

    2013-06-01

    We have developped a new X-ray modelling code based on embedded shocks which computes synthetic spectra as a function of plasma temperature, abundances and localization of the X-ray emitting shell in the wind. We have also included a proper treatment of the radial dependence of the X-ray opacity of the cool matter as well as a treatment forthe Forbiden Inter combination Resonance (FIR) lines of He-like ions. Our code combines several synthetic spectra in order to fit all the lines of an X-ray spectrum simultaneously and coherently. Our results on two O-type stars ? Pup and ? Ori reveal non-porous winds with a mass loss rate consistent with studies in the optical domain as well as non-solar abundances for the CNO elements as expected for evolved stars. More important, the X-ray plasma starts emitting close to the stellarsurface. An improved version of our code allowing an analysis of the radial dependence of the hot gas filling factor reveals for ? Ori a non continuity of the X-ray emission regions associated to high values of the hot gas filling factor.

  11. Relative rates of RNA synthesis across the genome of Epstein-Barr virus are highest near oriP and oriLyt.

    PubMed Central

    Metzenberg, S

    1989-01-01

    The rates of Epstein-Barr virus transcription were measured in isolated nuclei from marmoset and human lymphoblasts transformed in vitro. In B95-8, a marmoset B-lymphoid cell line, the most frequently transcribed viral genes are the EBERs (small nuclear RNAs) and BHLF-1 (encoding a lytic-phase gene product). The EBERs and BHLF-1 genes are separated by nearly 50 kilobase pairs on the Epstein-Barr virus genome and lie adjacent to (less than 300 base pairs from) oriP and oriLyt, respectively. oriP and oriLyt are putative origins of viral DNA replication, and each is associated with a transcriptional enhancer element. Among the human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines tested, only the transcription of EBERs predominates. Images PMID:2552173

  12. Near-IR photometric monitoring of FU Ori Type Object 2MASS J06593158-0405277

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varricatt, W. P.; Carroll, T.; Moore, E.; Benigni, S.

    2015-05-01

    Maehara, Kojima, and Fujii (ATel #6770) discovered a recent FU Ori-type outburst in 2MASS J06593158-0405277. High resolution spectroscopic follow up by Hillenbrand (ATel #6797) confirmed its FU Ori nature, and discovered P-Cygni profile for H alpha line and blue-shifted absorption for other hydrogen lines.

  13. Cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator muscle are located in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kenya; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Kawagishi, Kyutaro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2012-12-01

    Since the levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles despite being antigravity mixed muscles to involuntarily sustain eyelid opening and eyebrow lifting, this study has proposed a hypothetical mechanism to compensate for this anatomical defect. The voluntary contraction of fast-twitch fibres of the levator muscle stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to evoke proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study confirmed the presence of cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles. After confirming that severing the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induced ipsilateral eyelid ptosis, Fluorogold was applied as a tracer to the proximal stump of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve in rats. Fluorogold labelled the cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons, not in any regions of the rat brain including the trigeminal ganglion, but in the ipsilateral mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neighbouring the locus ceruleus. Some Fluorogold particles accumulated in the area of the locus ceruleus. The trigeminal proprioceptive neurons could be considered centrally displaced ganglion cells to transmit afferent signal from the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to the mesencephalon, where they may be able to make excitatory synaptic connections with both the oculomotor neurons and the frontalis muscle motoneurons for the involuntary coordination of the eyelid and eyebrow activities, and potentially to the locus ceruleus. PMID:23157498

  14. [The establishment and meaning of the three-dimensional finite element model of pelvic floor levator ani muscle in an old healthy woman].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Wn, Lijun; Yan, Zhihan; Wang, Jusong; Fu, Yalan; Chen, Xiongfei; Liu, Kun; Wu, Zhipeng

    2011-10-01

    This paper is to establish a three-dimensional finite element model (3D-FEM) of pelvic floor levator ani muscles in an old healthy women. We acquired the image data of the pelvic bones and pelvic floor muscles from CT and MRI scanning in a non-pregnant old healthy female volunteers. The 3-D reconstruction and mesh optimization of the whole pelvic bones and muscles with application of image processing software Mimics12.0 and Geomagic9.0 were obtained. Then we built the 3D-FEM of the musculoskeletal system of the pelvic bones and levator ani muscles with Ansys11.0 software. We obtained an accurate 3D-FEM of pelvic bones and levator ani muscles in the older healthy woman. The results showed that it was reliable to build 3D-FEM with CT and MRI scanning data and this model could vividly reflect the huge space anatomy of the real pelvic floor levator ani muscles. It avoids the defects to gain the model from the body of anatomical specimens in the past. The image data of model are closer to vivisection, and the model is more conducive to the latter finite element analysis. PMID:22097257

  15. A shape guided C-V model to segment the levator ani muscle in axial magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhen; Jorge, Renato Natal M; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2010-09-01

    This paper proposes a modified Chan-Vese model to segment levator ani muscles from axial magnetic resonance (MR) images. Intensity variances of the foreground and the background are used as the main segmentation clues. As in most cases the boundary of the rectum can be successfully segmented in axial MR images, it is assumed as a priori and is used to define the region of interest and the initial contour. In order to handle the complex influences of the connective tissues, a shape influence field is formed based on the shape information of the rectum and is integrated into the Chan-Vese model. Several segmentation examples are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed method and the necessity of adding the shape influences. PMID:20627794

  16. The Early ALMA View of the FU Ori Outburst System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, A. S.; Corder, S. A.; Dent, W. R. D.; Andrews, S. M.; Eisner, J. A.; Cieza, L. A.

    2015-10-01

    We have obtained ALMA Band 7 observations of the FU Ori outburst system at a 0.″6 × 0.″5 resolution to measure the link between the inner disk instability and the outer disk through submillimeter continuum and molecular line observations. Our observations detect continuum emission that can be well-modeled by two unresolved sources located at the position of each binary component. The interferometric observations recover the entire flux reported in previous single-dish studies, ruling out the presence of a large envelope. Assuming that the dust is optically thin, we derive disk dust masses of 2 × 10-4 M⊙ and 8× {10}-5 M⊙ for the north and south components, respectively. We place limits on the disks’ radii of r < 45 AU. We report the detection of molecular emission from 12CO(3-2), HCO+(4-3), and from HCN(4-3). The 12CO appears widespread across the two binary components and is slightly more extended than the continuum emission. The denser gas tracer HCO+ peaks close to the position of the southern binary component, while HCN appears to be peaked at the position of the northern component. This suggests that the southern binary component is embedded in denser molecular material, consistent with previous studies that indicate a heavily reddened object. At this angular resolution, any interaction between the two unresolved disk components cannot be disentangled. Higher-resolution images are vital for understanding the process of star formation via rapid accretion FU Ori-type episodes.

  17. Intra-eyebrow frontalis suspension using inverted Y-shaped short autogenous fascia lata for blepharoptosis with poor levator function.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yusuke; Nagasao, Tomohisa; Shido, Hirokazu; Fujii, Takako; Kato, Tatsuya; Aoki, Marie; Takada, Keiko; Kishi, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Frontalis suspension using autogenous fascia lata is a common procedure for blepharoptosis with poor levator function. However, donor-site morbidity associated with fascia lata harvest cannot be ignored. In conventional procedures, the required length of the fascia lata is usually >5-12 cm with a lateral thigh skin incision of approximately 5 cm or more. The present study introduces a new frontalis suspension procedure in which the required size (length and width) of the fascia lata and length of lateral thigh incision is much smaller. The harvested fascia lata is tailored to an inverted Y shape and the separated caudal legs are fixed to the tarsus while the cephalic end is grafted inside the eyebrow through a suborbital septum tunnel. In the present study, 11 patients who underwent the new procedure with a minimum of 6 months of follow-up were evaluated. The average length and width of the harvested fascia lata in unilateral ptosis cases were 2.85 and 0.89 cm, respectively. The average length of the lateral thigh incision was 1.25 cm. The margin reflex distance improved in all cases at 6 months postoperatively. The cosmetic result was graded as good to excellent in most of the patients. Trichiasis, widened donor scar, and eyebrow notch were noted as complications. The present method is a good alternative for the treatment of blepharoptosis with poor levator function. It potentially reduces donor-site morbidity as compared with conventional frontalis muscle suspension procedures using autogenous fascia lata. PMID:25260853

  18. A Multi-Wavelength Study of the 2003-2006 Outburst of V1647 Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Ancker, Mario E.; Fedele, D.; Petr-Gotzens, M.; Rafanelli, P.

    2007-08-01

    Using optical to mid-IR photometry and spectroscopy at the VLT, we monitored the recent outburst of V1647 Ori - the illuminating source of a new nebula dicovered in 2003 by the amateur astronomer J.W. McNeil. The optical spectrum of V1647 Ori is characterised by H-alpha and H-beta emission with P-Cygni type profiles and by many weak Fe I and Fe II emission lines. Short-timescale variability was measured in the continuum and in line emission. The mid-IR spectrum of V1647 Ori is flat and featureless at all epochs. However, the energy distribution changed drastically: V1647 Ori was much redder in the early outburst than in the final phases. These data are consistent with the occurence of a disk instability which led to a strong increase in the mass accretion rate onto the central star. The magnitude and rise of the outburst of V1647 Ori resemble that of an FUOR, while the duration and recurrence of the outburst resemble that of an EXOR. The optical spectrum of V1647 Ori is clearly distinct from that of both FUORs and EXORs. The presence of objects such as V1647 Ori with intermediate characteristics between these two classes of young violent stars, suggests that FUOR and EXOR outburst, as well as these newly discovered intermediate objects, may all be due to one physical mechanism. We discuss these in terms of the thermal instability model.

  19. Variability of the FU Ori-type object V900 Mon at thermal wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varricatt, W. P.; Kerr, T. H.; Carroll, T.; Moore, E.

    2015-10-01

    V900 Mon (2MASS 06572222-0823176) was discovered as an eruptive variable by Thommes et al. (2011, CBET #2795). Based on the spectral line features observed, they suggested a FU Ori type for this object.

  20. Absolute ultraviolet spectrophotometry of: alpha CMa, gamma Ori, kappa Ori, and alpha Leo; and a continuing calibration program and some preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    Spectral observations of the stars alpha CMa, gamma Ori, kappa Ori, and alpha Leo have been obtained in the range 1150 to 4000 Angstroms, using rocket borne spectrometers. The payloads have a 13-inch diameter telescope, a rotatable concave diffraction grating, and three pulse counting photomultiplier photometers. The laboratory standards used as photometric references derive their primary calibration directly or indirectly from the National Bureau of Standards. An error range of up to + or - 10 percent is attributed to these laboratory standards; + or - 8 percent to the calibration procedure; and + or - 10 percent is assigned as an accidental error range.

  1. ORI2 inhibits coxsackievirus replication and myocardial inflammation in experimental murine myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Byung-Kwan; Kim, Jin Hee

    2014-01-01

    We purified ORI2 [3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)acrylic acid 1-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-2-methoxycarbonylethyl ester] from an extract of the plant Isodon excisus. We tested the antiviral effect of ORI2 in a coxsackievirus-induced myocarditis model. Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a common cause of myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt signaling in virus-infected cells is essential for CVB3 replication. Antiviral compounds were screened by HeLa cell survival assay. Several purified natural compounds were added to HeLa cells cultured in 96-well plates for 30 min after 1 multiplicity of infection (m.o.i) CVB3 infection. ORI2 significantly improved HeLa cell survival in a dose-dependent manner. For in vivo studies, BALB/c mice (n=20) were infected with CVB3, then 10 of the mice were treated by daily intraperitoneal injections of ORI2 (100 mM) for 3 consecutive days. ORI2 treatment significantly improved early survival in the treated mice compared to untreated mice (85% vs. 50%, respectively). Organ virus titers and myocardial damage were significantly lower in the ORI2-treated mice than in untreated mice. These results demonstrate that ORI2, delivered by intraperitoneal injection after CVB3 infection, has a significant antiviral effect by markedly inhibiting virus replication, resulting in a decrease in organ virus titer and myocardial damage. ORI2 may be developed as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of CVB3 infections. PMID:25273388

  2. UX Ori Variables in the Cluster IC 348

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsunova, O. Yu.; Grinin, V. P.; Sergeev, S. G.; Semenov, A. O.; Shugarov, S. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    Results are presented from many years of photometric (VRCIC) observations of three variable T Tauri type stars in the cluster IC 348: V712 Per, V719 Per, and V909 Per. All three stars have photometric activity characteristic of UX Ori stars. The activity of V719 Per has increased significantly over the last 10 years: the amplitude of its Algol-like minima has increased by roughly a factor of 4 and has reached three stellar magnitudes in the I band. Periodograms of the light curves do not confirm the periods found previously by other authors on the basis of shorter series of observations. The slope of the color tracks on "color-magnitude" diagrams is used to determine the reddening law for these stars owing to selective absorption by circumstellar dust. Modelling of these parameters by the Mie theory shows that the maximum size amax of the dust particles in the protoplanetary disks of these stars is 1.5-2 times greater than in the interstellar medium. In V712 Per and V909 Per, the bulk of the mass of the dust particles is concentrated near amax, while in V719 Per the average mass of the dust particles is determined by the minimum size of the particles. It should be emphasized that these conclusions rely on an analysis of the optical variability of these stars.

  3. HsOrc4-Dependent Dna Remodeling of the ori-β Dhfr Replicator.

    PubMed

    Tomic, Branko; Kusic-Tisma, Jelena

    2015-12-01

    Replication of DNA in multicellular organisms initiates from origin of replication (ori) sequences, which significantly differ in length and complexity. One of the best characterized is hamster dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), which contains the ori-β sequence with several functionally relevant domains, such as an AT-rich region, dinucleotide repeat element (DNR), sequence-induced bend DNA (BEND) and a RIP60 protein-binding site (RIP60). Prior to initiation, ori sequences are recognized by origin recognition complex (ORC), which is a hetero hexamer complex that serves as the landing pad for proteins of the pre-replication complex. The function of each ORC subunit is still unclear. In this study, we analyze the function of subunit 4 of the human ORC complex (HsOrc4) in interaction with a plasmid bearing the ori-β DHFR sequence. We show that the topologically closed DHFR ori-β replicator contains a bubble-like structure within its AT-rich region and that it is reversibly modified in the interaction with HsOrc4. The non-canonical structure of the AT-rich region in the topologically closed ori sequence is recognized and changed by HsOrc4 using the energy of supercoiled DNA. These findings could help to further elucidate DNA replication and its possible association with human genetic diseases. PMID:26124052

  4. Fu Ori outbursts and the planet-disc mass exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayakshin, Sergei; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2012-10-01

    It has been recently proposed that giant protoplanets migrating inwards through the disc more rapidly than they contract could be tidally disrupted when they fill their Roche lobes ˜0.1 au away from their parent protostars. Here we consider the process of mass and angular momentum exchange between the tidally disrupted planet and the surrounding disc in detail. We find that the planet's adiabatic mass-radius relation and its ability to open a deep gap in the disc determine whether the disruption proceeds as a sudden runaway or a balanced quasi-static process. In the latter case, the planet feeds the inner disc through its Lagrangian L1 point like a secondary star in a stellar binary system. As the planet loses mass, it gains specific angular momentum and normally migrates in the outward direction until the gap closes. Numerical experiments show that planet disruption outbursts are preceded by long 'quiescent' periods during which the disc inward of the planet is empty. The hole in the disc is created when the planet opens a deep gap, letting the inner disc to drain on to the star while keeping the outer one stalled behind the planet. We find that the mass-losing planet embedded in a realistic protoplanetary disc spawns an extremely rich set of variability patterns. In a subset of parameter space, there is a limit cycle behaviour caused by non-linear interaction between the planet mass-loss and the disc hydrogen ionization instability. We suggest that tidal disruptions of young massive planets near their stars may be responsible for the observed variability of young accreting protostars such as FU Ori, EXor and T Tauri stars in general.

  5. ORBITAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF THE σ Ori Aa, Ab, B TRIPLE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Simón-Díaz, S.; Caballero, J. A.; Apellániz, J. Maíz; Lorenzo, J.; Negueruela, I.; Dorda, R.; Marco, A.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Barbá, R. H.; Montes, D.; Pellerin, A.; Sanchez-Bermudez, J.; Sota, A.

    2015-02-01

    We provide a complete characterization of the astrophysical properties of the σ Ori Aa, Ab, B hierarchical triple system and an improved set of orbital parameters for the highly eccentric σ Ori Aa, Ab spectroscopic binary. We compiled a spectroscopic data set comprising 90 high-resolution spectra covering a total time span of 1963 days. We applied the Lehman-Filhés method for a detailed orbital analysis of the radial velocity curves and performed a combined quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the σ Ori Aa, Ab, B system by means of the stellar atmosphere code FASTWIND. We used our own plus other available information on photometry and distance to the system for measuring the radii, luminosities, and spectroscopic masses of the three components. We also inferred evolutionary masses and stellar ages using the Bayesian code BONNSAI. The orbital analysis of the new radial velocity curves led to a very accurate orbital solution of the σ Ori Aa, Ab pair. We provided indirect arguments indicating that σ Ori B is a fast-rotating early B dwarf. The FASTWIND+BONNSAI analysis showed that the Aa, Ab pair contains the hottest and most massive components of the triple system while σ Ori B is a bit cooler and less massive. The derived stellar ages of the inner pair are intriguingly younger than the one widely accepted for the σ Orionis cluster, at 3 ± 1 Ma. The outcome of this study will be of key importance for a precise determination of the distance to the σ Orionis cluster, the interpretation of the strong X-ray emission detected for σ Ori Aa, Ab, B, and the investigation of the formation and evolution of multiple massive stellar systems and substellar objects.

  6. A profile of prognostic and molecular factors in European and Māori breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background New Zealand Māori have a poorer outcome from breast cancer than non-Māori, yet prognostic data are sparse. The objective of this study was to quantify levels of prognostic factors in a cohort of self-declared Māori and European breast cancer patients from Christchurch, New Zealand. Methods and Results Clinicopathological and survival data from 337 consecutive breast cancer patients (27 Māori, 310 European) were evaluated. Fewer tumours were high grade in Māori women than European women (p = 0.027). No significant ethnic differences were detected for node status, tumour type, tumour size, human epidermal growth factor receptor, oestrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR) status, or survival. In addition, tumour and serum samples from a sub-cohort of 14 Māori matched to 14 NZ European patients were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for molecular prognostic factors. Significant correlations were detected between increased grade and increased levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1α), glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), microvessel density (MVD) and cytokeratins CK5/6 (p < 0.05). High nodal status correlated with reduced carbonic anhydrase IX (CA-IX). Negative ER/PR status correlated with increased GLUT-1, CA-IX and MVD. Within the molecular factors, increased HIF-1α correlated with raised GLUT-1, MVD and CK5/6, and CK5/6 with GLUT-1 and MVD (p < 0.05). The small number of patients in this sub-cohort limited discrimination of ethnic differences. Conclusions In this Christchurch cohort of breast cancer patients, Māori women were no more likely than European women to have pathological or molecular factors predictive of poor prognosis. These data contrast with data from the North Island NZ, and suggest potential regional differences. PMID:20932344

  7. oriC-encoded instructions for the initiation of bacterial chromosome replication

    PubMed Central

    Wolański, Marcin; Donczew, Rafał; Zawilak-Pawlik, Anna; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    Replication of the bacterial chromosome initiates at a single origin of replication that is called oriC. This occurs via the concerted action of numerous proteins, including DnaA, which acts as an initiator. The origin sequences vary across species, but all bacterial oriCs contain the information necessary to guide assembly of the DnaA protein complex at oriC, triggering the unwinding of DNA and the beginning of replication. The requisite information is encoded in the unique arrangement of specific sequences called DnaA boxes, which form a framework for DnaA binding and assembly. Other crucial sequences of bacterial origin include DNA unwinding element (DUE, which designates the site at which oriC melts under the influence of DnaA) and binding sites for additional proteins that positively or negatively regulate the initiation process. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge and understanding of the information encoded in bacterial origins of chromosomal replication, particularly in the context of replication initiation and its regulation. We show that oriC encoded instructions allow not only for initiation but also for precise regulation of replication initiation and coordination of chromosomal replication with the cell cycle (also in response to environmental signals). We focus on Escherichia coli, and then expand our discussion to include several other microorganisms in which additional regulatory proteins have been recently shown to be involved in coordinating replication initiation to other cellular processes (e.g., Bacillus, Caulobacter, Helicobacter, Mycobacterium, and Streptomyces). We discuss diversity of bacterial oriC regions with the main focus on roles of individual DNA recognition sequences at oriC in binding the initiator and regulatory proteins as well as the overall impact of these proteins on the formation of initiation complex. PMID:25610430

  8. IHF redistributes bound initiator protein, DnaA, on supercoiled oriC of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Grimwade, J E; Ryan, V T; Leonard, A C

    2000-02-01

    In Escherichia coli, initiation of chromosome replication requires that DnaA binds to R boxes (9-mer repeats) in oriC, the unique chromosomal replication origin. At the time of initiation, integration host factor (IHF) also binds to a specific site in oriC. IHF stimulates open complex formation by DnaA on supercoiled oriC in cell-free replication systems, but it is unclear whether this stimulation involves specific changes in the oriC nucleoprotein complex. Using dimethylsulphate (DMS) footprinting on supercoiled oriC plasmids, we observed that IHF redistributed prebound DnaA, stimulating binding to sites R2, R3 and R5(M), as well as to three previously unidentified non-R sites with consensus sequence (A/T)G(G/C) (A/T)N(G/C)G(A/T)(A/T)(T/C)A. Redistribution was dependent on IHF binding to its cognate site and also required a functional R4 box. By reducing the DnaA level required to separate DNA strands and trigger initiation of DNA replication at each origin, IHF eliminates competition between strong and weak sites for free DnaA and enhances the precision of initiation synchrony during the cell cycle. PMID:10692160

  9. A Star-forming Ring around κ Ori 250 pc from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillitteri, I.; Wolk, S. J.; Megeath, S. T.

    2016-04-01

    X-rays are a powerful probe of activity in early stages of star formation. They allow us to identify young stars even after they have lost the IR signatures of circumstellar disks and provide constraints on their distance. Here, we report on XMM-Newton observations that detect 121 young stellar objects (YSOs) in two fields between L1641 S and κ Ori. These observations extend the Survey of Orion A with XMM and Spitzer (SOXS). The YSOs are contained in a ring of gas and dust apparent at millimeter wavelengths, and in far-IR and near-IR surveys. The X-ray luminosity function of the YSOs detected in the two fields indicates a distance of 250-280 pc, much closer than the Orion A cloud and similar to distance estimates of κ Ori. We propose that the ring is a 5-8 pc diameter shell that has been swept up by κ Ori. This ring contains several groups of stars detected by Spitzer and WISE including one surrounding the Herbig Ae/Be stars V1818 Ori. In this interpretation, the κ Ori ring is one of several shells swept up by massive stars within the Orion Eridanus Superbubble and is unrelated to the southern portion of Orion A/L1641 S.

  10. Transcripts within the replication origin, oriC, of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Schauzu, M A; Kücherer, C; Kölling, R; Messer, W; Lother, H

    1987-01-01

    Transcription start and termination sites were mapped in the E. coli replication origin, oriC. Outward transcription from within oriC (promoters Pori-r and Pori-l) was found to start in vivo at position 178 for Pori-l and at positions 294 and 304 for Pori-r, respectively. These transcripts were terminated after 100-150 bases, at terminators designated Tori-l and Tori-r. Transcription from the 16 kd promoter, which lies clockwise adjacent to oriC and promotes transcription toward oriC, started at position 757 and gave transcripts with 3' ends at several positions within and to the left of the minimal replication origin. However, the majority of transcripts traversed the whole oriC region, and were not terminated within the DNA segment tested. Transcription of the chromosomal 16 kd gene was negatively regulated by DnaA protein and positively affected by dam methylation. The possible function of these transcripts is discussed. Images PMID:3031600

  11. Design of non-isomorphic symmetric descendants of the Miura-ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareh, Pooya; Guest, Simon D.

    2015-08-01

    The Miura fold pattern, or the Miura-ori, is a flat-foldable origami pattern with various applications in engineering and architecture. In addition to free-form variations, scholars have proposed a number of symmetric derivatives for this classic fold pattern over recent years. In a previous work, the authors of this paper studied isomorphic variations on the Miura-ori which led to the development of an ‘isomorphic family’ for this fold pattern. In this paper, we study non-isomorphic variations on the Miura-ori in order to develop a ‘non-isomorphic family’ for this pattern. Again we start with the Miura-ori, but reduce the symmetry by migrating from the original symmetry group to its subgroups, which may also include the enlargement of its unit cell. We systematically design and classify the non-isomorphic symmetric descendants of the Miura-ori which are either globally planar, or globally curved, flat-foldable tessellations.

  12. Topography and landmarks for the nerve supply to the levator ani and its relevance to pelvic floor pathologies.

    PubMed

    Loukas, Marios; Joseph, Shamfa; Etienne, Denzil; Linganna, Sanjay; Hallner, Barry; Tubbs, R Shane

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the anatomical variations of the nerve to the levator ani (LA) and to relate these findings to LA dysfunction. One hundred fixed human female cadavers were dissected using transabdominal, gluteal, and perineal approaches, resulting in two hundred dissections of the sacral plexus. The pudendal nerve and the sacral nerve roots were traced from their origin at the sacral foramina to their termination. All nerves contributing to the innervation of the LA were considered to be the nerve to the LA. Based on the spinal nerve components, the nerve to the LA was classified into the following categories: 50% (n = 100) originated from S4 and S5 (type I); 19% (n = 38) originated from S5 (type II); 16% (n = 32) originated from S4 (type III); 11% (n = 22) originated from S3 and S4 (type IV); 4% (n = 8) originated from S3, S4, and S5 (type V). Two patterns of nerve termination were observed. In 42% of specimens, the nerve to the LA penetrated the coccygeus muscle and assumed an external position along the inferior surface of the LA muscle. In the remaining 58% of specimens, the nerve crossed the superior surface of the coccygeus muscle and continued along the superior surface of the iliococcygeus muscle. Damage to the nerve to LA has been associated with various pathologies. In order to minimize injuries during surgical procedures, a thorough understanding of the course and variations of the nerve to the LA is extremely important. Clin. Anat. 29:516-523, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26579995

  13. Evaluation of the levator veli palatini muscle thickness in patients with velocardiofacial syndrome using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Mikyong; Ahn, Seung Hyun; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Baek, Rong-Min

    2015-08-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) is associated with velopharyngeal insufficiency, which occurs in approximately 75% of VCFS patients. Surgical management of velopharyngeal insufficiency in VCFS patients is difficult with a high revision rate due to the anatomic and physiological abnormalities of the velopharynx. The aims of this study were to evaluate the thickness and symmetry of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to compare the findings in VCFS patients to those in patients with nonsyndromic submucous cleft palate. We conducted a prospective analysis of 17 VCFS patients (nine boys, eight girls; age range, 4-9 years) and nine patients with submucous cleft palate without VCFS (eight boys, one girl; age range, 4-13 years) who had undergone MRI between March 2009 and August 2013. The thickness of the LVP muscle was measured at six locations in both groups. The symmetry was determined by comparing the values between the average of the left three points and the right three points. The mean LVP muscle thickness was significantly thinner in VCFS patients (2.14 0.73 mm) than in patients without VCFS (3.70 1.08 mm) (p < 0.001). In addition, the difference between the left and right sides of muscle thickness in the VCFS group was larger than that in the nonsyndromic submucous cleft palate group (0.25 and 0.09 mm, respectively). The thinness and asymmetry of the LVP muscle should be considered when determining the surgical management of velopharyngeal insufficiency in VCFS patients. PMID:26031215

  14. Predicting Birth-Related Levator Ani Tear Severity in Primiparous Women: Evaluating Maternal Recovery from Labor and Delivery (EMRLD Study)

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lisa Kane; Zielinski, Ruth; Tao, Yebin; Galecki, Andrzej; Brandon, Catherine J.; Miller, Janis M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine which maternal characteristics or birth events independently predict severity of levator ani muscle (LA) tears at first vaginal birth in a longitudinal/observational investigation in a tertiary care hospital. Sample Ninety primiparas with at least one at risk for LA tear inclusion factor at vaginal birth: maternal age ≥ 33 years, second stage ≥ 150 minutes, macrosomia, instrumented delivery, and/or anal sphincter laceration were studied. Methods Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was obtained early postpartum (mean ± sd 48.9 ± 21.6 days) to identify LA tear. Severity of LA muscle fiber loss was graded on an ordinal scale of: “0” as no loss, “1” as <50% unilateral loss, “2” as ≥50% unilateral or <50% bilateral loss, and “3” as ≥50% bilateral loss. Data were analyzed using proportional odds modeling. Inclusion factors were explored as predictors of LA tear severity and at analysis episiotomy, time spent actively pushing, epidural, and oxytocin were also considered. The main outcome measures of interest included grading of severity of LA muscle fiber loss on an ordinal scale. Results Respective counts/percentages of women within each 0 thru 3 ordered category of LA tear severity were: “0” = 58(64%), “1” = 9(10%), “2” = 15(17%), and “3” = 8(9%). Estimates and 95% CI for significant demographic or obstetric univariate predictors of LA tear severity level were age, OR 1.093 (CI 1.012 - 1.180), p = 0.023; and time spent in active pushing, OR 1.089 (CI 1.005 - 1.180), p = 0.038. The other factors considered were not significant. There were too few women with forceps deliveries to analyze. Conclusion: In our enriched sample of primiparous women, 26% showed a significant LA tear. Maternal age and time spent actively pushing independently predict LA tear severity. PMID:25379356

  15. Co-firing of levator palpebrae and masseter muscles links the masticatory and oculomotor system in humans

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Houcheng; Song, Jinxin; Shen, Di; Qiao, Ying; Zhang, Jingdong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Simultaneous co-firing of the levator palpebrae (LP) and pterygoid muscles were recorded in Marcus Gann Syndrome (MGS) patients in early clinical studies. “Release hypothesis” proposed an intrinsic masticatory oculomotor neural circuit and this kind circuit, which, however, has been observed only in amphibian. On the other hand, congenital miswiring hypothesis has overwhelmed other interpretations. However, the same phenomenon visualized in MGS cases was unveiled in human subjects without any sign of congenital oculomotor disorder. To further study co-firing of the upper eyelid and jaw muscles, we applied non-invasive EMG recording of the upper eyelid and ipsilateral masseter muscle belly in nine healthy volunteers. LP activity was determined initially by looking upward and active retraction of upper eyelid with head fixed. Then, dual channel inputs from upper eyelid and masseter muscle was recorded during tooth occlusion motivated by isometric masseter muscle contraction without jaw and face moving. The EMG recorded from upper eyelid when the subjects retracted eyelid with head fixed exhibited the same pattern as that collected during tooth occlusion, but the pattern was completely different from EMG of active eye closure. This reflects tooth occlusion evoked LP activity. Then, simultaneous co-firing of the LP and masseter muscle was recorded simultaneously during tooth occlusion without jaw movement. Finally, the aforementioned co-firing was recorded when the subjects conducted rhythmic occlusion and synchronous EMG from both muscles was acquired. In conclusions, humans may also have an intrinsic masticatory oculomotor circuit and release hypothesis may apply, at least, to some cases of MGS. PMID:26243518

  16. Co-firing of levator palpebrae and masseter muscles links the masticatory and oculomotor system in humans.

    PubMed

    Liang, Houcheng; Song, Jinxin; Shen, Di; Qiao, Ying; Zhang, Jingdong

    2015-07-01

    Simultaneous co-firing of the levator palpebrae (LP) and pterygoid muscles were recorded in Marcus Gann Syndrome (MGS) patients in early clinical studies. "Release hypothesis" proposed an intrinsic masticatory oculomotor neural circuit and this kind circuit, which, however, has been observed only in amphibian. On the other hand, congenital miswiring hypothesis has overwhelmed other interpretations. However, the same phenomenon visualized in MGS cases was unveiled in human subjects without any sign of congenital oculomotor disorder. To further study co-firing of the upper eyelid and jaw muscles, we applied non-invasive EMG recording of the upper eyelid and ipsilateral masseter muscle belly in nine healthy volunteers. LP activity was determined initially by looking upward and active retraction of upper eyelid with head fixed. Then, dual channel inputs from upper eyelid and masseter muscle was recorded during tooth occlusion motivated by isometric masseter muscle contraction without jaw and face moving. The EMG recorded from upper eyelid when the subjects retracted eyelid with head fixed exhibited the same pattern as that collected during tooth occlusion, but the pattern was completely different from EMG of active eye closure. This reflects tooth occlusion evoked LP activity. Then, simultaneous co-firing of the LP and masseter muscle was recorded simultaneously during tooth occlusion without jaw movement. Finally, the aforementioned co-firing was recorded when the subjects conducted rhythmic occlusion and synchronous EMG from both muscles was acquired. In conclusions, humans may also have an intrinsic masticatory oculomotor circuit and release hypothesis may apply, at least, to some cases of MGS. PMID:26243518

  17. Outcomes of vaginal hysterectomy and constricting colporrhaphy with concurrent levator myorrhaphy and high perineorrhaphy in women older than 75 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Töz, Emrah; Özcan, Aykut; Apaydın, Nesin; Uyar, İbrahim; Kocakaya, Betül; Okay, Gülin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We performed constricting anterior and posterior colporrhaphy, levator myorrhaphy, and high perineorrhaphy with concurrent hysterectomy, and investigated the intraoperative complications, and short-term outcomes of these constricting procedures in patients aged 75 years or older. Methods We searched our hospital database for cases, between January 2011 and January 2014, of women aged over 75 years who underwent surgery for pelvic organ prolapse of stage 2 or higher, via vaginal hysterectomy, constricting anterior and posterior colporrhaphy, levator myorrhaphy, and high perineorrhaphy, with or without treatment of urinary incontinence. All volunteers were evaluated via pelvic examination using the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system, the modified Decision Regret Scale–Pelvic Floor Disorders form, the Satisfaction Decision Scale–Pelvic Floor Disorders form, and the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory form. Results Fifty-four patients were included in the study. The mean follow-up time was 24.4 months after constricting surgery (range: 8–44 months). There were four cases (7%) of de novo urge incontinence (the symptoms resolved upon prescription of anticholinergic medication). Two patients developed de novo stress urinary incontinence after the procedure and were treated via transobturator sling surgery using Safyre T® polypropylene monofilament slings. No anatomical or subjective recurrence of prolapse was noted during the follow-up period. No patient required additional surgery for recurrence of prolapse. Conclusion Constricting anterior and posterior colporrhaphy, levator myorrhaphy, and high perineorrhaphy with concurrent hysterectomy is a feasible, safe, and effective surgical option in elderly patients at low anesthesiological risk. The decision to perform an incontinence procedure should be individualized based on preoperative findings after prolapse reduction. PMID:26150705

  18. Interest of retro-anal levator plate myorrhaphy in selected cases of descending perineum syndrome with positive anti-sagging test

    PubMed Central

    Beco, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Background Levator plate sagging (LPS), usually called descending perineum syndrome, is one of the main defects encountered in perineology. This defect is classically associated with colo-proctologic functional troubles (dyschesia and anal incontinence) but can also induce perineodynia, gynaecological and lower urinary tract symptoms. Methods A retrospective case series of nine female patients (mean age: 44.3) underwent an isolated retro-anal levator plate myorrhaphy (RLPM) to treat symptomatic LPS confirmed by rectal examination and/or Perineocaliper®. An anti-sagging test (support of the posterior perineum) must significantly improve the symptoms that were resistant to conservative treatment. The effect of the procedure on the symptoms of the 3 axes of the perineum (urological, colo-proctologic and gynecological) and on perineodynia was evaluated during a follow up consultation more than 9 months after surgery. The effect of RLPM on the position of the anal margin and on the levator plate angle was studied using rectal examination, Perineocaliper® and retro-anal ultrasound. Results Before surgery, anti-sagging tests were positive for dyschesia, urinary urgency and pain. After a mean follow-up of 16.1 months, RLPM resolved or improved 2/2 cases of stress urinary incontinence, 3/5 of urinary urgency, 3/4 of dysuria, 3/3 of anal incontinence, 7/8 of dyschesia, 3/4 of cystocele, 4/5 of rectocele, 5/8 of dyspareunia and 6/7 of perineodynia. Rectal examination showed a complete suppression of sagging in 4 patients and an improvement in the 5 others. The mean reduction of perineal descent was 1.08 cm (extremes: 0–1.5). Using retro-anal ultrasound of the levator plate, the mean reduction of sagging was 12.67 degrees (extremes: 1 – 21). Conclusion Anti-sagging tests can be used before surgery to simulate the effect of RLPM. This surgical procedure seems to improve stress urinary incontinence, frequency, nocturia, urgency, dysuria, anal incontinence, dyschesia, dyspareunia, perineodynia, cystocele and rectocele. These results must be confirmed by a larger case series. PMID:18667056

  19. Looking Māori Predicts Decreased Rates of Home Ownership: Institutional Racism in Housing Based on Perceived Appearance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study examined differences in rates of home ownership among Māori (the indigenous peoples of New Zealand). We identified systematic factors that predicted why some Māori were more likely to own their own home (partially or fully) relative to other Māori. Data were drawn from a large national postal sample of 561 self-identified Māori collected as part of the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study. As predicted, our analyses indicated that self-reported appearance as Māori, or the extent to which people thought they personally displayed features which visibly identified them as Māori to others, significantly predicted decreased rates of home ownership. This association held when adjusting for numerous demographic covariates, such as education, level of deprivation of the immediate area, household income, age, relationship status, region of residence, and so forth. Our analyses suggest there is, or at least has been in the recent past, institutional racism against Māori in New Zealand’s home lending industry based on merely appearing more Māori. PMID:25738961

  20. 78 FR 49507 - OriGen Energy LLC ; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission OriGen Energy LLC ; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...-referenced proceeding of OriGen Energy LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with...

  1. Looking Māori predicts decreased rates of home ownership: institutional racism in housing based on perceived appearance.

    PubMed

    Houkamau, Carla A; Sibley, Chris G

    2015-01-01

    This study examined differences in rates of home ownership among Māori (the indigenous peoples of New Zealand). We identified systematic factors that predicted why some Māori were more likely to own their own home (partially or fully) relative to other Māori. Data were drawn from a large national postal sample of 561 self-identified Māori collected as part of the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study. As predicted, our analyses indicated that self-reported appearance as Māori, or the extent to which people thought they personally displayed features which visibly identified them as Māori to others, significantly predicted decreased rates of home ownership. This association held when adjusting for numerous demographic covariates, such as education, level of deprivation of the immediate area, household income, age, relationship status, region of residence, and so forth. Our analyses suggest there is, or at least has been in the recent past, institutional racism against Māori in New Zealand's home lending industry based on merely appearing more Māori. PMID:25738961

  2. Thermal imaging of the FU Ori type object 2MASS J06593158-0405277 = V960 Mon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varricatt, W. P.; Kerr, T. H.; Carroll, T.; Moore, E.; Milne, P.

    2015-10-01

    A FU Ori-type outburst of 2MASS J06593158-0405277 (V960 Mon) was discovered by Maehara, Kojima and Fujii (ATel #6770). Further observational studies (ATel #6797, #6838, #6862, #6901, #7025, #7578) and archival data research (Jurdana- & #138;epi & #263; & Munari, 2016, NewA, 43, 87) confirmed the FU Ori nature of this object.

  3. Insanity and ethnicity in New Zealand: Māori encounters with the Auckland Mental Hospital, 1860-1900.

    PubMed

    Barry, Lorelle; Coleborne, Catharine

    2011-09-01

    This article examines Māori patients at the Auckland Mental Hospital between 1860 and 1900.We argue that the patient case notes reveal 'European' categories in which Māori were situated, and demonstrate the extent to which the authorities at the hospital grappled with their appearance, their language and their culture, all of which were elements of their ethnicity. We argue that the use of institutional case records is highly suggestive of some of the historical meanings of insanity for Māori, including the lack of detailed or sustained collection of information about patients' tribal affiliations, the interest shown in their rights to land in maintenance payment inquiries, the experiences of cultural alienation or mate Māori, and the sad outcomes for Māori. PMID:22043662

  4. OryGenesDB 2008 update: database interoperability for functional genomics of rice

    PubMed Central

    Droc, Gaëtan; Périn, Christophe; Fromentin, Sébastien; Larmande, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    OryGenesDB (http://orygenesdb.cirad.fr/index.html) is a database developed for rice reverse genetics. OryGenesDB contains FSTs (flanking sequence tags) of various mutagens and functional genomics data, collected from both international insertion collections and the literature. The current release of OryGenesDB contains 171 000 FSTs, and annotations divided among 10 specific categories, totaling 78 annotation layers. Several additional tools have been added to the main interface; these tools enable the user to retrieve FSTs and design probes to analyze insertion lines. The major innovation of OryGenesDB 2008, besides updating the data and tools, is a new tool, Orylink, which was developed to speed up rice functional genomics by taking advantage of the resources developed in two related databases, Oryza Tag Line and GreenPhylDB. Orylink was designed to field complex queries across these three databases and store both the queries and their results in an intuitive manner. Orylink offers a simple and powerful virtual workbench for functional genomics. Alternatively, the Web services developed for Orylink can be used independently of its Web interface, increasing the interoperability between these different bioinformatics applications. PMID:19036791

  5. Swift and SMARTS observations of the 2015 outburst of V1118 Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audard, Marc; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Kastner, Joel; Grosso, Nicolas; Walter, Frederick M.

    2016-01-01

    Swift observed V1118 Ori on 2015 Dec 11-12 (5.17 ksec, obs ID 00034203001) and on Dec 16 (2.45ks, obs ID 00034203002) during the latest mass accretion outburst reported by Lorenzetti et al. (ATel #8100).

  6. Observing the Circumstellar Environment of the Eruptive FUor/EXor Protostar V1647 Ori with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principe, David; Cieza, Lucas A.; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Tobin, John J.; Prieto, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fu Ori (FUor) and EXor objects represent a short-lived stage of protostellar evolution characterized by intense mass accretion events which cause extreme variability in the form of outbursts. While it is well demonstrated that these objects exhibit sudden outbursts (ΔV~2-6), the mechanism causing such variability is not well understood. High spatial and spectral resolution observations of the circumstellar environment of these objects are essential to distinguish between different outbursting mechanisms. We present ALMA observations of the FUor/EXor object V1647 Ori as part of an ALMA campaign, which has observed a combined eight FUor and EXor type objects. Deeply embedded in the dark cloud LDN 1630 (L1630), V1647 Ori is one of a few FUor/EXor objects to have been extensively studied at multiple wavelengths before, during and after an outburst. We present preliminary results derived from ALMA 12CO, 13CO, C18O and continuum observations of the circumstellar environment of V1647 Ori. By measuring gas/dust masses and gas kinematics of the circumstellar disk, we investigate the potential mechanisms producing variability in these eruptive protostars during an essential, yet rarely observed, stage of pre-main sequence stellar evolution.

  7. FU Ori-type outburst of 2MASS J06593158-0405277

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehara, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Tadashi; Fujii, Mitsugu

    2014-11-01

    We report the discovery of an FU Ori-type outburst of 2MASS J06593158-0405277. The outburst was discovered by T. Kojima from the survey image obtained with a 85mm f/2.8 lens and Canon EOS 60D DSLR camera on 2014-11-03.821 UT at mag 11.0.

  8. An Improved Method for oriT-Directed Cloning and Functionalization of Large Bacterial Genomic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Kvitko, Brian H.; McMillan, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    We have made significant improvements to a broad-host-range system for the cloning and manipulation of large bacterial genomic regions based on site-specific recombination between directly repeated oriT sites during conjugation. Using two suicide capture vectors carrying flanking homology regions, oriT sites are recombined on either side of the target region. Using a broad-host-range conjugation helper plasmid, the region between the oriT sites is conjugated into an Escherichia coli recipient strain, where it is circularized and maintained as a chimeric mini-F vector. The cloned target region is functionalized in multiple ways to accommodate downstream manipulation. The target region is flanked with Gateway attB sites for recombination into other vectors and by rare 18-bp I-SceI restriction sites for subcloning. The Tn7-functionalized target can also be inserted at a naturally occurring chromosomal attTn7 site(s) or maintained as a broad-host-range plasmid for complementation or heterologous expression studies. We have used the oriTn7 capture technique to clone and complement Burkholderia pseudomallei genomic regions up to 140 kb in size and have created isogenic Burkholderia strains with various combinations of genomic islands. We believe this system will greatly aid the cloning and genetic analysis of genomic islands, biosynthetic gene clusters, and large open reading frames. PMID:23747708

  9. Otariodibacter oris and Bisgaardia genomospecies 1 isolated from infections in pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mie Johanne; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Delaney, Martha Ann; Fravel, Vanessa Ashley; Gulland, Frances; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2013-07-01

    We document the first associations of two recently described species of Pasteurellaceae bacteria with lesions in wild pinnipeds in rehabilitation. Samples were collected from nine lesions in four California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) and two Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) during necropsy or admission examinations at a rehabilitation facility in northern California. Seven Pasteurellaceae isolates were identified using phenotypic tests and partial rpoB gene sequencing. Six strains of Otariodibacter oris were isolated from California sea lions. Otariodibacter oris was isolated in pure culture from four abscesses, an affected lymph node, and a bone lesion consistent with osteomyelitis. Otariodibacter oris was also cultured with Arcanobacterium phocae and β-hemolytic streptococci. A pure culture of Bisgaardia genomospecies 1 was obtained from an abscess in a harbor seal. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that O. oris has been associated with infection. Isolation of these bacteria in pure culture from abscesses and osteomyelitis strongly indicates a pathogenic potential of this organism. Likewise, the isolation of Bisgaardia genomospecies 1 in pure culture from an abscess in a harbor seal implies causality. PMID:23778617

  10. A Long-lasting Quiescence Phase of the Eruptive Variable V1118 Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzetti, D.; Antoniucci, S.; Giannini, T.; Harutyunyan, A.; Arkharov, A. A.; Larionov, V. M.; Cusano, F.; Di Paola, A.; Li Causi, G.; Nisini, B.; Speziali, R.; Vitali, F.

    2015-03-01

    V1118 Ori is an eruptive variable belonging to the EXor class of pre-main-sequence stars whose episodic outbursts are attributed to disk accretion events. Since 2006, V1118 Ori has been in the longest quiescence stage ever observed between two subsequent outbursts in its recent history. We present near-infrared photometry of V1118 Ori carried out over the last eight years, along with complete spectroscopic coverage from 0.35 to 2.5 μm. Long term sampling of V1118 Ori in quiescence has never been performed, and hence we can benefit from the current circumstance by determining the lowest values (i.e., the zeroes) of the parameters to be used as reference for evaluating the physical changes typical of more active phases. A quiescence mass accretion rate of 1-3 × 10-9 {{M}} yr-1 can be derived and the difference from previous determinations is discussed. Based on line emission and IR color analysis, a visual extinction of 1-2 mag is consistently derived, confirming that V1118 Ori (at least in quiescence) is a low-extinction T Tauri star with a bolometric luminosity of about 2.1 {{L}}. An anti-correlation exists between the equivalent width of the emission lines and the underlying continuum. We searched the literature to evaluate whether or not such behavior is a common feature for the whole class. The anti-correlation is clearly recognizable for all of the available EXors in the optical range (Hβ and Hα lines); however, this is not as evident in the infrared (Paβ and Brγ lines). The observed anti-correlation supports the accretion-driven mechanism as the most likely to account for continuum variations.

  11. Initiation of Heat-Induced Replication Requires DnaA and the L-13-mer of oriC▿

    PubMed Central

    González-Soltero, Rocío; Botello, Emilia; Jiménez-Sánchez, Alfonso

    2006-01-01

    An upshift of 10°C or more in the growth temperature of an Escherichia coli culture causes induction of extra rounds of chromosome replication. This stress replication initiates at oriC but has functional requirements different from those of cyclic replication. We named this phenomenon heat-induced replication (HIR). Analysis of HIR in bacterial strains that had complete or partial oriC deletions and were suppressed by F integration showed that no sequence outside oriC is used for HIR. Analysis of a number of oriC mutants showed that deletion of the L-13-mer, which makes oriC inactive for cyclic replication, was the only mutation studied that inactivated HIR. The requirement for this sequence was strictly correlated with Benham's theoretical stress-induced DNA duplex destabilization. oriC mutations at DnaA, FIS, or IHF binding sites showed normal HIR activation, but DnaA was required for HIR. We suggest that strand opening for HIR initiation occurs due to heat-induced destabilization of the L-13-mer, and the stable oligomeric DnaA-single-stranded oriC complex might be required only to load the replicative helicase DnaB. PMID:16980453

  12. Initiation of heat-induced replication requires DnaA and the L-13-mer of oriC.

    PubMed

    González-Soltero, Rocío; Botello, Emilia; Jiménez-Sánchez, Alfonso

    2006-12-01

    An upshift of 10 degrees C or more in the growth temperature of an Escherichia coli culture causes induction of extra rounds of chromosome replication. This stress replication initiates at oriC but has functional requirements different from those of cyclic replication. We named this phenomenon heat-induced replication (HIR). Analysis of HIR in bacterial strains that had complete or partial oriC deletions and were suppressed by F integration showed that no sequence outside oriC is used for HIR. Analysis of a number of oriC mutants showed that deletion of the L-13-mer, which makes oriC inactive for cyclic replication, was the only mutation studied that inactivated HIR. The requirement for this sequence was strictly correlated with Benham's theoretical stress-induced DNA duplex destabilization. oriC mutations at DnaA, FIS, or IHF binding sites showed normal HIR activation, but DnaA was required for HIR. We suggest that strand opening for HIR initiation occurs due to heat-induced destabilization of the L-13-mer, and the stable oligomeric DnaA-single-stranded oriC complex might be required only to load the replicative helicase DnaB. PMID:16980453

  13. Cranial muscles of the anurans Leiopelma hochstetteri and Ascaphus truei and the homologies of the mandibular adductors in Lissamphibia and other gnathostomes.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Peter

    2011-12-01

    The frogs Ascaphus truei and Leiopelma hochstetteri are members of the most basal lineages of extant anurans. Their cranial muscles have not been previously described in full and are investigated here by dissection. Comparison of these taxa is used to review a controversy regarding the homologies of the jaw adductor muscles in Lissamphibia, to place these homologies in a wider gnathostome context, and to define features that may be useful for cladistic analysis of Anura. A new muscle is defined in Ascaphus and is designated m. levator anguli oris. The differences noted between Ascaphus and Leiopelma are in the penetration of the jaw adductor muscles by the mandibular nerve (V3). In the traditional view of this anatomy, the paths of the trigeminal nerve branches define homologous muscles. This scheme results in major differences among frogs, salamanders, and caecilians. The alternative view is that the topology of origins, insertions, and fiber directions are defining features, and the nerves penetrate the muscle mass in a variable way. The results given here support the latter view. A new model is proposed for Lissamphibia, whereby the adductor posterior (levator articularis) is a separate entity, and the rest of the adductor mass is configured around it as a folded sheet. This hypothesis is examined in other gnathostomes, including coelacanth and lungfish, and a possible sequence for the evolution of the jaw muscles is demonstrated. In this system, the main jaw adductor in teleost fish is not considered homologous with that of tetrapods. This hypothesis is consistent with available data on the domain of expression of the homeobox gene engrailed 2, which has previously not been considered indicative of homology. Terminology is discussed, and "adductor mandibulae" is preferred to "levator mandibulae" to align with usage in other gnathostomes. PMID:21845732

  14. MOST OBSERVATIONS OF {sigma} Ori E: CHALLENGING THE CENTRIFUGAL BREAKOUT NARRATIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, R. H. D.; Rivinius, Th.; Rowe, J. F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Matthews, J. M.; Kallinger, T.; Kuschnig, R.; Bohlender, D.; Neiner, C.; Telting, J. H.; Guenther, D. B.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2013-05-20

    We present results from three weeks' photometric monitoring of the magnetic helium-strong star {sigma} Ori E using the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars microsatellite. The star's light curve is dominated by twice-per-rotation eclipse-like dimmings arising when magnetospheric clouds transit across and occult the stellar disk. However, no evidence is found for any abrupt centrifugal breakout of plasma from the magnetosphere, either in the residual flux or in the depths of the light minima. Motivated by this finding we compare the observationally inferred magnetospheric mass against that predicted by a breakout analysis. The large discrepancy between the values leads us to argue that centrifugal breakout does not play a significant role in establishing the magnetospheric mass budget of {sigma} Ori E.

  15. Narratives and traits in personality development among New Zealand Māori, Chinese, and European adolescents.

    PubMed

    Reese, Elaine; Chen, Yan; McAnally, Helena M; Myftari, Ella; Neha, Tia; Wang, Qi; Jack, Fiona

    2014-07-01

    Narrative and trait levels of personality were assessed in a sample of 268 adolescents from age 12 to 21 from New Zealand Māori, Chinese, and European cultures. Adolescents narrated three critical events and completed a Big Five personality inventory. Each narrative was coded for causal and thematic coherence. NZ Chinese adolescents reported lower levels of extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness, and higher levels of neuroticism, than NZ Māori or European adolescents. Cultural differences were also evident in narrative coherence. Adolescents in all three groups demonstrated age-related increases in thematic coherence, but only NZ European adolescents demonstrated the expected age-related increases in causal coherence. Narrative identity and traits were distinct aspects of personality for younger adolescents, but were linked for middle and older adolescents. These findings support the importance of both narrative identity and traits in understanding personality development in adolescents across cultures. PMID:24703815

  16. The Dynamical Future of the Mini-cluster θ1 Ori B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Christine; Costero, Rafael; Hernández, Miroslava

    2015-12-01

    Recent adaptive optics observations have shown that θ1 Ori B is a mini-cluster composed of five stars, and that it is probably bound. The dynamical stability of such a system is, however, questionable. By means of N-body integrations we conduct an exploratory study of the dynamical fate of an ensemble of systems closely resembling θ1 Ori B in projection, with random positions and velocities in the z-direction, and with perturbations compatible with observational errors in the plane. We find that the great majority of the systems are destroyed after 100 crossing times (about 30,000 years). Even after only five crossing times, 20% of the systems dissolve, leaving behind only a tight binary. The implications of these results for the probable age of this multiple system, the fate of stars formed in small clusters, the formation of low mass runaway stars, and the properties of visual binaries are discussed.

  17. X-Ray Production by V1647 Ori during Optical Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teets, William K.; Weintraub, David A.; Grosso, Nicolas; Principe, David; Kastner, Joel H.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Richmond, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The pre-main-sequence (PMS) star V1647 Ori has recently undergone two optical/near-infrared (OIR) outbursts that are associated with dramatic enhancements in the stellar accretion rate. Our intensive X-ray monitoring of this object affords the opportunity to investigate whether and how the intense X-ray emission is related to PMS accretion activity. Our analysis of all 14 Chandra X-Ray Observatory observations of V1647 Ori demonstrates that variations in the X-ray luminosity of V1647 Ori are correlated with similar changes in the OIR brightness of this source during both (2003-2005 and 2008) eruptions, strongly supporting the hypothesis that accretion is the primary generation mechanism for the X-ray outbursts. Furthermore, the Chandra monitoring demonstrates that the X-ray spectral properties of the second eruption were strikingly similar to those of the 2003 eruption. We find that X-ray spectra obtained immediately following the second outburstduring which V1647 Ori exhibited high X-ray luminosities, high hardness ratios, and strong X-ray variabilityare well modeled as a heavily absorbed (N H ~ 4 1022 cm-2), single-component plasma with characteristic temperatures (kT X ~ 2-6 keV) that are consistently too high to be generated via accretion shocks but are in the range expected for plasma heated by magnetic reconnection events. We also find that the X-ray absorbing column has not changed significantly throughout the observing campaign. Since the OIR and X-ray changes are correlated, we hypothesize that these reconnection events either occur in the accretion stream connecting the circumstellar disk to the star or in accretion-enhanced protostellar coronal activity.

  18. Regulation of Epstein-Barr virus OriP replication by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1.

    PubMed

    Tempera, Italo; Deng, Zhong; Atanasiu, Constandache; Chen, Chi-Ju; D'Erme, Maria; Lieberman, Paul M

    2010-05-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is an abundant, chromatin-associated, NAD-dependent enzyme that functions in multiple chromosomal processes, including DNA replication and chromatin remodeling. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) origin of plasmid replication (OriP) is a dynamic genetic element that confers stable episome maintenance, DNA replication initiation, and chromatin organization functions. OriP function depends on the EBV-encoded origin binding protein EBNA1. We have previously shown that EBNA1 is subject to negative regulation by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation). We now show that PARP1 physically associates with OriP in latently EBV-infected B cells. Short hairpin RNA depletion of PARP1 enhances OriP replication activity and increases EBNA1, origin recognition complex 2 (ORC2), and minichromosome maintenance complex (MCM) association with OriP. Pharmacological inhibitors of PARP1 enhance OriP plasmid maintenance and increase EBNA1, ORC2, and MCM3 occupancy at OriP. PARylation in vitro inhibits ORC2 recruitment and remodels telomere repeat factor (TRF) binding at the dyad symmetry (DS) element of OriP. Purified PARP1 can ribosylate EBNA1 at multiple sites throughout its amino terminus but not in the carboxy-terminal DNA binding domain. We also show that EBNA1 linking regions (LR1 and LR2) can bind directly to oligomers of PAR. We propose that PARP1-dependent PARylation of EBNA1 and adjacently bound TRF2 induces structural changes at the DS element that reduce EBNA1 DNA binding affinity and functional recruitment of ORC. PMID:20219917

  19. Neoliberalism and indigenous knowledge: Māori health research and the cultural politics of New Zealand's "National Science Challenges".

    PubMed

    Prussing, Erica; Newbury, Elizabeth

    2016-02-01

    In 2012-13 the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) in New Zealand rapidly implemented a major restructuring of national scientific research funding. The "National Science Challenges" (NSC) initiative aims to promote greater commercial applications of scientific knowledge, reflecting ongoing neoliberal reforms in New Zealand. Using the example of health research, we examine the NSC as a key moment in ongoing indigenous Māori advocacy against neoliberalization. NSC rhetoric and practice through 2013 moved to marginalize participation by Māori researchers, in part through constructing "Māori" and "science" as essentially separate arenas-yet at the same time appeared to recognize and value culturally distinctive forms of Māori knowledge. To contest this "neoliberal multiculturalism," Māori health researchers reasserted the validity of culturally distinctive knowledge, strategically appropriated NSC rhetoric, and marshalled political resources to protect Māori research infrastructure. By foregrounding scientific knowledge production as an arena of contestation over neoliberal values and priorities, and attending closely to how neoliberalizing tactics can include moves to acknowledge cultural diversity, this analysis poses new questions for social scientific study of global trends toward reconfiguring the production of knowledge about health. Study findings are drawn from textual analysis of MBIE documents about the NSC from 2012 to 2014, materials circulated by Māori researchers in the blogosphere in 2014, and ethnographic interviews conducted in 2013 with 17 Māori health researchers working at 7 sites that included university-based research centers, government agencies, and independent consultancies. PMID:26735331

  20. VLA observations of rapid 6 cm flux variations in alpha Ori

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, J. A.; Stencel, R. E.; Drake, S. A.; Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.; Florkowski, D.

    1987-01-01

    The red supergiant star alpha Ori was monitored with the Very Large Array (VLA). Thirteen observations at 6 cm show stochastic variations, at the 30 to 40 percent level, with no long term trend. All data was clipped and tapered in AIPS to minimize differences between VLA arrays. The calibration source varied by less than 10 percent over the same interval. The VLA observations of alpha Ori were continued, as well as alpha Her and alpha Sco, at both 2 and 6 cm, to confirm this result and search for long term trends. The stochastic 6 cm flux behavior, with 30 to 40 percent changes on all timescales from the shortest interval of 10 days to the longest, seems at odds with the 400 day periodic variations in U-band photometry and Mg II UV fluxes reported by Dupree, et al. The observed 6 cm flux was 25 percent below the 6 cm flux reported earlier this decade. Several models for the outer atmosphere of alpha Ori place the 6 cm optical depth unity location at several stellar radii above the optical photosphere. The rapid, stochastic variations reported are difficult to reconcile with almost any global process, such as pulsation, Alfven waves or periastron passage.

  1. Extended Atmospheres of the M Supergiants Alpha Ori and Alpha Sco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A.; Harper, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    Multifrequency spatially-resolved radio continuum observations of the M supergiants Alpha Ori (M2 Iab) and Alpha Sco (M1 Iab + B2.5 V) obtained using the VLA A array and VLA+Pie Town configurations are used to measure changes in the extended (with scale 1 - 10 stellar radii) atmospheres of these stars and to model the conditions in the acceleration regions of their winds. Strong modelling constraints on the atmospheric thermal properties are derived because the radio source is resolved in multiple observing bands. Changes seen in the Alpha Ori source flux density and radio visibility data occurring on months - years timescales are described based on observations obtained in 2002 February and April and in 1996 December. Multicomponent models for the plasma conditions in both the warm and cool gas around Alpha Ori are examined. The radio properties of the Alpha Sco system both of the M supergiant itself and in the H II region surrounding the B-type companion are used to estimate conditions within the M supergiant's wind. These observations are of relevance to understanding the process of mass loss and how chemically-processed material is returned to the interstellar medium.

  2. A Comparison of Pacific, Māori, and European Violent Youth Offenders in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Ioane, Julia; Lambie, Ian; Percival, Teuila

    2016-05-01

    Pacific Island and Māori youth are disproportionately overrepresented in Aotearoa/New Zealand in violent offending. To date, research has not examined Pacific Island violent youth offenders in comparison with other ethnic populations. This study compared Pacific Island violent youth offenders with Māori and European violent youth offenders to determine whether similarities or differences existed in their offending, social, and demographic characteristics. Findings showed that Pacific Island violent youth offenders, in comparison with Māori and European violent youth offenders, were more likely to have grown up in the lowest socioeconomic deprivation areas in New Zealand, were more likely to be older when they first started offending, and their first offence was more likely to be of a serious, violent nature. Family violence was present among all three ethnic groups highlighting the ongoing importance of intervention in this area. The findings of the current study are likely to have implications for government department policy makers, along with program providers and practitioners. Recommendations are made regarding clinical implications and future research on this population. PMID:25476711

  3. Revisiting the Rigidly Rotating Magnetosphere model for σ Ori E - I. Observations and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksala, M. E.; Wade, G. A.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Owocki, S. P.; Kochukhov, O.; Neiner, C.; Alecian, E.; Grunhut, J.

    2012-01-01

    We have obtained 18 new high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of the B2Vp star σ Ori E with both the Narval and ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeters. The aim of these observations is to test, with modern data, the assumptions of the Rigidly Rotating Magnetosphere (RRM) model of Townsend & Owocki, applied to the specific case of σ Ori E by Townsend, Owocki & Groote. This model includes a substantially offset dipole magnetic field configuration, and approximately reproduces previous observational variations in longitudinal field strength, photometric brightness and Hα emission. We analyse new spectroscopy, including H I, He I, C II, Si III and Fe III lines, confirming the diversity of variability in photospheric lines, as well as the double S-wave variation of circumstellar hydrogen. Using the multiline analysis method of least-squares deconvolution (LSD), new, more precise longitudinal magnetic field measurements reveal a substantial variance between the shapes of the observed and RRM model time-varying field. The phase-resolved Stokes V profiles of He I 5876 and 6678 Å lines are fitted poorly by synthetic profiles computed from the magnetic topology assumed by Townsend et al.. These results challenge the offset dipole field configuration assumed in the application of the RRM model to σ Ori E, and indicate that future models of its magnetic field should also include complex, higher order components. Footnotes<label>1</label></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=59662','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=59662"><span id="translatedtitle">Abnormal expression of p27kip1 protein in <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle of aging women with pelvic floor disorders – a relationship to the cellular differentiation and degeneration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bukovsky, Antonin; Copas, Pleas; Caudle, Michael R; Cekanova, Maria; Dassanayake, Tamara; Asbury, Bridgett; Van Meter, Stuart E; Elder, Robert F; Brown, Jeffrey B; Cross, Stephanie B</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Background Pelvic floor disorders affect almost 50% of aging women. An important role in the pelvic floor support belongs to the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle. The p27/kip1 (p27) protein, multifunctional cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, shows changing expression in differentiating skeletal muscle cells during development, and relatively high levels of p27 RNA were detected in the normal human skeletal muscles. Methods Biopsy samples of <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle were obtained from 22 symptomatic patients with stress urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and overlaps (age range 38–74), and nine asymptomatic women (age 31–49). Cryostat sections were investigated for p27 protein expression and type I (slow twitch) and type II (fast twitch) fibers. Results All fibers exhibited strong plasma membrane (and nuclear) p27 protein expression. cytoplasmic p27 expression was virtually absent in asymptomatic women. In perimenopausal symptomatic patients (ages 38–55), muscle fibers showed hypertrophy and moderate cytoplasmic p27 staining accompanied by diminution of type II fibers. Older symptomatic patients (ages 57–74) showed cytoplasmic p27 overexpression accompanied by shrinking, cytoplasmic vacuolization and fragmentation of muscle cells. The plasma membrane and cytoplasmic p27 expression was not unique to the muscle cells. Under certain circumstances, it was also detected in other cell types (epithelium of ectocervix and luteal cells). Conclusions This is the first report on the unusual (plasma membrane and cytoplasmic) expression of p27 protein in normal and abnormal human striated muscle cells in vivo. Our data indicate that pelvic floor disorders are in perimenopausal patients associated with an appearance of moderate cytoplasmic p27 expression, accompanying hypertrophy and transition of type II into type I fibers. The patients in advanced postmenopause show shrinking and fragmentation of muscle fibers associated with strong cytoplasmic p27 expression. PMID:11696252</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=107518','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=107518"><span id="translatedtitle">The Bacteroides fragilis BtgA Mobilization Protein Binds to the <span class="hlt">ori</span>T Region of pBFTM10</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sitailo, Leonid A.; Zagariya, Alexander M.; Arnold, Patrick J.; Vedantam, Gayatri; Hecht, David W.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>The Bacteroides fragilis conjugal plasmid pBFTM10 contains two genes, btgA and btgB, and a putative <span class="hlt">ori</span>T region necessary for transfer in Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli. The BtgA protein was predicted to contain a helix-turn-helix motif, indicating possible DNA binding activity. DNA sequence analysis of the region immediately upstream of btgA revealed three sets of inverted repeats, potentially locating the <span class="hlt">ori</span>T region. A 304-bp DNA fragment comprising this putative <span class="hlt">ori</span>T region was cloned and confirmed to be the functional pBFTM10 <span class="hlt">ori</span>T by bacterial conjugation experiments using E. coli and B. fragilis. btgA was cloned and overexpressed in E. coli, and the purified protein was used in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, demonstrating specific binding of BtgA protein to its cognate <span class="hlt">ori</span>T. DNase I footprint analysis demonstrated that BtgA binds apparently in a single-stranded fashion to the <span class="hlt">ori</span>T-containing fragment, overlapping inverted repeats I, II, and III and the putative nick site. PMID:9733696</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23486752','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23486752"><span id="translatedtitle">Narratives of four Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> ex-inmates about their experiences and perspectives of rehabilitation programmes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nakhid, Camille; Shorter, Lily Tairiri</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> are overrepresented in the criminal justice system in Aotearoa New Zealand. Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> offenders comprise 53% of those serving custodial sentences and 48% serving community-based sentences. The majority of Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> offenders reoffended within 2 years of serving their sentence. A number of programmes aimed at reducing recidivism among Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> have been implemented, and there is considerable debate around the effectiveness of these programmes. This qualitative study focuses on the narratives of four Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> male ex-inmates about their reoffending and their experiences of the rehabilitation programmes during their incarceration. Using a narrative approach, the study sought to hear the shared stories from the men and to determine what they believe would have reduced their reoffending. The stories revealed that a lack of financial resources and gang connections influenced reoffending; the value of prison rehabilitation programmes varied depending on their appropriateness to the inmate and to their intended outcomes; and healing programmes incorporating kaupapa Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> principles and practices assisted the participants in understanding their cultural heritage and communicating with society in more acceptable ways. PMID:23486752</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=523242','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=523242"><span id="translatedtitle">Human Cytomegalovirus DNA Replication Requires Transcriptional Activation via an IE2- and UL84-Responsive Bidirectional Promoter Element within <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Xu, Yiyang; Cei, Sylvia A.; Huete, Alicia Rodriguez; Colletti, Kelly S.; Pari, Gregory S.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Amplification of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic origin (<span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt) in human fibroblasts is dependent upon six core replication proteins and UL84, IE2, and UL36-38. Using a telomerase-immortalized human fibroblast cell line (T-HFs), <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt-dependent DNA replication no longer required the gene products of UL36-38. To determine the role of IE2 in DNA replication in human fibroblasts, we examined potential IE2-binding sites within HCMV <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt. We now show that a strong bidirectional promoter (<span class="hlt">ori</span>LytPM) (nucleotides 91754 to 92030) is located in the previously identified core region of the origin and is required for efficient amplification of <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt. It was determined that a 14-bp novel DNA motif (<span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt promoter activation element), which was initially identified as a binding element for the immediate-early protein IE2, was essential for <span class="hlt">ori</span>LytPM activity. In Vero cells the <span class="hlt">ori</span>LytPM was constitutively active and strongly repressed by IE2, but it was reactivated by UL84. In contrast, transfection of the <span class="hlt">ori</span>LytPM into human fibroblasts resulted in a very low basal level of promoter activity that was dramatically up-regulated upon infection with HCMV. Cotransfection assays demonstrated that the transfection of UL84 along with IE2 transactivated the <span class="hlt">ori</span>LytPM in human fibroblasts. Further activation was observed upon cotransfection of the set of plasmids expressing the entire replication complex. Efficient <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt amplification in the absence of IE2 in human fibroblasts was observed by replacing the <span class="hlt">ori</span>LytPM with the simian virus 40 early promoter. Under these conditions, however, UL84 was still required for amplification of <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt. These results suggest that the mechanism of initiation of HCMV lytic replication in part involves transcriptional activation. PMID:15479808</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4392467','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4392467"><span id="translatedtitle">The Design and Relevance of a Computerized Gamified Depression Therapy Program for Indigenous Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> Adolescents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fleming, Theresa; Lucassen, Mathijs; Stasiak, Karolina</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Depression is a major health issue among Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> indigenous adolescents, yet there has been little investigation into the relevance or effectiveness of psychological treatments for them. Further, consumer views are critical for engagement and adherence to therapy. However, there is little research regarding indigenous communities’ opinions about psychological interventions for depression. Objective The objective of this study was to conduct semistructured interviews with Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> (indigenous New Zealand) young people (taitamariki) and their families to find out their opinions of a prototype computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (cCBT) program called Smart, Positive, Active, Realistic, X-factor thoughts (SPARX), a free online computer game intended to help young persons with mild to moderate depression, feeling down, stress or anxiety. The program will teach them how to resolve their issues on their own using Cognitive Behavioural Therapy as psychotherapeutic approach. Methods There were seven focus groups on the subject of the design and cultural relevance of SPARX that were held, with a total of 26 participants (19 taitamarki, 7 parents/caregivers, all Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>). There were five of the groups that were with whānau (family groups) (n=14), one group was with Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> teenage mothers (n=4), and one group was with taitamariki (n=8). The general inductive approach was used to analyze focus group data. Results SPARX computerized therapy has good face validity and is seen as potentially effective and appealing for Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> people. Cultural relevance was viewed as being important for the engagement of Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> young people with SPARX. Whānau are important for young peoples’ well-being. Participants generated ideas for improving SPARX for Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and for the inclusion of whānau in its delivery. Conclusions SPARX computerized therapy had good face validity for indigenous young people and families. In general, Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> participants were positive about the SPARX prototype and considered it both appealing and applicable to them. The results of this study were used to refine SPARX prior to it being delivered to taitamariki and non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> young people. Trial Registration The New Zealand Northern Y Regional Ethics Committee; http://ethics.health.govt.nz/home; NTY/09/003; (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation/6VYgHXKaR). PMID:25736225</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22273320','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22273320"><span id="translatedtitle">HH 222: A GIANT HERBIG-HARO FLOW FROM THE QUADRUPLE SYSTEM V380 <span class="hlt">ORI</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Reipurth, Bo; Aspin, Colin; Connelley, M. S.; Bally, John; Geballe, T. R.; Kraus, Stefan; Appenzeller, Immo; Burgasser, Adam E-mail: caa@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: John.Bally@colorado.edu E-mail: stefan.kraus@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: aburgasser@ucsd.edu</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>HH 222 is a giant shocked region in the L1641 cloud, and is popularly known as the Orion Streamers or ''the waterfall'' on account of its unusual structure. At the center of these streamers are two infrared sources coincident with a nonthermal radio jet aligned along the principal streamer. The unique morphology of HH 222 has long been associated with this radio jet. However, new infrared images show that the two sources are distant elliptical galaxies, indicating that the radio jet is merely an improbable line-of-sight coincidence. Accurate proper motion measurements of HH 222 reveal that the shock structure is a giant bow shock moving directly away from the well-known, very young, Herbig Be star V380 <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. The already known Herbig-Haro object HH 35 forms part of this flow. A new Herbig-Haro object, HH 1041, is found precisely in the opposite direction of HH 222 and is likely to form part of a counterflow. The total projected extent of this HH complex is 5.3 pc, making it among the largest HH flows known. A second outflow episode from V380 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> is identified as a pair of HH objects, HH 1031 to the northwest and the already known HH 130 to the southeast, along an axis that deviates from that of HH 222/HH 1041 by only 3.°7. V380 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> is a hierarchical quadruple system, including a faint companion of spectral type M5 or M6, which at an age of ∼1 Myr corresponds to an object straddling the stellar-to-brown dwarf boundary. We suggest that the HH 222 giant bow shock is a direct result of the dynamical interactions that led to the conversion from an initial non-hierarchical multiple system into a hierarchical configuration. This event occurred no more than 28,000 yr ago, as derived from the proper motions of the HH 222 giant bow shock.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013prpl.conf2B025K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013prpl.conf2B025K"><span id="translatedtitle">Revealing the inclined circumstellar disk in the UX <span class="hlt">Ori</span> system KK Ophiuchi</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kreplin, A.; Weigelt, G.; Kraus, S.; Grinin, V.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Kishimoto, M.; Schertl, D.; Tambovtseva, L.; Clausse, J.-M.; Massi, F.; Perraut, K.; Stee, Ph.</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>We study the inner sub-AU region of the circumstellar environment of the UX <span class="hlt">Ori</span> type star KK Oph with near-infrared VLTI/AMBER interferometry. We are particularly interested in the inclination of the star-disk system, and we will use this information to test the current standard picture for UX <span class="hlt">Ori</span> stars. We recorded spectrally dispersed (R˜35) interferograms in the near-infrared H and K bands with the VLTI/AMBER instrument. The derived visibilities, closure phases and the SED of KK Oph were compared with two-dimensional geometric and radiative transfer models (RADMC). We obtained visibilities at four different position angles. Using two-dimensional geometric models, we derive an axis ratio ˜3.0 corresponding to an inclination of ˜70 degree. A fitted inclined ring model leads to a ring radius of 2.8 ± 0.2 mas, corresponding to 0.44 ± 0.03 AU at a distance of 160 pc, which is larger than the dust sublimation radius of ˜0.1 AU predicted for a dust sublimation temperature of 1500 K. Our derived two-dimensional RADMC model consists of a circumstellar disk with an inclination angle of ˜70 degree and an additional dust envelope. The finding of an ˜70 degree inclined disk around KK Oph is consistent with the prediction that UX <span class="hlt">Ori</span> objects are seen under large inclination angles, and orbiting clouds in the line of sight cause the observed variability. Furthermore, our results suggest that the orbit of the companion KK Oph B and the disk plane are coplanar.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21558445','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21558445"><span id="translatedtitle">Ancient DNA recovers the origins of Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> feather cloaks.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hartnup, K; Huynen, L; Te Kanawa, R; Shepherd, L D; Millar, C D; Lambert, D M</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>Feather cloaks ("kakahu"), particularly those adorned with kiwi feathers, are treasured items or "taonga" to the Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> people of "Aotearoa"/New Zealand. They are considered iconic expression of Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> culture. Despite their status, much of our knowledge of the materials used to construct cloaks, the provenance of cloaks, and the origins of cloak making itself, has been lost. We used ancient DNA methods to recover mitochondrial DNA sequences from 849 feather samples taken from 109 cloaks. We show that almost all (>99%) of the cloaks were constructed using feathers from North Island brown kiwi. Molecular sexing of nuclear DNA recovered from 92 feather cloak samples also revealed that the sex ratio of birds deviated from a ratio of 1:1 observed in reference populations. Additionally, we constructed a database of 185 mitochondrial control region DNA sequences of kiwi feathers comprising samples collected from 26 North Island locations together with data available from the literature. Genetic subdivision (G(ST)), nucleotide subdivision (N(ST)) and Spatial Analysis of Molecular Variants (SAMOVA) analyses revealed high levels of genetic structuring in North Island brown kiwi. Together with sequence data from previously studied ancient and modern kiwi samples, we were able to determine the geographic provenance of 847 cloak feathers from 108 cloaks. A surprising proportion (15%) of cloaks were found to contain feathers from different geographic locations, providing evidence of kiwi trading among Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> tribes or organized hunting trips into other tribal areas. Our data also suggest that the east of the North Island of New Zealand was the most prolific of all kiwi cloak making areas, with over 50% of all cloaks analyzed originating from this region. Similar molecular approaches have the potential to discover a wealth of lost information from artifacts of endemic cultures worldwide. PMID:21558445</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21344488','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21344488"><span id="translatedtitle">Direct Imaging of the Pre-outburst FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> Candidate V1331 Cyg</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kitamura, Misae; Yamada, Tom; Tamura, Motohide; Kudo, Tomoyuki</p> <p>2009-08-05</p> <p>We carried out a direct imaging campaign of the pre-outburst FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> candidate V1331 Cyg in the H band with CIAO on the Subaru Telescope to investigate the inner structures of VI331 Cyg and to directly detect the disk. Spatial structures revealed by direct imaging may describe the physical conditions of the disk and can restrict the theories of planetary formation. In our preliminary results, we clearly detected a bright arc interior to the known inner ring, which is likely to be the scattered light from the disk. Here, we will show the results and discuss nature of the structure including the comparison with the HST images.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AIPC.1158..135K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AIPC.1158..135K"><span id="translatedtitle">Direct Imaging of the Pre-outburst FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> Candidate V1331 Cyg</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kitamura, Misae; Yamada, Tom; Tamura, Motohide; Kudo, Tomoyuki</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>We carried out a direct imaging campaign of the pre-outburst FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> candidate V1331 Cyg in the H band with CIAO on the Subaru Telescope to investigate the inner structures of VI331 Cyg and to directly detect the disk. Spatial structures revealed by direct imaging may describe the physical conditions of the disk and can restrict the theories of planetary formation. In our preliminary results, we clearly detected a bright arc interior to the known inner ring, which is likely to be the scattered light from the disk. Here, we will show the results and discuss nature of the structure including the comparison with the HST images.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997AnPh...22...83V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997AnPh...22...83V"><span id="translatedtitle">Thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> visco-élastique non-extensive III. Thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> simplifiée à modes translationnels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Volino, F.</p> <p></p> <p>The non-extensive visco-elastic theory with rotational modes developed in (I) is extended to the case of translational modes. A full parallelism between the two formalisms exists. This theory predicts a thermal phase transition as in the rotational case. The expressions of the translational elastic constant, viscosity and self-diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature and size sample are derived. A detailed study of thermodynamical properties is made. Explicit expressions of the thermal energy and specific heat associated with the modes are established, as well as formal expressions for the entropy, pressure and equation of state. The importance of translational macroscopic motions associated with linear velocity gradients is outlined. These motions limit the amplitude of long wavelength modes, thus avoiding "catastrophic" situations predicted by the theory for very large samples, in the absence of such motions. The fundamental notions of "dissipative distance" and "finite velocity for heat propagation", which appear naturally in the description, lead inevitably to the notion of dynamical instability (translational turbulence). In Appendix B, it is shown how the rotational theory of (I) should be modified to take into account the existence of angular velocity gradients. The generalization of the theory to the case where translational and rotational motions are simultaneouly taken into account, and the problem of coupling between the two kinds of motions, is discussed. It is argued that this theory should be adequate to describe the main macroscopic properties of common liquids. La thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> visco-élastique non-extensive à modes rotationnels développée dans l'article (I) est étendue au cas de modes translationnels. On montre qu'il existe un parallélisme complet entre les deux formalismes. Cette thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> prédit l'existence d'une transition de phase thermique comme dans le cas rotationnel. Les expressions de la constante élastique et de la viscosité translationnelles, ainsi que du coefficient d'auto-diffusion, en fonction de la température et de la taille de l'échantillon, sont établies. On présente une étude détaillée des propriétés thermodynamiques. On donne des expressions explicites pour l'énergie interne d'origine thermique et la chaleur spécifique associées aux modes, ainsi que des expressions formelles pour l'entropie, la pression et l'équation d'état. On souligne l'importance des mouvements macroscopiques de translation associés à des gradients de vitesse linéaire. Ces mouvements permettent de limiter l'amplitude des fluctuations de grande longueur d'onde, évitant ainsi des "catastrophes" prévues par la thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> pour des gros échantillons, en l'absence de tels mouvements. Les notions fondamentales de "distance dissipative" et de "vitesse finie de propagation de la chaleur", qui apparaissent naturellement dans la description des phénomènes dynamiques, conduisent inévitablement à la notion d'instabilité dynamique (turbulence translationnelle). Dans l'annexe B, on montre comment il faut modifier la thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> rotationnelle pour tenir compte de l'existence de gradients de vitesse angulaire. On discute la généralisation de la thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> au cas où l'on considère simultanément la rotation et la translation, et le problème du couplage entre ces deux types de mouvements. On suggère que ce formalisme est adéquat pour décrire l'essentiel des propriétés macroscopiques des liquides usuels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18181426','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18181426"><span id="translatedtitle">The voyage to McDonalds--short and long-term factors in the etiology of obesity in Mä<span class="hlt">ori</span> children in Aotearoa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gray, George</p> <p>2003-09-01</p> <p>In Aotearoa, it has been revealed that 14.7% of European adults are obese, compared with 27.5% for Mä<span class="hlt">ori</span> adults. It has been difficult to elucidate the recent trends in children and adolescents without large-scale population analysis, but a recent study of obesity in Auckland schoolchildren revealed a prevalence rate of 15.8% for Mä<span class="hlt">ori</span> children, compared with 8.6% for European children. This essay will review factors affecting the etiology of obesity in Mä<span class="hlt">ori</span> children. The classification of obesity will be examined before a discussion of short-term and long-term factors leading to obesity in this ethnic group. Measuring Obesity in Children It has been recommended that the BMI range for overweight in Mä<span class="hlt">ori</span> be increased to 27-32, and obesity a BMI greater than 32. Unfortunately though, there is no consensus among researchers and some studies may use the conventional obesity range of a BMI greater than 30 for both Mä<span class="hlt">ori</span> and non-Mä<span class="hlt">ori</span> children. Mä<span class="hlt">ori</span> disproportionately occupy low socioeconomic strata in Aotearoa. The significant discrepancy between obesity prevalence rates for Mä<span class="hlt">ori</span> and European children indicates that other factors are involved. Dietary fat intake, and by extension obesity, tend to be more prevalent for people in low socioeconomic groups, as numerous studies have shown. Therefore, the Mä<span class="hlt">ori</span>-European obesity discrepancy can be further explained by the discrepancy in socioeconomic status between these two groups, as national census data reveal that Mä<span class="hlt">ori</span> are disproportionately represented in all negative socioeconomic indices. However, for completeness, it is necessary to understand exactly why Mä<span class="hlt">ori</span> dominate these indices. PMID:18181426</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25193966','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25193966"><span id="translatedtitle">Redesigning the architecture of policy-making: Engaging with Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> on nanotechnology in New Zealand.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Munshi, Debashish; Kurian, Priya A; Morrison, Talei; Morrison, Sandra L</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Although there is an extensive literature on public engagement on the use of new and emerging technologies such as nanotechnology, there is little evidence of the participation of marginalised indigenous communities in processes of such engagement. How do particular cultural values and worldviews shape the perceptions of new technologies among such indigenous peoples? This article addresses this question through an analysis of the deliberations of an indigenous Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> citizens' panel on nanotechnology in Aotearoa New Zealand. An active process of public engagement with the nation's Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> stakeholders, and their conversations with nanotechnology experts, sustainability activists and Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> researchers, helps map an alternative, culture-based architecture of public engagement on policies around new technologies. The analysis is grounded in a concept of active citizenship that we term 'sustainable citizenship'. PMID:25193966</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3557718','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3557718"><span id="translatedtitle">Pathogenicity of exopolysaccharide-producing Actinomyces <span class="hlt">oris</span> isolated from an apical abscess lesion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yamane, K; Nambu, T; Yamanaka, T; Ishihara, K; Tatami, T; Mashimo, C; Walker, C B; Leung, K-P; Fukushima, H</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Aim To demonstrate a capacity for producing exopolysaccharides (EPSs) and an ability to form biofilm on abiotic materials of Actinomyces <span class="hlt">oris</span> strain K20. Methodology The productivity of EPSs and the ability to form biofilm of strain K20 were evaluated by measuring viscosity of spent culture media and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the biofilm assay on microtitre plates, respectively. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to determine the chemical composition of the viscous materials. To examine the role of the viscous materials attributable to the pathogenicity in this organism, the ability of strain K20 to induce abscess formation was compared in mice to that of ATCC 27044. Results The viscosity of the spent culture media of K20 was significantly higher than that of ATCC 27044. Strain K20 showed dense meshwork structures around the cells and formed biofilms on microtitre plates, whereas ATCC 27044 did not. Chemical analysis of the viscous materials revealed that they were mainly composed of neutral sugars with mannose constituting 77.5% of the polysaccharides. Strain K20 induced persistent abscesses in mice lasting at least 5 days at a concentration of 108 cells mL−1, whereas abscesses induced by ATCC 27044 healed and disappeared or decreased in size at day 5. Conclusions Strain K20 produced EPSs, mainly consisting of mannose, and formed biofilms. This phenotype might play an important role for A. <span class="hlt">oris</span> to express virulence through the progression of apical periodontitis. PMID:22900599</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4262642','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4262642"><span id="translatedtitle">Lethality of Sortase Depletion in Actinomyces <span class="hlt">oris</span> Caused by Excessive Membrane Accumulation of a Surface Glycoprotein</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wu, Chenggang; Huang, I-Hsiu; Chang, Chungyu; Reardon-Robinson, Melissa Elizabeth; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Sortase, a cysteine-transpeptidase conserved in Gram-positive bacteria, anchors on the cell wall many surface proteins that facilitate bacterial pathogenesis and fitness. Genetic disruption of the housekeeping sortase in several Gram-positive pathogens reported thus far attenuates virulence, but not bacterial growth. Paradoxically, we discovered that depletion of the housekeeping sortase SrtA was lethal for Actinomyces <span class="hlt">oris</span>; yet, all of its predicted cell wall-anchored protein substrates (AcaA-N) were individually dispensable for cell viability. Using Tn5-transposon mutagenesis to identify factors that upend lethality of srtA deletion, we uncovered a set of genetic suppressors harboring transposon insertions within genes of a locus encoding AcaC and a LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP)-like protein. AcaC was shown to be highly glycosylated and dependent on LCP for its glycosylation. Upon SrtA depletion, the glycosylated form of AcaC, hereby renamed GspA, was accumulated in the membrane. Overexpression of GspA in a mutant lacking gspA and srtA was lethal; conversely, cells overexpressing a GspA mutant missing a membrane-localization domain were viable. The results reveal a unique glycosylation pathway in A. <span class="hlt">oris</span> that is coupled to cell wall anchoring catalyzed by sortase SrtA. Significantly, this novel phenomenon of glyco-stress provides convenient cell-based assays for developing a new class of inhibitors against Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:25230351</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4874106','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4874106"><span id="translatedtitle">A qualitative analysis of Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pacific smokers' views on informed choice and smoking</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gifford, Heather; Tautolo, El-Shadan; Erick, Stephanie; Hoek, Janet; Gray, Rebecca; Edwards, Richard</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objectives Tobacco companies frame smoking as an informed choice, a strategy that holds individuals responsible for harms they incur. Few studies have tested this argument, and even fewer have examined how informed indigenous smokers or those from minority ethnicities are when they start smoking. We explored how young adult Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pacific smokers interpreted ‘informed choice’ in relation to smoking. Participants Using recruitment via advertising, existing networks and word of mouth, we recruited and undertook qualitative in-depth interviews with 20 Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pacific young adults aged 18–26 years who smoked. Analyses Data were analysed using an informed-choice framework developed by Chapman and Liberman. We used a thematic analysis approach to identify themes that extended this framework. Results Few participants considered themselves well informed and none met more than the framework's initial two criteria. Most reflected on their unthinking uptake and subsequent addiction, and identified environmental factors that had facilitated uptake. Nonetheless, despite this context, most agreed that they had made an informed choice to smoke. Conclusions The discrepancy between participants' reported knowledge and understanding of smoking's risks, and their assessment of smoking as an informed choice, reflects their view of smoking as a symbol of adulthood. Policies that make tobacco more difficult to use in social settings could help change social norms around smoking and the ease with which initiation and addiction currently occur. PMID:27188813</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3608319','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3608319"><span id="translatedtitle">An indigenous approach to explore health-related experiences among M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> parents: the Pukapuka Hauora asthma study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background The prevalence of asthma for Indigenous New Zealand M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> is amongst the highest in the world. Recent evidence shows ethnic differences in asthma symptom prevalence in New Zealand have widened, with asthma symptoms and hospitalisation rates consistently higher for M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> across all age-groups, especially children and adolescents. This paper: outlines our qualitative, longitudinal research exploring the practical issues M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> children and their families face trying to achieve optimum asthma outcomes; details the research methods used within this study; and discusses the process evaluation findings of the features that made this approach successful in engaging and retaining participants in the study. Methods Thirty-two M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> families were recruited using a Kaupapa M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> (M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> way) Research approach. Each participated in a series of four in-depth interviews that were carried out at seasonal intervals over the course of one year. Families also took part in an interviewer-administered questionnaire and participated in a Photovoice exercise. All interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and independently coded by two researchers. The research team then conducted the analysis and theme development. The questionnaires were analysed separately, with explanations for findings explored within the qualitative data. Results The methodology produced a 100 percent retention rate of the participating families over the course of the follow-up. This was attributed to the research collaboration, the respectful research relationships established with families, and the families judgement that the methods used enabled them to tell their stories. The acceptability of the methodology will add to the validity and trustworthiness of the findings. Conclusion Given the extent and persistence of ethnic disparities in childhood asthma management, it is imperative that an indigenous approach be taken to understanding the core issues facing M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> families. By conducting community-partnership research underpinned by an indigenous methodology, and employing a range of appropriate methods, we have successfully recruited and retained a cohort of M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> families with experiences of childhood asthma. We aim to make their voices heard in order to develop a series of culturally relevant interventions aimed at remediating these disparities. PMID:23497423</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25645659','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25645659"><span id="translatedtitle">The significance of socially-assigned ethnicity for self-identified Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> accessing and engaging with primary healthcare in New Zealand.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Reid, Jennifer; Cormack, Donna; Crowe, Marie</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Despite increased focus in New Zealand on reducing health inequities between Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and New Zealand European ethnic groups, research on barriers and facilitators to primary healthcare access for Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> remains limited. In particular, there has been little interrogation of the significance of social-assignment of ethnicity for Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> in relation to engagement with predominantly non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> primary healthcare services and providers. A qualitative study was undertaken with a subsample (n = 40) of the broader Hauora Manawa Study to examine experiences of accessing and engaging with primary healthcare among adult urban Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>. Thematic analysis of in-depth interviews identified that participants perceived social-assignment as New Zealand European as an efficacious form of capital when interacting with predominantly non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> health professionals. Skin colour that was 'white' or was perceived to identify Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> as belonging to the 'dominant' New Zealand European ethnic group was reported as broadly advantageous and protective. In contrast, social-assignment as Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> was seen to be associated with risk of exposure to differential and discriminatory healthcare. Reducing the negative impacts of racialisation in a (neo)colonial society where 'White' cultural capital dominates requires increased recognition of the health-protective advantages of 'White' privilege and concomitant risks associated with socially-assigned categorisation of ethnicity as non-'White'. PMID:25645659</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ITEIS.131.1775I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ITEIS.131.1775I"><span id="translatedtitle">A Practice Indexes for Improving Facial Movements of Brass Instrument Players</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ito, Kyoko; Hirano, Takeshi; Noto, Kazufumi; Nishida, Shogo; Ohtsuki, Tatsuyuki</p> <p></p> <p>Two experimental studies have been conducted in order to propose practice indexes for the improvement of the embouchure of French horn players, two experimental studies have been conducted. In both studies, the same task was performed by advanced and amateur French horn players. The first study investigated the activity, while performing the above-mentioned task, of the 5 facial muscles (<span class="hlt">levator</span> labii superioris, zygomaticus major, depressor <span class="hlt">anguli</span> <span class="hlt">oris</span>, depressor labii inferioris, and risorius muscles) on the right side of the face by surface electromyography, and the facial movement on the left side of the face by attaching two markers above each muscle and using two high-speed cameras simultaneously. The results of the study showed that it is possible for the four markers around the lower lip to practice indexes. The second study evaluated whether the above-mentioned markers are appropriate as practice indexes using a 3-D tracking system and questionnaires. The results showed that both the advanced and the amateur players assessed that the markers were suitable as practice indexes for improving the embouchure. This set of approaches could be useful for selecting practice indexes and developing scientific practice methods not only for the French horn but also for other instruments and other fields.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApJ...756..118B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApJ...756..118B"><span id="translatedtitle">Observed Luminosity Spread in Young Clusters and FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> Stars: A Unified Picture</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Baraffe, I.; Vorobyov, E.; Chabrier, G.</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>The idea that non-steady accretion during the embedded phase of protostar evolution can produce the observed luminosity spread in the Herzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD) of young clusters has recently been called into question. Observations of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, for instance, suggest an expansion of the star during strong accretion events, whereas the luminosity spread implies a contraction of the accreting objects, decreasing their radiating surface. In this paper, we present a global scenario based on calculations coupling episodic accretion histories derived from numerical simulations of collapsing cloud prestellar cores of various masses and subsequent protostar evolution. Our calculations show that, assuming an initial protostar mass Mi ~ 1 M Jup, typical of the second Larson's core, both the luminosity spread in the HRD and the inferred properties of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> events (mass, radius, accretion rate) can be explained by this scenario, providing two conditions. First, there must be some variation within the fraction of accretion energy absorbed by the protostar during the accretion process. Second, the range of this variation should increase with increasing accretion burst intensity and thus with the initial core mass and final star mass. The numerical hydrodynamics simulations of collapsing cloud prestellar cores indeed show that the intensity of the accretion bursts correlates with the mass and initial angular momentum of the prestellar core. Massive prestellar cores with high initial angular momentum are found to produce intense bursts characteristic of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-like events. Our results thus suggest a link between the burst intensities and the fraction of accretion energy absorbed by the protostar, with some threshold in the accretion rate, of the order of 10-5 M ⊙ yr-1, delimitating the transition from "cold" to "hot" accretion. Such a transition might reflect a change in the accretion geometry with increasing accretion rate, i.e., a transition from magnetospheric or thin-disk to thick-disk accretion, or in the magnetospheric interaction between the star and the disk. Conversely, the luminosity spread can also be explained by a variation of the initial protostar mass within the ~1-5 M Jup range, although it is unclear for now whether such a spread among the second Larson's core can be produced during the prestellar core second collapse. This unified picture confirms the idea that early accretion during protostar and proto-brown dwarf formation/evolution can explain the observed luminosity spread in young clusters without invoking any significant age spread, and that the concept of a well-defined birthline does not apply for low-mass objects. Finally, we examine the impact of accretion on the determination of the initial mass function in young clusters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24708455','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24708455"><span id="translatedtitle">The protective influence of family connectedness, ethnic identity, and ethnic engagement for New Zealand Ma̅<span class="hlt">ori</span> adolescents.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stuart, Jaimee; Jose, Paul E</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>The present study examined the associations among family connectedness, ethnic identity, and ethnic engagement on changes in well-being over time for the understudied population of Ma̅<span class="hlt">ori</span> (indigenous New Zealand) youth. Data were collected as part of a longitudinal study of youth connectedness in New Zealand using self-report measures at 3 measurement occasions separated by 1 year each. Participants in the current study were 431 self-identified Ma̅<span class="hlt">ori</span> (ages 10-15 years at Time 1). As expected, the variables of family connectedness, ethnic identity, and well-being were all positively related to each other. Results of a latent growth curve model showed that, following normative trends for adolescents of this age, well-being diminished over time for Ma̅<span class="hlt">ori</span> youth; however, high levels of family connectedness were found to mitigate this general decline in well-being over time. Furthermore, in a longitudinal path analysis, ethnic engagement was found to exert a positive indirect effect on residualized Time 3 well-being through Time 2 ethnic identity. These findings indicate that the quality of family relationships and affiliation with one's ethnic group are important predictors of positive adjustment for Ma̅<span class="hlt">ori</span> youth over time. These results are discussed in the context of positive youth development for ethnic minority and indigenous youth. PMID:24708455</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18789041','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18789041"><span id="translatedtitle">Crisis engagement in mental health: a New Zealand Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> contribution.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Drury, Nick; Munro, Te Ata</p> <p>2008-10-01</p> <p>The active engagement of clients in mental health services offers far greater chances of successful outcomes. When clients do not actively engage in treatment, their risk of becoming part of the population of 'high users' is greater. The 'high users' consume a disproportionate share of health resources, which may prevent other potential clients from accessing services. Engagement can be particularly challenging in crisis situations, which is how many clients attracting psychotic diagnoses first enter the service. New Zealand Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> bring a transcendent quality to the idea of 'respect for Other', which would make it sacrilegious to overpower Other in most situations. This paper reviews a growing body of literature indicating how we might integrate an enhanced respect or reverence of Other into clinical practice. This includes the idea of engaging more frequently with the social network when building rapport with an individual is particularly challenging. There is some evidence that services adopting this kind of approach are more economical. PMID:18789041</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9070910','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9070910"><span id="translatedtitle">In organello footprinting analysis of rat mitochondrial DNA: protein interaction upstream of the <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-L.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cingolani, G; Capaccio, L; D'Elia, D; Gadaleta, G</p> <p>1997-02-24</p> <p>An in organello footprinting approach has been used to probe a protein-DNA interaction of a nuclear coded 25 kDa protein, previously isolated in our laboratory, that binds "in vitro" a region within the ND2 gene, located upstream of the <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-L. Footprinting studies with the purine-modifying reagent dimethyl sulfate and the pirimidine-modifying reagent potassium permanganate were carried out in isolated mitochondria from rat liver. Dimethyl sulfate footprinting has allowed the detection of a protein-DNA interaction within the curved ND2 region with contact sites located in both the strands. Potassium permanganate footprinting allowed detection of an adjacent permanganate-reactive region. We hypothesize that the permanganate-reactive region is a single stranded DNA due to a profound helix distortion induced by a 25 kDa protein binding to the nearest region. PMID:9070910</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22315107N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22315107N"><span id="translatedtitle">Time-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy of the Massive Binary delta <span class="hlt">Ori</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nichols, Joy S.; Naze, Y.; Corcoran, M. F.; Pollock, A.; Moffat, A. F.; Ignace, R.; Waldron, W. L.; Evans, N. R.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We have obtained 500 ks of Chandra HETG observations of the massive binary delta <span class="hlt">Ori</span> (O9.5II+unseen companion), one of the fundamental calibrators of the mass-luminosity-radius relation in the upper HR diagram. The program is intended to map the emission line parameters as the secondary moves through the wind of the primary star. Custom extraction techniques have been developed to create 12 time-resolved 40 ks spectra from these observations, each of which is properly calibrated for time and temperature effects. Emission line fluxes for these time slice spectra are presented, as well as phase analysis of the variability of the fluxes. We discuss the interpretation of the resulting data, such as colliding winds and occultation of various temperature regimes of the primary wind by the secondary.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013yCat..74262738N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013yCat..74262738N"><span id="translatedtitle">VizieR Online Data Catalog: Magnetic properties of ω <span class="hlt">Ori</span> (Neiner+, 2012)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Neiner, C.; Grunhut, J. H.; Petit, V.; Ud-Doula, A.; Wade, G. A.; Landstreet, J.; de Batz, B.; Cochard, F.; Gutierrez-Soto, J.; Huat, A.-L.</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>High-resolution (R~68000) circular polarization (Stokes V) spectra of omega <span class="hlt">Ori</span> were obtained with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter, mounted on the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) in Hawaii, and the Narval spectropolarimeter, mounted on the 2-m Bernard Lyot Telescope (TBL) in France, as part of the commissioning ESPaDOnS runs (04BE80, 04BE37 and 04BD51), PI programmes (Neiner on Narval L062N05 and L072N08, and Landstreet on ESPaDOnS 07BC08) and of the MiMeS project (Wade on ESPaDOnS 08BP13). Six different epochs of spectropolarimetric data were obtained in 2004, 2007 January, 2007 November, 2008 January, 2008 October and 2009 January that resulted in 125 polarimetric observations. (1 data file).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1166500','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1166500"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultrastructure of the angularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> salivary gland in the house sparrow.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nagato, T; Tandler, B</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The angularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> gland, an avian salivary gland that lies beneath the zygomatic arch, was studied in the house sparrow by means of light and electron microscopy. The gland consists of lobules composed of epithelial tubules and folds on a delicate connective tissue framework. The lobules are drained by large channels to form an intraglandular duct, which becomes the main extraglandular duct. The tubules, folds, and all ducts are covered by pseudostratified epithelium that shows progressive changes from the blind ends of tubules to the duct system. At the closed end of the tubules, the tall cells contain an aggregation of closely packed mucous droplets; their mitochondria are long and slender. As the epithelium nears the duct system, the mucus content of the tall cells is reduced and the mitochondria, which are increased in number, are ovoid. The lateral borders of the cells are complexly interlocked. In the ducts, mitochondria-rich cells with extensive lateral interfoliation comprise the major cell type; some of these cells contain a few mucous droplets at their apices. The basal cells of the pseudostratified epithelium have the same basic structure regardless of their location. These pyramidal cells have abundant cytofilaments and are joined to the basal lamina by many hemidesmosomes. Despite the absence of clear-cut morphological zonation, the angularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> may function in a manner that is analogous to mammalian salivary glands: secretory cells produce the organic component of the saliva, mucus, while the mitochondria-rich cells with their extensive lateral membranes probably resorb electrolytes to render the final saliva hypotonic. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:3429300</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23702212','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23702212"><span id="translatedtitle">Ethnic density and area deprivation: neighbourhood effects on Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> health and racial discrimination in Aotearoa/New Zealand.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bécares, Laia; Cormack, Donna; Harris, Ricci</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Some studies suggest that ethnic minority people are healthier when they live in areas with a higher concentration of people from their own ethnic group, a so-called ethnic density effect. To date, no studies have examined the ethnic density effect among indigenous peoples, for whom connections to land, patterns of settlement, and drivers of residential location may differ from ethnic minority populations. The present study analysed the Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> sample from the 2006/07 New Zealand Health Survey to examine the association between increased Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> ethnic density, area deprivation, health, and experiences of racial discrimination. Results of multilevel regressions showed that an increase in Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> ethnic density was associated with decreased odds of reporting poor self-rated health, doctor-diagnosed common mental disorders, and experienced racial discrimination. These associations were strengthened after adjusting for area deprivation, which was consistently associated with increased odds of reporting poor health and reports of racial discrimination. Our findings show that whereas ethnic density is protective of the health and exposure to racial discrimination of Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, this effect is concealed by the detrimental effect of area deprivation, signalling that the benefits of ethnic density must be interpreted within the current socio-political context. This includes the institutional structures and racist practices that have created existing health and socioeconomic inequities in the first place, and maintain the unequal distribution of concentrated poverty in areas of high Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> density. Addressing poverty and the inequitable distribution of socioeconomic resources by ethnicity and place in New Zealand is vital to improving health and reducing inequalities. Given the racialised nature of access to goods, services, and opportunities within New Zealand society, this also requires a strong commitment to eliminating racism. Such commitment and action will allow the benefits potentially flowing from strong communities to be fully realised. PMID:23702212</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3725420','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3725420"><span id="translatedtitle">Ethnic density and area deprivation: Neighbourhood effects on Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> health and racial discrimination in Aotearoa/New Zealand</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bécares, Laia; Cormack, Donna; Harris, Ricci</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Some studies suggest that ethnic minority people are healthier when they live in areas with a higher concentration of people from their own ethnic group, a so-called ethnic density effect. To date, no studies have examined the ethnic density effect among indigenous peoples, for whom connections to land, patterns of settlement, and drivers of residential location may differ from ethnic minority populations. The present study analysed the Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> sample from the 2006/07 New Zealand Health Survey to examine the association between increased Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> ethnic density, area deprivation, health, and experiences of racial discrimination. Results of multilevel regressions showed that an increase in Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> ethnic density was associated with decreased odds of reporting poor self-rated health, doctor-diagnosed common mental disorders, and experienced racial discrimination. These associations were strengthened after adjusting for area deprivation, which was consistently associated with increased odds of reporting poor health and reports of racial discrimination. Our findings show that whereas ethnic density is protective of the health and exposure to racial discrimination of Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, this effect is concealed by the detrimental effect of area deprivation, signalling that the benefits of ethnic density must be interpreted within the current socio-political context. This includes the institutional structures and racist practices that have created existing health and socioeconomic inequities in the first place, and maintain the unequal distribution of concentrated poverty in areas of high Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> density. Addressing poverty and the inequitable distribution of socioeconomic resources by ethnicity and place in New Zealand is vital to improving health and reducing inequalities. Given the racialised nature of access to goods, services, and opportunities within New Zealand society, this also requires a strong commitment to eliminating racism. Such commitment and action will allow the benefits potentially flowing from strong communities to be fully realised. PMID:23702212</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7652051','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7652051"><span id="translatedtitle">The importance of accurate repair of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle in the correction of unilateral cleft lip.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Park, C G; Ha, B</p> <p>1995-09-01</p> <p>Most of the attempts and efforts in cleft lip repair have been directed toward the skin incision. The importance of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle repair has been emphasized in recent years. The well-designed skin incision with simple repair of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle has produced a considerable improvement in the appearance of the upper lip; however, the repaired upper lip seems to change its shape abnormally in motion and has a tendency to be distorted with age if the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle is not repaired precisely and accurately. Following the dissection of the normal upper lip and unilateral cleft lip in cadavers, we could find two different components in the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle, a superficial and a deep component. One is a retractor and the other is a constrictor of the lip. They have antagonistic actions to each other during lip movement. We also can identify these two different components of the muscle in the cleft lip patient during operation. We thought inaccurate and mixed connection between these two different functional components could make the repaired lip distorted and unbalanced, which would get worse during growth. By identification and separate repair of the two different muscular components of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle (i.e., repair of the superficial and deep components on the lateral side with the corresponding components on the medial side), better results in the dynamic and three-dimensional configuration of the upper lip can be achieved, and unfavorable distortion can be avoided as the patients grow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7652051</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22126796','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22126796"><span id="translatedtitle">DRAMATIC EVOLUTION OF THE DISK-SHAPED SECONDARY IN THE ORION TRAPEZIUM STAR {theta}{sup 1} <span class="hlt">Ori</span> B{sub 1} (BM <span class="hlt">Ori</span>): MOST SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Windemuth, Diana; Herbst, William; Tingle, Evan; Fuechsl, Rachel; Kilgard, Roy; Pinette, Melanie; Templeton, Matthew; Henden, Arne</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>The eclipsing binary {theta}{sup 1} Orionis B{sub 1}, variable star designation BM <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, is the faintest of the four well-known Trapezium stars at the heart of the Orion Nebula. The primary is a B3 star ({approx}6 M{sub Sun }) but the nature of the secondary ({approx}2 M{sub Sun }) has long been mysterious, since the duration and shape of primary eclipse are inappropriate for any sort of ordinary star. Here we report nearly continuous photometric observations obtained with the MOST satellite over {approx}4 cycles of the 6.47 d binary period. The light curve is of unprecedented quality, revealing a deep, symmetric primary eclipse as well as a clear reflection effect and secondary eclipse. In addition, there are other small disturbances, some of which repeat at the same phase over the four cycles monitored. The shape of the primary light curve has clearly evolved significantly over the past 40 years. While its overall duration and depth have remained roughly constant, the slopes of the descent and ascent phases are significantly shallower now than in the past and its distinctive flat-bottomed ''pseudo-totality'' is much less obvious or even absent in the most recent data. We further demonstrate that the primary eclipse was detected at X-ray wavelengths during the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) study. The light curve continues to be well modeled by a self-luminous and reflective disk-shaped object seen nearly edge-on orbiting the B3 primary. The dramatic change in shape over four decades is modeled as an opacity variation in a tenuous outer envelope or disk of the secondary object. We presume that the secondary is an extremely young protostar at an earlier evolutionary phase than can be commonly observed elsewhere in the Galaxy and that the opacity variations observed are related to its digestion of some accreted matter over the last 50-100 years. Indeed, this object deserves continued observational and theoretical attention as the youngest known eclipsing binary system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012MNRAS.426.2738N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012MNRAS.426.2738N"><span id="translatedtitle">An investigation of the magnetic properties of the classical Be star ω <span class="hlt">Ori</span> by the MiMeS Collaboration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Neiner, C.; Grunhut, J. H.; Petit, V.; ud-Doula, A.; Wade, G. A.; Landstreet, J.; de Batz, B.; Cochard, F.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Huat, A.-L.</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>One hundred and twenty-five new high-precision spectropolarimetric observations have been obtained with ESPaDOnS (Eschelle Spectro-Polarimetric Device for the Observation of Stars) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and Narval at Télescope Bernard Lyot to investigate the magnetic properties of the classical Be star ω <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. No Stokes V signatures are detected in our polarimetric data. Measurements of the longitudinal magnetic field, with a median error bar of 30 G, and direct modelling of the mean least-squares deconvolved Stokes V profiles yield no evidence for a dipole magnetic field with polar surface strength greater than ˜80 G. We are therefore unable to confirm the presence of the magnetic field previously reported by Neiner et al. However, our spectroscopic data reveal the presence of periodic emission variability in H and He lines analogous to that reported by Neiner et al., considered as evidence of magnetically confined circumstellar plasma clouds. We revisit this hypothesis in light of the new magnetic analysis. Calculation of the magnetospheric Kepler radius RK and confinement parameter η* indicates that a surface dipole magnetic field with a polar strength larger than 63 G is sufficient to form of a centrifugally supported magnetosphere around ω <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. Our data are not sufficiently sensitive to detect fields of this magnitude; we are therefore unable to confirm or falsify the magnetic cloud hypothesis. Based on our results, we examine three possible scenarios that could potentially explain the behaviour of ω <span class="hlt">Ori</span>: (1) that no significant magnetic field is (or was) present in ω <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, and that the observed phenomena have their origin in another mechanism or mechanisms than corotating clouds. We are, however, unable to identify one; (2) that ω <span class="hlt">Ori</span> hosts an intermittent magnetic field produced by dynamo processes; however, no such process has been found so far to work in massive stars and especially to produce a dipolar field; and (3) that ω <span class="hlt">Ori</span> hosts a stable, organized (fossil) magnetic field that is responsible for the observed phenomena, but with a strength that is below our current detection threshold. Of these three scenarios, we consider the second one (dynamo process) as highly unlikely, whereas the other two should be falsifiable with intense monitoring. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France and the University of Hawaii and observations obtained with the Narval spectropolarimeter at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL), Observatoire du Pic du Midi, France.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AAS...21943704T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AAS...21943704T"><span id="translatedtitle">Evidence For Accretion-driven X-ray Production In Ex Lupi And V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Teets, William K.; Weintraub, D.; Grosso, N.; Principe, D.; Kastner, J.; Hamaguchi, K.; Richmond, M.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>EX Lupi is the prototype for a class of young, pre-main sequence stars, which are observed to undergo irregular optical outbursts that result in a several magnitude rise of the optical flux. EX Lupi was observed to optically erupt in 2008 January, triggering Chandra X-ray Observatory ToO observations shortly thereafter. In the 2008 March and June observations, we find the X-ray spectrum is best modeled with a two-temperature plasma with components of ˜0.4 and 1.7 keV. In subsequent observations in 2008 October, the lower-temperature plasma component appears to fade as EX Lupi returns to more quiescent optical levels. Accretion hotspots should generate plasma with temperatures of a few million Kelvin (˜0.3 keV); thus, this fading of the lower-temperature component in the spectra of EX Lupi is consistent with a decrease in accretion-generated X-ray flux from shock-heated plasma. We also find that during optical outburst, the light curve of EX Lupi appears to exhibit periodic variability of ˜37 days with the V-band flux changing by as much as ˜44 magnitudes. Similar to EX Lupi, V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> is a low-mass, deeply-embedded, pre-main sequence star that has undergone two optical/NIR outbursts in the last decade; both times, the star gradually faded over several months to years. The X-ray evolution during each of these eruptions has been monitored through multi-epoch Chandra observations. Like the X-ray flux of EX Lupi, we find that the X-ray flux of V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> is well correlated with the rise and fall in the optical and infrared brightnesses for both epochs; unlike EX Lupi, however, these spectra are well modeled with a single-temperature plasma of 4-6 keV. These results suggest that the primary X-ray generation mechanism for this star during optical/NIR outbursts is accretion but that the X-ray flux is likely generated by magnetic reconnection events in the accretion stream.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005A%26A...429.1007S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005A%26A...429.1007S"><span id="translatedtitle">Rotation and variability of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs near ɛ <span class="hlt">Ori</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Scholz, A.; Eislöffel, J.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>We explore the rotation and activity of very low mass (VLM) objects by means of a photometric variability study. Our targets in the vicinity of ɛ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> belong to the <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1b population in the Orion star-forming complex. In this region we selected 143 VLM stars and brown dwarfs (BDs), whose photometry in RIJHK is consistent with membership of the young population. The variability of these objects was investigated using a densely sampled I-band time series covering four consecutive nights with altogether 129 data points per object. Our targets show three types of variability: Thirty objects, including nine BDs, show significant photometric periods, ranging from 4 h up to 100 h, which we interpret as the rotation periods. Five objects, including two BDs, exhibit variability with high amplitudes up to 1 mag which is at least partly irregular. This behaviour is most likely caused by ongoing accretion and confirms that VLM objects undergo a T Tauri phase similar to solar-mass stars. Finally, one VLM star shows a strong flare event of 0.3 mag amplitude. The rotation periods show dependence on mass, i.e. the average period decreases with decreasing object mass, consistent with previously found mass-period relationships in younger and older clusters. The period distribution of BDs extends down to the breakup period, where centrifugal and gravitational forces are balanced. Combining our BD periods with literature data, we found that the lower period limit for substellar objects lies between 2 h and 4 h, more or less independent of age. Contrary to stars, these fast rotating BDs seem to evolve at constant rotation period from ages of 3 Myr to 1 Gyr, in spite of the contraction process. Thus, they should experience strong rotational braking. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, observing run 68.C-0213(A) Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http:/ /cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/429/1007.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.456.2907P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.456.2907P"><span id="translatedtitle">X-ray, UV and optical analysis of supergiants: ɛ <span class="hlt">Ori</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Puebla, Raul E.; Hillier, D. John; Zsargó, Janos; Cohen, David H.; Leutenegger, Maurice A.</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>We present a multi-wavelength (X-ray to optical) analysis, based on non-local thermodynamic equilibrium photospheric+wind models, of the B0 Ia-supergiant: ɛ <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. The aim is to test the consistency of physical parameters, such as the mass-loss rate and CNO abundances, derived from different spectral bands. The derived mass-loss rate is {dot {M}} / {√{f_{∞}}} {˜} 1.6 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 where f∞ is the volume filling factor. However, the S IV λλ1062,1073 profiles are too strong in the models; to fit the observed profiles it is necessary to use f∞ <0.01. This value is a factor of 5 to 10 lower than inferred from other diagnostics, and implies {dot{M}} ≲ 1 × 10^{-7} M⊙ yr-1. The discrepancy could be related to porosity-vorosity effects or a problem with the ionization of sulphur in the wind. To fit the UV profiles of N V and O VI it was necessary to include emission from an interclump medium with a density contrast (ρcl/ρICM) of ˜100. X-ray emission in H/He like and Fe L lines was modelled using four plasma components located within the wind. We derive plasma temperatures from 1 × 106 to 7 × 106 K, with lower temperatures starting in the outer regions (R0 ˜ 3-6 R*), and a hot component starting closer to the star (R0 ≲ 2.9 R*). From X-ray line profiles we infer {dot{M}} < 4.9 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1. The X-ray spectrum (≥0.1 kev) yields an X-ray luminosity LX ˜ 2.0 × 10-7Lbol, consistent with the superion line profiles. X-ray abundances are in agreement with those derived from the UV and optical analysis: ɛ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> is slightly enhanced in nitrogen and depleted in carbon and oxygen, evidence for CNO processed material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NewA...28...23K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NewA...28...23K"><span id="translatedtitle">First BVR light curves and preliminary results of a recently discovered W UMa-type binary: V1848 <span class="hlt">Ori</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kriwattanawong, W.; Poojon, P.</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>First complete photometric light curves of a recently discovered contact binary, V1848 <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, are presented. BVR imaging data were used to derive photometric solutions, using Wilson-Devinney code. We discovered that this system is a weak-contact binary, with a fillout factor of f = 13.14%(1.44%). Preliminary results showed that V1848 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> is an A-type W UMa system, with a mass ratio of q = 0.7615. The more massive component was found about 400 K hotter than the other one. This system has varied from W-type to A-type during the last decade. According to the preliminary physical parameters, the weak-contact configuration of this system, with the mass ratio close to unity, and no sign of long-term orbital period change yet, is unlikely to be broken. The contact configuration is expected to be maintained and become deeper or not, depending on effect of the AML mechanism.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AAS...22734305C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AAS...22734305C"><span id="translatedtitle">ALMA Early Science Observations of Outbursting Stellar Systems:Disk Masses for FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> and EXor Objects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cieza, Lucas A.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Tobin, John J.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Hales, Antonio; Casassus, Simon; Principe, David; Schreiber, Matthias R.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>It is believed that low-mass stars build a significant fraction of their total mass during short outbursts of enhanced accretion (up to 10E-4 MSOLAR /yr). The most dramatic episodic accretion events known in Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) are FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> and EXor outbursts. FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> objects are characterized by a sudden brightening of 5 magnitudes or more within one year and remain bright for decades. EXor objects have lower amplitude outbursts on shorter timescales (months to years). Here we present an ALMA 230 GHz (1.3 mm / band-6) mini-survey of 8 outbursting sources (three FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> and ve EXor objects) in Orion with 1" (450 AU) resolution. We present continuum, 12CO, 13CO, and C18O line images and derive dust and (when possible) gas disk masses. The disk masses derived from the line observations are systematically lower (by factors of 3-5) than those calculated from the continuum and adopting the standard gas-to-dust ratio of 100, which agrees with results on T Tauri disks in Taurus. After beam deconvolution, we nd that the disks are remarkably compact (r = 70-150 AU). The 1.3 mm fuxes of the outbursting sources span over three orders of magnitude, but the FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> objects are signi cantly brighter than the EXor objects. The inferred disk masses for the brightest objects are > 0.1 Msolar , rendering gravitational instability a likely outburst mechanism. On the other hand, the inferred disk masses for the faintest targets are ~ 1-5 MJUP , and thus an alternative mechanism must be responsible for their outbursts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3733188','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3733188"><span id="translatedtitle">The Combating Obesity in Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pasifika Adolescent School-Children Study: COMPASS Methodology and Study Protocol</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Stoner, Lee; Shultz, Sarah P.; Lambrick, Danielle M.; Krebs, Jeremy; Weatherall, Mark; Palmer, Barry R.; Lane, Andrew M.; Kira, Geoff; Witter, Trevor; Williams, Michelle A.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background: Lifestyle modifications including, physical activity can reduce obesity-related morbidity and subsequent cardiovascular disease in youth. This study will investigate the efficacy of a culturally-sensitive, non-contact, boxing-orientated training program on obesity and related cardio-metabolic conditions in Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pasifika adolescents. Details of the methodological aspects of recruitment, inclusion criteria, randomization, cultural sensitivity, intervention program, assessments, process evaluation, and statistical analyses are described. Methods: This study will be a community based, New Zealand, randomized control trial (RCT). Male and female obese (body mass index >95th percentile) Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pasifika adolescents aged 14-16 years will be recruited and the sample size will be confirmed through a feasibility study. Combating Obesity in Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pasifika Adolescent School-children Study (COMPASS) is a 6-month, theory-based program, conducted 3-times/week in a culturally appropriate setting. Each session includes 40 min boxing-orientated training and 30 min resistance training. Assessments will be made at baseline, 3-months, 6-months, 12-months, and 24-months. Main outcomes include abdominal obesity, endothelial function, and insulin resistance. Other outcomes include arterial stiffness, lipid profile, inflammatory biomarkers, well-being, and aerobic fitness. Control measures include physical activity, sleep behavior, and dietary intake. Results: As a protocol paper there are no specific results to present, our purpose is to share our RCT design with the scientific community. Conclusions: COMPASS will be used to provide direction for exercise prescription policy in at-risk Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pasifika adolescents. PMID:23930168</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApJ...819L...5G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApJ...819L...5G"><span id="translatedtitle">On the 2015 Outburst of the EXor Variable V1118 <span class="hlt">Ori</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Giannini, T.; Lorenzetti, D.; Antoniucci, S.; Arkharov, A. A.; Larionov, V. M.; Di Paola, A.; Bisogni, S.; Marchetti, A.</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>After a long-lasting period of quiescence of about a decade, the source V1118 <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, one of the most representative members of the EXor variables, is now outbursting. Since the initial increase of the near-infrared flux of about 1 mag (JHK bands) registered on 2015 September 22, the source brightness has remained fairly stable. We estimate ΔV ˜ 3 mag, with respect to the quiescence phase. An optical/near-IR low-resolution spectrum has been obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope instruments MODS and LUCI2 and compared with a spectrum of a similar spectral resolution and sensitivity level taken during quiescence. Together with the enhancement of the continuum, the outburst spectrum presents a definitely higher number of emission lines, in particular H i recombination lines of the Balmer, Paschen, and Brackett series, along with bright permitted lines of several species, forbidden atomic lines, and CO ro-vibrational lines. Both mass accretion and mass-loss rates have significantly increased (by about an order of magnitude: {\\dot{M}}{acc} = 1.2-4.8 10-8 M⊙ yr-1, {\\dot{M}}{loss} = 0.8-2 10-9 M⊙ yr-1), with respect to the quiescence phase. If compared with previous outbursts, the present one appears less energetic. Alternatively, it could already be in the fading phase (with the maximum brightness level reached when the source was not visible), or, viceversa, still in the rising phase.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26267565','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26267565"><span id="translatedtitle">Functional Sharing of the Upper Orbicularis <span class="hlt">Oris</span> Muscle for the Reconstruction of the Lower Lip.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yazar, Memet; Yazar, Sevgi Kurt; Kozanoğlu, Erol; Karsidag, Semra</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>The lip reconstruction is a very controversial topic in plastic surgery and many flaps have been described for this purpose. Despite all of the interventions, some patients still have problems such as drooling and gingival show that decrease their quality of life. In this study, the authors report a patient whose lower lip was resected totally for squamous cell carcinoma. His lip was reconstructed with radial forearm flap and the patient was referred to our clinic with the aforementioned complaints. A portion of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle of the upper lip was designed as a bipedicled flap, and it was transposed to the lower lip to make the initial flap functional. After the operation, the sphincteric function of the lip was better, and the problems as drooling and gingival show were absent. In conclusion, this flap can be a good option to make the initial nonfunctional flaps (such as radial forearm flap), functional in the aspect of lower lip reconstruction. It has a function, and it is concordant with the principle of "reconstructing like with like." The native muscle tissue of the upper lip can be transferred partially to maintain physiologic oral competency. PMID:26267565</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14602914','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14602914"><span id="translatedtitle">Bidirectional replication from an internal <span class="hlt">ori</span> site of the linear N15 plasmid prophage.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ravin, Nikolai V; Kuprianov, Victor V; Gilcrease, Eddie B; Casjens, Sherwood R</p> <p>2003-11-15</p> <p>The prophage of coliphage N15 is not integrated into the chromosome but exists as a linear plasmid molecule with covalently closed hairpin ends (telomeres). Upon infection the injected phage DNA circularizes via its cohesive ends. Then, a phage-encoded enzyme, protelomerase, cuts the circle and forms the hairpin telomeres. N15 protelomerase acts as a telomere-resolving enzyme during prophage DNA replication. We characterized the N15 replicon and found that replication of circular N15 miniplasmids requires only the repA gene, which encodes a multidomain protein homologous to replication proteins of bacterial plasmids replicated by a theta-mechanism. Replication of a linear N15 miniplasmid also requires the protelomerase gene and telomere regions. N15 prophage replication is initiated at an internal <span class="hlt">ori</span> site located within repA and proceeds bidirectionally. Electron microscopy data suggest that after duplication of the left telomere, protelomerase cuts this site generating Y-shaped molecules. Full replication of the molecule and subsequent resolution of the right telomere then results in two linear plasmid molecules. N15 prophage replication thus appears to follow a mechanism that is distinct from that employed by eukaryotic replicons with this type of telomere and suggests the possibility of evolutionarily independent appearances of prokaryotic and eukaryotic replicons with covalently closed telomeres. PMID:14602914</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=275552','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=275552"><span id="translatedtitle">Bidirectional replication from an internal <span class="hlt">ori</span> site of the linear N15 plasmid prophage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ravin, Nikolai V.; Kuprianov, Victor V.; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Casjens, Sherwood R.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>The prophage of coliphage N15 is not integrated into the chromosome but exists as a linear plasmid molecule with covalently closed hairpin ends (telomeres). Upon infection the injected phage DNA circularizes via its cohesive ends. Then, a phage-encoded enzyme, protelomerase, cuts the circle and forms the hairpin telomeres. N15 protelomerase acts as a telomere-resolving enzyme during prophage DNA replication. We characterized the N15 replicon and found that replication of circular N15 miniplasmids requires only the repA gene, which encodes a multidomain protein homologous to replication proteins of bacterial plasmids replicated by a theta-mechanism. Replication of a linear N15 miniplasmid also requires the protelomerase gene and telomere regions. N15 prophage replication is initiated at an internal <span class="hlt">ori</span> site located within repA and proceeds bidirectionally. Electron microscopy data suggest that after duplication of the left telomere, protelomerase cuts this site generating Y-shaped molecules. Full replication of the molecule and subsequent resolution of the right telomere then results in two linear plasmid molecules. N15 prophage replication thus appears to follow a mechanism that is distinct from that employed by eukaryotic replicons with this type of telomere and suggests the possibility of evolutionarily independent appearances of prokaryotic and eukaryotic replicons with covalently closed telomeres. PMID:14602914</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22494506','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22494506"><span id="translatedtitle">The 'warrior gene' and the Mã<span class="hlt">ori</span> people: the responsibility of the geneticists.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Perbal, Laurence</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>The 'gene of' is a teleosemantic expression that conveys a simplistic and linear relationship between a gene and a phenotype. Throughout the 20th century, geneticists studied these genes of traits. The studies were often polemical when they concerned human traits: the 'crime gene', 'poverty gene', 'IQ gene', 'gay gene' or 'gene of alcoholism'. Quite recently, a controversy occurred in 2006 in New Zealand that started with the claim that a 'warrior gene' exists in the Mã<span class="hlt">ori</span> community. This claim came from a geneticist working on the MAOA gene. This article is interested in the responsibility of that researcher regarding the origin of the controversy. Several errors were made: overestimation of results, abusive use of the 'gene of' kind of expression, poor communication with the media and a lack of scientific culture. The issues of the debate were not taken into account sufficiently, either from the political, social, ethical or even the genetic points of view. After more than 100 years of debates around 'genes of' all kinds (here, the 'warrior gene'), geneticists may not hide themselves behind the media when a controversy occurs. Responsibilities have to be assumed. PMID:22494506</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015yCat..74441793D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015yCat..74441793D"><span id="translatedtitle">VizieR Online Data Catalog: 25 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> group low-mass stars (Downes+, 2014)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Downes, J. J.; Briceno, C.; Mateu, C.; Hernandez, J.; Vivas, A. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; Allen, L.</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Multi-epoch optical V-, R-, I-band and Hα observations across the entire Orion OB1 association (spanning ~180deg2) were obtained as part of the CVSO (Briceno et al., 2005AJ....129..907B, Cat. J/AJ/129/907), being conducted since 1998 with the Jurgen Stock 1.0/1.5 Schmidt-type telescope and the 8000x8000-pixel QUEST-I CCD Mosaic camera, at the National Astronomical Observatory of Venezuela. During 2009 a new dedicated 4m survey telescope, the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), located at ESO's Paranal Observatory, was commissioned by the VISTA consortium. For the Galactic Science Verification of VISTA, an ~30deg2 area of the Orion OB1 association, which included the Orion Belt region, part of the Orion A cloud, the 25 Orionis and σ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> clusters, was imaged in the Z, Y, J, H and Ks filters, during 2009 October 16 to November 2. (3 data files).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26755532','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26755532"><span id="translatedtitle">Interkingdom cooperation between Candida albicans, Streptococcus oralis and Actinomyces <span class="hlt">oris</span> modulates early biofilm development on denture material.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cavalcanti, Indira M G; Nobbs, Angela H; Ricomini-Filho, Antônio Pedro; Jenkinson, Howard F; Del Bel Cury, Altair A</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Candida-associated stomatitis affects up to 60% of denture wearers, and Candida albicans remains the most commonly isolated fungal species. The oral bacteria Actinomyces <span class="hlt">oris</span> and Streptococcus oralis are abundant in early dental plaque. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of S. oralis and A. <span class="hlt">oris</span> on the development of C. albicans biofilms on denture material. Resin discs were coated with saliva and at early (1.5 h) or later (24 h) stages of biofilm development, cell numbers of each species were determined. Spatial distribution of microorganisms was visualized by confocal scanning laser microscopy of biofilms labelled by differential fluorescence or by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Interkingdom interactions underpinning biofilm development were also evaluated planktonically utilizing fluorescence microscopy. Synergistic interactions between all three species occurred within biofilms and planktonically. Bacterial cells coaggregated with each other and adhered singly or in coaggregates to C. albicans hyphal filaments. Streptococcus oralis appeared to enhance hyphal filament production and C. albicans biovolume was increased 2-fold. Concomitantly, cell numbers of S. oralis and A. <span class="hlt">oris</span> were enhanced by C. albicans. Thus, cooperative physical and metabolic processes occurring between these three microbial species intensify pathogenic plaque communities on denture surfaces. PMID:26755532</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20634889','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20634889"><span id="translatedtitle">Role for a region of helically unstable DNA within the Epstein-Barr virus latent cycle origin of DNA replication <span class="hlt">ori</span>P in origin function</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Polonskaya, Zhanna; Benham, Craig J.; Hearing, Janet . E-mail: jhearing@ms.cc.sunysb.edu</p> <p>2004-10-25</p> <p>The minimal replicator of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent cycle origin of DNA replication <span class="hlt">ori</span>P is composed of two binding sites for the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and flanking inverted repeats that bind the telomere repeat binding factor TRF2. Although not required for minimal replicator activity, additional binding sites for EBNA-1 and TRF2 and one or more auxiliary elements located to the right of the EBNA-1/TRF2 sites are required for the efficient replication of <span class="hlt">ori</span>P plasmids. Another region of <span class="hlt">ori</span>P that is predicted to be destabilized by DNA supercoiling is shown here to be an important functional component of <span class="hlt">ori</span>P. The ability of DNA fragments of unrelated sequence and possessing supercoiled-induced DNA duplex destabilized (SIDD) structures, but not fragments characterized by helically stable DNA, to substitute for this component of <span class="hlt">ori</span>P demonstrates a role for the SIDD region in the initiation of <span class="hlt">ori</span>P-plasmid DNA replication.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3675488','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3675488"><span id="translatedtitle">Din7 and Mhr1 expression levels regulate double-strand-break–induced replication and recombination of mtDNA at <span class="hlt">ori</span>5 in yeast</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ling, Feng; Hori, Akiko; Yoshitani, Ayako; Niu, Rong; Yoshida, Minoru; Shibata, Takehiko</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The Ntg1 and Mhr1 proteins initiate rolling-circle mitochondrial (mt) DNA replication to achieve homoplasmy, and they also induce homologous recombination to maintain mitochondrial genome integrity. Although replication and recombination profoundly influence mitochondrial inheritance, the regulatory mechanisms that determine the choice between these pathways remain unknown. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, double-strand breaks (DSBs) introduced by Ntg1 at the mitochondrial replication origin <span class="hlt">ori</span>5 induce homologous DNA pairing by Mhr1, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) enhance production of DSBs. Here, we show that a mitochondrial nuclease encoded by the nuclear gene DIN7 (DNA damage inducible gene) has 5′-exodeoxyribonuclease activity. Using a small ρ− mtDNA bearing <span class="hlt">ori</span>5 (hypersuppressive; HS) as a model mtDNA, we revealed that DIN7 is required for ROS-enhanced mtDNA replication and recombination that are both induced at <span class="hlt">ori</span>5. Din7 overproduction enhanced Mhr1-dependent mtDNA replication and increased the number of residual DSBs at <span class="hlt">ori</span>5 in HS-ρ− cells and increased deletion mutagenesis at the <span class="hlt">ori</span>5 region in ρ+ cells. However, simultaneous overproduction of Mhr1 suppressed all of these phenotypes and enhanced homologous recombination. Our results suggest that after homologous pairing, the relative activity levels of Din7 and Mhr1 modulate the preference for replication versus homologous recombination to repair DSBs at <span class="hlt">ori</span>5. PMID:23598996</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4790504','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4790504"><span id="translatedtitle">Whakawhanaungatanga: the importance of culturally meaningful connections to improve uptake of pulmonary rehabilitation by Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> with COPD – a qualitative study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Levack, William MM; Jones, Bernadette; Grainger, Rebecca; Boland, Pauline; Brown, Melanie; Ingham, Tristram R</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background Pulmonary rehabilitation is known to improve function and quality of life for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, little research has been conducted on the influence of culture on experiences of pulmonary rehabilitation. This study examined factors influencing uptake of pulmonary rehabilitation by Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> with COPD in New Zealand. Method Grounded theory nested within kaupapa Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> methodology. Transcripts were analyzed from interviews and focus groups with 15 Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and ten New Zealand non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> invited to attend pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD. Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> participants had either attended a mainstream hospital-based program, a community-based program designed “by Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, for Māori”, or had experienced both. Results Several factors influencing uptake of pulmonary rehabilitation were common to all participants regardless of ethnicity: 1) participants’ past experiences (eg, of exercise; of health care systems), 2) attitudes and expectations, 3) access issues (eg, time, transport, and conflicting responsibilities), and 4) initial program experiences. These factors were moderated by the involvement of family and peers, interactions with health professionals, the way information on programs was presented, and by new illness events. For Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, however, several additional factors were also identified relating to cultural experiences of pulmonary rehabilitation. In particular, Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> participants placed high value on whakawhanaungatanga: the making of culturally meaningful connections with others. Culturally appropriate communication and relationship building was deemed so important by some Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> participants that when it was absent, they felt strongly discouraged to attend pulmonary rehabilitation. Only the more holistic services offered a program in which they felt culturally safe and to which they were willing to return for ongoing rehabilitation. Conclusion Lack of attention to cultural factors in the delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation may be a barrier to its uptake by indigenous, minority ethnic groups, such as New Zealand Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>. Indigenous-led or culturally responsive health care interventions for COPD may provide a solution to this issue. PMID:27022255</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApJ...808...88R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApJ...808...88R"><span id="translatedtitle">HST/STIS Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of the Components of the Massive Triple Star δ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> A</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Richardson, Noel D.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Gull, Theodore R.; Lindler, Don J.; Gies, Douglas R.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Chené, André-Nicolas</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>The multiple star system of δ Orionis is one of the closest examples of a system containing a luminous O-type, bright giant star (component Aa1). It is often used as a spectral-type standard and has the highest observed X-ray flux of any hot-star binary. The main component Aa1 is orbited by two lower mass stars, faint Aa2 in a 5.7 day eclipsing binary, and Ab, an astrometric companion with an estimated period of 346 years. Generally the flux from all three stars is recorded in ground-based spectroscopy, and the spectral decomposition of the components has proved difficult. Here we present Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph ultraviolet spectroscopy of δ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> A that provides us with spatially separated spectra of Aa and Ab for the first time. We measured radial velocities for Aa1 and Ab in two observations made near the velocity extrema of Aa1. We show tentative evidence for the detection of the Aa2 component in cross-correlation functions of the observed and model spectra. We discuss the appearance of the UV spectra of Aa1 and Ab with reference to model spectra. Both stars have similar effective temperatures, but Ab is fainter and is a rapid rotator. The results will help in the interpretation of ground-based spectroscopy and in understanding the physical and evolutionary parameters of these massive stars. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #13450.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AJ....129..907B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AJ....129..907B"><span id="translatedtitle">The CIDA Variability Survey of Orion OB1. I. The Low-Mass Population of <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1a and 1b</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Briceo, Cesar; Calvet, Nuria; Hernndez, J.; Vivas, A. K.; Hartmann, Lee; Downes, J. J.; Berlind, Perry</p> <p>2005-02-01</p> <p>We present results of a large-scale, multiepoch optical survey of the Orion OB1 association, carried out with the QUEST camera at the Venezuela National Astronomical Observatory. We identify for the first time the widely spread low-mass, young population in the <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1a and OB1b subassociations. Candidate members were picked up by their variability in the V band and position in color-magnitude diagrams. We obtained spectra to confirm membership. In a region spanning ~68 deg2, we found 197 new young stars; of these, 56 are located in the <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1a subassociation and 141 in <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1b. The spatial distribution of the low-mass young stars is spatially coincident with that of the high-mass members but suggests a much sharper edge to the association. Comparison with the spatial extent of molecular gas and extinction maps indicates that the subassociation <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1b is concentrated within a ringlike structure of radius ~2(~15 pc at 440 pc), centered roughly on the star ? <span class="hlt">Ori</span> in the Orion belt. The ring is apparent in 13CO and corresponds to a region with an extinction AV>=1. The stars exhibiting strong H? emission, an indicator of active accretion, are found along this ring, whereas the center is populated with weak H?-emitting stars. In contrast, <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1a is located in a region devoid of gas and dust. We identify a grouping of stars within a ~3 deg2 area located in <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1a, roughly clustered around the B2 star 25 <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. The Herbig Ae/Be star V346 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> is also associated with this grouping, which could be an older analog of ? <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. Using several sets of evolutionary tracks, we find an age of 7-10 Myr for <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1a and of ~4-6 Myr for <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1b, consistent with previous estimates from OB stars. Indicators such as the equivalent width of H? and near-IR excesses show that the number of accreting low-mass stars decreases sharply between <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1b and <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1a. These results indicate that although a substantial fraction of accreting disks remain at ages ~5 Myr, inner disks are essentially dissipated by 10 Myr. Based on observations obtained at the Llano del Hato National Astronomical Observatory of Venezuela, operated by Centro de Investigaciones de Astronoma (CIDA) for the Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnologa, and at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) of the Smithsonian Institution. Based on observations obtained at the 3.5 m WIYN Telescope. The WIYN Observatory is a joint facility of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3047731','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3047731"><span id="translatedtitle">Elevation of the Corner of the Mouth Using Botulinum Toxin Type A</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Goldman, Alberto; Wollina, Uwe</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Indications for botulinum toxin type A have been constantly evolving, and it can currently be used in virtually any area of the face and neck. The authors present their experience with this neurotoxin in treating the platysmal bands and depressor <span class="hlt">anguli</span> <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle with the purpose of cosmetically improving the anterior neck and lifting the oral commissure. PMID:21430826</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130011908','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130011908"><span id="translatedtitle">X-Raying the Beating Heart of a Newborn Star: Rotational Modulation of High-Energy Radiation from V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hamaguchi, Kenji; Grosso, Nicolas; Kastner, Joel H.; Weintraub, David A.; Richmond, Michael; Petre, Robert; Teets, William K.; Principe, David</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>We report a periodicity of approx.1 day in the highly elevated X-ray emission from the protostar V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> during its two recent multiple-year outbursts of mass accretion. This periodicity is indicative of protostellar rotation at near-breakup speed. Modeling of the phased X-ray light curve indicates the high-temperature ( 50 MK), X-ray-emitting plasma, which is most likely heated by accretion-induced magnetic reconnection, resides in dense ( 5 1010 cm.3), pancake-shaped magnetic footprints where the accretion stream feeds the newborn star. The sustained X-ray periodicity of V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> demonstrates that such protostellar magnetospheric accretion configurations can be stable over timescales of years. Subject headings: stars: formation stars: individual (V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span>) stars: pre-main sequence X-rays: stars</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9159470','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9159470"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of the tobacco chloroplast DNA replication origin (<span class="hlt">ori</span>B) downstream of the 23 S rRNA gene.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kunnimalaiyaan, M; Shi, F; Nielsen, B L</p> <p>1997-05-01</p> <p>We have mapped the origin of DNA replication (<span class="hlt">ori</span>B) downstream of the 23 S rRNA gene in each copy of the inverted repeat (IR) of tobacco chloroplast DNA between positions 130,502 and 131,924 (IR(A)) by a combination of approaches. In vivo chloroplast DNA replication intermediates were examined by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis. Extended arc patterns suggestive of replication intermediates containing extended single-stranded regions were observed with the 4.29 kb SspI fragment and an overlapping EcoRI fragment from one end of the inverted repeat, while only simple Y patterns were observed with a 3.92 kb BamHI-KpnI fragment internal to the SspI fragment. Other restriction fragments of tobacco chloroplast DNA besides those at the <span class="hlt">ori</span>A region also generated only simple Y patterns in two-dimensional agarose gels. Several chloroplast DNA clones from this region were tested for their ability to support in vitro DNA replication using a partially purified chloroplast protein fraction. Templates with a deletion of 154 bp from the SspI to the BamHI sites near the end of the inverted repeat resulted in a considerable loss of in vitro DNA replication activity. These results support the presence of a replication origin at the end of the inverted repeat. The 5' end of nascent DNA from the replication displacement loop was identified at position 130,697 for IR(A) (111,832 for IR(B)) by primer extension. A single major product insensitive to alkali and RNase treatment was observed and mapped to the base of a stem-loop structure which contains one of two neighboring BamHI sites near the end of each inverted repeat. This provides the first precise determination of the start site of DNA synthesis from <span class="hlt">ori</span>B. Adjacent DNA fragments containing the stem-loop structure and the 5' region exhibit sequence-specific gel mobility shift activity when incubated with the replication protein fraction, suggesting the presence of multiple binding sites. PMID:9159470</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AJ....151..147S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AJ....151..147S"><span id="translatedtitle">The Ionization Structure of Sharpless 2-264: Multiwavelength Observations of the λ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> H II Region</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sahan, M.; Haffner, L. M.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>We present velocity-resolved maps taken with the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) in Hα, [S ii] λ 6716, and [N ii] λ 6583 around the well-known O8 III star λ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> A (HD 36861) ({\\ell }=185^\\circ to 205^\\circ ,b=-24^\\circ to -1^\\circ ). The integrated intensity ({v}{{LSR}}=-80 to +80 km s‑1), {I}{{H}α }, within WHAM’s one-degree beams varies from ∼190 R near the center to ∼10 R on the periphery of the nebula where it becomes comparable to foreground and/or background emission in this complex region. Intensity ratios for [N ii]/Hα and [S ii]/Hα average 0.28 and 0.35, respectively. In both ratios, higher values are found preferentially at larger radii from λ <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, although the behavior of [N ii]/Hα is complicated near the edges of the nebula. The [S ii]/[N ii] intensity ratio ranges from ∼0.5 to ∼1.0, with the value increasing toward larger radii (and lower Hα intensities). Variations of the [S ii]/Hα, [N ii]/Hα, and [S ii]/[N ii] line ratios in this diffuse region show some similar trends to those seen in the warm ionized medium (WIM) but with generally lower metal-line ratios. As with the WIM, the trends are driven by changes in the underlying physical parameters, most notably the ionization states and gas temperature. To investigate which cause might be dominant in this region, we use these extremely high signal-to-noise observations to construct a map of temperature and non-thermal velocity throughout the nebula. Using the line widths of Hα and [S ii], we separate thermal and non-thermal components and find spatial trends of these parameters within the nebula. Ion temperatures range between 4000 and 8000 K throughout the nebula. The non-thermal velocity map reveals a decrease in velocity from about 10 to 5 km s‑1 from the center to the edge of the lower half of the H ii region. In addition to using the widths as a measure of temperature, we also use the variation in [N ii]/Hα to estimate electron temperature. The results obtained from this diffuse H ii region around λ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> can be compared to studies of the WIM to provide important insight into the nature of the diffuse ionized gas throughout the disk and halo of the Galaxy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3556536','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3556536"><span id="translatedtitle">A New Method for Creating a Definite Philtrum by the Flipping of an Orbicularis <span class="hlt">Oris</span> Muscle Flap in a Patient with an Indistinct Philtrum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Choi, Hyun Nam; Kim, Sin Rak</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The philtrum plays a key role in the appearance of the upper lip and nostril sill. Therefore, construction of the philtrum is crucial for attaining a natural appearance of the upper lip. We used a flipping myoplasty of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle on a patient with a flat philtrum in order to effectively reconstruct the philtral dimple and column. A 35-year-old female presented to our department with the complaint of a flat upper lip. A superficial layer of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle on the median aspect of the upper lip was vertically incised and elevated to a thickness of 2 mm. Both sides of the elevated muscle flap were then folded to the lateral sides so that the border could be sutured onto the outer portion of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle. The patient was observed for one year postoperatively. Her philtrum deepened by 1.25 mm, with the central angle of her Cupid's bow improving from a preoperative measurement of 146° to 128° postoperatively. In a patient with an indistinct philtrum, a flipping orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> myoplasty was performed to attain a definite philtral column and a philtral dimple. Natural upper lip movement was maintained, and an aesthetically and functionally satisfactory reconstruction was achieved. PMID:23362482</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005hris.conf..419L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005hris.conf..419L"><span id="translatedtitle">Spectroscopy of the M Supergiant α <span class="hlt">Ori</span> in the 1 2.5 μm Region</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lundqvist, Martin; Wahlgren, Glenn</p> <p></p> <p>The study of elemental abundances in cool stars via atomic lines in the optical region is made di.cult by stellar molecular absorption. At infrared wavelengths this problem is diminished, but ground-based observations suffer from absorption by the earth’s atmosphere. Fortunately, there are spectral windows through which we can observe. We have explored several such windows in the spectral region from 1 2.5 μm, coinciding with the wavelength domain of the new VLT instrument CRIRES, for atomic lines suitable for the study of cool luminous stars, in particular α <span class="hlt">Ori</span> (M2Iab). We present preliminary results from this search along with our first results on abundances of iron and the weak s-process elements Sr, Y, Zr.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10572291','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10572291"><span id="translatedtitle">Cellular localization of <span class="hlt">ori</span>C during the cell cycle of Escherichia coli as analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Roos, M; van Geel, A B; Aarsman, M E; Veuskens, J T; Woldringh, C L; Nanninga, N</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>The origin of replication of Escherichia coli, <span class="hlt">ori</span>C, has been labeled by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The E. coli K12 strain was grown under steady state conditions with a doubling time of 79 min at 28 degrees C. Under these growth conditions DNA replication starts in the previous cell cycle at -33 min. At birth cells possess two origins which are visible as two separated foci in fully labeled cells. The number of foci increased with cell length. The distance of foci from the nearest cell pole has been measured in various length classes. The data suggest: i) that the two most outwardly located foci keep a constant distance to the cell pole and they therefore move apart gradually in line with cell elongation; and ii) that at the initiation of DNA replication the labeled origins occur near the center of prospective daughter cells. PMID:10572291</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22092435','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22092435"><span id="translatedtitle">MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF V2775 <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, AN OUTBURSTING PROTOSTAR IN L 1641: EXPLORING THE EDGE OF THE FU ORIONIS REGIME</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fischer, William J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Kounkel, Marina; Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Henning, Thomas; Ali, Babar; Stanke, Thomas; Osorio, Mayra; Wilson, T. L.</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>Individual outbursting young stars are important laboratories for studying the physics of episodic accretion and the extent to which this phenomenon can explain the luminosity distribution of protostars. We present new and archival data for V2775 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> (HOPS 223), a protostar in the L 1641 region of the Orion molecular clouds that was discovered by Caratti o Garatti et al. to have recently undergone an order-of-magnitude increase in luminosity. Our near-infrared spectra of the source have strong blueshifted He I {lambda}10830 absorption, strong H{sub 2}O and CO absorption, and no H I emission, all typical of FU Orionis sources. With data from the Infrared Telescope Facility, the Two Micron All Sky Survey, the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Herschel, and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment that span from 1 to 70 {mu}m pre-outburst and from 1 to 870 {mu}m post-outburst, we estimate that the outburst began between 2005 April and 2007 March. We also model the pre- and post-outburst spectral energy distributions of the source, finding it to be in the late stages of accreting its envelope with a disk-to-star accretion rate that increased from {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} to {approx}10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} during the outburst. The post-outburst luminosity at the epoch of the FU Orionis-like near-IR spectra is 28 L{sub Sun }, making V2775 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> the least luminous documented FU Orionis outburster with a protostellar envelope. The existence of low-luminosity outbursts supports the notion that a range of episiodic accretion phenomena can partially explain the observed spread in protostellar luminosities.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MNRAS.451.2015O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MNRAS.451.2015O"><span id="translatedtitle">Revisiting the rigidly rotating magnetosphere model for σ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> E - II. Magnetic Doppler imaging, arbitrary field RRM, and light variability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oksala, M. E.; Kochukhov, O.; Krtička, J.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Wade, G. A.; Prvák, M.; Mikulášek, Z.; Silvester, J.; Owocki, S. P.</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>The initial success of the Rigidly Rotating Magnetosphere (RRM) model application to the B2Vp star σ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> E by Townsend, Owocki & Groote triggered a renewed era of observational monitoring of this archetypal object. We utilize high-resolution spectropolarimetry and the magnetic Doppler imaging (MDI) technique to simultaneously determine the magnetic configuration, which is predominately dipolar, with a polar strength Bd = 7.3-7.8 kG and a smaller non-axisymmetric quadrupolar contribution, as well as the surface distribution of abundance of He, Fe, C, and Si. We describe a revised RRM model that now accepts an arbitrary surface magnetic field configuration, with the field topology from the MDI models used as input. The resulting synthetic H α emission and broad-band photometric observations generally agree with observations, however, several features are poorly fit. To explore the possibility of a photospheric contribution to the observed photometric variability, the MDI abundance maps were used to compute a synthetic photospheric light curve to determine the effect of the surface inhomogeneities. Including the computed photospheric brightness modulation fails to improve the agreement between the observed and computed photometry. We conclude that the discrepancies cannot be explained as an effect of inhomogeneous surface abundance. Analysis of the UV light variability shows good agreement between observed variability and computed light curves, supporting the accuracy of the photospheric light variation calculation. We thus conclude that significant additional physics is necessary for the RRM model to acceptably reproduce observations of not only σ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> E, but also other similar stars with significant stellar wind-magnetic field interactions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4853378','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4853378"><span id="translatedtitle">A Functional <span class="hlt">ori</span>T in the Ptw Plasmid of Burkholderia cenocepacia Can Be Recognized by the R388 Relaxase TrwC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fernández-González, Esther; Bakioui, Sawsane; Gomes, Margarida C.; O'Callaghan, David; Vergunst, Annette C.; Sangari, Félix J.; Llosa, Matxalen</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Burkholderia cenocepacia is both a plant pathogen and the cause of serious opportunistic infections, particularly in cystic fibrosis patients. B. cenocepacia K56-2 harbors a native plasmid named Ptw for its involvement in the Plant Tissue Watersoaking phenotype. Ptw has also been reported to be important for survival in human cells. Interestingly, the presence of PtwC, a homolog of the conjugative relaxase TrwC of plasmid R388, suggests a possible function for Ptw in conjugative DNA transfer. The ptw region includes Type IV Secretion System genes related to those of the F plasmid. However, genes in the adjacent region shared stronger homology with the R388 genes involved in conjugative DNA metabolism. This region included the putative relaxase ptwC, a putative coupling protein and accessory nicking protein, and a DNA segment with high number of inverted repeats and elevated AT content, suggesting a possible <span class="hlt">ori</span>T. Although we were unable to detect conjugative transfer of the Ptw resident plasmid, we detected conjugal mobilization of a co-resident plasmid containing the ptw region homologous to R388, demonstrating the cloned ptw region contains an <span class="hlt">ori</span>T. A similar plasmid lacking ptwC could not be mobilized, suggesting that the putative relaxase PtwC must act in cis on its <span class="hlt">ori</span>T. Remarkably, we also detected mobilization of a plasmid containing the Ptw <span class="hlt">ori</span>T by the R388 relaxase TrwC, yet we could not detect PtwC-mediated mobilization of an R388 <span class="hlt">ori</span>T-containing plasmid. Our data unambiguously show that the Ptw plasmid harbors DNA transfer functions, and suggests the Ptw plasmid may play a dual role in horizontal DNA transfer and eukaryotic infection. PMID:27200362</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24127255','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24127255"><span id="translatedtitle">Unusual labial glands in snakes of the genus Geophis Wagler, 1830 (Serpentes: Dipsadinae).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>de Oliveira, Leonardo; da Costa Prudente, Ana Lcia; Zaher, Hussam</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Geophis belongs to the goo-eating dipsadine assemblage of snakes that are known to feed exclusively on earthworms, snails, and slugs. Although the unusual feeding strategies of the goo-eating dipsadines are well known (but poorly documented), little attention has been paid to their internal anatomy. Here, we describe a new and noteworthy morphological and histochemical condition of the infralabial glands in three species of Geophis (G. brachycephalus, G. nasalis and G. semidoliatus), all earthworm feeders. Their infralabial glands are constituted of two distinct parts: an anterolateral portion composed of mucous and seromucous cells that stretches from the tip of the dentary to the corner of the mouth, and a tubular posteromedial portion that is exclusively seromucous. The anterolateral portion receives fibers of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> <span class="hlt">anguli</span> <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle that attaches on its posterodorsal extremity while the posteromedial portion extends posteriorly to the corner of the mouth where it receives fibers of the adductor mandibulae externus medialis muscle. Furthermore, the posteromedial portion of the infralabial gland is constituted by large acini filled with secretion that is periodic acid-Schiff positive. These acini release their secretion directly into a large lumen located in the middle of the glandular portion. In the three species examined, the supralabial glands show a traditional configuration, being constituted of mucous and seromucous cells and retaining an enlarged part in its caudal region that resembles a Duvernoy's gland. The presence in Geophis of an expanded lumen in part of the infralabial gland that is compressed by an adjacent muscle suggests a more specialized role for the secretion produced by these glands that may not be related to envenomation but rather to prey transport and mucus control. PMID:24127255</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22199211','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22199211"><span id="translatedtitle">Otariodibacter <span class="hlt">oris</span> gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of the family Pasteurellaceae isolated from the oral cavity of pinnipeds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hansen, Mie Johanne; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Christensen, Henrik; Bojesen, Anders Miki; Bisgaard, Magne</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>A total of 27 bacterial isolates from California sea lions and a walrus tentatively classified within the family Pasteurellaceae was further characterized by genotypic and phenotypic tests. Phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequences showed that the isolates investigated formed a monophyletic group, tentatively designated Bisgaard taxon 57. According to 16S rRNA gene sequences, the most closely related species with a validly published name was Bisgaardia hudsonensis and the most closely related species based on rpoB sequence comparison was Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida; highest similarities between the isolates and the type strains of B. hudsonensis and P. multocida subsp. multocida were 95.0 and 88.2%. respectively. All isolates of Bisgaard taxon 57 exhibit the phenotypic characters of the family Pasteurellaceae. Members of Bisgaard taxon 57 can be separated from existing genera of the Pasteurellaceae by the following tests: positive reactions for catalase, oxidase, Voges-Proskauer and indole; no X- or V-factor dependency; and acid production from L-arabinose (slow), L-fucose, maltose and trehalose, but not from dulcitol, D-mannitol, D-mannose or sucrose. The main fatty acids of Bisgaard taxon 57 (CCUG 59994(T)) are C(14:0), C(16:0), C(16:1)ω7c and the summed feature C(14:0) 3-OH/iso-C(16:1) I. This fatty acid profile is characteristic of members of the Pasteurellaceae. The quinone profile of Bisgaard taxon 57 (DSM 23800(T)) was similar to that of other genera in the Pasteurellaceae. The DNA G+C content of strain Baika1(T) is 36.2 mol%, which is at the lower end of the range for members of the family Pasteurellaceae. On the basis of both phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, it is proposed that members of Bisgaard taxon 57 should be classified as representatives of a novel species in a new genus, Otariodibacter <span class="hlt">oris</span> gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Otariodibacter <span class="hlt">oris</span> is Baika1(T) (=CCUG 59994(T)=DSM 23800(T)), which was isolated from the oral cavity of a healthy California sea lion in Copenhagen Zoo, Denmark, in 2007. PMID:22199211</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25743610','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25743610"><span id="translatedtitle">The fluid and electrolyte balance of New Zealand European and Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>/Pacific Island athletes: An observational study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McLean, Andrew; Brown, Rachel Clare; Black, Katherine Elizabeth</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Observational research on professional athletes from the USA suggests differences may exist in sweat sodium loss based on ethnic differences. The New Zealand (NZ) sporting population is mainly of European or Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>/Pacific Island origin. Therefore, this study aimed to describe the fluid-electrolyte balance of athletes by ethnicity. A total of 20 Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>/Pacific Islanders (MP; body mass 100.97 ± 13.05 kg) and 29 NZ European (NZE; body mass 89.11 ± 11.56 kg) elite male athletes were recruited. Sweat rates were determined by body mass change during a 1-h spin cycle exercise session, during which fluid intakes and heart rate were recorded. Sweat samples were analysed for sodium concentration. Mean ± SD sweat sodium concentrations were 73.4 ± 27.2 mmol·L(-1) and 55.5 ± 26.8 mmol·L(-1) for the MP and NZE groups, respectively (p = 0.070). Sweat rate was 0.93 ± 0.26 L·h(-1) for the MP group and 0.89 ± 0.33 L·h(-1) for the NZE group (p = 0.357). Fluid intake was 1.05 ± 0.48 L and 0.93 ± 0.49 L for MP and NZE, respectively (p = 0.395). Half of the MP group gained weight during the exercise session compared to 37% of the NZE group. Pre-exercise urine specific gravity was significantly lower amongst the NZE group (1.016 ± 0.009 g mL(-1)) than the MP group (1.024 ± 0.008 g mL(-1)) p = 0.001. There was no significant difference in heart rate between the groups, p = 0.082. Hydration practices of athletes in NZ may differ by ethnicity, and this may highlight the need for more targeted education by ethnicity. PMID:25743610</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ASPC..481....3S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ASPC..481....3S"><span id="translatedtitle">The EXOTIME Monitoring Program Discovers Substellar Companion Candidates around the Rapidly Pulsating Subdwarf B Stars V1636 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> and DW Lyn</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schuh, S.; Silvotti, R.; Lutz, R.; Kim, S.-L.; Exotime Collaboration</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>The EXOTIME monitoring program has discovered sub-stellar companion candidates around the rapidly pulsating subdwarf B stars V1636 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> and DW Lyn using the timing method. Here we motivate our continuing search, and refer to descriptions of the photometric data collected, the data analysis and the characteristics of the O-C diagrams obtained. We also discuss our on-going efforts to consolidate the candidate discoveries with additional simulations and confirm them with independent methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26170452','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26170452"><span id="translatedtitle">A Disulfide Bond-forming Machine Is Linked to the Sortase-mediated Pilus Assembly Pathway in the Gram-positive Bacterium Actinomyces <span class="hlt">oris</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Reardon-Robinson, Melissa E; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Chang, Chungyu; Wu, Chenggang; Jooya, Neda; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung</p> <p>2015-08-28</p> <p>Export of cell surface pilins in Gram-positive bacteria likely occurs by the translocation of unfolded precursor polypeptides; however, how the unfolded pilins gain their native conformation is presently unknown. Here, we present physiological studies to demonstrate that the FimA pilin of Actinomyces <span class="hlt">oris</span> contains two disulfide bonds. Alanine substitution of cysteine residues forming the C-terminal disulfide bridge abrogates pilus assembly, in turn eliminating biofilm formation and polymicrobial interaction. Transposon mutagenesis of A. <span class="hlt">oris</span> yielded a mutant defective in adherence to Streptococcus oralis, and revealed the essential role of a vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) gene in pilus assembly. Targeted deletion of vkor results in the same defects, which are rescued by ectopic expression of VKOR, but not a mutant containing an alanine substitution in its conserved CXXC motif. Depletion of mdbA, which encodes a membrane-bound thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase, abrogates pilus assembly and alters cell morphology. Remarkably, overexpression of MdbA or a counterpart from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, rescues the Δvkor mutant. By alkylation assays, we demonstrate that VKOR is required for MdbA reoxidation. Furthermore, crystallographic studies reveal that A. <span class="hlt">oris</span> MdbA harbors a thioredoxin-like fold with the conserved CXXC active site. Consistently, each MdbA enzyme catalyzes proper disulfide bond formation within FimA in vitro that requires the catalytic CXXC motif. Because the majority of signal peptide-containing proteins encoded by A. <span class="hlt">oris</span> possess multiple Cys residues, we propose that MdbA and VKOR constitute a major folding machine for the secretome of this organism. This oxidative protein folding pathway may be a common feature in Actinobacteria. PMID:26170452</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19153876','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19153876"><span id="translatedtitle">Jack-like eversion by splitting the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle for reconstruction of the philtral column in secondary cleft lip.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cakir, Baris; Gideroglu, Kaan; Akan, Mithat; Taylan, Gaye; Akoz, Tayfun</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The philtrum is an important aesthetic unit that contributes hugely to the characteristics of the human face. From March 2002 to May 2006 inclusive, a total of 16 patients with unilateral cleft lip nose were operated on to form a philtral column and obtain muscular continuity. Six of the patients were female and 12 were male, age range 5 to 30 years old. We used Millard's method, so rotation and advancement flaps were planned. A full thickness incision was made down to the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle and mucosa after the scar on the philtral column had been excised. The medial and lateral muscle flaps were exposed and split into two leaves at the coronal plane. The deepest part of the muscle flaps were sutured together to create a jack-like eversion. Skin and mucosa were then closed. The follow-up period ranged from 8 to 18 months (mean 11 months). Two visual analogue scales were used to assess the outcomes. Thirteen of 16 patients were satisfied with their good result. Three had moderate results. The advantages of the technique are: ease of use; the creation of an anatomically-natural philtrum while preserving the continuity and function of the muscle; sufficient augmentation of the philtral column by the jack-like eversion; and no donor-site morbidity. PMID:19153876</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140010267','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140010267"><span id="translatedtitle">The Chandra Delta <span class="hlt">Ori</span> Large Project: Occultation Measurements of the Shocked Gas tn the Nearest Eclipsing O-Star Binary</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Corcoran, Michael F.; Nichols, Joy; Naze, Yael; Rauw, Gregor; Pollock, Andrew; Moffat, Anthony; Richardson, Noel; Evans, Nancy; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Oskinova, Lida; Hamann, W. -R.; Gull, Ted; Ignace, Rico; Hole, Tabetha; Iping, Rosina; Walborn, Nolan; Hoffman, Jennifer; Lomax, Jamie; Waldron, Wayne; Owocki, Stan; Maiz-Apellaniz, Jesus; Leutenegger, Maurice; Hole, Tabetha; Gayley, Ken; Russell, Chris</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Delta <span class="hlt">Ori</span> is the nearest massive, single-lined eclipsing binary (O9.5 II + B0.5III). As such it serves as a fundamental calibrator of the mass-radius-luminosity relation in the upper HR diagram. It is also the only eclipsing O-type binary system which is bright enough to be observable with the CHANDRA gratings in a reasonable exposure. Studies of resolved X-ray line complexes provide tracers of wind mass loss rate and clumpiness; occultation by the X-ray dark companion of the line emitting region can provide direct spatial information on the location of the X-ray emitting gas produced by shocks embedded in the wind of the primary star. We obtained phase-resolved spectra with Chandra in order to determine the level of phase-dependent vs. secular variability in the shocked wind. Along with the Chandra observations we obtained simultaneous photometry from space with the Canadian MOST satellite to help understand the relation between X-ray and photospheric variability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21255899','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21255899"><span id="translatedtitle">The N-terminus of porcine circovirus type 2 replication protein is required for nuclear localization and <span class="hlt">ori</span> binding activities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lin, W.-L.; Chien, M.-S.; Du, Y.-W.; Wu, P.-C.; Huang Chienjin</p> <p>2009-02-20</p> <p>Porcine circovirus type 2 possesses a circular, single-stranded DNA genome that requires the replication protein (Rep) for virus replication. To characterize the DNA binding potential and the significant region that confers the nuclear localization of the Rep protein, the defined coding regions of rep gene were cloned and expressed. All of the recombinant proteins except for the N-terminal 110 residues deletion mutant could bind to the double-stranded minimal binding site of replication origin (<span class="hlt">ori</span>). In addition, the N-terminal deletion mutant lacking 110 residues exhibited mainly cytoplasmic staining in the transfected cells in contrast to the others, which localized dominantly in the nucleus, suggesting that this N-terminal domain is essential for nuclear localization. Furthermore, a series of green fluorescence proteins (GFP) containing potential nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences were tested for their cellular distribution. The ability of the utmost 20 residues of the N-terminal region to target the GFP to the nucleus confirmed its role as a functional NLS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NewA...43...87J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NewA...43...87J"><span id="translatedtitle">The past photometric history of the FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-type young eruptive star 2MASS J06593158-0405277 = V960 Mon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jurdana-Šepić, Rajka; Munari, Ulisse</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>The known FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-type young eruptive stars are exceedingly rare (a dozen or so confirmed objects) and 2MASS J06593158-0405277, with its 2014 outburst, is likely the latest addition to the family. All members have displayed just one such eruption in their recorded history, an event lasting for decades. To test the FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> nature of 2MASS J06593158-0405277, we have reconstructed its photometric history by measuring its brightness on Harvard photographic plates spanning the time interval 1899-1989. No previous large amplitude eruption similar to that initiated in 2014 has been found, as in bona fide FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-type objects. The median value of the brightness in quiescence of 2MASS J06593158-0405277 is B = 15.5, with the time interval 1935-1950 characterized by a large variability (˜ 1 mag amplitude) that contrasts with the remarkable photometric stability displayed at later epochs. The variability during 1935-1950 can either be ascribed to some T Tau like activity of 2MASS J06593158-0405277 itself or to the also young and fainter star 2MASS J06593168-0405224 that lies 5 arcsec to the North and forms an unresolved pair at the astrometric scale of Harvard photographic plates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4631859','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4631859"><span id="translatedtitle">Whakawhiti Kōrero, a Method for the Development of a Cultural Assessment Tool, Te Waka Kuaka, in Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> Traumatic Brain Injury</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Elder, Hinemoa; Kersten, Paula</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The importance of tools for the measurement of outcomes and needs in traumatic brain injury is well recognised. The development of tools for these injuries in indigenous communities has been limited despite the well-documented disparity of brain injury. The wairua theory of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> proposes that a culturally defined injury occurs in tandem with the physical injury. A cultural response is therefore indicated. This research investigates a Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> method used in the development of cultural needs assessment tool designed to further examine needs associated with the culturally determined injury and in preparation for formal validation. Whakawhiti kōrero is a method used to develop better statements in the development of the assessment tool. Four wānanga (traditional fora) were held including one with whānau (extended family) with experience of traumatic brain injury. The approach was well received. A final version, Te Waka Kuaka, is now ready for validation. Whakawhiti kōrero is an indigenous method used in the development of cultural needs assessment tool in Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> traumatic brain injury. This method is likely to have wider applicability, such as Mental Health and Addictions Services, to ensure robust process of outcome measure and needs assessment development. PMID:26576070</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3556164','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3556164"><span id="translatedtitle">Adhesion of Streptococcus mitis and Actinomyces <span class="hlt">oris</span> in co-culture to machined and anodized titanium surfaces as affected by atmosphere and pH</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background With the rising demand for osseointegrated titanium implants for replacing missing teeth, often in patients with a history of periodontitis, implant-related infections have become an issue of growing concern. Novel methods for treating and preventing implant-associated infections are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to investigate if different pH, atmosphere and surface properties could restrict bacterial adhesion to titanium surfaces used in dental implants. Methods Titanium discs with machined or anodized (TiUnite™) surface were incubated with a co-culture of Streptococcus mitis and Actinomyces <span class="hlt">oris</span> (early colonizers of oral surfaces) at pH 5.0, 7.0 and 9.0 at aerobic or anaerobic atmosphere. The adhesion was analysed by counting colony forming (CFU) units on agar and by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Results The CFU analysis showed that a pH of 5.0 was found to significantly decrease the adhesion of S. mitis, and an aerobic atmosphere, the adhesion of A. <span class="hlt">oris</span>. S. mitis was found in significantly less amounts on the anodized surface than the machined surface, while A. <span class="hlt">oris</span> was found in equal amounts on both surfaces. The CLSM analysis confirmed the results from the CFU count and provided additional information on how the two oral commensal species adhered to the surfaces: mainly in dispersed clusters oriented with the groves of the machined surface and the pores of the anodized surface. Conclusions Bacterial adhesion by S. mitis and A. <span class="hlt">oris</span> can be restricted by acidic pH and aerobic atmosphere. The anodized surface reduced the adhesion of S. mitis compared to the machined surface; while A. <span class="hlt">oris</span> adhered equally well to the pores of the anodized surface and to the grooves of the machined surface. It is difficult to transfer these results directly into a clinical situation. However, it is worth further investigating these findings from an in vitro perspective, as well as clinically, to gain more knowledge of the effects acid pH and aerobic atmosphere have on initial bacterial adhesion. PMID:23298213</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2750763','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2750763"><span id="translatedtitle">On the origin, homologies and evolution of primate facial muscles, with a particular focus on hominoids and a suggested unifying nomenclature for the facial muscles of the Mammalia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Diogo, R; Wood, B A; Aziz, M A; Burrows, A</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The mammalian facial muscles are a subgroup of hyoid muscles (i.e. muscles innervated by cranial nerve VII). They are usually attached to freely movable skin and are responsible for facial expressions. In this study we provide an account of the origin, homologies and evolution of the primate facial muscles, based on dissections of various primate and non-primate taxa and a review of the literature. We provide data not previously reported, including photographs showing in detail the facial muscles of primates such as gibbons and orangutans. We show that the facial muscles usually present in strepsirhines are basically the same muscles that are present in non-primate mammals such as tree-shrews. The exceptions are that strepsirhines often have a muscle that is usually not differentiated in tree-shrews, the depressor supercilii, and lack two muscles that are usually differentiated in these mammals, the zygomatico-orbicularis and sphincter colli superficialis. Monkeys such as macaques usually lack two muscles that are often present in strepsirhines, the sphincter colli profundus and mandibulo-auricularis, but have some muscles that are usually absent as distinct structures in non-anthropoid primates, e.g. the <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii superioris alaeque nasi, <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii superioris, nasalis, depressor septi nasi, depressor <span class="hlt">anguli</span> <span class="hlt">oris</span> and depressor labii inferioris. In turn, macaques typically lack a risorius, auricularis anterior and temporoparietalis, which are found in hominoids such as humans, but have muscles that are usually not differentiated in members of some hominoid taxa, e.g. the platysma cervicale (usually not differentiated in orangutans, panins and humans) and auricularis posterior (usually not differentiated in orangutans). Based on our observations, comparisons and review of the literature, we propose a unifying, coherent nomenclature for the facial muscles of the Mammalia as a whole and provide a list of more than 300 synonyms that have been used in the literature to designate the facial muscles of primates and other mammals. A main advantage of this nomenclature is that it combines, and thus creates a bridge between, those names used by human anatomists and the names often employed in the literature dealing with non-human primates and non-primate mammals. PMID:19531159</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007IAUS..240..130C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007IAUS..240..130C"><span id="translatedtitle">The Double-Lined Spectroscopic Binary θ?1 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> E: An Intermedite-Mass, Pre-Main Sequence System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Costero, R.; Poveda, A.; Echevarría, J.</p> <p>2007-08-01</p> <p>Theta 1 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> E = ADS 4186 E = NSV 2291 , the fifth brightest star in the Orion Trapezium, was reported to be a double-lined spectroscopic binary by Costero et al. 2006 (IAUC 8669). In this paper we present the derived orbital elements of the binary system and physical parameters of its members. The velocity curve of each component was derived from 61 Echelle spectra in which the absorption systems are not blended. The radial velocities were obtained by cross-correlating these spectra with those of two reference stars with well-measured radial velocities, in the 5120 -"5515 Å spectral range. The binary components are nearly identical, their composite spectral type being around G0IV. The Li I 6708 Å absorption line is strong and the Ca II K line is in emission inboth stars, indicative of their pre-main sequence evolutionary stage. The orbit is circular (e <10^-3). The orbital period and systemic velocity are 9.896 ± 0.001 d and 32.4 ± 1.0 km/s.The semi-amplitude of both components is 85.7±3.0 km/s. From the published K magnitude for the object and a suitable pre-main sequence stellar evolution model, we find the bolometric luminosity, radius and mass of each component to be, respectively, 89, 8.4 and 4.0 (in solar units), if the stars are identical to each other. Based on the latter values, the orbital inclination is about 59°, while the minimum Inclination for grazing eclipses to occur is 65°. Hence, no observable eclipses in this binary are expected.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997AnPh...22..121V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997AnPh...22..121V"><span id="translatedtitle">Thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> visco-élastique non-extensive IV. Premiers tests expérimentaux de la thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> simplifiée à modes translationnels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Volino, F.</p> <p></p> <p>This paper describes the first tests of the non-extensive visco-elastic theory with translational modes developed in (III), using viscosity, self-diffusion, shear elasticity, thermal conductivity and surface tension literature data of several liquids, namely water, organic solvents and a nematics, for which numerous data exist in the literature. As in the rotational case (I, II), a remarkable qualitative and quantitative agreement is obtained. The influence of translational-rotational coupling on the flow is examined for the nematics and for water. The obtained results, of equivalent importance as those obtained previouly in (II), are more spectacular in the sense that they concern more common substances. If the proposed description is accepted, important changes in the meaning of some physical concepts are necessarily implied. Cet article décrit les premiers tests de la thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> visco-élastique non-extensive à modes translationnels développée dans l'article (III), à l'aide de données de viscosité, de coefficients d'auto-diffusion, d'élasticité de cisaillement, de conductivité thermique et de tension superficielle, d'un certain nombre de liquides, à savoir l'eau, des solvants organiques usuels et un nématique, pour lesquels de très nombreuses données expérimentales existent dans la littérature. Comme dans le cas rotationnel avec les nématiques (I, II), un accord qualitatif et surtout quantitatif remarquable est obtenu. L'influence du couplage translation-orientation sur les propriétés d'écoulement est examiné dans le cas du nématique, et dans une certaine mesure, de l'eau. Ces résultats, de même importance absolue que ceux obtenus dans (II) avec les aspects rotationnels, sont relativement plus spectaculaires dans la mesure où ils sont relatifs à des substances beaucoup plus communes. Si ce type de description est accepté, ils impliquent inévitablement des changements importants sur la signification de certains concepts physiques.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25794281','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25794281"><span id="translatedtitle">A single parS sequence from the cluster of four sites closest to <span class="hlt">ori</span>C is necessary and sufficient for proper chromosome segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jecz, Paulina; Bartosik, Aneta A; Glabski, Krzysztof; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Among the mechanisms that control chromosome segregation in bacteria are highly-conserved partitioning systems comprising three components: ParA protein (a deviant Walker-type ATPase), ParB protein (a DNA-binding element) and multiple cis-acting palindromic centromere-like sequences, designated parS. Ten putative parS sites have been identified in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome, four localized in close proximity of <span class="hlt">ori</span>C and six, diverged by more than one nucleotide from a perfect palindromic sequence, dispersed along the chromosome. Here, we constructed and analyzed P. aeruginosa mutants deprived of each single parS sequence and their different combinations. The analysis included evaluation of a set of phenotypic features, chromosome segregation, and ParB localization in the cells. It was found that ParB binds specifically to all ten parS sites, although with different affinities. The P. aeruginosa parS mutant with all ten parS sites modified (parSnull) is viable however it demonstrates the phenotype characteristic for parAnull or parBnull mutants: slightly slower growth rate, high frequency of anucleate cells, and defects in motility. The genomic position and sequence of parS determine its role in P. aeruginosa biology. It transpired that any one of the four parS sites proximal to <span class="hlt">ori</span>C (parS1 to parS4), which are bound by ParB with the highest affinity, is necessary and sufficient for the parABS role in chromosome partitioning. When all these four sites are mutated simultaneously, the strain shows the parSnull phenotype, which indicates that none of the remaining six parS sites can substitute for these four <span class="hlt">ori</span>C-proximal sites in this function. A single ectopic parS2 (inserted opposite <span class="hlt">ori</span>C in the parSnull mutant) facilitates ParB organization into regularly spaced condensed foci and reverses some of the mutant phenotypes but is not sufficient for accurate chromosome segregation. PMID:25794281</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4368675','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4368675"><span id="translatedtitle">A Single parS Sequence from the Cluster of Four Sites Closest to <span class="hlt">ori</span>C Is Necessary and Sufficient for Proper Chromosome Segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jecz, Paulina; Bartosik, Aneta A.; Glabski, Krzysztof; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Among the mechanisms that control chromosome segregation in bacteria are highly-conserved partitioning systems comprising three components: ParA protein (a deviant Walker-type ATPase), ParB protein (a DNA-binding element) and multiple cis-acting palindromic centromere-like sequences, designated parS. Ten putative parS sites have been identified in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome, four localized in close proximity of <span class="hlt">ori</span>C and six, diverged by more than one nucleotide from a perfect palindromic sequence, dispersed along the chromosome. Here, we constructed and analyzed P. aeruginosa mutants deprived of each single parS sequence and their different combinations. The analysis included evaluation of a set of phenotypic features, chromosome segregation, and ParB localization in the cells. It was found that ParB binds specifically to all ten parS sites, although with different affinities. The P. aeruginosa parS mutant with all ten parS sites modified (parSnull) is viable however it demonstrates the phenotype characteristic for parAnull or parBnull mutants: slightly slower growth rate, high frequency of anucleate cells, and defects in motility. The genomic position and sequence of parS determine its role in P. aeruginosa biology. It transpired that any one of the four parS sites proximal to <span class="hlt">ori</span>C (parS1 to parS4), which are bound by ParB with the highest affinity, is necessary and sufficient for the parABS role in chromosome partitioning. When all these four sites are mutated simultaneously, the strain shows the parSnull phenotype, which indicates that none of the remaining six parS sites can substitute for these four <span class="hlt">ori</span>C-proximal sites in this function. A single ectopic parS2 (inserted opposite <span class="hlt">ori</span>C in the parSnull mutant) facilitates ParB organization into regularly spaced condensed foci and reverses some of the mutant phenotypes but is not sufficient for accurate chromosome segregation. PMID:25794281</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997AnPh...22...43V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997AnPh...22...43V"><span id="translatedtitle">Thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> visco-élastique non-extensive II. Premiers tests expérimentaux de la thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> simplifiée à modes rotationnels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Volino, F.; Gérard, H.; Miachon, S.</p> <p></p> <p>The non-extensive visco-elastic theory with rotational modes developed in (I), is tested using published data of elastic constants, refractive index, magnetic susceptibility, rotational viscosity, induced effects by strong fields, specific heat and heat of transition, and pressure effects on the transition temperature, of three typical nematic substances. A very good qualitative and quantitative agreement is obtained for all data considered. The various conjectures proposed in (I) appear to be well-verified, especially for the description of phenomena through the transition. Two important conclusions of this study are: (i) the non-trivial dependence of the experimental conditions such as the size of the sample or the applied fields, on the numerical values of the physical macroscopic quantities (ii) the evidence for the nematic materials, and thus for all liquids, of the existence of a space scale intermediate between the molecules and the sample size. This scale is the unit cell of the solid phase, as determined by single crystal crystallography. It is argued that this unified theory can advantageously replace the partial standard theories for describing the corresponding experimental reality. La thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> simplifiée à modes rotationnels développée dans l'article précédent (I), est testée à l'aide de données publiées de constantes élastiques, d'indice de réfraction, de susceptibilité magnétique, de viscosité de torsion, d'effets induits par des champs intenses, de chaleur spécifique et de chaleur de transition, et d'effets de pression sur la température de transition, de trois substances nématiques typiques. Un accord remarquable, tant du point de vue qualitatif que quantitatif, est obtenu avec toutes les données considérées. Les différentes conjectures proposées dans l'article (I) apparaissent être en très bon accord avec l'expérience, en particulier en ce qui concerne la description des phénomènes à travers la transition de phase. Deux conclusions importantes de cette étude concernent : (i) l'influence non-triviale des conditions expérimentales, telles que la taille de l'échantillon et des champs externes appliqués sur les valeurs des quantités physiques macroscopiques (ii) la mise en évidence, pour les matériaux nématogènes, et donc pour tous les liquides, de l'existence d'une échelle d'espace intermédiaire entre les molécules et l'échantillon macroscopique. Cette échelle est celle de la cellule unité du réseau cristallin de la phase solide, telle qu'on la détermine par la cristallographie de monocristaux. On argumente que la présente description peut remplacer avantageusement les descriptions partielles standards pour décrire la réalité expérimentale correspondante.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20858603','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20858603"><span id="translatedtitle">A strong role for the ABCG2 gene in susceptibility to gout in New Zealand Pacific Island and Caucasian, but not Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, case and control sample sets.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Phipps-Green, Amanda J; Hollis-Moffatt, Jade E; Dalbeth, Nicola; Merriman, Marilyn E; Topless, Ruth; Gow, Peter J; Harrison, Andrew A; Highton, John; Jones, Peter B B; Stamp, Lisa K; Merriman, Tony R</p> <p>2010-12-15</p> <p>Genetic variation in ABCG2 (rs2231142, Q141K), encoding a uric acid transporter, is associated with gout in diverse populations. The aim of this study was to examine a role for ABCG2 in gout susceptibility in New Zealand Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, Pacific Island and Caucasian samples. Patients (n = 185, 173 and 214, for Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, Pacific Island and Caucasian, respectively) satisfied the American College of Rheumatology gout classification criteria. The comparison samples comprised 284, 129 and 562 individuals, respectively, without gout. rs2231142 was genotyped and stratification accounted for using genomic control markers. Association of the minor allele of rs2231142 with gout was observed in the Pacific Island samples (OR = 2.80, P(STRAT) < 0.001 after accounting for effects of population structure), but not in the Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> samples (OR = 1.08, P(STRAT)= 0.70), with heterogeneity in association evident between the Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pacific Island datasets (P(HET) = 0.001). A similar dichotomy in association was observed when samples were stratified into Western (Tonga, Samoa, Niue, Tokelau) versus Eastern Polynesian (Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, Cook Island) origin (OR = 2.59, P(STRAT) < 0.001; OR = 1.12, P(STRAT)= 0.48, respectively; P(HET) = 0.005). Association with gout was observed in the Caucasian samples (OR = 2.20, P = 3.2 × 10(-8)). Unlike SLC2A9, which is a strong risk factor for gout in both Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pacific Island people, ABCG2 rs2231142 has a strong effect only in people of Western Polynesian ancestry. Our results emphasize the need to account for sub-population differences when undertaking biomedical genetic research in a group defined by a geographical region and shared ancestry but characterized by migratory events that create bottlenecks and altered genetic structure in the founder populations. PMID:20858603</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=207221','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=207221"><span id="translatedtitle">traY and traI are required for <span class="hlt">ori</span>T-dependent enhanced recombination between lac-containing plasmids and lambda plac5.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Carter, J R; Porter, R D</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Recombination between F42lac and lambda plac5 is typically 20- to 50-fold more efficient than recombination between chromosomal lac and lambda plac5. This enhancement of recombination requires trans-acting factors located in the promoter-distal and promoter-proximal regions of the main traY-to-traI (traZ) operon. By testing the ability of deletion mutants of tra to support enhanced recombination, we have identified traY as the only product has been ruled out. We also report that traI is the only gene from the promoter-distal end of the traY to traI operon that is required for recombination enhancement. Of the two proposed domains of traI, we conclude that the <span class="hlt">ori</span>T-nicking activity is essential, whereas the helicase activity is largely dispensable. The possibility of a third traI activity is also discussed. PMID:1846851</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19458011','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19458011"><span id="translatedtitle">Upstream regulatory region alterations found in human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) isolates from cervical carcinomas increase transcription, <span class="hlt">ori</span> function, and HPV immortalization capacity in culture.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lace, Michael J; Isacson, Christina; Anson, James R; Lörincz, Attila T; Wilczynski, Sharon P; Haugen, Thomas H; Turek, Lubomír P</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNAs isolated from cervical and head and neck carcinomas frequently contain nucleotide sequence alterations in the viral upstream regulatory region (URR). Our study has addressed the role such sequence changes may play in the efficiency of establishing HPV persistence and altered keratinocyte growth. Genomic mapping of integrated HPV type 16 (HPV-16) genomes from 32 cervical cancers revealed that the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes, as well as the L1 region/URR, were intact in all of them. The URR sequences from integrated and unintegrated viral DNA were found to harbor distinct sets of nucleotide substitutions. A subset of the altered URRs increased the potential of HPV-16 to establish persistent, cell growth-altering viral-genome replication in the cell. This aggressive phenotype in culture was not solely due to increased viral early gene transcription, but also to augmented initial amplification of the viral genome. As revealed in a novel <span class="hlt">ori</span>-dependent HPV-16 plasmid amplification assay, the altered motifs that led to increased viral transcription from the intact genome also greatly augmented HPV-16 <span class="hlt">ori</span> function. The nucleotide sequence changes correlate with those previously described in the distinct geographical North American type 1 and Asian-American variants that are associated with more aggressive disease in epidemiologic studies and encompass, but are not limited to, alterations in previously characterized sites for the negative regulatory protein YY1. Our results thus provide evidence that nucleotide alterations in HPV regulatory sequences could serve as potential prognostic markers of HPV-associated carcinogenesis. PMID:19458011</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090042841','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090042841"><span id="translatedtitle">Suzaku Observation of Strong Fluorescent Iron Line Emission from the Young Stellar Object V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> during Its New X-ray Outburst</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hamaguchi, Kenji; Grosso, Nicolas; Kastner, Joel H.; Weintraub, David A.; Richmond, Michael</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The Suzaku X-ray satellite observed the young stellar object V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> on 2008 October 8 during the new mass accretion outburst reported in August 2008. During the 87 ksec observation with a net exposure of 40 ks, V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> showed a. high level of X-ray emission with a gradual decrease in flux by a factor of 5 and then displayed an abrupt flux increase by an order of magnitude. Such enhanced X-ray variability was also seen in XMM-Newton observations in 2004 and 2005 during the 2003-2005 outburst, but has rarely been observed for other young stellar objects. The spectrum clearly displays emission from Helium-like iron, which is a signature of hot plasma (kT approx.5 keV). It also shows a fluorescent iron Ka line with a remarkably large equivalent width of approx. 600 eV. Such a, large equivalent width indicates that a part of the incident X-ray emission that irradiates the circumstellar material and/or the stellar surface is hidden from our line of sight. XMM-Newton spectra during the 2003-2005 outburst did not show a strong fluorescent iron Ka line ; so that the structure of the circumstellar gas very close to the stellar core that absorbs and re-emits X-ray emission from the central object may have changed in between 2005 and 2008. This phenomenon may be related to changes in the infrared morphology of McNeil's nebula between 2004 and 2008.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15457010','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15457010"><span id="translatedtitle">New technique for correction of the microform cleft lip using vertical interdigitation of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle through the intraoral incision.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cho, Byung Chae</p> <p>2004-10-01</p> <p>A microform cleft lip has three major components: (1) a minor defect of the upper vermilion border with loss of the mucocutaneous ridge; (2) a narrow ridge of tissue, resembling an exaggerated philtral column extending to the nostril sill; and (3) a deformity of the nostril. To attain the muscle continuity without an external scar on the upper lip, the author introduced a new method for the correction of a microform cleft lip deformity using vertical interdigitation of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle through the intraoral incision to create the philtrum. Through the intraoral incision, a full-thickness incision is made down to the mucosa and the posterior portion of the muscle. Then, the remaining portion of the muscle is dissected. The medial and lateral muscle flaps are also detached from the oral mucosa and completely exposed and split into two leaves. The upper leaf of the lateral muscle flap is sutured to the dermis on the philtral dimple and base of the upper leaf of the medial muscle flap. Two leaves of each muscle flap are sutured together to create a vertical interdigitation to increase the thickness of the philtral column and to provide continuity of the muscle. A total of 12 patients with microform cleft lip were treated between August of 2001 and October of 2002. Seven of the patients were male and five were female, with an age range of 1 to 43 years. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 15 months, with an average follow-up of 9 months. The results of vertical interdigitation of the muscle were examined. All patients were satisfied with their results. The orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle provided continuity and preserved good function. In all cases, the operation scar was not visible on the depressed philtral groove on the cleft side. Correction of cleft lip nasal deformity was performed in four patients and alar base advancement was performed in two patients. The advantages of the proposed procedure include the creation of an anatomically natural philtrum without an external visible scar through the intraoral incision, preservation of the continuity and function of the muscle, and sufficient augmentation of the philtral column by the vertical interdigitation of the muscle. PMID:15457010</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997AnPh...22..181V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997AnPh...22..181V"><span id="translatedtitle">Thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> visco-élastique non-extensive VI. Application à un liquide formant une phase vitreuse: l'OrthoTerPhényl (OTP)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Volino, F.; Gérard, H.; Gebel, G.</p> <p></p> <p>The non-extensive visco-elastic theory developed in articles (I-V) is tested using experimental data of a glass forming liquid, orthoterphenyl (OTP). This system has been widely studied during the last fifty years. One obtains a coherent and rather simple description of a large number of these data, of statical, dynamical, thermodynamical and spectroscopical nature, if one supposes that the viscous phase between the melting temperature of the crystal and the glass transition temperature is a (quasi) simultaneous translational and rotational transition predicted by the theory, spread over this temperature range. The rather comprehensive analysis presented on this particular system, suggests that the theory is adequate to describe, in a unified manner, the main physical properties of liquids in their stable state between the boiling temperature and the melting temperature of the crystal, and, when they can be supercooled, in their metastables states until very low temperatures. In this latter situation, the description provides, among other things, a simple interpretation of the experimental features associated with the so-called "α relaxation", "β relaxation" and "boson peak". It is suggested that spreading of the transition is to be associated with onset of spatial density fluctuations, transforming the medium from homogeneous to inhomogeneous. The maximum local density increases faster than the average density as temperature decreases, and seems to level off at the conventional glass transition temperature. La thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> visco-élastique non-extensive développée dans (I-V) est testée à l'aide d'un grand nombre de données expérimentales concernant un liquide formant une phase vitreuse. Le système choisi est l'orthoterphényl (OTP), qui a été très étudié depuis un demi-siècle, et a beaucoup servi à tester diverses thé<span class="hlt">ories</span> et modèles. En utilisant systématiquement les idées développées dans les articles précédents (I-V), on obtient une description cohérente assez simple d'un grand nombre de ces données expérimentales de nature statique, dynamique, thermodynamique et spectroscopique, si l'on suppose que la phase visqueuse, entre le point de fusion du cristal et la température de transition vitreuse est une transition de la thé<span class="hlt">orie</span>, à la fois translationnelle et rotationnelle, très "étalée" sur cet intervalle de température. Cette analyse assez complète de ce système particulier, suggère que la thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> devrait permettre de décrire, de façon unifiée, les propriétés physiques des liquides dans leur état stable entre la température d'ébullition et celle de fusion du cristal, et, quand ils peuvent être sur-refroidis, dans leurs états métastables jusqu'aux très basses températures. Dans ce dernier cas, la description fournit, entre autres choses, une interprétation simple des caractéristiques expérimentales connues sous les vocables de "relaxation α", "relaxation β" et "pic de bosons". On suggère que l'étalement de la transition est associée avec l'apparition de fluctuations spatiales de la densité, qui rendent le milieu inhomogène. La densité locale maximum augmente plus vite que la densité moyenne quand la température diminue, et semble saturer à la température de transition vitreuse.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3613878','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3613878"><span id="translatedtitle">Single horizontal Y-V vermilion plasty including orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle repair for secondary correction of the whistling defect: A universal technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Vairaktaris, Elefterios; Stelzle, Florian; Scheller, Konstanze</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Objectives: The present prospective study aimed at objectively evaluating the relevance of a single horizontal Y-V vermilion plasty including orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle repair for secondary correction of whistling deformities in unilateral as well as bilateral cleft lip cases. Study Design: Ten patients were included in the study (mean age 20.26.2 years). The size of the whistling defects was determined on photographs before and 12 months after surgery. Additional surgical procedures like columella lengthening and rhinoplasty were documented. Results: Seven minor and 3 moderate whistling defects were corrected. In 7 patients additional procedures were carried out. The data of the 12 months follow-up showed that the whistling defect was significantly reduced in size (p<0005). In 7 out of 10 patients the result of surgery was rated good and in 3 patients moderate. Conclusions: The present prospective study is the first one to show on an objective basis that the presented technique allows reducing whistling deformities significantly with good overall results in the majority of the cases. Moreover, the technique can be combined with other corrective procedures like columella lengthening without problems. As a consequence, it is a relevant and universal surgical technique for the correction of whistling defects. Key words:Bilateral cleft lip, unilateral cleft lip, secondary correction, vermillion plasty, whistling defect. PMID:23229265</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3882284','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3882284"><span id="translatedtitle">An innovative team-based stop smoking competition among Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pacific Island smokers: rationale and method for the study and its evaluation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pacific Island people have significantly higher smoking rates compared to the rest of the New Zealand population. The main aim of this paper is to describe how knowledge of Indigenous people’s practices and principles can be combined with proven effective smoking cessation support into a cessation intervention appropriate for Indigenous people. Methods/Design A literature review was conducted to identify what cultural principles and practices could be used to increase salience, and what competition elements could have an impact on efficacy of smoking cessation. The identified elements were incorporated into the design of a cessation intervention. Discussion Cultural practices incorporated into the intervention include having a holistic family or group-centred focus, inter-group competitiveness, fundraising and ritual pledging. Competition elements included are social support, pharmacotherapy use, cash prize incentives and the use of a dedicated website and iPad application. A pre-test post-test will be combined with process evaluation to evaluate if the competition results in triggering mass-quitting, utilisation of pharmacotherapy and in increasing sustained smoking cessation and to get a comprehensive understanding of the way in which they contribute to the effect. The present study is the first to describe how knowledge about cultural practices and principles can be combined with proven cessation support into a smoking cessation contest. The findings from this study are promising and further more rigorous testing is warranted. PMID:24365329</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20860980','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20860980"><span id="translatedtitle">Keeping Kids Smokefree: rationale, design, and implementation of a community, school, and family-based intervention to modify behaviors related to smoking among Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pacific Island children in New Zealand.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Glover, Marewa; Scragg, Robert; Nosa, Vili; Bullen, Chris; McCool, Judith; Kira, Anette</p> <p></p> <p>Despite a concerted, sustained and comprehensive tobacco control effort, smoking is prevalent among young people in New Zealand, particularly for Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pacific Island teenagers. Many took up smoking in their pre-teen years. New Zealand research has shown that daily smoking by children aged 14-15 years is strongly influenced by parental smoking. The Keeping Kids Smokefree study is investigating whether changing parental smoking behavior and attitudes via a community-partnership approach with parents, schools, and local health providers can reduce smoking initiation by 11-12 year olds. It is a quasi-experimental trial involving four schools in an urban area of high social deprivation with large numbers of Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pacific Islands families. Schools were allocated to intervention or control and the intervention was developed through a process of engagement with the schools, parents of children and local healthcare organizations. This article describes the rationale, context, methodology and methods involved in establishing the study. Building Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pacific Islander research capacity was a secondary objective of the study. PMID:20860980</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4784150','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4784150"><span id="translatedtitle">Eye-rima <span class="hlt">oris</span> distance and its relation to the vertical dimension of occlusion measured by two methods: Anthropometric study in a sample of Yemeni dental students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Alhajj, Mohammed Nasser; Khalifa, Nadia; Amran, Abdullah</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between the distance measured from the distal outer of the eye to the parting line of the lips and the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) measured by two methods. Methods: One hundred and fourteen dental students (76 males and 38 females) were recruited for this study with mean age (22.34 ± 1.83) years. The distance from distal canthus of the eye to rima <span class="hlt">oris</span> (eye-RO) was compared with two different measurements of the OVD (nasal [N] to gnathion [Gn], and subnasal [Sn] to menton [Me]). All distances were measured using modified digital caliper. Results: Pearson correlation coefficient test for correlations and paired samples t-test for differences were used with a significant level of (P < 0.05). There was a positive significant correlation between the eye-RO distance and the two measurements of the OVD. However, this correlation was stronger between eye-RO and the distance from the tip of the nose to the tip of the chin than that between eye-RO and the distance from the septum of the nose to the under of the chin (r = 0.313 with P = 0.0007, r = 0.296 with P = 0.0014), respectively. Conclusion: The distance from the outer canthus of the eye to the parting of the lips seems to be a reliable method in predicting the OVD and should relate to the distance from the tip of the nose to the tip of the chin. PMID:27011736</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.457.3372M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.457.3372M"><span id="translatedtitle">Physical parameters and long-term photometric variability of V1481 <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, an SB2 member of Orion nebula Cluster with an accreting component</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Messina, S.; Parihar, P.; Biazzo, K.; Lanza, A. F.; Distefano, E.; Melo, C. H. F.; Bradstreet, D. H.; Herbst, W.</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>We present the results of our analysis on V1481 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> (JW 239), a young SB2 in the Orion nebula Cluster with a circumbinary disc accreting on the lower mass component. The analysis is based on high-resolution spectroscopic data and high-quality photometric time series about 20-yr long. Thanks to the spectroscopy, we confirm the binary nature of this system consisting of M3 + M4 components and derive the mass ratio MB/MA = 0.54, a variable luminosity ratio LB/LA = 0.68-0.94, and an orbital period Porb = 4.433 d. The photometric data allowed us to measure the rotation periods of the two components Pphot = 4.4351 d and they are found to be synchronized with the orbital period. The simultaneous modelling of V-, I-band, and radial velocity curves in the 2005 season suggests that the variability is dominated by one hotspot on the secondary component covering at least ˜3.5 per cent of the stellar surface and about 420 K hotter than the unperturbed photosphere. Such a spot may originate from the material of the circumbinary disc accreting on to the secondary component. We also detect an apparent 6-yr periodic variation in the position of this hotspot, which is inferred from the phase migration of the light-curve maximum, which we interpret as due to either the presence of surface differential rotation as large as 0.065 per cent, a value compatible with the fully convective components, or to a periodic exchange of angular momentum between the disc and the star, which implies a minimum magnetic field strength of 650 G at the stellar surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=191665','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=191665"><span id="translatedtitle">The Rep78 gene product of adeno-associated virus (AAV) self-associates to form a hexameric complex in the presence of AAV <span class="hlt">ori</span> sequences.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Smith, R H; Spano, A J; Kotin, R M</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>The Rep78 and Rep68 proteins of adeno-associated virus (AAV) are replication initiator proteins that bind the viral replicative-form origin of replication, nick the origin in a site- and strand-specific fashion, and mediate vectorial unwinding of the DNA duplex via an ATP-dependent helicase activity, thus initiating a strand displacement mechanism of viral DNA replication. Genetic and biochemical studies have identified Rep mutants that demonstrate a trans-dominant negative phenotype in vitro and in vivo, suggesting the possibility that multimerization of Rep is essential for certain replicative functions. In this study, we have investigated the ability of the largest of the Rep proteins, Rep78, to self-associate in vitro and in vivo. Self-association of Rep78 in vivo was demonstrated through the use of a mammalian two-hybrid system. Rep-Rep protein interaction was confirmed in vitro through coimmunoprecipitation experiments with a bacterially expressed maltose-binding protein-Rep78 fusion protein in combination with [35S]methionine-labeled Rep78 synthesized in a coupled in vitro transcription-translation system. Mapping studies with N- and C-terminal truncation mutant forms of Rep indicate that amino acid sequences required for maximal self-association occur between residues 164 and 484. Site-directed mutagenesis identified two essential motifs within this 321-amino-acid region: (i) a putative alpha-helix bearing a 3,4-hydrophobic heptad repeat reminiscent of those found in coiled-coil domains and (ii) a previously recognized nucleoside triphosphate-binding motif. Deletion of either of these regions from the full-length polypeptide resulted in severe impairment of Rep-Rep interaction. In addition, gel filtration chromatography and protein cross-linking experiments indicated that Rep78 forms a hexameric complex in the presence of AAV <span class="hlt">ori</span> sequences. PMID:9151837</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3756030','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3756030"><span id="translatedtitle">Vers une réconciliation des thé<span class="hlt">ories</span> et de la pratique de l’évaluation, perspectives d’avenir</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Brousselle, Astrid; Champagne, François; Contandriopoulos, André-Pierre</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>L’évaluation est un domaine très prolifique, à plusieurs points de vue. Sur le plan théorique, de nouvelles approches s’ajoutent chaque année. La pratique est également en pleine expansion. Cette demande croissante pour des évaluations dans un domaine où les développements théoriques sont très importants crée, paradoxalement, des difficultés quant à la transposition des nouvelles connaissances dans la pratique de l’évaluation. Nous proposons, premièrement, d’illustrer trois grandes difficultés auxquelles est confronté l’évaluateur dans sa pratique : la définition de l’intervention, la considération du changement et les préoccupations pour l’utilisation de l’évaluation. Dans un deuxième temps, nous présenterons les trois principales réponses théoriques que propose le domaine de l’évaluation. Dans un troisième temps, nous discuterons des enjeux de cette interface et des avenues possibles pour favoriser une réconciliation entre la pratique et la thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> de l’évaluation. Cette discussion permettra d’illustrer la tension qui se dessine actuellement entre les questionnements de la pratique et le foisonnement théorique et de présenter les avancées prochaines sur le plan des développements théoriques, vers un rapprochement des préoccupations pratiques des évaluateurs. PMID:23997420</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AAS...22534408C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AAS...22534408C"><span id="translatedtitle">Mining the HST "Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL)": Winds of the Evolved M Stars Alpha <span class="hlt">Ori</span> (M2 Iab) and Gamma Cru (M3.4 III)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Nielsen, Krister E.; Kober, Gladys V.; Ayres, Thomas R.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The "Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) Project: Cool Stars" (PI = T. Ayres) is an HST Cycle 18 Treasury Program that collected a definitive set of representative, high-resolution (R=30,000-100,000) and high signal/noise (S/N>100) UV spectra of eight F-M evolved cool stars. These extremely high-quality STIS UV echelle spectra are available from the HST archive and through the ASTRAL website at the University of Colorado at http://casa.colorado.edu/~ayres/ASTRAL/ and will enable investigations of a broad range of problems -- stellar, interstellar, and beyond -- for many years. In this paper, we examine the wealth of wind diagnostics contained in the very rich spectra of the two evolved M stars in the sample, the M3.4 III giant Gamma Crucis (GaCrux) and the M2 Iab supergiant Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse) and characterize the winds at the time of these STIS observations in 2011 and compare the results with those obtained from more limited data taken at earlier epochs with HST/GHRS and IUE. In particular we study the variation of the numerous Fe II profiles with intrinsic strength in the two stars. The shifting wavelengths of the wind absorptions relative to the emission peaks and the changes in relative strengths of the emission peaks reflect the acceleration of the wind from the base of the chromosphere. Although the characteristics of the Gamma Cru wind are relatively stable with time, the Alpha <span class="hlt">Ori</span> wind outflow appears significantly smaller than seen by Carpenter et al. (1997, ApJ, 479, 970) in GHRS observations taken in 1992 (and in earlier IUE observations). There might in fact be evidence in these STIS spectra that the outflow has turned into an inflow, as reported at epochs prior to IUE by Boesgaard and Magnan (1975 ApJ 198, 369) and Boesgaard (1979 ApJ 232, 485) based on a limited number of lines in the extreme blue end of ground-based spectra.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21402398','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21402398"><span id="translatedtitle">Organochlorines and heavy metals in wild caught food as a potential human health risk to the indigenous Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> population of South Canterbury, New Zealand.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stewart, Michael; Phillips, Ngaire R; Olsen, Greg; Hickey, Christopher W; Tipa, Gail</p> <p>2011-05-01</p> <p>Increasing concentrations of anthropogenic contaminants in wild kai (food) of cultural, recreational and economic importance to the indigenous Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> of New Zealand is a potential human health risk. Contaminants that are known to bioaccumulate through the food chain (e.g., organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), PCBs and selected heavy metals) were analysed in important kai species including eel (Anguilla sp.), brown trout (Salmo trutta), black flounder (Rhombosolea retiaria) and watercress (Nasturtium officinale) from important harvesting sites in the region of South Canterbury. Eels contained relatively high wet weight concentrations of p,p'-DDE (8.6-287ng/g), PCBs ((32)Σ(PCB); 0.53-58.3ng/g), dieldrin (<0.05-16.3ng/g) and Σchlordanes (0.03-10.6ng/g). Trout and flounder contained lower concentrations of organochlorines than eels, with p,p'-DDE wet weight concentrations ranging from 2.2 to 18.5ng/g for trout and 6.4 to 27.8ng/g for flounder. Total arsenic wet weight concentrations were below detection limits for eels but ranged from 0.27 to 0.89μg/g for trout and 0.12 to 0.56μg/g for flounder. Mercury concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 0.56μg/g, 0.11 to 0.50μg/g and 0.04 to 0.10μg/g (ww) for eel, trout and flounder respectively. Lifetime excess cancer risk was calculated through established risk assessment procedures, highlighting dieldrin, ΣPCBs and p,p'-DDE in eels and arsenic in trout and flounder as primary contaminants of concern. A second non-cancer chronic health risk assessment indicated that mercury and PCBs were a potential concern in eels and mercury in trout. A cumulative lifetime cancer risk assessment showed potential health risk for consumption of some species, even at low consumption rates and provided the basis for establishing recommended dietary consumption limits for harvest sites within the study region. PMID:21402398</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJEaS.tmp...17Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJEaS.tmp...17Z"><span id="translatedtitle">U-Pb zircon and biostratigraphic data of high-pressure/low-temperature metamorphic rocks of the Talea <span class="hlt">Ori</span>: tracking the Paleotethys suture in central Crete, Greece</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zulauf, G.; Dörr, W.; Krahl, J.; Lahaye, Y.; Chatzaras, V.; Xypolias, P.</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Inherited deformation microfabrics of detrital quartz grains and U-Pb (Laser ablation (LA)-ICPMS and ID TIMS) ages of detrital zircons separated from the Phyllite-Quartzite Unit s.l. of the Talea <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, central Crete, suggest strikingly different source rocks. Albite gneiss of the lower Rogdia Beds includes Cambrian and Neoproterozoic rounded zircons with main U-Pb age peaks at 628 and 988 Ma. These and minor Paleoproterozoic and Archean peaks, together with the lack of Variscan-aged and Mesoproterozoic zircons, are similar to the age spectra obtained from the Phyllite-Quartzite Unit s.str. of the Peloponnesus and eastern Crete and from the Taurides. All of these zircons should be derived from the northeastern passive margin of Gondwana (Cimmeria). Metatuffites of the uppermost Rogdia Beds and metasandstone of Bali beach, on the other hand, include euhedral detrital zircons displaying a Variscan U-Pb age spectra at ca. 300 Ma with concordia ages at 291 ± 3, 300 ± 1 Ma (Rogdia) and 286 ± 3, 300 ± 3, 313 ± 2 Ma (Bali). Both types of metasediments and their zircons are similar to those of the pre-Alpine basement and overlying Tyros Beds of eastern Crete, revealing a provenance at the southern active margin of Laurasia. Thus, in central Crete the Paleotethys suture should be situated inside the Rogdia Beds. Magmatic zircons separated from a rhyolite boulder of the lower Achlada Beds yielded a concordant U-Pb zircon age at 242 ± 2 Ma placing a maximum age for the deposition of the (meta)conglomerate from which the boulder was collected. This age is compatible with an Olenekian-early Anisian age of the underlying Vasilikon marble suggested by new findings of the foraminifera Meandrospira aff. pusilla. Both the Achlada Beds and the Vasilikon marble can be attributed to the lower Tyros Beds of eastern Crete. The Alpine deformation led to a pervasive mylonitic foliation, which is affecting most of the studied rocks. This foliation results from D2 top-to-the-north shearing, which post-dates the growth of blue amphiboles (crossite).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=506931','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=506931"><span id="translatedtitle">Human Cytomegalovirus UL84 Oligomerization and Heterodimerization Domains Act as Transdominant Inhibitors of <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt-Dependent DNA Replication: Evidence that IE2-UL84 and UL84-UL84 Interactions Are Required for Lytic DNA Replication</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Colletti, Kelly S.; Xu, Yiyang; Cei, Sylvia A.; Tarrant, Margaret; Pari, Gregory S.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL84 encodes a 75-kDa protein required for <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt-dependent DNA replication and interacts with IE2 in infected and transfected cells. UL84 localizes to the nucleus of transfected and infected cells and is found in viral replication compartments. In transient assays it was shown that UL84 can interfere with the IE2-mediated transactivation of the UL112/113 promoter of HCMV. To determine whether UL84 protein-protein interactions are necessary for lytic DNA synthesis, we purified UL84 and used this protein to generate a monoclonal antibody. Using this antibody, we now show that UL84 forms a stable interaction with itself in vivo. The point of self-interaction maps to a region of the protein between amino acids 151 and 200, a domain that contains a series of highly charged amino acid residues. Coimmunoprecipitation assays determined that UL84 interacts with a protein domain present within the first 215 amino acids of IE2. We also show that an intact leucine zipper domain of UL84 is required for a stable interaction with IE2 and UL84 leucine zipper mutants fail to complement <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt-dependent DNA replication. UL84 leucine zipper mutants no longer interfere with IE2-mediated transactivation of the UL112/113 promoter, confirming that the leucine zipper is essential for a functional interaction with IE2. In addition, we demonstrate that both the leucine zipper and oligomerization domains of UL84 can act as transdominant-negative inhibitors of lytic replication in the transient assay, strongly suggesting that both an IE2-UL84 and a UL84-UL84 interaction are required for DNA synthesis. PMID:15308715</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002MNRAS.335...44W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002MNRAS.335...44W"><span id="translatedtitle">High-speed photometry of faint cataclysmic variables - II. RS Car, V365 Car, V436 Car, AP Cru, RR Cha, BI <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, CM Phe and V522 Sgr</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Woudt, Patrick A.; Warner, Brian</p> <p>2002-09-01</p> <p>Short time-scale photometric properties of eight faint cataclysmic variable (CV) stars are presented. Nova Carinae 1895 (RS Car) has a photometric modulation at 1.977 h that could be either an orbital or a superhump period. Nova Carinae 1948 (V365 Car) shows flickering, but any orbital modulation has a period in excess of 6 h. The nova-like variable and X-ray source V436 Car has an orbital modulation at Porb= 4.207 h, no detectable period near 2.67 h (which had previously given it a possible intermediate polar classification), and dwarf nova oscillations (DNOs) at ~40 s. Nova Crucis 1936 (AP Cru) has a double-humped ellipsoidal modulation at Porb= 5.12 h and a stable modulation at 1837 s characteristic of an intermediate polar. Nova Chamaeleontis 1953 (RR Cha) is an eclipsing system with Porb= 3.362 h, but at times shows negative superhumps at 3.271 h and positive superhumps at 3.466 h. In addition it has a stable period at 1950 s, characteristic of an intermediate polar. BI <span class="hlt">Ori</span> is a dwarf nova that we observed at quiescence and outburst without detecting any orbital modulation. CM Phe is a nova-like variable for which we confirm the value of Porb= 6.454 h found by Hoard, Wachter & Kim-Quijano. We have identified the remnant of Nova Sagittarii 1931 (V522 Sgr) with a flickering source ~2.2 mag fainter than the previously proposed candidate (which we find to be non-variable).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.9340T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.9340T"><span id="translatedtitle">Shear zones at the base of the lowermost known unit of the Cretan nappe pile in the Talea <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, northern central Crete - the long-time deformation record during burial and exhumation from HP-LT metamorphic conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Trepmann, Claudia</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The structural characteristics and microfabrics of shear zones at the base of the lowermost known level of the Cretan nappe pile, exposed at the northern central coast of the Talea <span class="hlt">Ori</span> Mountains, are presented. There, the high pressure - low temperature (HP-LT) metamorphic sediments provide information on the long-term geological history from the pre-Alpine basement and the Alpine stages of detachment, burial to and exhumation from HP-LT conditions. Information on the unknown pre-Alpine basement of the metasedimentary unit is obtained by the components in low-strain metaconglomerates, where deformation microstructures from the source rocks are preserved or quasi-statically overprinted during the later geological history. Information on the deformation mechanisms and stress history during detachment, burial and exhumation is obtained by high-strain shear zones surrounding the low-strain metasediments. A gradual transition from the low-strain metaconglomerates and associated black shales and metacherts to shear zones characterized by a scaly foliation, shear bands and associated quartz veins is observed. Shear bands occur likewise in black shales, metaquartzites and metaconglomerates and are inclined at various angles to the sedimentary layering or the scaly foliation, respectively. They generally indicate down-faulting of the respective northern block. Associated quartz veins taper wedge-shaped at a high angle to the foliation, decorating the shear band boundaries and showing shear offsets. Microstructures in rocks from these shear bands and related vein quartz show indication of dislocation glide-controlled deformation of quartz by the presence of deformation lamellae, deformation bands, short-wavelength undulatory extinction and localized strings of recrystallized grains. The shear zones document at least two different deformation stages: A first stage of deformation is characterized mainly by dissolution precipitation creep generating the scaly cleavage and implying low-stress viscous flow. A second stage is recorded by the shear bands and associated quartz veins, indicating episodic deformation at transient high stresses. Strain during the second deformation stage is apparently localized in pre-existing shear zones, i.e. representing shear zone reactivation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26441116','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26441116"><span id="translatedtitle">Neurotoxins: Current Concepts in Cosmetic Use on the Face and Neck--Lower Face.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wu, Douglas C; Fabi, Sabrina G; Goldman, Mitchel P</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Botulinum toxin A was Food and Drug Administration approved in 2002 for the temporary correction of glabellar frown lines. Since that time, a variety of neuromodulators have established a convincing profile for both safety and efficacy in the treatment hyperdynamic rhytides of the upper face. With increasing clinical experience and expertise, these applications have been expanded to include targeted treatment of muscles in both the mid and lower face. This article details common techniques using botulinum toxin to treat orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span>, depressor <span class="hlt">anguli</span> <span class="hlt">oris</span>, mentalis, and masseter muscles for the temporary correction of unwanted lower face hyperdynamic rhytides and facial contouring. Although we detail our suggested quantity of units per injection site based on onabotulinumtoxinA, all neuromodulators can be used in all of these suggested treatment areas with adjustment of the quantity of units based on the efficacy of the specific neuromodulator. A more compete discussion on the relative efficacy of all neuromodulators is beyond the scope of this article. PMID:26441116</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10522213','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10522213"><span id="translatedtitle">Microbiological understandings and mysteries of noma (cancrum <span class="hlt">oris</span>).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Falkler, W A; Enwonwu, C O; Idigbe, E O</p> <p>1999-04-01</p> <p>The microbiologic history of noma was reviewed. Studies have associated the disease process with large numbers of fusiform bacilli and spirochetal organisms. In order to study the microbiology of the staging and infection periods of noma 62 Nigerian children, aged 3-14 years, 22 children had acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (ANUG) and were also malnourished, 20 exhibited no acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis but were malnourished and 20 were free of acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis and in good nutritional state) were evaluated for the presence of viruses and oral microorganisms. The ANUG cases in the malnourished children had a higher incidence of Herpesviridae, the main virus being detected was cytomegalovirus. There were more anaerobic microorganisms recovered, with Prevotella intermedia as the predominant isolate, in the malnourished children as compared to the healthy children. A study of the predominant microflora in active sites of noma lesions was carried out in eight noma patients, 3-15 years of age, in Sokoto State, northwestern Nigeria. Fusobacterium necrophorum was recovered from 87.5% of the noma lesions. Oral microorganisms isolated included Prevotella intermedia, alpha-hemolytic streptococci and Actinomyces spp. which were isolated from 75.0, 50.0 and 37.5% of the patients, respectively. Peptostreptococcus micros, Veillonella parvula, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas spp. were each recovered from one lesion. All strains were observed to be sensitive to all of the antibiotics tested with the exception of one strain of P. intermedia which showed resistance to penicillin. The pathogenic mechanisms of F. necrophorum as a trigger organism were discussed. The isolation from human noma lesions of F. necrophorum, a pathogen primarily associated with animal diseases, may have important etiologic and animal transmission implications. PMID:10522213</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=learning+AND+difficulties&pg=7&id=EJ1021842','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=learning+AND+difficulties&pg=7&id=EJ1021842"><span id="translatedtitle">Learning about Inclusion by Listening to Ma¯<span class="hlt">ori</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Berryman, Mere; Woller, Paul</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Behavioural and learning difficulties experienced by students from minoritised cultural groups often arise because their cultural beliefs, values and preferred practices differ markedly from those of their teachers and their school. Research in New Zealand has shown that if inclusive education is to have real meaning for these students and their…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007HDRTh........1M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007HDRTh........1M"><span id="translatedtitle">Study of physical conditions in protoplanetary disks by interferometry. Theory, instrumentation and first observations. -- étude des conditions physiques dans les disques protoplanétaires par interférométrie. Thé<span class="hlt">orie</span>, instrumentation et premières observations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Malbet, Fabien</p> <p>2007-10-01</p> <p>Les étoiles se forment lors de l'effondrement de nuages de gaz et de poussière. Dans l'environnement proche de l'étoile naissante la matière se concentre dans un plan équatorial que l'on appelle disque protoplanétaire. Les astronomes pensent que les planètes se forment au sein de cette masse de gaz et de poussière orbitant autour de l'étoile. Pour sonder ces disques à des échelles correspondant aux orbites des futures planètes, il convient d'observer dans l'infrarouge à très haute résolution spatiale. L'interférométrie infrarouge est donc un outil idéal pour étudier les conditions physiques des disques protoplanétaires. Dans ce mémoire, je décris les premiers pas de l'interférométrie infrarouge, depuis la mise au point des petits interféromètres PTI et IOTA jusqu'à la construction de l'instrument AMBER au foyer de l'interféromètre du VLT. Je décris aussi les résultats d'une piste de recherche technologique particulièrement attrayante dans le cas de l'interférométrie infrarouge et issue des technologies des autoroutes de l'information: l'optique intégrée appliquée à la combinaison de plusieurs faisceaux en astronomie. Je montre ensuite comment à partir des observations obtenues à partir de ces instruments, il est possible de contraindre la physique des disques autour des étoiles jeunes. Gráce à la résolution spectrale nouvellement disponible sur ces instruments, pour la première fois nous pouvons séparer des phénomènes physiques aussi différents que l'accrétion de matière sur l'étoile et l'éjection de particules par des vents dont l'origine précise est encore mal connue. Les résultats présentés dans ce mémoire ont été obtenus principalement à partir d'observations sur les systèmes jeunes FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> et MWC 297 effectuées par AMBER sur le VLTI, mais aussi par les petits interféromètres infrarouges PTI et IOTA. Je développe aussi les travaux de modélisation de la structure verticale des disques associés afin de montrer la richesse des renseignements obtenus. Finalement je trace les contours d'un programme de recherche qui permettra tout d'abord de maximiser le retour astrophysique sur un instrument comme le VLTI, puis d'obtenir de premières images interférométriques de ces environnements circumstellaires. Je propose aussi la réalisation d'un instrument de seconde génération qui permettra de fournir des images interférométriques détaillées de ces sources compactes par synthèse d'ouverture. Stars are forming when clouds of gas and dust collapse. In the close environment of the new star, the matter is concentrated in an equatorial plane which is called protoplanetary disk. The astronomers think that planets are formed within this mass of gas and dust orbiting around the star. To probe these disks at scales corresponding to the orbits of the future planets, it is necessary to observe at very high spatial resolution in the infrared wavelength domain. Infrared interferometry is therefore an ideal tool to study the physical conditions in protoplanetary disks. In this document, I describe the first steps of infrared interferometry, from the beginning of the small interferometers PTI and IOTA until the construction of the AMBER instrument at the focus of the VLT Interferometer. I describe also the results of a technological research track, particularly attractive in the case of infrared interferometry, and coming from the information freeway: the integrated optics applies to the combination of several beams in astronomy. I show then how from observations obtained from these instruments, it is possible to constrain the physics of disks around young stars. Thanks to the spectral resolution recently available on these instruments, for the first time, we can separate the physical phenomena as different as accretion of matter onto the star and the ejection of particles by winds whose precise origin is still not well known. The results presented in this document were obtained mainly from observations on the young systems FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> and MWC 297 and performed by AMBER on the VLTI, but also by the small infrared interferometers PTI and IOTA. I tackle also the modeling of the vertical structure of those disks in order to show the wealth of obtained information. Finally I draw the contours of a research program that will allow first the VLTI astrophysical return to be maximized, and then the first interferometric images of these circumstellar environments to be obtained. I also propose to build a second generation instrument for the VLTI which will bring detailed interferometric images by aperture synthesis of these compact sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3624858','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3624858"><span id="translatedtitle">Intracortical circuits, sensorimotor integration and plasticity in human motor cortical projections to muscles of the lower face</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pilurzi, G; Hasan, A; Saifee, T A; Tolu, E; Rothwell, J C; Deriu, F</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Previous studies of the cortical control of human facial muscles documented the distribution of corticobulbar projections and the presence of intracortical inhibitory and facilitatory mechanisms. Yet surprisingly, given the importance and precision in control of facial expression, there have been no studies of the afferent modulation of corticobulbar excitability or of the plasticity of synaptic connections in the facial primary motor cortex (face M1). In 25 healthy volunteers, we used standard single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) methods to probe motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), short-intracortical inhibition, intracortical facilitation, short-afferent and long-afferent inhibition and paired associative stimulation in relaxed and active depressor <span class="hlt">anguli</span> <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscles. Single-pulse TMS evoked bilateral MEPs at rest and during activity that were larger in contralateral muscles, confirming that corticobulbar projection to lower facial muscles is bilateral and asymmetric, with contralateral predominance. Both short-intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation were present bilaterally in resting and active conditions. Electrical stimulation of the facial nerve paired with a TMS pulse 5–200 ms later showed no short-afferent inhibition, but long-afferent inhibition was present. Paired associative stimulation tested with an electrical stimulation–TMS interval of 20 ms significantly facilitated MEPs for up to 30 min. The long-term potentiation, evoked for the first time in face M1, demonstrates that excitability of the facial motor cortex is prone to plastic changes after paired associative stimulation. Evaluation of intracortical circuits in both relaxed and active lower facial muscles as well as of plasticity in the facial motor cortex may provide further physiological insight into pathologies affecting the facial motor system. PMID:23297305</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4467658','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4467658"><span id="translatedtitle">IncobotulinumtoxinA in aesthetics: Russian multidisciplinary expert consensus recommendations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yutskovskaya, Yana; Gubanova, Elena; Khrustaleva, Irina; Atamanov, Vasiliy; Saybel, Anastasiya; Parsagashvili, Elena; Dmitrieva, Irina; Sanchez, Elena; Lapatina, Natalia; Korolkova, Tatiana; Saromytskaya, Alena; Goltsova, Elena; Satardinova, Elmira</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Although there are various international consensus recommendations on the use of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) in facial aesthetics, there are no global or Russian guidelines on the optimal dose of incobotulinumtoxinA, free from complexing proteins, within specific aesthetic indications. This article reports the outcomes of two expert consensus meetings, conducted to review and analyze efficacy and tolerability data for incobotulinumtoxinA in various facial aesthetic indications and to give expert consensus recommendations to ensure best clinical practice among Russian clinicians. Methods Thirteen dermatology and/or plastic surgery experts attended meetings held in Paris, France (November 2013), and Moscow, Russia (March 2014). The expert group reviewed and analyzed the existing evidence, consensus recommendations, and Russian experts’ extensive practical experience of incobotulinumtoxinA in aesthetics to reach consensus on optimal doses, potential dose adjustments, and injection sites of incobotulinumtoxinA for facial aesthetics. Results All experts developed guidance on the optimal doses for incobotulinumtoxinA treatment of different regions of the upper and lower face. The expert panel agreed that there are no differences in the efficacy and duration of the effect between the four BoNT/As that are commercially available for facial aesthetic indications in Russia and that, when administered correctly, all BoNT/As can achieve optimal results. Experts also agreed that nonresponse to BoNT/A can be caused by neutralizing antibodies. Conclusion On the basis of the scientific and clinical evidence available for incobotulinumtoxinA, coupled with the extensive clinical experience of the consensus group, experts recommended the optimal doses of incobotulinumtoxinA effective for treatment of wrinkles of the upper and lower face to achieve the expected aesthetic outcome. These first Russian guidelines on the optimal use of incobotulinumtoxinA for augmentation of glabellar lines, periorbital wrinkles, forehead lines, bunny lines, perioral wrinkles, depressor <span class="hlt">anguli</span> <span class="hlt">oris</span>, mentalis, masseters and platysmal bands, and performing the Nefertiti lift, are presented here. PMID:26089695</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4002923','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4002923"><span id="translatedtitle">3D-Ultrasonography for evaluation of facial muscles in patients with chronic facial palsy or defective healing: a pilot study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background While standardized methods are established to examine the pathway from motorcortex to the peripheral nerve in patients with facial palsy, a reliable method to evaluate the facial muscles in patients with long-term palsy for therapy planning is lacking. Methods A 3D ultrasonographic (US) acquisition system driven by a motorized linear mover combined with conventional US probe was used to acquire 3D data sets of several facial muscles on both sides of the face in a healthy subject and seven patients with different types of unilateral degenerative facial nerve lesions. Results The US results were correlated to the duration of palsy and the electromyography results. Consistent 3D US based volumetry through bilateral comparison was feasible for parts of the frontalis muscle, orbicularis oculi muscle, depressor <span class="hlt">anguli</span> <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle, depressor labii inferioris muscle, and mentalis muscle. With the exception of the frontal muscle, the facial muscles volumes were much smaller on the palsy side (minimum: 3% for the depressor labii inferior muscle) than on the healthy side in patients with severe facial nerve lesion. In contrast, the frontal muscles did not show a side difference. In the two patients with defective healing after spontaneous regeneration a decrease in muscle volume was not seen. Synkinesis and hyperkinesis was even more correlated to muscle hypertrophy on the palsy compared with the healthy side. Conclusion 3D ultrasonography seems to be a promising tool for regional and quantitative evaluation of facial muscles in patients with facial palsy receiving a facial reconstructive surgery or conservative treatment. PMID:24782657</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920028482&hterms=spectrophotometry+solutions&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dspectrophotometry%2Bsolutions','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920028482&hterms=spectrophotometry+solutions&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dspectrophotometry%2Bsolutions"><span id="translatedtitle">The 11 year history of starspots on V1149 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> = HD 37824</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hall, Douglas S.; Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Barksdale, William S.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>All available radial-velocity measures, published and unpublished, yield an improved period and a new (assumed circular) solution. The period is 53.58 d +/- 0.02 d, and conjunction (K1 giant in front) was at 2 444 325.93 +/- 0.12 d. Eleven years of V-band photometry, published and unpublished, between 1978-1979 and 1989-1990 are analyzed. Eighteen data groups are fit with a two-spot light-curve-modeling technique. Six spots existing sometime during the 11 years are identified, and the 4-percent range of their rotation periods is used to estimate a differential rotation coefficient of k = 0.08 +/- 0.02. Observed lifetimes of those six spots are consistent with times calculated on the assumption that large spots are disrupted by the shear of differential rotation. The two best observed spots each lasted about five years.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7368706','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7368706"><span id="translatedtitle">Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (<span class="hlt">ORIES</span>) site workstation information packet for OREIS V1. 2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Voorhees, L.D.; McCord, R.A.; Durfee, R.C.; Land, M.L.; Olson, R.J.; Palmer, M.R.; Thomas, J.K.; Tinnel, E.P.; Zygmunt, B.C.</p> <p>1993-02-01</p> <p>The OREIS site workstation information packet was developed to accompany the OREIS site workstations, which are being delivered to the Environmental Restoration programs at the five DOE-OR sites. The packet is written specifically for the Site ER program staff at each of the five Sites who have been designated the OREIS contact by their ER program manager, and is not intended for general distribution. The packet provides an overview of the components of OREIS, points to more detailed information provided in the accompanying vendor and OREIS developed manuals, and includes information on training opportunities and user support.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ATel.8147....1M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ATel.8147....1M"><span id="translatedtitle">Spectroscopic identification of ASASSN-15qi as an FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-like object</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Maehara, Hiroyuki; Ayani, Kazuya; Itoh, Ryosuke; Takata, Koji; Kawabata, Koji S.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>We report spectroscopic observations of the optical transient ASASSN-15qi. This object was discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") at V=13.64 mag on 2015-10-03.27 and was classified as a possible YSO based on its association with an HII region (ASAS-SN Transients list; Shappee et al. 2014, ApJ, 788, 48). The object is identical to IPHAS J225608.82+583104.1 (r=16.66, i=15.59) and 2MASS J22560882+5831040 (J=13.704, H=12.923, K=12.647).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IAUS..307..273M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IAUS..307..273M"><span id="translatedtitle">Evidences for a large hot spot on the disk of Betelgeuse (α <span class="hlt">Ori</span>)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Montargès, M.; Kervella, P.; Perrin, G.; Chiavassa, A.; Le Bouquin, J. B.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Massive evolved stars contribute to the chemical enrichment of the Galaxy. When they die as supernova but also through their mass loss during the several thousands of years of their red supergiant (RSG) phase. Unfortunately the mass loss mechanism remains poorly understood. Detailed study of the CSE and photosphere of nearby RSGs is required to constrain this scenario. Betelgeuse is the closest RSG (197 pc) and therefore has a large apparent diameter (~ 42 mas) which makes it a very interesting target. For several years, our team has lead a multi-wavelength and multi-scale observing program to characterize its mass loss. We will review here our recent results in near-infrared interferometry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4042050','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4042050"><span id="translatedtitle">Intraoperative blood loss during surgical treatment of low-rectal cancer by abdominosacral resection is higher than during extra-<span class="hlt">levator</span> abdominosacral amputation of the rectum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Abdominosacral resection (ASR) usually required blood transfusions, which are virtually no longer in use in the modified abdominosacral amputation of the rectum (ASAR). The aim of this study was to compare the intra-operative bleeding in low-rectal patients subjected to ASR or ASAR. Material and methods The study included low-rectal cancer patients subjected to ASR (n = 114) or ASAR (n = 46) who were retrospectively compared in terms of: 1) the frequency of blood transfusions during surgery and up to 24 h thereafter; 2) the volume of intraoperative blood loss (ml of blood transfused) during surgery and up to 24 h thereafter; 3) hemoglobin concentrations (Hb) 1, 3 and 5 days after surgery; 4) the duration of hospitalization. Results Blood transfusions were necessary in 107 ASR patients but in none of those subjected to ASAR (p < 0.001). Median blood loss in the ASR group was 800 ml (range: 100–4500 ml). The differences between the groups in median Hb determined 1, 3 and 5 days following surgery were insignificant. The proportions of patients with abnormal values of Hb, however, were significantly higher in the ASR group on postoperative days 1 and 3 (day 1: 71.9% vs. 19.6% in the ASAR group, p = 0.025; day 3: 57.% vs. 13.0%, p = 0.009). Average postoperative hospitalization in ASR patients was 13 days compared to 9 days in the ASAR group (p = 0.031). Conclusions Abdominosacral amputation of the rectum predominates over ASR in terms of the prevention of intra- and postoperative bleeding due to the properly defined surgical plane in low-rectal cancer patients. PMID:24904664</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011yCat..35210045C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011yCat..35210045C"><span id="translatedtitle">VizieR Online Data Catalog: X-ray detections in the σ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> cluster (Caballero+, 2010)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Caballero, J. A.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; Lopez-Santiago, J.</p> <p>2011-02-01</p> <p>We used public HRC-I/Chandra data from a 97.6ks pointing towards the cluster centre and complemented them with X-ray data from IPC/Einstein, HRI/ROSAT, EPIC/XMM-Newton, and ACIS-S/Chandra together with optical and infrared photometry and spectroscopy from the literature and public catalogues. On our HRC-I/Chandra data, we measured count rates, estimated X-ray fluxes, and searched for short-term variability. We also looked for long-term variability by comparing with previous X-ray observations. (3 data files).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Azi.....2d..15N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Azi.....2d..15N"><span id="translatedtitle">Structure de l'univers - quand l'observation guide la thé<span class="hlt">orie</span>... ou pas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nazé, Yaël</p> <p></p> <p>The scientific method is often presented, e.g. to children, as a linear process, starting by a question and ending by the elaboration of a theory, with a few experiments in-between. The reality of the building of science is much more complex, with back-and-forth motions between theories and observations, with some intervention of technology and randomness. This complex process is not always correctly understood and assimilated, even amongst scientists. The hero cult, mixed with some revisionism, still exists despite in-depth historical studies. In this context, it may be useful to comparatively examine the reaction to crucial observations, their interpretation and their impact on the contemporaneous theory development. Four examples are presented here, all linked to the question of the 'construction of the heavens' but at different epochs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10141901','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10141901"><span id="translatedtitle">Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (<span class="hlt">ORIES</span>) site workstation information packet for OREIS V1.2. Environmental Restoration Program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Voorhees, L.D.; McCord, R.A.; Durfee, R.C.; Land, M.L.; Olson, R.J.; Palmer, M.R.; Thomas, J.K.; Tinnel, E.P.; Zygmunt, B.C.</p> <p>1993-02-01</p> <p>The OREIS site workstation information packet was developed to accompany the OREIS site workstations, which are being delivered to the Environmental Restoration programs at the five DOE-OR sites. The packet is written specifically for the Site ER program staff at each of the five Sites who have been designated the OREIS contact by their ER program manager, and is not intended for general distribution. The packet provides an overview of the components of OREIS, points to more detailed information provided in the accompanying vendor and OREIS developed manuals, and includes information on training opportunities and user support.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4335283','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4335283"><span id="translatedtitle">Allier thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> et pratique dans la lutte contre la pandémie du Sida</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zerbo, Roger</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Le premier cas d'infection par le VIH a été notifié en 1986 au Burkina Faso. L'ignorance qui entourait cette infection et l'absence de traitement curatif a amplifié ses conséquences sociales et économiques. La mise en œuvre des interventions communautaire est un enjeu majeur actuel qui recommande la compréhension des logiques sociales endogènes qui influencent les comportements individuels et collectifs. C'est en cela que l'implication des sciences sociales dans la lutte contre les maladies, en particulier le Sida constitue un enjeu, en termes de définition et d'identification de leur contribution. Dans notre propos, nous pouvons mettre en évidence trois niveaux de contribution des sciences sociales, notamment la sociologie, l'anthropologie, la psychologie et dans une certaine mesure le droit et l’économie, à la prévention du Sida et la prise en charge des personnes infectées par le VIH. Il faut noter que ces disciplines contribuent à la lutte contre le VIH d'une part, par des réflexions et des éléments d'analyses constructives, et d'autre part, l'aptitude des porteurs de ces disciplines est parfois sollicitée pour l'efficacité de la mise en œuvre des actions et l'organisation des systèmes de soins. PMID:25722761</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=anatomy+AND+human+AND+body&pg=7&id=EJ1015587','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=anatomy+AND+human+AND+body&pg=7&id=EJ1015587"><span id="translatedtitle">A Biomechanical Modeling Study of the Effects of the Orbicularis <span class="hlt">Oris</span> Muscle and Jaw Posture on Lip Shape</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Stavness, Ian; Nazari, Mohammad Ali; Perrier, Pascal; Demolin, Didier; Payan, Yohan</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: The authors' general aim is to use biomechanical models of speech articulators to explore how possible variations in anatomical structure contribute to differences in articulatory strategies and phone systems across human populations. Specifically, they investigated 2 issues: (a) the link between lip muscle anatomy and variability in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015yCat..74503490D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015yCat..74503490D"><span id="translatedtitle">VizieR Online Data Catalog: 15 new brown dwarfs in Orion OB1a/25 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> group (Downes+, 2015)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Downes, J. J.; Roman-Zuniga, C.; Ballesteros-Paredes, J.; Mateu, C.; Briceno, C.; Hernandez, J.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Mauco, K.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>For this work, we studied 21 targets from the sample of photometric BD candidates with expected spectral types between M6 and L1, obtained during the survey of the 25 Orionis group and its surroundings carried out by Downes et al. (2014, Cat. J/MNRAS/444/1793). We have carried out the spectroscopic observations of the 21 candidates with the OSIRIS instrument at the Gran Telescopio de Canarias (GTC). (3 data files).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AnPh...34b...1K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AnPh...34b...1K"><span id="translatedtitle">Les métamatériaux, des micro-ondes à l'optique : thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> et applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kante, B.</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>Cet article constitue une contribution originale et importante à la compréhension à la fois théorique et expérimentale des métamatériaux en micro-ondes et en infrarouge. Nous avons réalisé et caractérisé sur silicium des nano-structures metallo-diélectriques, briques de base des métamatériaux infrarouge et optique. Des caractérisations optiques exhaustives ont été réalisées pour la première fois sur ces structures en amplitude et en phase par interférométrie. Des topologies plus simples de métamatériaux d’un point de vue technologique et des performances optiques ont été introduites, et leur potentiel démontré dans la réalisation de fonctions aussi complexes que la réfraction négative, le couplage de mode plasmoniques, les nano senseurs pour la biologie et l’invisibilité électromagnétique en infrarouge. Les transformations d’espace, et le nouveau paradigme qu’elles offrent à l’optique, rendant possible une ingénierie de l’espace pour les photons ainsi que leur implémentation par métamatériaux ont été présentés par la première démonstration expérimentale d’une cape d’invisibilité non magnétique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4371235','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4371235"><span id="translatedtitle">The hunt for origins of DNA replication in multicellular eukaryotes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Urban, John M.; Foulk, Michael S.; Casella, Cinzia</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Origins of DNA replication (<span class="hlt">ORIs</span>) occur at defined regions in the genome. Although DNA sequence defines the position of <span class="hlt">ORIs</span> in budding yeast, the factors for <span class="hlt">ORI</span> specification remain elusive in metazoa. Several methods have been used recently to map <span class="hlt">ORIs</span> in metazoan genomes with the hope that features for <span class="hlt">ORI</span> specification might emerge. These methods are reviewed here with analysis of their advantages and shortcomings. The various factors that may influence <span class="hlt">ORI</span> selection for initiation of DNA replication are discussed. PMID:25926981</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.6842E..1UR','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.6842E..1UR"><span id="translatedtitle">Optical stimulation of the facial nerve: a surgical tool?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Richter, Claus-Peter; Teudt, Ingo Ulrik; Nevel, Adam E.; Izzo, Agnella D.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.</p> <p>2008-02-01</p> <p>One sequela of skull base surgery is the iatrogenic damage to cranial nerves. Devices that stimulate nerves with electric current can assist in the nerve identification. Contemporary devices have two main limitations: (1) the physical contact of the stimulating electrode and (2) the spread of the current through the tissue. In contrast to electrical stimulation, pulsed infrared optical radiation can be used to safely and selectively stimulate neural tissue. Stimulation and screening of the nerve is possible without making physical contact. The gerbil facial nerve was irradiated with 250-μs-long pulses of 2.12 μm radiation delivered via a 600-μm-diameter optical fiber at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Muscle action potentials were recorded with intradermal electrodes. Nerve samples were examined for possible tissue damage. Eight facial nerves were stimulated with radiant exposures between 0.71-1.77 J/cm2, resulting in compound muscle action potentials (CmAPs) that were simultaneously measured at the m. orbicularis oculi, m. <span class="hlt">levator</span> nasolabialis, and m. orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span>. Resulting CmAP amplitudes were 0.3-0.4 mV, 0.15-1.4 mV and 0.3-2.3 mV, respectively, depending on the radial location of the optical fiber and the radiant exposure. Individual nerve branches were also stimulated, resulting in CmAP amplitudes between 0.2 and 1.6 mV. Histology revealed tissue damage at radiant exposures of 2.2 J/cm2, but no apparent damage at radiant exposures of 2.0 J/cm2.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=anatomic&id=EJ951485','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=anatomic&id=EJ951485"><span id="translatedtitle">Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Velopharyngeal Structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bae, Youkyung; Kuehn, David P.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Conway, Charles A.; Perry, Jamie L.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: To report the feasibility of using a 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for examining velopharyngeal structures. Using collected 3D MRI data, the authors investigated the effect of sex on the midsagittal velopharyngeal structures and the <span class="hlt">levator</span> veli palatini (<span class="hlt">levator</span>) muscle configurations. Method: Ten Caucasian</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=muscle&pg=5&id=EJ951485','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=muscle&pg=5&id=EJ951485"><span id="translatedtitle">Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Velopharyngeal Structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bae, Youkyung; Kuehn, David P.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Conway, Charles A.; Perry, Jamie L.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: To report the feasibility of using a 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for examining velopharyngeal structures. Using collected 3D MRI data, the authors investigated the effect of sex on the midsagittal velopharyngeal structures and the <span class="hlt">levator</span> veli palatini (<span class="hlt">levator</span>) muscle configurations. Method: Ten Caucasian…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25556104','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25556104"><span id="translatedtitle">Nanostructured lipid carriers used for oral delivery of oridonin: an effect of ligand modification on absorption.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhou, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xingwang; Ye, Yanghuan; Zhang, Tianpeng; Wang, Huan; Ma, Zhiguo; Wu, Baojian</p> <p>2015-02-20</p> <p>Oridonin (<span class="hlt">Ori</span>) is a natural compound with notable anti-inflammation and anti-cancer activities. However, therapeutic use of this compound is limited by its poor solubility and low bioavailability. Here a novel biotin-modified nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) was developed to enhance the bioavailability of <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. The effect of ligand (biotin) modification on oral absorption of <span class="hlt">Ori</span> encapsulated in NLCs was also explored. <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-loaded NLCs (<span class="hlt">Ori</span>-NLCs) were prepared by the melt dispersion-high pressure homogenization method. Biotin modification of <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-NLCs was achieved by EDC and NHS in aqueous phase. The obtained biotin-decorated <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-NLCs (Bio-<span class="hlt">Ori</span>-NLCs) were 144.9nm in size with an entrapment efficiency of 49.54% and a drug load of 4.81%. Oral bioavailability was enhanced by use of Bio-<span class="hlt">Ori</span>-NLCs with a relative bioavailability of 171.01%, while the value of non-modified <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-NLCs was improved to 143.48%. Intestinal perfusion showed that <span class="hlt">Ori</span> solution unexpectedly exhibited a moderate permeability, indicating that permeability was not a limiting factor of <span class="hlt">Ori</span> absorption. <span class="hlt">Ori</span> could be rapidly metabolized that was the main cause of low bioavailability. However, there was a difference in the enhancement of bioavailability between Bio-<span class="hlt">Ori</span>-NLCs and conventional NLCs. Although severe lipolyses happened both on Bio-<span class="hlt">Ori</span>-NLCs and non-modified NLCs, the performance of Bio-<span class="hlt">Ori</span>-NLCs in the bioavailability improvement was more significant. Overall, Bio-<span class="hlt">Ori</span>-NLCs can further promote the oral absorption of <span class="hlt">Ori</span> by a ligand-mediated active transport. It may be a promising carrier for the oral delivery of <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. PMID:25556104</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11169489','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11169489"><span id="translatedtitle">Muscle phenotype remains unaltered after limb autotomy and unloading.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Griffis, B; Moffett, S B; Cooper, R L</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Loss of chelipeds in crustaceans results in severe atrophy of the major muscle responsible for lifting the limb, the anterior <span class="hlt">levator</span>. We decided to test if this loss of mechanical load altered muscle phenotype as measured by SDS-PAGE analysis of <span class="hlt">levator</span> total protein and actomyosin fractions. <span class="hlt">Levator</span> muscles of adult crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, with either functional regenerate limbs or lack of limb buds (papilla stage) were compared with those from normal contralateral limbs and those from pristine animals. We find that there is no difference in protein profiles among the three conditions. However, the total protein profile for the dually excited <span class="hlt">levator</span> muscle is unique compared to those of fast or slow muscles of the abdomen (L and SEL, respectively), which receive only phasic or tonic excitatory innervation. The <span class="hlt">levator</span> myosin heavy chain profile is similar to that of slow phenotype muscles such as the SEL and opener. We conclude that load does not influence <span class="hlt">levator</span> phenotype. This is likely due either to the intact innervation and continued activation of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> during atrophy or to the maintenance of passive tension on the muscle. J. Exp. Zool. 289:10-22, 2001. PMID:11169489</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3432843','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3432843"><span id="translatedtitle">The Olympic Regeneration in East London (<span class="hlt">ORi</span>EL) study: protocol for a prospective controlled quasi-experiment to evaluate the impact of urban regeneration on young people and their families</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Smith, Neil R; Clark, Charlotte; Fahy, Amanda E; Tharmaratnam, Vanathi; Lewis, Daniel J; Thompson, Claire; Renton, Adrian; Moore, Derek G; Bhui, Kamaldeep S; Taylor, Stephanie J C; Eldridge, Sandra; Petticrew, Mark; Greenhalgh, Tricia; Stansfeld, Stephen A; Cummins, Steven</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Recent systematic reviews suggest that there is a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of large-scale urban regeneration programmes in improving health and well-being and alleviating health inequalities. The development of the Olympic Park in Stratford for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games provides the opportunity to take advantage of a natural experiment to examine the impact of large-scale urban regeneration on the health and well-being of young people and their families. Design and methods A prospective school-based survey of adolescents (11–12 years) with parent data collected through face-to-face interviews at home. Adolescents will be recruited from six randomly selected schools in an area receiving large-scale urban regeneration (London Borough of Newham) and compared with adolescents in 18 schools in three comparison areas with no equivalent regeneration (London Boroughs of Tower Hamlets, Hackney and Barking & Dagenham). Baseline data will be completed prior to the start of the London Olympics (July 2012) with follow-up at 6 and 18 months postintervention. Primary outcomes are: pre–post change in adolescent and parent mental health and well-being, physical activity and parental employment status. Secondary outcomes include: pre–post change in social cohesion, smoking, alcohol use, diet and body mass index. The study will account for individual and environmental contextual effects in evaluating changes to identified outcomes. A nested longitudinal qualitative study will explore families’ experiences of regeneration in order to unpack the process by which regeneration impacts on health and well-being. Ethics and dissemination The study has approval from Queen Mary University of London Ethics Committee (QMREC2011/40), the Association of Directors of Children's Services (RGE110927) and the London Boroughs Research Governance Framework (CERGF113). Fieldworkers have had advanced Criminal Records Bureau clearance. Findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, national and international conferences, through participating schools and the study website (http://www.orielproject.co.uk). PMID:22936822</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998CRASE.327..253D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998CRASE.327..253D"><span id="translatedtitle">Modèle d'aide à la gestion des eaux souterraines (MAGES). 1. Thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> du modèle numérique de transport des contaminants</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Delay, Frédérick; Banton, Olivier; Porel, Gilles</p> <p>1998-08-01</p> <p>MAGES is software for forecasting pollution hazards of groundwater which is in the process of development at INRS-Eau (Canada). The main distinctive feature of the model is the use of stationary truncated temporal moment equations instead of the classical time dependent advection-dispersion equation to solve the transport of contaminants. The aim of this work is to describe the theory of truncated temporal moment equations and to show how the curves of the concentration versus time can be calculated from temporal moments. The discrete method used to solve the equations and its stability is also discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CRPhy..17..237B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CRPhy..17..237B"><span id="translatedtitle">Métallurgie fondamentale et métallurgie numérique : l'héritage de Jacques Friedel dans la thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> de la plasticité des métaux et alliages</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bréchet, Yves</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Jacques Friedel's contribution to the theory of plasticity is described, as well as the more recent developments it inspired. It involves the microscopic properties of dislocations as well as macroscopic effects. The evolution of fundamental metallurgy toward numerical metallurgy is discussed, and Friedel's point of view on numerical methods is analyzed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1203731','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1203731"><span id="translatedtitle">Extragenic Suppression and Synthetic Lethality among Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii Mutants Resistant to anti-Microtubule Drugs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>James, S. W.; Silflow, C. D.; Thompson, M. D.; Ranum, LPW.; Lefebvre, P. A.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>The antimicrotubule agents oryzalin (<span class="hlt">ORY</span>), colchicine (COL) and taxol (TAX) were used to select three recessive, conditional lethal (ts(-)) mutants which defined two new essential loci, <span class="hlt">ory</span>1 and cor1. The two <span class="hlt">ory</span>1 mutants conferred resistance to <span class="hlt">ORY</span>, TAX, and COL; the cor1 mutant conferred resistance only to COL. Each of the mutants displayed wild-type sensitivity to a number of unrelated inhibitors. Assembly and disassembly of flagellar microtubules in the <span class="hlt">ory</span>1 mutants displayed wild-type sensitivity to <span class="hlt">ORY</span> and COL, suggesting that the <span class="hlt">ory</span>1 gene product either does not participate in these processes or the <span class="hlt">ory</span>1 gene product alone is not sufficient to confer resistance. The <span class="hlt">ory</span>1 locus mapped to linkage group X; cor1 was mapped to the left arm of linkage group XII. A synthetic lethal interaction was observed between <span class="hlt">ory</span>1 and cor1 mutations, i.e., inferred <span class="hlt">ory</span>1 cor1 double mutants were inviable at the permissive temperature. The conditional lethal phenotype of <span class="hlt">ory</span>1-1 was used to select many spontaneous TS(+) revertants, which arose at high frequencies. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of the revertants demonstrated that (1) the revertants fell into four phenotypic classes, including some which conferred supersensitivity to <span class="hlt">ORY</span> and others which conferred cold-sensitive lethality, (2) reversion was caused in most or all cases by extragenic suppressors, (3) suppressor mutations displayed complex behavior in heterozygous (sup/+) diploids, (4) many different loci may be capable of suppressing <span class="hlt">ory</span>1 mutants, and (5) suppressors of <span class="hlt">ory</span>1-1 efficiently suppressed an independently isolated allele, <span class="hlt">ory</span>1-2. Taken together the <span class="hlt">ory</span>1, cor1, and suppressor mutations identify a number of interacting loci involved in essential cellular processes which are specifically susceptible to antimicrotubule agents. PMID:2569432</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=187779&keyword=finasteride&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=59771417&CFTOKEN=97353063','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=187779&keyword=finasteride&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=59771417&CFTOKEN=97353063"><span id="translatedtitle">The OECD program to validate the rat Hershberger bioassay to screen compounds for in vivo and androgen and antiandrogen responses: Phase-2 dose-response studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>DESIGN: The Hershberger bioassay is designed to identify suspected androgens and antiandrogens based on changes in the weights of five androgen-responsive tissues (ventral prostate, paired seminal vesicles and coagulating glands, the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani and bulbocavernosus muscles, the g...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol1-sec93-404.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol1-sec93-404.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.404 - Findings of research misconduct and proposed administrative actions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... administrative actions. After completing its review, <span class="hlt">ORI</span> either closes the case without a finding of research... obtained by <span class="hlt">ORI</span> during its review; or (b) Recommends that HHS seek to settle the case....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-04-30/pdf/2013-10085.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-04-30/pdf/2013-10085.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 25274 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-30</p> <p>...Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) has taken final action in the following case: Matthew Poore, Advanced Liquid Logic Inc.: Based on the report of an inquiry conducted by Advanced Liquid Logic Inc. (Liquid Logic), the Respondent's admission, and additional analysis conducted by <span class="hlt">ORI</span>, <span class="hlt">ORI</span> found that Mr. Matthew Poore, former Technician, Liquid Logic, engaged in......</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-08-05/pdf/2011-19930.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-08-05/pdf/2011-19930.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 47589 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-08-05</p> <p>... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) has... Research Center: Based on the Respondent's acceptance of <span class="hlt">ORI</span>'s research misconduct findings, <span class="hlt">ORI</span> found...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-01-07/pdf/2013-00010.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-01-07/pdf/2013-00010.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 941 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-07</p> <p>...Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) has taken final action in the following case: Paul J. Muchowski, Ph.D., The J. David Gladstone Institutes: Based on the report of an investigation conducted by The J. David Gladstone Institutes (Gladstone) and additional analysis conducted by <span class="hlt">ORI</span> in its oversight review, <span class="hlt">ORI</span> found that Dr. Paul J. Muchowski, former Senior......</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-07-09/pdf/2010-16824.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-07-09/pdf/2010-16824.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 39530 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-09</p> <p>...Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) and the Assistant Secretary for Health have taken final action in the following case: Gerardo L. Paez, PhD, University of Pennsylvania: Based on the reports of an inquiry and an investigation conducted by the University of Pennsylvania (UP) and analysis conducted by the <span class="hlt">ORI</span> Division of Investigative Oversight (DIO), <span class="hlt">ORI</span> found......</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-10-13/pdf/2011-26453.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-10-13/pdf/2011-26453.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 63621 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-13</p> <p>...Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) has taken final action in the following case: Nicola Solomon, Ph.D., University of Michigan Medical School: Based on an investigation conducted by the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) and a preliminary analysis conducted by <span class="hlt">ORI</span>, <span class="hlt">ORI</span> found that Dr. Nicola Solomon, former postdoctoral scholar, Department of Human......</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22594278','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22594278"><span id="translatedtitle">[Inhibition of herpes simplex virus helicase UL9 by netropsin derivatives and antiviral activities of bis-netropsins].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bazhulina, N P; Surovaia, A N; Gurskiĭ, Ia G; Andronova, V L; Arkhipova, V S; Golovkin, M V; Nikitin, A M; Galegov, G A; Gorokhovskiĭ, S L; Gurskiĭ, G V</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Data obtained show that antiviral activities of bis-linked netropsin derivatives are targeted by specific complexes formed by helicase UL9 of herpes simplex virus type 1 with viral DNA replication origins, represented by two <span class="hlt">OriS</span> sites and one <span class="hlt">Ori</span>L site. According to the results of footprinting studies bis-netropsins get bound selectively to an A+T-cluster which separates interaction sites I and II for helicase UL9 in <span class="hlt">OriS</span>. Upon binding to DNA bis-netropsins stabilize a structure of the A+T-cluster and inhibit thermal fluctuation-induced opening of AT- base pairs which is needed for local unwinding of DNA by helicase UL9. Kinetics of ATP-dependent DNA unwinding in the presence and absence of Pt-bis-netropsin are studied by measuring the efficiency of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the fluorescent probes attached covalently to 3?- and 5?-ends of the oligonucleotides in the minimal <span class="hlt">OriS</span> duplex. Pt-bis-netropsin and related molecules inhibit unwinding of <span class="hlt">OriS</span> duplex by helicase UL9. Pt-bis-netropsin is also able to reduce the rate of unwinding of the AT- rich hairpin formed by the upper strand in the minimal <span class="hlt">OriS</span> duplex. The antiviral activities and toxicity of bis-linked netropsin derivatives are studied in cell cultured experiments and experiments with animals infected by herpes virus. PMID:22594278</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26136739','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26136739"><span id="translatedtitle">Redefining bacterial origins of replication as centralized information processors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Marczynski, Gregory T; Rolain, Thomas; Taylor, James A</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In this review we stress the differences between eukaryotes and bacteria with respect to their different cell cycles, replication mechanisms and genome organizations. One of the most basic and underappreciated differences is that a bacterial chromosome uses only one <span class="hlt">ori</span> while eukaryotic chromosome uses multiple <span class="hlt">oris</span>. Consequently, eukaryotic <span class="hlt">oris</span> work redundantly in a cell cycle divided into separate phases: First inactive replication proteins assemble on eukaryotic <span class="hlt">oris</span>, and then they await conditions (in the separate "S-phase") that activate only the <span class="hlt">ori</span>-bound and pre-assembled replication proteins. S-phase activation (without re-assembly) ensures that a eukaryotic <span class="hlt">ori</span> "fires" (starts replication) only once and that each chromosome consistently duplicates only once per cell cycle. This precise chromosome duplication does not require precise multiple <span class="hlt">ori</span> firing in S-phase. A eukaryotic <span class="hlt">ori</span> can fire early, late or not at all. The single bacterial <span class="hlt">ori</span> has no such margin for error and a comparable imprecision is lethal. Single <span class="hlt">ori</span> usage is not more primitive; it is a totally different strategy that distinguishes bacteria. We further argue that strong evolutionary pressures created more sophisticated single <span class="hlt">ori</span> systems because bacteria experience extreme and rapidly changing conditions. A bacterial <span class="hlt">ori</span> must rapidly receive and process much information in "real-time" and not just in "cell cycle time." This redefinition of bacterial <span class="hlt">oris</span> as centralized information processors makes at least two important predictions: First that bacterial <span class="hlt">oris</span> use many and yet to be discovered control mechanisms and second that evolutionarily distinct bacteria will use many very distinct control mechanisms. We review recent literature that supports both predictions. We will highlight three key examples and describe how negative-feedback, phospho-relay, and chromosome-partitioning systems act to regulate chromosome replication. We also suggest future studies and discuss using replication proteins as novel antibiotic targets. PMID:26136739</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4468827','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4468827"><span id="translatedtitle">Redefining bacterial origins of replication as centralized information processors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Marczynski, Gregory T.; Rolain, Thomas; Taylor, James A.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In this review we stress the differences between eukaryotes and bacteria with respect to their different cell cycles, replication mechanisms and genome organizations. One of the most basic and underappreciated differences is that a bacterial chromosome uses only one <span class="hlt">ori</span> while eukaryotic chromosome uses multiple <span class="hlt">oris</span>. Consequently, eukaryotic <span class="hlt">oris</span> work redundantly in a cell cycle divided into separate phases: First inactive replication proteins assemble on eukaryotic <span class="hlt">oris</span>, and then they await conditions (in the separate “S-phase”) that activate only the <span class="hlt">ori</span>-bound and pre-assembled replication proteins. S-phase activation (without re-assembly) ensures that a eukaryotic <span class="hlt">ori</span> “fires” (starts replication) only once and that each chromosome consistently duplicates only once per cell cycle. This precise chromosome duplication does not require precise multiple <span class="hlt">ori</span> firing in S-phase. A eukaryotic <span class="hlt">ori</span> can fire early, late or not at all. The single bacterial <span class="hlt">ori</span> has no such margin for error and a comparable imprecision is lethal. Single <span class="hlt">ori</span> usage is not more primitive; it is a totally different strategy that distinguishes bacteria. We further argue that strong evolutionary pressures created more sophisticated single <span class="hlt">ori</span> systems because bacteria experience extreme and rapidly changing conditions. A bacterial <span class="hlt">ori</span> must rapidly receive and process much information in “real-time” and not just in “cell cycle time.” This redefinition of bacterial <span class="hlt">oris</span> as centralized information processors makes at least two important predictions: First that bacterial <span class="hlt">oris</span> use many and yet to be discovered control mechanisms and second that evolutionarily distinct bacteria will use many very distinct control mechanisms. We review recent literature that supports both predictions. We will highlight three key examples and describe how negative-feedback, phospho-relay, and chromosome-partitioning systems act to regulate chromosome replication. We also suggest future studies and discuss using replication proteins as novel antibiotic targets. PMID:26136739</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17021026','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17021026"><span id="translatedtitle">Neural control and coordination of jumping in froghopper insects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Burrows, Malcolm</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The thrust for jumping in froghopper insects is produced by a rapid, synchronous depression of both hind legs generated by huge, multipartite trochanteral depressor muscles in the thorax and smaller <span class="hlt">levator</span> muscles in the coxae. A three-phase motor pattern activates these muscles in jumping. First, a <span class="hlt">levation</span> phase lasts a few hundred milliseconds, in which a burst of spikes in the trochanteral <span class="hlt">levator</span> motor neurons moves the hind legs into their fully cocked position and thus engages a mechanical lock between a coxa and a femur. Second, a cocked phase lasts a few seconds, in which a trochanteral depressor motor neuron spikes continuously at a frequency gradually rising to 50 Hz, although the hind legs remain stationary. <span class="hlt">Levator</span> motor spikes are sporadic. Third, the jump movement lasts <1 ms, in which the spikes in the depressors stop abruptly and the legs rapidly depress. This pattern may vary in the speed of the initial <span class="hlt">levation</span> and in the duration of the cocked phase. Recordings from the depressor muscles on both sides showed remarkable synchrony of their motor spikes. In one 4.9-long cocked phase all 174 spikes were synchronous and in another 27 s period of continuous spiking all but one of 1,176 spikes were synchronous. When a single hind leg moves rapidly, these depressor spikes are nevertheless independent of those of the other leg. These features of the motor pattern and the coupling between motor neurons to the two hind legs ensure powerful movements to propel rapid jumping. PMID:17021026</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27082429','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27082429"><span id="translatedtitle">Oridonin inhibits gefitinib-resistant lung cancer cells by suppressing EGFR/ERK/MMP-12 and CIP2A/Akt signaling pathways.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xiao, Xiangling; He, Zhongwei; Cao, Wei; Cai, Fen; Zhang, Liang; Huang, Qiuyue; Fan, Chunsheng; Duan, Chao; Wang, Xiaobo; Wang, Jiu; Liu, Ying</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Oridonin (<span class="hlt">Ori</span>), a diterpenoid compound extracted from traditional medicinal herbs, elicits antitumor effects on many cancer types. However, whether <span class="hlt">Ori</span> can be used in gefitinib-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells remains unclear. This study investigated the antitumor activity and underlying mechanisms of <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. Results demonstrated that this compound dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation, invasion, and migration of the gefitinib-resistant NSCLC cells in vitro. <span class="hlt">Ori</span> also significantly downregulated the phosphorylation of EGFR, ERK, Akt, expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), and the cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A). In addition, <span class="hlt">Ori</span> upregulated protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity of gefitinib-resistant NSCLC cells. <span class="hlt">Ori</span> combined with docetaxel synergistically inhibited these cells. <span class="hlt">Ori</span> also inhibited tumor growth in murine models. Immunohistochemistry results further revealed that <span class="hlt">Ori</span> downregulated phospho-EGFR, MMP-12, and CIP2A in vivo. These findings indicated that <span class="hlt">Ori</span> can inhibit the proliferation, invasion, and migration of gefitinib-resistant NSCLC cells by suppressing EGFR/ERK/MMP-12 and CIP2A/PP2A/Akt signaling pathways. Thus, <span class="hlt">Ori</span> may be a novel effective candidate to treat gefitinib-resistant NSCLC. PMID:27082429</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11288935','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11288935"><span id="translatedtitle">Obsessive relational intrusion: incidence, perceived severity, and coping.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cupach, W R; Spitzberg, B H</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Two studies investigated the phenomenon of obsessive relational intrusion (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>), defined as repeated and unwanted pursuit and invasion of one's sense of physical or symbolic privacy by another person, either stranger or acquaintance, who desires and/or presumes an intimate relationship. In Study 1, we sought to identify the incidence of a broad range of relationally intrusive behaviors, to identify the coping responses employed by victims of <span class="hlt">ORI</span>, and to assess the associations between coping responses and <span class="hlt">ORI</span> behaviors. Study 2 assessed the perceived degree of severity of <span class="hlt">ORI</span> behaviors. Results revealed that each of 63 <span class="hlt">ORI</span> behaviors was experienced by 3-78% of respondents in three different samples. Factor analysis revealed four types of <span class="hlt">ORI</span> behavior: pursuit, violation, threat, and hyper-intimacy. Responses for coping with <span class="hlt">ORI</span> consisted of interaction, protection, retaliation, and evasion. Virtually all intrusive behaviors were perceived to be annoying. Some types of <span class="hlt">ORI</span> behaviors were perceived to be relatively more threatening, upsetting and privacy-invading than others. Although sex differences were not observed for the incidence of <span class="hlt">ORI</span> or coping, women consistently perceived <span class="hlt">ORI</span> behaviors to be more annoying, upsetting, threatening, and privacy-invading than did men. PMID:11288935</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3166829','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3166829"><span id="translatedtitle">Genome-scale analysis of metazoan replication origins reveals their organization in specific but flexible sites defined by conserved features</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cayrou, Christelle; Coulombe, Philippe; Vigneron, Alice; Stanojcic, Slavica; Ganier, Olivier; Peiffer, Isabelle; Rivals, Eric; Puy, Aurore; Laurent-Chabalier, Sabine; Desprat, Romain; Méchali, Marcel</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>In metazoans, thousands of DNA replication origins (<span class="hlt">Oris</span>) are activated at each cell cycle. Their genomic organization and their genetic nature remain elusive. Here, we characterized <span class="hlt">Oris</span> by nascent strand (NS) purification and a genome-wide analysis in Drosophila and mouse cells. We show that in both species most CpG islands (CGI) contain <span class="hlt">Oris</span>, although methylation is nearly absent in Drosophila, indicating that this epigenetic mark is not crucial for defining the activated origin. Initiation of DNA synthesis starts at the borders of CGI, resulting in a striking bimodal distribution of NS, suggestive of a dual initiation event. <span class="hlt">Oris</span> contain a unique nucleotide skew around NS peaks, characterized by G/T and C/A overrepresentation at the 5′ and 3′ of <span class="hlt">Ori</span> sites, respectively. Repeated GC-rich elements were detected, which are good predictors of <span class="hlt">Oris</span>, suggesting that common sequence features are part of metazoan <span class="hlt">Oris</span>. In the heterochromatic chromosome 4 of Drosophila, <span class="hlt">Oris</span> correlated with HP1 binding sites. At the chromosome level, regions rich in <span class="hlt">Oris</span> are early replicating, whereas <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-poor regions are late replicating. The genome-wide analysis was coupled with a DNA combing analysis to unravel the organization of <span class="hlt">Oris</span>. The results indicate that <span class="hlt">Oris</span> are in a large excess, but their activation does not occur at random. They are organized in groups of site-specific but flexible origins that define replicons, where a single origin is activated in each replicon. This organization provides both site specificity and <span class="hlt">Ori</span> firing flexibility in each replicon, allowing possible adaptation to environmental cues and cell fates. PMID:21750104</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15249744','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15249744"><span id="translatedtitle">Botulinum toxin for the treatment of genital pain syndromes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Romito, Silvia; Bottanelli, Mara; Pellegrini, Maria; Vicentini, Silvana; Rizzuto, Niccolò; Bertolasi, Laura</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Our purpose was to test the effect of botulinum toxin injections on hypertonic pelvic floor muscles of patients suffering from genital pain syndromes. We report two cases of women complaining of a genital pain syndrome resistant to pharmacological therapies and rehabilitation exercises associated with a documented involuntary tonic contraction of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle as a defense reaction triggered by vulvar pain. We performed botulinum toxin injections into the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani with the intent to relieve pelvic muscular spasms. Within a few days after the injections both the patients reported a complete resolution of the painful symptomatology, lasting for several months. Our experience suggests that botulinum injections are indicated in patients with genital pain syndrome with documented pelvic muscle hyperactivity, whose symptoms arise not only from genital inflammation and lesions, but also, and sometimes chiefly, from <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani myalgia. PMID:15249744</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850005159','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850005159"><span id="translatedtitle">Modulation of the cytosolic androgen receptor in striated muscle by sex steroids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rance, N. E.; Max, S. E.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The influence of orchiectomy (GDX) and steroid administration on the level of the cytosolic androgen receptor in the rat <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle and in rat skeletal muscles (tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus) was studied. Androgen receptor binding to muscle cytosol was measured using H-3 methyltrienolone (R1881) as ligand, 100 fold molar excess unlabeled R1881 to assess nonspecific binding, and 500 fold molar excess of triamcinolone acetonide to prevent binding to glucocorticoid and progestin receptors. Results demonstrate that modification of the levels of sex steroids can alter the content of androgen receptors of rat striated muscle. Data suggest that: (1) cytosolic androgen receptor levels increase after orchiectomy in both <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle and skeletal muscle; (2) the acute increase in receptor levels is blocked by an inhibitor of protein synthesis; and (3) administration of estradiol-17 beta to castrated animals increases receptor binding in <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle but not in skeletal muscle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26703054','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26703054"><span id="translatedtitle">Elevator Muscle Anterior Resection: A New Technique for Blepharoptosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zigiotti, Gian Luigi; Delia, Gabriele; Grenga, Pierluigi; Pichi, Francesco; Rechichi, Miguel; Jaroudi, Mahmoud O; d'Alcontres, Francesco Stagno; Lupo, Flavia; Meduri, Alessandro</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Blepharoptosis is a condition of inadequate upper eyelid position, with a downward displacement of the upper eyelid margin resulting in obstruction of the superior visual field. <span class="hlt">Levator</span> resection is an effective technique that is routinely used to correct aponeurotic ptosis. The anterior <span class="hlt">levator</span> resection is the procedure of choice in moderate blepharoptosis when there is moderate to good <span class="hlt">levator</span> muscle function, furthermore, with an anterior approach, a greater resection can be achieved than by a conjunctival approach. The authors describe a modification in the Putterman technique with a resection done over a plicated elevator, plication that was suggested by Mustardè. The technique has been named as elevator muscle anterior resection. The elevator muscle anterior resection inspires from the Fasanella-Servat operation by the use of a clamp, making the operation simple and predictable. PMID:26703054</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=26220967&dopt=AbstractPlus','TOXNETTOXLINE'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=26220967&dopt=AbstractPlus"><span id="translatedtitle">Molecular Dissection of the Essential Features of the Origin of Replication of the Second Vibrio cholerae Chromosome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/htmlgen?TOXLINE">TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information</a></p> <p>Gerding MA; Chao MC; Davis BM; Waldor MK</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>IMPORTANCE: The genome of the enteric pathogen Vibrio cholerae consists of two chromosomes. While the chromosome I replication origin and its cognate replication initiator protein resemble those of Escherichia coli, the factors responsible for chromosome II replication initiation display no similarity to any other known initiation systems. Here, to enhance our understanding of how this DNA sequence, <span class="hlt">ori</span>CII, and its initiator protein, RctB, function, we used both targeted mutagenesis and a new random-mutagenesis approach (<span class="hlt">Ori</span>Seq) to finely map the <span class="hlt">ori</span>CII structural features and sequences required for RctB-mediated DNA replication. Collectively, our findings reveal the extraordinary evolutionary honing of the architecture and motifs that constitute <span class="hlt">ori</span>CII and reveal a new role for methylation in <span class="hlt">ori</span>CII-based replication. Finally, our findings suggest that the <span class="hlt">Ori</span>Seq approach is likely to be widely applicable for defining critical bases in cis-acting sequences.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27007137','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27007137"><span id="translatedtitle">Multiple Lytic Origins of Replication Are Required for Optimal Gammaherpesvirus Fitness In Vitro and In Vivo.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sattler, Christine; Steer, Beatrix; Adler, Heiko</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>An unresolved question in herpesvirus biology is why some herpesviruses contain more than one lytic origin of replication (<span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt). Using murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) as model virus containing two <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyts, we demonstrate that loss of either of the two <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyts was well tolerated in some situations but not in others both in vitro and in vivo. This was related to the cell type, the organ or the route of inoculation. Depending on the cell type, different cellular proteins, for example Hexim1 and Rbbp4, were found to be associated with <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt DNA. Overexpression or downregulation of these proteins differentially affected the growth of mutants lacking either the left or the right <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt. Thus, multiple <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyts are required to ensure optimal fitness in different cell types and tissues. PMID:27007137</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4805163','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4805163"><span id="translatedtitle">Multiple Lytic Origins of Replication Are Required for Optimal Gammaherpesvirus Fitness In Vitro and In Vivo</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sattler, Christine; Steer, Beatrix; Adler, Heiko</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>An unresolved question in herpesvirus biology is why some herpesviruses contain more than one lytic origin of replication (<span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt). Using murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) as model virus containing two <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyts, we demonstrate that loss of either of the two <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyts was well tolerated in some situations but not in others both in vitro and in vivo. This was related to the cell type, the organ or the route of inoculation. Depending on the cell type, different cellular proteins, for example Hexim1 and Rbbp4, were found to be associated with <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt DNA. Overexpression or downregulation of these proteins differentially affected the growth of mutants lacking either the left or the right <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt. Thus, multiple <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyts are required to ensure optimal fitness in different cell types and tissues. PMID:27007137</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23016736','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23016736"><span id="translatedtitle">New light through old windows: nurses, colonists and indigenous survival.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McKillop, Ann; Sheridan, Nicolette; Rowe, Deborah</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to explore the influences, processes and environments that shaped the practice of European nurses for indigenous New Zealand (NZ) Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> communities who were being overwhelmed by introduced infectious diseases. Historical data were accessed from multiple archival sources and analysed through the lens of colonial theory. Through their work early last century, NZ nurses actively gained professional status and territory through their work with Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>. By living and working alongside Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, they learned to practise in new ways that influenced Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> health. By developing a new role in new professional territory, nurses extended their practice to include health promotion as well as disease prevention. Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> survival from epidemics improved, and the population grew over that period. For Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, however, Eurocentric care alleviated their immediate health problems, but the detrimental impact of the mechanisms of colonisation overall has continued to the present day. PMID:23016736</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22237697','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22237697"><span id="translatedtitle">Physiological and anatomical evidence for an inhibitory trigemino-oculomotor pathway in the cat.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>May, Paul J; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; Baker, Harriet; Baker, Robert</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>During blink down-phase, the <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae superioris (<span class="hlt">levator</span>) muscle is inactivated, allowing the orbicularis oculi muscle to act. For trigeminal reflex blinks, the excitatory connections from trigeminal sensory nuclei to the facial nucleus have been described, but the pathway whereby the <span class="hlt">levator</span> is turned off have not. We examined this question by use of both physiological and anatomical approaches in the cat. Intracellular records from antidromically activated <span class="hlt">levator</span> motoneurons revealed that periorbital electrical stimulation produced bilateral, long latency inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs). Central electrical stimulation of the principal trigeminal nucleus produced shorter latency IPSPs. Intracellular staining revealed that these motoneurons reside in the caudal central subdivision and have 10 or more poorly branched dendrites, which extend bilaterally into the surrounding supraoculomotor area. Axons penetrated in this region could be activated from periorbital and central electrodes. Neurons labeled from tracer injections into the caudal oculomotor complex were distributed in a crescent-shaped band that lined the ventral and rostral aspects of the pontine trigeminal sensory nucleus. Double-label immunohistochemical procedures demonstrated that these cells were not tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the Kölliker-Fuse area. Instead, supraorbital nerve afferents displayed a similar crescent-shaped distribution, suggesting they drive these trigemino-oculomotor neurons. Anterograde labeling of the trigemino-oculomotor projection indicates that it terminates bilaterally, in and above the caudal central subdivision. These results characterize a trigemino-oculomotor pathway that inhibits <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae motoneurons in response to blink-producing periorbital stimuli. The bilateral distributions of trigemino-oculomotor afferents, <span class="hlt">levator</span> motoneurons, and their dendrites supply a morphological basis for conjugate lid movements. PMID:22237697</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3709393','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3709393"><span id="translatedtitle">The role of apoptosis in blepharoptosis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Şahlı, E; Hoşal, B M; Zilelioğlu, G; Dinçer, N; Tezel, G G</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of apoptosis in the pathogenesis of blepharoptosis. Patients and methods Forty-five eyelids of 43 consecutive patients (16 female, 27 males) that underwent <span class="hlt">levator</span> resection surgery for ptosis correction were included in the study. Twenty-six of the eyelids had congenital myogenic ptosis and 19 had aponeurotic ptosis. <span class="hlt">Levator</span> palpebrae superioris function and height of the vertical palpebral fissure were measured in all patients. After <span class="hlt">levator</span> resection surgery, the distal part of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> aponeurosis was fixed and sent for evaluation. Apoptotic cells were detected using Apop Tag Plus Peroxidase In Situ Apoptosis Detection Kit. Results The mean <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae superioris function was 8.4 mm (range 5–10 mm) in congenital ptosis group and 12.1 mm (range 10–17 mm) in the aponeurotic ptosis group. The mean height of the vertical palpebral fissure in patients with congenital ptosis and aponeurotic ptosis were 6.5 mm (range 5–9 mm) and 6.1 mm (3–9 mm), respectively. The mean apoptotic index of congenital ptosis and aponeurotic ptosis were 27.3 (16–39) and 29.8 (18–41), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between congenital and aponeurotic ptosis groups in a mean apoptotic index (P<0.05). Apoptotic index was not correlated with age, <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae superioris function, palpebral fissure height, and lid crease height in two groups. Conclusion We found no statistically significant difference between two subtypes of blepharoptosis regarding apoptosis. According to this study, apoptosis seems to have no significant role in the development of aponeurotic blepharoptosis. PMID:23598678</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3885353','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3885353"><span id="translatedtitle">Physiological and Anatomical Evidence for an Inhibitory Trigemino-Oculomotor Pathway in the Cat</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>May, Paul J.; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; Baker, Harriet; Baker, Robert</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>During blink down-phase, the <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae superioris (<span class="hlt">levator</span>) muscle is inactivated, allowing the orbicularis oculi muscle to act. For trigeminal reflex blinks, the excitatory connections from trigeminal sensory nuclei to the facial nucleus have been described, but the pathway whereby the <span class="hlt">levator</span> is turned off have not. We examined this question by use of both physiological and anatomical approaches in the cat. Intracellular records from antidromically activated <span class="hlt">levator</span> motoneurons revealed that periorbital electrical stimulation produced bilateral, long latency inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs). Central electrical stimulation of the principal trigeminal nucleus produced shorter latency IPSPs. Intracellular staining revealed that these motoneurons reside in the caudal central subdivision and have 10 or more poorly branched dendrites, which extend bilaterally into the surrounding supraoculomotor area. Axons penetrated in this region could be activated from periorbital and central electrodes. Neurons labeled from tracer injections into the caudal oculomotor complex were distributed in a crescent-shaped band that lined the ventral and rostral aspects of the pontine trigeminal sensory nucleus. Double-label immunohisto-chemical procedures demonstrated that these cells were not tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the Kölliker-Fuse area. Instead, supraorbital nerve afferents displayed a similar crescent-shaped distribution, suggesting they drive these trigemino-oculomotor neurons. Anterograde labeling of the trigemino-oculomotor projection indicates that it terminates bilaterally, in and above the caudal central subdivision. These results characterize a trigemino-oculomotor pathway that inhibits <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae motoneurons in response to blink-producing periorbital stimuli. The bilateral distributions of trigemino-oculomotor afferents, <span class="hlt">levator</span> motoneurons, and their dendrites supply a morphological basis for conjugate lid movements. PMID:22237697</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2592620','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2592620"><span id="translatedtitle">Motor innervation of respiratory muscles and an opercular display muscle in Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gorlick, D L</p> <p>1989-12-15</p> <p>Horseradish peroxidase was used to identify motor neurons projecting to the adductor mandibulae, <span class="hlt">levator</span> hyomandibulae, <span class="hlt">levator</span> operculi, adductor operculi, and dilator operculi muscles in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens. These muscles participate in the production of respiratory and feeding movements in teleost fishes. The dilator operculi is also the effector muscle for gill-cover erection behavior that is part of Betta's aggressive display. The motor innervation of these muscles in Betta was compared to that previously described for carp. Motor neurons of the adductor mandibulae, <span class="hlt">levator</span> hyomandibulae, and dilator operculi are located in the trigeminal motor nucleus, and motor neurons of the adductor operculi and <span class="hlt">levator</span> operculi are located in the facial motor nucleus in Betta and in carp. The trigeminal motor nucleus in both species is divided into rostral and caudal subnuclei. However, there are substantial differences in the organization of the subnuclei, and in the distribution of motor neurons within them. In Betta, the rostral trigeminal subnucleus consists of a single part but the caudal subnucleus is divided into two parts. Motor neurons for the dilator operculi and <span class="hlt">levator</span> hyomandibulae muscles are located in the lateral part of the caudal subnucleus; the medial part of the caudal subnucleus contains only dilator operculi motor neurons. The single caudal subnucleus in carp is located laterally, and contains motor neurons of both the dilator operculi and <span class="hlt">levator</span> hyomandibulae muscles. Differences in the organization of the trigeminal motor nucleus may relate to the use of the dilator operculi muscle for aggressive display behavior by perciform fishes such as Betta but not by cypriniform fishes such as carp. Five species of perciform fishes that perform gill-cover erection behavior had a Betta-like pattern of organization of the caudal trigeminal nucleus and a similar distribution of dilator operculi motor neurons. Goldfish, which like carp are cypriniform fish and do not display, had a carp-like trigeminal organization and dilator operculi motor neuron distribution. PMID:2592620</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-13/pdf/2012-8903.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-13/pdf/2012-8903.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 22320 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-13</p> <p>...Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) has taken final action in the following case: Peter J. Francis, M.D., Ph.D., Oregon Health Sciences University: Based on the report of an investigation conducted by Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) and additional analysis conducted by <span class="hlt">ORI</span> in its oversight review, <span class="hlt">ORI</span> found that Dr. Peter J. Francis, Associate Professor,......</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12068228','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12068228"><span id="translatedtitle">Use of the orbicularis oculi muscle flap for severe Marcus Gunn ptosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tsai, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Tsai-Ming; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Lin, Sin-Daw</p> <p>2002-04-01</p> <p>The authors present a 22-year-old man with severe unilateral congenital blepharoptosis associated with Marcus Gunn (jaw-winking) syndrome. The best conventional treatment was <span class="hlt">levator</span> excision to eliminate the synkinetic reflex and fascia lata brow suspension. However, the previous surgery had some disadvantages. Therefore, the authors report the use of the orbicularis oculi muscle flap to elevate dynamically the ptotic eyelid and to eliminate the synkinetic reflex without <span class="hlt">levator</span> resection. The postoperative result was both functionally and cosmetically satisfactory after 1 year of follow-up. PMID:12068228</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21042934','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21042934"><span id="translatedtitle">Enhanced production of single copy backbone-free transgenic plants in multiple crop species using binary vectors with a pRi replication origin in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ye, Xudong; Williams, Edward J; Shen, Junjiang; Johnson, Susan; Lowe, Brenda; Radke, Sharon; Strickland, Steve; Esser, James A; Petersen, Michael W; Gilbertson, Larry A</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>Single transgene copy, vector backbone-free transgenic crop plants are highly desired for functional genomics and many biotechnological applications. We demonstrate that binary vectors that use a replication origin derived from the Ri plasmid of Agrobacterium rhizogenes (<span class="hlt">ori</span>Ri) increase the frequency of single copy, backbone-free transgenic plants in Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation of soybean, canola, and corn, compared to RK2-derived binary vectors (RK2 <span class="hlt">ori</span>V). In large scale soybean transformation experiments, the frequency of single copy, backbone-free transgenic plants was nearly doubled in two versions of the <span class="hlt">ori</span>Ri vectors compared to the RK2 <span class="hlt">ori</span>V control vector. In canola transformation experiments, the <span class="hlt">ori</span>Ri vector produced more single copy, backbone-free transgenic plants than did the RK2 <span class="hlt">ori</span>V vector. In corn transformation experiments, the frequency of single copy backbone-free transgenic plants was also significantly increased when using the <span class="hlt">ori</span>Ri vector, although the transformation frequency dropped. These results, derived from transformation experiments using three crops, indicate the advantage of <span class="hlt">ori</span>Ri vectors over RK2 <span class="hlt">ori</span>V binary vectors for the production of single copy, backbone-free transgenic plants using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. PMID:21042934</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol1-sec93-512.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol1-sec93-512.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.512 - Discovery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest <span class="hlt">ORI</span> Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol1-sec93-512.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol1-sec93-512.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.512 - Discovery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest <span class="hlt">ORI</span> Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol1-sec93-512.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol1-sec93-512.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.512 - Discovery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest <span class="hlt">ORI</span> Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26986967','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26986967"><span id="translatedtitle">Oridonin inhibits the proliferation of human colon cancer cells by upregulating BMP7 to activate p38 MAPK.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ren, Chun-Mei; Li, Yang; Chen, Qian-Zhao; Zeng, Yu-Hua; Shao, Ying; Wu, Qiu-Xiang; Yuan, Shuang-Xue; Yang, Jun-Qin; Yu, Yu; Wu, Ke; He, Bai-Cheng; Sun, Wen-Juan</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Oridonin (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>), a diterpenoid purified from Rabdosia rubescens, has been reported as a promising chemotherapy drug for colon cancer treatment; yet, the precise mechanisms underlying this anticancer activity remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer effect of <span class="hlt">ORI</span> in HCT116 cells, and dissected the possible molecular mechanisms underlying this activity. With crystal violet staining, flow cytometry and western blot assay, we found that <span class="hlt">ORI</span> effectively inhibited the proliferation and induced the apoptosis of HCT116 cells. Further analysis of the results indicated that BMP7 was greatly upregulated by <span class="hlt">ORI</span> in the HCT116 cells, but its endogenous expression in FHC cells was apparently lower than that in the colon cancer cell lines. Exogenous expression of BMP7 inhibited the proliferation of the HCT116 cells, and substantially potentiated the anticancer effect of <span class="hlt">ORI</span>. However, the specific antibody of BMP7 nearly abolished this anticancer activity of <span class="hlt">ORI</span> in the HCT116 cells. Meanwhile, <span class="hlt">ORI</span> exerted no significant effect on the level of phosphorylated Smad1/5/8 or total p38 MAPK, but greatly increased the level of phosphorylated p38 MAPK in the HCT116 cells. A p38 MAPK-specific inhibitor partly reversed the antiproliferative effect of BMP7 in the HCT116 cells, but prominently promoted the effect of the BMP7 antibody on proliferation. Exogenous expression of BMP7 increased the <span class="hlt">ORI</span>-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, while the BMP7 antibody almost abolished the <span class="hlt">ORI</span>-elevated p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Our findings suggest that <span class="hlt">ORI</span> may be an efficacious drug for colon cancer treatment. This anticancer activity of <span class="hlt">ORI</span> may be mediated by upregulating BMP7 at least to increase the activation of p38 MAPK. PMID:26986967</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=226591','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=226591"><span id="translatedtitle">The Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally Cleft Goats Palates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A cleft palate goat model was used to study the contractile properties of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> veli palatini (LVP) muscle which is responsible for the movement of the soft palate. In 15-25% of patients that undergo palatoplasty, residual velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) remains a problem and often require...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=230923','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=230923"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of cleft palate repair on the susceptibility to contraction-induced injury of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenitally-clefted goat palates.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Despite cleft palate repair, velopharyngeal competence is not achieved in ~ 15% of patients, often necessitating secondary surgical correction. Velopharyngeal competence postrepair may require the conversion of <span class="hlt">levator</span> veli palatini muscle fibers from injury-susceptible type 2 fibers to injury-resi...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=215120','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=215120"><span id="translatedtitle">Contraction-induced injury to single permeabilized muscle fibers from normal and congenitally-clefted goat palates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> veli palatine (LVP) muscle. It was determined that muscle fiber type, size, and sensitivity to contraction-induced injury was different between cleft palate ind...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10450583','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10450583"><span id="translatedtitle">A clinical sign of the Marcus Gunn phenomenon. Case Report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yoshikata, R; Yanai, A</p> <p>1999-06-01</p> <p>We present a 33-year-old man with severe unilateral congenital blepharoptosis associated with the Marcus Gunn "jaw-winking" phenomenon. The most important factor in surgical treatment was elimination of the synkinetic reflex. We also thought that excision of as much of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> muscle as possible was necessary. The result was both functionally and cosmetically satisfactory. PMID:10450583</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=60432&keyword=hormones+AND+food&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=72136694&CFTOKEN=42860967','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=60432&keyword=hormones+AND+food&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=72136694&CFTOKEN=42860967"><span id="translatedtitle">COMBINED EFFECTS OF ANTIANDROGENIC PESTICIDESVINCLOZOLIN AND PROCYMIDONE ON ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT TISSUE IN THE HERSHBERGER ASSAY USING SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Vinclozolin(V) and procymidone(P) are antiandrogens which block <br>testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) action by competing with <br>these steroid hormones for the androgen receptor. These pesticides alone <br>are known to block T-induced ventral prostate and <span class="hlt">levator</span> ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8377680','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8377680"><span id="translatedtitle">Stress urinary incontinence in women--an overuse syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jóźwik, M</p> <p>1993-06-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscles in women are overloaded by constant supporting abdominal contents, and counteracting rises of abdominal pressure at the level of the urethra. The excessive load leads to a decrease in their type II fibers. This results in stress urinary incontinence due to loss of the fibers responsible for additional compression of the urethra at strain. PMID:8377680</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=emg&pg=5&id=EJ117746','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=emg&pg=5&id=EJ117746"><span id="translatedtitle">Palatal Activity in Voicing Distinctions: A Simultaneous Fiberoptic and Electromyographic Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bell-Berti, Fredericka; Hirose, Hajime</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>A study of electromyographic (EMG) activity and palatal movement is reported. Motion pictures were taken of the nasal surface of the soft palate and EMG recordings from the <span class="hlt">levator</span> palatini muscle were obtained. Both were analyzed for the relationship of velar height to EMG strength and time. (SC)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=215117','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=215117"><span id="translatedtitle">Contractile properties of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenital cleft palates and normal palates of Spanish goats</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> veli palatine muscle. It was determined that the muscle fibers of the cleft palate-induced goats were primarily of the type 2 (fast fibers) which fatigue easil...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760050464&hterms=Fink&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DT.%2BFink','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760050464&hterms=Fink&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DT.%2BFink"><span id="translatedtitle">A lower limit on the surface C-12/C-13 ratio in Alpha Orionis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Gautier, T. N., III; Fink, U.; Larson, H. P.; Thompson, R. I.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>The second overtone CO bands near 1.6 microns were analyzed in Alpha <span class="hlt">Ori</span> using synthetic spectra. No firm identification of (C-13)O was made, which allowed a lower limit of 20 to be set on the C-12/C-13 ratio. A rather low microturbulent velocity of 2 km/s was found to match the spectrum of Alpha <span class="hlt">Ori</span> best.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740049343&hterms=boo&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dboo','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740049343&hterms=boo&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dboo"><span id="translatedtitle">Four stellar-diameter measurements by a new technique - Amplitude interferometry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Currie, D. G.; Knapp, S. L.; Liewer, K. M.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>Diameters are reported for four late-type giant stars, alpha Boo, alpha <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, alpha Tau, and beta Peg. The diameters were obtained with a new kind of interferometer designed expressly to operate in the presence of atmospheric fluctuations. The new technique, called amplitude interferometry, is briefly described. The results include measurements of alpha <span class="hlt">Ori</span> at several wavelengths.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-04-27/pdf/2011-10157.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-04-27/pdf/2011-10157.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 23600 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-27</p> <p>... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) has... Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) in its oversight review, the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS)...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3936714','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3936714"><span id="translatedtitle">Multiple replication origins with diverse control mechanisms in Haloarcula hispanica</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wu, Zhenfang; Liu, Jingfang; Yang, Haibo; Liu, Hailong; Xiang, Hua</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The use of multiple replication origins in archaea is not well understood. In particular, little is known about their specific control mechanisms. Here, we investigated the active replication origins in the three replicons of a halophilic archaeon, Haloarcula hispanica, by extensive gene deletion, DNA mutation and genome-wide marker frequency analyses. We revealed that individual origins are specifically dependent on their co-located cdc6 genes, and a single active origin/cdc6 pairing is essential and sufficient for each replicon. Notably, we demonstrated that the activities of <span class="hlt">ori</span>C1 and <span class="hlt">ori</span>C2, the two origins on the main chromosome, are differently controlled. A G-rich inverted repeat located in the internal region between the two inverted origin recognition boxes (ORBs) plays as an enhancer for <span class="hlt">ori</span>C1, whereas the replication initiation at <span class="hlt">ori</span>C2 is negatively regulated by an ORB-rich region located downstream of <span class="hlt">ori</span>C2-cdc6E, likely via Cdc6E-titrating. The <span class="hlt">ori</span>C2 placed on a plasmid is incompatible with the wild-type (but not the Δ<span class="hlt">ori</span>C2) host strain, further indicating that strict control of the <span class="hlt">ori</span>C2 activity is important for the cell. This is the first report revealing diverse control mechanisms of origins in haloarchaea, which has provided novel insights into the use and coordination of multiple replication origins in the domain of Archaea. PMID:24271389</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3926323','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3926323"><span id="translatedtitle">Replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome in RNase HI-deficient cells: Multiple initiation regions and fork dynamics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Maduike, Nkabuije Z; Tehranchi, Ashley K; Wang, Jue D; Kreuzer, Kenneth N</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>DNA replication in Escherichia coli is normally initiated at a single origin, <span class="hlt">ori</span>C, dependent on initiation protein DnaA. However, replication can be initiated elsewhere on the chromosome at multiple ectopic <span class="hlt">ori</span>K sites. Genetic evidence indicates that initiation from <span class="hlt">ori</span>K depends on RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops), which are normally removed by enzymes such as RNase HI to prevent <span class="hlt">ori</span>K from misfiring during normal growth. Initiation from <span class="hlt">ori</span>K sites occurs in RNase HI-deficient mutants, and possibly in wild-type cells under certain unusual conditions. Despite previous work, the locations of <span class="hlt">ori</span>K and their impact on genome stability remain unclear. We combined 2D gel electrophoresis and whole genome approaches to map genome-wide <span class="hlt">ori</span>K locations. The DNA copy number profiles of various RNase HI-deficient strains contained multiple peaks, often in consistent locations, identifying candidate <span class="hlt">ori</span>K sites. Removal of RNase HI protein also leads to global alterations of replication fork migration patterns, often opposite to normal replication directions, and presumably eukaryote-like replication fork merging. Our results have implications for genome stability, offering a new understanding of how RNase HI deficiency results in R-loop-mediated transcription-replication conflict, as well as inappropriate replication stalling or blockage at Ter sites outside of the terminus trap region and at ribosomal operons. PMID:24164596</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol1-sec93-316.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol1-sec93-316.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.316 - Completing the research misconduct process.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... <span class="hlt">ORI</span> in advance if the institution plans to close a case at the inquiry, investigation, or appeal stage... reached, or for any other reason, except the closing of a case at the inquiry stage on the basis that an... to <span class="hlt">ORI</span> under § 93.315. (b) After consulting with the institution on its basis for closing a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4009838','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4009838"><span id="translatedtitle">Recent Advances in the Identification of Replication Origins Based on the Z-curve Method</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gao, Feng</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Precise DNA replication is critical for the maintenance of genetic integrity in all organisms. In all three domains of life, DNA replication starts at a specialized locus, termed as the replication origin, <span class="hlt">ori</span>C or <span class="hlt">ORI</span>, and its identification is vital to understanding the complex replication process. In bacteria and eukaryotes, replication initiates from single and multiple origins, respectively, while archaea can adopt either of the two modes. The Z-curve method has been successfully used to identify replication origins in genomes of various species, including multiple <span class="hlt">ori</span>Cs in some archaea. Based on the Z-curve method and comparative genomics analysis, we have developed a web-based system, <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-Finder, for finding <span class="hlt">ori</span>Cs in bacterial genomes with high accuracy. Predicted <span class="hlt">ori</span>C regions in bacterial genomes are organized into an online database, DoriC. Recently, archaeal <span class="hlt">ori</span>C regions identified by both in vivo and in silico methods have also been included in the database. Here, we summarize the recent advances of in silico prediction of <span class="hlt">ori</span>Cs in bacterial and archaeal genomes using the Z-curve based method. PMID:24822028</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-12-13/pdf/2010-31168.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-12-13/pdf/2010-31168.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 77641 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-12-13</p> <p>... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) has... Medicine (NYUSOM) and the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) found that Sagar S. Mungekar, PhD, former...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4790895','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4790895"><span id="translatedtitle">Oridonin Attenuates Synaptic Loss and Cognitive Deficits in an Aβ1–42-Induced Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yang, Hui; Li, Chaosheng; Hui, Zhen; Xu, Yun; Zhu, Xiaolei</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Synaptic loss induced by beta-amyloid (Aβ) plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but the mechanisms underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we found that oridonin (<span class="hlt">Ori</span>) rescued synaptic loss induced by Aβ1–42 in vivo and in vitro and attenuated the alterations in dendritic structure and spine density observed in the hippocampus of AD mice. In addition, <span class="hlt">Ori</span> increased the expression of PSD-95 and synaptophysin and promoted mitochondrial activity in the synaptosomes of AD mice. <span class="hlt">Ori</span> also activated the BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling pathway in the hippocampus of AD mice. Furthermore, in the Morris water maze test, <span class="hlt">Ori</span> reduced latency and searching distance and increased the number of platform crosses in AD mice. These data suggest that <span class="hlt">Ori</span> might prevent synaptic loss and improve behavioral symptoms in Aβ1–42-induced AD mice. PMID:26974541</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25757664','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25757664"><span id="translatedtitle">A multi-compartment 3-D finite element model of rectocele and its interaction with cystocele.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E; Ashton-Miller, James A; DeLancey, John O L</p> <p>2015-06-25</p> <p>We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% <span class="hlt">levator</span> and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, <span class="hlt">levator</span> and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment. PMID:25757664</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23801591','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23801591"><span id="translatedtitle">Mandibular and hyoid muscles of Galeomorph sharks (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii), with remarks on their phylogenetic intrarelationships.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Soares, Mateus C; de Carvalho, Marcelo R</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>The superorder Galeomorph comprises the orders Heterodontiformes, Orectolobiformes, Lamniformes, and Carcharhiniformes. Recent morphological and molecular support that it is a monophyletic taxon. The phyletic relationship within the Galeomorphi are also well resolved. However, only few morphological characters of the mandibular and hyoid muscles have been employed, and a detailed description of these muscles and their variations may contribute new interpretations of homology and to the discussion of different hypothesis of intrarelationships. This paper provides a detailed description of mandibular and hyoid arch muscles in galeomorph sharks, within a comparative elasmobranch framework, with the objective to discuss putative homologies that may elucidate our understanding of galeomorph evolution. Twenty-eight galeomorph species were dissected, described, illustrated and compared with other elasmobranchs and with data from the literature. The Galeomorphi are supported as monophyletic by presenting the m. <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii superioris attached directly to the neurocranium, different from the attachment through a tendon in basal squalomorphs. Heterodontiformes and Orectolobiformes share particular variations in the position and insertion of the m. <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii superioris and the presence of a well-defined m. <span class="hlt">levator</span> hyomandibulae. Lamniformes and Carcharhiniformes show similar patterns in the position and attachment of the m. <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii superioris, subdivision of the m. adductor mandibulae, and the presence of an almost indivisible m. <span class="hlt">levator</span> hyomandibulae and m. constrictor hyoideus dorsalis, similar to the condition, albeit independently, in basal squalomorphs. No specific mandibular or hyoid arch muscle character was found to support the clade composed of Orectolobiformes, Lamniformes, and Carcharhiniformes, as advocated by recent phylogenetic analyses. PMID:23801591</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4551981','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4551981"><span id="translatedtitle">Molecular Dissection of the Essential Features of the Origin of Replication of the Second Vibrio cholerae Chromosome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gerding, Matthew A.; Chao, Michael C.; Davis, Brigid M.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT Vibrionaceae family members are interesting models for studying DNA replication initiation, as they contain two circular chromosomes. Chromosome II (chrII) replication is governed by two evolutionarily unique yet highly conserved elements, the origin DNA sequence <span class="hlt">ori</span>CII and the initiator protein RctB. The minimum functional region of <span class="hlt">ori</span>CII, <span class="hlt">ori</span>CII-min, contains multiple elements that are bound by RctB in vitro, but little is known about the specific requirements for individual elements during <span class="hlt">ori</span>CII initiation. We utilized undirected and site-specific mutagenesis to investigate the functionality of mutant forms of <span class="hlt">ori</span>CII-min and assessed binding to various mutant forms by RctB. Our analyses showed that deletions, point mutations, and changes in RctB target site spacing or methylation all impaired <span class="hlt">ori</span>CII-min-based replication. RctB displayed a reduced affinity for most of the low-efficacy origins tested, although its characteristic cooperative binding was generally maintained. Mutations that removed or altered the relative positions of origin components other than RctB binding sites (e.g., AT-rich sequence, DnaA target site) also abolished replicative capacity. Comprehensive mutagenesis and deep-sequencing-based screening (<span class="hlt">Ori</span>Seq) allowed the identification of a previously uncharacterized methylated domain in <span class="hlt">ori</span>CII that is required for origin function. Together, our results reveal the remarkable evolutionary honing of <span class="hlt">ori</span>CII and provide new insight into the complex interplay between RctB and <span class="hlt">ori</span>CII. PMID:26220967</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015csss...18.1065P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015csss...18.1065P"><span id="translatedtitle">Status of known T type sources towards the σ Orionis cluster</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pena Ramirez, K.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Bejar, V. J. S.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We present the characterization of the three T type candidates (S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70, S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 73, and S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> J053804.65-021352.5) lying in the line of sight towards σ Orionis (˜3 Myr, ˜352 pc, solar metallicity) by means of near-infrared photometric, astrometric, and spectroscopic studies. H-band methane images were collected for all three sources using the LIRIS instrument on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope. J-band spectra of resolution ˜500 were obtained for S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> J053804.65-021352.5 with the ISAAC spectrograph on the 8 m Very Large Telescope (VLT), and public low resolution (R˜50) JH spectra obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were employed for the spectroscopic classification of S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 and 73. Accurate proper motions with a typical uncertainty of ±3 mas yr^{-1} were derived using ancient images and new data collected with ISAAC/VLT and WFC3/HST. The three objects were spectroscopically classified as T4.5 ± 0.5 (S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 73), T5 ± 0.5 (S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> J053804.65-021352.5), and T7^{+0.5}_{-1.0} (S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70). These spectral types agree with the H-band methane colors. The proper motions of S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 and 73 are larger than that of the cluster by >4 σ. The proper motion of S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> J053804.65-021352.5 is consistent with a null displacement during the time interval of 7.03 yr.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=364475','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=364475"><span id="translatedtitle">Activation of a mammalian origin of replication by chromosomal rearrangement.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Leu, T H; Hamlin, J L</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The methotrexate-resistant Chinese hamster cell line DC3F/A3-4K (A3/4K) contains at least two prominent dihydrofolate reductase amplicon types. The type I amplicons, constituting approximately 80% of the total, are at least 650 kb in length, but the endpoints have not yet been characterized. The type II sequences represent approximately 20% of amplicons, are 450 kb in length, and are arranged as alternating head-to-head and tail-to-tail repeats. In previous studies on the CHOC 400 line, in which the amplicons are much smaller, a replication initiation locus (<span class="hlt">ori-beta/ori</span>-gamma) has been shown to reside downstream from the dihydrofolate reductase gene. In a more recent study on the larger amplicons of A3/4K cells, we detected an additional initiation locus (<span class="hlt">ori</span>-alpha) lying approximately 240 kb upstream from <span class="hlt">ori-beta/ori</span>-gamma. Interestingly, in vivo labelling experiments suggested that replication forks diverge from <span class="hlt">ori</span>-alpha only in the downstream direction. This finding suggested either that <span class="hlt">ori</span>-alpha is a unidirectional origin or that a terminus lies immediately upstream from <span class="hlt">ori</span>-alpha. However, in this study, we show that <span class="hlt">ori</span>-alpha is actually very close to the head-to-head palindromic junction sequence between the minor type II amplicons in A3/4K cells; furthermore, <span class="hlt">ori</span>-alpha is active in the early S period in the type II amplicons but not in the larger type I sequences that lack this palindromic junction. This is the first direct demonstration in mammalian cells that a cryptic origin can be activated by chromosomal rearrangement, presumably by deleting negative regulatory elements or by creating a more favorable chromosomal milieu for initiation. Images PMID:1588972</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21829357','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21829357"><span id="translatedtitle">EBV latency types adopt alternative chromatin conformations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tempera, Italo; Klichinsky, Michael; Lieberman, Paul M</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) can establish latent infections with distinct gene expression patterns referred to as latency types. These different latency types are epigenetically stable and correspond to different promoter utilization. Here we explore the three-dimensional conformations of the EBV genome in different latency types. We employed Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C) assay to investigate chromatin loop formation between the <span class="hlt">Ori</span>P enhancer and the promoters that determine type I (Qp) or type III (Cp) gene expression. We show that <span class="hlt">Ori</span>P is in close physical proximity to Qp in type I latency, and to Cp in type III latency. The cellular chromatin insulator and boundary factor CTCF was implicated in EBV chromatin loop formation. Combining 3C and ChIP assays we found that CTCF is physically associated with <span class="hlt">Ori</span>P-Qp loop formation in type I and <span class="hlt">Ori</span>P-Cp loop formation in type III latency. Mutations in the CTCF binding site located at Qp disrupt loop formation between Qp and <span class="hlt">Ori</span>P, and lead to the activation of Cp transcription. Mutation of the CTCF binding site at Cp, as well as siRNA depletion of CTCF eliminates both <span class="hlt">Ori</span>P-associated loops, indicating that CTCF plays an integral role in loop formation. These data indicate that epigenetically stable EBV latency types adopt distinct chromatin architectures that depend on CTCF and mediate alternative promoter targeting by the <span class="hlt">Ori</span>P enhancer. PMID:21829357</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21464588','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21464588"><span id="translatedtitle">CHANDRA REVEALS VARIABLE MULTI-COMPONENT X-RAY EMISSION FROM FU ORIONIS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Skinner, Stephen L.; Guedel, Manuel; Briggs, Kevin R.; Lamzin, Sergei A.</p> <p>2010-10-20</p> <p>FU Orionis is the prototype of a class of eruptive young stars ('FUors') characterized by strong optical outbursts. We recently completed an exploratory survey of FUors using XMM-Newton to determine their X-ray properties, about which little was previously known. The prototype FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> and V1735 Cyg were detected. The X-ray spectrum of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> was found to be unusual, consisting of a cool moderately absorbed component plus a hotter component viewed through an absorption column density that is an order of magnitude higher. We present here a sensitive (99 ks) follow-up X-ray observation of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> obtained at higher angular resolution with Chandra ACIS-S. The unusual multi-component spectrum is confirmed. The hot component is centered on FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> and dominates the emission above 2 keV. It is variable (a signature of magnetic activity) and is probably coronal emission originating close to FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>'s surface viewed through cool gas in FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>'s strong wind or accretion stream. In contrast, the X-ray centroid of the soft emission below 2 keV is offset 0.''20 to the southeast of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, toward the near-IR companion (FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> S). This offset amounts to slightly less than half the separation between the two stars. The most likely explanation for the offset is that the companion contributes significantly to the softer X-ray emission below 2 keV (and weakly above 2 keV). The superimposed X-ray contributions from FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> and the companion resolve the paradox posed by XMM-Newton of an apparently single X-ray source viewed through two different absorption columns.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3893580','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3893580"><span id="translatedtitle">Healthy lifestyle and risk of breast cancer for indigenous and non-indigenous women in New Zealand: a case control study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background The reasons for the increasing breast cancer incidence in indigenous Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> compared to non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> New Zealand women are unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the association of an index of combined healthy lifestyle behaviours with the risk of breast cancer in Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> women. Methods A population-based case–control study was conducted, including breast cancer cases registered in New Zealand from 2005–2007. Controls were matched by ethnicity and 5-year age bands. A healthy lifestyle index score (HLIS) was generated for 1093 cases and 2118 controls, based on public health and cancer prevention recommendations. The HLIS was constructed from eleven factors (limiting red meat, cream, and cheese; consuming more white meat, fish, fruit and vegetables; lower alcohol consumption; not smoking; higher exercise levels; lower body mass index; and longer cumulative duration of breastfeeding). Equal weight was given to each factor. Logistic regression was used to estimate the associations between breast cancer and the HLIS for each ethnic group stratified by menopausal status. Results Among Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, the mean HLIS was 5.00 (range 1–9); among non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> the mean was 5.43 (range 1.5-10.5). There was little evidence of an association between the HLIS and breast cancer for non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> women. Among postmenopausal Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, those in the top HLIS tertile had a significantly lower odds of breast cancer (Odds Ratio 0.47, 95% confidence interval 0.23-0.94) compared to those in the bottom tertile. Conclusion These findings suggest that healthy lifestyle recommendations could be important for reducing breast cancer risk in postmenopausal Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> women. PMID:24410858</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4388369','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4388369"><span id="translatedtitle">Breast Cancer Biology and Ethnic Disparities in Breast Cancer Mortality in New Zealand: A Cohort Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Seneviratne, Sanjeewa; Lawrenson, Ross; Scott, Nina; Kim, Boa; Shirley, Rachel; Campbell, Ian</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Indigenous M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> women have a 60% higher breast cancer mortality rate compared with European women in New Zealand. We investigated differences in cancer biological characteristics and their impact on breast cancer mortality disparity between M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> and NZ European women. Materials and Methods Data on 2849 women with primary invasive breast cancers diagnosed between 1999 and 2012 were extracted from the Waikato Breast Cancer Register. Differences in distribution of cancer biological characteristics between M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> and NZ European women were explored adjusting for age and socioeconomic deprivation in logistic regression models. Impacts of socioeconomic deprivation, stage and cancer biological characteristics on breast cancer mortality disparity between M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> and NZ European women were explored in Cox regression models. Results Compared with NZ European women (n=2304), M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> women (n=429) had significantly higher rates of advanced and higher grade cancers. M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> women also had non-significantly higher rates of ER/PR negative and HER-2 positive breast cancers. Higher odds of advanced stage and higher grade remained significant for M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> after adjusting for age and deprivation. M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> women had almost a 100% higher age and deprivation adjusted breast cancer mortality hazard compared with NZ European women (HR=1.98, 1.55-2.54). Advanced stage and lower proportion of screen detected cancer in M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> explained a greater portion of the excess breast cancer mortality (HR reduction from 1.98 to 1.38), while the additional contribution through biological differences were minimal (HR reduction from 1.38 to 1.35). Conclusions More advanced cancer stage at diagnosis has the greatest impact while differences in biological characteristics appear to be a minor contributor for inequities in breast cancer mortality between M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> and NZ European women. Strategies aimed at reducing breast cancer mortality in M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> should focus on earlier diagnosis, which will likely have a greater impact on reducing breast cancer mortality inequity between M?<span class="hlt">ori</span> and NZ European women. PMID:25849101</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27090084','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27090084"><span id="translatedtitle">Evolution of the head-trunk interface in tetrapod vertebrates.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sefton, Elizabeth M; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Mohaddes, Zahra; Hanken, James</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Vertebrate neck musculature spans the transition zone between head and trunk. The extent to which the cucullaris muscle is a cranial muscle allied with the gill <span class="hlt">levators</span> of anamniotes or is instead a trunk muscle is an ongoing debate. Novel computed tomography datasets reveal broad conservation of the cucullaris in gnathostomes, including coelacanth and caecilian, two sarcopterygians previously thought to lack it. In chicken, lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) adjacent to occipital somites is a recently identified embryonic source of cervical musculature. We fate-map this mesoderm in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), which retains external gills, and demonstrate its contribution to posterior gill-<span class="hlt">levator</span> muscles and the cucullaris. Accordingly, LPM adjacent to the occipital somites should be regarded as posterior cranial mesoderm. The axial position of the head-trunk border in axolotl is congruent between LPM and somitic mesoderm, unlike in chicken and possibly other amniotes. PMID:27090084</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25954644','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25954644"><span id="translatedtitle">Inverse Bell's Phenomenon: Rare Ophthalmic Finding Following Ptosis Surgery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shitole, Satish; Jakkal, Tapan; Khaire, Bhasakar</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Bell's phenomenon is protective reflex in which the globe is turned upwards and slightly outwards during the eyelid closure to avoid corneal exposure. In Inverse Bell's phenomenon, the eye moves downward instead of upward, this may be seen in the normal population, patients with Bell's palsy or following conjunctival scarring. We hereby present the unusual complication of transient inversion of Bell's phenomenon following extensive <span class="hlt">levator</span> resection surgery performed for congenital ptosis. A 24-year-old male was undergone ptosis correction surgery. On postoperative day two, ocular examination revealed down rolling of eye ball during eyelid closure. It underwent spontaneous resolution within four weeks without any corneal complication. The patients were given frequent lubricating eye drops during this period and advised frequent follow-up for early diagnosis of corneal complication. Here we highlight an inverse Bell's phenomenon following <span class="hlt">levator</span> resection surgery, its possible mechanism and risk of corneal complication. PMID:25954644</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21277047','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21277047"><span id="translatedtitle">[Oculopalpebral and facial synkinesis associated with ptosis: epidemiological, clinical, and therapeutic features].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ben Rayana, N; Ben Hadj Hamida, F; Touzani, F; Chahed, N; Knani, L; Krifa, F; Yakoubi, S; Mahjoub, H</p> <p>2011-02-01</p> <p>Synkinetic movements of the upper eyelids may be noted in association with movements of either extraocular muscles or other muscles of the face. Patients with oculopalpebral or facial-palpebral synkinesis may also have ptosis of the involved eyelid. The clinical and therapeutic features of this association are specific. We mainly distinguish two forms of synkinetic movements, characterized either by the elevation of the ptotic eyelid such as in Marcus Gunn phenomenon and in the Fuchs sign or by the falling of the upper lid such as in Marin Amat syndrome. Many surgical techniques have been used to correct the blepharoptosis and the synkinetic movement. <span class="hlt">Levator</span> resection is often advocated for correction of blepharoptosis with a mild degree of synkinesis. However, when the ptosis is major, eyelid lag is a possible outcome. For moderate or major synkinesis, bilateral frontalis suspension with disinsertion of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> has been suggested. This procedure generally provides satisfactory cosmetic results. PMID:21277047</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4413093','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4413093"><span id="translatedtitle">Inverse Bell’s Phenomenon: Rare Ophthalmic Finding Following Ptosis Surgery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jakkal, Tapan; Khaire, Bhasakar</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Bell’s phenomenon is protective reflex in which the globe is turned upwards and slightly outwards during the eyelid closure to avoid corneal exposure. In Inverse Bell’s phenomenon, the eye moves downward instead of upward, this may be seen in the normal population, patients with Bell’s palsy or following conjunctival scarring. We hereby present the unusual complication of transient inversion of Bell’s phenomenon following extensive <span class="hlt">levator</span> resection surgery performed for congenital ptosis. A 24-year-old male was undergone ptosis correction surgery. On postoperative day two, ocular examination revealed down rolling of eye ball during eyelid closure. It underwent spontaneous resolution within four weeks without any corneal complication. The patients were given frequent lubricating eye drops during this period and advised frequent follow-up for early diagnosis of corneal complication. Here we highlight an inverse Bell’s phenomenon following <span class="hlt">levator</span> resection surgery, its possible mechanism and risk of corneal complication. PMID:25954644</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20616918','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20616918"><span id="translatedtitle">Current techniques in surgical correction of congenital ptosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Allard, Felicia D; Durairaj, Vikram D</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>Ptosis refers to vertical narrowing of the palpebral fissure secondary to drooping of the upper eyelid to a lower than normal position. Ptosis is considered congenital if present at birth or if it is diagnosed within the first year of life. Correction of congenital ptosis is one of the most difficult challenges ophthalmologists face. Multiple surgical procedures are available including, frontalis sling, <span class="hlt">levator</span> advancement, Whitnall sling, frontalis muscle flap, and Mullerectomy. Selection of one technique over another depends on the consideration of several factors including the surgeon experience, the degree of ptosis in the patient, as well as the degree of <span class="hlt">levator</span> muscle function. Current recommendations for the correction of congential ptosis vary based on clinical presentation. Advantages and disadvantages of each of these procedures are presented with recommendations to avoid complications. PMID:20616918</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24370542','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24370542"><span id="translatedtitle">Automatic facial responses to near-threshold presented facial displays of emotion: imitation or evaluation?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Neumann, Roland; Schulz, Stefan M; Lozo, Ljubica; Alpers, Georg W</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>Automatic facial reactions to near-threshold presented facial displays of emotion can be due to motor-mimicry or evaluation. To examine the mechanisms underlying such automatic facial responses we presented facial displays of joy, anger, and disgust for 16.67ms with a backwards masking technique and assessed electromyographic activity over the zygomaticus major, the <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii, and the corrugator supercilii. As expected, we found that participants responded to displays of joy with contractions of the zygomaticus major and to expressions of anger with contractions of the corrugator supercilii. Critically, facial displays of disgust automatically activated the corrugator supercilii rather than the <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii. This supports the notion that evaluative processes mediate facial responses to near-threshold presented facial displays of emotion rather than direct mimicry of emotional facial features. PMID:24370542</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820021110','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820021110"><span id="translatedtitle">Testosterone enhances C-14 2-deoxyglucose uptake by striated muscle. [sex hormones and muscle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Toop, J.; Max, S. R.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The effect of testosterone propionate (TP) on C-14 2-deoxyglucose (C-14 2DG) uptake was studied in the rat <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle in vivo using the autoradiographic technique. Following a delay of 1 to 3 h after injecting TP, the rate of C-14 2DG uptake in experimental animals began to increase and continued to increase for at least 20 h. The label, which corresponds to C-14 2-deoxyglucose 6-phosphate, as demonstrated by chromatographic analysis of muscle extracts, was uniformly distributed over the entire muscle and was predominantly in muscle fibers, although nonmuscular elements were also labeled. The 1 to 3 h time lag suggests that the TP effect may be genomic, acting via androgen receptors, rather than directly on muscle membranes. Acceleration of glucose uptake may be an important early event in the anabolic response of the rat <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle to androgens.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6466190','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6466190"><span id="translatedtitle">Oriental eyelids. An anatomic study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Doxanas, M T; Anderson, R L</p> <p>1984-08-01</p> <p>Dissection of the eyelids and sagittal sections of the orbital blocks identified the anatomic features of the oriental eyelids responsible for their unique appearance. The basic distinction involves the formation of the eyelid crease and fold. In the occidental eyelid, the orbital septum fuses with the <span class="hlt">levator</span> aponeurosis below the superior tarsal border. However, in the oriental eyelid, the orbital septum fuses with the <span class="hlt">levator</span> aponeurosis below the superior tarsal border. The accompanying preaponeurotic or orbital fat is allowed to proceed to the anterior tarsal surface, resulting in a full or thickened eyelid. The inferior extension of the orbital septum, beyond the superior tarsal border, prevents anterior aponeurotic fibers from fanning toward the subcutaneous tissues to produce the normal eyelid crease. Appreciation of the unique anatomic features of oriental eyelids is important for those persons who evaluate or surgically explore these eyelids. PMID:6466190</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25564592','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25564592"><span id="translatedtitle">Acute unilateral isolated ptosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Court, Jennifer Helen; Janicek, David</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>A 64-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of acute onset painless left ptosis. He had no other symptoms; importantly pupils were equal and reactive and eye movements were full. There was no palpable mass or swelling. He was systemically well with no headache, other focal neurological signs, or symptoms of fatigue. CT imaging showed swelling of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae superioris suggestive of myositis. After showing no improvement over 5 days the patient started oral prednisolone 30 mg reducing over 12 weeks. The ptosis resolved quickly and the patient remains symptom free at 6 months follow-up. Acute ptosis may indicate serious pathology. Differential diagnoses include a posterior communicating artery aneurysm causing a partial or complete third nerve palsy, Horner's syndrome, and myasthenia gravis. A careful history and examination must be taken. Orbital myositis typically involves the extraocular muscles causing pain and diplopia. Isolated <span class="hlt">levator</span> myositis is rare. PMID:25564592</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-12-04/pdf/2013-28887.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-12-04/pdf/2013-28887.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 72892 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-12-04</p> <p>... Manager, DNA Extraction and Staging Laboratory (DESL), SAIC-Frederick, Inc., the Operations and Technical..., <span class="hlt">ORI</span> found that Respondent fabricated the quantitative and qualitative data for RNA and DNA...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=136845','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=136845"><span id="translatedtitle">Colonization of Fopius ceratitivorus, A Newly Discovered African Egg-Pupal Parasitoid (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) of Ceratitis Capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Fopius ceratitivorus Wharton is a recently discovered braconid parasitoid of the Mediterranean fruit fly (= medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Wied.). Unlike other parasitoids previously used in medfly biological control, F. ceratitivorus was originally collected from medfly in its purported region of <span class="hlt">ori</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=204323','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=204323"><span id="translatedtitle">A Comparative Study of Normalization Methods Used in Statistical Analysis of Oligonucleotide Microarray Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Normalization methods used in the statistical analysis of oligonucleotide microarray data were evaluated. The oligonucleotide microarray is considered an efficient analytical tool for analyzing thousands of genes simultaneously in a single experiment. However, systematic variation in microarray, <span class="hlt">ori</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=555453','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=555453"><span id="translatedtitle">High efficiency of replication and expression of foreign genes in SV40-transformed human fibroblasts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Boast, S; La Mantia, G; Lania, L; Blasi, F</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Human fibroblasts (HF) were transformed in vitro with origin-defective SV40 DNA (<span class="hlt">ori</span>-) using the calcium phosphate co-precipitation technique. The SV40 <span class="hlt">ori</span>- transformed human cells (HSF) were able to replicate efficiently a recombinant DNA molecule containing the <span class="hlt">ori</span> sequence of SV40 DNA. Transfection of HFS with pTBC1, a recombinant pi vx plasmid containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene and the <span class="hlt">ori</span> SV40 sequences, results in high levels of TK mRNA of correct size. The pTBC1 plasmid does not appear to contain 'poison' sequences and can be efficiently re-established in Escherichia coli after replication in human cells. This host vector system may be of great usefulness in studying the expression of human genes in human cells. Images Fig. 2. Figure 3. PMID:6321161</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol1-sec93-101.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol1-sec93-101.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.101 - Purpose.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... the integrity of PHS supported research and the research process, and conserve public funds. ... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT General... Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>), and institutions in responding to research misconduct issues;...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol1-sec93-101.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol1-sec93-101.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.101 - Purpose.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... the integrity of PHS supported research and the research process, and conserve public funds. ... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT General... Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>), and institutions in responding to research misconduct issues;...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23345532','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23345532"><span id="translatedtitle">Marcus Gunn jaw winking synkinesis: report of two cases.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Carman, Kursat Bora; Ozkan, Serhat; Yakut, Ayten; Ekici, Arzu</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Marcus Gunn jaw winking synkinesis (MGJWS) is caused by congenital miswiring of a branch of the fifth cranial nerve into the branch of the third cranial nerve supplying the <span class="hlt">levator</span> muscle. It has been observed in 2-13% of patients with congenital ptosis. Although bilateral cases were reported, most were unilateral and occurred more frequently on the left side than the right. We report two cases of children who presented with ptosis and were diagnosed with MGJWS. PMID:23345532</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16491724','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16491724"><span id="translatedtitle">Early habituation of severe blepharoptosis in marcus gunn jaw-winking syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lelli, Gary J; Nelson, Christine C</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>A 23-day-old neonate had severe unilateral Marcus Gunn jaw-winking syndrome (MGJWS). By 2 1/2 months of age, she controlled the ptosis with jaw positioning. Habituation of the pterygoid-<span class="hlt">levator</span> synkinesis has not been reported this early. Surgery can be delayed until a safer time in MGJWS with severe ptosis that lacks objective signs of amblyopia. PMID:16491724</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3618604','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3618604"><span id="translatedtitle">Marcus Gunn jaw winking synkinesis: report of two cases</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Carman, Kursat Bora; Ozkan, Serhat; Yakut, Ayten; Ekici, Arzu</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Marcus Gunn jaw winking synkinesis (MGJWS) is caused by congenital miswiring of a branch of the fifth cranial nerve into the branch of the third cranial nerve supplying the <span class="hlt">levator</span> muscle. It has been observed in 2–13% of patients with congenital ptosis. Although bilateral cases were reported, most were unilateral and occurred more frequently on the left side than the right. We report two cases of children who presented with ptosis and were diagnosed with MGJWS. PMID:23345532</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11394033','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11394033"><span id="translatedtitle">Functional anorectal and pelvic pain.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wald, A</p> <p>2001-03-01</p> <p>Functional anorectal and pelvic pain syndromes represent a diverse group of disorders that affect the quality of life and about which many physicians possess little understanding. Nongynecologic causes include <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani syndrome, proctalgia fugax, and coccygodnia, which can often be distinguished by careful history and physical examination. In women, chronic pelvic pain may arise from the uterus, cervix, ovaries, or from endometriosis and pelvic adhesions. This article reviews these diverse disorders and the approach to diagnosis and management. PMID:11394033</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15467476','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15467476"><span id="translatedtitle">[Chronic anoperineal pain: diagnosis and strategy for evaluation].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bauer, P</p> <p>2004-07-01</p> <p>Chronic anoperineal pain may result from diverse causes; a precise and painstaking diagnostic approach is necessary to avoid inappropriate treatments which may aggravate the situation. Advances in imaging and neurophysiologic testing have improved the ability to diagnose and differentiate coccydynia, pudendal neuralgia, and the pyriformis muscle syndrome. Other etiologies including anismus, the descending perineum syndrome, and the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani syndrome are discussed as well as psychologic ans somatic interactions. PMID:15467476</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7608667','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7608667"><span id="translatedtitle">Electromyography and recovery of the blink reflex in involuntary eyelid closure: a comparative study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aramideh, M; Eekhof, J L; Bour, L J; Koelman, J H; Speelman, J D; Ongerboer de Visser, B W</p> <p>1995-06-01</p> <p>Electromyographic (EMG) activity of orbicularis oculi and <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae muscles was recorded to study the origin of involuntary eyelid closure in 33 patients. The evoked blink reflex in all patients and in 23 controls was also studied. To examine the excitability of facial motoneurons and bulbar interneurons in individual patients and to compare the results with EMG findings, R1 and R2 recovery indices were calculated in all subjects, as the average of recovery values at 0.5, 0.3, and 0.21 second interstimulus intervals. Based on EMG patterns, the patients were divided into three subclasses: EMG subclass 1, 10 patients with involuntary discharges solely in orbicularis oculi muscle; EMG subclass 2, 20 patients with involuntary discharges in orbicularis oculi and either involuntary <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae inhibition or a disturbed reciprocal innervation between orbicularis oculi and <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae; EMG subclass 3, three patients who did not have blepharospasm, but had involuntary <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae inhibition in association with a basal ganglia disease. The total patient group showed an enhanced recovery of both R1 and R2 components compared with controls. Although 30 out of 33 patients had blepharospasm (EMG subclasses 1 and 2), R1 recovery index was normal in 64% and R2 recovery index was normal in 54%. Patients with an abnormal R2 recovery index had an abnormal R1 recovery index significantly more often. All patients from EMG subclass 1 had an abnormal R2 recovery index, whereas all patients from EMG subclass 3 had normal recovery indices for both R1 and R2 responses. Seventy five per cent of the patients from EMG subclass 2 had normal recovery indices. The results provide further evidence that physiologically blepharospasm is not a homogeneous disease entity, and indicate that different pathophysiological mechanisms at the suprasegmental, or segmental level, or both are involved. PMID:7608667</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1073546','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1073546"><span id="translatedtitle">Electromyography and recovery of the blink reflex in involuntary eyelid closure: a comparative study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Aramideh, M; Eekhof, J L; Bour, L J; Koelman, J H; Speelman, J D; Ongerboer de Visser, B W</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Electromyographic (EMG) activity of orbicularis oculi and <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae muscles was recorded to study the origin of involuntary eyelid closure in 33 patients. The evoked blink reflex in all patients and in 23 controls was also studied. To examine the excitability of facial motoneurons and bulbar interneurons in individual patients and to compare the results with EMG findings, R1 and R2 recovery indices were calculated in all subjects, as the average of recovery values at 0.5, 0.3, and 0.21 second interstimulus intervals. Based on EMG patterns, the patients were divided into three subclasses: EMG subclass 1, 10 patients with involuntary discharges solely in orbicularis oculi muscle; EMG subclass 2, 20 patients with involuntary discharges in orbicularis oculi and either involuntary <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae inhibition or a disturbed reciprocal innervation between orbicularis oculi and <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae; EMG subclass 3, three patients who did not have blepharospasm, but had involuntary <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae inhibition in association with a basal ganglia disease. The total patient group showed an enhanced recovery of both R1 and R2 components compared with controls. Although 30 out of 33 patients had blepharospasm (EMG subclasses 1 and 2), R1 recovery index was normal in 64% and R2 recovery index was normal in 54%. Patients with an abnormal R2 recovery index had an abnormal R1 recovery index significantly more often. All patients from EMG subclass 1 had an abnormal R2 recovery index, whereas all patients from EMG subclass 3 had normal recovery indices for both R1 and R2 responses. Seventy five per cent of the patients from EMG subclass 2 had normal recovery indices. The results provide further evidence that physiologically blepharospasm is not a homogeneous disease entity, and indicate that different pathophysiological mechanisms at the suprasegmental, or segmental level, or both are involved. PMID:7608667</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4520777','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4520777"><span id="translatedtitle">The Dilator Naris Muscle as a Reporter of Facial Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Weinberg, Julie S.; Kleiss, Ingrid J.; Knox, Christopher J.; Heaton, James T.; Hadlock, Tessa A.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Objective Many investigators study facial nerve regeneration using the rat whisker pad model, though widely standardized outcomes measures of facial nerve regeneration in the rodent have not yet been developed. The intrinsic whisker pad “sling” muscles producing whisker protraction, situated at the base of each individual whisker, are extremely small and difficult to study en bloc. Here, we compare the functional innervation of two potential reporter muscles for whisker pad innervation: the dilator naris and the <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii superioris, to characterize facial nerve regeneration. Methods Motor supply of the dilator naris and <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii superioris was elucidated by measuring contraction force and compound muscle action potentials during stimulation of individual facial nerve branches, and by measuring whisking amplitude before and after dilator naris distal tendon release. Results The pattern of dilator naris innervation matched that of the intrinsic whisker pad musculature (i.e. via the buccal and marginal mandibular branches of the facial nerve), whereas the <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii superioris appeared to be innervated almost entirely by the zygomatic branch, whose primary target is the orbicularis oculi muscle. Conclusion While the <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii superioris has been commonly used as a reporter muscle of whisker pad innervation, the present data show that its innervation pattern does not overlap substantially with the muscles producing whisker protraction. The dilator naris muscle may serve as a more appropriate reporter for whisker pad innervation because it is innervated by the same facial nerve branches as the intrinsic whisker pad musculature, making structure\\function correlations more accurate, and more relevant to investigators studying facial nerve regeneration. PMID:25643189</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ApJ...661.1119B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ApJ...661.1119B"><span id="translatedtitle">25 Orionis: A Kinematically Distinct 10 Myr Old Group in Orion OB1a</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Briceo, Csar; Hartmann, Lee; Hernndez, Jess; Calvet, Nuria; Vivas, A. Katherina; Furesz, Gabor; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew</p> <p>2007-06-01</p> <p>We report here on the photometric and kinematic properties of a well-defined group of nearly 200 low-mass pre-main-sequence stars, concentrated within ~1 of the early-B star 25 <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, in the Orion OB1a subassociation. We refer to this stellar aggregate as the 25 Orionis group. The group also harbors the Herbig Ae/Be star V346 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> and a dozen other early-type stars with photometry, parallaxes, and some with IR excess emission, indicative of group membership. The number of high- and low-mass stars is in agreement with expectations from a standard initial mass function. The velocity distribution for the low-mass stars shows a narrow peak at 19.7 km s-1, offset ~-10 km s-1 from the velocity characterizing the younger stars of the <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1b subassociation, and -4 km s-1 from the velocity of widely spread young stars of the <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1a population; this result provides new and compelling evidence that the 25 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> group is a distinct kinematic entity, and that considerable space and velocity structure is present in the <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1a subassociation. The low-mass members follow a well-defined band in the color-magnitude diagram, consistent with an isochronal age of ~7-10 Myr. The ~2 time drop in the overall Li I equivalent widths and accretion fraction between the younger <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB1b and the 25 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> group is consistent with the latter being significantly older. In a simple-minded kinematic evolution scenario, the 25 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> group may represent the evolved counterpart of the younger ? <span class="hlt">Ori</span> cluster. The 25 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> stellar aggregate is the most populous ~10 Myr sample yet known within 500 pc, setting it as an excellent laboratory to study the evolution of solar-like stars and protoplanetary disks. Based on observations obtained at the Llano del Hato National Astronomical Observatory of Venezuela, operated by CIDA for the Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnologa the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona; and the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory of the Smithsonian Institution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008MNRAS.389...75B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008MNRAS.389...75B"><span id="translatedtitle">The weak magnetic field of the O9.7 supergiant ζOrionisA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bouret, J.-C.; Donati, J.-F.; Martins, F.; Escolano, C.; Marcolino, W.; Lanz, T.; Howarth, I. D.</p> <p>2008-09-01</p> <p>We report here the detection of a weak magnetic field of 50-100G on the O9.7 supergiant ζOrionisA (ζ<span class="hlt">Ori</span>A), using spectropolarimetric observations obtained with NARVAL at the 2-m Télescope Bernard Lyot atop Pic du Midi (France). ζ<span class="hlt">Ori</span>A is the third O star known to host a magnetic field (along with θ1<span class="hlt">Ori</span>C and HD191612), and the first detection on a `normal' rapidly rotating O star. The magnetic field of ζ<span class="hlt">Ori</span>A is the weakest magnetic field ever detected on a massive star. The measured field is lower than the thermal equipartition limit (about 100G). By fitting non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres to our spectra, we determined that ζ<span class="hlt">Ori</span>A is a 40Msolar star with a radius of 25Rsolar and an age of about 5-6Myr, showing no surface nitrogen enhancement and losing mass at a rate of about 2 × 10-6Msolaryr-1. The magnetic topology of ζ<span class="hlt">Ori</span>A is apparently more complex than a dipole and involves two main magnetic polarities located on both sides of the same hemisphere; our data also suggest that ζ<span class="hlt">Ori</span>A rotates in about 7.0d and is about 40° away from pole-on to an Earth-based observer. Despite its weakness, the detected magnetic field significantly affects the wind structure; the corresponding Alfvén radius is however very close to the surface, thus generating a different rotational modulation in wind lines than that reported on the two other known magnetic O stars. The rapid rotation of ζ<span class="hlt">Ori</span>A with respect to θ1<span class="hlt">Ori</span>C appears as a surprise, both stars having similar unsigned magnetic fluxes (once rescaled to the same radius); it may suggest that the subequipartition field detected on ζ<span class="hlt">Ori</span>A is not a fossil remnant (as opposed to that of θ1 <span class="hlt">Ori</span>C and HD191612), but the result of an exotic dynamo action produced through magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities. Based on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL), operated by the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France. E-mail: jean-claude.bouret@oamp.fr</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4351888','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4351888"><span id="translatedtitle">Development and Host Compatibility of Plasmids for Two Important Ruminant Pathogens, Mycoplasma bovis and Mycoplasma agalactiae</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sharma, Shukriti; Citti, Chistine; Sagné, Eveline; Marenda, Marc S.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Mycoplasma bovis is a cause of pneumonia, mastitis, arthritis and otitis media in cattle throughout the world. However, despite its clinical significance, there is a paucity of tools to genetically manipulate it, impeding our capacity to further explore the molecular basis of its virulence. To address this limitation, we developed a series of homologous and heterologous replicable plasmids from M. bovis and M. agalactiae. The shortest replicable <span class="hlt">ori</span>C plasmid based on the region downstream of dnaA in M. bovis was 247 bp and contained two DnaA boxes, while <span class="hlt">ori</span>C plasmids based on the region downstream of dnaA in M. agalactiae strains 5632 and PG2 were 219 bp and 217 bp in length, respectively, and contained only a single DnaA box. The efficiency of transformation in M. bovis and M. agalactiae was inversely correlated with the size of the <span class="hlt">ori</span>C region in the construct, and, in general, homologous <span class="hlt">ori</span>C plasmids had a higher transformation efficiency than heterologous <span class="hlt">ori</span>C plasmids. The larger pWholeoriC45 and pMM21-7 plasmids integrated into the genomic <span class="hlt">ori</span>C region of M. bovis, while the smaller <span class="hlt">ori</span>C plasmids remained extrachromosomal for up to 20 serial passages in selective media. Although specific gene disruptions were not be achieved in M. bovis in this study, the <span class="hlt">ori</span>C plasmids developed here could still be useful as tools in complementation studies and for expression of exogenous genes in both M. bovis and M. agalactiae. PMID:25746296</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25746296','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25746296"><span id="translatedtitle">Development and host compatibility of plasmids for two important ruminant pathogens, Mycoplasma bovis and Mycoplasma agalactiae.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sharma, Shukriti; Citti, Chistine; Sagné, Eveline; Marenda, Marc S; Markham, Philip F; Browning, Glenn F</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Mycoplasma bovis is a cause of pneumonia, mastitis, arthritis and otitis media in cattle throughout the world. However, despite its clinical significance, there is a paucity of tools to genetically manipulate it, impeding our capacity to further explore the molecular basis of its virulence. To address this limitation, we developed a series of homologous and heterologous replicable plasmids from M. bovis and M. agalactiae. The shortest replicable <span class="hlt">ori</span>C plasmid based on the region downstream of dnaA in M. bovis was 247 bp and contained two DnaA boxes, while <span class="hlt">ori</span>C plasmids based on the region downstream of dnaA in M. agalactiae strains 5632 and PG2 were 219 bp and 217 bp in length, respectively, and contained only a single DnaA box. The efficiency of transformation in M. bovis and M. agalactiae was inversely correlated with the size of the <span class="hlt">ori</span>C region in the construct, and, in general, homologous <span class="hlt">ori</span>C plasmids had a higher transformation efficiency than heterologous <span class="hlt">ori</span>C plasmids. The larger pWholeoriC45 and pMM21-7 plasmids integrated into the genomic <span class="hlt">ori</span>C region of M. bovis, while the smaller <span class="hlt">ori</span>C plasmids remained extrachromosomal for up to 20 serial passages in selective media. Although specific gene disruptions were not be achieved in M. bovis in this study, the <span class="hlt">ori</span>C plasmids developed here could still be useful as tools in complementation studies and for expression of exogenous genes in both M. bovis and M. agalactiae. PMID:25746296</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26366809','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26366809"><span id="translatedtitle">Effectiveness of γ-oryzanol in reducing neuromotor deficits, dopamine depletion and oxidative stress in a Drosophila melanogaster model of Parkinson's disease induced by rotenone.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Araujo, Stífani Machado; de Paula, Mariane Trindade; Poetini, Marcia Rósula; Meichtry, Luana; Bortolotto, Vandreza Cardoso; Zarzecki, Micheli Stefani; Jesse, Cristiano Ricardo; Prigol, Marina</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The γ-orizanol present in rice bran oil contains a mix of steryl triterpenyl esters of ferulic acid, which is believed to be linked to its antioxidant potential. In this study we investigated the neuroprotective actions of γ-orizanol (<span class="hlt">ORY</span>) against the toxicity induced by rotenone (ROT) in Drosophila melanogaster. The flies (both genders) aged between 1 and 5 days old were divided into four groups of 50 flies each: (1) control, (2) <span class="hlt">ORY</span> 25 μM, (3) ROT 500 μM, (4) <span class="hlt">ORY</span> 25 μM+ROT 500 μM. Flies were concomitantly exposed to a diet containing ROT and <span class="hlt">ORY</span> for 7 days according to their respective groups. Survival and behavior analyses were carried out in vivo, and ex vivo analyses involved acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), determination of dopaminergic levels, cellular viability and mitochondrial viability, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), reactive species levels (RS), lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and contents of total thiols and non-proteic thiols (NPSH). Our results show for the first time that <span class="hlt">ORY</span> not only acts as an endogenous activator of the cellular antioxidant defenses, but it also ameliorates rotenone induced mortality, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our salient findings regarded the restoration of cholinergic deficits, dopamine levels and improved motor function provided by <span class="hlt">ORY</span>. These results demonstrate the neuroprotective potential of <span class="hlt">ORY</span> and that this effect can be potentially due to its antioxidant action. In conclusion, the present results show that <span class="hlt">ORY</span> is effective in reducing the ROT induced toxicity in D. melanogaster, which showed a neuroprotective action, possibly due to the presence of the antioxidant constituents such as the ferulic acid. PMID:26366809</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840064415&hterms=cash&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dcash','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840064415&hterms=cash&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dcash"><span id="translatedtitle">Line profile variation in delta-Orionis A, l-Orionis A, and 15 Monocerotis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Grady, C. A.; Snow, T. P.; Cash, W. C.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>The results of a monitoring program with IUE and Einstein are presented for three stars, delta-<span class="hlt">Ori</span> A, l-<span class="hlt">Ori</span> A, and 15 Mon. Line profile variability is observed in the UV profiles accessible to IUE and the relation between the variation in the different ions suggests that the ionization level is varying in the winds of these stars. This is consistent with Einstein observations of soft X-ray variability for two of the stars.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870009742&hterms=White+dwarf+stars&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3D%2528%2528White%2Bdwarf%2529%2Bstars%2529','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870009742&hterms=White+dwarf+stars&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3D%2528%2528White%2Bdwarf%2529%2Bstars%2529"><span id="translatedtitle">Stars of type MS with evidence of white dwarf companions. [IUE, Main Sequence (MS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Peery, Benjamin F., Jr.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>A search for white dwarf companions of MS-type stars was conducted, using IUE. The overendowments of these stars in typical S-process nuclides suggest that they, like the Ba II stars, may owe their peculiar compositions to earlier mass transfer. Short-wavelength IUE spectra show striking emission line variability in HD35155, HD61913, and 4 <span class="hlt">Ori</span>; HD35155 and 4 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> show evidence of white dwarf companions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/biblio/1025937','SCIGOVIMAGE-SCICINEMA'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/biblio/1025937"><span id="translatedtitle">Explorer : des clés pour mieux comprendre la matière</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/">ScienceCinema</a></p> <p>None</p> <p>2011-10-06</p> <p>Le LHC va-t-il bouleverser les thé<span class="hlt">ories</span> de l'infiniment petit ? Les physiciens aimeraient que l'accélérateur fasse trembler le modèle standard. Cette thé<span class="hlt">orie</span> des particules élémentaires et des forces laisse de nombreuses zones d'ombre. Le LHC et ses expériences ont été conçus pour les éclairer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900037404&hterms=fu&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dfu','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900037404&hterms=fu&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dfu"><span id="translatedtitle">Pre-conditions for disc-generated FU Orionis outbursts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Clarke, C. J.; Lin, D. N. C.; Pringle, J. E.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The condition in which a protostellar disk must be set up in order to generate FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> outbursts is examined. It is found that FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> behavior can be produced by perturbation of a low-accretion-rate disk around a normal T Tau star. Suitable perturbations involve a substantial surface-density enhancement and heating to about 10,000 K of the inner disk.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14582757','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14582757"><span id="translatedtitle">Reconstruction of microform cleft lip.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tosun, Zekeriya; Ho?nuter, Mbin; Sentrk, Sadik; Savaci, Nedim</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Partial cleft of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle without skin and mucosa can also be called "discontinuity of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle" or "subepithelial cleft". Microform cleft lip or mini-cleft lip are better definitions. We present two women aged 25 and 29 years old who complained of vermilion notching, vertical depression on the upper lip, and asymmetry of lower lateral cartilage of the nose. The "discontinuity of the muscle" was found at operation in both cases and reconstructed successfully. PMID:14582757</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8982184','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8982184"><span id="translatedtitle">Refined frontalis fascial sling with proper lid crease formation for blepharoptosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, T H; Yang, J Y; Chen, Y R</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Ptosis of the upper eyelid is a complicated problem, and many surgical techniques have been developed for the treatment of ptosis. Frontalis sling with autogenous fascial strip for the correction of severe ptosis with poor <span class="hlt">levator</span> function is still well accepted. The treatment necessitates an understanding of the etiology of ptosis, detailed history taking, degree of ptosis, the <span class="hlt">levator</span> function, the anatomic basis of the ptosis and lid crease, and a historic review of surgical procedures. The refinement of our procedure consists of a circular type of frontalis sling with an autogenous fascial strip, harvested from fasciae latae or temporalis fascia, with evenly balanced strength and partial lid resection, including a semilunar segment of skin flap and orbicularis muscle and moderate amount of protruded orbital fat from the orbital septum. The fascial strip is anchored simultaneously to the upper margin of the tarsal plate and incision margin of the pretarsal lid to produce a proper lid crease. This procedure has been successful in the management of 64 lids (46 patients) with a severe degree of ptosis and poor <span class="hlt">levator</span> function. Satisfactory results have been achieved in 57 lids (89 percent) according to the modified criteria of Berke after an average follow-up period of 18.5 months. Most patients (87.5 percent) have mild lid lag (1 to 3 mm) after the operation, but 58 lids (90.6 percent) achieved a proper lid crease height of 3 to 6 mm. PMID:8982184</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26800142','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26800142"><span id="translatedtitle">Paravaginal defect: A new classification of fascial and muscle tears in the paravaginal region.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Otcenasek, Michal; Gauruder-Burmester, Annett; Haak, Lucia A; Grill, Robert; Popken, Gralf; Baca, Vaclav</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>The lateral support of the vaginal wall depends on the integrity of the paravaginal section of the visceral pelvic fascia, <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani, and their connection. Various defects of the muscle and fascia can result in identical clinical findings-ie, the descent of the lateral vaginal sulcus. In this study, we created a realistic scheme for classifying paravaginal defects, based on the complex relationship of the pelvic fascia with the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani. Surgical observations, cadaver examinations, and a complex magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based 3-dimensional (3D) model were used to analyze the spatial relationships of normal and defective anatomy of the female pelvic floor. Descent of the lateral vaginal sulcus can result from a defect in the paravaginal visceral pelvic fascia, <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani, or both. The fascial defect can be partial or complete, and the muscle defect can vary in location. A detailed illustrated classification is presented. We present a new model of the pathology that underlies a common clinical finding. Clin. Anat. 29:524-529, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26800142</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3365240','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3365240"><span id="translatedtitle">Changes in facial electromyographic activity in spider-phobic girls after psychotherapy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Leutgeb, Verena; Schienle, Anne</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Recent studies of spider phobia have indicated that disgust is a crucial disorder-relevant emotion and that the facial electromyogram (EMG) of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii region is a reliable disgust indicator. The present investigation focused on EMG effects of psychotherapy in thirty girls (aged between 8 and 14 years) suffering from spider phobia. They were presented with phobia-relevant, generally fear-inducing, disgust-inducing and affectively neutral pictures in a first EMG session. Subsequently, patients were randomly assigned to either a therapy group or a waiting-list group. Therapy-group participants received a single session of exposure therapy in vivo. One week later a second EMG session was conducted. Patients of the waiting-list group received exposure therapy after the second EMG session. After therapy, the girls were able to hold a living spider in their hands and rated spiders more positive, and less arousing, fear- and disgust-inducing. Moreover, they showed a reduction of average <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii activity in response to pictures of spiders, reflecting the reduction of feelings of disgust. A positive side effect of the therapy was a significant drop in overall disgust proneness and a decreased average activity of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii muscle in response to generally disgust-inducing pictures. Results emphasize the role of disgust feelings in spider-phobic children and suggest that overall disgust proneness should also be targeted in therapy. PMID:22424962</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3268710','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3268710"><span id="translatedtitle">[The surgical anatomy of the rectal and anal blood vessels].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vogel, P; Klosterhalfen, B</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>The authors examined 40 rectum specimens by angiography, preparation and staining methods to show the exact arterial vessel supply of the rectum and tried to find out whether a reason could be found for the relatively high rate of suture leaks after low resection of the rectum or not. The insertion of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> muscle is a sort of vessel divide: caudal to the <span class="hlt">levator</span> muscle the inferior rectal artery is the main supplying vessel, cranially the superior rectal artery. Here a vessel deficient-area always remains in the dorso-caudal sector of the rectal ampulla which cannot be compensated by another rectum-supplying vessel. The middle rectal artery supplies the rectum accessorily. The results are able to explain why the suture leaks are constantly observed in the dorso-caudal ampulla after profound anterior resection of the rectum. Furthermore the results account for the good healing tendency of coloanal anastomoses: the inferior rectal artery amply supplies the anal canal; there is not the same vessel-deficient area as found cranial to the <span class="hlt">levator</span> muscle. PMID:3268710</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3917110','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3917110"><span id="translatedtitle">Three-dimensional Ultrasound Appearance of Pelvic Floor in Nulliparous Women and Postpartum Women One Week after Their First Delivery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Liu, Feifei; Xu, Lian; Ying, Tao; Tao, Junjia; Hu, Bing</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This study investigated the morphology and structure of pelvic floor in 50 nulliparous and 95 postpartum women (47 vaginal delivery, 48 Cesarean section) using translabial three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound. All the primiparae underwent ultrasound examination within one week after their first delivery. Volume datasets were acquired and analyzed to determine the alterations of <span class="hlt">levator</span> hiatus after childbirth. Significant differences were observed in the <span class="hlt">levator</span> hiatus of postpartum women compared with that of nullipara women. In postpartum women, the <span class="hlt">levator</span> hiatus, with their dimensions increased, expanded into a circular shape. Puborectalis was avulsed in eight cases (accounting for 8.42% of all) and pelvic organ prolapse was found in 12 cases (accounting for 12.63%). The hiatal dimensions were larger and the incidence of pubrectalis muscle avulsion (17.02% vs. 0%) and pelvic organ prolapse (21.28% vs. 4.17%) was significantly higher in Vaginal delivery group than Cesarean section group. In summary, 3D ultrasound is an effective tool to detect the pelvic floor of postpartum women who present with morphological abnormalities, and such abnormalities are more likely to show in vaginal delivery women compared to Cesarean section. PMID:24522119</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24522119','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24522119"><span id="translatedtitle">Three-dimensional ultrasound appearance of pelvic floor in nulliparous women and postpartum women one week after their first delivery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Feifei; Xu, Lian; Ying, Tao; Tao, Junjia; Hu, Bing</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This study investigated the morphology and structure of pelvic floor in 50 nulliparous and 95 postpartum women (47 vaginal delivery, 48 Cesarean section) using translabial three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound. All the primiparae underwent ultrasound examination within one week after their first delivery. Volume datasets were acquired and analyzed to determine the alterations of <span class="hlt">levator</span> hiatus after childbirth. Significant differences were observed in the <span class="hlt">levator</span> hiatus of postpartum women compared with that of nullipara women. In postpartum women, the <span class="hlt">levator</span> hiatus, with their dimensions increased, expanded into a circular shape. Puborectalis was avulsed in eight cases (accounting for 8.42% of all) and pelvic organ prolapse was found in 12 cases (accounting for 12.63%). The hiatal dimensions were larger and the incidence of pubrectalis muscle avulsion (17.02% vs. 0%) and pelvic organ prolapse (21.28% vs. 4.17%) was significantly higher in Vaginal delivery group than Cesarean section group. In summary, 3D ultrasound is an effective tool to detect the pelvic floor of postpartum women who present with morphological abnormalities, and such abnormalities are more likely to show in vaginal delivery women compared to Cesarean section. PMID:24522119</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7145052','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7145052"><span id="translatedtitle">Octane requirement increase of 1990 and 1991 model vehicles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1992-06-01</p> <p>The octane requirement increase (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) of 80 1990 and 43 1991 model-year vehicles operated on commercial fuels in customer-like service has been determined. These <span class="hlt">ORI</span> values were established from the octane number requirements regardless of whether they were determined at maximum- or part-throttle. At 15,000 miles, the mean <span class="hlt">ORI</span> of the 1990 vehicles with full-boiling range fuels (FBRU) was 4.4 (R+M)/2 octane numbers, 5.2 Research octane numbers (RON), and 3.5 Motor octane numbers (MON). The <span class="hlt">ORI</span> of individual vehicles ranged from no increase to 1 1. 1 (R + M)/2 numbers. At 15,000 miles, the mean <span class="hlt">ORI</span> of the 1991 vehicles with full-boiling range fuels (FBRU) was 3.3 (R+M)/2 numbers, 4.1 RON, and 2.6 MON. Individual vehicle <span class="hlt">ORI</span> ranged from no increase to 9.2 (R + M)/2 numbers. As opposed to a number of 1989 models submitted which showed a somewhat unusual variation with mileage, the 1990 and 1991 models behaved in the more traditional manner.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApJ...816L..29L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApJ...816L..29L"><span id="translatedtitle">Absence of Significant Cool Disks in Young Stellar Objects Exhibiting Repetitive Optical Outbursts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Kóspál, Ágnes; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Dunham, Michael M.; Hirano, Naomi; Henning, Thomas; Takami, Michihiro; Dong, Ruobing; Hashimoto, Jun; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Carrasco-González, Carlos</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We report Submillimeter Array 1.3 mm high angular resolution observations toward the four EXor-type outbursting young stellar objects VY Tau, V1118 <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, V1143 <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, and NY <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. The data mostly show low dust masses Mdust in the associated circumstellar disks. Among the sources, NY <span class="hlt">Ori</span> possesses a relatively massive disk with Mdust ˜ 9 × 10-4M⊙. V1118 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> has a marginal detection equivalent to Mdust ˜ 6 × 10-5M⊙. V1143 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> has a non-detection also equivalent to Mdust < 6 × 10-5M⊙. For the nearest source, VY Tau, we get a surprising non-detection that provides a stringent upper limit Mdust < 6 × 10-6M⊙. We interpret our findings as suggesting that the gas and dust reservoirs that feed the short-duration, repetitive optical outbursts seen in some EXors may be limited to the small-scale, innermost region of their circumstellar disks. This hot dust may have escaped our detection limits. Follow-up, more sensitive millimeter observations are needed to improve our understanding of the triggering mechanisms of EXor-type outbursts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4674748','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4674748"><span id="translatedtitle">Identification of the Replication Origins from Cyanothece ATCC 51142 and Their Interactions with the DnaA Protein: From In Silico to In Vitro Studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Huang, He; Song, Cheng-Cheng; Yang, Zhi-Liang; Dong, Yan; Hu, Yao-Zhong; Gao, Feng</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Based on the complete genome of Cyanothece ATCC 51142, the <span class="hlt">ori</span>Cs of both the circular and linear chromosomes in Cyanothece ATCC 51142 have been predicted by utilizing a web-based system <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-Finder. Here, we provide experimental support for the results of <span class="hlt">Ori</span>-Finder to identify the replication origins of Cyanothece ATCC 51142 and their interactions with the initiator protein, DnaA. The two replication origins are composed of three characteristically arranged DnaA boxes and an AT-rich stretch, and the <span class="hlt">ori</span>C in the circular chromosome is followed by the dnaN gene. The dnaA gene is located downstream of the origin of the circular chromosome and it expresses a typical DnaA protein that is divided into four domains (I, II, III, IV), as with other members of the DnaA protein family. We purify DnaA (IV) and characterize the interaction of the purified protein with the replication origins, so as to offer experimental support for the prediction. The results of the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and DNase I footprint assay demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of the DnaA protein from Cyanothece ATCC 51142 specifically binds the <span class="hlt">ori</span>Cs of both the circular and linear chromosomes, and the DNase I footprint assay demonstrates that DnaA (IV) exhibits hypersensitive affinity with DnaA boxes in both <span class="hlt">ori</span>Cs. PMID:26696980</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26950459','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26950459"><span id="translatedtitle">Rapid amplification system for recombinant protein production in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) Cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Metta, M K; Kunaparaju, R K; Tantravahi, S</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Recombinant therapeutic proteins have changed the face of modern medicine in the present trend and they continue to provide innovative therapies for deadly diseases. This study describes the development of a novel stable expression system for rapid amplification of genes in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. The expression system consists of a host CHO cell line and an expression vector (pUB-Py<span class="hlt">Ori</span>-D-C) which encodes for Polyomavirus (Py) Origin of Replication (Py<span class="hlt">Ori</span>) for amplification of integrated genes in the presence of Py Large T Antigen (PyLT) and Dihydrofolate Reductase (DHFR) selectable marker gene for selection in the presence of Methotrexate (MTX). Use of both Py<span class="hlt">Ori</span>/PyLT and DHFR can reduce the number of rounds of selection and amplification required for isolation of high producing clones. The efficiency of pUB-Py<span class="hlt">Ori</span>-D-C was compared with that of pUB-D-C plasmid using Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Erythropoietin (EPO) as reporter proteins. Our results showed that pUB-Py<span class="hlt">Ori</span>-D-C-EPO can help development of high expressing clone in one round of selection/amplification as compared to multiple rounds of selection/amplification with pUB-D-C-EPO plasmid. CHO-DG44/EPO clone generated using pUB-Py<span class="hlt">Ori</span>-D-C-EPO gave a productivity of 119 mg/L in shake flask. PMID:26950459</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18040525','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18040525"><span id="translatedtitle">A role for MRE11, NBS1, and recombination junctions in replication and stable maintenance of EBV episomes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Deng, Zhong; Wiedmer, Andreas; Weitzman, Matthew D; Lieberman, Paul M</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Recombination-like structures formed at origins of DNA replication may contribute to replication fidelity, sister chromatid cohesion, chromosome segregation, and overall genome stability. The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) origin of plasmid replication (<span class="hlt">Ori</span>P) provides episomal genome stability through a poorly understood mechanism. We show here that recombinational repair proteins MRE11 and NBS1 are recruited to the Dyad Symmetry (DS) region of <span class="hlt">Ori</span>P in a TRF2- and cell cycle-dependent manner. Depletion of MRE11 or NBS1 by siRNA inhibits <span class="hlt">Ori</span>P replication and destabilized viral episomes. <span class="hlt">Ori</span>P plasmid maintenance was defective in MRE11 and NBS1 hypomorphic fibroblast cell lines and only integrated, non-episomal forms of EBV were detected in a lympoblastoid cell line derived from an NBS1-mutated individual. Two-dimensional agarose gel analysis of <span class="hlt">Ori</span>P DNA revealed that recombination-like structures resembling Holliday-junctions form at <span class="hlt">Ori</span>P in mid S phase. MRE11 and NBS1 association with DS coincided with replication fork pausing and origin activation, which preceded the formation of recombination structures. We propose that NBS1 and MRE11 promote replication-associated recombination junctions essential for EBV episomal maintenance and genome stability. PMID:18040525</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22092251','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22092251"><span id="translatedtitle">CONSTRAINING MASS RATIO AND EXTINCTION IN THE FU ORIONIS BINARY SYSTEM WITH INFRARED INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pueyo, Laurent; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Hinkley, Sasha; Dekany, Richard; Roberts, Jenny; Vasisht, Gautam; Roberts, Lewis C. Jr.; Shao, Mike; Burruss, Rick; Cady, Eric; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Brenner, Douglas; Zimmerman, Neil; Monnier, John D.; Crepp, Justin; Parry, Ian; Beichman, Charles; Soummer, Remi</p> <p>2012-09-20</p> <p>We report low-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the eruptive star FU Orionis using the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) Project 1640 installed at the Palomar Hale telescope. This work focuses on elucidating the nature of the faint source, located 0.''5 south of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, and identified in 2003 as FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> S. We first use our observations in conjunction with published data to demonstrate that the two stars are indeed physically associated and form a true binary pair. We then proceed to extract J- and H-band spectro-photometry using the damped LOCI algorithm, a reduction method tailored for high contrast science with IFS. This is the first communication reporting the high accuracy of this technique, pioneered by the Project 1640 team, on a faint astronomical source. We use our low-resolution near-infrared spectrum in conjunction with 10.2 {mu}m interferometric data to constrain the infrared excess of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> S. We then focus on estimating the bulk physical properties of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> S. Our models lead to estimates of an object heavily reddened, A{sub V} = 8-12, with an effective temperature of {approx}4000-6500 K. Finally, we put these results in the context of the FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> N-S system and argue that our analysis provides evidence that FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> S might be the more massive component of this binary system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26858444','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26858444"><span id="translatedtitle">Ribosome Protein L4 is essential for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 function.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shen, Chih-Lung; Liu, Cheng-Der; You, Ren-In; Ching, Yung-Hao; Liang, Jun; Ke, Liangru; Chen, Ya-Lin; Chen, Hong-Chi; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Liou, Je-Wen; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen</p> <p>2016-02-23</p> <p>Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1)-mediated origin of plasmid replication (<span class="hlt">ori</span>P) DNA episome maintenance is essential for EBV-mediated tumorigenesis. We have now found that EBNA1 binds to Ribosome Protein L4 (RPL4). RPL4 shRNA knockdown decreased EBNA1 activation of an <span class="hlt">ori</span>P luciferase reporter, EBNA1 DNA binding in lymphoblastoid cell lines, and EBV genome number per lymphoblastoid cell line. EBV infection increased RPL4 expression and redistributed RPL4 to cell nuclei. RPL4 and Nucleolin (NCL) were a scaffold for an EBNA1-induced <span class="hlt">ori</span>P complex. The RPL4 N terminus cooperated with NCL-K429 to support EBNA1 and <span class="hlt">ori</span>P-mediated episome binding and maintenance, whereas the NCL C-terminal K380 and K393 induced <span class="hlt">ori</span>P DNA H3K4me2 modification and promoted EBNA1 activation of <span class="hlt">ori</span>P-dependent transcription. These observations provide new insights into the mechanisms by which EBV uses NCL and RPL4 to establish persistent B-lymphoblastoid cell infection. PMID:26858444</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=190215','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=190215"><span id="translatedtitle">Plasmid-like replicative intermediates of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic origin of DNA replication.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pfüller, R; Hammerschmidt, W</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>During the lytic phase of herpesviruses, intermediates of viral DNA replication are found as large concatemeric molecules in the infected cells. It is not known, however, what the early events in viral DNA replication that yield these concatemers are. In an attempt to identify these early steps of DNA replication, replicative intermediates derived from the lytic origin of Epstein-Barr virus, <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt, were analyzed. As shown by density shift experiments with bromodeoxyuridine, <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt replicated semiconservatively soon after induction of the lytic cycle and <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt-containing DNA is amplified to yield monomeric plasmid progeny DNA (besides multimeric forms and high-molecular-weight DNA). A new class of plasmid progeny DNA which have far fewer negative supercoils than do plasmids extracted from uninduced cells is present only in cells undergoing the lytic cycle of Epstein-Barr virus. This finding is consistent with plasmid DNAs having fewer nucleosomes before extraction. The newly replicated plasmid DNAs are dependent on a functional <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt in cis and support an efficient marker transfer into Escherichia coli as monomeric plasmids. Multimeric forms of presumably circular progeny DNA of <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt, as well as detected recombination events, indicate that <span class="hlt">ori</span>Lyt-mediated DNA replication is biphasic: an early theta-like mode is followed by a complex pattern which could result from rolling-circle DNA replication. PMID:8648674</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22952336','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22952336"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating Maori community initiatives to promote healthy eating, healthy action.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hamerton, Heather; Mercer, Christine; Riini, Denise; McPherson, Brighid; Morrison, Laurie</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand, experience poorer health than non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> across a range of health measures. Interventions focused at an individual level have proved largely ineffective; 'bottom-up' approaches where communities determine their own priorities may be more sustainable than 'top-down' approaches where goals are determined by health authorities. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate an innovative health promotion programme aimed at improving Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> health and to discuss the importance of ownership and control of health initiatives by Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>. Evaluators conducted a comprehensive evaluation of a Healthy Eating Healthy Action programme in six small Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> health agencies, gathering information from programme managers and co-ordinators, participants and wider community members about what changes were occurring at individual, family and community levels. Effective interventions built on cultural values and practices and were delivered by Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> with close connections to the community. Changes in nutrition and physical activity made by participants also benefitted their wider families and community. The changes demonstrated subtle but important shifts in thinking about healthy eating and healthy activity that in the longer term could lead to more measurable change towards improved quality of life for people within communities. PMID:22952336</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3895524','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3895524"><span id="translatedtitle">Electrophysiologic Investigation During Facial Motor Neuron Suppression in Patients With Hemifacial Spasm: Possible Pathophysiology of Hemifacial Spasm: A Pilot Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Choi, Soo In; Kim, Min-Wook; Park, Dong Yoon; Huh, Ryoong</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Objective To evaluate the pathophysiological mechanism of hemifacial spasm (HFS), we performed electrophysiological examinations, such as supraorbital nerve stimulation with orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle recording and lateral spread tests, after suppressing the patient's central nervous system by administering intravenous diazepam. Methods Six patients with HFS were recruited. Supraorbital nerve stimulation with orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle recording and the lateral spread test were performed, followed by intravenous application of 10 mg diazepam to achieve facial motor neuron suppression. Subsequently, we repeated the two electrophysiological experiments mentioned above at 10 and 20 minutes after the patients had received the diazepam intravenously. Results Orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle responses were observed in all patients after supraorbital nerve stimulation and lateral spread tests. After the diazepam injection, no orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle response to supraorbital nerve stimulation was observed in one patient, and the latencies of this response were evident as a slowing tendency with time in the remaining five patients. However, the latencies of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle responses were observed consistently in all patients in the lateral spread test. Conclusion Our results suggest that ectopic excitation/ephaptic transmission contributes to the pathophysiological mechanisms of HFS. This is because the latencies of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle responses in the lateral spread test were observed consistently in the suppressed motor neuron in our patients. PMID:24466519</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApJ...757...57P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApJ...757...57P"><span id="translatedtitle">Constraining Mass Ratio and Extinction in the FU Orionis Binary System with Infrared Integral Field Spectroscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pueyo, Laurent; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Vasisht, Gautam; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Monnier, John D.; Hinkley, Sasha; Crepp, Justin; Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Brenner, Douglas; Zimmerman, Neil; Parry, Ian; Beichman, Charles; Dekany, Richard; Shao, Mike; Burruss, Rick; Cady, Eric; Roberts, Jenny; Soummer, Rémi</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>We report low-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the eruptive star FU Orionis using the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) Project 1640 installed at the Palomar Hale telescope. This work focuses on elucidating the nature of the faint source, located 0farcs5 south of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, and identified in 2003 as FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> S. We first use our observations in conjunction with published data to demonstrate that the two stars are indeed physically associated and form a true binary pair. We then proceed to extract J- and H-band spectro-photometry using the damped LOCI algorithm, a reduction method tailored for high contrast science with IFS. This is the first communication reporting the high accuracy of this technique, pioneered by the Project 1640 team, on a faint astronomical source. We use our low-resolution near-infrared spectrum in conjunction with 10.2 μm interferometric data to constrain the infrared excess of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> S. We then focus on estimating the bulk physical properties of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> S. Our models lead to estimates of an object heavily reddened, AV = 8-12, with an effective temperature of ~4000-6500 K. Finally, we put these results in the context of the FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> N-S system and argue that our analysis provides evidence that FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> S might be the more massive component of this binary system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015A%26A...574A.118P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015A%26A...574A.118P"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of the known T-type dwarfs towards the σ Orionis cluster</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Peña Ramírez, K.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Béjar, V. J. S.</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Aims: The detailed study of T-type candidate members of the young σ Orionis cluster (~3 Myr, ~352 pc, solar metallicity) is fundamental to properly assess the objects' cluster membership and their contribution to the definition of the substellar mass function. Methods: A total of three T-type candidates (S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70, S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 73, and S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> J053804.65-021352.5) lying in the line of sight towards σ Orionis were characterized by means of near-infrared photometric, astrometric, and spectroscopic studies. H-band methane images were collected for all three sources and an additional sample of 15 field T-type dwarfs using the LIRIS instrument on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT). J-band spectra of resolution of ~500 were obtained for S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> J053804.65-021352.5 with the ISAAC spectrograph on the 8 m Very Large Telescope (VLT), and JH spectra of resolution of ~50 acquired with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were employed for the spectroscopic classification of S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 and 73. Accurate proper motions with a typical uncertainty of ±3 mas yr-1 and a time interval of ~7-9 yr were derived using old images and new data collected with ISAAC/VLT and WFC3/HST. Results: Using the LIRIS observations of the field T dwarfs, we calibrated this imager for T spectral typing via methane photometry. The three S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> objects were spectroscopically classified as T4.5 ± 0.5 (S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 73), T5 ± 0.5 (S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> J053804.65-021352.5), and T7 +0.5-1.0 (S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70). These spectral types agree with the measured H-band methane colors. The similarity between the observed JH spectra and the methane colors and the data of field ultra-cool dwarfs of related classifications suggests that S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70, 73, and S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> J053804.65-021352.5 do not deviate significantly in surface gravity in relation to the field. Additionally, the detection of K I at ~1.25 μm in S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> J053804.65-021352.5 points to a high-gravity atmosphere. Only the K-band reddish nature of S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 may be consistent with a low-gravity atmosphere. The proper motions of S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 and 73 are measurable and are larger than that of the cluster by >3.5σ. The proper motion of S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> J053804.65-021352.5 is consistent with a null displacement. These observations suggest that none of the three T dwarfs is a likely σ Orionis member, and that either planetary-mass objects with masses below ~4 MJup may not exist free-floating in the cluster or they may lie at fainter near-infrared magnitudes than those of the targets (i.e., H > 20.6 mag), thus remaining unidentified to date. We determined the volume density of field T4-T7 dwarfs to be ≥2.8 ± 1.6 × 10-3 pc-3 from a survey that covered 2798.4 arcmin2 and was complete up to a distance of 119 pc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011A%26A...532A..42P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011A%26A...532A..42P"><span id="translatedtitle">Search and characterization of T-type planetary mass candidates in the σ Orionis cluster</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Peña Ramírez, K.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Rebolo, R.; Bihain, G.</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>Context. The proper characterization of the least massive population of the young σ Orionis star cluster is required to understand the form of the cluster mass function and its impact on our comprehension of the substellar formation processes. S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 (T5.5 ± 1) and 73, two T-type cluster member candidates, are likely to have masses between 3 and 7 MJup if their age is 3 Myr. It awaits confirmation whether S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 73 has a methane atmosphere. Aims: We aim to: i) confirm the presence of methane absorption in S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 73 by performing methane imaging; ii) study S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 and 73 cluster membership via photometric colors and accurate proper motion analysis; and iii) perform a new search to identify additional T-type σ Orionis member candidates. Methods: We obtained HAWK-I (VLT) J, H, and CH4off photometry of an area of 119.15 arcmin2 in σ Orionis down to Jcomp = 21.7 and Hcomp = 21 mag. S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 and 73 are contained in the explored area. Near-infrared data were complemented with optical photometry using images acquired with OSIRIS (GTC) and VISTA as part of the VISTA Orion survey. Color-magnitude and color-color diagrams were constructed to characterize S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 and 73 photometrically, and to identify new objects with methane absorption and masses below 7 MJup. We derived proper motions by comparing of the new HAWK-I and VISTA images with published near-infrared data taken 3.4 - 7.9 yr ago. Results.S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 73 has a red H - CH4off color indicating methane absorption in the H-band and a spectral type of T4 ± 1. S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 displays a redder methane color than S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 73 in agreement with its latter spectral classification. Our proper motion measurements (μα cos δ = 26.7 ± 6.1, μδ = 21.3 ± 6.1 mas yr-1 for S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70, and μα cos δ = 46.7 ± 4.9, μδ = -6.3 ± 4.7 mas yr-1 for S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 73) are larger than the motion of σ Orionis, rendering S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 and 73 cluster membership uncertain. From our survey, we identified one new photometric candidate with J = 21.69 ± 0.12 mag and methane color consistent with spectral type ≥ T8. Conclusions.S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 73 has colors similar to those of T3-T5 field dwarfs, which in addition to its high proper motion suggests that it is probably a field dwarf located at 170-200 pc. The origin of S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 remains unclear: it can be a field, foreground mid- to late-T free-floating dwarf with peculiar colors, or an orphan planet ejected through strong dynamical interactions from σ Orionis or from a nearby star-forming region in Orion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ISPAr39B5..499S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ISPAr39B5..499S"><span id="translatedtitle">Generation of High Resolution and High Precision Orthorectified Road Imagery from Mobile Mapping System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sakamoto, M.; Tachibana, K.; Shimamura, H.</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>In this paper, a novel technique to generate a high resolution and high precision Orthorectified Road Imagery (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) by using spatial information acquired from a Mobile Mapping System (MMS) is introduced. The MMS was equipped with multiple sensors such as GPS, IMU, odometer, 2-6 digital cameras and 2-4 laser scanners. In this study, a Triangulated Irregular Network (TIN) based approach, similar to general aerial photogrammetry, was adopted to build a terrain model in order to generate <span class="hlt">ORI</span> with high resolution and high geometric precision. Compared to aerial photogrammetry, there are several issues that are needed to be addressed. <span class="hlt">ORI</span> is generated by merging multiple time sequence images of a short section. Hence, the influence of occlusion due to stationary objects, such as telephone poles, trees, footbridges, or moving objects, such as vehicles, pedestrians are very significant. Moreover, influences of light falloff at the edges of cameras, tone adjustment among images captured from different cameras or a round trip data acquisition of the same path, and time lag between image exposure and laser point acquisition also need to be addressed properly. The proposed method was applied to generate <span class="hlt">ORI</span> with 1 cm resolution, from the actual MMS data sets. The <span class="hlt">ORI</span> generated by the proposed technique was more clear, occlusion free and with higher resolution compared to the conventional orthorectified coloured point cloud imagery. Moreover, the visual interpretation of road features from the <span class="hlt">ORI</span> was much easier. In addition, the experimental results also validated the effectiveness of proposed radiometric corrections. In occluded regions, the <span class="hlt">ORI</span> was compensated by using other images captured from different angles. The validity of the image masking process, in the occluded regions, was also ascertained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3978685','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3978685"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence of HLA-B27 in the New Zealand population: effect of age and ethnicity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Introduction HLA-B27 genotyping is commonly used to support a diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A recent study has suggested that HLA-B27 may adversely affect longevity. The objectives of this study were to determine, for the first time, the prevalence of HLA-B27 in the New Zealand population, and to test whether HLA-B27 prevalence declines with age. Methods 117 Caucasian controls, 111 New Zealand Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> controls, and 176 AS patients were directly genotyped for HLA-B27 using PCR-SSP. These participants and a further 1103 Caucasian controls were genotyped for the HLA-B27 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs4349859 and rs116488202. All AS patients testing positive for HLA-B27 of New Zealand Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> ancestry underwent high resolution typing to determine sub-allele status. Results HLA-B27 prevalence was 9.2% in New Zealand Caucasian controls and 6.5% in Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> controls. No decline in HLA-B27 prevalence with age was detected in Caucasian controls (p = 0.92). Concordance between HLA-B27 and SNP genotypes was 98.7-99.3% in Caucasians and 76.9-86% in Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>. Of the 14 AS patients of Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> ancestry, 1 was negative for HLA-B27, 10 were positive for HLAB*2705, and 3 positive for HLAB*2704. All cases of genotype discordance were explained by the presence of HLAB*2704. Conclusions HLA-B27 prevalence in New Zealand Caucasians is consistent with that of Northern European populations and did not decline with increasing age. In Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> with AS who were HLA-B27 positive, 76.9% were positive for HLA-B*2705, suggesting that genetic susceptibility to AS in Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> is primarily due to admixture with Caucasians. PMID:24286455</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=367143','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=367143"><span id="translatedtitle">Initiation of simian virus 40 DNA replication in vitro: aphidicolin causes accumulation of early-replicating intermediates and allows determination of the initial direction of DNA synthesis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Decker, R S; Yamaguchi, M; Possenti, R; DePamphilis, M L</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Aphidicolin, a specific inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha, provided a novel method for distinguishing between initiation of DNA synthesis at the simian virus 40 (SV40) origin of replication (<span class="hlt">ori</span>) and continuation of replication beyond <span class="hlt">ori</span>. In the presence of sufficient aphidicolin to inhibit total DNA synthesis by 50%, initiation of DNA replication in SV40 chromosomes or <span class="hlt">ori</span>-containing plasmids continued in vitro, whereas DNA synthesis in the bulk of SV40 replicative intermediate DNA (RI) that had initiated replication in vivo was rapidly inhibited. This resulted in accumulation of early RI in which most nascent DNA was localized within a 600- to 700-base-pair region centered at <span class="hlt">ori</span>. Accumulation of early RI was observed only under conditions that permitted initiation of SV40 <span class="hlt">ori</span>-dependent, T-antigen-dependent DNA replication and only when aphidicolin was added to the in vitro system. Increasing aphidicolin concentrations revealed that DNA synthesis in the <span class="hlt">ori</span> region was not completely resistant to aphidicolin but simply less sensitive than DNA synthesis at forks that were farther away. Since DNA synthesized in the presence of aphidicolin was concentrated in the 300 base pairs on the early gene side of <span class="hlt">ori</span>, we conclude that the initial direction of DNA synthesis was the same as that of early mRNA synthesis, consistent with the model proposed by Hay and DePamphilis (Cell 28:767-779, 1982). The data were also consistent with initiation of the first DNA chains in <span class="hlt">ori</span> by CV-1 cell DNA primase-DNA polymerase alpha. Synthesis of pppA/G(pN)6-8(pdN)21-23 chains on a single-stranded DNA template by a purified preparation of this enzyme was completely resistant to aphidicolin, and further incorporation of deoxynucleotide monophosphates was inhibited. Therefore, in the presence of aphidicolin, this enzyme could initiate RNA-primed DNA synthesis at <span class="hlt">ori</span> first in the early gene direction and then in the late gene direction, but could not continue DNA synthesis for an extended distance. Images PMID:3025613</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820047361&hterms=Orion+Nebula&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DOrion%2BNebula','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820047361&hterms=Orion+Nebula&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DOrion%2BNebula"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultraviolet absorption by highly ionized atoms in the Orion Nebula</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Franco, J.; Savage, B. D.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The International Ultraviolet Explorer was used to obtain high-resolution, far-UV spectra of theta 1 A, theta 1 C, theta 1 D, and theta 2 A Orionis. The interstellar absorption lines in these spectra are discussed with an emphasis on the high-ionization lines of C IV and Si IV. Theta 2 A <span class="hlt">Ori</span> has interstellar C IV and Si IV absorption of moderate strength at the velocity found for normal H II region ions. Theta 1 C <span class="hlt">Ori</span> has very strong interstellar C IV and Si IV absorption at velocities blueshifted by about 25 km/s from that found for the normal H II region ions. The possible origin of the high-ionization lines by three processes is considered: X-ray ionization, collisional ionization, and UV photoionization. It is concluded that the C IV and Si IV ions toward theta 2 A and theta 1 C <span class="hlt">Ori</span> are likely produced by UV photoionization of surrounding nebular gas. In the case of theta 1 C <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, the velocity shift of the high-ionization lines may be produced through the acceleration of high-density globules in the core of the nebula by the stellar wind of theta 1 C <span class="hlt">Ori</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14982629','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14982629"><span id="translatedtitle">Escherichia coli prereplication complex assembly is regulated by dynamic interplay among Fis, IHF and DnaA.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ryan, Valorie T; Grimwade, Julia E; Camara, Johanna E; Crooke, Elliott; Leonard, Alan C</p> <p>2004-03-01</p> <p>Initiator DnaA and DNA bending proteins, Fis and IHF, comprise prereplication complexes (pre-RC) that unwind the Escherichia coli chromosome's origin of replication, <span class="hlt">ori</span>C. Loss of either Fis or IHF perturbs synchronous initiation from <span class="hlt">ori</span>C copies in rapidly growing E. coli. Based on dimethylsulphate (DMS) footprinting of purified proteins, we observed a dynamic interplay among Fis, IHF and DnaA on supercoiled <span class="hlt">ori</span>C templates. Low levels of Fis inhibited <span class="hlt">ori</span>C unwinding by blocking both IHF and DnaA binding to low affinity sites. As the concentration of DnaA was increased, Fis repression was relieved and IHF rapidly redistributed DnaA to all unfilled binding sites on <span class="hlt">ori</span>C. This behaviour in vitro is analogous to observed assembly of pre-RC in synchronized E. coli. We propose that as new DnaA is synthesized in E. coli, opposing activities of Fis and IHF ensure an abrupt transition from a repressed complex with unfilled weak affinity DnaA binding sites to a completely loaded unwound complex, increasing both the precision of DNA replication timing and initiation synchrony. PMID:14982629</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006ApJ...648L..43K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006ApJ...648L..43K"><span id="translatedtitle">V1647 Orionis: The X-Ray Evolution of a Pre-Main-Sequence Accretion Burst</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kastner, Joel H.; Richmond, Michael; Grosso, Nicolas; Weintraub, David A.; Simon, Theodore; Henden, Arne; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Frank, Adam; Ozawa, Hideki</p> <p>2006-09-01</p> <p>We present Chandra X-Ray Observatory monitoring observations of the recent accretion outburst displayed by the pre-main-sequence (pre-MS) star V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. The X-ray observations were obtained over a period beginning prior to outburst onset in late 2003 and continuing through its apparent cessation in late 2005, and demonstrate that the mean flux of the spatially coincident X-ray source closely tracked the near-infrared luminosity of V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> throughout its eruption. We find negligible likelihood that the correspondence between X-ray and infrared light curves over this period was the result of multiple X-ray flares unrelated to the accretion burst. The recent Chandra data confirm that the X-ray spectrum of V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> hardened during outburst, relative both to its preoutburst state and to the X-ray spectra of nearby pre-MS stars in the L1630 cloud. We conclude that the observed changes in the X-ray emission from V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> over the course of its 2003-2005 eruption were generated by a sudden increase and subsequent decline in its accretion rate. These results for V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> indicate that the flux of hard X-ray emission from erupting low-mass, pre-MS stars, and the duration and intensity of such eruptions, reflect the degree to which star-disk magnetic fields are reorganized before and during major accretion events.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAVSO..43R.109S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAVSO..43R.109S"><span id="translatedtitle">Observational Activities at Manipur University, India (Abstract)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Singh, K. Y.; Meitei, I. A.; Singh, S. A.; Singh, R. B.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>(Abstract only) We have innovatively designed and constructed three observatories each costing a few hundred USD for housing three small Schmidt-Cassegrain type telescopes namely, Celestron CGE925, Celestron CGE1400, Meade 12-inch LX200GPS. These observatories are completely different in design and are found to be perfectly usable for doing serious work on astronomical observation and measurements. The observatory with the Celestron CGE1400 telescope has been inducted, since January 2012, as one of the observatories of the international “Orion Project” headquartered at Phoenix, Arizona, which is dedicated for photometric and spectroscopic observations of five bright variable stars of the Orion constellation namely, Betelgeuse (alpha <span class="hlt">Ori</span>), Rigel (beta <span class="hlt">Ori</span>), Mintaka (delta <span class="hlt">Ori</span>), Alnilam (epsilon <span class="hlt">Ori</span>) and Alnitak (zeta <span class="hlt">Ori</span>). Using this observatory, we have been producing BVRI photometric data for the five stars of the Orion project. The other observatory with the Meade 12-inch LX200GPS telescope is being inducted into service for CCD photometric study of SU UMa stars in connection with implementation of a project funded by Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). In the present paper, we would like to describe our self-built observatories, our observational facilities, the BVRI photometric data that we acquired for the Orion project, and our future plan for observation of variable stars of interest.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApJ...604..827B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApJ...604..827B"><span id="translatedtitle">S Orionis 70: Just a Foreground Field Brown Dwarf?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Burgasser, Adam J.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; McGovern, Mark R.; McLean, Ian S.; Prato, L.; Reid, I. Neill</p> <p>2004-04-01</p> <p>We examine recent claims that the T-type brown dwarf S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 053810.1-203626 (S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70) is a spectroscopically verified low-mass (3+5-1 MJup) member of the 1-8 Myr σ Orionis cluster. Comparative arguments by Martín & Zapatero Osorio asserting that S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 exhibits low surface gravity spectral features indicative of youth and low mass are invalidated by the fact that their comparison object was not the field T dwarf 2MASS 0559-1404, but rather a nearby background star. Instead, we find that the 1-2.5 μm spectra of S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 are well matched to older (age~few Gyr) field T6-T7 dwarfs. Moreover, we find that spectral model fits to late-type field T dwarf spectra tend to yield low surface gravities (logg=3.0-3.5), and thus young ages (<~5 Myr) and low masses (<~3 MJup), inconsistent with expected and/or empirical values. Finally, we show that the identification of one T dwarf in the field imaged by Zapatero Osorio et al. is statistically consistent with the expected foreground contamination. Based on the reexamined evidence, we conclude that S <span class="hlt">Ori</span> 70 may simply be an old, massive (30-60 MJup) field brown dwarf lying in the foreground of the σ Orionis cluster. This interpretation should be considered before presuming the existence of so-called ``cluster planets.''</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21364800','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21364800"><span id="translatedtitle">Mapping of origin of replication in Themococcales.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ojha, Krishna K; Swati, D</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Genome replication is a crucial and essential process for the continuity of life.In all organisms it starts at a specific region of the genome known as origin of replication (<span class="hlt">Ori</span>) site. The number of <span class="hlt">Ori</span> sites varies in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Replication starts at a single <span class="hlt">Ori</span> site in bacteria, but in eukaryotes multiple <span class="hlt">Ori</span> sites are used for fast copying across all chromosomes. The situation becomes complex in archaea, where some groups have single and others have multiple origins of replication. Themococcales, are a hyperthermophilic order of archaea. They are anaerobes and heterotrophs-peptide fermenters, sulphate reducers, methanogens being some of the examples of metabolic types. In this paper we have applied a combination of multiple in silico approaches - Z curve, the cell division cycle (cdc6) gene location and location of consensus origin recognition box (ORB) sequences for location of origin of replication in Thermococcus onnurineus, Thermococcus gammatolerans and other Themococcales and compared the results to that of the well-documented case of Pyrococcus abyssi. The motivation behind this study is to find the number of <span class="hlt">Ori</span> sites based on the data available for members of this order. Results from this in silico analysis show that the Themococcales have a single origin of replication. PMID:21364800</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26560080','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26560080"><span id="translatedtitle">TcpM: a novel relaxase that mediates transfer of large conjugative plasmids from Clostridium perfringens.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wisniewski, Jessica A; Traore, Daouda A; Bannam, Trudi L; Lyras, Dena; Whisstock, James C; Rood, Julian I</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Conjugative transfer of toxin and antibiotic resistance plasmids in Clostridium perfringens is mediated by the tcp conjugation locus. Surprisingly, neither a relaxase gene nor an origin of transfer (<span class="hlt">ori</span>T) has been identified on these plasmids, which are typified by the 47 kb tetracycline resistance plasmid pCW3. The tcpM gene (previously called intP) encodes a potential tyrosine recombinase that was postulated to be an atypical relaxase. Mutagenesis and complementation studies showed that TcpM was required for wild-type transfer of pCW3 and that a tyrosine residue, Y259, was essential for TcpM activity, which was consistent with the need for a relaxase-mediated hydrophilic attack at the <span class="hlt">ori</span>T site. Other catalytic residues conserved in tyrosine recombinases were not required for TcpM activity, suggesting that TcpM was not a site-specific recombinase. Mobilization studies led to the identification of the <span class="hlt">ori</span>T site, which was located in the 391 bp intergenic region upstream of tcpM. The <span class="hlt">ori</span>T site was localized to a 150 bp region, and gel mobility shift studies showed that TcpM could bind to this region. Based on these studies we postulate that conjugative transfer of pCW3 involves the atypical relaxase TcpM binding to and processing the <span class="hlt">ori</span>T site to initiate plasmid transfer. PMID:26560080</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3552951','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3552951"><span id="translatedtitle">Multiple Infections with Cardinium and Two Strains of Wolbachia in The Spider Mite Tetranychus phaselus Ehara: Revealing New Forces Driving the Spread of Wolbachia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zhao, Dong-Xiao; Chen, Da-Song; Ge, Cheng; Gotoh, Tetsuo; Hong, Xiao-Yue</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) has been proposed as a major mechanism by which certain strains of Wolbachia to invade and persist in host populations. However, mechanisms that underlie the invasion and persistence of non-CI strains are less well understood. Here, we established a spider mite Tetranychus phaselus population multiply infected by Cardinium as well as two distinct lineages of Wolbachia, designated wCon and w<span class="hlt">Ori</span>, to study the forces driving the spread of the non-CI strain of Wolbachia w<span class="hlt">Ori</span>. Interestingly, we found that w<span class="hlt">Ori</span> provided a longevity advantage to its female hosts under ideal conditions, making w<span class="hlt">Ori</span> stay longer in this population, and then being transmitted to more offspring. Furthermore, the lifespan of uninfected females was reduced when mated with multiple-infected males. As a result, the uninfected population is attenuated by the multiple-infected males. Thus, we infer that the host age effects of multiple infection may represent sufficient forces driving the spread of w<span class="hlt">Ori</span> through the host population. PMID:23355904</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994AAS...184.6505J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994AAS...184.6505J"><span id="translatedtitle">Observations of Far-uv Absorption Lines at 2 km/s Resolution with IMAPS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jenkins, E. B.; Zucchino, P. M.; Reale, M. A.; Joseph, C. L.; Sonneborn, G.; Polidan, R. S.; Williams, T.</p> <p>1994-05-01</p> <p>The Interstellar Medium Absorption Profile Spectrograph (IMAPS) flew on the ORFEUS-Spas mission that was launched on STS-51 in September, 1993 for a joint science program sponsored by the US and German space agencies, NASA and DARA. IMAPS is an objective-grating echelle spectrograph that records the spectra of bright stars in the wavelength region 950-1150 Angstroms at a resolution of 1 to 2 km s(-1) . The central objective of IMAPS is to study the interstellar lines of H_2 and some key atomic species, but it is also useful for observing stellar phenomena. The following stars were observed: gamma Cas, alpha Eri, epsilon <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, zeta <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, kappa <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, zeta Pup, gamma (2) Vel, beta Cru, eta UMa, and beta Cen A. Data processing is still underway, but we present some preliminary results, in particular, well resolved velocity components of H_2 toward epsilon and zeta <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. In zeta <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, H_2 at a heliocentric velocity v_⊙ ~ -2 km s(-1) shows pronounced changes in width for different rotational quantum numbers J, and ionized gas shown by the strong features of C II and N II can be seen over the velocity ranges -95 < v_⊙ < -70 and -45 < v_⊙ < +50 km s(-1) .</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26141047','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26141047"><span id="translatedtitle">Support Needs of Families Living with Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Searing, Billie Margaret Jean; Graham, Fiona; Grainger, Rebecca</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>This study examined the perceived availability and helpfulness of supports used by caregivers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in New Zealand, particularly for caregivers who are Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, and who live rurally. Caregivers (N = 92) completed the Family Support Scale with comparisons analysed using t tests. Free text comments were invited and analysed using a general inductive approach. More support was perceived as available by Non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> than Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> p = 0.03, 95 % CI (0.21, 3.88). Spouses were rated as the most helpful support. Professional helpers were rated as 'somewhat helpful'. Helpful support emphasised caring, knowledge and accessibility. Ethnic differences in perceptions of support endorse calls for culturally tailored supports. Informal supports are highly valued however professional supports require development to better meet caregiver needs. PMID:26141047</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21946641','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21946641"><span id="translatedtitle">Managing obstructive sleep apnoea and achieving equity: implications for health services.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Paine, Sarah-Jane; Harris, Ricci B; Mihaere, Kara M</p> <p>2011-05-13</p> <p>Sleep occupies a third of life, and poor sleep has wide-ranging consequences for health, safety, and well-being. Recent research suggests significant inequalities in sleep health between Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> adults in New Zealand including self-reported sleeping problems and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). This paper will outline a series of studies that were designed to assess how many people were affected by OSAS in Aotearoa/New Zealand and specifically sought to prioritise the needs of Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>. It will discuss a number of issues related to the diagnosis and treatment of OSAS in New Zealand and present strategies for reducing inequalities in sleep health. PMID:21946641</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750048033&hterms=cloud+computing&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dcloud%2Bcomputing','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750048033&hterms=cloud+computing&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dcloud%2Bcomputing"><span id="translatedtitle">Interstellar clouds containing optically thin H2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jura, M.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>The theory of Black and Delgarno that the relative populations of the excited rotational levels of H2 can be understood in terms of cascading following absorption in the Lyman and Werner bands is employed to infer the gas densities and radiation fields within diffuse interstellar clouds containing H2 that is optically thin in those bands. The procedure is described for computing the populations of the different rotation levels, the relative distribution among the different rotation levels of newly formed H2 is determined on the basis of five simplified models, and the rate of H2 formation is estimated. The results are applied to delta <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, two components of iota <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, the second components of rho Leo and zeta <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, tau Sco, gamma Vel, and zeta Pup. The inferred parameters are summarized for each cloud.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23301687','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23301687"><span id="translatedtitle">Spo0A regulates chromosome copy number during sporulation by directly binding to the origin of replication in Bacillus subtilis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boonstra, Mirjam; de Jong, Imke G; Scholefield, Graham; Murray, Heath; Kuipers, Oscar P; Veening, Jan-Willem</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>When starved, Bacillus subtilis cells can enter the developmental programme of endospore formation by activation of the master transcriptional regulator Spo0A. Correct chromosome copy number is crucial for the production of mature and fully resistant spores. The production and maintenance of one chromosome for the mother cell and one copy for the forespore requires accurate co-ordination between DNA replication and initiation of sporulation. Here, we show that Spo0A regulates chromosome copy number by directly binding to a number of Spo0A binding sites that are present near the origin of replication (<span class="hlt">ori</span>C). We demonstrate that cells lacking three specific Spo0A binding sites at <span class="hlt">ori</span>C display increased chromosome copy numbers when sporulation is induced. Our data support the hypothesis that Spo0A directly controls DNA replication during sporulation by binding to <span class="hlt">ori</span>C. PMID:23301687</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22362838','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22362838"><span id="translatedtitle">Results of a telehealth-enabled chronic care management service to support people with long-term conditions at home.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Venter, Anton; Burns, Rosemary; Hefford, Martin; Ehrenberg, Nieves</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Both congestive heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are more common among Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> than non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> people, and the cultural acceptability of home-based remote monitoring technology has not been tested. We conducted a 12-month pilot trial of home telemonitoring. Patients were randomly assigned to the control and intervention groups. Patients in the control group showed no clear differences in quality of life at the end of the trial. The telehealth group showed a consistent trend towards improved quality of life on several instruments, including the SF-36, the St George Respiratory Questionnaire and the K10 questionnaire; the improvement in the latter was significant. Hospitalizations were reduced in both the control (-19%) and telehealth group (-25%). Patient interviews indicated that the technology was acceptable to most patients and their families, including the Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>. The results from the pilot trial suggest that wider implementation with a cost benefit evaluation could be worthwhile. PMID:22362838</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930026456&hterms=fu&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dfu','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930026456&hterms=fu&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dfu"><span id="translatedtitle">Optical spectroscopy of Z Canis Majoris, V1057 Cygni, and FU Orionis - Accretion disks and signatures of disk winds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Welty, Alan D.; Strom, Stephen E.; Edwards, Suzan; Kenyon, Scott J.; Hartmann, Lee W.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>High resolution, high SNR optical spectra have been used to investigate the hypothesis that in outburst, FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> objects are self-luminous accretion disks whose light dominates at optical and near-IR wavelengths. Strong evidence has been found for linewidth versus wavelength correlation in good agreement with model predictions for Z CMa and V1057 Cyg, but not for FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> itself. Linewidth varies continuously with wavelength at optical wavelengths in the former two objects, In the case of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, it is argued that a combination of strong wind components to spectral lines, and surface gravity possibly being lower than that of supergiants, conceals the underlying linewidth versus wavelength relationship. A marginal correlation is found between linewidth and lower excitation potential in all three objects. Synthetic disk spectra are subtracted from observed spectral, and remarkably good fits are found for all three objects for wavelengths longer than about 5000 A.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22059253','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22059253"><span id="translatedtitle">Criminal sittings – rape in the colony, New Zealand, 1862.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Erai, Michelle</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>In 1862 His Honor, Justice Johnston, issued his instructions to the jury of the New Zealand Supreme Court for two simultaneous rape trials – the alleged rape of a European woman by two Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> men, and an alleged “assault with intent to commit a rape” of a Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> woman by a European man. This article argues that those instructions should be read within an historiographical critique of British colonial expansion, print capitalism and violence. Drawing on feminist postcolonial theorizing the question posed here, is, “What is the historical, ideological context for a newspaper reporting of the possible rape of a Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> woman in 1862? PMID:22059253</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21707666','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21707666"><span id="translatedtitle">Rejection as a call to arms: inter-racial hostility and support for political action as outcomes of race-based rejection in majority and minority groups.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Barlow, Fiona Kate; Sibley, Chris G; Hornsey, Matthew J</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>Both majority and minority group members fear race-based rejection, and respond by disparaging the groups that they expect will reject them. It is not clear, however, how this process differs in minority and majority groups. Using large representative samples of White (N= 4,618) and Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> (N= 1,163) New Zealanders, we found that perceptions of race-based rejection predicted outgroup negativity in both groups, but in different ways and for different reasons. For White (but not Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>) New Zealanders, increased intergroup anxiety partially mediated the relationship between cognitions of rejection and outgroup negativity. Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> who expected to be rejected on the basis of their race reported increased ethnic identification and, in part through this, increased support for political action benefiting their own group. This finding supports collective-action models of social change in historically disadvantaged minority groups. PMID:21707666</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16813585','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16813585"><span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic resonance imaging of the low rectum: defining the radiological anatomy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Salerno, G; Daniels, I R; Brown, G</p> <p>2006-09-01</p> <p>Low rectal cancer provides a particular surgical challenge of local tumour control and sphincter preservation. Histopathological studies have shown that an involved circumferential resection margin (CRM) and depth of extramural invasion are independent markers of poor prognosis and correlate with high local recurrence rates due to residual microscopic disease [1]. Recent data suggests that a CRM at risk of tumour involvement can be reliably seen on the pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan with good correlation with the histological specimen [2-5]. In published series, low rectal cancers have a higher incidence of involved resection margins, with rates up to 30% for abdomino-perineal excision (APE) vs 10% for low anterior resection (LAR) [6-9]. This has been attributed to narrow surgical planes deep within the pelvis as the mesorectum becomes narrowed and tapered, forming a bare muscle tube at the level of the anal sphincter complex. The challenge for the surgeon is to undertake careful removal of a cylinder of tissue beyond the rectal wall without perforating the tumour. An overall local recurrence rate of 10% after APE for all stages of rectal cancer has been reported and this low rate was attributed to the surgical technique that included a wide peri-anal dissection and lateral division of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani. The abdominal dissection was stopped above the tumour, taking care to avoid separation of the tumour from the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani to reduce the risk of inadvertent tumour cell spillage [8]. Therefore, rates of involved surgical margins from APE specimens may be reduced when a cuff of <span class="hlt">levators</span> is taken compared with standard resection. In this review, we will discuss how MRI of the low rectum can aid in the staging and optimization of the best treatment strategy for low rectal cancer. PMID:16813585</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26581871','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26581871"><span id="translatedtitle">A three-leg model producing tetrapod and tripod coordination patterns of ipsilateral legs in the stick insect.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tóth, T I; Daun-Gruhn, S</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Insect locomotion requires the precise coordination of the movement of all six legs. Detailed investigations have revealed that the movement of the legs is controlled by local dedicated neuronal networks, which interact to produce walking of the animal. The stick insect is well suited to experimental investigations aimed at understanding the mechanisms of insect locomotion. Beside the experimental approach, models have also been constructed to elucidate those mechanisms. Here, we describe a model that replicates both the tetrapod and tripod coordination pattern of three ipsilateral legs. The model is based on an earlier insect leg model, which includes the three main leg joints, three antagonistic muscle pairs, and their local neuronal control networks. These networks are coupled via angular signals to establish intraleg coordination of the three neuromuscular systems during locomotion. In the present three-leg model, we coupled three such leg models, representing front, middle, and hind leg, in this way. The coupling was between the <span class="hlt">levator</span>-depressor local control networks of the three legs. The model could successfully simulate tetrapod and tripod coordination patterns, as well as the transition between them. The simulations showed that for the interleg coordination during tripod, the position signals of the <span class="hlt">levator</span>-depressor neuromuscular systems sent between the legs were sufficient, while in tetrapod, additional information on the angular velocities in the same system was necessary, and together with the position information also sufficient. We therefore suggest that, during stepping, the connections between the <span class="hlt">levator</span>-depressor neuromuscular systems of the different legs are of primary importance. PMID:26581871</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4339521','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4339521"><span id="translatedtitle">Vertical Diplopia and Ptosis from Removal of the Orbital Roof in Pterional Craniotomy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Desai, Shilpa J.; Lawton, Michael T.; McDermott, Michael W.; Horton, Jonathan C.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Purpose To describe a newly recognized clinical syndrome consisting of ptosis, diplopia, vertical gaze limitation, and abduction weakness that can occur following orbital roof removal during orbito-zygomatic-pterional craniotomy. Design Case series. Participants Eight study patients, ages 44 – 80 years, 7 female, with neuro-ophthalmic symptoms after pterional craniotomy. Methods Case description of eight study patients. Main Outcome Measures Presence of ptosis, diplopia, and gaze limitation. Results Eight patients had neuro-ophthalmic findings after pterional craniotomy for meningioma removal or aneurysm clipping. The cardinal features were ptosis, limited elevation and hypotropia. Three patients also had limitation of downgaze and two had limitation of abduction. Imaging showed loss of the fat layers which normally envelop the superior rectus/<span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae superioris. The muscles appeared attached to the defect in the orbital roof. Ptosis and diplopia developed in two patients despite Medpor titanium mesh implants. Deficits in all patients showed spontaneous improvement. In two patients a <span class="hlt">levator</span> advancement was required to repair ptosis. In three patients an inferior rectus recession using an adjustable suture was performed to treat vertical diplopia. Follow-up a mean of 6.5 years later revealed that all patients had a slight residual upgaze deficit, but alignment was orthotropic in primary gaze. Conclusions After pterional craniotomy, ptosis, diplopia and vertical gaze limitation can result from tethering of the superior rectus/<span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae superioris complex to the surgical defect in the orbital roof. Lateral rectus function is sometimes compromised by muscle attachment to the lateral orbital osteotomy. This syndrome occurs in about 1% of patients after removal of the orbital roof and can be treated, if necessary, by prism glasses or surgery. PMID:25439610</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26086928','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26086928"><span id="translatedtitle">Relation of the Vector Force Needed to Lift the Upper Eyelids and the Degree of Exophthalmos.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hwang, Kun; Kim, Joo Ho; Kim, Hun; Hwang, Se Won</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to determine the relation of the vector force needed to lift the upper eyelids and the degree of exophthalmos (EX). In the 109 magnetic resonance imaging films, the degree of EX (the shortest distance from the cornea to the line connecting both lateral orbital rims), the anterior angle (θ, an angle formed from the lower margin of the upper eyelid-superior transverse ligament (STL)--with a parallel line connecting the supraorbital rim and the infraorbital rim in the sagittal film), the length from the STL to the upper eyelid margin (<span class="hlt">levator</span> length [LL]), the thickness of the STL (WT), and the thickness the of <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae (LT) were measured.The average EX was 14.5 ± 2.35  mm. The average θ was 33.84 ± 2.15 degrees. The vector force needed to lift the upper eyelids (cos θ) was 0.83. The average LL was 21.0 ± 1.54  mm. The average WT was 1.07 ± 0.22  mm. The average LT was 1.69 ± 0.30  mm. There was a significant positive relationship between the EX and age (P = 0.022). The EX in those younger than 20 years (12.8 ± 2.06) was significantly lesser than that of the other age groups. There was no significant relationship between the EX and cos θ. However, there was a significant positive relationship between the EX and the LL. There was a significant positive relationship between LL and LT, and between LL and WT.The farther the eyeball protrudes, the longer the LL is needed. The longer the LL is, the thicker the <span class="hlt">levator</span> muscle and STL. PMID:26086928</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20151364','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20151364"><span id="translatedtitle">Actions of motor neurons and leg muscles in jumping by planthopper insects (hemiptera, issidae).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Burrows, Malcolm; Bräunig, Peter</p> <p>2010-04-15</p> <p>To understand the catapult mechanism that propels jumping in a planthopper insect, the innervation and action of key muscles were analyzed. The large trochanteral depressor muscle, M133b,c, is innervated by two motor neurons and by two dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons, all with axons in N3C. A smaller depressor muscle, M133a, is innervated by two neurons, one with a large-diameter cell body, a large, blind-ending dendrite, and a giant ovoid, axon measuring 50 microm by 30 microm in nerve N5A. The trochanteral <span class="hlt">levator</span> muscles (M132) and (M131) are innervated by N4 and N3B, respectively. The actions of these muscles in a restrained jump were divisible into a three-phase pattern. First, both hind legs were moved into a cocked position by high-frequency bursts of spikes in the <span class="hlt">levator</span> muscles lasting about 0.5 seconds. Second, and once both legs were cocked, M133b,c received a long continuous sequence of motor spikes, but the two <span class="hlt">levators</span> spiked only sporadically. The spikes in the two motor neurons to M133b,c on one side were closely coupled to each other and to the spikes on the other side. If one hind leg was cocked then the spikes only occurred in motor neurons to that side. The final phase was the jump movement itself, which occurred when the depressor spikes ceased and which lasted 1 ms. Muscles 133b,c activated synchronously on both sides, are responsible for generating the power, and M133a and its giant neuron may play a role in triggering the release of a jump. PMID:20151364</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5017566','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5017566"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultraviolet absorption by highly ionized atoms in the Orion nebula</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Franco, J.; Savage, B.D.</p> <p>1982-04-15</p> <p>The International Ultraviolet Explorer was used to obtain high-resolution, far-UV spectra of theta/sup 1/A, theta/sup 1/C, theta/sup 1/D, and theta/sup 2/A Orionis. The interstellar absorption lines in these spectra are discussed with an emphasis on the high-resolution lines of C IV and Si IV. Toward theta/sup 1/A and theta/sup 1/D <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, blending of interstellar and stellar absorption prevents us from unambiguously determining the strength of the high-ionization interstellar absorption. theta/sup 2/A <span class="hlt">Ori</span> has an interstellar C IV and Si IV absorption of moderate strength at the velocity found for normal H II region ions. theta/sup 1/C <span class="hlt">Ori</span> has very strong interstellar C IV and Si IV absorption at velocities blueshifted by approx.25 km s/sup -1/ from that found for the normal H II region ions. We consider the possible origin of the high-ionization lines by three processes: X-ray ionization, collisional ionization, and UV photoionization. We conclude that the C IV and Si IV ions toward theta/sup 2/A and theta/sup 1/C <span class="hlt">Ori</span> are likely produced by UV photoionization of surrounding nebular gas. In the case of theta/sup 1/C <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, the velocity shift of the high-ionization lines may be produced through the acceleration of high-density globules in the core of the nebula by the stellar wind of theta/sup 1/C <span class="hlt">Ori</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4652767','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4652767"><span id="translatedtitle">Origin-of-transfer sequences facilitate mobilisation of non-conjugative antimicrobial-resistance plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>O'Brien, Frances G.; Yui Eto, Karina; Murphy, Riley J. T.; Fairhurst, Heather M.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Grubb, Warren B.; Ramsay, Joshua P.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of hospital, community and livestock-associated infections and is increasingly resistant to multiple antimicrobials. A significant proportion of antimicrobial-resistance genes are plasmid-borne, but only a minority of S. aureus plasmids encode proteins required for conjugative transfer or Mob relaxase proteins required for mobilisation. The pWBG749 family of S. aureus conjugative plasmids can facilitate the horizontal transfer of diverse antimicrobial-resistance plasmids that lack Mob genes. Here we reveal that these mobilisable plasmids carry copies of the pWBG749 origin-of-transfer (<span class="hlt">ori</span>T) sequence and that these <span class="hlt">ori</span>T sequences facilitate mobilisation by pWBG749. Sequences resembling the pWBG749 <span class="hlt">ori</span>T were identified on half of all sequenced S. aureus plasmids, including the most prevalent large antimicrobial-resistance/virulence-gene plasmids, pIB485, pMW2 and pUSA300HOUMR. <span class="hlt">ori</span>T sequences formed five subfamilies with distinct inverted-repeat-2 (IR2) sequences. pWBG749-family plasmids encoding each IR2 were identified and pWBG749 mobilisation was found to be specific for plasmids carrying matching IR2 sequences. Specificity of mobilisation was conferred by a putative ribbon-helix-helix-protein gene smpO. Several plasmids carried 2–3 <span class="hlt">ori</span>T variants and pWBG749-mediated recombination occurred between distinct <span class="hlt">ori</span>T sites during mobilisation. These observations suggest this relaxase-in trans mechanism of mobilisation by pWBG749-family plasmids is a common mechanism of plasmid dissemination in S. aureus. PMID:26243776</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24548144','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24548144"><span id="translatedtitle">Identifying advanced and delayed sleep phase disorders in the general population: a national survey of New Zealand adults.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Paine, Sarah-Jane; Fink, Jo; Gander, Philippa H; Warman, Guy R</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>The aim was to estimate the prevalence of, and identify independent risk factors for, Advanced (ASPD) and Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder (DSPD) among Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> (indigenous New Zealanders) and non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> adults using a self-report questionnaire. The Munich Chronotype Questionnaire was mailed to a stratified sample of 9100 adults (5100 Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and 4000 non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>) aged 20-59 years randomly selected from the electoral rolls (54% response rate). Different definitions for ASPD and DSPD were developed using combinations of symptoms including self-reported bed and rising times, current chronotype, and a desire to change sleep schedule. Logistic regression models were used to model the likelihood of reporting ASPD or DSPD separately after adjusting for ethnicity (Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> versus non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>), sex (males versus females), age (in decades), socio-economic deprivation (NZDep2006 deciles) and employment status (unemployed, night work versus employed with no night work). The prevalence of ASPD ranged from 0.25% to 7.13% whereas the prevalence of DSPD was 1.51 to 8.90% depending on the definition used. The prevalence of ASPD was higher among men and increased with age. The prevalence of DSPD was higher among those living in more deprived areas and decreased with age. After controlling for ethnicity, gender, age, socio-economic deprivation and employment status, people with ASPD were more likely to report excessive daytime sleepiness, whereas those with DSPD were more likely to report poor or fair self-rated health. Reporting ASPD and DSPD were associated with self-reported night work. In this large sleep timing survey, we found no differences in the prevalence of self-identified ASPD and DSPD between Maori and non-Maori. This has implications for the development and provision of sleep health services and strategies for managing the significant impact of work patterns on sleep. PMID:24548144</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4099155','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4099155"><span id="translatedtitle">The WERO group stop smoking competition: main outcomes of a pre- and post- study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background One potential promising strategy for increasing smoking cessation for Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> (Indigenous New Zealanders) and New Zealand resident Pacific Island people is Quit and Win competitions. The current uncontrolled pre and post study, WERO (WERO in Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> language means challenge), differs from previous studies in that it aims to investigate if a stop smoking contest, using both within team support, external support from a team coach and cessation experts, and technology, would be effective in prompting and sustaining quitting. Method Fifteen teams, recruited from urban Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>, rural Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and urban Pacific communities, competed to win a NZ$5000 (about €3,000, £2600) prize for a charity or community group of their choice. People were eligible if they were aged 18 years and over and identified as smokers. Smoking status was biochemically validated at the start and end of the 3 month competition. At 3-months post competition self-reported smoking status was collected. Results Fourteen teams with 10 contestants and one team with eight contestants were recruited. At the end of the competition the biochemically verified quit rate was 36%. The 6 months self-reported quit rate was 26%. The Pacific and rural Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> teams had high end of competition and 6 months follow-up quit rates (46% and 44%, and 36% and 29%). Conclusion WERO appeared to be successful in prompting quitting among high smoking prevalence groups. WERO combined several promising strategies for supporting cessation: peer support, cessation provider support, incentives, competition and interactive internet and mobile tools. Though designed for Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pacific people, WERO could potentially be effective for other family- and community-centred cultures. PMID:24924780</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17672320','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17672320"><span id="translatedtitle">[Cloning and functional studies of the chromosomal replication origin of Actinomadura yumaensis].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xia, Hai-yang; Lin, Kai-chun; Yang, Chang-juz; Qin, Zhong-jun</p> <p>2007-06-01</p> <p>The chromosomal replication origins (<span class="hlt">ori</span>C) have been investigated in Gram-positive eubacteria actinomycetes, including Streptomyces, Mycobacterium and Amycolatopsis, and reveal various DnaA-boxes and AT-rich sequences between the conserved dnaA and dnaN genes. Actinomadura yumaensis NRRL12515 is a producer of anthelmintic polyether maduramicin. In this paper,cloning, sequencing and functional studies of its <span class="hlt">ori</span>C have been carried out. A pair of oligonucleotide primers, based on the conserved sequences of dnaA and dnaN, was used to PCR amplification. A-1.3kb DNA band was detected on agarose gel. Subsequently cloning in an E. coli plasmid pBluescript II SK ( + ) and sequencing showed 1265bp,which contained 919bp between dnaA and dnaN genes. 14 DnaA-boxes with conserved 9bp sequence (T/C) (T/C) GTCC (A/C) CA and two 13bp AT-rich regions (GAAAAATCCCAAG, AAGAAAAAACTCA), were found on the sequence,indicating the <span class="hlt">ori</span>C of A. yumaensis NRRL12515. Phylogenetic trees based on the sequences of <span class="hlt">ori</span>C and of 16S rRNA genes of the four actinomycetes species show a similar pattern, suggesting that <span class="hlt">ori</span>C sequences also reflected well the relationship between actinomycetes species. An E. coli plasmid pOR1, containing the <span class="hlt">ori</span>C, actinomycetes selection markers tsr and melC, was introduced into Streptomyces coelicolor M145 by conjugal transfer. Transformants were obtained,and plasmids DNA were isolated and detected as low copy number, suggesting a functional mini-chromosome in Streptomyces. PMID:17672320</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3788811','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3788811"><span id="translatedtitle">Food Prices and Consumer Demand: Differences across Income Levels and Ethnic Groups</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Eyles, Helen; Schilling, Chris; Yang, Qing; Kaye-Blake, William; Genç, Murat; Blakely, Tony</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background Targeted food pricing policies may improve population diets. To assess their effects on inequalities, it is important to determine responsiveness to price changes across income levels and ethnic groups. Objective Our goal was to estimate price elasticity (PE) values for major commonly consumed food groups in New Zealand, by income and ethnicity. PE values represent percentage change in demand associated with 1% change in price of that good (own-PE) or another good (cross-PE). Design We used food expenditure data from national household economic surveys in 2007/08 and 2009/10 and Food Price Index data from 2007 and 2010. Adopting an Almost Ideal Demand System approach, own-PE and cross-PE estimates were derived for 24 food categories, household income quintiles, and two ethnic groups (Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>). Results Own-PE estimates (with two exceptions) ranged from −0.44 to −1.78. Cross-PE estimates were generally small; only 31% of absolute values were greater than 0.10. Excluding the outlier ‘energy drinks’, nine of 23 food groups had significantly stronger own-PEs for the lowest versus highest income quintiles (average regression-based difference across food groups −0.30 (95% CI −0.62 to 0.02)). Six own-PEs were significantly stronger among Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>; the average difference for Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span>: non-Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> across food groups was −0.26 (95% CI −0.52 to 0.00). Conclusions Food pricing policies have potential to improve population diets. The greater sensitivity of low-income households and Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> to price changes suggests the beneficial effects of such policies on health would be greatest for these groups. PMID:24098408</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4497933','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4497933"><span id="translatedtitle">Physical well-being and ethnic inequality in New Zealand prisons, 1840–1975</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Inwood, Kris; Oxley, Les</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The British colonization of New Zealand after 1840 was marked by an unusual concern compared to other settler colonies for incorporating the indigenous population Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> population into the new society. But despite a continuing political rhetoric of protection and sovereignty Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> have historically had lower living standards and, since the 1920s, higher rates of incarceration than European-descended New Zealanders (Pākehā). In this paper we examine differences between Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pākehā over 130 years using prison records. Aggregate data from the Ministry of Justice show long-term change and differences in incarceration rates. Using a dataset of all extant registers of men entering New Zealand prisons we show change over time in convictions and in height. The adult statures of Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pākehā were similar for men born before 1900 but marked differences emerged among cohorts born during the twentieth century. By World War II the gap in adult stature widened to around 3 cm, before narrowing for men born after World War II. Periods of divergence in stature are paralleled by divergence in fertility and indicators of family size, suggesting the possibility that increasing fertility stressed the economic situation of Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> families. The prison evidence suggests that inequalities in ‘net nutrition’ between Mā<span class="hlt">ori</span> and Pākehā are long-standing but not unchanging, indeed they increased for cohorts born into the early 20th century. A subset of the data describing adolescents confirms that among those born after 1945 the ethnic differential was already visible by the age of 16 years. PMID:26167110</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22126756','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22126756"><span id="translatedtitle">THE CORONAL ABUNDANCES OF MID-F DWARFS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin</p> <p>2013-05-10</p> <p>A Chandra spectrum of the moderately active nearby F6 V star {pi}{sup 3} <span class="hlt">Ori</span> is used to study the coronal properties of mid-F dwarfs. We find that {pi}{sup 3} <span class="hlt">Ori</span>'s coronal emission measure distribution is very similar to those of moderately active G and K dwarfs, with an emission measure peak near log T = 6.6 seeming to be ubiquitous for such stars. In contrast to coronal temperature, coronal abundances are known to depend on spectral type for main sequence stars. Based on this previously known relation, we expected {pi}{sup 3} <span class="hlt">Ori</span>'s corona to exhibit an extremely strong ''first ionization potential (FIP) effect'', a phenomenon first identified on the Sun where elements with low FIP are enhanced in the corona. We instead find that {pi}{sup 3} <span class="hlt">Ori</span>'s corona exhibits a FIP effect essentially identical to that of the Sun and other early G dwarfs, perhaps indicating that the increase in FIP bias toward earlier spectral types stops or at least slows for F stars. We find that {pi}{sup 3} <span class="hlt">Ori</span>'s coronal characteristics are significantly different from two previously studied mid-F stars, Procyon (F5 IV-V) and {tau} Boo (F7 V). We believe {pi}{sup 3} <span class="hlt">Ori</span> is more representative of the coronal characteristics of mid-F dwarfs, with Procyon being different because of luminosity class, and {tau} Boo being different because of the effects of one of two close companions, one stellar ({tau} Boo B: M2 V) and one planetary.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2575489','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2575489"><span id="translatedtitle">Chromosome replication dynamics in the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Duggin, Iain G.; McCallum, Simon A.; Bell, Stephen D.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The “baby machine” provides a means of generating synchronized cultures of minimally perturbed cells. We describe the use of this technique to establish the key cell-cycle parameters of hyperthermophilic archaea of the genus Sulfolobus. The 3 DNA replication origins of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius were mapped by 2D gel analysis to near 0 (<span class="hlt">ori</span>C2), 579 (<span class="hlt">ori</span>C1), and 1,197 kb (<span class="hlt">ori</span>C3) on the 2,226-kb circular genome, and we present a direct demonstration of their activity within the first few minutes of a synchronous cell cycle. We also detected X-shaped DNA molecules at the origins in log-phase cells, but these were not directly associated with replication initiation or ongoing chromosome replication in synchronized cells. Whole-genome marker frequency analyses of both synchronous and log-phase cultures showed that origin utilization was close to 100% for all 3 origins per round of replication. However, <span class="hlt">ori</span>C2 was activated slightly later on average compared with <span class="hlt">ori</span>C1 and <span class="hlt">ori</span>C3. The DNA replication forks moved bidirectionally away from each origin at ≈88 bp per second in synchronous culture. Analysis of the 3 Orc1/Cdc6 initiator proteins showed a uniformity of cellular abundance and origin binding throughout the cell cycle. In contrast, although levels of the MCM helicase were constant across the cell cycle, its origin localization was regulated, because it was strongly enriched at all 3 origins in early S phase. PMID:18922777</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015A%26A...582A.110B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015A%26A...582A.110B"><span id="translatedtitle">The magnetic field of ζ Orionis A</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Blazère, A.; Neiner, C.; Tkachenko, A.; Bouret, J.-C.; Rivinius, Th.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Context. ζ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> A is a hot star claimed to host a weak magnetic field, but no clear magnetic detection was obtained so far. In addition, it was recently shown to be a binary system composed of a O9.5I supergiant and a B1IV star. Aims: We aim at verifying the presence of a magnetic field in ζ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> A, identifying to which of the two binary components it belongs (or whether both stars are magnetic), and characterizing the field. Methods: Very high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric data were obtained with Narval at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (TBL) in France. Archival HEROS, FEROS and UVES spectroscopic data were also used. The data were first disentangled to separate the two components. We then analyzed them with the least-squares deconvolution technique to extract the magnetic information. Results: We confirm that ζ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> A is magnetic. We find that the supergiant component ζ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> Aa is the magnetic component: Zeeman signatures are observed and rotational modulation of the longitudinal magnetic field is clearly detected with a period of 6.829 d. This is the only magnetic O supergiant known as of today. With an oblique dipole field model of the Stokes V profiles, we show that the polar field strength is ~140 G. Because the magnetic field is weak and the stellar wind is strong, ζ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> Aa does not host a centrifugally supported magnetosphere. It may host a dynamical magnetosphere. Its companion ζ <span class="hlt">Ori</span> Ab does not show any magnetic signature, with an upper limit on the undetected field of ~300 G. Based on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16201134','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16201134"><span id="translatedtitle">Human evolution in Polynesia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Whyte, Adele L H; Marshall, Stephen J; Chambers, Geoffrey K</p> <p>2005-04-01</p> <p>The number of eastern Polynesian females required to found the Maori population of Aotearoa (New Zealand) has been recalculated. Our estimates use computer simulations that incorporate realistic sigmoid population growth models and include previously published and new mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 3' hypervariable region 1 sequences from Mă<span class="hlt">ori</span> (N = 109) and other eastern Polynesian (N = 125) volunteers. Approximately 190 (170-230) women are estimated to have been present in the founding waka (canoes). This new figure is more than double the previous estimate (Murray-McIntosh et al. 1998). Our claim for a large Maori founding population fits well with Mă<span class="hlt">ori</span> oral history and has additional support from Mă<span class="hlt">ori</span> paleodemography studies based on fertility estimates (Brewis et al. 1990; Pool 1991). An increasing body of data, including our own, supports the concept of planned multiple settlement voyages to Aotearoa by Polynesian navigators, leading us to suggest that theories for an "accidental discovery" of Aotearoa can now be completely disregarded. Four rare and novel Mă<span class="hlt">ori</span> mtDNA haplotypes have been identified in the present study, but we are unable to assign the immediate origin of Mă<span class="hlt">ori</span> to an exact Pacific island "homeland" because these haplotypes are not currently known elsewhere in Polynesia. We also discuss briefly the ultimate origin of all Polynesians (including Mă<span class="hlt">ori</span>) in a wider context. In general, we support the emerging consensus for Pacific origins most closely encapsulated by the "slow boat" model (Oppenheimer and Richards 2001a). Previously "competing" models for the settlement of Oceania are seen as extremes in a continuum of possibilities with the slow boat representing an "intermediate" model. We suggest that a complete account is now close, incorporating data from all relevant interdisciplinary fields to provide a "synthetic total evidence theory." PMID:16201134</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2557697','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2557697"><span id="translatedtitle">Measles epidemiology and outbreak response immunization in a rural community in Peru.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sniadack, D. H.; Moscoso, B.; Aguilar, R.; Heath, J.; Bellini, W.; Chiu, M. C.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Only limited data are available on the impact of measles outbreak response immunization (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) in developing countries. We conducted a community survey in Espindola, a rural border community in northern Peru, following a measles outbreak and subsequent <span class="hlt">ORI</span> to study the epidemiology and impact of the outbreak and to evaluate the costs and benefits of measles <span class="hlt">ORI</span>. During the outbreak, 150 of the 553 Espindola residents developed clinical cases of measles. Adults accounted for 44.0% of cases, and were frequently identified as primary cases. The attack rate among all susceptible people was 45.5% and was highest (61.2%) for the 16-20 year age group. Among adults, significant risk factors for developing measles included being aged 16-20 years (relative risk [RR] = 3.06, 95% CI = 2.08, 4.49) and being male (RR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.11, 2.71). Among serologically confirmed cases, 60.7% developed diarrhoea and 32.1% pneumonia. The overall case-fatality rate was 3.3%, but reached 19.1% in the 0-23-month age group. Failure to reach children through either routine immunization or national campaigns made this community vulnerable to the severe and extensive impact of measles virus importation. The <span class="hlt">ORI</span> campaign targeted non-measles case children aged 6 months to 15 years, regardless of their previous immunization status, and was effective in terminating this measles outbreak and in preventing morbidity, loss of livelihood and death despite the involvement of large numbers of adults in measles transmission. The last measles case occurred within 3 weeks of completing <span class="hlt">ORI</span>. The <span class="hlt">ORI</span> campaign, which would have cost approximately US$ 3000 in 1998, saved as many as 1155 person-days of work among 77 adults, prevented an estimated 87 cases of diarrhoea and 46 cases of pneumonia, and averted 5 deaths. PMID:10444877</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26243776','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26243776"><span id="translatedtitle">Origin-of-transfer sequences facilitate mobilisation of non-conjugative antimicrobial-resistance plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>O'Brien, Frances G; Yui Eto, Karina; Murphy, Riley J T; Fairhurst, Heather M; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Grubb, Warren B; Ramsay, Joshua P</p> <p>2015-09-18</p> <p>Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of hospital, community and livestock-associated infections and is increasingly resistant to multiple antimicrobials. A significant proportion of antimicrobial-resistance genes are plasmid-borne, but only a minority of S. aureus plasmids encode proteins required for conjugative transfer or Mob relaxase proteins required for mobilisation. The pWBG749 family of S. aureus conjugative plasmids can facilitate the horizontal transfer of diverse antimicrobial-resistance plasmids that lack Mob genes. Here we reveal that these mobilisable plasmids carry copies of the pWBG749 origin-of-transfer (<span class="hlt">ori</span>T) sequence and that these <span class="hlt">ori</span>T sequences facilitate mobilisation by pWBG749. Sequences resembling the pWBG749 <span class="hlt">ori</span>T were identified on half of all sequenced S. aureus plasmids, including the most prevalent large antimicrobial-resistance/virulence-gene plasmids, pIB485, pMW2 and pUSA300HOUMR. <span class="hlt">ori</span>T sequences formed five subfamilies with distinct inverted-repeat-2 (IR2) sequences. pWBG749-family plasmids encoding each IR2 were identified and pWBG749 mobilisation was found to be specific for plasmids carrying matching IR2 sequences. Specificity of mobilisation was conferred by a putative ribbon-helix-helix-protein gene smpO. Several plasmids carried 2-3 <span class="hlt">ori</span>T variants and pWBG749-mediated recombination occurred between distinct <span class="hlt">ori</span>T sites during mobilisation. These observations suggest this relaxase-in trans mechanism of mobilisation by pWBG749-family plasmids is a common mechanism of plasmid dissemination in S. aureus. PMID:26243776</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25697222','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25697222"><span id="translatedtitle">Direct single-molecule observations of local denaturation of a DNA double helix under a negative supercoil state.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Takahashi, Shunsuke; Motooka, Shinya; Usui, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Shohei; Miyata, Hidefumi; Kurita, Hirofumi; Mizuno, Takeshi; Matsuura, Shun-ichi; Mizuno, Akira; Oshige, Masahiko; Katsura, Shinji</p> <p>2015-03-17</p> <p>Effects of a negative supercoil on the local denaturation of the DNA double helix were studied at the single-molecule level. The local denaturation in λDNA and λDNA containing the SV40 origin of DNA replication (SV40<span class="hlt">ori</span>-λDNA) was directly observed by staining single-stranded DNA regions with a fusion protein comprising the ssDNA binding domain of a 70-kDa subunit of replication protein A and an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (RPA-YFP) followed by staining the double-stranded DNA regions with YOYO-1. The local denaturation of λDNA and SV40<span class="hlt">ori</span>-λDNA under a negative supercoil state was observed as single bright spots at the single-stranded regions. When negative supercoil densities were gradually increased to 0, -0.045, and -0.095 for λDNA and 0, -0.047, and -0.1 for SV40<span class="hlt">ori</span>-λDNA, single bright spots at the single-stranded regions were frequently induced under higher negative supercoil densities of -0.095 for λDNA and -0.1 for SV40<span class="hlt">ori</span>-λDNA. However, single bright spots of the single-stranded regions were rarely observed below a negative supercoil density of -0.045 and -0.047 for λDNA and SV40<span class="hlt">ori</span>-λDNA, respectively. The probability of occurrence of the local denaturation increased with negative superhelicity for both λDNA and SV40<span class="hlt">ori</span>-λDNA. PMID:25697222</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=208237','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=208237"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization and comparative sequence analysis of replication origins from three large Bacillus thuringiensis plasmids.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Baum, J A; Gilbert, M P</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The replication origins of three large Bacillus thuringiensis plasmids, derived from B. thuringiensis HD263 subsp. kurstaki, have been cloned in Escherichia coli and sequenced. The replication origins, designated <span class="hlt">ori</span> 43, <span class="hlt">ori</span> 44, and <span class="hlt">ori</span> 60, were isolated from plasmids of 43, 44, and 60 MDa, respectively. Each cloned replication origin exhibits incompatibility with the resident B. thuringiensis plasmid from which it was derived. Recombinant plasmids containing the three replication origins varied in their ability to transform strains of B. thuringiensis, Bacillus megaterium, and Bacillus subtilis. Analysis of the derived nucleotide and amino acid sequences indicates that the replication origins are nonhomologous, implying independent derivations. No significant homology was found to published sequences of replication origins derived from the single-stranded DNA plasmids of gram-positive bacteria, and shuttle vectors containing the three replication origins do not appear to generate single-stranded DNA intermediates in B. thuringiensis. The replication origin regions of the large plasmids are each characterized by a single open reading frame whose product is essential for replication in B. thuringiensis. The putative replication protein of <span class="hlt">ori</span> 60 exhibits partial homology to the RepA protein of the Bacillus stearothermophilus plasmid pTB19. The putative replication protein of <span class="hlt">ori</span> 43 exhibits weak but extensive homology to the replication proteins of several streptococcal plasmids, including the open reading frame E replication protein of the conjugative plasmid pAM beta 1. The nucleotide sequence of <span class="hlt">ori</span> 44 and the amino acid sequence of its putative replication protein appear to be nonhomologous to other published replication origin sequences. Images PMID:1885511</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4339506','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4339506"><span id="translatedtitle">Unattractive infant faces elicit negative affect from adults</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Schein, Stevie S.; Langlois, Judith H.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We examined the relationship between infant attractiveness and adult affect by investigating whether differing levels of infant facial attractiveness elicit facial muscle movement correlated with positive and negative affect from adults (N = 87) using electromyography. Unattractive infant faces evoked significantly more corrugator supercilii and <span class="hlt">levator</span> labii superioris movement (physiological correlates of negative affect) than attractive infant faces. These results suggest that unattractive infants may be at risk for negative affective responses from adults, though the relationship between those responses and caregiving behavior remains elusive. PMID:25658199</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24094142','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24094142"><span id="translatedtitle">Anorectal avulsion: an exceptional rectal trauma.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ibn Majdoub Hassani, Karim; Ait Laalim, Said; Benjelloun, El Bachir; Toughrai, Imane; Mazaz, Khalid</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Anorectal avulsion is an exceptional rectal trauma in which the anus and sphincter no longer join the perineum and are pulled upward. As a result, they ventrally follow <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscles. We present a rare case of a 29-years old patient who was admitted in a pelvic trauma context; presenting a complete complex anorectal avulsion. The treatment included a primary repair of the rectum and a diverting colostomy so as to prevent sepsis. Closure of the protective sigmoidostomy was performed seven months after the accident and the evolution was marked by an anal stenosis requiring iterative dilatations. PMID:24094142</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22350119','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22350119"><span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral Marcus Gunn jaw winking synkinesis with monocular elevation deficiency: a case report and literature review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shah, Akash D; Kumar, Anand B; Kothari, Kulin</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Marcus Gunn jaw winking synkinesis (MGJWS) occurs due to an aberrant innervation of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae superioris muscle by a branch of the motor division of the trigeminal nerve that supplies the muscles of mastication. MGJWS is mostly unilateral occurring in isolation and is less frequently associated with ocular or systemic abnormalities. Although MGJWS is mostly unilateral, few bilateral cases have been reported. Here we describe a rare case of bilateral MGJWS in an 18 year-old male patient with asymmetric bilateral ptosis and monocular elevation deficiency in the right eye. PMID:22350119</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3519132','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3519132"><span id="translatedtitle">Surgically Mismanaged Ptosis in a Patient with Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles Type I</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tawfik, Hatem A.; Rashad, Mohamed A.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Fibrosis syndromes comprise a rare form of severe limitation of ocular motility. An 11-year-old girl was referred for the correction of eyelid retraction. The eyelid retraction occurred immediately following <span class="hlt">levator</span> resection surgery performed by a plastic surgeon who missed the restrictive extraocular muscle abnormalities. On examination, both eyes were fixed in an infraducted position (20 prism diopters (Δ)), with a chin-up position and significant lagophthalmos. Bilateral 12-mm inferior rectus recession with adjustable sutures was performed, which resulted in significant reduction of lagophthalmos and elimination of the head tilt. PMID:23248547</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10457046','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10457046"><span id="translatedtitle">Functional disorders of the anus and rectum.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Whitehead, W E; Wald, A; Diamant, N E; Enck, P; Pemberton, J H; Rao, S S</p> <p>1999-09-01</p> <p>In this report the functional anorectal disorders, the etiology of which is currently unknown or related to the abnormal functioning of normally innervated and structurally intact muscles, are discussed. These disorders include functional fecal incontinence, functional anorectal pain, including <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani syndrome and proctalgia fugax, and pelvic floor dyssynergia. The epidemiology of each disorder is defined and discussed, their pathophysiology is summarized and diagnostic approaches and treatment are suggested. Some suggestions for the direction of future research on these disorders are also given. PMID:10457046</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18794003','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18794003"><span id="translatedtitle">Functional and chronic anorectal and pelvic pain disorders.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bharucha, Adil E; Trabuco, Emanuel</p> <p>2008-09-01</p> <p>Several organic and functional disorders of the urinary bladder, reproductive tract, anorectum, and the pelvic floor musculature cause pelvic pain. This article describes functional disorders in which chronic pelvic and anorectal pain cannot be explained by a structural or other specified pathology. Currently, these functional disorders are classified into urogynecologic conditions or cystitis and painful bladder syndrome, anorectal disorders, and the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani syndrome. Although nomenclature suggests that these conditions are distinct, there is considerable overlap of their symptoms and these disorders have much in common. PMID:18794003</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23798022','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23798022"><span id="translatedtitle">[Acute anal pain].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pittet, Olivier; Demartines, Nicolas; Hahnloser, Dieter</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Acute anal pain is a common proctological problem. A detailed history together with the clinical examination are crucial for the diagnosis. An acute perianal vein thrombosis can be successfully excised within the first 72 hours. Acute anal fissures are best treated conservatively using stool regulation and topical medications reducing the sphincter spasm. A chronic anal fissure needs surgery. Perianal abscesses can very often be incised and drained in local anesthesia. Proctalgia fugax and the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani syndrome are exclusion diagnoses and are treated symptomatically. PMID:23798022</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15309642','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15309642"><span id="translatedtitle">Anorectal and perineal pain: new pathophysiological hypothesis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mazza, L; Formento, E; Fonda, G</p> <p>2004-08-01</p> <p>Anorectal and perineal pain has been described in association with a variety of organic conditions but can also occur under circumstances in which organic disorders are absent and pathophysiology is uncertain. The three most common functional disorders causing anorectal and perineal pain are <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani syndrome, coccygodynia and proctalgia fugax; Alcock's canal syndrome is also responsible for pain in these areas. We review current concepts about these disorders and the approach to diagnosis and management, and offer a provocative interpretation of the role of psychological factors. PMID:15309642</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/90804','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/90804"><span id="translatedtitle">Colonic motility in proctalgia fugax.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Harvey, R F</p> <p>1979-10-01</p> <p>Intraluminal pressure recordings were obtained from the rectum and sigmoid colon in two patients experiencing attacks of proctalgia fugax. In each patient the pain appeared to result from contractions of the sigmoid colon, and not from spasm of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani, rectal wall muscle, or anal sphincters, all of which have previously been suggested as the source of such pain. Proctalgia fugax therefore appears, at least in some patients, to be an unusual variant of the irritable bowel syndrome, in which pain is referred from the sigmoid colon to the rectum. PMID:90804</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1500658','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1500658"><span id="translatedtitle">Uninhibited anal sphincter relaxation syndrome. A new syndrome with report of four cases.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shafik, A</p> <p>1992-07-01</p> <p>I report a new syndrome, in four patients, all male. Patients ranged from 36 to 43 years of age. The main complaint was fecal urgency with occasional fecal soiling. Physical examination as well as pressure and EMG studies of anal sphincters and <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle were all normal. The only positive finding was an abnormal rectoinhibitory reflex. The external anal sphincter did not contract either reflexively or voluntarily on rectal distension, leaving the relaxing internal sphincter unprotected and uncontrolled. The patients could not oppose the urge to defecate if conditions are inopportune, with resulting urgency and occasional fecal soiling. The cause is unknown, but biofeedback effected improvement in all four cases. PMID:1500658</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6786021','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6786021"><span id="translatedtitle">Bladder base impressions in women: "female prostate".</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pope, T L; Harrison, R B; Clark, R L; Cuttino, J T</p> <p>1981-06-01</p> <p>Bladder base impressions due to prostate hypertrophy are a common urographic finding in older males. A similar appearance may be occasionally seen in females and presents a more difficult diagnostic problem. Sixteen such cases of bladder base defects in females at two institutions were identified. The impressions were caused by symphysis pubis asymmetry, postoperative change, urethral diverticulum, <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani impression, or "urethral syndrome." Vaginal fibromyoma, ectopic ureterocele, and intramural bladder neoplasm can also cause this defect, although no such cases were found in this series. PMID:6786021</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4815491','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4815491"><span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral Ptosis as the First Presentation of Guillain-Barre Syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>TALEBIAN, Ahmad; SOLTANI, Babak; TALEBIAN, Motahhareh</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objective Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is the most common cause of acute weakness in children. It has multiple variant forms with different presentations. A rare initial sign is ptosis. In this study, we present a 10-year-old girl with bilateral ptosis without opthalmoplegia followed by a weakness in extremities with a favourable response to intravenous immunoglobulin. Due to the patient’s initial eyelid <span class="hlt">levators</span>, myasthenia gravis was ruled out by a Tensilon test and electrophysiological studies. Our report highlights the possibility of GBS as a cause of isolated ptosis, especially in cases without ophthalmoplegia. PMID:27057192</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/902725','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/902725"><span id="translatedtitle">[Experimental anti-androgenic activity of 4-nitro-3-trifluoromethylisobutyranilide (niftholide) in rats and guinea pigs].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Reznikov, A G; Varga, S V; Demkiv, L P; Bal'on, Ia G; Iagupol'skiĭ, L M</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>In experiments on rats and guinea pigs is shown the capability of the synthetized nesteroid antiandrogen--4-nitro-3-trifluormethylisobutyranilide (niftholide) to block the stimulating effect of exogenous and endogenous testosteon on the prostate, seminal vesicles and <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle. The results of histological and morphometric investigations bear proof to inhibition of the hypertrophic reaction of theprostatic epithelium in response to introduction of the androgen. It is inferred that antiandrogenic effect of niftholide with respect to testerone manifests itself on the level of the target-organs. PMID:902725</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810044784&hterms=cash&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dcash','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810044784&hterms=cash&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dcash"><span id="translatedtitle">The detection of X-ray variability in O stars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Snow, T. P., Jr.; Cash, W.; Grady, C. A.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Seven O stars known to have strong, and sometimes variable, stellar winds have been observed repeatedly with the Imaging Proportional Counter on the Einstein Observatory, in a program designed to determine whether the X-ray fluxes from these stars are variable. In three cases, definite changes were seen, either on a time scale of a year (Iota <span class="hlt">Ori</span> and Delta <span class="hlt">Ori</span>) or five days (15 Mon). In two of these cases, the X-ray spectrum was harder when the overall flux was higher, indicating that some of the fluctuations may take place in a hot (approximately 10 to the 7th K) emitting region at the bottom of the winds.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940029761','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940029761"><span id="translatedtitle">IUE observations of new A star candidate proto-planetary systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Grady, Carol A.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>As a result of the detection of accreting gas in the A5e PMS Herbig Ae star, HR 5999, most of the observations for this IUE program were devoted to Herbig Ae stars rather than to main sequence A stars. Mid-UV emission at optical minimum light was detected for UX <span class="hlt">Ori</span> (A1e), BF <span class="hlt">Ori</span> (A5e), and CQ Tau (F2e). The presence of accreting gas in HD 45677 and HD 50138 prompted reclassification of these stars as Herbig Be stars rather than as protoplanetary nebulae. Detailed results are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApJ...616.1058M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApJ...616.1058M"><span id="translatedtitle">The V1647 Orionis (IRAS 05436-0007) Protostar and Its Environment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McGehee, Peregrine M.; Smith, J. Allyn; Henden, Arne A.; Richmond, Michael W.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Ivezić, Željko; Brinkmann, J.</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>We present Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and United States Naval Observatory (USNO) observations of the V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span> protostar and its surrounding field near NGC 2068. V1647 <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, the likely driving source for HH 23, brightened significantly in 2003 November. Analysis of SDSS imaging acquired in 1998 November and 2002 February during the quiescent state, recent USNO photometry, and published Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and Gemini data show that the color changes associated with brightening suggest an EX Lupi type (EXor) outburst rather than a simple dust-clearing event.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990A%26A...232...70E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990A%26A...232...70E"><span id="translatedtitle">High resolution spectroscopy of the new FU Orionis object BBW 76</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Eisloeffel, J.; Hessman, F. V.; Mundt, R.</p> <p>1990-06-01</p> <p>High-resolution spectra of the new FU Orionis object BBW 76 are presented. Although the photometric outburst of this FU Orionis object could not be observed, its spectral characteristics clearly identify it as belonging to this class. BBW 76 shows Balmer line profiles typical for FU Orionis stars. Its absorption line spectrum and, in particular, the line widths are strikingly similar to that of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. Other similarities to FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> are the presence of an arclike nebula, and the FIR luminosities and color temperatures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JIPM...28..401O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JIPM...28..401O"><span id="translatedtitle">In-house Information Processing and Management System in Otsuka Chemical Ltd.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ogata, Masahiko; Uchida, Kiyoshi; Tanioka, Kyoko</p> <p></p> <p>This paper describes objectives and background of developing an in-house information processing and management system (<span class="hlt">ORIS</span>), the system outline, and future subjects to be solved. <span class="hlt">ORIS</span> aims to share in-house information resources and to provide prompt and versatile searching. It was started to be developed in Nov. 1984, and has been operated since Feb. 1985. Only three months passed since the system has been run so that it is hard to evaluate it at present. Consolidation of the database, PR of the system, control of primary materials and so on are regarded as subjects to be solved in near future.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25451459','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25451459"><span id="translatedtitle">Development of a replicative plasmid for gene expression in Mycoplasma bovis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Jiahe; Zhang, Jixiang; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Yuewei; Wu, Wenxue; Li, Jinxiang</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) is a pathogen related to a variety of disease syndromes that result in significant economic losses in the cattle industry. Here, a stable replicative plasmid system is developed for use in M. bovis, utilizing an origin of replication (<span class="hlt">ori</span>C) region. Additionally, the heterologous protein β-galactosidase and a FLAG tag-fused endogenous protein were successfully expressed by this plasmid system. These findings provide evidence that this <span class="hlt">ori</span>C-based vector is applicable for the study of M. bovis. PMID:25451459</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4297629','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4297629"><span id="translatedtitle">Congenital Epidermoid Cyst Results in Muscle Fusion Defect in the Upper Lip</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dogan, Fatih; Bucak, Ibrahim Hakan</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Epidermoid cysts are rarely detected malformations in the oral cavity. Their development sites are the sublingual, submaxillary, and submandibular spaces. In this paper, we report a three-month-old infant who was admitted to our hospital due upper lip swelling. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that she had a two-centimeter cystic lesion and fusion defects of orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle. The cyst was surgically removed and histopathological diagnosis was epidermoid cyst. In recent literature, we could not find reports related to orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle fusion defects because of epidermoid cyst. PMID:25628908</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750045664&hterms=GEMINI&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DGEMINI','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750045664&hterms=GEMINI&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DGEMINI"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultraviolet spectrophotometry from Gemini 11 of stars in Orion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Morgan, T. H.; Spear, G. G.; Kondo, Y.; Henize, K. G.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>Ultraviolet spectrophotometry in the wavelength region 2600-3600 A is reported for the bright early-type stars beta, eta, gamma, delta, iota, epsilon, sigma, zeta, and kappa <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. The results are in good agreement with other observations, and, with the possible exception of the supergiants, are in good agreement with recent line-blanketed model atmospheres. There is evidence that the supergiants possess a small ultraviolet deficiency shortward of 3000 A relative to main-sequence stars of similar spectral type. The most extreme example of this phenomenon is the star kappa <span class="hlt">Ori</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26489576','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26489576"><span id="translatedtitle">[A Case of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Successfully Treated by Conversion Surgery after Multidisciplinary Treatment].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shimizu, Yosuke; Yamashita, Shinya; Tominaga, Harumi; Kimura, Yuri; Odagiri, Kazuki; Kurokawa, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Megumi; Takahashi, Gen; Sawada, Genta; Jeongho, Moon; Inoue, Masasi; Irei, Toshimitsu; Nakahira, Sin; Hatanaka, Nobutaka</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>A 70-year-old woman who complained of abdominal pain and a prolapsed tumor from the anus was diagnosed with an intestinal obstruction resulting from anal canal cancer. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a huge tumor (11×5×12 cm) invading the vagina and <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle. Enlarged inguinal lymph nodes on both sides indicated metastasis. The clinical stage was T4b (vagina, <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle, and pudenda) N0H0M1a (LYM), stage IV (Japanese Classification of Colorectal Carcinoma: 8th edition). As curative resection was not possible, a transvers colostomy was performed to relieve the intestinal obstruction. This was followed by chemoradiotherapy (45 Gy/1.8 Gy×25; TS-1, 80 mg/body for 2 weeks and a 1-week interval, for 2 courses) and up to 10 courses of Bev+mFOLFOX6 continuously. After this regimen, there was a remarkable reduction in tumor size. Positron emission tomography-CT revealed no FDG uptake in the primary rectal site or inguinal lymph nodes, but a maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 6.3 was detected in the vagina. Six weeks after chemotherapy, the patient underwent a pelvic exenteration including resection of the vagina, bladder, and pudenda. The pathological stage was yp T4b (vagina) N0H0M0, stageⅡ. Curative resection was performed, and the patient had a Grade 2 pathological response after chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26489576</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4409469','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4409469"><span id="translatedtitle">ANMS-ESNM Position Paper and Consensus Guidelines On Biofeedback Therapy for Anorectal Disorders</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rao, Satish S.C.; Benninga, Marc A; Bharucha, Adil E; Chiarioni, Giuseppe; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Whitehead, William E</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Anorectal disorders such as dyssynergic defecation, fecal incontinence, <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani syndrome and solitary rectal ulcer syndrome are common, and affect both the adult and pediatric populations. Although they are treated with several treatment approaches, over the last two decades, biofeedback therapy using visual and verbal feedback techniques has emerged as an useful option. Because it is safe, it is commonly recommended. However, the clinical efficacy of biofeedback therapy in adults and children is not clearly known, and there is a lack of critical appraisal of the techniques used and the outcomes of biofeedback therapy for these disorders. The American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society and the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility convened a task force to examine the indications, study performance characteristics, methodologies used and the efficacy of biofeedback therapy, and to provide evidence-based recommendations. Based on the strength of evidence, biofeedback therapy is recommended for the short term and long term treatment of constipation with dyssynergic defecation (Level I, Grade A), and for the treatment of fecal incontinence (Level II, Grade B). Biofeedback therapy may be useful in the short-term treatment of <span class="hlt">Levator</span> Ani Syndrome with dyssynergic defecation (Level II, Grade B), and solitary rectal ulcer syndrome with dyssynergic defecation (Level III, Grade C), but the evidence is fair. Evidence does not support the use of biofeedback for the treatment of childhood constipation (Level 1, Grade D). PMID:25828100</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3178123','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3178123"><span id="translatedtitle">Prolene frontalis suspension in paediatric ptosis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chow, K; Deva, N; Ng, S G J</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Aim The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of frontalis suspension using 4–0 prolene sutures for paediatric ptosis with poor <span class="hlt">levator</span> function. Patients and methods A retrospective chart review was performed on children who underwent 4–0 prolene frontalis suspension from 2000 to 2008 with a minimum of 6 months' follow-up. Functional success was defined when three criteria were met: (a) satisfactory lid height (defined as margin-to-reflex distance ≥3 mm with minimal frontalis muscle tone); (b) satisfactory lid symmetry (≤2 mm asymmetry in margin-to-reflex distance); and (c) satisfactory cosmesis. Recurrence was defined by a drop in lid height of ≥3 mm from the initial post-operative level. Results A total of 23 patients (30 eyelids) were included. The mean follow-up duration was 28.7 months (range 6.3 to 100 months). The functional success rate was 74% (17/23 patients). Ptosis recurred in 22% (5/23) of patients. Only one patient (4%) developed a complication: a case of minor wound infection. Conclusions In paediatric ptosis with poor <span class="hlt">levator</span> function, prolene frontalis suspension has good efficacy and an excellent safety profile. The results of prolene frontalis suspension are comparable to those of other non-autogenous materials. PMID:21378994</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2707089','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2707089"><span id="translatedtitle">Coexistence of adrenergic and cholinergic nerves in the inferior hypogastric plexus: anatomical and immunohistochemical study with 3D reconstruction in human male fetus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Alsaid, Bayan; Bessede, Thomas; Karam, Ibrahim; Abd-Alsamad, Issam; Uhl, Jean-Francois; Benoît, Gérard; Droupy, Stéphane; Delmas, Vincent</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Classic anatomical methods have failed to determine the precise location, origin and nature of nerve fibres in the inferior hypogastric plexus (IHP). The purpose of this study was to identify the location and nature (adrenergic and/or cholinergic) of IHP nerve fibres and to provide a three-dimensional (3D) representation of pelvic nerves and their relationship to other anatomical structures. Serial transverse sections of the pelvic portion of two human male fetuses (16 and 17 weeks’ gestation) were studied histologically and immunohistochemically, digitized and reconstructed three-dimensionally. 3D reconstruction allowed a ‘computer-assisted dissection’, identifying the precise location and distribution of the pelvic nerve elements. Proximal (supra-<span class="hlt">levator</span>) and distal (infra-<span class="hlt">levator</span>) communications between the pudendal nerve and IHP were observed. By determining the nature of the nerve fibres using immunostaining, we were able to demonstrate that the hypogastric nerves and pelvic splanchnic nerves, which are classically considered purely sympathetic and parasympathetic, respectively, contain both adrenergic and cholinergic nerve fibres. The pelvic autonomic nervous system is more complex than previously thought, as adrenergic and cholinergic fibres were found to co-exist in both ‘sympathetic’ and ‘parasympathetic’ nerves. This study is the first step to a 3D cartography of neurotransmitter distribution which could help in the selection of molecules to be used in the treatment of incontinence, erectile dysfunction and ejaculatory disorders. PMID:19438760</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8166577','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8166577"><span id="translatedtitle">Pudendal canal decompression in the treatment of erectile dysfunction.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shafik, A</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>The results of the treatment of 7 patients with neurogenic erectile dysfunction (ED) by pudendal canal decompression are presented. Ages ranged from 46 to 56 years. Patients had penile, perineal, and scrotal hypoesthesia or anesthesia. EMG of the external urethral sphincter and <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle revealed diminished activity. There were increased bulbocavernosus and pudendal nerve terminal motor (PNTML) latencies. Patients tested normal for endocrine assays, Doppler examination of the penile arteries penobrachial pressure index, and cavernosometry. Nocturnal penile tumescence activity was absent. These findings pointed to neurogenic ED due to pudendal canal syndrome (PCS). Pudendal canal decompression was done through a para-anal incision. The inferior rectal nerve was followed to the pudendal nerve in the pudendal canal, which was slit open. Mean followup was 19.6 months. No complications were encountered. ED improved in 6 of the 7 patients 2-6 months postoperatively. Sensory and motor changes also improved. It is suggested that chronic straining at stool in these patients led to <span class="hlt">levator</span> subluxation and sagging, and to pulling on the pudendal nerve with a resulting entrapment in the pudendal canal, pudendal neuropathy, and PCS. ED results from involvement of the penile and perineal branches of the pudendal nerve. To conclude, PCS may cause ED, which improves with pudendal canal decompression. PMID:8166577</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8902936','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8902936"><span id="translatedtitle">Functional anorectal disorders.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Whitehead, W E</p> <p>1996-10-01</p> <p>The functional anorectal disorders-functional fecal incontinence, pelvic floor dyssynergia-type constipation, <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani syndrome, and proctalgia fugax-are common but poorly understood gastrointestinal complaints. Fecal incontinence may occur in constipated patients when a fecal impaction of the rectum reflexly inhibits the internal anal sphincter and allows leakage of soft stool, or it may occur in diarrhea. Constipation-related incontinence can be treated with habit training (use of a routine time to defecate backed up by laxatives) or biofeedback to teach relaxation of the pelvic floor, but diarrhea-related fecal incontinence usually requires antidiarrheal medications. Pelvic floor dyssynergia occurs when the pelvic floor muscles paradoxically contract instead of relaxing when the patient strains to defecate. Biofeedback to teach relaxation of these muscles is effective in two thirds of patients. <span class="hlt">Levator</span> ani syndrome involves chronic, and proctalgia fugax involves fleeting rectal pain. The cause of these painful conditions is unknown, and no treatment of proven efficacy is available. PMID:8902936</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18171720','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18171720"><span id="translatedtitle">A floxed allele of the androgen receptor gene causes hyperandrogenization in male mice.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>MacLean, Helen E; Chiu, W S Maria; Ma, Cathy; McManus, Julie F; Davey, Rachel A; Cameron, Rhoda; Notini, Amanda J; Zajac, Jeffrey D</p> <p>2008-03-14</p> <p>We previously generated a conditional floxed mouse line to study androgen action, in which exon 3 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene is flanked by loxP sites, with the neomycin resistance gene present in intron 3. Deletion of exon 3 in global AR knockout mice causes androgen insensitivity syndrome, characterized by genotypic males lacking normal masculinization. We now report that male mice carrying the floxed allele (AR(lox)) have the reverse phenotype, termed hyperandrogenization. AR(lox) mice have increased mass of androgen-dependent tissues, including kidney, (P < 0.001), seminal vesicle (P < 0.001), <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle (P = 0.001), and heart (P < 0.05). Serum testosterone is not significantly different. Testis mass is normal, histology shows normal spermatogenesis, and AR(lox) males are fertile. AR(lox) males also have normal AR mRNA levels in kidney, brain, <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani, liver, and testis. This study reaffirms the need to investigate the potential phenotypic effects of floxed alleles in the absence of cre in tissue-specific knockout studies. In addition, this androgen hypersensitivity model may be useful to further investigate the effects of subtle perturbations of androgen action in a range of androgen-responsive systems in the male. PMID:18171720</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16298856','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16298856"><span id="translatedtitle">A shell finite element model of the pelvic floor muscles.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>d'Aulignac, D; Martins, J A C; Pires, E B; Mascarenhas, T; Jorge, R M Natal</p> <p>2005-10-01</p> <p>The pelvic floor gives support to the organs in the abdominal cavity. Using the dataset made public in (Janda et al. J. Biomech. (2003) 36(6), pp. 749-757), we have reconstructed the geometry of one of the most important parts of the pelvic floor, the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani, using NURB surfaces. Once the surface is triangulated, the corresponding mesh is used in a finite element analysis with shell elements. Based on the 3D behavior of the muscle we have constructed a shell that takes into account the direction of the muscle fibers and the incompressibility of the tissue. The constitutive model for the isotropic strain energy and the passive strain energy stored in the fibers is adapted from Humphrey's model for cardiac muscles. To this the active behavior of the skeletal muscle is added. We present preliminary results of a simulation of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle under pressure and with active contraction. This research aims at helping simulate the damages to the pelvic floor that can occur after childbirth. PMID:16298856</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4841772','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4841772"><span id="translatedtitle">Evolution of the head-trunk interface in tetrapod vertebrates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sefton, Elizabeth M; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Mohaddes, Zahra; Hanken, James</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Vertebrate neck musculature spans the transition zone between head and trunk. The extent to which the cucullaris muscle is a cranial muscle allied with the gill <span class="hlt">levators</span> of anamniotes or is instead a trunk muscle is an ongoing debate. Novel computed tomography datasets reveal broad conservation of the cucullaris in gnathostomes, including coelacanth and caecilian, two sarcopterygians previously thought to lack it. In chicken, lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) adjacent to occipital somites is a recently identified embryonic source of cervical musculature. We fate-map this mesoderm in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), which retains external gills, and demonstrate its contribution to posterior gill-<span class="hlt">levator</span> muscles and the cucullaris. Accordingly, LPM adjacent to the occipital somites should be regarded as posterior cranial mesoderm. The axial position of the head-trunk border in axolotl is congruent between LPM and somitic mesoderm, unlike in chicken and possibly other amniotes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09972.001 PMID:27090084</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11103518','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11103518"><span id="translatedtitle">Arterial vascularization of the uropygial glands (Gl. uropygialis) in geese (Anser anser) and ducks (Anas platyrhynches).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aslan, K; Ozcan, S; Kurtul, I</p> <p>2000-10-01</p> <p>In the present study, arterial vascularization of the uropygial glands (Gl. uropygialis) of 10 adult geese (Anser anser) and 10 adult ducks (Anas platyrhynches) were studied. Takilon was injected into the median coccygeal arteries of six specimens from each species, and Latex (a natural rubber with ammonia) into those of four specimens. Takilon-injected specimens were corrosion casted, and arteries nourishing the gland were revealed via dissection. Vascularization of the uropygial glands of both the goose and the duck was observed to be the right (a. gl. uropygii dextra), left (a. gl. uropygi sinistra) and ventral (a. gl. uropygi ventralis) glandular uropygial arteries, arising from the median coccygeal (a. coccygea media) artery. Both the right and left glandular uropygial arteries were observed, divided into four branches as follows; muscular ramus (ramus muscularis), medial ramus (ramus medialis), ventral ramus (ramus ventralis) and lateral ramus (ramus lateralis). Of these, as the lateral, medial and ventral branches feed the gland, the muscular branch provides blood for the lateral coccygeal (m. coccygealis lateralis) and <span class="hlt">levator</span> coccygeal (m. <span class="hlt">levator</span> coccygealis) muscles, and the skin. Among the arteries mentioned above, anastomosis between the first and the second branches of the right ventral uropygial arteries in the five geese and five ducks was found. PMID:11103518</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20738636','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20738636"><span id="translatedtitle">Ontogeny of the cranial musculature in Corydoras aeneus Callichthyidae, Siluriformes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Huysentruyt, F; Brunain, M; Adriaens, D</p> <p>2009-11-01</p> <p>A complete study of the early ontogeny of the cranial muscles of Corydoras aeneus (Callichthyidae) was undertaken and results were compared with those for the loricariid Ancistrus cf. triradiatus. This comparison reveals a high degree of similarity in the ontogeny of both species' cranial muscles. Both species lack a musculus protractor hyoidei, and the musculus intermandibularis posterior is divided into two different parts that have partly obtained a novel function (serving the lower lip) in A. cf. triradiatus. A similar increase in muscular complexity in this species is found in the dorsal constrictor of the hyoid muscle plate. This constrictor gives rise to the same muscles in both C. aeneus and A. cf. triradiatus, but in A. cf. triradiatus the musculus <span class="hlt">levator</span> operculi later hypertrophies. In C. aeneus the musculus extensor tentaculi forms a single muscle diverging posteriorly, whereas in A. cf. triradiatus the musculus extensor tentaculi differentiates into two separate bundles. Also, a loricariid neoformation is present called the musculus <span class="hlt">levator</span> tentaculi. PMID:20738636</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4319537','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4319537"><span id="translatedtitle">A Prototype External Magnetic Eyelid Device for Blepharoptosis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Houston, Kevin E.; Tomasi, Matteo; Yoon, Michael; Paschalis, Eleftherios I.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Purpose To test a prototype magnet system (magnetic <span class="hlt">levator</span> prosthesis) for the ability to comfortably and non-invasively provide eye opening with maintenance of the blink in people with paralytic ptosis and determine preliminary efficacy for short-term clinical application. Methods The prototype device consisted of a magnet on a spectacle frame and a micro-magnet array mounted externally on the eyelid. Participants with unilateral CN III palsy (n=3) trialed the predicate (ptosis crutch) and magnet device. Video analysis was used to quantify changes in eyelid opening and subjective responses were documented with a rating scale. A 20-minute and then a 1-week trial were offered. Results The magnetic <span class="hlt">levator</span> prosthesis device was effective to provide eye opening while allowing, at minimum, a volitional blink without ill effects on the eyelid skin or ocular surface. Comfort scores ranged from 6 to 9 out of 10 over 3 evaluations. All patients chose an extended trial of the magnet device and reported continued 8-9/10 comfort and efficacy after the extended 1-week trial. Conclusions Comfortable and effective restoration of eye opening with maintenance of the blink is feasible using external static magnets and warrants further study. Translational Relevance This is the first careful documentation of the successful use of an externally mounted static magnet system to treat paralytic ptosis. PMID:25674358</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3934473','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3934473"><span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic resonance imaging in rectal cancer: A surgeon’s perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Saklani, Avanish P; Bae, Sung Uk; Clayton, Amy; Kim, Nam Kyu</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in rectal cancer was first investigated in 1999 and has become almost mandatory in planning rectal cancer treatment. MRI has a high accuracy in predicting circumferential resection margin involvement and is used to plan neoadjuvant therapy. The accuracy of MRI in assessing mesorectal lymph nodes remains moderate, as there are no reliable criteria to assess nodal involvement. MRI seems to be good in assessing peritoneal involvement in upper rectal cancer; this however has been assessed in only a few studies and needs further research. For low rectal cancers, mesorectum is thin at the level of <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani especially in relation to prostate; so predicting circumferential resection margin involvement is not easy. However high spatial resolution coronal imaging shows <span class="hlt">levator</span> muscles, sphincter complex and intersphincteric plane accurately. This is used to stage low rectal tumors and plan plane of surgery (standard surgery, intersphincteric resection, Extralevator abdominoperineal resection). While most centres perform MRI post chemoradiotherapy, its role in accurate staging post neoadjuvant therapy remains debatable. THe role of Diffusion weighted MRI post neoadjuvant therapy is being evaluated in research settings. PMID:24616572</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1171818','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1171818"><span id="translatedtitle">Localisation of motoneurons supplying the extra-ocular muscles of the rat using horseradish peroxidase and fluorescent double labelling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Labandeira Garcia, J L; Gomez Segade, L A; Suarez Nuñez, J M</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>This paper describes a qualitative and quantitative investigation into the location of the motoneurons innervating the extra-ocular muscles of the rat. Injections of horseradish peroxidase, bisbenzimide, propidium iodide and DAPI-primuline were made either in one or simultaneously in two muscles. Unlike those of the cat, rabbit and monkey, the motoneurons which make up the oculomotor nucleus of the rat are not arranged in spatially separate subgroups belonging each to its corresponding extra-ocular muscle, but instead allow a high degree of superposition among the motor pools which they compose. The motoneurons innervating the lateral rectus and inferior oblique muscles are all homolateral; those of the medial and inferior rectus muscles are mainly homolateral with a few contralateral exceptions; and those of the superior rectus, <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae and superior oblique muscles are mainly contralateral with a small minority of homolateral exceptions. As well as from the main motor pools with which they are associated, the medial rectus, inferior rectus, superior rectus, <span class="hlt">levator</span> palpebrae, superior oblique and lateral rectus muscles all receive innervation from motoneurons lying among the fibres of the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis. All these observations are supported by quantitative data. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6195140</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17154285','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17154285"><span id="translatedtitle">Cranial musculature in the larva of the caecilian, Ichthyophis kohtaoensis (Lissamphibia: Gymnophiona).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kleinteich, Thomas; Haas, Alexander</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Within the Gymnophiona (caecilians) oviparous species with biphasic life-cycles possess a free living semi-aquatic larval stage that feeds in aquatic habitats. The larvae pass through a metamorphosis to a purely terrestrial adult stage. It is likely that the cranial morphology of caecilian larvae has specializations for aquatic feeding. However, little is known about the cranial morphology, and the cranial musculature is especially neglected in the literature. This study provides a detailed description of the jaw and hyobranchial musculature in larval stages of a caecilian. We studied late embryonic and early larval specimens of Ichthyophis kohtaoensis. Furthermore, we compared and homologized the cranial muscles found in larval I. kohtaoensis with the muscles described for adult caecilians. Most cranial muscles of larval I. kohtaoensis are also present in the adult, except for the m. <span class="hlt">levator</span> mandibulae externus and the m. subarcualis obliquus II. Our results were compared with the data available for larval frogs and salamanders in order to hypothesize the cranial musculature in the larva of the most recent common ancestor of the Lissamphibia. Larval caecilians, frog tadpoles, and salamander larvae share many characters in their cranial musculature, which, consequently, can be assigned to the lissamphibian ground pattern. However, the m. pterygoideus and the m. <span class="hlt">levator</span> quadrati are unique to the Gymnophiona. PMID:17154285</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2596957','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2596957"><span id="translatedtitle">Subject Specific Finite Elasticity Simulations of the Pelvic Floor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Noakes, Kimberley F.; Pullan, Andrew J.; Bissett, Ian P.; Cheng, Leo K.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>An anatomically realistic computational model of the pelvic floor and anal canal regions was used in this study to examine the mechanics of normal defecatory function within the female pelvic floor. This subject-specific, MRI-based model enabled mechanical simulations to be performed and quantitatively assessed against experimental data retrieved from the same volunteer. The <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani muscle group mesh was used as the domain over which the governing equations of finite elasticity were solved using the finite element method with a Mooney-Rivlin material law. Deformation of the <span class="hlt">levator</span> ani was simulated during a ‘bear down’ maneuver in order to visualize the way this muscle group functions in an asymptomatic subject. A pressure of 4 kPa was imposed on the mesh and the computed mesh displacements were compared to those obtained from dynamic MR images with an average, experimentally consistent, downwards displacement of 27.2 mm being achieved. The RMS error for this movement was 0.7 mm equating to a percentage error of 2.6% in the supero-inferior direction and 13.7 mm or 74.5% in the antero-posterior direction. PMID:18757058</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ASPC..435..343H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ASPC..435..343H"><span id="translatedtitle">A Study of the Herbig Be Binary/FU Orionis Object Z CMa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hubrig, S.; Mikulášek, Z.; Schöller, M.; González, J.; Schütz, O.; Stelzer, B.; Zejda, M.; Šmelcer, L.; Brát, L.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Z CMa is a young visual binary star with a FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> companion. The primary star is in an outburst state since February 2008. We acquired photometric, spectroscopic, spectropolarimetric, and X-ray Chandra observations to study the mechanism causing violent outbursts in this kind of systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6446638','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6446638"><span id="translatedtitle">Filamentary structure in the Orion molecular cloud</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bally, J.; Stark, A.A.; Wilson, R.W.; Langer, W.D.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>A large-scale (C-13)O map (containing 33,000 spectra on a 1-arcmin grid) is presented for the giant molecular cloud located in the southern part of <span class="hlt">Ori</span> which contains the <span class="hlt">Ori</span> Nebula, NGC 1977, and the L1641 dark cloud complex. The overall structure of the cloud is filamentary, with individual features having a length up to 40 times their width. The northern portion of the cloud is compressed, dynamically relaxed, and supports massive star formation. In contrast, the southern part of the <span class="hlt">Ori</span> A cloud is diffuse, exhibits chaotic spatial and velocity structure, and supports only intermediate- to low-mass star formation. This morphology may be the consequence of the formation and evolution of the <span class="hlt">Ori</span> OB I association centered north of the molecular cloud. The entire cloud, in addition to the 5000-solar-mass filament containing both OMC-1 and OMC-2, exhibits a north-south velocity gradient. Implications of the observed cloud morphology for theories of molecular cloud evolution are discussed. 14 references.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870029352&hterms=Orion+Nebula&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DOrion%2BNebula','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870029352&hterms=Orion+Nebula&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DOrion%2BNebula"><span id="translatedtitle">Submillimeter polarization in the Orion Nebula</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dragovan, M.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Linear polarization measurements, obtained at 270 microns with the 0.91-m telescope of the NASA Kuyper Airborne Observatory in September 1983 and January and November 1984, are reported for three regions in <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. The large-scale magnetic field inferred from the measurements is shown to be uniform on the 0.4-pc scale of the beams.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=207644','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=207644"><span id="translatedtitle">Homologous recombination plays minor role in excision of unit-length viral genomes from head-to-tail direct tandem repeats of porcine circovirus during DNA replication in Escherichia coli</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Previously, we demonstrated that a theta-replicating bacterial plasmid containing 1.75 copies of genomic porcine circovirus (PCV) DNA in head-to-tail tandem (HTT) [a partial copy of PCV type 1 (PCV1), a complete copy of PCV type 2 (PCV2) and two origins of DNA replication (<span class="hlt">Ori</span>)] yielded three differ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=211517','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=211517"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of Three Near Infrared Spectrophotometers for Infestation Detection in Wild Blueberries Using Multivariate Calibration Models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) method for automated non-destructive detection of insect infestation internal to small fruit is desirable because of the zero-to-zero tolerance of the fresh and processed fruit markets. Three NIRS instruments: the Ocean Optics SD2000, the Perten DA7000 and the <span class="hlt">Ori</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=253782','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=253782"><span id="translatedtitle">Natural migration of rotylenchulus reniformis in a no-till cotton system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Rotylenchulus reniformis is the most economically damaging pathogen of cotton in Alabama. It is easily introduced into cotton fields via contaminated equipment and when present, is difficult and costly to control. A trial to monitor the natural migration of R. reniformis from an initial point of <span class="hlt">ori</span>...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=19474&keyword=types+AND+background+AND+knowledge&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=70313877&CFTOKEN=76749656','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=19474&keyword=types+AND+background+AND+knowledge&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=70313877&CFTOKEN=76749656"><span id="translatedtitle">MARKERS OF THE LOW-DOSE RADIATION RESPONSE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Ionizing radiation has a unique ability to induce damage simultaneously at multiple sites within a spatially restricted region of DNA. The resulting double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) present a major threat to the integrity and stability of the genome. Our understanding of the <span class="hlt">ori</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol1-sec15b-3.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol1-sec15b-3.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 15b.3 - Definitions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>...; reproductive; digestive; genitourinary; hemic and lymphatic; skin; and endocrine; or (2) any mental <span class="hlt">or...)(i</span>) A college, university, or other postsecondary institution, or a public system of higher education; or (ii) A local educational agency (as defined in 20 U.S.C. 7801), system of vocational education,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Pulse-periodic+AND+electric-discharge+AND+DF+AND+laser+AND+pulse+AND+repetition+AND+frequency+AND+up+AND+50+AND+Hz+AND+energy+AND+per+AND+pulse+AND+%7e1&pg=5&id=EJ742667','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Pulse-periodic+AND+electric-discharge+AND+DF+AND+laser+AND+pulse+AND+repetition+AND+frequency+AND+up+AND+50+AND+Hz+AND+energy+AND+per+AND+pulse+AND+%7e1&pg=5&id=EJ742667"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of High-Frequency Electroencephalographic-Electromyographic Coherence Elicited by Speech and Oral Nonspeech Tasks in Parkinson's Disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Caviness, John N.; Liss, Julie M.; Adler, Charles; Evidente, Virgilio</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: Corticomuscular electroencephalographic-electromyographic (EEG-EMG) coherence elicited by speech and nonspeech oromotor tasks in healthy participants and those with Parkinson's disease (PD) was examined. Hypotheses were the following: (a) corticomuscular coherence is demonstrable between orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> (OO) muscles' EMG and scalp EEG…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11375207','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11375207"><span id="translatedtitle">Exploitation of plasmid pMRC01 to direct transfer of mobilizable plasmids into commercial lactococcal starter strains.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hickey, R M; Twomey, D P; Ross, R P; Hill, C</p> <p>2001-06-01</p> <p>Genetic analysis of the 60.2-kb lactococcal plasmid pMRC01 revealed a 19.6-kb region which includes putative genes for conjugal transfer of the plasmid and a sequence resembling an origin of transfer (<span class="hlt">ori</span>T). This <span class="hlt">ori</span>T-like sequence was amplified and cloned on a 312-bp segment into pCI372, allowing the resultant plasmid, pRH001, to be mobilized at a frequency of 3.4 x 10(-4) transconjugants/donor cell from an MG1363 (recA mutant) host containing pMRC01. All of the resultant chloramphenicol-resistant transconjugants contained both pRH001 and genetic determinants responsible for bacteriocin production and immunity of pMRC01. This result is expected, given that transconjugants lacking the lacticin 3147 immunity determinants (on pMRC01) would be killed by bacteriocin produced by the donor cells. Indeed, incorporation of proteinase K in the mating mixture resulted in the isolation of transformants, of which 47% were bacteriocin deficient. Using such an approach, the <span class="hlt">ori</span>T-containing fragment was exploited to mobilize pRH001 alone to a number of lactococcal hosts. These results demonstrate that <span class="hlt">ori</span>T of pMRC01 has the potential to be used in the development of mobilizable food-grade vectors for the genetic enhancement of lactococcal starter strains, some of which may be difficult to transform. PMID:11375207</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=192073','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=192073"><span id="translatedtitle">ROLLING-CIRCLE REPLICATION OF AN ANIMAL CIRCOVIRUS GENOME IN A THETA-REPLICATING BACTERIAL PLASMID IN ESCHERICHIA COLI</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A bacterial plasmid containing 1.75 copies of double-stranded porcine circovirus (PCV) DNA in tandem [O.8 copy of PCV type 1 (PCV1), 0.95 copy of PCV type 2 (PCV2)] with two origins of DNA replication (<span class="hlt">Ori</span>) yielded three different DNA species when transformed into Escherichia coli: the input constru...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-13/pdf/2010-8386.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-13/pdf/2010-8386.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 18836 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-13</p> <p>...Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) and the Assistant Secretary for Health have taken final action in the following case: Emily M. Horvath, Indiana University: Based on the Respondent's own admissions in sworn testimony and as set forth below, Indiana University (IU) and the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) found that Ms. Emily M. Horvath, former graduate......</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-09-06/pdf/2012-21992.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-09-06/pdf/2012-21992.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 54917 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-09-06</p> <p>... an investigation conducted by Harvard University (Harvard) and additional analysis conducted by <span class="hlt">ORI</span>... experiments designed to determine whether tamarin monkeys habituated to a sound pattern consisting of three sequential syllables (for example AAB) would then distinguish a different sound pattern (i.e., ABB). Figure...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-04-27/pdf/2011-10150.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-04-27/pdf/2011-10150.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 23599 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-27</p> <p>... intentionally tampered with research materials related to five (5) immunoprecipitation/Western blot experiments... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>)...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-12-28/pdf/2012-31287.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-12-28/pdf/2012-31287.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 76491 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-12-28</p> <p>... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) has..., engaged in research misconduct in research supported by National Institute of General Medical...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-02-02/pdf/2012-2276.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-02-02/pdf/2012-2276.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 5254 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-02-02</p> <p>... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) has... obtained from Creighton University (CU) and additional evidence gathered by the Office of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=236864','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=236864"><span id="translatedtitle">The rolling-circle melting-pot model for porcine circovirus DNA replication</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A stem-loop structure, formed by a pair of inverted repeats during DNA replication, is a conserved feature at the origin of DNA replication (<span class="hlt">Ori</span>) among plant and animal viruses, bacteriophages and plasmids that replicate their genomes via the rolling-circle replication (RCR) mechanism. Porcine circo...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol1-sec93-311.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol1-sec93-311.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.311 - Investigation time limits.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Investigation time limits. 93.311 Section 93.311... time limits. (a) Time limit for completing an investigation. An institution must complete all aspects... sending the final report to <span class="hlt">ORI</span> under 93.315. (b) Extension of time limit. If unable to complete...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol1-sec93-311.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol1-sec93-311.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.311 - Investigation time limits.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Investigation time limits. 93.311 Section 93.311... time limits. (a) Time limit for completing an investigation. An institution must complete all aspects... sending the final report to <span class="hlt">ORI</span> under 93.315. (b) Extension of time limit. If unable to complete...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6138560','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6138560"><span id="translatedtitle">Radio continuum from FU Orionis stars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rodriguez, L.F.; Hartmann, L.W.; Chavira, E. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Puebla )</p> <p>1990-12-01</p> <p>Using the very large array a sensitive search is conducted for 3.6-cm continuum emission toward four FU Orionis objects: FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, and Elias 1-12. V1057 Cyg and Elias 1-12 at the level of about 0.1 mJy is detected. The association of radio continuum emission with these FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> objects strengthens a possible relation between FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> stars and objects like L 1551 IRS 5 and Z CMa that are also sources of radio continuum emission and have been proposed as post-FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> objects. Whether the radio continuum emission is caused by free-free emission from ionized ejecta or if it is optically thin emission from a dusty disk is discussed. It was determined that, in the archives of the Tonantzintla Observatory, a plate taken in 1957 does not show Elias 1-12. This result significantly narrows the time range for the epoch of the outburst of this source to between 1957 and 1965. 38 refs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhRvE..81c2902A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhRvE..81c2902A"><span id="translatedtitle">Role of topology in electrical properties of bacterio-rhodopsin and rat olfactory receptor I7</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alfinito, E.; Reggiani, L.</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>We report on electrical properties of the two sensing proteins: bacteriorhodopsin and rat olfactory receptor <span class="hlt">OR-I</span>7. As relevant transport parameters we consider the small-signal impedance spectrum and the static current-voltage characteristics. Calculations are compared with available experimental results and the model predictability is tested for future perspectives.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title48-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title48-vol1-sec27-304-1.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title48-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title48-vol1-sec27-304-1.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">48 CFR 27.304-1 - General.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... future research and discovery. (3) Promoting public availability of inventions made in the United States... contractor, the agency shall follow the applicable procedures at 37 CFR 401. (2) A small business concern <span class="hlt">or...)(i</span>) through (e)(1)(iv) in accordance with agency procedures and 37 CFR part 401. (c) Greater...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PMB....54.6837S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PMB....54.6837S"><span id="translatedtitle">Quantification of the optical surface reflection and surface roughness of articular cartilage using optical coherence tomography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Saarakkala, Simo; Wang, Shu-Zhe; Huang, Yan-Ping; Zheng, Yong-Ping</p> <p>2009-11-01</p> <p>Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising new technique for characterizing the structural changes of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA). The calculation of quantitative parameters from the OCT signal is an important step to develop OCT as an effective diagnostic technique. In this study, two novel parameters for the quantification of optical surface reflection and surface roughness from OCT measurements are introduced: optical surface reflection coefficient (ORC), describing the amount of a ratio of the optical reflection from cartilage surface with respect to that from a reference material, and OCT roughness index (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) indicating the smoothness of the cartilage surface. The sensitivity of ORC and <span class="hlt">ORI</span> to detect changes in bovine articular cartilage samples after enzymatic degradations of collagen and proteoglycans using collagenase and trypsin enzymes, respectively, was tested in vitro. A significant decrease (p < 0.001) in ORC as well as a significant increase (p < 0.001) in <span class="hlt">ORI</span> was observed after collagenase digestion. After trypsin digestion, no significant changes in ORC or <span class="hlt">ORI</span> were observed. To conclude, the new parameters introduced were demonstrated to be feasible and sensitive to detect typical OA-like degenerative changes in the collagen network. From the clinical point of view, the quantification of OCT measurements is of great interest since OCT probes have been already miniaturized and applied in patient studies during arthroscopy or open knee surgery in vivo. Further studies are still necessary to demonstrate the clinical capability of the introduced parameters for naturally occurring early OA changes in the cartilage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol1-sec93-516.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol1-sec93-516.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.516 - Standard and burden of proof.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard and burden of proof. 93.516 Section 93.516... Actions Hearing Process § 93.516 Standard and burden of proof. (a) Standard of proof. The standard of proof is the preponderance of the evidence. (b) Burden of proof. (1) <span class="hlt">ORI</span> bears the burden of proving...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/88928','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/88928"><span id="translatedtitle">Xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells are resistant to immortalization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Volpe, J.P.G.; Cleaver, J.E.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>We have attempted to immortalize fibroblasts from several Xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) patients to better characterize this disease. These patients exhibit sun sensitivity and highly elevated skin cancer rates. It is believed that the defect in these cells involves post replication repair of DNA damage, but the molecular mechanisms and their involvement in patient`s phenotypes remain unknown. Human cells undergo senescence and stop growing after a period of growth in culture, making prolonged studies difficult or impossible. For this reason, immortal cell lines are essential. We have attempted to immortalize XPV cells by: spontaneous transformation, transfection with pSV40 <span class="hlt">ori</span> (a plasmid containing the SV40 large T-antigen), transfection with pSV40 <span class="hlt">ori</span> and exposure to 300 rads of x-rays, transfection with pSV40 <span class="hlt">ori</span>, exposure to 200 rads of x-rays, and treatment with 0.5mM ethyl methanesulfonate, and infection with SV40 virus (strain 776). Despite the fact that some experiments had as many as 2x10{sup 8} cells, we were unable to immortalize any of the cells from our patients. We also obtained several XPV lines from other laboratories which had been transformed with pSV40 <span class="hlt">ori</span>, but none of them proved to be immortalized either. We suspect that the presumed mutation in XPV cells is in some way interfering with SV40 large T-antigen induced immortalization.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApJ...601L..83W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApJ...601L..83W"><span id="translatedtitle">FU Orionis: A Binary Star?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Hongchi; Apai, Dániel; Henning, Thomas; Pascucci, Ilaria</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>By using the Adaptive Optics with a Laser for Astronomy system at the 3.6 m telescope of the Calar Alto Observatory, we detected a faint red star in the apparent vicinity of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, the prototype of the FUor outburst stars. Independent confirmation of the detection is obtained from archival Probing the Universe with Enhanced Optics/Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope images. The separation between the companion candidate and FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> is 0.50", and their brightness contrast is around 4 mag. We discuss the possible nature of the newly detected star based on near-infrared photometry and its proper motion relative to FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. The photometric data are consistent with a nearby late-type main-sequence star, a background giant star, and a pre-main-sequence star. On the basis of the proper motion and the stellar surface density in the direction toward FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, we argue that the probabilities of the first two options are very low.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22078327','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22078327"><span id="translatedtitle">HIGH-RESOLUTION INFRARED IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE Z CANIS MAJORIS SYSTEM DURING QUIESCENCE AND OUTBURST</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hinkley, Sasha; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Crepp, Justin R.; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Zimmerman, Neil; Brenner, Douglas; Rice, Emily L.; Pueyo, Laurent; Vasisht, Gautam; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Roberts, Lewis C. Jr.; Burruss, Rick; Wallace, J. Kent; Cady, Eric; Zhai, Chengxing; Kraus, Adam L.; Ireland, Michael J.; Beichman, Charles; Dekany, Richard; Parry, Ian R.; and others</p> <p>2013-01-20</p> <p>We present adaptive optics photometry and spectra in the JHKL bands along with high spectral resolution K-band spectroscopy for each component of the Z Canis Majoris system. Our high angular resolution photometry of this very young ({approx}<1 Myr) binary, comprised of an FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> object and a Herbig Ae/Be star, was gathered shortly after the 2008 outburst while our high-resolution spectroscopy was gathered during a quiescent phase. Our photometry conclusively determines that the outburst was due solely to the embedded Herbig Ae/Be member, supporting results from earlier works, and that the optically visible FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> component decreased slightly ({approx}30%) in luminosity during the same period, consistent with previous works on the variability of FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> type systems. Further, our high-resolution K-band spectra definitively demonstrate that the 2.294 {mu}m CO absorption feature seen in composite spectra of the system is due solely to the FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> component, while a prominent CO emission feature at the same wavelength, long suspected to be associated with the innermost regions of a circumstellar accretion disk, can be assigned to the Herbig Ae/Be member. These findings clarify previous analyses of the origin of the CO emission in this complex system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-28/pdf/2012-21236.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-28/pdf/2012-21236.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 52034 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-08-28</p> <p>... of blood stem cell niches.'' Nature 463:495-500, 2010. Mayack, S.R., & Wagers, A.J. ``Osteolineage niche cells initiate hemotopoietic stem cell mobilization.'' Blood 112:519-531, 2008. As a result of... review, <span class="hlt">ORI</span> found that Dr. Shane Mayack, former postdoctoral fellow, Department of Developmental and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=523700','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=523700"><span id="translatedtitle">In vivo excision and amplification of large segments of the Escherichia coli genome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pósfai, G; Koob, M; Hradecná, Z; Hasan, N; Filutowicz, M; Szybalski, W</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>In vivo excision and amplification of large segments of a genome offer an alternative to heterologous DNA cloning. By obtaining predetermined fragments of the chromosome directly from the original organism, the problems of clone stability and clone identification are alleviated. This approach involves the insertion of two recognition sequences for a site-specific recombinase into the genome at predetermined sites, 50-100 kb apart. The integration of these sequences, together with a conditional replication origin (<span class="hlt">ori</span>), is targeted by homologous recombination. The strain carrying the insertions is stably maintained until, upon induction of specifically engineered genes, the host cell expresses the site-specific recombinase and an <span class="hlt">ori</span>-specific replication protein. The recombinase then excises and circularizes the genomic segment flanked by the two insertions. This excised DNA, which contains <span class="hlt">ori</span>, is amplified with the aid of the replication protein and can be isolated as a large plasmid. The feasibility of such an approach is demonstrated here for E. coli. Using the yeast FLP/FRT site-specific recombination system and the pi/gamma-<span class="hlt">ori</span> replication initiation of plasmid R6K, we have devised a procedure that should allow the isolation of virtually any segment of the E. coli genome. This was shown by excising, amplifying and isolating the 51-kb lacZ--phoB and the 110-kb dapX--dsdC region of the E. coli MG1655 genome. Images PMID:8036169</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950036871&hterms=Pollock&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAuthor-Name%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3DPollock','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950036871&hterms=Pollock&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAuthor-Name%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3DPollock"><span id="translatedtitle">ASCA solid state imaging spectrometer observations of O stars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W. L.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Chen, W.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Torii, K.; Kitamoto, S.; Miura, N.; Egoshi, M.; Ohno, Y.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>We report ASCA Solid State Imaging Spectrometer (SIS) X-ray observations of the O stars delta <span class="hlt">Ori</span> and lambda <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. The energy resolution of the SIS allows us to resolve features in the O star X-ray spectra which are not apparent in spectra obtained by X-ray spectrometers with lower energy resolution. SIS spectra from both stars show evidence of line emission, suggesting the thermal nature of the X-ray source. However, the observed line strengths are different for the two stars. The observed stellar X-ray spectra are not well described by isothermal models although absorbed thermal emission models with two or more temperatures can provide an adequate fit to the data. For both stars we present evidence of absorbing columns significantly larger than the known Interstellar Medium (ISM) columns, indicative of absorption by a circumstellar medium, presumably the stellar winds. In addition, the lambda <span class="hlt">Ori</span> spectrum shows the presence of emission at energies greater than 3 keV which is not seen in the delta <span class="hlt">Ori</span> spectrum.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6759804','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6759804"><span id="translatedtitle">Properties of SV40 large T antigen involved in the replication of SV40 DNA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mohr, I.J.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>The role of phosphorylation in regulating the biochemical properties of SV40 large T antigen (Tag) was analyzed. Treatment of purified Tag with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIAP) removed 80% of the {sup 32}P label. CIAP treated Tag displayed an increased ability to support SV40 DNA replication in vitro. This paralleled an activation of specific DNA binding to site II, an essential element within the SV40 origin of replication (<span class="hlt">ori</span>). The ATPase activity of dephosphorylated Tag remained unchanged. To evaluate the properties of Tag devoid of mammalian post translational modifications, a bacterial expression system was used. Purified E. coli Tag did not bind to site II, and therefore could not unwind <span class="hlt">ori</span> containing plasmids or efficiently replicate SV40 DNA in vitro. However, E. coli Tag functioned as a helicase, and bound to DNA fragments containing either site I or the wild type (wt) <span class="hlt">ori</span> in a manner identical to mammalian Tag. A single DNA binding domain is responsible for specific DNA binding to either of two different sites embedded in the SV40 <span class="hlt">ori</span>, and the intrinsic preference of full length Tag for either site I, or site II appears to be modulated by phosphorylation. Several Tag point mutants were examined in a series of assays which reflect partial biochemical reactions required for the in vitro replication of SV40 DNA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Performances+AND+Mergers&pg=3&id=ED431969','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Performances+AND+Mergers&pg=3&id=ED431969"><span id="translatedtitle">Change Processes in Organizations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>1999</p> <p></p> <p>The first of the four papers in this symposium, "The Role of the Survey in the Assessment of an Organization for High Performance Redesign: A Case Study" (Teresa K. Moyers, <span class="hlt">Oris</span> T. Griffin), looks at how one company used a survey to analyze the way the social system currently is designed and operates. "Thriving on Change: An Organizational…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3411110','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3411110"><span id="translatedtitle">AdpA, key regulator for morphological differentiation regulates bacterial chromosome replication</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wolański, Marcin; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>AdpA, one of the most pleiotropic transcription regulators in bacteria, controls expression of several dozen genes during Streptomyces differentiation. Here, we report a novel function for the AdpA protein: inhibitor of chromosome replication at the initiation stage. AdpA specifically recognizes the 5′ region of the Streptomyces coelicolor replication origin (<span class="hlt">ori</span>C). Our in vitro results show that binding of AdpA protein decreased access of initiator protein (DnaA) to the <span class="hlt">ori</span>C region. We also found that mutation of AdpA-binding sequences increased the accessibility of <span class="hlt">ori</span>C to DnaA, which led to more frequent replication and acceleration of Streptomyces differentiation (at the stage of aerial hyphae formation). Moreover, we also provide evidence that AdpA and DnaA proteins compete for <span class="hlt">ori</span>C binding in an ATP-dependent manner, with low ATP levels causing preferential binding of AdpA, and high ATP levels causing dissociation of AdpA and association of DnaA. This would be consistent with a role for ATP levels in determining when aerial hyphae emerge. PMID:22870392</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ945951.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ945951.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Training the Research Integrity Officers (RIO): The Federally Funded "RIO Boot Camps" Backward Design to Train for the Future</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wright, David E.; Schneider, Paige P.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Research institutions receiving U. S. Public Health Service (PHS) funding must assure the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>/OPHS/DHHS) that policies and procedures are in place conforming to 42 CFR 93 to investigate allegations of Misconduct in Research, defined as fabrication or falsification of research data, or plagiarism. An institutional…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17140410','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17140410"><span id="translatedtitle">Changes of initiation mass and cell dimensions by the 'eclipse'.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zaritsky, Arieh; Vischer, Norbert; Rabinovitch, Avinoam</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The minimum time (E) required for a new pair of replication origins (<span class="hlt">ori</span>Cs) produced upon initiating a round of replication to be ready to initiate the next round after one cell mass doubling, the 'eclipse', is explained in terms of a minimal distance (l(min)) that the replication forks must move away from <span class="hlt">ori</span>C before <span class="hlt">ori</span>Cs can 'fire' again. In conditions demanding a scheduled initiation event before the relative distance l(min)/L(0.5) (L being the total chromosome length) is reached, initiation is presumably delayed. Under such circumstances, cell mass at the next initiation would be greater than the usual, constant Mi (cell mass per copy number of <span class="hlt">ori</span>C) prevailing in steady state of exponential growth. This model can be tested experimentally by extending the replication time C using thymine limitation at short doubling times tau in rich media to reach a relative eclipse E/C < l(min)/L(0.5). It is consistent with results obtained in experiments in which the number of replication 'positions'n (= C/tau) is increased beyond the natural maximum, causing the mean cell size to rise continuously, first by widening, then by lengthening, and finally by splitting its poles. The consequent branching is associated with casting off a small proportion of normal-sized cells and lysing DNA-less cells. Whether or how these phenomena are related to peptidoglycan composition and synthesis are moot questions. PMID:17140410</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=231388','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=231388"><span id="translatedtitle">Recovery Plan for Phytophthora kernoviae Causing Bleeding Trunk Cankers, Leaf Blight and Stem Dieback in Trees and Shrubs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Phytophthora kernoviae, a recently described species of Phytophthora, is an invasive pathogen of forest trees and shrubs such as beech (Fagus sylvatica) and rhododendron (Rhododendron ponticum) that has become established in woodlands and public gardens in Cornwall, United Kingdom. Although the <span class="hlt">ori</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060030581&hterms=blum&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dblum','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060030581&hterms=blum&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dblum"><span id="translatedtitle">CNO abundances in the quintuplet cluster M supergiant 5-7</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ramirez, S. V.; Sellgren, K.; Blum, R.; Terndrup, D. M.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>We present and analyze infrared spectra of the supergiant VR 5-7, in the Quintuplet cluster 30 pc from the Galactic center. Within the uncertainties, the [C/H],[N/H], and [O/H] abundances in this star are equal of <span class="hlt">Ori</span>, a star which exhibits mixing of CNO processed elements, but distinct from the abundance patterns in IRS 7.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-13/pdf/2010-8387.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-13/pdf/2010-8387.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 18837 - Findings of Research Misconduct</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-13</p> <p>... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>)...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=silver+AND+information&pg=3&id=ED277394','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=silver+AND+information&pg=3&id=ED277394"><span id="translatedtitle">Distributing the ERIC Database on SilverPlatter Compact Disc--A Brief Case History.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brandhorst, Ted</p> <p></p> <p>This description of the development of the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) compact disc by two companies, SilverPlatter and <span class="hlt">ORI</span>, Inc., provides background information on ERIC and the ERIC database, discusses reasons for choosing to put the ERIC database on compact discs, and describes the formulation of an ERIC CD-ROM team as part of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=silver+AND+information&pg=7&id=ED272170','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=silver+AND+information&pg=7&id=ED272170"><span id="translatedtitle">ERIC on Compact Disc (CD-ROM). A Case Study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brandhorst, Ted</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">ORI</span>, Inc., and SilverPlatter, Inc., have joined together in a joint venture to offer the ERIC database to the public on compact laser disc (CD-ROM). Data from both "Resources in Education" (RIE) and "Current Index to Journals in Education" (CIJE) will be offered on a single disc from January 1983 to the present (with the disc being updated every…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol1-sec93-501.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol1-sec93-501.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.501 - Opportunity to contest findings of research misconduct and administrative actions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Opportunity to contest findings of research... RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest <span class="hlt">ORI</span> Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions General Information § 93.501 Opportunity...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol1-sec93-500.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol1-sec93-500.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.500 - General policy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... under 42 U.S.C. 289b in connection with PHS supported biomedical and behavioral research, research... accordance with 45 CFR 76.845(c). (d) Where a proposed debarment or suspension action is based upon an <span class="hlt">ORI</span>... contest, and fact-finding required under the HHS debarment and suspension regulations at 45 CFR part...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol1-sec93-500.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol1-sec93-500.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.500 - General policy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... under 42 U.S.C. 289b in connection with PHS supported biomedical and behavioral research, research... accordance with 45 CFR 76.845(c). (d) Where a proposed debarment or suspension action is based upon an <span class="hlt">ORI</span>... contest, and fact-finding required under the HHS debarment and suspension regulations at 45 CFR part...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol1-sec93-500.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol1-sec93-500.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.500 - General policy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... under 42 U.S.C. 289b in connection with PHS supported biomedical and behavioral research, research... accordance with 45 CFR 76.845(c). (d) Where a proposed debarment or suspension action is based upon an <span class="hlt">ORI</span>... contest, and fact-finding required under the HHS debarment and suspension regulations at 45 CFR part...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol1-sec93-500.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol1-sec93-500.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.500 - General policy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... under 42 U.S.C. 289b in connection with PHS supported biomedical and behavioral research, research... accordance with 45 CFR 76.845(c). (d) Where a proposed debarment or suspension action is based upon an <span class="hlt">ORI</span>... contest, and fact-finding required under the HHS debarment and suspension regulations at 45 CFR part...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol1-sec93-500.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol1-sec93-500.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.500 - General policy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... under 42 U.S.C. 289b in connection with PHS supported biomedical and behavioral research, research... accordance with 45 CFR 76.845(c). (d) Where a proposed debarment or suspension action is based upon an <span class="hlt">ORI</span>... contest, and fact-finding required under the HHS debarment and suspension regulations at 45 CFR part...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Simultaneous+AND+electrodes.&id=EJ742667','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Simultaneous+AND+electrodes.&id=EJ742667"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of High-Frequency Electroencephalographic-Electromyographic Coherence Elicited by Speech and Oral Nonspeech Tasks in Parkinson's Disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Caviness, John N.; Liss, Julie M.; Adler, Charles; Evidente, Virgilio</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: Corticomuscular electroencephalographic-electromyographic (EEG-EMG) coherence elicited by speech and nonspeech oromotor tasks in healthy participants and those with Parkinson's disease (PD) was examined. Hypotheses were the following: (a) corticomuscular coherence is demonstrable between orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> (OO) muscles' EMG and scalp EEG</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol1-sec93-502.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol1-sec93-502.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.502 - Appointment of the Administrative Law Judge and scientific expert.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest <span class="hlt">ORI</span> Findings of Research... expertise to assist the ALJ in evaluating scientific or technical issues related to the findings of research... expert's background and qualifications. Any comment on or response to a report by a party, which...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950017965','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950017965"><span id="translatedtitle">ASCA solid state imaging spectrometer observations of O stars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W. L.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Chen, W.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Torrii, K.; Kitamoto, S.; Muira, N.; Egoshi, M.; Ohno, Y.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>We report ASCA Solid State Imaging Spectrometer (SIS) x-ray observations of the O stars delta <span class="hlt">Ori</span> and lambda <span class="hlt">Ori</span>. The energy resolution of the SIS allows us to resolve features in the O star x-ray spectra which are not apparent in spectra obtained by x-ray spectrometers with lower energy resolution. SIS spectra from both stars show evidence of line emission, suggesting the thermal nature of the x-ray source. However, the observed line strengths are different for the two stars. The observed stellar x-ray spectra are not well described by isothermal models although absorbed thermal emission models with two or more temperatures can provide an adequate fit to the data. For both stars we present evidence of absorbing columns significantly larger than the known ISM columns, indicative of absorption by a circumstellar medium, presumably the stellar winds. In addition, the lambda <span class="hlt">Ori</span> spectrum shows the presence of emission at energies greater than 3 keV which is not seen in the delta <span class="hlt">Ori</span> spectrum.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-12-06/pdf/2011-30919.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-12-06/pdf/2011-30919.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 76252 - Proposed Revision of Annual Information Return/Reports</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-12-06</p> <p>... operation of the plans. Filing the Form 5500 Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan (Form 5500 Annual..., identified by RIN 1210-AB51, by one of the following methods: Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov . Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Email: e-<span class="hlt">ORI</span>@dol.gov . Mail or...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-11-18/pdf/2010-28890.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-11-18/pdf/2010-28890.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 70625 - Annual Funding Notice for Defined Benefit Plans</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-11-18</p> <p>... in one or more direct filing entities (DFEs), i.e., MTIAs, CCTs, PSAs, or 103-12IEs, the plan... by RIN 1210-AB18, by one of the following methods: Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov . Follow the instructions for submitting comments. E-mail: e-<span class="hlt">ORI</span>@dol.gov . Include RIN...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24344309','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24344309"><span id="translatedtitle">Nucleolin is important for Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1-mediated episome binding, maintenance, and transcription.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Ya-Lin; Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Zhao, Bo; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Shen, Chih-Long; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-wen</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for EBV episome maintenance, replication, and transcription. These effects are mediated by EBNA1 binding to cognate <span class="hlt">ori</span>P DNA, which comprise 20 imperfect copies of a 30-bp dyad symmetry enhancer and an origin for DNA replication. To identify cell proteins essential for these EBNA1 functions, EBNA1 associated cell proteins were immune precipitated and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Nucleolin (NCL) was identified to be EBNA1 associated. EBNA1's N-terminal 100 aa and NCL's RNA-binding domains were critical for EBNA1/NCL interaction. Lentivirus shRNA-mediated NCL depletion substantially reduced EBNA1 recruitment to <span class="hlt">ori</span>P DNA, EBNA1-dependent transcription of an EBV <span class="hlt">ori</span>P luciferase reporter, and EBV genome maintenance in lymphoblastoid cell lines. NCL RNA-binding domain K429 was critical for ATP and EBNA1 binding. NCL overexpression increased EBNA1 binding to <span class="hlt">ori</span>P and transcription, whereas NCL K429A was deficient. Moreover, NCL silencing impaired lymphoblastoid cell line growth. These experiments reveal a surprisingly critical role for NCL K429 in EBNA1 episome maintenance and transcription, which may be a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24344309</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060035776&hterms=young+model&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dyoung%2Bmodel','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060035776&hterms=young+model&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dyoung%2Bmodel"><span id="translatedtitle">8-13 Micron Spectroscopy of Young Stars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hanner, M. S.; Brooke, T. Y.; Tokunaga, A. T.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>We presen 8-13 meu spectra of 23 young stars acquired with the UKIRT CGS3 spectromere, including T Tauri, Herbig Ae/Be, and FU <span class="hlt">Ori</span> stars. Silicate emission and absorption features can generally be matched with the Trapezium emissivity, by employing simple models to account for optical depth effects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750032221&hterms=beer+composition&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dbeer%2Bcomposition','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750032221&hterms=beer+composition&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dbeer%2Bcomposition"><span id="translatedtitle">The silicon monoxide radical and the atmosphere of alpha Orionis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Beer, R.; Lambert, D. L.; Sneden, C.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>We present new molecular constants, line positions, and transition probabilities for the first-overtone vibration-rotation bands in the X 1 Sigma+ electronic ground state of SiO, together with an estimate of the SiO abundance and silicon isotope ratios in the atmosphere of alpha <span class="hlt">Ori</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6967825','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6967825"><span id="translatedtitle">Induction of anti-EBNA-1 protein by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment of human lymphoblastoid cells</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wen, Longthung; Tanaka, Akiko; Nonoyama, Meihan )</p> <p>1989-08-01</p> <p>Binding of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen (EBNA-1) to BamHI-C DNA was studied by affinity column chromatography followed by immunoblotting with human serum specific for EBNA-1. Two species of EBNA-1 (68 and 70 kilodaltons) were identified in nuclear extracts of the EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cell line Raji and not in nuclear extracts of the EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphoma cell line BJAB. Both EBNA-1s bound specifically to the region required for EBV plasmid DNA maintenance (<span class="hlt">ori</span>P) located in the BamHI-C fragment. Upon treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, which activates latent EBV genome in Raji cells, the 68-kilodalton EBNA-1 was uncoupled from binding to EBV <span class="hlt">ori</span>P. Nuclear extracts from 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-treated BJAB cells also uncoupled the binding of both EBNA-1s to <span class="hlt">ori</span>P. DNA-cellulose column chromatography identified two protein species which competed for and uncoupled the binding of EBNA-1 to <span class="hlt">ori</span>P. The two cellular competitors the authors called anti-EBNA-1 proteins had molecular masses of 60 and 40 kilodaltons, respectively. They were not found in nuclear extracts of BJAB cells not activated by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=labia&id=EJ355589','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=labia&id=EJ355589"><span id="translatedtitle">Speech-Muscle Visuomotor Tracking in Dysarthric and Nonimpaired Speakers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McClean, Michael D.; And Others</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Surface electrodes were used to describe the perioral reflexes in seven stutterers and five nonstutterers and electromyographic (EMG) recordings were obtained at electrode sites associated with the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> inferior muscle and the depressor labia inferior muscle. A difference was noted in the pattern of reflex response between the two…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=labia&id=EJ355590','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=labia&id=EJ355590"><span id="translatedtitle">Surface EMG Recording of the Perioral Reflexes: Preliminary Observations on Stutterers and Nonstutterers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McClean, Michael D.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Surface electrodes were used to describe the perioral reflexes in seven stutterers and five nonstutterers and electromyographic (EMG) recordings were obtained at electrode sites associated with the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> inferior muscle and the depressor labia inferior muscle. A difference was noted in the pattern of reflex response between the two…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol1-sec93-520.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol1-sec93-520.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.520 - The record.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest <span class="hlt">ORI</span> Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions Hearing... at any time. (d) The DAB may return original research records and other similar items to the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol1-sec93-508.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol1-sec93-508.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.508 - Filing, forms, and service.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest <span class="hlt">ORI</span> Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative... telephone number of the party on whose behalf the document or paper was filed, or the attorney of record for... the ALJ. (d) Proof of service. Each party filing a document or paper with the ALJ must also...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol1-sec93-508.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol1-sec93-508.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.508 - Filing, forms, and service.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest <span class="hlt">ORI</span> Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative... telephone number of the party on whose behalf the document or paper was filed, or the attorney of record for... the ALJ. (d) Proof of service. Each party filing a document or paper with the ALJ must also...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol1-sec93-508.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol1-sec93-508.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.508 - Filing, forms, and service.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest <span class="hlt">ORI</span> Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative... telephone number of the party on whose behalf the document or paper was filed, or the attorney of record for... the ALJ. (d) Proof of service. Each party filing a document or paper with the ALJ must also...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24561375','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24561375"><span id="translatedtitle">Treatment of microstomia caused by burn with a nasolabial flap--an ingenious approach for tugging and fixation of the oral commissure.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Makiguchi, Takaya; Yokoo, Satoshi; Koitabashi, Atsushi; Ogawa, Masaru; Miyazaki, Hidetaka; Terashi, Hiroto</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>The objectives of surgical treatment for microstomia due to cicatricial contracture after burn are to obtain sufficient oral aperture, while maintaining sphincter function of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle, and to secure favorable function for eating and conversation in addition to good oral health.The lips of the mouth have a free border, and the oral aperture, which has been enlarged by the operation, tends to be reduced, because of the actions of the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle. When the orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle is resected, putting a priority on sufficient oral aperture and prevention of redevelopment of contracture, the function of the sphincter is often damaged. With the exception of those cases with deep extensive burn that damages a wide area of orbicularis <span class="hlt">oris</span> muscle, the muscle should be preserved as expeditiously as is practical. In such cases, however, preventive measures for the redevelopment of microstomia should be established. As a postoperative adjuvant therapy, the usefulness of splint therapy has been suggested in many reports. However, a splint should be used for a long period after the surgery, and in some cases, pain is observed with therapy. When a splint is not used for an appropriate period, microstomia may redevelop. It would be ideal to take preventive measures against the redevelopment of contracture during surgery.We provided treatment with some ingenious attempts for the nasolabial flap to a patient with microstomia caused by cicatricial contracture after burn. We obtained favorable results with no postoperative use of a splint. PMID:24561375</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=311561','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=311561"><span id="translatedtitle">Registration of 'OLé' peanut</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>OLé peanut (experimental designation ARSOK-S140-1OL) is a high oleic Spanish-type peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. fastigiata var. vulgaris) that was cooperatively released by the USDA-ARS and the Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station in 2014. OLé is the product of a Tamspan 90 X F435, the <span class="hlt">ori</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol1-sec93-313.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol1-sec93-313.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">42 CFR 93.313 - Institutional investigation report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Institutional investigation report. 93.313 Section... Institutional investigation report. The final institutional investigation report must be in writing and include... already provided to <span class="hlt">ORI</span> with the inquiry report, include the institutional policies and procedures...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=297573','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=297573"><span id="translatedtitle">Measuring the effect of spray plume angle on the accuracy of droplet size data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Analysis of droplet size data using laser diffraction allows for quick and easy assessment of droplet size for agricultural spray nozzles and pesticides; however, operation and setup of the instrument and test system can potentially influence the accuracy of the data. One of the factors is the <span class="hlt">orie</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ISPAn.II4...71T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ISPAn.II4...71T"><span id="translatedtitle">Precise Global DEM Generation by ALOS PRISM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tadono, T.; Ishida, H.; Oda, F.; Naito, S.; Minakawa, K.; Iwamoto, H.</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) generated the global digital elevation/surface model (DEM/DSM) and orthorectified image (<span class="hlt">ORI</span>) using the archived data of the Panchromatic Remote-sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping (PRISM) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS, nicknamed "Daichi"), which was operated from 2006 to 2011. PRISM consisted of three panchromatic radiometers that acquired along-track stereo images. It had a spatial resolution of 2.5 m in the nadir-looking radiometer and achieved global coverage, making it a suitable potential candidate for precise global DSM and <span class="hlt">ORI</span> generation. In the past 10 years or so, JAXA has conducted the calibration of the system corrected standard products of PRISM in order to improve absolute accuracies as well as to validate the high-level products such as DSM and <span class="hlt">ORI</span>. In this paper, we introduce an overview of the global DEM/DSM dataset generation project, including a summary of ALOS and PRISM, in addition to the global data archive status. It is also necessary to consider data processing strategies, since the processing capabilities of the level 1 standard product and the high-level products must be developed in terms of both hardware and software to achieve the project aims. The automatic DSM/<span class="hlt">ORI</span> processing software and its test processing results are also described.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.</small> </div> </center> <div id="footer-wrapper"> <div class="footer-content"> <div id="footerOSTI" class=""> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-4 text-center col-md-push-4 footer-content-center"><small><a href="http://www.science.gov/disclaimer.html">Privacy and Security</a></small> <div class="visible-sm visible-xs push_footer"></div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 text-center col-md-pull-4 footer-content-left"> <img src="http://www.osti.gov/images/DOE_SC31.png" alt="U.S. Department of Energy" usemap="#doe" height="31" width="177"><map style="display:none;" name="doe" id="doe"><area shape="rect" coords="1,3,107,30" href="http://www.energy.gov" alt="U.S. Deparment of Energy"><area shape="rect" coords="114,3,165,30" href="http://www.science.energy.gov" alt="Office of Science"></map> <a ref="http://www.osti.gov" style="margin-left: 15px;"><img src="http://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/ostigov53.png" alt="Office of Scientific and Technical Information" height="31" width="53"></a> <div class="visible-sm visible-xs push_footer"></div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 text-center footer-content-right"> <a href="http://www.osti.gov/nle"><img src="http://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/NLElogo31.png" alt="National Library of Energy" height="31" width="79"></a> <a href="http://www.science.gov"><img src="http://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/scigov77.png" alt="science.gov" height="31" width="98"></a> <a href="http://worldwidescience.org"><img src="http://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/wws82.png" alt="WorldWideScience.org" height="31" width="90"></a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><br></p> </div><!-- container --> </body> </html>