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Sample records for levels affects stomatal

  1. A flowering integrator, SOC1, affects stomatal opening in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuriko; Aoki, Saya; Ando, Eigo; Kitatsuji, Ayaka; Watanabe, Aiko; Ohnishi, Masato; Takahashi, Koji; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Nakamichi, Norihito; Tamada, Yosuke; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2015-04-01

    Stomatal movements are regulated by multiple environmental signals. Recent investigations indicate that photoperiodic flowering components, such as CRY, GI, CO, FT and TSF, are expressed in guard cells and positively affect stomatal opening in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we show that SOC1, which encodes a MADS box transcription factor and integrates multiple flowering signals, also exerts a positive effect on stomatal opening. FLC encodes a potent repressor of FT and SOC1, and FRI acts as an activator of FLC. Thus, we examined stomatal phenotypes in FRI-Col, which contains an active FRI allele of accession Sf-2 by introgression. We found higher expression of FLC and lower expression of FT, SOC1 and TSF in guard cells from FRI-Col than in those from Col. Light-induced stomatal opening was significantly suppressed in FRI-Col. Interestingly, vernalization of FRI-Col partially restored light-induced stomatal opening, concomitant with a decrease of FLC and increase of FT, SOC1 and TSF. Furthermore, we observed the constitutive open-stomata phenotype in transgenic plants overexpressing SOC1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) in guard cells (SOC1-GFP overexpressor), and found that light-induced stomatal opening was significantly suppressed in a soc1 knockout mutant. RNA sequencing using epidermis from the SOC1-GFP overexpressor revealed that the expression levels of several genes involved in stomatal opening, such as BLUS1 and the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases, were higher than those in background plants. From these results, we conclude that SOC1 is involved in the regulation of stomatal opening via transcriptional regulation in guard cells. PMID:25588388

  2. Tubulin perturbation leads to unexpected cell wall modifications and affects stomatal behaviour in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Prashant S.; Hu, Hao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Maloney, Victoria J.; Xiao, Hui; Xue, Liang-Jiao; Chung, Jeng-Der; Johnson, Virgil E.; Zhu, Yingying; Peter, Gary F.; Hahn, Michael G.; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Harding, Scott A.; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2015-01-01

    Cortical microtubules are integral to plant morphogenesis, cell wall synthesis, and stomatal behaviour, presumably by governing cellulose microfibril orientation. Genetic manipulation of tubulins often leads to abnormal plant development, making it difficult to probe additional roles of cortical microtubules in cell wall biogenesis. Here, it is shown that expressing post-translational C-terminal modification mimics of α-tubulin altered cell wall characteristics and guard cell dynamics in transgenic Populus tremula x alba that otherwise appear normal. 35S promoter-driven transgene expression was high in leaves but unusually low in xylem, suggesting high levels of tubulin transgene expression were not tolerated in wood-forming tissues during regeneration of transformants. Cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents were unaffected in transgenic wood, but expression of cell wall-modifying enzymes, and extractability of lignin-bound pectin and xylan polysaccharides were increased in developing xylem. The results suggest that pectin and xylan polysaccharides deposited early during cell wall biogenesis are more sensitive to subtle tubulin perturbation than cellulose and matrix polysaccharides deposited later. Tubulin perturbation also affected guard cell behaviour, delaying drought-induced stomatal closure as well as light-induced stomatal opening in leaves. Pectins have been shown to confer cell wall flexibility critical for reversible stomatal movement, and results presented here are consistent with microtubule involvement in this process. Taken together, the data show the value of growth-compatible tubulin perturbations for discerning microtubule functions, and add to the growing body of evidence for microtubule involvement in non-cellulosic polysaccharide assembly during cell wall biogenesis. PMID:26246616

  3. Tubulin perturbation leads to unexpected cell wall modifications and affects stomatal behaviour in Populus.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Prashant S; Hu, Hao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Maloney, Victoria J; Xiao, Hui; Xue, Liang-Jiao; Chung, Jeng-Der; Johnson, Virgil E; Zhu, Yingying; Peter, Gary F; Hahn, Michael G; Mansfield, Shawn D; Harding, Scott A; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2015-10-01

    Cortical microtubules are integral to plant morphogenesis, cell wall synthesis, and stomatal behaviour, presumably by governing cellulose microfibril orientation. Genetic manipulation of tubulins often leads to abnormal plant development, making it difficult to probe additional roles of cortical microtubules in cell wall biogenesis. Here, it is shown that expressing post-translational C-terminal modification mimics of α-tubulin altered cell wall characteristics and guard cell dynamics in transgenic Populus tremula x alba that otherwise appear normal. 35S promoter-driven transgene expression was high in leaves but unusually low in xylem, suggesting high levels of tubulin transgene expression were not tolerated in wood-forming tissues during regeneration of transformants. Cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents were unaffected in transgenic wood, but expression of cell wall-modifying enzymes, and extractability of lignin-bound pectin and xylan polysaccharides were increased in developing xylem. The results suggest that pectin and xylan polysaccharides deposited early during cell wall biogenesis are more sensitive to subtle tubulin perturbation than cellulose and matrix polysaccharides deposited later. Tubulin perturbation also affected guard cell behaviour, delaying drought-induced stomatal closure as well as light-induced stomatal opening in leaves. Pectins have been shown to confer cell wall flexibility critical for reversible stomatal movement, and results presented here are consistent with microtubule involvement in this process. Taken together, the data show the value of growth-compatible tubulin perturbations for discerning microtubule functions, and add to the growing body of evidence for microtubule involvement in non-cellulosic polysaccharide assembly during cell wall biogenesis. PMID:26246616

  4. Tree-Level Hydrodynamic Approach for Improved Stomatal Conductance Parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirfenderesgi, G.; Bohrer, G.; Matheny, A. M.; Ivanov, V. Y.

    2014-12-01

    between species which affect their response to the disturbance. We used FETCH2 to conduct a sensitivity analysis of the total stand-level transpiration to the inter-specific differences in hydraulic strategies and used the results to reflect on the future trajectory of the forest, in terms of species composition and transpiration.

  5. Disruption of ROOT PHOTOTROPISM2 gene does not affect phototropin-mediated stomatal opening.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Toshifumi; Takemiya, Atsushi; Harada, Akiko; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2013-03-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2), blue light-receptor protein kinases in plants, mediate stomatal opening by activating the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase in guard cells, but the signaling from phototropins to the H(+)-ATPase remains unknown. A recent study concluded that ROOT PHOTOTROPISM2 (RPT2) is involved in the primary step of this process. However, this conclusion is based solely on the determination of stomatal apertures in the epidermis. We investigated the role of RPT2 in blue light-dependent stomatal opening in more detail. We generated double mutants of rpt2 and phototropins (phot1 or phot2) in the Col ecotype background and obtained the typical phenotypes of rpt2 mutants, including the impairment in phototropism. In contrast, neither blue light-dependent H(+) pumping nor blue light-dependent H(+)-ATPase activation in guard cells was affected in the rpt2 mutants of rpt2, phot1 rpt2, and phot2 rpt2. Stomata in these rpt2 mutants opened widely by blue light in both epidermal peels and intact leaves, and no difference in the responses was found between the wild type and the mutants. From these results, we concluded that RPT2 gene disruption does not affect blue light-dependent stomatal opening. PMID:23352406

  6. Stomatal numbers are sensitive to increases in CO2 from pre-industrial levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, F. I.

    1987-06-01

    Recent measurements of atmospheric CO2 levels in ice cores1 have shown that global CO2 has increased by about 60 µmol mol-1 over the past 200 years. Evidence for the response of plants in the field to this change in CO2 levels is here presented in the form of a significant change in stomatal density-an anatomical response of considerable ecophysiological importance. A 40% decrease in density of stomata was observed in herbarium specimens of leaves of eight temperate arboreal species collected over the last 200 years. This decline was confirmed for some of the species observed as herbarium specimens by experiments under controlled environmental conditions. In these an increase in the mole fraction of CO2 from 280 μmol mol-1 to the current ambient level of 340 µmol mol-1 was found to cause a decrease in stomatal density of 67%. Experiments have shown that the combination of this previously unreported response of stomatal density to the level of CO2, with the known responses of stomatal aperture2, cause water use efficiency to be much lower than expected at low levels of CO2 and over a wide range of humidities.

  7. Drought limitations to leaf-level gas exchange: results from a model linking stomatal optimization and cohesion-tension theory.

    PubMed

    Novick, Kimberly A; Miniat, Chelcy F; Vose, James M

    2016-03-01

    We merge concepts from stomatal optimization theory and cohesion-tension theory to examine the dynamics of three mechanisms that are potentially limiting to leaf-level gas exchange in trees during drought: (1) a 'demand limitation' driven by an assumption of optimal stomatal functioning; (2) 'hydraulic limitation' of water movement from the roots to the leaves; and (3) 'non-stomatal' limitations imposed by declining leaf water status within the leaf. Model results suggest that species-specific 'economics' of stomatal behaviour may play an important role in differentiating species along the continuum of isohydric to anisohydric behaviour; specifically, we show that non-stomatal and demand limitations may reduce stomatal conductance and increase leaf water potential, promoting wide safety margins characteristic of isohydric species. We used model results to develop a diagnostic framework to identify the most likely limiting mechanism to stomatal functioning during drought and showed that many of those features were commonly observed in field observations of tree water use dynamics. Direct comparisons of modelled and measured stomatal conductance further indicated that non-stomatal and demand limitations reproduced observed patterns of tree water use well for an isohydric species but that a hydraulic limitation likely applies in the case of an anisohydric species. PMID:26466749

  8. Mg-chelatase I subunit 1 and Mg-protoporphyrin IX methyltransferase affect the stomatal aperture in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Masakazu; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Tsuzuki, Tomo; Soda, Midori; Morimoto, Sayuri; Okigaki, Yukiko; Ohishi, Takaya; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2014-07-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of stomatal opening and closure, we performed a genetic screen using infrared thermography to isolate stomatal aperture mutants. We identified a mutant designated low temperature with open-stomata 1 (lost1), which exhibited reduced leaf temperature, wider stomatal aperture, and a pale green phenotype. Map-based analysis of the LOST1 locus revealed that the lost1 mutant resulted from a missense mutation in the Mg-chelatase I subunit 1 (CHLI1) gene, which encodes a subunit of the Mg-chelatase complex involved in chlorophyll synthesis. Transformation of the wild-type CHLI1 gene into lost1 complemented all lost1 phenotypes. Stomata in lost1 exhibited a partial ABA-insensitive phenotype similar to that of rtl1, a Mg-chelatase H subunit missense mutant. The Mg-protoporphyrin IX methyltransferase (CHLM) gene encodes a subsequent enzyme in the chlorophyll synthesis pathway. We examined stomatal movement in a CHLM knockdown mutant, chlm, and found that it also exhibited an ABA-insensitive phenotype. However, lost1 and chlm seedlings all showed normal expression of ABA-induced genes, such as RAB18 and RD29B, in response to ABA. These results suggest that the chlorophyll synthesis enzymes, Mg-chelatase complex and CHLM, specifically affect ABA signaling in the control of stomatal aperture and have no effect on ABA-induced gene expression. PMID:24840863

  9. Light-Induced Stomatal Opening Is Affected by the Guard Cell Protein Kinase APK1b

    PubMed Central

    Elhaddad, Nagat S.; Hunt, Lee; Sloan, Jennifer; Gray, Julie E.

    2014-01-01

    Guard cells allow land plants to survive under restricted or fluctuating water availability. They control the exchange of gases between the external environment and the interior of the plant by regulating the aperture of stomatal pores in response to environmental stimuli such as light intensity, and are important regulators of plant productivity. Their turgor driven movements are under the control of a signalling network that is not yet fully characterised. A reporter gene fusion confirmed that the Arabidopsis APK1b protein kinase gene is predominantly expressed in guard cells. Infrared gas analysis and stomatal aperture measurements indicated that plants lacking APK1b are impaired in their ability to open their stomata on exposure to light, but retain the ability to adjust their stomatal apertures in response to darkness, abscisic acid or lack of carbon dioxide. Stomatal opening was not specifically impaired in response to either red or blue light as both of these stimuli caused some increase in stomatal conductance. Consistent with the reduction in maximum stomatal conductance, the relative water content of plants lacking APK1b was significantly increased under both well-watered and drought conditions. We conclude that APK1b is required for full stomatal opening in the light but is not required for stomatal closure. PMID:24828466

  10. Light-induced stomatal opening is affected by the guard cell protein kinase APK1b.

    PubMed

    Elhaddad, Nagat S; Hunt, Lee; Sloan, Jennifer; Gray, Julie E

    2014-01-01

    Guard cells allow land plants to survive under restricted or fluctuating water availability. They control the exchange of gases between the external environment and the interior of the plant by regulating the aperture of stomatal pores in response to environmental stimuli such as light intensity, and are important regulators of plant productivity. Their turgor driven movements are under the control of a signalling network that is not yet fully characterised. A reporter gene fusion confirmed that the Arabidopsis APK1b protein kinase gene is predominantly expressed in guard cells. Infrared gas analysis and stomatal aperture measurements indicated that plants lacking APK1b are impaired in their ability to open their stomata on exposure to light, but retain the ability to adjust their stomatal apertures in response to darkness, abscisic acid or lack of carbon dioxide. Stomatal opening was not specifically impaired in response to either red or blue light as both of these stimuli caused some increase in stomatal conductance. Consistent with the reduction in maximum stomatal conductance, the relative water content of plants lacking APK1b was significantly increased under both well-watered and drought conditions. We conclude that APK1b is required for full stomatal opening in the light but is not required for stomatal closure. PMID:24828466

  11. GOLDEN 2-LIKE transcription factors for chloroplast development affect ozone tolerance through the regulation of stomatal movement.

    PubMed

    Nagatoshi, Yukari; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Hayashi, Maki; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Okuma, Eiji; Kubo, Akihiro; Murata, Yoshiyuki; Seo, Mitsunori; Saji, Hikaru; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2016-04-12

    Stomatal movements regulate gas exchange, thus directly affecting the efficiency of photosynthesis and the sensitivity of plants to air pollutants such as ozone. The GARP family transcription factors GOLDEN 2-LIKE1 (GLK1) and GLK2 have known functions in chloroplast development. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) plants expressing the chimeric repressors for GLK1 and -2 (GLK1/2-SRDX) exhibited a closed-stomata phenotype and strong tolerance to ozone. By contrast, plants that overexpress GLK1/2 exhibited an open-stomata phenotype and higher sensitivity to ozone. The plants expressing GLK1-SRDX had reduced expression of the genes for inwardly rectifying K(+) (K(+) in) channels and reduced K(+) in channel activity. Abscisic acid treatment did not affect the stomatal phenotype of 35S:GLK1/2-SRDX plants or the transcriptional activity for K(+) in channel gene, indicating that GLK1/2 act independently of abscisic acid signaling. Our results indicate that GLK1/2 positively regulate the expression of genes for K(+) in channels and promote stomatal opening. Because the chimeric GLK1-SRDX repressor driven by a guard cell-specific promoter induced a closed-stomata phenotype without affecting chloroplast development in mesophyll cells, modulating GLK1/2 activity may provide an effective tool to control stomatal movements and thus to confer resistance to air pollutants. PMID:27035938

  12. ALA Inhibits ABA-induced Stomatal Closure via Reducing H2O2 and Ca(2+) Levels in Guard Cells.

    PubMed

    An, Yuyan; Liu, Longbo; Chen, Linghui; Wang, Liangju

    2016-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a newly proved natural plant growth regulator, is well known to improve plant photosynthesis under both normal and stressful conditions. However, its underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Stomatal closure is one of the major limiting factors for photosynthesis and abscisic acid (ABA) is the most important hormone in provoking stomatal closing. Here, we showed that ALA significantly inhibited ABA-induced stomatal closure using wild-type and ALA-overproducing transgenic Arabidopsis (YHem1). We found that ALA decreased ABA-induced H2O2 and cytosolic Ca(2+) accumulation in guard cells with stomatal bioassay, laser-scanning confocal microscopy and pharmacological methods. The inhibitory effect of ALA on ABA-induced stomatal closure was similar to that of AsA (an important reducing substrate for H2O2 removal), CAT (a H2O2-scavenging enzyme), DPI (an inhibitor of the H2O2-generating NADPH oxidase), EGTA (a Ca-chelating agent), and AlCl3 (an inhibitor of calcium channel). Furthermore, ALA inhibited exogenous H2O2- or Ca(2+)-induced stomatal closure. Taken together, we conclude that ALA inhibits ABA-induced stomatal closure via reducing H2O2, probably by scavenging, and Ca(2+) levels in guard cells. Moreover, the inhibitive effect of ALA on ABA-induced stomatal closure was further confirmed in the whole plant. Finally, we demonstrated that ALA inhibits stomatal closing, but significantly improves plant drought tolerance. Our results provide valuable information for the promotion of plant production and development of a sustainable low-carbon society. PMID:27148309

  13. ALA Inhibits ABA-induced Stomatal Closure via Reducing H2O2 and Ca2+ Levels in Guard Cells

    PubMed Central

    An, Yuyan; Liu, Longbo; Chen, Linghui; Wang, Liangju

    2016-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a newly proved natural plant growth regulator, is well known to improve plant photosynthesis under both normal and stressful conditions. However, its underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Stomatal closure is one of the major limiting factors for photosynthesis and abscisic acid (ABA) is the most important hormone in provoking stomatal closing. Here, we showed that ALA significantly inhibited ABA-induced stomatal closure using wild-type and ALA-overproducing transgenic Arabidopsis (YHem1). We found that ALA decreased ABA-induced H2O2 and cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation in guard cells with stomatal bioassay, laser-scanning confocal microscopy and pharmacological methods. The inhibitory effect of ALA on ABA-induced stomatal closure was similar to that of AsA (an important reducing substrate for H2O2 removal), CAT (a H2O2-scavenging enzyme), DPI (an inhibitor of the H2O2-generating NADPH oxidase), EGTA (a Ca-chelating agent), and AlCl3 (an inhibitor of calcium channel). Furthermore, ALA inhibited exogenous H2O2- or Ca2+-induced stomatal closure. Taken together, we conclude that ALA inhibits ABA-induced stomatal closure via reducing H2O2, probably by scavenging, and Ca2+ levels in guard cells. Moreover, the inhibitive effect of ALA on ABA-induced stomatal closure was further confirmed in the whole plant. Finally, we demonstrated that ALA inhibits stomatal closing, but significantly improves plant drought tolerance. Our results provide valuable information for the promotion of plant production and development of a sustainable low-carbon society. PMID:27148309

  14. Molecular characterization of a mutation affecting abscisic acid biosynthesis and consequently stomatal responses to humidity in an agriculturally important species.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Scott A M; Sussmilch, Frances C; Brodribb, Timothy J; Ross, John J

    2015-01-01

    Mutants deficient in the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) have been instrumental in determining not only the biosynthetic pathway for this hormone, but also its physiological role in land plants. The wilty mutant of Pisum sativum is one of the classical, well-studied ABA-deficient mutants; however, this mutant remains uncharacterized at a molecular level. Using a candidate gene approach, we show that the wilty mutation affects the xanthoxin dehydrogenase step in ABA biosynthesis. To date, this step has only been represented by mutants in the ABA2 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana. Functional ABA biosynthesis appears to be critical for normal stomatal responses to changes in humidity in angiosperms, with wilty mutant plants having no increase in foliar ABA levels in response to a doubling in vapour pressure deficit, and no closure of stomata. Phylogenetic analysis of the ABA2 gene family from diverse land plants indicates that an ABA-biosynthesis-specific short-chain dehydrogenase (ABA2) evolved in the earliest angiosperms. The relatively recent origin of specificity in this step has important implications for both the evolution of ABA biosynthesis and action in land plants. PMID:26216469

  15. Molecular characterization of a mutation affecting abscisic acid biosynthesis and consequently stomatal responses to humidity in an agriculturally important species

    PubMed Central

    McAdam, Scott A. M.; Sussmilch, Frances C.; Brodribb, Timothy J.; Ross, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutants deficient in the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) have been instrumental in determining not only the biosynthetic pathway for this hormone, but also its physiological role in land plants. The wilty mutant of Pisum sativum is one of the classical, well-studied ABA-deficient mutants; however, this mutant remains uncharacterized at a molecular level. Using a candidate gene approach, we show that the wilty mutation affects the xanthoxin dehydrogenase step in ABA biosynthesis. To date, this step has only been represented by mutants in the ABA2 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana. Functional ABA biosynthesis appears to be critical for normal stomatal responses to changes in humidity in angiosperms, with wilty mutant plants having no increase in foliar ABA levels in response to a doubling in vapour pressure deficit, and no closure of stomata. Phylogenetic analysis of the ABA2 gene family from diverse land plants indicates that an ABA-biosynthesis-specific short-chain dehydrogenase (ABA2) evolved in the earliest angiosperms. The relatively recent origin of specificity in this step has important implications for both the evolution of ABA biosynthesis and action in land plants. PMID:26216469

  16. Deficient glutathione in guard cells facilitates abscisic acid-induced stomatal closure but does not affect light-induced stomatal opening.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Md Sarwar; Ogawa, Ken'ichi; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Shimoishi, Yasuaki; Mori, Izumi C; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2008-10-01

    We investigated the role of glutathione (GSH) in stomatal movements using a GSH deficient mutant, chlorinal-1 (ch1-1). Guard cells of ch1-1 mutants accumulated less GSH than wild types did. Light induced stomatal opening in ch1-1 and wild-type plants. Abscisic acid (ABA) induced stomatal closure in ch1-1 mutants more than wild types without enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Therefore, GSH functioned downstream of ROS production in the ABA signaling cascade. PMID:18838781

  17. An epidemiological assessment of stomatal ozone flux-based critical levels for visible ozone injury in Southern European forests.

    PubMed

    Sicard, Pierre; De Marco, Alessandra; Dalstein-Richier, Laurence; Tagliaferro, Francesco; Renou, Camille; Paoletti, Elena

    2016-01-15

    Southern forests are at the highest ozone (O3) risk in Europe where ground-level O3 is a pressing sanitary problem for ecosystem health. Exposure-based standards for protecting vegetation are not representative of actual field conditions. A biologically-sound stomatal flux-based standard has been proposed, although critical levels for protection still need to be validated. This innovative epidemiological assessment of forest responses to O3 was carried out in 54 plots in Southeastern France and Northwestern Italy in 2012 and 2013. Three O3 indices, namely the accumulated exposure AOT40, and the accumulated stomatal flux with and without an hourly threshold of uptake (POD1 and POD0) were compared. Stomatal O3 fluxes were modeled (DO3SE) and correlated to measured forest-response indicators, i.e. crown defoliation, crown discoloration and visible foliar O3 injury. Soil water content, a key variable affecting the severity of visible foliar O3 injury, was included in DO3SE. Based on flux-effect relationships, we developed species-specific flux-based critical levels (CLef) for forest protection against visible O3 injury. For O3 sensitive conifers, CLef of 19 mmol m(-2) for Pinus cembra (high O3 sensitivity) and 32 mmol m(-2) for Pinus halepensis (moderate O3 sensitivity) were calculated. For broadleaved species, we obtained a CLef of 25 mmol m(-2) for Fagus sylvatica (moderate O3 sensitivity) and of 19 mmol m(-2) for Fraxinus excelsior (high O3 sensitivity). We showed that an assessment based on PODY and on real plant symptoms is more appropriated than the concentration-based method. Indeed, POD0 was better correlated with visible foliar O3 injury than AOT40, whereas AOT40 was better correlated with crown discoloration and defoliation (aspecific indicators). To avoid an underestimation of the real O3 uptake, we recommend the use of POD0 calculated for hours with a non-null global radiation over the 24-h O3 accumulation window. PMID:26437347

  18. Latitudinal variation of leaf stomatal traits from species to community level in forests: linkage with ecosystem productivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruili; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Qiufeng; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Zhiwei; Ge, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    To explore the latitudinal variation of stomatal traits from species to community level and their linkage with net primary productivity (NPP), we investigated leaf stomatal density (SDL) and stomatal length (SLL) across 760 species from nine forest ecosystems in eastern China, and calculated the community-level SD (SDC) and SL (SLC) through species-specific leaf area index (LAI). Our results showed that latitudinal variation in species-level SDL and SLL was minimal, but community-level SDC and SLC decreased clearly with increasing latitude. The relationship between SD and SL was negative across species and different plant functional types (PFTs), but positive at the community level. Furthermore, community-level SDC correlated positively with forest NPP, and explained 51% of the variation in NPP. These findings indicate that the trade-off by regulating SDL and SLL may be an important strategy for plant individuals to adapt to environmental changes, and temperature acts as the main factor influencing community-level stomatal traits through alteration of species composition. Importantly, our findings provide new insight into the relationship between plant traits and ecosystem function. PMID:26403303

  19. Latitudinal variation of leaf stomatal traits from species to community level in forests: linkage with ecosystem productivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruili; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Qiufeng; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Zhiwei; Ge, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    To explore the latitudinal variation of stomatal traits from species to community level and their linkage with net primary productivity (NPP), we investigated leaf stomatal density (SDL) and stomatal length (SLL) across 760 species from nine forest ecosystems in eastern China, and calculated the community-level SD (SDC) and SL (SLC) through species-specific leaf area index (LAI). Our results showed that latitudinal variation in species-level SDL and SLL was minimal, but community-level SDC and SLC decreased clearly with increasing latitude. The relationship between SD and SL was negative across species and different plant functional types (PFTs), but positive at the community level. Furthermore, community-level SDC correlated positively with forest NPP, and explained 51% of the variation in NPP. These findings indicate that the trade-off by regulating SDL and SLL may be an important strategy for plant individuals to adapt to environmental changes, and temperature acts as the main factor influencing community-level stomatal traits through alteration of species composition. Importantly, our findings provide new insight into the relationship between plant traits and ecosystem function. PMID:26403303

  20. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein mutations that affect membrane fusion activity and abolish virus infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Fredericksen, B L; Whitt, M A

    1995-01-01

    We have introduced amino acid substitutions into two regions of the extracellular domain of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) glycoprotein (G protein) and examined the effect of these mutations on protein transport, low-pH-induced stability of G protein oligomers, and membrane fusion activity. We suggested previously that the region between amino acids 118 and 139 may be important for the membrane fusion activity of G protein, on the basis of the characterization of a fusion-defective G protein mutant (M. A. Whitt, P. Zagouras, B. Crise, and J. K. Rose, J. Virol. 64:4907-4913, 1990). It has also been postulated by others that this region as well as the region between amino acids 181 and 212 may constitute putative internal fusion domains of VSV G protein. In this report, we show that three different amino acids substitutions between residues 118 and 139 (G-124-->E, P-127-->D, and A-133-->K) either altered or abolished low-pH-dependent membrane fusion activity. In contrast, substitutions between residues 192 and 212 resulted either in G proteins that had wild-type fusion activity or in mutant proteins in which the mutation prevented transport of G protein to the cell surface. Two of the substitutions between residues 118 and 139 (G-124-->E and P-127-->D) resulted in G proteins that were fusion defective at pH 5.7, although syncytia were observed after cells were treated with fusion buffer at pH 5.5, albeit at levels significantly less than that induced by wild-type G protein. Interestingly, when either G-124-->E or P-127-->D was incorporated into tsO45 virions, the resulting particles were not infectious, presumably because the viral envelope was not able to fuse with the proper intracellular membrane. These results support the hypothesis that the region between amino acids 118 and 139 is important for the membrane fusion activity of VSV G protein and may constitute an internal fusion domain. PMID:7853475

  1. The Arabidopsis mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase PP2C5 affects seed germination, stomatal aperture, and abscisic acid-inducible gene expression.

    PubMed

    Brock, Anita K; Willmann, Roland; Kolb, Dagmar; Grefen, Laure; Lajunen, Heini M; Bethke, Gerit; Lee, Justin; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Gust, Andrea A

    2010-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone regulating various cellular processes in plants, including stomatal opening and seed germination. Although protein phosphorylation via mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) has been suggested to be important in ABA signaling, the corresponding phosphatases are largely unknown. Here, we show that a member of the Protein Phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), PP2C5, is acting as a MAPK phosphatase. The PP2C5 protein colocalizes and directly interacts with stress-induced MPK3, MPK4, and MPK6, predominantly in the nucleus. Importantly, altered PP2C5 levels affect MAPK activation. Whereas Arabidopsis plants depleted of PP2C5 show an enhanced ABA-induced activation of MPK3 and MPK6, ectopic expression of PP2C5 in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) resulted in the opposite effect, with the two MAPKs salicylic acid-induced protein kinase and wound-induced protein kinase not being activated any longer after ABA treatment. Moreover, depletion of PP2C5, whose gene expression itself is affected by ABA treatment, resulted in altered ABA responses. Loss-of-function mutation in PP2C5 or AP2C1, a close PP2C5 homolog, resulted in an increased stomatal aperture under normal growth conditions and a partial ABA-insensitive phenotype in seed germination that was most prominent in the pp2c5 ap2c1 double mutant line. In addition, the response of ABA-inducible genes such as ABI1, ABI2, RD29A, and Erd10 was reduced in the mutant plants. Thus, we suggest that PP2C5 acts as a MAPK phosphatase that positively regulates seed germination, stomatal closure, and ABA-inducible gene expression. PMID:20488890

  2. New stomatal flux-based critical levels for ozone effects on vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Gina; Pleijel, Håkan; Braun, Sabine; Büker, Patrick; Bermejo, Victoria; Calvo, Esperanza; Danielsson, Helena; Emberson, Lisa; Fernández, Ignacio González; Grünhage, Ludger; Harmens, Harry; Hayes, Felicity; Karlsson, Per-Erik; Simpson, David

    2011-09-01

    The critical levels for ozone effects on vegetation have been reviewed and revised by the LRTAP Convention. Eight new or revised critical levels based on the accumulated stomatal flux of ozone (POD Y, the Phytotoxic Ozone Dose above a threshold flux of Y nmol m -2 PLA s -1, where PLA is the projected leaf area) have been agreed. For each receptor, data were combined from experiments conducted under naturally fluctuating environmental conditions in 2-4 countries, resulting in linear dose-response relationships with response variables specific to each receptor ( r2 = 0.49-0.87, p < 0.001 for all). For crops, critical levels were derived for effects on wheat (grain yield, grain mass, and protein yield), potato (tuber yield) and tomato (fruit yield). For forest trees, critical levels were derived for effects on changes in annual increment in whole tree biomass for beech and birch, and Norway spruce. For (semi-)natural vegetation, the critical level for effects on productive and high conservation value perennial grasslands was based on effects on important component species of the genus Trifolium (clover species). These critical levels can be used to assess protection against the damaging effects of ozone on food security, important ecosystem services provided by forest trees (roundwood production, C sequestration, soil stability and flood prevention) and the vitality of pasture.

  3. Lead accumulation reduces photosynthesis in the lead hyper-accumulator Salvinia minima Baker by affecting the cell membrane and inducing stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Leal-Alvarado, Daniel A; Espadas-Gil, Francisco; Sáenz-Carbonell, Luis; Talavera-May, Carlos; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2016-02-01

    Salvinia minima Baker accumulates a fair amount of lead in its tissues; however, no studies have investigated the effect of lead on the physiological processes that affect photosynthesis in this species. The objective of the present study was to assess whether the high amounts of lead accumulated by S. minima can affect its photosynthetic apparatus. The physiological changes in the roots and leaves in response to lead accumulation were analyzed. An exposure to 40 μM Pb(NO3)2 for 24 h (first stage) was sufficient to reduce the photosynthetic rate (Pn) by 44%. This reduction in Pn was apparently the result of processes at various levels, including damage to the cell membranes (mainly in roots). Interestingly, although the plants were transferred to fresh medium without lead for an additional 24 h (second stage), Pn not only remained low, but was reduced even further, which was apparently related to stomatal closure, and may have led to reduced CO2 availability. Therefore, it can be concluded that lead exposure first decreases the photosynthetic rate by damaging the root membrane and then induces stomatal closure, resulting in decreased CO2 availability. PMID:26742090

  4. Multi-level Modeling of Light-Induced Stomatal Opening Offers New Insights into Its Regulation by Drought

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongyao; Jin, Xiaofen; Albert, Réka; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Plant guard cells gate CO2 uptake and transpirational water loss through stomatal pores. As a result of decades of experimental investigation, there is an abundance of information on the involvement of specific proteins and secondary messengers in the regulation of stomatal movements and on the pairwise relationships between guard cell components. We constructed a multi-level dynamic model of guard cell signal transduction during light-induced stomatal opening and of the effect of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) on this process. The model integrates into a coherent network the direct and indirect biological evidence regarding the regulation of seventy components implicated in stomatal opening. Analysis of this signal transduction network identified robust cross-talk between blue light and ABA, in which [Ca2+]c plays a key role, and indicated an absence of cross-talk between red light and ABA. The dynamic model captured more than 1031 distinct states for the system and yielded outcomes that were in qualitative agreement with a wide variety of previous experimental results. We obtained novel model predictions by simulating single component knockout phenotypes. We found that under white light or blue light, over 60%, and under red light, over 90% of all simulated knockouts had similar opening responses as wild type, showing that the system is robust against single node loss. The model revealed an open question concerning the effect of ABA on red light-induced stomatal opening. We experimentally showed that ABA is able to inhibit red light-induced stomatal opening, and our model offers possible hypotheses for the underlying mechanism, which point to potential future experiments. Our modelling methodology combines simplicity and flexibility with dynamic richness, making it well suited for a wide class of biological regulatory systems. PMID:25393147

  5. Multi-level modeling of light-induced stomatal opening offers new insights into its regulation by drought.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongyao; Jin, Xiaofen; Albert, Réka; Assmann, Sarah M

    2014-11-01

    Plant guard cells gate CO2 uptake and transpirational water loss through stomatal pores. As a result of decades of experimental investigation, there is an abundance of information on the involvement of specific proteins and secondary messengers in the regulation of stomatal movements and on the pairwise relationships between guard cell components. We constructed a multi-level dynamic model of guard cell signal transduction during light-induced stomatal opening and of the effect of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) on this process. The model integrates into a coherent network the direct and indirect biological evidence regarding the regulation of seventy components implicated in stomatal opening. Analysis of this signal transduction network identified robust cross-talk between blue light and ABA, in which [Ca2+]c plays a key role, and indicated an absence of cross-talk between red light and ABA. The dynamic model captured more than 10(31) distinct states for the system and yielded outcomes that were in qualitative agreement with a wide variety of previous experimental results. We obtained novel model predictions by simulating single component knockout phenotypes. We found that under white light or blue light, over 60%, and under red light, over 90% of all simulated knockouts had similar opening responses as wild type, showing that the system is robust against single node loss. The model revealed an open question concerning the effect of ABA on red light-induced stomatal opening. We experimentally showed that ABA is able to inhibit red light-induced stomatal opening, and our model offers possible hypotheses for the underlying mechanism, which point to potential future experiments. Our modelling methodology combines simplicity and flexibility with dynamic richness, making it well suited for a wide class of biological regulatory systems. PMID:25393147

  6. Vesicular stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Timoney, Peter

    2016-07-30

    More than 800 premises in eight states in the USA have recently reported cases of vesicular stomatitis in their horses. Here, Peter Timoney, of the Gluck Equine Research Center in Kentucky, discusses this zoonotic disease in more detail. PMID:27474058

  7. Lacking chloroplasts in guard cells of crumpled leaf attenuates stomatal opening: both guard cell chloroplasts and mesophyll contribute to guard cell ATP levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Wei; Li, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Lu; Yang, Hai-Qiang; Han, Xue-Fei; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Shang, Zhong-Lin; Asano, Tomoya; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Zhang, Chun-Guang; Chen, Yu-Ling

    2014-09-01

    Controversies regarding the function of guard cell chloroplasts and the contribution of mesophyll in stomatal movements have persisted for several decades. Here, by comparing the stomatal opening of guard cells with (crl-ch) or without chloroplasts (crl-no ch) in one epidermis of crl (crumpled leaf) mutant in Arabidopsis, we showed that stomatal apertures of crl-no ch were approximately 65-70% those of crl-ch and approximately 50-60% those of wild type. The weakened stomatal opening in crl-no ch could be partially restored by imposing lower extracellular pH. Correspondingly, the external pH changes and K(+) accumulations following fusicoccin (FC) treatment were greatly reduced in the guard cells of crl-no ch compared with crl-ch and wild type. Determination of the relative ATP levels in individual cells showed that crl-no ch guard cells contained considerably lower levels of ATP than did crl-ch and wild type after 2 h of white light illumination. In addition, guard cell ATP levels were lower in the epidermis than in leaves, which is consistent with the observed weaker stomatal opening response to white light in the epidermis than in leaves. These results provide evidence that both guard cell chloroplasts and mesophyll contribute to the ATP source for H(+) extrusion by guard cells. PMID:24506786

  8. Whole-Tree Water Use Efficiency Is Decreased by Ambient Ozone and Not Affected by O3-Induced Stomatal Sluggishness

    PubMed Central

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Omasa, Kenji; Paoletti, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Steady-state and dynamic gas exchange responses to ozone visible injury were investigated in an ozone-sensitive poplar clone under field conditions. The results were translated into whole tree water loss and carbon assimilation by comparing trees exposed to ambient ozone and trees treated with the ozone-protectant ethylenediurea (EDU). Steady-state stomatal conductance and photosynthesis linearly decreased with increasing ozone visible injury. Dynamic responses simulated by severing of a leaf revealed that stomatal sluggishness increased until a threshold of 5% injury and was then fairly constant. Sluggishness resulted from longer time to respond to the closing signal and slower rate of closing. Changes in photosynthesis were driven by the dynamics of stomata. Whole-tree carbon assimilation and water loss were lower in trees exposed to ambient O3 than in trees protected by EDU, both under steady-state and dynamic conditions. Although stomatal sluggishness is expected to increase water loss, lower stomatal conductance and premature leaf shedding of injured leaves aggravated O3 effects on whole tree carbon gain, while compensating for water loss. On average, WUE of trees exposed to ambient ozone was 2–4% lower than that of EDU-protected control trees in September and 6–8% lower in October. PMID:22723982

  9. Light and Stomatal Metabolism 1

    PubMed Central

    Rao, I. Madhusudana; Anderson, Louise E.

    1983-01-01

    New evidence is provided regarding the direct effect of light on stomatal opening in the epidermis of the pea (Pisum sativum L. var Little Marvel) leaf. Light modulates the activity of a number of key enzymes involved in stomatal metabolism. When isolated epidermal strips are illuminated, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase are activated; and aspartate aminotransferase is inactivated. Sulfhydryl compounds, dithiothreitol and glutathione, enhance stomatal opening in epidermal strips both in light or darkness while the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide inhibits, indicating the possible involvement of sulfhydryl groups in stomatal movements. Further, light treatment increases measureable thiol levels in the epidermis about 3-fold. These results suggest that light modulation of enzymes in the epidermis may play a significant role in the mechanism of stomatal movement. PMID:16662847

  10. A new positive relationship between pCO2 and stomatal frequency in Quercus guyavifolia (Fagaceae): a potential proxy for palaeo-CO2 levels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jin-Jin; Xing, Yao-Wu; Turkington, Roy; Jacques, Frédéric M. B.; Su, Tao; Huang, Yong-Jiang; Zhou, Zhe-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The inverse relationship between atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) and stomatal frequency in many species of plants has been widely used to estimate palaeoatmospheric CO2 (palaeo-CO2) levels; however, the results obtained have been quite variable. This study attempts to find a potential new proxy for palaeo-CO2 levels by analysing stomatal frequency in Quercus guyavifolia (Q. guajavifolia, Fagaceae), an extant dominant species of sclerophyllous forests in the Himalayas with abundant fossil relatives. Methods Stomatal frequency was analysed for extant samples of Q. guyavifolia collected from17 field sites at altitudes ranging between 2493 and 4497 m. Herbarium specimens collected between 1926 and 2011 were also examined. Correlations of pCO2–stomatal frequency were determined using samples from both sources, and these were then applied to Q. preguyavaefolia fossils in order to estimate palaeo-CO2 concentrations for two late-Pliocene floras in south-western China. Key Results In contrast to the negative correlations detected for most other species that have been studied, a positive correlation between pCO2 and stomatal frequency was determined in Q. guyavifolia sampled from both extant field collections and historical herbarium specimens. Palaeo-CO2 concentrations were estimated to be approx. 180–240 ppm in the late Pliocene, which is consistent with most other previous estimates. Conclusions A new positive relationship between pCO2 and stomatal frequency in Q. guyavifolia is presented, which can be applied to the fossils closely related to this species that are widely distributed in the late-Cenozoic strata in order to estimate palaeo-CO2 concentrations. The results show that it is valid to use a positive relationship to estimate palaeo-CO2 concentrations, and the study adds to the variety of stomatal density/index relationships that available for estimating pCO2. The physiological mechanisms underlying this positive response are

  11. Stomatal malfunctioning under low VPD conditions: induced by alterations in stomatal morphology and leaf anatomy or in the ABA signaling?

    PubMed

    Aliniaeifard, Sasan; Malcolm Matamoros, Priscila; van Meeteren, Uulke

    2014-12-01

    Exposing plants to low VPD reduces leaf capacity to maintain adequate water status thereafter. To find the impact of VPD on functioning of stomata, stomatal morphology and leaf anatomy, fava bean plants were grown at low (L, 0.23 kPa) or moderate (M, 1.17 kPa) VPDs and some plants that developed their leaves at moderate VPD were then transferred for 4 days to low VPD (M→L). Part of the M→L-plants were sprayed with ABA (abscisic acid) during exposure to L. L-plants showed bigger stomata, larger pore area, thinner leaves and less spongy cells compared with M-plants. Stomatal morphology (except aperture) and leaf anatomy of the M→L-plants were almost similar to the M-plants, while their transpiration rate and stomatal conductance were identical to that of L-plants. The stomatal response to ABA was lost in L-plants, but also after 1-day exposure of M-plants to low VPD. The level of foliar ABA sharply decreased within 1-day exposure to L, while the level of ABA-GE (ABA-glucose ester) was not affected. Spraying ABA during the exposure to L prevented loss of stomatal closing response thereafter. The effect of low VPD was largely depending on exposure time: the stomatal responsiveness to ABA was lost after 1-day exposure to low VPD, while the responsiveness to desiccation was gradually lost during 4-day exposure to low VPD. Leaf anatomical and stomatal morphological alterations due to low VPD were not the main cause of loss of stomatal closure response to closing stimuli. PMID:24773210

  12. Evidence Regarding the Treatment of Denture Stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Yarborough, Alexandra; Cooper, Lyndon; Duqum, Ibrahim; Mendonça, Gustavo; McGraw, Kathleen; Stoner, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    Denture stomatitis is a common inflammatory condition affecting the mucosa underlying complete dentures. It is associated with denture microbial biofilm, poor denture hygiene, poor denture quality, and nocturnal denture use. Numerous treatment methodologies have been used to treat stomatitis; however, a gold standard treatment has not been identified. The aim of this systematic review is to report on the current knowledge available in studies representing a range of evidence on the treatment of denture stomatitis. PMID:27062660

  13. Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Akintoye, Sunday O.; Greenberg, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS) is the most common ulcerative disease affecting the oral mucosa. It occurs mostly in healthy individuals and has atypical clinical presentation in immunocompromised individuals. The etiology of RAS is still unknown, but several local, systemic, immunologic, genetic, allergic, nutritional, and microbial factors, as well as immunosuppressive drugs, have been proposed as causative agents. Clinical management of RAS is based on severity of symptoms, frequency, size and number of lesions using topical and systemic therapies. The goals of therapy are to decrease pain and ulcer size, promote healing and decrease frequency of recurrence. PMID:24655523

  14. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Akintoye, Sunday O; Greenberg, Martin S

    2014-04-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common ulcerative disease affecting the oral mucosa. RAS occurs mostly in healthy individuals and has an atypical clinical presentation in immunocompromised individuals. The etiology of RAS is still unknown, but several local, systemic, immunologic, genetic, allergic, nutritional, and microbial factors, as well as immunosuppressive drugs, have been proposed as causative agents. Clinical management of RAS using topical and systemic therapies is based on severity of symptoms and the frequency, size, and number of lesions. The goals of therapy are to decrease pain and ulcer size, promote healing, and decrease the frequency of recurrence. PMID:24655523

  15. Stomatal response and leaf injury of Pisum sativum L. with SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ exposures. I. Influence of pollutant level and leaf maturity

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.M.; Tibbitts, T.W.

    1981-03-01

    Plants of Pisum sativum L. Alsweet were grown under a controlled environment and exposed to SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ to determine whether changes in stomatal aperture during exposure were related to subsequent leaf injury. Stomata consistently closed with injurious levels of SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/. Measurements with diffusion porometers demonstrated approx. = 75 and 25% lower conductance with SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ exposures, respectively, compared to the conductance of control plants. Stomata also showed a closing response with noninjurious levels of SO/sub 2/ but an opening response with noninjurious levels of O/sub 3/. Stomata closed to the same degree with combinations of SO/sub 2/ plus O/sub 3/ as with SO/sub 2/ alone. Stomata of expanding leaves closed more during pollutant exposures than stomata of expanded leaves. The abaxial and adaxial stomata both exhibited closure with SO/sub 2/ and combinations of SO/sub 2/ plus O/sub 3/, but abaxial stomata tended to close and adaxial stomata tended to open with exposure to O/sub 3/ alone. The changes in stomatal aperture were not closely correlated with the amount of leaf injury produced by different pollutant levels. Stomata closed, not only with exposure to pollutant levels that caused severe necrosis, but also with levels that caused only a trace of injury. There was no evidence of a reduced amount of closure or even stomatal opening with combinations of SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ compared to plants exposed to the pollutants alone to explain the large amount of injury to plants exposed to pollutant combinations.

  16. Effects of CO2 Concentration on Leaf Photosynthesis and Stomatal Conductance of Potatoes Grown Under Different Irradiance Levels and Photoperiods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Fitzpatrick, A. H.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    2012-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cvs. Russet Burbank, Denali, and Norland, were grown in environmental rooms controlled at approx 350 micro mol/mol (ambient during years 1987/1988) and 1000 micro mol/mol (enriched) CO2 concentrations. Plants and electric lamps were arranged to provide two irradiance zones, 400 and 800 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF and studies were repeated using two photoperiods (12-h light / 12-h dark and continuous light). Leaf photosynthetic rates and leaf stomatal conductance were measured using fully expanded, upper canopy leaves at weekly intervals throughout growth (21 through 84 days after transplanting). Increasing the CO2 from approx 350 to 1000 micro mol/mol under the 12-h photoperiod increased leaf photosynthetic rates by 39% at 400 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF and 27% at 800 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF. Increasing the CO2 from approx 350 to 1000 micro mol/mol under continuous light decreased leaf photosynthetic rates by 7% at 400 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF and 13% at 800 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF. Increasing the CO2 from approx 350 to 1000 micro mol/mol under the 12-h photoperiod plants decreased stomatal conductance by an average of 26% at 400 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF and 42% at 800 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF. Under continuous light, CO2 enrichment resulted in a small increase (2%) of stomatal conductance at 400 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF, and a small decrease (3%) at 800 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF. Results indicate that CO2 enrichment under the 12-h photoperiod showed the expected increase in photosynthesis and decrease in stomatal conductance for a C3 species like potato, but the decreases in leaf photosynthetic rates and minimal effect on conductance from CO2 enrichment under continuous light were not expected. The plant leaves under continuous light showed more chlorosis and some rusty flecking versus plants under the 12-h photoperiod, suggesting the continuous light was more stressful on the plants. The increased

  17. Oral medicine case book 65: Necrotising stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Khammissa, R A G; Ciya, R; Munzhelele, T I; Altini, M; Rikhotso, E; Lemmer, J; Feller, L

    2014-11-01

    Necrotising stomatitis is a fulminating anaerobic polybacterial infection affecting predominantly the oral mucosa of debilitated malnourished children or immunosuppressed HIV-seropositive subjects. It starts as necrotising gingivitis which progresses to necrotising periodontitis and subsequently to necrotising stomatitis. In order to prevent the progression of necrotising stomatitis to noma (cancrum oris), affected patients should be vigorously treated and may require admission to hospital. Healthcare personnel should therefore be familiar with the signs and symptoms of necrotising gingivitis/necrotising periodontitis, of their potential sequelae and of the need for immediate therapeutic intervention. PMID:26506800

  18. CLIL Learning: Achievement Levels and Affective Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seikkula-Leino, Jaana

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how successfully pupils had learned content in content and language integrated learning (CLIL) and to assess pupils' affective learning factors, such as motivation and self-esteem, in CLIL. Learning was presented in terms of achievement level, which was described as the relationship between measured levels…

  19. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Carolina-Cavaliéri; Gomez, Ricardo-Santiago; Zina, Lívia-Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Background Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a recurrent painful ulcerative disorder that commonly affects the oral mucosa. Local and systemic factors such as trauma, food sensitivity, nutritional deficiencies, systemic conditions, immunological disorders and genetic polymorphisms are associated with the development of the disease. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram-negative, microaerophile bacteria, that colonizes the gastric mucosa and it was previously suggested to be involved in RAS development. In the present paper we reviewed all previous studies that investigated the association between RAS and H. pylori. Material and Methods A search in Pubmed (MEDLINE) databases was made of articles published up until July 2015 using the following keywords: Helicobacter Pylori or H. pylori and RAS or Recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Results Fifteen experimental studies that addressed the relationship between infection with H. pylori and the presence of RAS and three reviews, including a systematic review and a meta-analysis were included in this review. The studies reviewed used different methods to assess this relationship, including PCR, nested PCR, culture, ELISA and urea breath test. A large variation in the number of patients included in each study, as well as inclusion criteria and laboratorial methods was observed. H. pylori can be detected in the oral mucosa or ulcerated lesion of some patients with RAS. The quality of the all studies included in this review was assessed using levels of evidence based on the University of Oxford’s Center for Evidence Based Medicine Criteria. Conclusions Although the eradication of the infection may affect the clinical course of the oral lesions by undetermined mechanisms, RAS ulcers are not associated with the presence of the bacteria in the oral cavity and there is no evidence that H. pylori infection drives RAS development. Key words:Campylobacter, elisa, h. pylori, Helicobacter Pylori, RAS, recurrent aphthous

  20. A novel allele of L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase is associated with enhanced drought tolerance through affecting stomatal aperture in common wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juncheng; Li, Bin; Yang, Yanping; Mu, Peiyuan; Qian, Weiqiang; Dong, Lingli; Zhang, Kunpu; Liu, Xin; Qin, Huanju; Ling, Hongqing; Wang, Daowen

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants, L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) plays important roles in ascorbic acid (AsA) biosynthesis and assembly of respiration complex I. Here we report three homoeologous genes (TaGLDH-A1, -B1 and -D1) encoding common wheat GLDH isozymes and a unique allelic variant (TaGLDH-A1b) associated with enhanced drought tolerance. TaGLDH-A1, -B1 and -D1 were located on chromosomes 5A, 5B and 5D, respectively, and their transcripts were found in multiple organs. The three homoeologs each conferred increased GLDH activity when ectopically expressed in tobacco. Decreasing TaGLDH expression in wheat significantly reduced GLDH activity and AsA content. TaGLDH-A1b differed from wild type allele TaGLDH-A1a by an in-frame deletion of three nucleotides. TaGLDH-A1b was biochemically less active than TaGLDH-A1a, and the total GLDH activity levels were generally lower in the cultivars carrying TaGLDH-A1b relative to those with TaGLDH-A1a. Interestingly, TaGLDH-A1b cultivars showed stronger water deficiency tolerance than TaGLDH-A1a cultivars, and TaGLDH-A1b co-segregated with decreased leaf water loss in a F2 population. Finally, TaGLDH-A1b cultivars generally exhibited smaller leaf stomatal aperture than TaGLDH-A1a varieties in control or water deficiency environments. Our work provides new information on GLDH genes and function in higher plants. TaGLDH-A1b is likely useful for further studying and improving wheat tolerance to drought stress. PMID:27443220

  1. A novel allele of L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase is associated with enhanced drought tolerance through affecting stomatal aperture in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juncheng; Li, Bin; Yang, Yanping; Mu, Peiyuan; Qian, Weiqiang; Dong, Lingli; Zhang, Kunpu; Liu, Xin; Qin, Huanju; Ling, Hongqing; Wang, Daowen

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants, L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) plays important roles in ascorbic acid (AsA) biosynthesis and assembly of respiration complex I. Here we report three homoeologous genes (TaGLDH-A1, -B1 and -D1) encoding common wheat GLDH isozymes and a unique allelic variant (TaGLDH-A1b) associated with enhanced drought tolerance. TaGLDH-A1, -B1 and -D1 were located on chromosomes 5A, 5B and 5D, respectively, and their transcripts were found in multiple organs. The three homoeologs each conferred increased GLDH activity when ectopically expressed in tobacco. Decreasing TaGLDH expression in wheat significantly reduced GLDH activity and AsA content. TaGLDH-A1b differed from wild type allele TaGLDH-A1a by an in-frame deletion of three nucleotides. TaGLDH-A1b was biochemically less active than TaGLDH-A1a, and the total GLDH activity levels were generally lower in the cultivars carrying TaGLDH-A1b relative to those with TaGLDH-A1a. Interestingly, TaGLDH-A1b cultivars showed stronger water deficiency tolerance than TaGLDH-A1a cultivars, and TaGLDH-A1b co-segregated with decreased leaf water loss in a F2 population. Finally, TaGLDH-A1b cultivars generally exhibited smaller leaf stomatal aperture than TaGLDH-A1a varieties in control or water deficiency environments. Our work provides new information on GLDH genes and function in higher plants. TaGLDH-A1b is likely useful for further studying and improving wheat tolerance to drought stress. PMID:27443220

  2. How High Glucose Levels Affect Tendon Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Snedeker, Jess G

    2016-01-01

    Among the many factors playing a role in tendon disease, unregulated biochemical reactions between glucose and the collagen extracellular matrix are coming increasingly into focus. We have shown that formation of advanced glycation end-products that cross-link the collagen extracellular matrix can drastically affect cellular level mechanical properties of the matrix, and in turn affect cell-level biomechanical stimuli during physiological loading of the tissue. We suggest that these may adversely affect tendon cell response to matrix damage, as well as the quality of the consequent repair. If such mechanical feedback loops are altered, the ability of tendon cells to maintain tissue in a functional, healthy state may be compromised. Although key foundational elements of biochemical, biomechanical, and biological understanding are now in place, the full extent of how these aspects interact, including the precise mechanisms by which advanced glycation end-products pathologically disrupt connective tissue homeostasis and damage repair, are only beginning to be adequately appreciated. PMID:27535261

  3. Pre-dawn stomatal opening does not substantially enhance early-morning photosynthesis in Helianthus annuus.

    PubMed

    Auchincloss, Lisa; Easlon, Hsien M; Levine, Diedre; Donovan, Lisa; Richards, James H

    2014-06-01

    Most C3 plant species have partially open stomata during the night especially in the 3-5 h before dawn. This pre-dawn stomatal opening has been hypothesized to enhance early-morning photosynthesis (A) by reducing diffusion limitations to CO2 at dawn. We tested this hypothesis in cultivated Helianthus annuus using whole-shoot gas exchange, leaf level gas exchange and modelling approaches. One hour pre-dawn low-humidity treatments were used to reduce pre-dawn stomatal conductance (g). At the whole-shoot level, a difference of pre-dawn g (0.40 versus 0.17 mol m(-2) s(-1)) did not significantly affect A during the first hour after dawn. Shorter term effects were investigated with leaf level gas exchange measurements and a difference of pre-dawn g (0.10 versus 0.04 mol m(-2) s(-1)) affected g and A for only 5 min after dawn. The potential effects of a wider range of stomatal apertures were explored with an empirical model of the relationship between A and intercellular CO2 concentration during the half-hour after dawn. Modelling results demonstrated that even extremely low pre-dawn stomatal conductance values have only a minimal effect on early-morning A for a few minutes after dawn. Thus, we found no evidence that pre-dawn stomatal opening enhances A. PMID:24895756

  4. Photosynthesis affects following night leaf conductance in Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Easlon, Hsien Ming; Richards, James H

    2009-01-01

    Night-time stomatal opening in C(3) plants may result in significant water loss when no carbon gain is possible. The objective of this study was to determine if endogenous patterns of night-time stomatal opening, as reflected in leaf conductance, in Vicia faba are affected by photosynthetic conditions the previous day. Reducing photosynthesis with low light or low CO(2) resulted in reduced night-time stomatal opening the following night, irrespective of the effects on daytime stomatal conductance. Likewise, increasing photosynthesis with enriched CO(2) levels resulted in increased night-time stomatal opening the following night. Reduced night-time stomatal opening was not the result of an inability to regulate stomatal aperture as leaves with reduced night-time stomatal opening were capable of greater night-time opening when exposed to low CO(2). After acclimating plants to long or short days, it was found that night-time leaf conductance was greater in plants acclimated to short days, and associated with greater leaf starch and nitrate accumulation, both of which may affect night-time guard cell osmotic potential. Direct measurement of guard cell contents during endogenous night-time stomatal opening will help identify the mechanism of the effect of daytime photosynthesis on subsequent night-time stomatal regulation. PMID:19076531

  5. Stomatal development and movement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Kun; Liu, Yu-Bo; Zhang, Mao-Ying

    2010-01-01

    Stomata are epidermal pores on plant surface used for gas exchange with the atmosphere. Stomatal development and movement are regulated by environmental and internal signals. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are universal transducers of extracellular signals among all eukaryotes. In plant, MAPK cascades regulate diverse cellular processes occurring during the whole ontogenetic plant life and ranging from normal cell proliferation to stress-inducing plant-to-environment interactions. Recent reports reveal that MAPK signaling is involved in both stomatal development and movement. This mini-review summarizes the roles of MAPK signaling in stomatal development and movement. How MAPK specificity is maintained in stomatal development and movement is also discussed. PMID:20855958

  6. Towards a causal analysis of stomatal patchiness: the role of stomatal size variability and hydrological heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyschlag, Wolfram; Eckstein, Jürgen

    2001-06-01

    The induction of the well known and widespread phenomenon 'stomatal patchiness' has been attributed to a variety of potential causes: from low PPFD levels, all kinds of stress conditions to CO 2-changes and even fungal infections. A mechanism which explains the occurrence of reproducible patterns of static (i.e. stable) stomatal patchiness at low PPFD levels is proposed. Further, experimental evidence is presented for the hypothesis that dynamic (i.e. not stable) stomatal patchiness is a consequence of heterogeneous water status in different parts of the leaf and can be induced by all ambient factors which cause such heterogeneities.

  7. The guard cell metabolome: functions in stomatal movement and global food security

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Biswapriya B.; Acharya, Biswa R.; Granot, David; Assmann, Sarah M.; Chen, Sixue

    2015-01-01

    Guard cells represent a unique single cell-type system for the study of cellular responses to abiotic and biotic perturbations that affect stomatal movement. Decades of effort through both classical physiological and functional genomics approaches have generated an enormous amount of information on the roles of individual metabolites in stomatal guard cell function and physiology. Recent application of metabolomics methods has produced a substantial amount of new information on metabolome control of stomatal movement. In conjunction with other “omics” approaches, the knowledge-base is growing to reach a systems-level description of this single cell-type. Here we summarize current knowledge of the guard cell metabolome and highlight critical metabolites that bear significant impact on future engineering and breeding efforts to generate plants/crops that are resistant to environmental challenges and produce high yield and quality products for food and energy security. PMID:26042131

  8. Modelling stomatal conductance in Acacia caven: A two way approach to understand vapor fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, N.; Meza, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Evapotranspiration fluxes from semi arid ecosystems show a strong interannual variability and dependence on water availability. Usually this variable is regarded as very small but at local scale could substantially affect water balance at basin level. Climate Change scenarios for these regions are a source of concern as they project an increase in temperature, leading to a greater atmospheric water demand. In addition, precipitation is expected to decrease, increasing pressure for this kind of ecosystems. At a plant level, a rise on the actual atmospheric CO2 concentration is expected to improve photosynthetic performance and water use efficiency. However, as stomatal conductance is the main pathway for water vapor flux, from the leaf to the atmosphere, and CO2 entrance to the substomatal cavity, a larger control of the stomatal opening, due to a severe water control lost from the plant, could lead to shortages in net assimilation, jeopardizing the behavior of Semi Arid ecosystems as natural carbon sinks. Stoma is also one of the main lock of the soil-plant-water continuum, thus finally controlling the rate of soil water depletion. Its modeling presents a key role in determining future groundwater availability and net ecosystem exchange. There are several approaches for stomatal conductance modeling, from mechanistic models, based on the physiological functioning of the stomata, to empirical models where the stomatal behavior is correlated with environmental conditions. We modeled stomatal conductance for a Chilean typical Mediterranean Savannanh, dominated by Acacia caven, comparing two different empirical approaches. We used a Shuttleworth and Wallace model for sparse canopies combined with an inversion of the Penman-Monteith equation. This model allowed us to link stomatal conductance to evapotranspiration. The second approach was based on a multiplicative model for stomatal conductance based on environmental limitation, following Jarvis's model

  9. Stomatal and non-stomatal limitations of photosynthesis in trees of a tropical seasonally flooded forest.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Ana; Tezara, Wilmer; Marín, Oranys; Rengifo, Elizabeth

    2008-09-01

    Trees in the flooded forest of the Mapire River in Venezuela suffer a decrease in photosynthetic rate (A) when flood begins, which is reverted at maximum flood. Changes in A are accompanied by similar changes in stomatal conductance (g(s)), and the possibility of changes in photosynthetic capacity is not ruled out. In order to understand how relative stomatal and non-stomatal limitations of photosynthesis are affected by flooding, we studied the seasonal changes in A and its response to intercellular CO(2) concentration in trees of Campsiandra laurifolia, Symmeria paniculata, Acosmium nitens and Eschweilera tenuifolia. Flooding caused in trees of C. laurifolia and S. paniculata a reduction in A, g(s), carboxylation efficiency and total soluble protein (TSP), whereas gas exchange in A. nitens and E. tenuifolia was more sensitive to drought. Under flooding, relative stomatal limitation (L(s)) was on average half the highest, and relative non-stomatal limitation (L(ns)) increased from the dry season to flooding. Under full flood, A, g(s) and TSP regained high values. A was positively correlated to light-saturated electron transport rate, suggesting that part of the decrease in A under flooding was due to impairment of photosynthetic capacity. Under flooding, not only stomatal closure but also increased L(ns) causes a reduction in photosynthesis of all four species, and a process of acclimation as flooding progresses allows gas exchange and related variables to regain high values. PMID:18444960

  10. Stomatal Spacing Safeguards Stomatal Dynamics by Facilitating Guard Cell Ion Transport Independent of the Epidermal Solute Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Papanatsiou, Maria; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    Stomata enable gaseous exchange between the interior of the leaf and the atmosphere through the stomatal pore. Control of the pore aperture depends on osmotic solute accumulation by, and its loss from the guard cells surrounding the pore. Stomata in most plants are separated by at least one epidermal cell, and this spacing is thought to enhance stomatal function, although there are several genera that exhibit stomata in clusters. We made use of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stomatal patterning mutants to explore the impact of clustering on guard cell dynamics, gas exchange, and ion transport of guard cells. These studies showed that stomatal clustering in the Arabidopsis too many mouths (tmm1) mutant suppressed stomatal movements and affected CO2 assimilation and transpiration differentially between dark and light conditions and were associated with alterations in K(+) channel gating. These changes were consistent with the impaired dynamics of tmm1 stomata and were accompanied by a reduced accumulation of K(+) ions in the guard cells. Our findings underline the significance of spacing for stomatal dynamics. While stomatal spacing may be important as a reservoir for K(+) and other ions to facilitate stomatal movements, the effects on channel gating, and by inference on K(+) accumulation, cannot be explained on the basis of a reduced number of epidermal cells facilitating ion supply to the guard cells. PMID:27406168

  11. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Akintoye, Sunday O; Greenberg, Martin S

    2005-01-01

    The cause of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) remains unknown despite considerable research. This article reviews the evidence for current theories regarding this disorder, including possible suspected relationships with microbial and immunologic factors, and presents medical diseases that mimic RAS lesions in certain patients. Topical management of the common form of minor RAS is described along with systemic therapy currently available to patients with severe forms of this disease. PMID:15567359

  12. Stomatal Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pillitteri, Lynn Jo; Dong, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Stomata consist of two guard cells that function as turgor-operated valves that regulate gas exchange in plants. In Arabidopsis, a dedicated cell lineage is initiated and undergoes a series of cell divisions and cell-state transitions to produce a stoma. A set of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulates the transition and differentiation events through the lineage, while the placement of stomata relative to each other is controlled by intercellular signaling via peptide ligands, transmembrane receptors, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) modules. Some genes involved in regulating stomatal differentiation or density are also involved in hormonal and environmental stress responses, which may provide a link between modulation of stomatal development or function in response to changes in the environment. Premitotic polarlylocalized proteins provide an added layer of regulation, which can be addressed more thoroughly with the identification of additional proteins in this pathway. Linking the networks that control stomatal development promises to bring advances to our understanding of signal transduction, cell polarity, and cell-fate specification in plants. PMID:23864836

  13. Hexokinase mediates stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Gilor; Moshelion, Menachem; David-Schwartz, Rakefet; Halperin, Ofer; Wallach, Rony; Attia, Ziv; Belausov, Eduard; Granot, David

    2013-09-01

    Stomata, composed of two guard cells, are the gates whose controlled movement allows the plant to balance the demand for CO2 for photosynthesis with the loss of water through transpiration. Increased guard-cell osmolarity leads to the opening of the stomata and decreased osmolarity causes the stomata to close. The role of sugars in the regulation of stomata is not yet clear. In this study, we examined the role of hexokinase (HXK), a sugar-phosphorylating enzyme involved in sugar-sensing, in guard cells and its effect on stomatal aperture. We show here that increased expression of HXK in guard cells accelerates stomatal closure. We further show that this closure is induced by sugar and is mediated by abscisic acid. These findings support the existence of a feedback-inhibition mechanism that is mediated by a product of photosynthesis, namely sucrose. When the rate of sucrose production exceeds the rate at which sucrose is loaded into the phloem, the surplus sucrose is carried toward the stomata by the transpiration stream and stimulates stomatal closure via HXK, thereby preventing the loss of precious water. PMID:23738737

  14. The Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase AHA1 Plays a Major Role in Stomatal Opening in Response to Blue Light.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Shota; Takemiya, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Kurata, Tetsuya; Tsutsumi, Toshifumi; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Shimazaki, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    Stomata open in response to a beam of weak blue light under strong red light illumination. A blue light signal is perceived by phototropins and transmitted to the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase that drives stomatal opening. To identify the components in this pathway, we screened for mutants impaired in blue light-dependent stomatal opening. We analyzed one such mutant, provisionally named blus2 (blue light signaling2), and found that stomatal opening in leaves was impaired by 65%, although the magnitude of red light-induced opening was not affected. Blue light-dependent stomatal opening in the epidermis and H(+) pumping in guard cell protoplasts were inhibited by 70% in blus2 Whole-genome resequencing identified a mutation in the AHA1 gene of the mutant at Gly-602. T-DNA insertion mutants of AHA1 exhibited a similar phenotype to blus2; this phenotype was complemented by the AHA1 gene. We renamed blus2 as aha1-10 T-DNA insertion mutants of AHA2 and AHA5 did not show any impairment in stomatal response, although the transcript levels of AHA2 and AHA5 were higher than those of AHA1 in wild-type guard cells. Stomata in ost2, a constitutively active AHA1 mutant, did not respond to blue light. A decreased amount of H(+)-ATPase in aha1-10 accounted for the reduced stomatal blue light responses and the decrease was likely caused by proteolysis of misfolded AHA1. From these results, we conclude that AHA1 plays a major role in blue light-dependent stomatal opening in Arabidopsis and that the mutation made the AHA1 protein unstable in guard cells. PMID:27261063

  15. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water balance of temperate deciduous forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Katata, Genki; Deushi, Makoto; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Paoletti, Elena

    2015-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations have increased by 60-100% in the Northern Hemisphere since the 19th century. The phytotoxic nature of ozone can impair forest productivity. In addition, ozone affects stomatal functions, by both favoring stomatal closure and impairing stomatal control. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness, i.e., a delay in stomatal responses to fluctuating stimuli, has the potential to change the carbon and water balance of forests. This effect has to be included in models for ozone risk assessment. Here we examine the effects of ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness on carbon assimilation and transpiration of temperate deciduous forests in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2009 by combining a detailed multi-layer land surface model and a global atmospheric chemistry model. An analysis of results by ozone FACE (Free-Air Controlled Exposure) experiments suggested that ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness can be incorporated into modelling based on a simple parameter (gmin, minimum stomatal conductance) which is used in the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal model. Our simulation showed that ozone can decrease water use efficiency, i.e., the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to transpiration, of temperate deciduous forests up to 20% when ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness is considered, and up to only 5% when the stomatal sluggishness is neglected.

  16. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water balance of temperate deciduous forests

    PubMed Central

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Katata, Genki; Deushi, Makoto; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Paoletti, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations have increased by 60–100% in the Northern Hemisphere since the 19th century. The phytotoxic nature of ozone can impair forest productivity. In addition, ozone affects stomatal functions, by both favoring stomatal closure and impairing stomatal control. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness, i.e., a delay in stomatal responses to fluctuating stimuli, has the potential to change the carbon and water balance of forests. This effect has to be included in models for ozone risk assessment. Here we examine the effects of ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness on carbon assimilation and transpiration of temperate deciduous forests in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2009 by combining a detailed multi-layer land surface model and a global atmospheric chemistry model. An analysis of results by ozone FACE (Free-Air Controlled Exposure) experiments suggested that ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness can be incorporated into modelling based on a simple parameter (gmin, minimum stomatal conductance) which is used in the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal model. Our simulation showed that ozone can decrease water use efficiency, i.e., the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to transpiration, of temperate deciduous forests up to 20% when ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness is considered, and up to only 5% when the stomatal sluggishness is neglected. PMID:25943276

  17. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water balance of temperate deciduous forests.

    PubMed

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Katata, Genki; Deushi, Makoto; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Paoletti, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations have increased by 60-100% in the Northern Hemisphere since the 19(th) century. The phytotoxic nature of ozone can impair forest productivity. In addition, ozone affects stomatal functions, by both favoring stomatal closure and impairing stomatal control. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness, i.e., a delay in stomatal responses to fluctuating stimuli, has the potential to change the carbon and water balance of forests. This effect has to be included in models for ozone risk assessment. Here we examine the effects of ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness on carbon assimilation and transpiration of temperate deciduous forests in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2009 by combining a detailed multi-layer land surface model and a global atmospheric chemistry model. An analysis of results by ozone FACE (Free-Air Controlled Exposure) experiments suggested that ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness can be incorporated into modelling based on a simple parameter (gmin, minimum stomatal conductance) which is used in the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal model. Our simulation showed that ozone can decrease water use efficiency, i.e., the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to transpiration, of temperate deciduous forests up to 20% when ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness is considered, and up to only 5% when the stomatal sluggishness is neglected. PMID:25943276

  18. Chlorella Induces Stomatal Closure via NADPH Oxidase-Dependent ROS Production and Its Effects on Instantaneous Water Use Efficiency in Vicia faba

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Xu, Shan-Shan; Gao, Jing; Pan, Sha; Wang, Gen-Xuan

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been established to participate in stomatal closure induced by live microbes and microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). Chlorella as a beneficial microorganism can be expected to trigger stomatal closure via ROS production. Here, we reported that Chlorella induced stomatal closure in a dose-and time-dependent manner in epidermal peels of Vicia faba. Using pharmacological methods in this work, we found that the Chlorella-induced stomatal closure was almost completely abolished by a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenger, catalase (CAT), significantly suppressed by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI), and slightly affected by a peroxidase inhibitor, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), suggesting that ROS production involved in Chlorella-induced stomatal closure is mainly mediated by DPI-sensitive NADPH oxidase. Additionally, Exogenous application of optimal concentrations of Chlorella suspension improved instantaneous water use efficiency (WUEi) in Vicia faba via a reduction in leaf transpiration rate (E) without a parallel reduction in net photosynthetic rate (Pn) assessed by gas-exchange measurements. The chlorophyll fluorescence and content analysis further demonstrated that short-term use of Chlorella did not influence plant photosynthetic reactions center. These results preliminarily reveal that Chlorella can trigger stomatal closure via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in epidermal strips and improve WUEi in leave levels. PMID:24687099

  19. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  20. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  1. Three-dimensional surface topography of the needle stomatal complexes of Pinus rigida and its hybrid species by complementary microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Du-Hyun; Han, Sim-Hee; Lee, Jae-Cheon; Kim, Pan-Gi

    2010-08-01

    Three-dimensional surface topography of needle stomatal complexes was investigated in Pinus rigida, Pinus taeda, and their interspecific hybrid Pinus rigitaeda. The stomatal complexes of P. rigida appeared to be sunken and ca. 15 microm deep by white light scanning interferometry. Stomatal grooves were evident in P. taeda along the stomata and amounted to ca. 5 microm deep. The centers of stomata maintained the similar height to the stomatal apertures. Meanwhile, the stomatal complexes of P. rigitaeda (ca. 15 microm deep) were characterized by distinct stomatal grooves and sunken stomatal chambers. In addition, field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed the stomatal complexes of P. rigida partially filled with epicuticular waxes. It was common to observe distinct stomatal grooves and chamber-filled stomata on P. taeda needles. The stomatal complexes of P. rigitaeda had the distinct stomatal grooves and were partially filled with wax tubules and rodlets. Surface roughness measurements of stomatal complexes showed higher levels of roughness from P. rigida and P. rigitaeda than that from P. taeda. These results indicate that the hybrid species P. rigitaeda showed intermediacy in surface characteristics between the parent species, suggesting the genetic control of needle stomatal complexes in the hybrid species. PMID:20452778

  2. Acclimations to light quality on plant and leaf level affect the vulnerability of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) to water deficit.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Anna M; Noga, Georg; Hunsche, Mauricio

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the influence of light quality on the vulnerability of pepper plants to water deficit. For this purpose plants were cultivated either under compact fluorescence lamps (CFL) or light-emitting diodes (LED) providing similar photon fluence rates (95 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) but distinct light quality. CFL emit a wide-band spectrum with dominant peaks in the green and red spectral region, whereas LEDs offer narrow band spectra with dominant peaks at blue (445 nm) and red (665 nm) regions. After one-week acclimation to light conditions plants were exposed to water deficit by withholding irrigation; this period was followed by a one-week regeneration period and a second water deficit cycle. In general, plants grown under CFL suffered more from water deficit than plants grown under LED modules, as indicated by the impairment of the photosynthetic efficiency of PSII, resulting in less biomass accumulation compared to respective control plants. As affected by water shortage, plants grown under CFL had a stronger decrease in the electron transport rate (ETR) and more pronounced increase in heat dissipation (NPQ). The higher amount of blue light suppressed plant growth and biomass formation, and consequently reduced the water demand of plants grown under LEDs. Moreover, pepper plants exposed to high blue light underwent adjustments at chloroplast level (e.g., higher Chl a/Chl b ratio), increasing the photosynthetic performance under the LED spectrum. Differently than expected, stomatal conductance was comparable for water-deficit and control plants in both light conditions during the stress and recovery phases, indicating only minor adjustments at the stomatal level. Our results highlight the potential of the target-use of light quality to induce structural and functional acclimations improving plant performance under stress situations. PMID:25626402

  3. Affective State Level Recognition in Naturalistic Facial and Vocal Expressions.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hongying; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia

    2014-03-01

    Naturalistic affective expressions change at a rate much slower than the typical rate at which video or audio is recorded. This increases the probability that consecutive recorded instants of expressions represent the same affective content. In this paper, we exploit such a relationship to improve the recognition performance of continuous naturalistic affective expressions. Using datasets of naturalistic affective expressions (AVEC 2011 audio and video dataset, PAINFUL video dataset) continuously labeled over time and over different dimensions, we analyze the transitions between levels of those dimensions (e.g., transitions in pain intensity level). We use an information theory approach to show that the transitions occur very slowly and hence suggest modeling them as first-order Markov models. The dimension levels are considered to be the hidden states in the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) framework. Their discrete transition and emission matrices are trained by using the labels provided with the training set. The recognition problem is converted into a best path-finding problem to obtain the best hidden states sequence in HMMs. This is a key difference from previous use of HMMs as classifiers. Modeling of the transitions between dimension levels is integrated in a multistage approach, where the first level performs a mapping between the affective expression features and a soft decision value (e.g., an affective dimension level), and further classification stages are modeled as HMMs that refine that mapping by taking into account the temporal relationships between the output decision labels. The experimental results for each of the unimodal datasets show overall performance to be significantly above that of a standard classification system that does not take into account temporal relationships. In particular, the results on the AVEC 2011 audio dataset outperform all other systems presented at the international competition. PMID:23757552

  4. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ricky Z; Bruce, Alison J; Rogers, Roy S

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common acute oral ulcerative condition in North America. RAS is divided into a mild, common form, simple aphthosis, and a severe, less common form, complex aphthosis. Aphthosis is a reactive condition. The lesions of RAS can represent the mucosal manifestation of a variety of conditions. These include conditions with oral and genital aphthae such as ulcus vulvae acutum, reactive nonsexually related acute genital ulcers, and Behçet disease. The mouth is the beginning of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and the lesions of RAS can be a manifestation of GI diseases such as gluten-sensitive enteropathy, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn disease. Complex aphthosis may also have correctable causes. The clinician should seek these in a careful evaluation. Successful management of both simple and complex aphthosis depends on accurate diagnosis, proper classification, recognition of provocative factors, and the identification of associated diseases. The outlook for patients with both simple and complex aphthosis is positive. PMID:27343962

  5. Environmental adaptation in stomatal size independent of the effects of genome size.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Gregory J; Carpenter, Raymond J; Koutoulis, Anthony; Price, Aina; Brodribb, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cell sizes are linked across multiple tissues, including stomata, and this variation is closely correlated with genome size. These associations raise the question of whether generic changes in cell size cause suboptimal changes in stomata, requiring subsequent evolution under selection for stomatal size. We tested the relationships among guard cell length, genome size and vegetation type using phylogenetically independent analyses on 67 species of the ecologically and structurally diverse family, Proteaceae. We also compared how genome and stomatal sizes varied at ancient (among genera) and more recent (within genus) levels. The observed 60-fold range in genome size in Proteaceae largely reflected the mean chromosome size. Compared with variation among genera, genome size varied much less within genera (< 6% of total variance) than stomatal size, implying evolution in stomatal size subsequent to changes in genome size. Open vegetation and closed forest had significantly different relationships between stomatal and genome sizes. Ancient changes in genome size clearly influenced stomatal size in Proteaceae, but adaptation to habitat strongly modified the genome-stomatal size relationship. Direct adaptation to the environment in stomatal size argues that new proxies for past concentrations of atmospheric CO2 that incorporate stomatal size are superior to older models based solely on stomatal frequency. PMID:25266914

  6. Environmental adaptation in stomatal size independent of the effects of genome size

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Gregory J; Carpenter, Raymond J; Koutoulis, Anthony; Price, Aina; Brodribb, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cell sizes are linked across multiple tissues, including stomata, and this variation is closely correlated with genome size. These associations raise the question of whether generic changes in cell size cause suboptimal changes in stomata, requiring subsequent evolution under selection for stomatal size. We tested the relationships among guard cell length, genome size and vegetation type using phylogenetically independent analyses on 67 species of the ecologically and structurally diverse family, Proteaceae. We also compared how genome and stomatal sizes varied at ancient (among genera) and more recent (within genus) levels. The observed 60-fold range in genome size in Proteaceae largely reflected the mean chromosome size. Compared with variation among genera, genome size varied much less within genera (< 6% of total variance) than stomatal size, implying evolution in stomatal size subsequent to changes in genome size. Open vegetation and closed forest had significantly different relationships between stomatal and genome sizes. Ancient changes in genome size clearly influenced stomatal size in Proteaceae, but adaptation to habitat strongly modified the genome–stomatal size relationship. Direct adaptation to the environment in stomatal size argues that new proxies for past concentrations of atmospheric CO2 that incorporate stomatal size are superior to older models based solely on stomatal frequency. PMID:25266914

  7. Calcium effects on stomatal movement in Commelina communis L

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A.; Ilan, N.; Grantz, D.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Stomatal movements depends on both ion influx and efflux: attainment of steady state apertures reflects modulation of either or both processes. The role of Ca{sup 2+} in those two processes was investigated in isolated epidermal strips of Commelina communis, using the Ca{sup 2+} chelator EGTA to reduce apoplastic (Ca{sup 2+}). The results suggest that a certain concentration of Ca{sup 2+} is an absolute requirement for salt efflux and stomatal closure. EGTA (2 millimolar) increased KCl-dependent stomatal opening in darkness and completely inhibited the dark-induced closure of initially open stomata. Closure was inhibited even in a KCl-free medium. Thus, maintenance of stomata in the open state does not necessarily depend on continued K{sup +} influx but on the inhibition of salt efflux. Opening in the dark was stimulated by IAA in a concentration-dependent manner, up to 15.4 micrometer without reaching saturation, while the response to EGTA leveled off at 9.2 micrometer. IAA did not inhibit stomatal closure to the extent it stimulated opening. The response to IAA is thus consistent with a primary stimulation of opening, while EGTA can be considered a specific inhibitor of stomatal closing since it inhibits closure to a much larger degree than it stimulates opening. CO{sub 2} causes concentration-dependent reduction in the steady state stomatal aperture. EGTA completely reversed CO{sub 2}-induced closing of open stomata but only partially prevented the inhibition of opening.

  8. Effects of stomatal development on stomatal conductance and on stomatal limitation of photosynthesis in Syringa oblata and Euonymus japonicus Thunb.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing-Jie; Chow, Wah Soon; Liu, Yu-Jun; Shi, Lei; Jiang, Chuang-Dao

    2014-12-01

    During leaf development, the increase in stomatal conductance cannot meet photosynthetic demand for CO2, thus leading to stomatal limitation of photosynthesis (Ls). Considering the crucial influences of stomatal development on stomatal conductance, we speculated whether stomatal development limits photosynthesis to some extent. To test this hypothesis, stomatal development, stomatal conductance and photosynthesis were carefully studied in both Syringa oblata (normal greening species) and Euonymus japonicus Thunb (delayed greening species). Our results show that the size of stomata increased gradually with leaf expansion, resulting in increased stomatal conductance up to the time of full leaf expansion. During this process, photosynthesis also increased steadily. Compared to that in S. oblata, the development of chloroplasts in E. japonicus Thunb was obviously delayed, leading to a delay in the improvement of photosynthetic capacity. Further analysis revealed that before full leaf expansion, stomatal limitation increased rapidly in both S. oblata and E. japonicus Thunb; after full leaf expansion, stomatal limitation continually increased in E. japonicus Thunb. Accordingly, we suggested that the enhancement of photosynthetic capacity is the main factor leading to stomatal limitation during leaf development but that stomatal development can alleviate stomatal limitation with the increase of photosynthesis by controlling gas exchange. PMID:25443830

  9. Enhanced Stomatal Conductance by a Spontaneous Arabidopsis Tetraploid, Me-0, Results from Increased Stomatal Size and Greater Stomatal Aperture.

    PubMed

    Monda, Keina; Araki, Hiromitsu; Kuhara, Satoru; Ishigaki, Genki; Akashi, Ryo; Negi, Juntaro; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Sho; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Goto, Nobuharu; Iba, Koh

    2016-03-01

    The rate of gas exchange in plants is regulated mainly by stomatal size and density. Generally, higher densities of smaller stomata are advantageous for gas exchange; however, it is unclear what the effect of an extraordinary change in stomatal size might have on a plant's gas-exchange capacity. We investigated the stomatal responses to CO2 concentration changes among 374 Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotypes and discovered that Mechtshausen (Me-0), a natural tetraploid ecotype, has significantly larger stomata and can achieve a high stomatal conductance. We surmised that the cause of the increased stomatal conductance is tetraploidization; however, the stomatal conductance of another tetraploid accession, tetraploid Columbia (Col), was not as high as that in Me-0. One difference between these two accessions was the size of their stomatal apertures. Analyses of abscisic acid sensitivity, ion balance, and gene expression profiles suggested that physiological or genetic factors restrict the stomatal opening in tetraploid Col but not in Me-0. Our results show that Me-0 overcomes the handicap of stomatal opening that is typical for tetraploids and achieves higher stomatal conductance compared with the closely related tetraploid Col on account of larger stomatal apertures. This study provides evidence for whether larger stomatal size in tetraploids of higher plants can improve stomatal conductance. PMID:26754665

  10. In situ stomatal responses to long-term CO 2 enrichment in calcareous grassland plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauber, Wolfgang; Körner, Christian

    A calcareous grassland community growing under full season CO 2 enrichment at low altitude in the Swiss Jura mountains was investigated for diurnal and seasonal variations of leaf diffusive conductance. A new CO 2 enrichment method (Screen aided CO 2 control, SACC) permitted in situ leaf porometry under natural climatic conditions without disturbance of plants. At 600 ppm CO 2, leaf conductance in the dominant species, Bromus erectus (a species so far not showing a growth response to elevated CO 2) was reduced to half the values measured in controls. In contrast, leaf conductance in Carex flacca, a species of low cover (the only species so far exhibiting a dramatic growth stimulation by CO 2 fertilization) remained almost unaffected by elevated CO 2. Sanguisorba minor, Plantago media, and Cirsium acaule showed intermediate responses. Trifolium montanum, studied only on a single day, showed a reduction like Bromus. Differences between treatments were largest under humid conditions and disappeared during dry periods. In none of the species studied did stomatal density or stomatal index differ between treatments. A parallel investigation of whole ecosystem evapotranspiration indicated only small (<10%) and non significant CO 2 responses, suggesting that both aerodynamic effects at the canopy level and a great interspecific variation of leaf level responses overshadow the clear CO 2 response of Bromus stomata. The different stomatal responses to CO 2 enrichment are likely to alter species specific water consumption, and may thus affect community structure in the long run.

  11. The Ecophysiology Of A Pinus Ponderosa Ecosystem Exposed To High Tropospheric Ozone: Implications For Stomatal And Non-Stomatal Ozone Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fares, S.; McKay, M.; Goldstein, A.

    2008-12-01

    Ecosystems remove ozone from the troposphere through both stomatal and non-stomatal deposition. The portion of ozone taken up through stomata has an oxidative effect causing damage. We used a multi-year dataset to assess the physiological controls over ozone deposition. Environmental parameters, CO2 and ozone fluxes were measured continuously from January 2001 to December 2006 above a ponderosa pine plantation near Blodgett Forest, Georgetown, California. We studied the dynamic of NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange, -838 g C m-2 yr-1) and water evapotranspiration on an annual and daily basis. These processes are tightly coupled to stomatal aperture which also controlled ozone fluxes. High levels of ozone concentrations (~ 100 ppb) were observed during the spring-summer period, with corresponding high levels of ozone fluxes (~ 30 μmol m-2 h-1). During the summer season, a large portion of the total ozone flux was due to non-stomatal processes, and we propose that a plant physiological control, releasing BVOC (Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds), is mainly responsible. We analyzed the correlations of common ozone exposure metrics based on accumulation of concentrations (AOT40 and SUM0) with ozone fluxes (total, stomatal and non-stomatal). Stomatal flux showed poorer correlation with ozone concentrations than non-stomatal flux during summer and fall seasons, which largely corresponded to the growing period. We therefore suggest that AOT40 and SUM0 are poor predictors of ozone damage and that a physiologically based metric would be more effective.

  12. Factors affecting the level of success of community information systems.

    PubMed

    Coombs, C R; Doherty, N F; Loan-Clarke, J

    1999-01-01

    The factors that influence the ultimate level of success or failure of systems development projects have received considerable attention in the academic literature. However, previous research has rarely targeted different instances of a common type of system within a homogeneous organisational sector. This paper presents the results of a survey of IM&T managers within Community Trusts to gain insights into the factors affecting the success of Community Information Systems. The results demonstrate that the most successful operational systems were thoroughly tested prior to implementation and enjoyed high levels of user and senior management commitment. Furthermore, it has been shown that there is a relationship between the level of organisational impact and systems success, with the most successful systems engendering changes to the host organisation's culture, level of empowerment and clinical working practices. In addition to being of academic interest, this research provides many important insights for practising IM&T managers. PMID:10747445

  13. NFX1-LIKE2 (NFXL2) Suppresses Abscisic Acid Accumulation and Stomatal Closure in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lisso, Janina; Schröder, Florian; Fisahn, Joachim; Müssig, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    The NFX1-LIKE1 (NFXL1) and NFXL2 genes were identified as regulators of salt stress responses. The NFXL1 protein is a nuclear factor that positively affects adaptation to salt stress. The nfxl1-1 loss-of-function mutant displayed reduced survival rates under salt and high light stress. In contrast, the nfxl2-1 mutant, defective in the NFXL2 gene, and NFXL2-antisense plants exhibited enhanced survival under these conditions. We show here that the loss of NFXL2 function results in abscisic acid (ABA) overaccumulation, reduced stomatal conductance, and enhanced survival under drought stress. The nfxl2-1 mutant displayed reduced stomatal aperture under all conditions tested. Fusicoccin treatment, exposition to increasing light intensities, and supply of decreasing CO2 concentrations demonstrated full opening capacity of nfxl2-1 stomata. Reduced stomatal opening presumably is a consequence of elevated ABA levels. Furthermore, seedling growth, root growth, and stomatal closure were hypersensitive to exogenous ABA. The enhanced ABA responses may contribute to the improved drought stress resistance of the mutant. Three NFXL2 splice variants were cloned and named NFXL2-78, NFXL2-97, and NFXL2-100 according to the molecular weight of the putative proteins. Translational fusions to the green fluorescent protein suggest nuclear localisation of the NFXL2 proteins. Stable expression of the NFXL2-78 splice variant in nfxl2-1 plants largely complemented the mutant phenotype. Our data show that NFXL2 controls ABA levels and suppresses ABA responses. NFXL2 may prevent unnecessary and costly stress adaptation under favourable conditions. PMID:22073231

  14. Role of H2O2 dynamics in brassinosteroid-induced stomatal closure and opening in Solanum lycopersicum.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Jian; Gao, Chun-Juan; Song, Liu-Xia; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2014-09-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential for plant growth and development; however, their roles in the regulation of stomatal opening or closure remain obscure. Here, the mechanism underlying BR-induced stomatal movements is studied. The effects of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) on the stomatal apertures of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) were measured by light microscopy using epidermal strips of wild type (WT), the abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient notabilis (not) mutant, and plants silenced for SlBRI1, SlRBOH1 and SlGSH1. EBR induced stomatal opening within an appropriate range of concentrations, whereas high concentrations of EBR induced stomatal closure. EBR-induced stomatal movements were closely related to dynamic changes in H(2)O(2) and redox status in guard cells. The stomata of SlRBOH1-silenced plants showed a significant loss of sensitivity to EBR. However, ABA deficiency abolished EBR-induced stomatal closure but did not affect EBR-induced stomatal opening. Silencing of SlGSH1, the critical gene involved in glutathione biosynthesis, disrupted glutathione redox homeostasis and abolished EBR-induced stomatal opening. The results suggest that transient H(2)O(2) production is essential for poising the cellular redox status of glutathione, which plays an important role in BR-induced stomatal opening. However, a prolonged increase in H(2)O(2) facilitated ABA signalling and stomatal closure. PMID:24428600

  15. Brassinosteroids tailor stomatal production to different environments.

    PubMed

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E; Betti, Camilla; Russinova, Eugenia

    2012-12-01

    Two recent reports show that brassinosteroids control stomata production by regulating the GSK3-like kinase BIN2-mediated phosphorylation of two different stomatal signalling components resulting in opposite stomatal phenotypes. We discuss how these two mechanisms might differentially control stomatal generation under diverse growth conditions. PMID:23022359

  16. Ozone inhibits guard cell K+ channels implicated in stomatal opening

    PubMed Central

    Torsethaugen, Gro; Pell, Eva J.; Assmann, Sarah M.

    1999-01-01

    Ozone (O3) deleteriously affects organisms ranging from humans to crop plants, yet little is understood regarding the underlying mechanisms. In plants, O3 decreases CO2 assimilation, but whether this could result from direct O3 action on guard cells remained unknown. Potassium flux causes osmotically driven changes in guard cell volume that regulate apertures of associated microscopic pores through which CO2 is supplied to the photosynthetic mesophyll tissue. We show in Vicia faba that O3 inhibits (i) guard cell K+ channels that mediate K+ uptake that drives stomatal opening; (ii) stomatal opening in isolated epidermes; and (iii) stomatal opening in leaves, such that CO2 assimilation is reduced without direct effects of O3 on photosynthetic capacity. Direct O3 effects on guard cells may have ecological and agronomic implications for plant productivity and for response to other environmental stressors including drought. PMID:10557363

  17. Stomatal Response to Environment with Sesamum indicum. L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Anthony E.; Kaufmann, Merrill R.

    1975-01-01

    Leaf resistance of Sesamum indicum L. increased when the humidity gradient between leaf and air was increased, at moderate temperatures, even though calculated carbon dioxide concentrations within the leaf decreased slightly. Mesophyll resistance remained relatively constant when humidity gradients were changed, indicating that the increases in leaf resistance were mainly caused by reductions in stomatal aperture and that nonstomatal aspects of photosynthesis and respiration were not affected. Low carbon dioxide concentrations inside the leaf decreased but did not eliminate resistance response to the humidity gradient. Internal carbon dioxide concentrations had little effect on resistance in humid air but had moderate effects on resistance with large humidity gradients between leaf and air. Stomatal response to humidity was not present at high leaf temperatures. Effects of humidity gradients on photosynthetic and stomatal responses to temperature suggested that large humidity gradients may contribute to mid-day closure of stomata and depressions in photosynthesis. PMID:16659101

  18. Transcription factor WRKY46 regulates osmotic stress responses and stomatal movement independently in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhong Jie; Yan, Jing Ying; Xu, Xiao Yan; Yu, Di Qiu; Li, Gui Xin; Zhang, Shu Qun; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2014-07-01

    Drought and salt stress severely inhibit plant growth and development; however, the regulatory mechanisms of plants in response to these stresses are not fully understood. Here we report that the expression of a WRKY transcription factor WRKY46 is rapidly induced by drought, salt and oxidative stresses. T-DNA insertion of WRKY46 leads to more sensitivity to drought and salt stress, whereas overexpression of WRKY46 (OV46) results in hypersensitivity in soil-grown plants, with a higher water loss rate, but with increased tolerance on the sealed agar plates. Stomatal closing in the OV46 line is insensitive to ABA because of a reduced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the guard cells. We further find that WRKY46 is expressed in guard cells, where its expression is not affected by dehydration, and is involved in light-dependent stomatal opening. Microarray analysis reveals that WRKY46 regulates a set of genes involved in cellular osmoprotection and redox homeostasis under dehydration stress, which is confirmed by ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in stressed seedlings. Moreover, WRKY46 modulates light-dependent starch metabolism in guard cells via regulating QUA-QUINE STARCH (QQS) gene expression. Taken together, we demonstrate that WRKY46 plays dual roles in regulating plant responses to drought and salt stress and light-dependent stomatal opening in guard cells. PMID:24773321

  19. A rate equation model of stomatal responses to vapour pressure deficit and drought

    PubMed Central

    Eamus, D; Shanahan, ST

    2002-01-01

    Background Stomata respond to vapour pressure deficit (D) – when D increases, stomata begin to close. Closure is the result of a decline in guard cell turgor, but the link between D and turgor is poorly understood. We describe a model for stomatal responses to increasing D based upon cellular water relations. The model also incorporates impacts of increasing levels of water stress upon stomatal responses to increasing D. Results The model successfully mimics the three phases of stomatal responses to D and also reproduces the impact of increasing plant water deficit upon stomatal responses to increasing D. As water stress developed, stomata regulated transpiration at ever decreasing values of D. Thus, stomatal sensitivity to D increased with increasing water stress. Predictions from the model concerning the impact of changes in cuticular transpiration upon stomatal responses to increasing D are shown to conform to experimental data. Sensitivity analyses of stomatal responses to various parameters of the model show that leaf thickness, the fraction of leaf volume that is air-space, and the fraction of mesophyll cell wall in contact with air have little impact upon behaviour of the model. In contrast, changes in cuticular conductance and membrane hydraulic conductivity have significant impacts upon model behaviour. Conclusion Cuticular transpiration is an important feature of stomatal responses to D and is the cause of the 3 phase response to D. Feed-forward behaviour of stomata does not explain stomatal responses to D as feedback, involving water loss from guard cells, can explain these responses. PMID:12153703

  20. Viral Surveillance during the 2006 Vesicular Stomatitis Outbreak in Natrona County, Wyoming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006, we collected 12203 biting flies from a vesicular stomatitis outbreak in Natrona County, Wyoming. Flies were identified to the species level and viruses were isolated and identified by RT-PCR. We detected vesicular stomatitis virus-New Jersey serotype in two pools of Simulium bivittatum, W...

  1. An integrated model of stomatal development and leaf physiology.

    PubMed

    Dow, Graham J; Bergmann, Dominique C; Berry, Joseph A

    2014-03-01

    Stomatal conductance (g(s)) is constrained by the size and number of stomata on the plant epidermis, and the potential maximum rate of g(s) can be calculated based on these stomatal traits (Anatomical g(smax)). However, the relationship between Anatomical g(smax) and operational g(s) under atmospheric conditions remains undefined. • Leaf-level gas-exchange measurements were performed for six Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes that have different Anatomical g(smax) profiles resulting from mutations or transgene activity in stomatal development. • We found that Anatomical g(smax) was an accurate prediction of g(s) under gas-exchange conditions that maximized stomatal opening, namely high-intensity light, low [CO₂], and high relative humidity. Plants with different Anatomical g(smax) had quantitatively similar responses to increasing [CO₂] when g(s) was scaled to Anatomical g(smax). This latter relationship allowed us to produce and test an empirical model derived from the Ball-Woodrow-Berry equation that estimates g(s) as a function of Anatomical g(smax), relative humidity, and [CO₂] at the leaf. • The capacity to predict operational g(s) via Anatomical g(smax) and the pore-specific short-term response to [CO₂] demonstrates a precise link between stomatal development and leaf physiology. This connection should be useful to quantify the gas flux of plants in past, present, and future CO₂ regimes based upon the anatomical features of stomata. PMID:24251982

  2. Neural Affective Mechanisms Predict Market-Level Microlending

    PubMed Central

    Genevsky, Alexander; Knutson, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Humans sometimes share with others whom they may never meet or know, in violation of the dictates of pure self-interest. Research has not established which neuropsychological mechanisms support lending decisions, nor whether their influence extends to markets involving significant financial incentives. In two studies, we found that neural affective mechanisms influence the success of requests for microloans. In a large Internet database of microloan requests (N = 13,500), we found that positive affective features of photographs promoted the success of those requests. We then established that neural activity (i.e., in the nucleus accumbens) and self-reported positive arousal in a neuroimaging sample (N = 28) predicted the success of loan requests on the Internet, above and beyond the effects of the neuroimaging sample’s own choices (i.e., to lend or not). These findings suggest that elicitation of positive arousal can promote the success of loan requests, both in the laboratory and on the Internet. They also highlight affective neuroscience’s potential to probe neuropsychological mechanisms that drive microlending, enhance the effectiveness of loan requests, and forecast market-level behavior. PMID:26187248

  3. Comparable low-level mosaicism in affected and non affected tissue of a complex CDH patient.

    PubMed

    Veenma, Danielle; Beurskens, Niels; Douben, Hannie; Eussen, Bert; Noomen, Petra; Govaerts, Lutgarde; Grijseels, Els; Lequin, Maarten; de Krijger, Ronald; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies; Van Opstal, Dian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the detailed clinical and cytogenetic analysis of a prenatally detected complex Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) patient with a mosaic unbalanced translocation (5;12). High-resolution whole genome SNP array confirmed a low-level mosaicism (20%) in uncultured cells, underlining the value of array technology for identification studies. Subsequently, targeted Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization in postmortem collected tissues demonstrated a similar low-level mosaicism, independently of the affected status of the tissue. Thus, a higher incidence of the genetic aberration in affected organs as lung and diaphragm cannot explain the severe phenotype of this complex CDH patient. Comparison with other described chromosome 5p and 12p anomalies indicated that half of the features presented in our patient (including the diaphragm defect) could be attributed to both chromosomal areas. In contrast, a few features such as the palpebral downslant, the broad nasal bridge, the micrognathia, microcephaly, abnormal dermatoglyphics and IUGR better fitted the 5p associated syndromes only. This study underlines the fact that low-level mosaicism can be associated with severe birth defects including CDH. The contribution of mosaicism to human diseases and specifically to congenital anomalies and spontaneous abortions becomes more and more accepted, although its phenotypic consequences are poorly described phenomena leading to counseling issues. Therefore, thorough follow-up of mosaic aberrations such as presented here is indicated in order to provide genetic counselors a more evidence based prediction of fetal prognosis in the future. PMID:21203572

  4. RNAi-Directed Downregulation of Vacuolar H+-ATPase Subunit A Results in Enhanced Stomatal Aperture and Density in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fangming; Cao, Shuqing; Liu, Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Stomatal movement plays a key role in plant development and response to drought and salt stress by regulating gas exchange and water loss. A number of genes have been demonstrated to be involved in the regulation of this process. Using inverse genetics approach, we characterized the function of a rice (Oryza sativa L.) vacuolar H+-ATPase subunit A (OsVHA-A) gene in stomatal conductance regulation and physiological response to salt and osmotic stress. OsVHA-A was constitutively expressed in different rice tissues, and the fusion protein of GFP-OsVHA-A was exclusively targeted to tonoplast when transiently expressed in the onion epidermal cells. Heterologous expression of OsVHA-A was able to rescue the yeast mutant vma1Δ (lacking subunit A activity) phenotype, suggesting that it partially restores the activity of V-ATPase. Meanwhile, RNAi-directed knockdown of OsVHA-A led to a reduction of vacuolar H+-ATPase activity and an enhancement of plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity, thereby increasing the concentrations of extracellular H+ and intracellular K+ and Na+ under stress conditions. Knockdown of OsVHA-A also resulted in the upregulation of PAM3 (plasma membrane H+-ATPase 3) and downregulation of CAM1 (calmodulin 1), CAM3 (calmodulin 3) and YDA1 (YODA, a MAPKK gene). Altered level of the ion concentration and the gene expression by knockdown of OsVHA-A probably resulted in expanded aperture of stomatal pores and increased stomatal density. In addition, OsVHA-A RNAi plants displayed significant growth inhibition under salt and osmotic stress conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that OsVHA-A takes part in regulating stomatal density and opening via interfering with pH value and ionic equilibrium in guard cells and thereby affects the growth of rice plants. PMID:23894405

  5. RNAi-directed downregulation of vacuolar H(+) -ATPase subunit a results in enhanced stomatal aperture and density in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiying; Niu, Xiangli; Liu, Jia; Xiao, Fangming; Cao, Shuqing; Liu, Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Stomatal movement plays a key role in plant development and response to drought and salt stress by regulating gas exchange and water loss. A number of genes have been demonstrated to be involved in the regulation of this process. Using inverse genetics approach, we characterized the function of a rice (Oryza sativa L.) vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunit A (OsVHA-A) gene in stomatal conductance regulation and physiological response to salt and osmotic stress. OsVHA-A was constitutively expressed in different rice tissues, and the fusion protein of GFP-OsVHA-A was exclusively targeted to tonoplast when transiently expressed in the onion epidermal cells. Heterologous expression of OsVHA-A was able to rescue the yeast mutant vma1Δ (lacking subunit A activity) phenotype, suggesting that it partially restores the activity of V-ATPase. Meanwhile, RNAi-directed knockdown of OsVHA-A led to a reduction of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase activity and an enhancement of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, thereby increasing the concentrations of extracellular H(+) and intracellular K(+) and Na(+) under stress conditions. Knockdown of OsVHA-A also resulted in the upregulation of PAM3 (plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase 3) and downregulation of CAM1 (calmodulin 1), CAM3 (calmodulin 3) and YDA1 (YODA, a MAPKK gene). Altered level of the ion concentration and the gene expression by knockdown of OsVHA-A probably resulted in expanded aperture of stomatal pores and increased stomatal density. In addition, OsVHA-A RNAi plants displayed significant growth inhibition under salt and osmotic stress conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that OsVHA-A takes part in regulating stomatal density and opening via interfering with pH value and ionic equilibrium in guard cells and thereby affects the growth of rice plants. PMID:23894405

  6. Treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Soriano, Yolanda; Claramunt-Lozano, Ariadna

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common chronic disease of the oral cavity, affecting 5-25% of the population. The underlying etiology remains unclear, and no curative treatment is available. The present review examines the existing treatments for RAS with the purpose of answering a number of questions: How should these patients be treated in the dental clinic? What topical drugs are available and when should they be used? What systemic drugs are available and when should they be used? A literature search was made of the PubMed, Cochrane and Scopus databases, limited to articles published between 2008-2012, with scientific levels of evidence 1 and 2 (metaanalyses, systematic reviews, phase I and II randomized clinical trials, cohort studies and case-control studies), and conducted in humans. The results obtained indicate that the management of RAS should be based on identification and control of the possible predisposing factors, with the exclusion of possible underlying systemic causes, and the use of a detailed clinical history along with complementary procedures such as laboratory tests, where required. Only in the case of continuous outbreaks and symptoms should drug treatment be prescribed, with the initial application of local treatments in all cases. A broad range of topical medications are available, including antiseptics (chlorhexidine), antiinflammatory drugs (amlexanox), antibiotics (tetracyclines) and corticosteroids (triamcinolone acetonide). In patients with constant and aggressive outbreaks (major aphthae), pain is intense and topical treatment is unable to afford symptoms relief. Systemic therapy is indicated in such situations, in the form of corticosteroids (prednisone) or thalidomide, among other drugs. Key words:Recurrent aphthous stomatitis, treatment, clinical management. PMID:24790718

  7. Perinatal Oxidative Stress May Affect Fetal Ghrelin Levels in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhong-Cheng; Bilodeau, Jean-François; Monique Nuyt, Anne; Fraser, William D.; Julien, Pierre; Audibert, Francois; Xiao, Lin; Garofalo, Carole; Levy, Emile

    2015-01-01

    In vitro cell model studies have shown that oxidative stress may affect beta-cell function. It is unknown whether oxidative stress may affect metabolic health in human fetuses/newborns. In a singleton pregnancy cohort (n = 248), we studied maternal (24–28 weeks gestation) and cord plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress [malondialdehyde (MDA), F2-isoprostanes] in relation to fetal metabolic health biomarkers including cord plasma glucose-to-insulin ratio (an indicator of insulin sensitivity), proinsulin-to-insulin ratio (an indicator of beta-cell function), insulin, IGF-I, IGF-II, leptin, adiponectin and ghrelin concentrations. Strong positive correlations were observed between maternal and cord plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress (r = 0.33 for MDA, r = 0.74 for total F2-isoprostanes, all p < 0.0001). Adjusting for gestational age at blood sampling, cord plasma ghrelin concentrations were consistently negatively correlated to oxidative stress biomarkers in maternal (r = −0.32, p < 0.0001 for MDA; r = −0.31, p < 0.0001 for F2-isoprostanes) or cord plasma (r = −0.13, p = 0.04 for MDA; r = −0.32, p < 0.0001 for F2-isoprostanes). Other fetal metabolic health biomarkers were not correlated to oxidative stress. Adjusting for maternal and pregnancy characteristics, similar associations were observed. Our study provides the first preliminary evidence suggesting that oxidative stress may affect fetal ghrelin levels in humans. The implications in developmental “programming” the vulnerability to metabolic syndrome related disorders remain to be elucidated. PMID:26643495

  8. Electrical potentials in stomatal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Saftner, R.A.; Raschke, K.

    1981-06-01

    Guard cells of several species, but predominantly Commelina communis, were impaled by micropipette electrodes and potential differences measured that occurred between cell compartments and the flowing bathing medium. The wall developed a Donnan potential that was between -60 and -70 millivolt in 30 millimolar KC1 at pH 7. The density of the fixed charges ranged from 0.3 to 0.5 molar; its dependence on pH was almost identical with the titration curve of authentic polygalacturonic acid. The vacuolar potential of guard cells of Commelina communis L., Zea mays L., Nicotiana glauca Graham, Allium cepa L., and Vicia faba L. was between -40 and -50 millivolt in 30 millimolar KCl when stomata were open and about -30 millivolt when stomata were closed. The vacuolar potential of guard cells of C. communis was almost linearly related to stomatal aperture and responded to changes in the ionic strength in the bathing medium in a Nernstian manner. No specificity for any alkali ion (except Li/sup +/), ammonium, or choline appeared. Lithium caused hyperpolarization. Calcium in concentrations between 1 and 100 millimolar in the medium led to stomatal closure, also caused hyperpolarization, and triggered transient oscillations in the intracellular potential. Gradients in the electrical potential existed across stomatal complexes with open pores. When stomata closed, these gradients almost disappeared or slightly reverted; all epidermal cells were then at potentials near -30 millivolt in 30 millimolar KCl.

  9. Levels of maternal care in dogs affect adult offspring temperament.

    PubMed

    Foyer, Pernilla; Wilsson, Erik; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    Dog puppies are born in a state of large neural immaturity; therefore, the nervous system is sensitive to environmental influences early in life. In primates and rodents, early experiences, such as maternal care, have been shown to have profound and lasting effects on the later behaviour and physiology of offspring. We hypothesised that this would also be the case for dogs with important implications for the breeding of working dogs. In the present study, variation in the mother-offspring interactions of German Shepherd dogs within the Swedish breeding program for military working dogs was studied by video recording 22 mothers with their litters during the first three weeks postpartum. The aim was to classify mothers with respect to their level of maternal care and to investigate the effect of this care on pup behaviour in a standardised temperament test carried out at approximately 18 months of age. The results show that females differed consistently in their level of maternal care, which significantly affected the adult behaviour of the offspring, mainly with respect to behaviours classified as Physical and Social Engagement, as well as Aggression. Taking maternal quality into account in breeding programs may therefore improve the process of selecting working dogs. PMID:26758076

  10. Levels of maternal care in dogs affect adult offspring temperament

    PubMed Central

    Foyer, Pernilla; Wilsson, Erik; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    Dog puppies are born in a state of large neural immaturity; therefore, the nervous system is sensitive to environmental influences early in life. In primates and rodents, early experiences, such as maternal care, have been shown to have profound and lasting effects on the later behaviour and physiology of offspring. We hypothesised that this would also be the case for dogs with important implications for the breeding of working dogs. In the present study, variation in the mother-offspring interactions of German Shepherd dogs within the Swedish breeding program for military working dogs was studied by video recording 22 mothers with their litters during the first three weeks postpartum. The aim was to classify mothers with respect to their level of maternal care and to investigate the effect of this care on pup behaviour in a standardised temperament test carried out at approximately 18 months of age. The results show that females differed consistently in their level of maternal care, which significantly affected the adult behaviour of the offspring, mainly with respect to behaviours classified as Physical and Social Engagement, as well as Aggression. Taking maternal quality into account in breeding programs may therefore improve the process of selecting working dogs. PMID:26758076

  11. Circadian Rhythms in Stomatal Responsiveness to Red and Blue Light.

    PubMed Central

    Gorton, H. L.; Williams, W. E.; Assmann, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    Stomata of many plants have circadian rhythms in responsiveness to environmental cues as well as circadian rhythms in aperture. Stomatal responses to red light and blue light are mediated by photosynthetic photoreceptors; responses to blue light are additionally controlled by a specific blue-light photoreceptor. This paper describes circadian rhythmic aspects of stomatal responsiveness to red and blue light in Vicia faba. Plants were exposed to a repeated light:dark regime of 1.5:2.5 h for a total of 48 h, and because the plants could not entrain to this short light:dark cycle, circadian rhythms were able to "free run" as if in continuous light. The rhythm in the stomatal conductance established during the 1.5-h light periods was caused both by a rhythm in sensitivity to light and by a rhythm in the stomatal conductance established during the preceding 2.5-h dark periods. Both rhythms peaked during the middle of the subjective day. Although the stomatal response to blue light is greater than the response to red light at all times of day, there was no discernible difference in period, phase, or amplitude of the rhythm in sensitivity to the two light qualities. We observed no circadian rhythmicity in net carbon assimilation with the 1.5:2.5 h light regime for either red or blue light. In continuous white light, small rhythmic changes in photosynthetic assimilation were observed, but at relatively high light levels, and these appeared to be attributable largely to changes in internal CO2 availability governed by stomatal conductance. PMID:12231947

  12. Balancing Water Uptake and Loss through the Coordinated Regulation of Stomatal and Root Development.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Christopher; Turner, Carla; Landim, Marcela Guimaraes; Cameron, Duncan; Gray, Julie E

    2016-01-01

    Root development is influenced by nutrient and water availabilities. Plants are able to adjust many attributes of their root in response to environmental signals including the size and shape of the primary root, lateral roots and root hairs. Here we investigated the response of roots to changes in the levels of leaf transpiration associated with altered stomatal frequency. We found that plants with high stomatal density and conductance produce a larger rooting area and as a result have enhanced phosphate uptake capacity whereas plants with low stomatal conductance produce a smaller root. Manipulating the growth environment of plants indicated that enhanced root growth is most likely a result of an increased demand for water rather than phosphate. Plants manipulated to have an increase or reduction in root hair growth show a reduction or increase respectively, in stomatal conductance and density. Our results demonstrate that plants can balance their water uptake and loss through coordinated regulation of both stomatal and root development. PMID:27275842

  13. Balancing Water Uptake and Loss through the Coordinated Regulation of Stomatal and Root Development

    PubMed Central

    Hepworth, Christopher; Turner, Carla; Landim, Marcela Guimaraes; Cameron, Duncan; Gray, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Root development is influenced by nutrient and water availabilities. Plants are able to adjust many attributes of their root in response to environmental signals including the size and shape of the primary root, lateral roots and root hairs. Here we investigated the response of roots to changes in the levels of leaf transpiration associated with altered stomatal frequency. We found that plants with high stomatal density and conductance produce a larger rooting area and as a result have enhanced phosphate uptake capacity whereas plants with low stomatal conductance produce a smaller root. Manipulating the growth environment of plants indicated that enhanced root growth is most likely a result of an increased demand for water rather than phosphate. Plants manipulated to have an increase or reduction in root hair growth show a reduction or increase respectively, in stomatal conductance and density. Our results demonstrate that plants can balance their water uptake and loss through coordinated regulation of both stomatal and root development. PMID:27275842

  14. Guard Cell Chloroplasts Are Essential for Blue Light-Dependent Stomatal Opening in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Takami, Tsuneaki; Ebisu, Yuuta; Watanabe, Harutaka; Iiboshi, Chihoko; Doi, Michio; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening through the activation of H+-ATPases with subsequent ion accumulation in guard cells. In most plant species, red light (RL) enhances BL-dependent stomatal opening. This RL effect is attributable to the chloroplasts of guard cell, the only cells in the epidermis possessing this organelle. To clarify the role of chloroplasts in stomatal regulation, we investigated the effects of RL on BL-dependent stomatal opening in isolated epidermis, guard cell protoplasts, and intact leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. In isolated epidermal tissues and intact leaves, weak BL superimposed on RL enhanced stomatal opening while BL alone was less effective. In guard cell protoplasts, RL enhanced BL-dependent H+-pumping and DCMU, a photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor, eliminated this effect. RL enhanced phosphorylation levels of the H+-ATPase in response to BL, but this RL effect was not suppressed by DCMU. Furthermore, DCMU inhibited both RL-induced and BL-dependent stomatal opening in intact leaves. The photosynthetic rate in leaves correlated positively with BL-dependent stomatal opening in the presence of DCMU. We conclude that guard cell chloroplasts provide ATP and/or reducing equivalents that fuel BL-dependent stomatal opening, and that they indirectly monitor photosynthetic CO2 fixation in mesophyll chloroplasts by absorbing PAR in the epidermis. PMID:25250952

  15. Guard cell chloroplasts are essential for blue light-dependent stomatal opening in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Takami, Tsuneaki; Ebisu, Yuuta; Watanabe, Harutaka; Iiboshi, Chihoko; Doi, Michio; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening through the activation of H+-ATPases with subsequent ion accumulation in guard cells. In most plant species, red light (RL) enhances BL-dependent stomatal opening. This RL effect is attributable to the chloroplasts of guard cell, the only cells in the epidermis possessing this organelle. To clarify the role of chloroplasts in stomatal regulation, we investigated the effects of RL on BL-dependent stomatal opening in isolated epidermis, guard cell protoplasts, and intact leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. In isolated epidermal tissues and intact leaves, weak BL superimposed on RL enhanced stomatal opening while BL alone was less effective. In guard cell protoplasts, RL enhanced BL-dependent H+-pumping and DCMU, a photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor, eliminated this effect. RL enhanced phosphorylation levels of the H+-ATPase in response to BL, but this RL effect was not suppressed by DCMU. Furthermore, DCMU inhibited both RL-induced and BL-dependent stomatal opening in intact leaves. The photosynthetic rate in leaves correlated positively with BL-dependent stomatal opening in the presence of DCMU. We conclude that guard cell chloroplasts provide ATP and/or reducing equivalents that fuel BL-dependent stomatal opening, and that they indirectly monitor photosynthetic CO2 fixation in mesophyll chloroplasts by absorbing PAR in the epidermis. PMID:25250952

  16. Evidence-based modelling of diverse plant water use strategies on stomatal and non-stomatal components under drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    zhou, S.; Prentice, C.; Medlyn, B. E.; Sabaté, S.

    2013-12-01

    Models disagree on how to represent effects of drought stress on plant gas exchange. Some models assume drought stress affects the marginal water use efficiency of plants (marginal WUE; i.e. the change in photosynthesis per unit of change in transpiration) whereas others assume drought stress acts directly on photosynthetic capacity. It is not clear whether either of these approaches is sufficient to capture the drought response, or whether the effect of drought varies among species and functional types. A collection of Eucalyptus and Quercus species derived from different hydro-climate habitats, in together with two European riparian species, were conducted with drought treatments respectively in Australia and Spain for three months. Measurements included net CO2 assimilation rate versus substomatal CO2 concentration (A-Ci) curves, fluorescence, and predawn leaf water potential at increasing levels of water stress. The correlations with quantitative plant traits of leaf, stomata, vessel, and wood density, leaf nitrogen content and 13C discrimination were also explored. We analysed the effect of drought effect on leaf gas exchange with a recently developed stomatal model that reconciles the empirical and optimal approaches on predicting optimal stomatal conductance. The model's single parameter g1 is a decreasing function of marginal WUE. The two genera showed consistence on the contrasting response patterns between species derived from mesic and arid habitats, which differed greatly in their estimated g1 values under moist conditions, and in the rate at which g1 declined with water stress. They also differed greatly in the predawn water potential at which apparent carboxylation capacity (apparent Vcmax) and mesophyll conductance (gm) declined most steeply, and in the steepness of this decline. Principal components analysis revealed a gradient in water relation strategies from sclerophyll species to malacophyll species. Malacophylls had higher g1, apparent Vcmax

  17. Hfq affects mRNA levels independently of degradation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial Lsm protein, Hfq, is an RNA chaperone involved in many reactions related to RNA metabolism, such as replication and stability, control of small RNA activity and polyadenylation. Despite this wide spectrum of known functions, the global role of Hfq is almost certainly undervalued; its capacity to bind DNA and to interact with many other proteins are only now beginning to be taken into account. Results The role of Hfq in the maturation and degradation of the rpsO mRNA of E. coli was investigated in vivo. The data revealed a decrease in rpsO mRNA abundance concomitant to an increase in its stability when Hfq is absent. This indicates that the change in mRNA levels in hfq mutants does not result from its modification of RNA stability. Moreover, a series of independent experiments have revealed that the decrease in mRNA level is not a consequence of a reduction of translation efficiency and that Hfq is not directly implicated in translational control of rpsO expression. Reduced steady-state mRNA levels in the absence of Hfq were also shown for rpsT, rpsB and rpsB-tsf, but not for lpp, pnp or tRNA transcripts. The abundance of chimeric transcripts rpsO-lacZ and rpsB-lacZ, whose expression was driven by rpsO and rpsB promoters, respectively, was also lower in the hfq null-mutants, while the β-galactosidase yield remained about the same as in the parent wild-type strain. Conclusions The data obtained suggest that alteration of rpsO, rpsT and rpsB-tsf transcript levels observed under conditions of Hfq deficiency is not caused by the post-transcriptional events, such as mRNA destabilization or changes in translation control, and may rather result from changes in transcriptional activity. So far, how Hfq affects transcription remains unclear. We propose that one of the likely mechanisms of Hfq-mediated modulation of transcription might operate early in the elongation step, when interaction of Hfq with a nascent transcript would help to overcome

  18. Genetic manipulation of stomatal density influences stomatal size, plant growth and tolerance to restricted water supply across a growth carbon dioxide gradient

    PubMed Central

    Doheny-Adams, Timothy; Hunt, Lee; Franks, Peter J.; Beerling, David J.; Gray, Julie E.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the impact of manipulating stomatal density, a collection of Arabidopsis epidermal patterning factor (EPF) mutants with an approximately 16-fold range of stomatal densities (approx. 20–325% of that of control plants) were grown at three atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations (200, 450 and 1000 ppm), and 30 per cent or 70 per cent soil water content. A strong negative correlation between stomatal size (S) and stomatal density (D) was observed, suggesting that factors that control D also affect S. Under some but not all conditions, mutant plants exhibited abnormal stomatal density responses to CO2 concentration, suggesting that the EPF signalling pathway may play a role in the environmental adjustment of D. In response to reduced water availability, maximal stomatal conductance was adjusted through reductions in S, rather than D. Plant size negatively correlated with D. For example, at 450 ppm CO2 EPF2-overexpressing plants, with reduced D, had larger leaves and increased dry weight in comparison with controls. The growth of these plants was also less adversely affected by reduced water availability than plants with higher D, indicating that plants with low D may be well suited to growth under predicted future atmospheric CO2 environments and/or water-scarce environments. PMID:22232766

  19. Guard cell photosynthesis is critical for stomatal turgor production, yet does not directly mediate CO2- and ABA-induced stomatal closing

    PubMed Central

    Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Palomares, Axxell; Bagheri, Andish; Israelsson-Nordstrom, Maria; Engineer, Cawas B.; Bargmann, Bastiaan O.R.; Stephan, Aaron B.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Stomata mediate gas exchange between the inter-cellular spaces of leaves and the atmosphere. CO2 levels in leaves (Ci) are determined by respiration, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and atmospheric [CO2]. [CO2] in leaves mediates stomatal movements. The role of guard-cell photosynthesis in stomatal conductance responses is a matter of debate, and genetic approaches are needed. We have generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants that are chlorophyll-deficient in guard cells only, expressing a constitutively active chlorophyllase in a guard-cell specific enhancer trap-line. Our data show that more than 90% of guard cells were chlorophyll-deficient. Interestingly, approximately ~ 45% of stomata had an unusual, previously not-described, morphology of thin-shaped chlorophyll-less stomata. Nevertheless, stomatal size, stomatal index, plant morphology, and whole-leaf photosynthetic parameters (PSII, qP, qN, FV′/FM′) were comparable to wild-type plants. Time-resolved intact leaf gas exchange analyses showed a reduction in stomatal conductance and carbon assimilation rates of the transgenic plants. Normalization of CO2 responses showed that stomata of transgenic plants respond to [CO2] shifts. Detailed stomatal aperture measurements of normal kidney-shaped stomata, which lack chlorophyll, showed stomatal closing responses to [CO2] elevation and abscisic acid (ABA), while thin-shaped stomata were continuously closed. Our present findings show that stomatal movement responses to [CO2] and ABA are functional in guard cells that lack chlorophyll. These data suggest that guard-cell CO2 and ABA signal transduction are not directly modulated by guard-cell photosynthesis/electron transport. Moreover, the finding that chlorophyll-less stomata cause a “deflated” thin-shaped phenotype, suggests that photosynthesis in guard cells is critical for energization and guard-cell turgor production. PMID:26096271

  20. Guard cell photosynthesis is critical for stomatal turgor production, yet does not directly mediate CO2 - and ABA-induced stomatal closing.

    PubMed

    Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Palomares, Axxell; Bagheri, Andisheh; Israelsson-Nordstrom, Maria; Engineer, Cawas B; Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Stephan, Aaron B; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-08-01

    Stomata mediate gas exchange between the inter-cellular spaces of leaves and the atmosphere. CO2 levels in leaves (Ci) are determined by respiration, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and atmospheric [CO2 ]. [CO2 ] in leaves mediates stomatal movements. The role of guard cell photosynthesis in stomatal conductance responses is a matter of debate, and genetic approaches are needed. We have generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants that are chlorophyll-deficient in guard cells only, expressing a constitutively active chlorophyllase in a guard cell specific enhancer trap line. Our data show that more than 90% of guard cells were chlorophyll-deficient. Interestingly, approximately 45% of stomata had an unusual, previously not-described, morphology of thin-shaped chlorophyll-less stomata. Nevertheless, stomatal size, stomatal index, plant morphology, and whole-leaf photosynthetic parameters (PSII, qP, qN, FV '/FM' ) were comparable with wild-type plants. Time-resolved intact leaf gas-exchange analyses showed a reduction in stomatal conductance and CO2 -assimilation rates of the transgenic plants. Normalization of CO2 responses showed that stomata of transgenic plants respond to [CO2 ] shifts. Detailed stomatal aperture measurements of normal kidney-shaped stomata, which lack chlorophyll, showed stomatal closing responses to [CO2 ] elevation and abscisic acid (ABA), while thin-shaped stomata were continuously closed. Our present findings show that stomatal movement responses to [CO2 ] and ABA are functional in guard cells that lack chlorophyll. These data suggest that guard cell CO2 and ABA signal transduction are not directly modulated by guard cell photosynthesis/electron transport. Moreover, the finding that chlorophyll-less stomata cause a 'deflated' thin-shaped phenotype, suggests that photosynthesis in guard cells is critical for energization and guard cell turgor production. PMID:26096271

  1. Signaling to stomatal initiation and cell division

    PubMed Central

    Le, Jie; Zou, Junjie; Yang, Kezhen; Wang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Stomata are two-celled valves that control epidermal pores whose opening and spacing optimizes shoot-atmosphere gas exchange. Arabidopsis stomatal formation involves at least one asymmetric division and one symmetric division. Stomatal formation and patterning are regulated by the frequency and placement of asymmetric divisions. This model system has already led to significant advances in developmental biology, such as the regulation of cell fate, division, differentiation, and patterning. Over the last 30 years, stomatal development has been found to be controlled by numerous intrinsic genetic and environmental factors. This mini review focuses on the signaling involved in stomatal initiation and in divisions in the cell lineage. PMID:25002867

  2. Signaling to stomatal initiation and cell division.

    PubMed

    Le, Jie; Zou, Junjie; Yang, Kezhen; Wang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Stomata are two-celled valves that control epidermal pores whose opening and spacing optimizes shoot-atmosphere gas exchange. Arabidopsis stomatal formation involves at least one asymmetric division and one symmetric division. Stomatal formation and patterning are regulated by the frequency and placement of asymmetric divisions. This model system has already led to significant advances in developmental biology, such as the regulation of cell fate, division, differentiation, and patterning. Over the last 30 years, stomatal development has been found to be controlled by numerous intrinsic genetic and environmental factors. This mini review focuses on the signaling involved in stomatal initiation and in divisions in the cell lineage. PMID:25002867

  3. Calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK6 positively functions in induction by yeast elicitor of stomatal closure and inhibition by yeast elicitor of light-induced stomatal opening in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenxiu; Muroyama, Daichi; Munemasa, Shintaro; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2013-10-01

    Yeast elicitor (YEL) induces stomatal closure that is mediated by a Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathway. A Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase, CPK6, positively regulates activation of ion channels in abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate signaling, leading to stomatal closure in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). YEL also inhibits light-induced stomatal opening. However, it remains unknown whether CPK6 is involved in induction by YEL of stomatal closure or in inhibition by YEL of light-induced stomatal opening. In this study, we investigated the roles of CPK6 in induction by YEL of stomatal closure and inhibition by YEL of light-induced stomatal opening in Arabidopsis. Disruption of CPK6 gene impaired induction by YEL of stomatal closure and inhibition by YEL of light-induced stomatal opening. Activation by YEL of nonselective Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels was impaired in cpk6-2 guard cells, and transient elevations elicited by YEL in cytosolic-free Ca(2+) concentration were suppressed in cpk6-2 and cpk6-1 guard cells. YEL activated slow anion channels in wild-type guard cells but not in cpk6-2 or cpk6-1 and inhibited inward-rectifying K(+) channels in wild-type guard cells but not in cpk6-2 or cpk6-1. The cpk6-2 and cpk6-1 mutations inhibited YEL-induced hydrogen peroxide accumulation in guard cells and apoplast of rosette leaves but did not affect YEL-induced hydrogen peroxide production in the apoplast of rosette leaves. These results suggest that CPK6 positively functions in induction by YEL of stomatal closure and inhibition by YEL of light-induced stomatal opening in Arabidopsis and is a convergent point of signaling pathways for stomatal closure in response to abiotic and biotic stress. PMID:23922271

  4. Type of Speech Material Affects Acceptable Noise Level Test Outcome.

    PubMed

    Koch, Xaver; Dingemanse, Gertjan; Goedegebure, André; Janse, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test, in which individuals indicate what level of noise they are willing to put up with while following speech, has been used to guide hearing aid fitting decisions and has been found to relate to prospective hearing aid use. Unlike objective measures of speech perception ability, ANL outcome is not related to individual hearing loss or age, but rather reflects an individual's inherent acceptance of competing noise while listening to speech. As such, the measure may predict aspects of hearing aid success. Crucially, however, recent studies have questioned its repeatability (test-retest reliability). The first question for this study was whether the inconsistent results regarding the repeatability of the ANL test may be due to differences in speech material types used in previous studies. Second, it is unclear whether meaningfulness and semantic coherence of the speech modify ANL outcome. To investigate these questions, we compared ANLs obtained with three types of materials: the International Speech Test Signal (ISTS), which is non-meaningful and semantically non-coherent by definition, passages consisting of concatenated meaningful standard audiology sentences, and longer fragments taken from conversational speech. We included conversational speech as this type of speech material is most representative of everyday listening. Additionally, we investigated whether ANL outcomes, obtained with these three different speech materials, were associated with self-reported limitations due to hearing problems and listening effort in everyday life, as assessed by a questionnaire. ANL data were collected for 57 relatively good-hearing adult participants with an age range representative for hearing aid users. Results showed that meaningfulness, but not semantic coherence of the speech material affected ANL. Less noise was accepted for the non-meaningful ISTS signal than for the meaningful speech materials. ANL repeatability was comparable across

  5. Type of Speech Material Affects Acceptable Noise Level Test Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Xaver; Dingemanse, Gertjan; Goedegebure, André; Janse, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test, in which individuals indicate what level of noise they are willing to put up with while following speech, has been used to guide hearing aid fitting decisions and has been found to relate to prospective hearing aid use. Unlike objective measures of speech perception ability, ANL outcome is not related to individual hearing loss or age, but rather reflects an individual’s inherent acceptance of competing noise while listening to speech. As such, the measure may predict aspects of hearing aid success. Crucially, however, recent studies have questioned its repeatability (test–retest reliability). The first question for this study was whether the inconsistent results regarding the repeatability of the ANL test may be due to differences in speech material types used in previous studies. Second, it is unclear whether meaningfulness and semantic coherence of the speech modify ANL outcome. To investigate these questions, we compared ANLs obtained with three types of materials: the International Speech Test Signal (ISTS), which is non-meaningful and semantically non-coherent by definition, passages consisting of concatenated meaningful standard audiology sentences, and longer fragments taken from conversational speech. We included conversational speech as this type of speech material is most representative of everyday listening. Additionally, we investigated whether ANL outcomes, obtained with these three different speech materials, were associated with self-reported limitations due to hearing problems and listening effort in everyday life, as assessed by a questionnaire. ANL data were collected for 57 relatively good-hearing adult participants with an age range representative for hearing aid users. Results showed that meaningfulness, but not semantic coherence of the speech material affected ANL. Less noise was accepted for the non-meaningful ISTS signal than for the meaningful speech materials. ANL repeatability was comparable

  6. Genetic variation in circadian regulation of nocturnal stomatal conductance enhances carbon assimilation and growth.

    PubMed

    Resco de Dios, Víctor; Loik, Michael E; Smith, Renee; Aspinwall, Michael J; Tissue, David T

    2016-01-01

    Circadian resonance, whereby a plant's endogenous rhythms are tuned to match environmental cues, has been repeatedly shown to be adaptive, although the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Concomitantly, the adaptive value of nocturnal transpiration in C3 plants remains unknown because it occurs without carbon assimilation. These seemingly unrelated processes are interconnected because circadian regulation drives temporal patterns in nocturnal stomatal conductance, with maximum values occurring immediately before dawn for many species. We grew individuals of six Eucalyptus camaldulensis genotypes in naturally lit glasshouses and measured sunset, predawn and midday leaf gas exchange and whole-plant biomass production. We tested whether sunrise anticipation by the circadian clock and subsequent increases in genotype predawn stomatal conductance led to rapid stomatal opening upon illumination, ultimately affecting genotype differences in carbon assimilation and growth. We observed faster stomatal responses to light inputs at sunrise in genotypes with higher predawn stomatal conductance. Moreover, early morning and midday stomatal conductance and carbon assimilation, leaf area and total plant biomass were all positively correlated with predawn stomatal conductance across genotypes. Our results lead to the novel hypothesis that genotypic variation in the circadian-regulated capacity to anticipate sunrise could be an important factor underlying intraspecific variation in tree growth. PMID:26147129

  7. Burdock fructooligosaccharide induces stomatal closure in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanling; Guo, Moran; Zhao, Wenlu; Chen, Kaoshan; Zhang, Pengying

    2013-09-12

    Burdock fructooligosaccharide (BFO) isolated from the root tissue of Arctium lappa is a reserve carbohydrate that can induce resistance against a number of plant diseases. Stomatal closure is a part of plant innate immune response to restrict bacterial invasion. In this study, the effects of BFO on stomata movement in Pisum sativum and the possible mechanisms were studied with abscisic acid (ABA) as a positive control. The results showed that BFO could induce stomatal closure accompanied by ROS and NO production, as is the case with ABA. BFO-induced stomatal closure was inhibited by pre-treatment with L-NAME (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, hydrochloride; nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) and catalase (hydrogen peroxide scavenger). Exogenous catalase completely restricted BFO-induced production of ROS and NO in guard cells. In contrast, L-NAME prevented the rise in NO levels but only partially restricted the ROS production. These results indicate that BFO-induced stomatal closure is mediated by ROS and ROS-dependent NO production. PMID:23911508

  8. Transmission and pathogenesis of vesicular stomatitis viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vesicular Stomatitis (VS) is caused by the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), a negative single stranded RNA arthropod-borne virus member of the Family Rhabdoviridae. The virion is composed of the host derived plasma membrane, the envelope, and an internal ribonucleoprotein core. The envelope contain...

  9. A New mouthwash for Chemotherapy Induced Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Miranzadeh, Sedigheh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Soleymanpoor, Leyla; Ehsani, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stomatitis is a disturbing side-effect of chemotherapy that disturbs patients and causes difficulties in patient’s drinking, eating and talking, and may results in infection and bleeding. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of Yarrow distillate in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. Patients and Methods: This randomized controlled trial study was conducted during 2013. The study population consisted of all cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced oral stomatitis referred to Shahid Beheshti Medical Center, Kashan, Iran. The data collection instrument had two-part; a demographic part and another part recording the severity of the stomatitis at the first, seventh, and 14th days of the intervention based on a WHO criteria checklist in 2005. In this study, 56 patients diagnosed with cancer were randomly assigned into control and experimental groups in similar blocks according to their stomatitis severity. The experimental group gargled 15 mL of a routine solution mixed with Yarrow distillate 4 times a day for 14 days while the control group gargled 15 mL of routine solution. The severity of stomatitis was assessed at the beginning of the intervention, and then after 7 and 14 days of the study. Data were analyzed using chi-square and Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, and Friedman tests using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: At first, the median score of stomatitis in the experimental group was 2.50 that significantly reduced to 1 and 0 in days 7 and 14 of the intervention, respectively (P value < 0.001). However, in the control group, the median score of stomatitis was 2.50, which significantly increased to 3 in days 7 and 14 (P value < 0.001). Conclusions: Yarrow distillate-contained solution reduced stomatitis severity more than the routine solution. Therefore, we suggest using it in patients with chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. PMID:25699281

  10. Mucosal Microbiome in Patients with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, K.; Lowe, T.; Meharg, C.; Berry, S.H.; Foley, J.; Hold, G.L.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common disease affecting oral mucosae. Etiology is unknown, but several factors have been implicated, all of which influence the composition of microbiota residing on oral mucosae, which in turn modulates immunity and thereby affects disease progression. Although no individual pathogens have been conclusively shown to be causative agents of RAS, imbalanced composition of the oral microbiota may play a key role. In this study, we sought to determine composition profiles of bacterial microbiota in the oral mucosa associated with RAS. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we characterized the most abundant bacterial populations residing on healthy and ulcerated mucosae in patients with RAS (recruited using highly stringent criteria) and no associated medical conditions; we also compared these to the bacterial microbiota of healthy controls (HCs). Phylum-level diversity comparisons revealed decreased Firmicutes and increased Proteobacteria in ulcerated sites, as compared with healthy sites in RAS patients, and no differences between RAS patients with healthy sites and HCs. Genus-level analysis demonstrated higher abundance of total Bacteroidales in RAS patients with healthy sites over HCs. Porphyromonadaceae comprising species associated with periodontal disease and Veillonellaceae predominated in ulcerated sites over HCs, while no quantitative differences of these families were observed between healthy sites in RAS patients and HCs. Streptococcaceae comprising species associated with oral health predominated in HCs over ulcerated sites but not in HCs over healthy sites in RAS patients. This study demonstrates that mucosal microbiome changes in patients with idiopathic RAS—namely, increased Bacteroidales species in mucosae of RAS patients not affected by active ulceration. While these changes suggest a microbial role in initiation of RAS, this study does not provide data on causality. Within this limitation

  11. An Abscisic Acid-Independent Oxylipin Pathway Controls Stomatal Closure and Immune Defense in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mondy, Samuel; Tranchimand, Sylvain; Rumeau, Dominique; Boudsocq, Marie; Garcia, Ana Victoria; Douki, Thierry; Bigeard, Jean; Laurière, Christiane; Chevalier, Anne; Castresana, Carmen; Hirt, Heribert

    2013-01-01

    Plant stomata function in innate immunity against bacterial invasion and abscisic acid (ABA) has been suggested to regulate this process. Using genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that (i) the Arabidopsis thaliana nine-specific-lipoxygenase encoding gene, LOX1, which is expressed in guard cells, is required to trigger stomatal closure in response to both bacteria and the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide flg22; (ii) LOX1 participates in stomatal defense; (iii) polyunsaturated fatty acids, the LOX substrates, trigger stomatal closure; (iv) the LOX products, fatty acid hydroperoxides, or reactive electrophile oxylipins induce stomatal closure; and (v) the flg22-mediated stomatal closure is conveyed by both LOX1 and the mitogen-activated protein kinases MPK3 and MPK6 and involves salicylic acid whereas the ABA-induced process depends on the protein kinases OST1, MPK9, or MPK12. Finally, we show that the oxylipin and the ABA pathways converge at the level of the anion channel SLAC1 to regulate stomatal closure. Collectively, our results demonstrate that early biotic signaling in guard cells is an ABA-independent process revealing a novel function of LOX1-dependent stomatal pathway in plant immunity. PMID:23526882

  12. Affective Education in the Primary Grade Levels: A Pilot Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stilwell, William E.; Barclay, James R.

    This report describes a 12-week pilot phase of an affective education program in the Stuttgart School District, Arkansas. Participating in the program were 218 children, grades 2-4, and a team of nineteen teachers who were given 12 weeks of in-service training designed to facilitate their use of the DUSO, Focus on Self-Development Human…

  13. Vocabulary Level; One Variable Affecting Learning from Audiovisual Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard F.

    Vocabulary level of 10 special students was determined and compared to their supposed level of proficiency on the Functional Basic Word List for Special Pupils (Tudyman and Groelle, 1958). Ss were five educable mentally retarded (EMR) students (CA 9-6 to 12-0, IQ 64-77, MA 6-6 to 9-7) and five matched emotionally disturbed students. Word sampling…

  14. Nitrogen dioxide assimilation as affected by light level

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, H. ); Ormond, D.; Marie, B. )

    1989-04-01

    The air pollutant NO{sub 2} is absorbed and assimilated by plants to serve as a source of nitrogen but only to a limited extent. The objective of this research was to identify the constraints on NO{sub 2} assimilation. Differential light levels were used to manipulate carbohydrate metabolites available for nitrogen assimilation. Bean plants were grown at four light levels with or without nutrient nitrate and exposed to 0.25 ppm NO{sub 2} for 6h each day. Growth of roots and shoots was inhibited by NO{sub 2} in both the presence and absence of nutrient nitrate. The inhibition was most pronounced at the lowest light level. Light level similarly influenced the effect of nitrate and of NO{sub 2} on soluble protein, nitrate nitrogen and Kjeldahl nitrogen in the root and shoot tissues. Two experiments demonstrated that the injurious effects of NO{sub 2} are more pronounced at low light than at high light and that more NO{sub 2} is assimilated into soluble shoot protein at higher light levels.

  15. Affect and Digital Learning at the University Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Yaacov J.; Yablon, Yaacov B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to examine the efficiency of SMS based cell-phone vocabulary learning as compared to email vocabulary delivery and snail mail vocabulary delivery at the university level. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 241 first year university students studied English vocabulary in their mandatory English foundation…

  16. CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT WATER LEAD LEVELS AND LEAD NEUROTOXICITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reports have attempted to show that certain approaches to fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of nexafluo...

  17. HSF1-deficiency affects gait coordination and cerebellar calbindin levels.

    PubMed

    Ingenwerth, Marc; Estrada, Veronica; Stahr, Anna; Müller, Hans Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in cell homeostasis and protect against cell damage. They were previously identified as key players in different ataxia models. HSF1 is the main transcription factor for HSP activation. HSF1-deficient mice (HSF1-/-) are known to have deficiencies in motor control test. However, little is known about effects of HSF1-deficiency on locomotor, especially gait, coordination. Therefore, we compared HSF-deficient (HSF1-/-) mice and wildtype littermates using an automated gait analysis system for objective assessment of gait coordination. We found significant changes in gait parameters of HSF1-/- mice reminiscent of cerebellar ataxia. Immunohistochemical analyses of a cerebellum revealed co-localization of HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis of a potential interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Calbindin levels were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, respectively. While quantitative PCR revealed no differences in calbindin mRNA levels between HSF1+/+ and HSF1-/- mice, calbindin protein levels, however, were significantly decreased in a cerebellum of HSF1-/- mice. A pathway analysis supports the hypothesis of an interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin. In summary, the targeted deletion of HSF1 results in changes of locomotor function associated with changes in cerebellar calbindin protein levels. These findings suggest a role of HSF1 in regular Purkinje cell calcium homeostasis. PMID:27173427

  18. CHILDHOOD BLOOD LEAD LEVELS NOT AFFECTED BY HOUSING COMPLIANCE STATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a secondary analysis of data from the Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program of Philadelphia (July 1, 1999 through September 1, 2004), the authors evaluated the effect of housing compliance status and time to achieve compliance on changes in children's blood lead levels. ...

  19. Fruiting Branch K+ Level Affects Cotton Fiber Elongation Through Osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiashuo; Hu, Wei; Zhao, Wenqing; Chen, Binglin; Wang, Youhua; Zhou, Zhiguo; Meng, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K) deficiency in cotton plants results in reduced fiber length. As one of the primary osmotica, K+ contributes to an increase in cell turgor pressure during fiber elongation. Therefore, it is hypothesized that fiber length is affected by K deficiency through an osmotic pathway, so in 2012 and 2013, an experiment was conducted to test this hypothesis by imposing three potassium supply regimes (0, 125, 250 kg K ha-1) on a low-K-sensitive cultivar, Siza 3, and a low-K-tolerant cultivar, Simian 3. We found that fibers were longer in the later season bolls than in the earlier ones in cotton plants grown under normal growth conditions, but later season bolls showed a greater sensitivity to low-K stress, especially the low-K sensitive genotype. We also found that the maximum velocity of fibre elongation (Vmax) is the parameter that best reflects the change in fiber elongation under K deficiency. This parameter mostly depends on cell turgor, so the content of the osmotically active solutes was analyzed accordingly. Statistical analysis showed that K+ was the major osmotic factor affecting fiber length, and malate was likely facilitating K+ accumulation into fibers, which enabled the low-K-tolerant genotype to cope with low-K stress. Moreover, the low-K-tolerant genotype tended to have greater K+ absorptive capacities in the upper fruiting branches. Based on our findings, we suggest a fertilization scheme for Gossypium hirsutum that adds extra potash fertilizer or distributes it during the development of late season bolls to mitigate K deficiency in the second half of the growth season and to enhance fiber length in late season bolls. PMID:26834777

  20. Fruiting Branch K(+) Level Affects Cotton Fiber Elongation Through Osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiashuo; Hu, Wei; Zhao, Wenqing; Chen, Binglin; Wang, Youhua; Zhou, Zhiguo; Meng, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K) deficiency in cotton plants results in reduced fiber length. As one of the primary osmotica, K(+) contributes to an increase in cell turgor pressure during fiber elongation. Therefore, it is hypothesized that fiber length is affected by K deficiency through an osmotic pathway, so in 2012 and 2013, an experiment was conducted to test this hypothesis by imposing three potassium supply regimes (0, 125, 250 kg K ha(-1)) on a low-K-sensitive cultivar, Siza 3, and a low-K-tolerant cultivar, Simian 3. We found that fibers were longer in the later season bolls than in the earlier ones in cotton plants grown under normal growth conditions, but later season bolls showed a greater sensitivity to low-K stress, especially the low-K sensitive genotype. We also found that the maximum velocity of fibre elongation (V max) is the parameter that best reflects the change in fiber elongation under K deficiency. This parameter mostly depends on cell turgor, so the content of the osmotically active solutes was analyzed accordingly. Statistical analysis showed that K(+) was the major osmotic factor affecting fiber length, and malate was likely facilitating K(+) accumulation into fibers, which enabled the low-K-tolerant genotype to cope with low-K stress. Moreover, the low-K-tolerant genotype tended to have greater K(+) absorptive capacities in the upper fruiting branches. Based on our findings, we suggest a fertilization scheme for Gossypium hirsutum that adds extra potash fertilizer or distributes it during the development of late season bolls to mitigate K deficiency in the second half of the growth season and to enhance fiber length in late season bolls. PMID:26834777

  1. Starch Biosynthesis in Guard Cells But Not in Mesophyll Cells Is Involved in CO2-Induced Stomatal Closing.

    PubMed

    Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Bagheri, Andisheh; Wang, Cun; Palomares, Axxell; Stephan, Aaron B; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-06-01

    Starch metabolism is involved in stomatal movement regulation. However, it remains unknown whether starch-deficient mutants affect CO2-induced stomatal closing and whether starch biosynthesis in guard cells and/or mesophyll cells is rate limiting for high CO2-induced stomatal closing. Stomatal responses to [CO2] shifts and CO2 assimilation rates were compared in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants that were either starch deficient in all plant tissues (ADP-Glc-pyrophosphorylase [ADGase]) or retain starch accumulation in guard cells but are starch deficient in mesophyll cells (plastidial phosphoglucose isomerase [pPGI]). ADGase mutants exhibited impaired CO2-induced stomatal closure, but pPGI mutants did not, showing that starch biosynthesis in guard cells but not mesophyll functions in CO2-induced stomatal closing. Nevertheless, starch-deficient ADGase mutant alleles exhibited partial CO2 responses, pointing toward a starch biosynthesis-independent component of the response that is likely mediated by anion channels. Furthermore, whole-leaf CO2 assimilation rates of both ADGase and pPGI mutants were lower upon shifts to high [CO2], but only ADGase mutants caused impairments in CO2-induced stomatal closing. These genetic analyses determine the roles of starch biosynthesis for high CO2-induced stomatal closing. PMID:27208296

  2. Starch Biosynthesis in Guard Cells But Not in Mesophyll Cells Is Involved in CO2-Induced Stomatal Closing1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Aaron B.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Starch metabolism is involved in stomatal movement regulation. However, it remains unknown whether starch-deficient mutants affect CO2-induced stomatal closing and whether starch biosynthesis in guard cells and/or mesophyll cells is rate limiting for high CO2-induced stomatal closing. Stomatal responses to [CO2] shifts and CO2 assimilation rates were compared in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants that were either starch deficient in all plant tissues (ADP-Glc-pyrophosphorylase [ADGase]) or retain starch accumulation in guard cells but are starch deficient in mesophyll cells (plastidial phosphoglucose isomerase [pPGI]). ADGase mutants exhibited impaired CO2-induced stomatal closure, but pPGI mutants did not, showing that starch biosynthesis in guard cells but not mesophyll functions in CO2-induced stomatal closing. Nevertheless, starch-deficient ADGase mutant alleles exhibited partial CO2 responses, pointing toward a starch biosynthesis-independent component of the response that is likely mediated by anion channels. Furthermore, whole-leaf CO2 assimilation rates of both ADGase and pPGI mutants were lower upon shifts to high [CO2], but only ADGase mutants caused impairments in CO2-induced stomatal closing. These genetic analyses determine the roles of starch biosynthesis for high CO2-induced stomatal closing. PMID:27208296

  3. Wind resource quality affected by high levels of renewables

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Diakov, Victor

    2015-06-17

    For solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind resources, the capacity factor is an important parameter describing the quality of the resource. As the share of variable renewable resources (such as PV and wind) on the electric system is increasing, so does curtailment (and the fraction of time when it cannot be avoided). At high levels of renewable generation, curtailments effectively change the practical measure of resource quality from capacity factor to the incremental capacity factor. The latter accounts only for generation during hours of no curtailment and is directly connected with the marginal capital cost of renewable generators for a givenmore » level of renewable generation during the year. The Western U.S. wind generation is analyzed hourly for a system with 75% of annual generation from wind, and it is found that the value for the system of resources with equal capacity factors can vary by a factor of 2, which highlights the importance of using the incremental capacity factor instead. Finally, the effect is expected to be more pronounced in smaller geographic areas (or when transmission limitations imposed) and less pronounced at lower levels of renewable energy in the system with less curtailment.« less

  4. Wind resource quality affected by high levels of renewables

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, Victor

    2015-06-17

    For solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind resources, the capacity factor is an important parameter describing the quality of the resource. As the share of variable renewable resources (such as PV and wind) on the electric system is increasing, so does curtailment (and the fraction of time when it cannot be avoided). At high levels of renewable generation, curtailments effectively change the practical measure of resource quality from capacity factor to the incremental capacity factor. The latter accounts only for generation during hours of no curtailment and is directly connected with the marginal capital cost of renewable generators for a given level of renewable generation during the year. The Western U.S. wind generation is analyzed hourly for a system with 75% of annual generation from wind, and it is found that the value for the system of resources with equal capacity factors can vary by a factor of 2, which highlights the importance of using the incremental capacity factor instead. Finally, the effect is expected to be more pronounced in smaller geographic areas (or when transmission limitations imposed) and less pronounced at lower levels of renewable energy in the system with less curtailment.

  5. Hormonal dynamics contributes to divergence in seasonal stomatal behaviour in a monsoonal plant community.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Scott A M; Brodribb, Timothy J

    2015-03-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a primary regulator of plant transpiration, but its influence in determining seasonal stomatal behaviour in natural plant communities is poorly understood. We examined distantly related vascular plants growing together in a seasonally dry, monsoonal environment to determine whether ABA dynamics contributed to contrasting water use patterns in this natural setting. Regular sampling of angiosperm, cycad, conifer and fern species revealed characteristic seasonal patterns in ABA production, but these were highly distinct among species. Although no general relationship was observed between ABA levels, plant hydration or stomatal conductance among species, the seasonal dynamics in stomatal behaviour within species were predictable functions of either ABA or leaf water potential. Strong divergence in the seasonal role of ABA among species suggests that modification in ABA-stomatal interactions represents an important evolutionary pathway for adaptation in plant water use. PMID:24995884

  6. Carbonic anhydrases, EPF2 and a novel protease mediate CO2 control of stomatal development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engineer, Cawas B.; Ghassemian, Majid; Anderson, Jeffrey C.; Peck, Scott C.; Hu, Honghong; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-09-01

    Environmental stimuli, including elevated carbon dioxide levels, regulate stomatal development; however, the key mechanisms mediating the perception and relay of the CO2 signal to the stomatal development machinery remain elusive. To adapt CO2 intake to water loss, plants regulate the development of stomatal gas exchange pores in the aerial epidermis. A diverse range of plant species show a decrease in stomatal density in response to the continuing rise in atmospheric CO2 (ref. 4). To date, one mutant that exhibits deregulation of this CO2-controlled stomatal development response, hic (which is defective in cell-wall wax biosynthesis, ref. 5), has been identified. Here we show that recently isolated Arabidopsis thaliana β-carbonic anhydrase double mutants (ca1 ca4) exhibit an inversion in their response to elevated CO2, showing increased stomatal development at elevated CO2 levels. We characterized the mechanisms mediating this response and identified an extracellular signalling pathway involved in the regulation of CO2-controlled stomatal development by carbonic anhydrases. RNA-seq analyses of transcripts show that the extracellular pro-peptide-encoding gene EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR 2 (EPF2), but not EPF1 (ref. 9), is induced in wild-type leaves but not in ca1 ca4 mutant leaves at elevated CO2 levels. Moreover, EPF2 is essential for CO2 control of stomatal development. Using cell-wall proteomic analyses and CO2-dependent transcriptomic analyses, we identified a novel CO2-induced extracellular protease, CRSP (CO2 RESPONSE SECRETED PROTEASE), as a mediator of CO2-controlled stomatal development. Our results identify mechanisms and genes that function in the repression of stomatal development in leaves during atmospheric CO2 elevation, including the carbonic-anhydrase-encoding genes CA1 and CA4 and the secreted protease CRSP, which cleaves the pro-peptide EPF2, in turn repressing stomatal development. Elucidation of these mechanisms advances the understanding of

  7. How Temperature and Water levels affect Polar Mesospheric Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. L.; Randall, C. E.; Harvey, V.

    2012-12-01

    Using the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument data, which is part of the Aeronomy in the Mesosphere (AIM) mission, we compare the albedo and ice water content measurements of CIPS with the Navy Operation Global Atmospheric Prediction System - Advanced Level Phyiscs and High Altitude (NOGAPS-ALPHA) temperature and water vapor data in order to derive a greater understanding of cloud formation and physics. We particularly focus on data from June 2007 and July 2007 in this case study because of particular cloud structures and formations during this time period for future studies.

  8. Cortical actin filament organization in developing and functioning stomatal complexes of Zea mays and Triticum turgidum.

    PubMed

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Galatis, Basil; Quader, Hartmut; Apostolakos, Panagiotis

    2007-07-01

    Cortical actin filament (AF) organization was studied in detail in developing stomatal complexes of the grasses Zea mays and Triticum turgidum. AF arrays during the whole stomatal complex development are dynamic, partly following the pattern of cortical microtubule (MT) organization. They also exhibit particular patterns of organization, spatially and temporarily restricted. Among AF arrays, the radial ones that underlie young guard cell (GC) periclinal walls, those that line the bulbous GC ends and the AF ring at the junction between subsidiary cells (SCs) and GCs are described here for the first time. Although many similarities in cortical AF organization exist among the stomatal cells of both plants studied, considerable differences have also been observed between them. Our data reveal that the expanding areas of stomatal cell walls are lined by distinct cortical AF aggregations that probably protect the plasmalemma against mechanical stresses. Experimental AF disruption does not seem to affect detectably stomatal cell morphogenesis. Moreover, the structural and experimental data of this study revealed that, in contrast to the elliptical stomata, in the dumbbell-shaped ones the AFs and MTs seem not to be involved in the mechanism of opening and closing of the stomatal pore. PMID:17443701

  9. An inducible, modular system for spatio-temporal control of gene expression in stomatal guard cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tou Cheu; Hann, Cliona M; Chambers, John P; Surget, Marie; Ng, Carl K-Y

    2009-01-01

    Stomata, flanked by pairs of guard cells, are small pores on the leaf surfaces of plants and they function to control gas exchange between plants and the atmosphere. Stomata will open when water is available to allow for the uptake of carbon dioxide for photosynthesis. During periods of drought, stomata will close to reduce desiccation stress. As such, optimal functioning of stomata will impact on water use efficiency by plants. The development of an inducible, modular system for robust and targeted gene expression in stomatal guard cells is reported here. It is shown that application of ethanol vapour to activate the gene expression system did not affect the ability of stomata to respond to ABA in bioassays to determine the promotion of stomatal closure and the inhibition of stomatal opening. The system that has been developed allows for robust spatio-temporal control of gene expression in all cells of the stomatal lineage, thereby enabling molecular engineering of stomatal function as well as studies on stomatal development. PMID:19700494

  10. Phosphatidic acid inhibits blue light-induced stomatal opening via inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 [corrected].

    PubMed

    Takemiya, Atsushi; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Stomata open in response to blue light under a background of red light. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits blue light-dependent stomatal opening, an effect essential for promoting stomatal closure in the daytime to prevent water loss. However, the mechanisms and molecular targets of this inhibition in the blue light signaling pathway remain unknown. Here, we report that phosphatidic acid (PA), a phospholipid second messenger produced by ABA in guard cells, inhibits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a positive regulator of blue light signaling, and PA plays a role in stimulating stomatal closure in Vicia faba. Biochemical analysis revealed that PA directly inhibited the phosphatase activity of the catalytic subunit of V. faba PP1 (PP1c) in vitro. PA inhibited blue light-dependent stomatal opening but did not affect red light- or fusicoccin-induced stomatal opening. PA also inhibited blue light-dependent H(+) pumping and phosphorylation of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. However, PA did not inhibit the autophosphorylation of phototropins, blue light receptors for stomatal opening. Furthermore, 1-butanol, a selective inhibitor of phospholipase D, which produces PA via hydrolysis of phospholipids, diminished the ABA-induced inhibition of blue light-dependent stomatal opening and H(+) pumping. We also show that hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, which are intermediates in ABA signaling, inhibited the blue light responses of stomata and that 1-butanol diminished these inhibitions. From these results, we conclude that PA inhibits blue light signaling in guard cells by PP1c inhibition, accelerating stomatal closure, and that PP1 is a cross talk point between blue light and ABA signaling pathways in guard cells. PMID:20498335

  11. Photocontrol of the functional coupling between photosynthesis and stomatal conductance in the intact leaf

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiger, E.; Field, C.

    1982-08-01

    The photocontrol of the functional coupling between photosynthesis and stomatal conductance in the leaf was investigated in gas exchange experiments using monochromatic light provided by lasers. Net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance were measured in attached leaves of Malva parviflora L. as a function of photon irradiance at 457.9 and 640.0 nanometers. Photosynthetic rates and quantum yields of photosynthesis were higher under red light than under blue, on an absorbed or incident basis. Stomatal conductance was higher under blue than under red light at all intensities. Based on a calculated apparent photon efficiency of conductance, blue and red light had similar effects on conductance at intensities higher than 0.02 millimoles per square meter per second, but blue light was several-fold more efficient at very low photon irradiances. Red light had no effect on conductance at photon irradiances below 0.02 millimoles per square meter per second. These observations support the hypothesis that stomatal conductance is modulated by two photosystems: a blue light-dependent one, driving stomatal opening at low light intensities and a photosynthetically active radiation (PAR)-dependent one operating at higher irradiances. When low intensity blue light was used to illuminate a leaf already irradiated with high intensity, 640 nanometers light, the leaf exhibited substantial increases in stomatal conductance. Net photosynthesis changed only slightly. Additional far-red light increased net photosynthesis without affecting stomatal conductance. These observations indicate that under conditions where the PAR-dependent system is driven by high intensity red light, the blue light-dependent system has an additive effect on stomatal conductance.

  12. Competitive binding of antagonistic peptides fine-tunes stomatal patterning

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Suk; Hnilova, Marketa; Maes, Michal; Lin, Ya-Chen Lisa; Putarjunan, Aarthi; Han, Soon-Ki; Avila, Julian; U.Torii, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    During development, cells interpret complex, often conflicting signals to make optimal decisions. Plant stomata, the cellular interface between a plant and the atmosphere, develop according to positional cues including a family of secreted peptides, EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTORS (EPFs). How these signaling peptides orchestrate pattern formation at a molecular level remains unclear. Here we report that Stomagen/EPF-LIKE9 peptide, which promotes stomatal development, requires ERECTA (ER)-family receptor kinases and interferes with the inhibition of stomatal development by the EPF2-ER module. Both EPF2 and Stomagen directly bind to ER and its co-receptor TOO MANY MOUTHS. Stomagen peptide competitively replaced EPF2 binding to ER. Furthermore, application of EPF2, but not Stomagen, elicited rapid phosphorylation of downstream signaling components in vivo. Our findings demonstrate how a plant receptor agonist and antagonist define inhibitory and inductive cues to fine-tune tissue patterning on the plant epidermis. PMID:26083750

  13. Relating Stomatal Conductance to Leaf Functional Traits

    PubMed Central

    Kröber, Wenzel; Plath, Isa; Heklau, Heike; Bruelheide, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Leaf functional traits are important because they reflect physiological functions, such as transpiration and carbon assimilation. In particular, morphological leaf traits have the potential to summarize plants strategies in terms of water use efficiency, growth pattern and nutrient use. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) is a recognized framework in functional plant ecology and reflects a gradient of increasing specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen, phosphorus and cation content, and decreasing leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and carbon nitrogen ratio (CN). The LES describes different strategies ranging from that of short-lived leaves with high photosynthetic capacity per leaf mass to long-lived leaves with low mass-based carbon assimilation rates. However, traits that are not included in the LES might provide additional information on the species' physiology, such as those related to stomatal control. Protocols are presented for a wide range of leaf functional traits, including traits of the LES, but also traits that are independent of the LES. In particular, a new method is introduced that relates the plants’ regulatory behavior in stomatal conductance to vapor pressure deficit. The resulting parameters of stomatal regulation can then be compared to the LES and other plant functional traits. The results show that functional leaf traits of the LES were also valid predictors for the parameters of stomatal regulation. For example, leaf carbon concentration was positively related to the vapor pressure deficit (vpd) at the point of inflection and the maximum of the conductance-vpd curve. However, traits that are not included in the LES added information in explaining parameters of stomatal control: the vpd at the point of inflection of the conductance-vpd curve was lower for species with higher stomatal density and higher stomatal index. Overall, stomata and vein traits were more powerful predictors for explaining stomatal regulation than traits used in the LES

  14. Respiratory complex I deficiency induces drought tolerance by impacting leaf stomatal and hydraulic conductances.

    PubMed

    Djebbar, Reda; Rzigui, Touhami; Pétriacq, Pierre; Mauve, Caroline; Priault, Pierrick; Fresneau, Chantal; De Paepe, Marianne; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Benhassaine-Kesri, Ghouziel; Streb, Peter; Gakière, Bertrand; Cornic, Gabriel; De Paepe, Rosine

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the role of plant mitochondria in drought tolerance, the response to water deprivation was compared between Nicotiana sylvestris wild type (WT) plants and the CMSII respiratory complex I mutant, which has low-efficient respiration and photosynthesis, high levels of amino acids and pyridine nucleotides, and increased antioxidant capacity. We show that the delayed decrease in relative water content after water withholding in CMSII, as compared to WT leaves, is due to a lower stomatal conductance. The stomatal index and the abscisic acid (ABA) content were unaffected in well-watered mutant leaves, but the ABA/stomatal conductance relation was altered during drought, indicating that specific factors interact with ABA signalling. Leaf hydraulic conductance was lower in mutant leaves when compared to WT leaves and the role of oxidative aquaporin gating in attaining a maximum stomatal conductance is discussed. In addition, differences in leaf metabolic status between the mutant and the WT might contribute to the low stomatal conductance, as reported for TCA cycle-deficient plants. After withholding watering, TCA cycle derived organic acids declined more in CMSII leaves than in the WT, and ATP content decreased only in the CMSII. Moreover, in contrast to the WT, total free amino acid levels declined whilst soluble protein content increased in CMSII leaves, suggesting an accelerated amino acid remobilisation. We propose that oxidative and metabolic disturbances resulting from remodelled respiration in the absence of Complex I activity could be involved in bringing about the lower stomatal and hydraulic conductances. PMID:22002624

  15. Prions are affected by evolution at two levels.

    PubMed

    Wickner, Reed B; Kelly, Amy C

    2016-03-01

    Prions, infectious proteins, can transmit diseases or be the basis of heritable traits (or both), mostly based on amyloid forms of the prion protein. A single protein sequence can be the basis for many prion strains/variants, with different biological properties based on different amyloid conformations, each rather stably propagating. Prions are unique in that evolution and selection work at both the level of the chromosomal gene encoding the protein, and on the prion itself selecting prion variants. Here, we summarize what is known about the evolution of prion proteins, both the genes and the prions themselves. We contrast the one known functional prion, [Het-s] of Podospora anserina, with the known disease prions, the yeast prions [PSI+] and [URE3] and the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of mammals. PMID:26713322

  16. Euthanasia by CO₂ inhalation affects potassium levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Traslavina, Ryan P; King, Edward J; Loar, Andrew S; Riedel, Elyn R; Garvey, Michael S; Ricart-Arbona, Rodolfo; Wolf, Felix R; Couto, Suzana S

    2010-05-01

    We and others frequently have noted serum potassium levels of 8.0 +/- 0.85 mEq/L or greater in laboratory mice; this concentration has even been published as the upper limit of a 'normal' reference range. However, if bone fide, this potassium concentration would be incompatible with life in all species. We investigated conditions frequently encountered in the research setting to distinguish artifactual from true hyperkalemia. Variables evaluated included site of collection, time allowed for clot formation before serum separation, time elapsed between collection and analysis of samples collected in a serum separator tube, precollection method of anesthesia, and euthanasia technique. Serum potassium was measured from 75 C57BL/6NTac 10-wk-old female mice and divided into at least 5 mice per variable. Animals were euthanized by exsanguination immediately after terminal CO₂ or ketamine-xylazine (KX) administration. Mice euthanized with CO₂ had higher mean serum potassium (7.0 +/- 0.5 mEq/L) and range serum potassium (6.0 to 8.1 mEq/L) than did KX-treated mice. CO₂ inhalation resulted in significantly lower blood pH (6.9 +/- 0.1), higher pCO₂ (153.3 +/- 38.8 mm Hg), and higher lactate levels (3.9 +/- 0.9 mmol/L) than did KX anesthesia followed by exsanguination. These results suggest that antemortem respiratory acidosis from CO₂ administration causes artifactual hyperkalemia in mice. Therefore, blood collection under KX anesthesia is preferable over CO₂ inhalation to obtain accurate potassium values from mice. PMID:20587163

  17. Factors affecting levels of genetic diversity in natural populations.

    PubMed Central

    Amos, W; Harwood, J

    1998-01-01

    Genetic variability is the clay of evolution, providing the base material on which adaptation and speciation depend. It is often assumed that most interspecific differences in variability are due primarily to population size effects, with bottlenecked populations carrying less variability than those of stable size. However, we show that population bottlenecks are unlikely to be the only factor, even in classic case studies such as the northern elephant seal and the cheetah, where genetic polymorphism is virtually absent. Instead, we suggest that the low levels of variability observed in endangered populations are more likely to result from a combination of publication biases, which tend to inflate the level of variability which is considered 'normal', and inbreeding effects, which may hasten loss of variability due to drift. To account for species with large population sizes but low variability we advance three hypotheses. First, it is known that certain metapopulation structures can result in effective population sizes far below the census size. Second, there is increasing evidence that heterozygous sites mutate more frequently than equivalent homozygous sites, plausibly because mismatch repair between homologous chromosomes during meiosis provides extra opportunities to mutate. Such a mechanism would undermine the simple relationship between heterozygosity and effective population size. Third, the fact that related species that differ greatly in variability implies that large amounts of variability can be gained or lost rapidly. We argue that such cases are best explained by rapid loss through a genome-wide selective sweep, and suggest a mechanism by which this could come about, based on forced changes to a control gene inducing coevolution in the genes it controls. Our model, based on meiotic drive in mammals, but easily extended to other systems, would tend to facilitate population isolation by generating molecular incompatabilities. Circumstances can even be

  18. Enhanced Stomatal Conductance by a Spontaneous Arabidopsis Tetraploid, Me-0, Results from Increased Stomatal Size and Greater Stomatal Aperture1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Monda, Keina; Araki, Hiromitsu; Kuhara, Satoru; Ishigaki, Genki; Akashi, Ryo; Negi, Juntaro; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Sho; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Goto, Nobuharu; Iba, Koh

    2016-01-01

    The rate of gas exchange in plants is regulated mainly by stomatal size and density. Generally, higher densities of smaller stomata are advantageous for gas exchange; however, it is unclear what the effect of an extraordinary change in stomatal size might have on a plant’s gas-exchange capacity. We investigated the stomatal responses to CO2 concentration changes among 374 Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotypes and discovered that Mechtshausen (Me-0), a natural tetraploid ecotype, has significantly larger stomata and can achieve a high stomatal conductance. We surmised that the cause of the increased stomatal conductance is tetraploidization; however, the stomatal conductance of another tetraploid accession, tetraploid Columbia (Col), was not as high as that in Me-0. One difference between these two accessions was the size of their stomatal apertures. Analyses of abscisic acid sensitivity, ion balance, and gene expression profiles suggested that physiological or genetic factors restrict the stomatal opening in tetraploid Col but not in Me-0. Our results show that Me-0 overcomes the handicap of stomatal opening that is typical for tetraploids and achieves higher stomatal conductance compared with the closely related tetraploid Col on account of larger stomatal apertures. This study provides evidence for whether larger stomatal size in tetraploids of higher plants can improve stomatal conductance. PMID:26754665

  19. The effect of NaCl on stomatal opening in Arabidopsis wild type and agb1 heterotrimeric G-protein mutant plants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a major agricultural problem that affects crop yield. Na(+) is transported to the shoot through the transpiration stream. The mutant of the sole Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein β subunit, agb1, is hypersensitive to salinity in part due to a higher transpiration rate. Here, we investigated the direct effect of Na(+) on stomatal opening using detached epidermal peels of wild type and agb1 plants. In both genotypes, NaCl is equally as effective as KCl in mediating stomatal opening at the concentrations tested. In both genotypes, ABA is less effective in inhibiting Na(+) mediated stomatal opening than K(+) mediated stomatal opening. The agb1 mutant is hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of K(+)-mediated but not Na(+)-mediated stomatal opening. These results suggest that the greater transpiration observed in agb1 plants grown in saline conditions is likely not mediated by differential genotypic direct effects of Na(+) on stomatal apertures. PMID:26431457

  20. The effect of NaCl on stomatal opening in Arabidopsis wild type and agb1 heterotrimeric G-protein mutant plants

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a major agricultural problem that affects crop yield. Na+ is transported to the shoot through the transpiration stream. The mutant of the sole Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein β subunit, agb1, is hypersensitive to salinity in part due to a higher transpiration rate. Here, we investigated the direct effect of Na+ on stomatal opening using detached epidermal peels of wild type and agb1 plants. In both genotypes, NaCl is equally as effective as KCl in mediating stomatal opening at the concentrations tested. In both genotypes, ABA is less effective in inhibiting Na+ mediated stomatal opening than K+ mediated stomatal opening. The agb1 mutant is hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of K+-mediated but not Na+-mediated stomatal opening. These results suggest that the greater transpiration observed in agb1 plants grown in saline conditions is likely not mediated by differential genotypic direct effects of Na+ on stomatal apertures. PMID:26431457

  1. Blood Feeding Behavior of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infected Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is the primary vector of Bluetongue virus in North America and a competent vector of Vesicular Stomatitis virus (VSV). Little is known about how viral infection of this midge affects blood feeding behavior and how this might affect virus transmission....

  2. Determinants affecting physical activity levels in animal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tou, Janet C L.; Wade, Charles E.

    2002-01-01

    Weight control is dependent on energy balance. Reduced energy expenditure (EE) associated with decreased physical activity is suggested to be a major underlying cause in the increasing prevalence of weight gain and obesity. Therefore, a better understanding of the biological determinants involved in the regulation of physical activity is essential. To facilitate interpretation in humans, it is helpful to consider the evidence from animal studies. This review focuses on animal studies examining the biological determinants influencing activity and potential implications to human. It appears that physical activity is influenced by a number of parameters. However, regardless of the parameter involved, body weight appears to play an underlying role in the regulation of activity. Furthermore, the regulation of activity associated with body weight appears to occur only after the animal achieves a critical weight. This suggests that activity levels are a consequence rather than a contributor to weight control. However, the existence of an inverse weight-activity relationship remains inconclusive. Confounding the results are the multifactorial nature of physical activity and the lack of appropriate measuring devices. Furthermore, many determinants of body weight are closely interlocked, making it difficult to determine whether a single, combination, or interaction of factors is important for the regulation of activity. For example, diet-induced obesity, aging, lesions to the ventral medial hypothalamus, and genetics all produce hypoactivity. Providing a better understanding of the biological determinants involved in the regulation of activity has important implications for the development of strategies for the prevention of weight gain leading to obesity and subsequent morbidity and mortality in the human population.

  3. Determinants Affecting Physical Activity Levels In Animal Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tou, Janet C. L.; Wade, Charles E.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Weight control is dependent on energy balance. Reduced energy expenditure (EE) associated with decreased physical activity is suggested to be a major underlying cause in the increasing prevalence of weight gain and obesity. Therefore, a better understanding of the biological determinants involved in the regulation of physical activity is essential. To facilitate interpretation in humans, it is helpful to consider the evidence from animal studies. This review focuses on animal studies examining the biological determinants influencing activity and potential implications to human. It appears that physical activity is influenced by a number of parameters. However, regardless of the parameter involved, body weight appears to play all underlying role in the regulation of activity. Furthermore, the regulation of activity associated with body weight appears to occur only after the animal achieves a critical weight. This suggests that activity levels are a consequence rather than a contributor to weight control. However, the existence of an inverse weight-activity relationship remains inconclusive. Confounding the results are the multi-factorial nature of physical activity and the lack of appropriate measuring devices. Furthermore, many determinants of body weight are closely interlocked making it difficult to determine whether a single, combination or interaction of factors is important for the regulation of activity. For example, diet-induced obesity, aging, lesions to tile ventral medial hypothalamus and genetics all produce hypoactivity. Providing a better understanding of the biological determinants involved in the regulation of activity has important implications for the development of strategies for the prevention of weight gain leading to obesity and subsequent morbidity and mortality in the human population.

  4. Organ-specific effects of brassinosteroids on stomatal production coordinate with the action of Too Many Mouths.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Yang, Kezhen; Le, Jie

    2015-03-01

    In Arabidopsis, stomatal development initiates after protodermal cells acquire stomatal lineage cell fate. Stomata or their precursors communicate with their neighbor epidermal cells to ensure the "one cell spacing" rule. The signals from EPF/EPFL peptide ligands received by Too Many Mouths (TMM) and ERECTA-family receptors are supposed to be transduced by YODA MAPK cascade. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor SPEECHLESS (SPCH) is another key regulator of stomatal cell fate determination and asymmetric entry divisions, and SPCH activity is regulated by YODA MAPK cascade. Brassinosteroid (BR) signaling, one of the most well characterized signal transduction pathways in plants, contributes to the control of stomatal production. But opposite organ-specific effects of BR on stomatal production were reported. Here we confirm that stomatal production in hypocotyls is controlled by BR levels. YODA and CYCD4 are not essential for BR stomata-promoting function. Furthermore, we found that BR could confer tmm hypocotyls clustered stomatal phenotype, indicating that the BR organ-specific effects on stomatal production might coordinate with the TMM organ-specific actions. PMID:25234048

  5. Maternal HIV status affects the infant hemoglobin level

    PubMed Central

    Feleke, Berhanu Elfu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Children, especially infants, are highly vulnerable to iron-deficiency anemia because of their rapid growth of the brain and the rest of the body. The objectives of this study were to compare the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in infants born from HIV-positive mothers and HIV-negative mothers and to identify the determinants of iron-deficiency anemia in infants. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in Bahir Dar city. Simple random sampling technique was used to select the study participants. Mothers were interviewed; blood samples were collected from mothers and infants to measure the hemoglobin level and anthropometric indicators were obtained from the infants using world health organization standards. Descriptive statistics were used to estimate the prevalence of infantile anemia. Binary logistic regression and multiple linear regressions were used to identify the determinants of infant anemia. A total of 1459 infants born from HIV-positive and HIV-negative mothers were included. The prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in infants born from HIV-positive and HIV-negative mothers was 41.9% (95% CI: 39–44). Infantile iron-deficiency anemia was associated with maternal HIV infection (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.54 [95% CI: 1.65–3.9]), stunting (AOR 3.46 [95% CI: 2.41–4.97]), low income (AOR 2.72 [95% CI: 2–3.73]), maternal malaria during pregnancy (AOR 1.81 [95% CI: 1.33–2.47]), use of cow milk before 6 month (AOR 1.82 [95% CI: 1.35–2.45]), residence (AOR 0.09 [95% CI: 0.06–0.13]), history of cough or fever 7 days preceding the survey (AOR 2.71 [95% CI: 1.99–3.69]), maternal hemoglobin (B 0.65 [95% CI: 0.61–0.68]), educational status of mother (B 0.22 [95% CI: 0.2–0.23]), age of the mother (B –0.03 [95% CI: –0.03, –0.02]), and family size (B –0.14 [95% CI: –0.18,–0.11]). PMID:27495044

  6. Xanthomonas campestris overcomes Arabidopsis stomatal innate immunity through a DSF cell-to-cell signal-regulated virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E; Torres, Pablo S; Vojnov, Adrián A

    2009-02-01

    Pathogen-induced stomatal closure is part of the plant innate immune response. Phytopathogens using stomata as a way of entry into the leaf must avoid the stomatal response of the host. In this article, we describe a factor secreted by the bacterial phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) capable of interfering with stomatal closure induced by bacteria or abscisic acid (ABA). We found that living Xcc, as well as ethyl acetate extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, are capable of reverting stomatal closure induced by bacteria, lipopolysaccharide, or ABA. Xcc ethyl acetate extracts also complemented the infectivity of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) mutants deficient in the production of the coronatine toxin, which is required to overcome stomatal defense. By contrast, the rpfF and rpfC mutant strains of Xcc, which are unable to respectively synthesize or perceive a diffusible molecule involved in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling, were incapable of reverting stomatal closure, indicating that suppression of stomatal response by Xcc requires an intact rpf/diffusible signal factor system. In addition, we found that guard cell-specific Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase3 (MPK3) antisense mutants were unresponsive to bacteria or lipopolysaccharide in promotion of stomatal closure, and also more sensitive to Pst coronatine-deficient mutants, showing that MPK3 is required for stomatal immune response. Additionally, we found that, unlike in wild-type Arabidopsis, ABA-induced stomatal closure in MPK3 antisense mutants is not affected by Xcc or by extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, suggesting that the Xcc factor might target some signaling component in the same pathway as MPK3. PMID:19091877

  7. Psychological Stress and Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    de Barros Gallo, Camila; Mimura, Maria Angela Martins; Sugaya, Norberto Nobuo

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common type of ulcerative disease of the oral mucosa. Despite its worldwide occurrence and the extensive amount of research that has been devoted to the subject, the etiology of RAS remains unclear. Nevertheless, several hereditary, nutritional, infectious and psychological factors have been associated with RAS. The aim of this case-control study was to assess the influence of psychological stress on the manifestation of RAS. METHOD: Fifty patients were enrolled in the trial. Twenty-five RAS patients constituted the study group and another 25 non-RAS patients who were similarly matched for sex, age and socioeconomic status constituted the control group. Each patient was evaluated in terms of the four domains of stress (emotional, physical, social and cognitive) using an internationally validated questionnaire, which was comprised of 59 items and measured the frequency and intensity of stress symptoms. The RAS group was interviewed during an active RAS episode. Completed questionnaires were submitted to proper analytical software and interpreted by an expert psychologist. RESULTS: There was a higher level of psychological stress among RAS group patients when compared to the control group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Psychological stress may play a role in the manifestation of RAS; it may serve as a trigger or a modifying factor rather than being a cause of the disease. PMID:19606240

  8. Moderate water stress causes different stomatal and non-stomatal changes in the photosynthetic functioning of Phaseolus vulgaris L. genotypes.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, J C; Zlatev, Z S; Leitão, A E; Pais, I P; Fortunato, A S; Lidon, F C

    2014-01-01

    The impact of moderate water deficit on the photosynthetic apparatus of three Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivars, Plovdiv 10 (P10), Dobrudjanski Ran (DR) and Prelom (Prel), was investigated. Water shortage had less impact on leaf hydration, RWC (predawn and midday) and predawn water potential in Prel. RWC and Ψ(p) were more reduced in P10, while there was no osmotic adjustment in any cultivar. Although drought drastically reduced stomatal opening in P10 and DR, reduced A(max) indicated non-stomatal limitations that contributed to the negligible P(n). These limitations were on potential thylakoid electron transport rates of PSI and II, pointing to photosystem functioning as a major limiting step in photosynthesis. This agrees with decreases in actual photochemical efficiency of PSII (F(v)'/F(m)'), quantum yield of photosynthetic non-cyclic electron transport (ϕ(e)) and energy-driven photochemical events (q(P)), although the impact on these parameters would also include down-regulation processes. When compared to DR, Prel retained a higher functional state of the photosynthetic machinery, justifying reduced need for photoprotective mechanisms (non-photochemical quenching, zeaxanthin, lutein, β-carotene) and maintenance of the balance between energy capture and dissipative pigments. The highest increases in fructose, glucose, arabinose and sorbitol in Prel might be related to tolerance to a lower oxidative state. All cultivars had reduced A(max) due to daytime stomatal closure in well-watered conditions. Under moderate drought, Prel had highest tolerance, higher leaf hydration and maintenance of important photochemical use of energy. However, water shortage caused appreciable non-stomatal limitations to photosynthesis linked to regulation/imbalance at the metabolic level (and growth) in all cultivars. This included damage, as reflected in decreased potential photosystem functioning, pointing to higher sensitivity of photosynthesis to drought than is commonly assumed

  9. Optimal stomatal behaviour under stochastic rainfall.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yaojie; Duursma, Remko A; Medlyn, Belinda E

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation CO2 uptake is always accompanied by water loss. The balance in this gas exchange is controlled by the stomata, through which CO2 and water vapour diffuse between the leaf and the atmosphere. The optimal stomatal behaviour theory proposes that vegetation should optimise its stomatal behaviour such that, for given water availability, photosynthesis is maximised. In this paper, we optimise stomatal conductance as a function of soil water content for the maximum expected value of photosynthesis rate. This optimisation process is considered under stochastic rainfall. The optimal solution is largely shaped by two constraints: the risks of soil water exhaustion and surface runoff, which results in an inverse S-shaped curve of stomatal conductance along the soil water gradient. We derive the optimal functional relationship between stomatal conductance and soil water content under varying rainfall frequency, mean annual precipitation and atmospheric CO2 concentration. Comparisons with large-scale observational data show that the model is able to broadly capture responses of photosynthesis, transpiration, and water use efficiency along rainfall gradients, although notable discrepancies suggest additional factors are important in shaping these responses. Our work provides a theoretical framework for analysing the vegetation gas exchange under environmental change. PMID:26796317

  10. The evolution of mechanisms driving the stomatal response to vapor pressure deficit.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Scott A M; Brodribb, Timothy J

    2015-03-01

    Stomatal responses to vapor pressure deficit (VPD) are a principal means by which vascular land plants regulate daytime transpiration. While much work has focused on characterizing and modeling this response, there remains no consensus as to the mechanism that drives it. Explanations range from passive regulation by leaf hydration to biochemical regulation by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). We monitored ABA levels, leaf gas exchange, and water status in a diversity of vascular land plants exposed to a symmetrical, mild transition in VPD. The stomata in basal lineages of vascular plants, including gymnosperms, appeared to respond passively to changes in leaf water status induced by VPD perturbation, with minimal changes in foliar ABA levels and no hysteresis in stomatal action. In contrast, foliar ABA appeared to drive the stomatal response to VPD in our angiosperm samples. Increased foliar ABA level at high VPD in angiosperm species resulted in hysteresis in the recovery of stomatal conductance; this was most pronounced in herbaceous species. Increased levels of ABA in the leaf epidermis were found to originate from sites of synthesis in other parts of the leaf rather than from the guard cells themselves. The transition from a passive regulation to ABA regulation of the stomatal response to VPD in the earliest angiosperms is likely to have had critical implications for the ecological success of this lineage. PMID:25637454

  11. The Evolution of Mechanisms Driving the Stomatal Response to Vapor Pressure Deficit1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    McAdam, Scott A.M.; Brodribb, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Stomatal responses to vapor pressure deficit (VPD) are a principal means by which vascular land plants regulate daytime transpiration. While much work has focused on characterizing and modeling this response, there remains no consensus as to the mechanism that drives it. Explanations range from passive regulation by leaf hydration to biochemical regulation by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). We monitored ABA levels, leaf gas exchange, and water status in a diversity of vascular land plants exposed to a symmetrical, mild transition in VPD. The stomata in basal lineages of vascular plants, including gymnosperms, appeared to respond passively to changes in leaf water status induced by VPD perturbation, with minimal changes in foliar ABA levels and no hysteresis in stomatal action. In contrast, foliar ABA appeared to drive the stomatal response to VPD in our angiosperm samples. Increased foliar ABA level at high VPD in angiosperm species resulted in hysteresis in the recovery of stomatal conductance; this was most pronounced in herbaceous species. Increased levels of ABA in the leaf epidermis were found to originate from sites of synthesis in other parts of the leaf rather than from the guard cells themselves. The transition from a passive regulation to ABA regulation of the stomatal response to VPD in the earliest angiosperms is likely to have had critical implications for the ecological success of this lineage. PMID:25637454

  12. Arabidopsis HY1-Modulated Stomatal Movement: An Integrative Hub Is Functionally Associated with ABI4 in Dehydration-Induced ABA Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yanjie; Mao, Yu; Duan, Xingliang; Zhou, Heng; Lai, Diwen; Zhang, Yihua; Shen, Wenbiao

    2016-03-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO; EC 1.14.99.3) has recently been proposed as a novel component in mediating wide ranges of the plant adaptive signaling processes. However, the physiological significance and molecular basis underlying Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HO1 (HY1) functioning in drought tolerance remained unclear. Here, we report that mutation of HY1 promoted, but overexpression of this gene impaired, Arabidopsis drought tolerance. This was attributed to the abscisic acid (ABA)-hypersensitive or -hyposensitive phenotypes, with the regulation of stomatal closure in particular. However, comparative transcriptomic profile analysis showed that the induction of numerous ABA/stress-dependent genes in dehydrated wild-type plants was differentially impaired in the hy1 mutant. In agreement, ABA-induced ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE4 (ABI4) transcript accumulation was strengthened in the hy1 mutant. Genetic analysis further identified that the hy1-associated ABA hypersensitivity and drought tolerance were arrested in the abi4 background. Moreover, the promotion of ABA-triggered up-regulation of RbohD abundance and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in the hy1 mutant was almost fully blocked by the mutation of ABI4, suggesting that the HY1-ABI4 signaling in the wild type involved in stomatal closure was dependent on the RbohD-derived ROS production. However, hy1-promoted stomatal closure was not affected by a nitric oxide scavenger. Correspondingly, ABA-insensitive behaviors in rbohD stomata were not affected by either the mutation of HY1 or its ectopic expression in the rbohD background, both of which responded significantly to exogenous ROS. These data indicate that HY1 functioned negatively and acted upstream of ABI4 in drought signaling, which was casually dependent on the RbohD-derived ROS in the regulation of stomatal closure. PMID:26704641

  13. Elevated air movement enhances stomatal sensitivity to abscisic acid in leaves developed at high relative air humidity

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Dália R. A.; Torre, Sissel; Kraniotis, Dimitrios; Almeida, Domingos P. F.; Heuvelink, Ep; Carvalho, Susana M. P.

    2015-01-01

    High relative air humidity (RH ≥ 85%) during growth leads to stomata malfunctioning, resulting in water stress when plants are transferred to conditions of high evaporative demand. In this study, we hypothesized that an elevated air movement (MOV) 24 h per day, during the whole period of leaf development would increase abscisic acid concentration ([ABA]) enhancing stomatal functioning. Pot rose ‘Toril’ was grown at moderate (61%) or high (92%) RH combined with a continuous low (0.08 m s-1) or high (0.92 m s-1) MOV. High MOV reduced stomatal pore length and aperture in plants developed at high RH. Moreover, stomatal function improved when high MOV-treated plants were subjected to leaflet desiccation and ABA feeding. Endogenous concentration of ABA and its metabolites in the leaves was reduced by 35% in high RH, but contrary to our hypothesis this concentration was not significantly affected by high MOV. Interestingly, in detached leaflets grown at high RH, high MOV increased stomatal sensitivity to ABA since the amount of exogenous ABA required to decrease the transpiration rate was significantly reduced. This is the first study to show that high MOV increases stomatal functionality in leaves developed at high RH by reducing the stomatal pore length and aperture and enhancing stomatal sensitivity to ABA rather than increasing leaf [ABA]. PMID:26074943

  14. Stomatal vs. genome size in angiosperms: the somatic tail wagging the genomic dog?

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, J. G.; Sharafi, M.; Jalili, A.; Díaz, S.; Montserrat-Martí, G.; Palmer, C.; Cerabolini, B.; Pierce, S.; Hamzehee, B.; Asri, Y.; Jamzad, Z.; Wilson, P.; Raven, J. A.; Band, S. R.; Basconcelo, S.; Bogard, A.; Carter, G.; Charles, M.; Castro-Díez, P.; Cornelissen, J. H. C.; Funes, G.; Jones, G.; Khoshnevis, M.; Pérez-Harguindeguy, N.; Pérez-Rontomé, M. C.; Shirvany, F. A.; Vendramini, F.; Yazdani, S.; Abbas-Azimi, R.; Boustani, S.; Dehghan, M.; Guerrero-Campo, J.; Hynd, A.; Kowsary, E.; Kazemi-Saeed, F.; Siavash, B.; Villar-Salvador, P.; Craigie, R.; Naqinezhad, A.; Romo-Díez, A.; de Torres Espuny, L.; Simmons, E.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Genome size is a function, and the product, of cell volume. As such it is contingent on ecological circumstance. The nature of ‘this ecological circumstance’ is, however, hotly debated. Here, we investigate for angiosperms whether stomatal size may be this ‘missing link’: the primary determinant of genome size. Stomata are crucial for photosynthesis and their size affects functional efficiency. Methods Stomatal and leaf characteristics were measured for 1442 species from Argentina, Iran, Spain and the UK and, using PCA, some emergent ecological and taxonomic patterns identified. Subsequently, an assessment of the relationship between genome-size values obtained from the Plant DNA C-values database and measurements of stomatal size was carried out. Key Results Stomatal size is an ecologically important attribute. It varies with life-history (woody species < herbaceous species < vernal geophytes) and contributes to ecologically and physiologically important axes of leaf specialization. Moreover, it is positively correlated with genome size across a wide range of major taxa. Conclusions Stomatal size predicts genome size within angiosperms. Correlation is not, however, proof of causality and here our interpretation is hampered by unexpected deficiencies in the scientific literature. Firstly, there are discrepancies between our own observations and established ideas about the ecological significance of stomatal size; very large stomata, theoretically facilitating photosynthesis in deep shade, were, in this study (and in other studies), primarily associated with vernal geophytes of unshaded habitats. Secondly, the lower size limit at which stomata can function efficiently, and the ecological circumstances under which these minute stomata might occur, have not been satisfactorally resolved. Thus, our hypothesis, that the optimization of stomatal size for functional efficiency is a major ecological determinant of genome size, remains unproven

  15. Linking Turgor with ABA Biosynthesis: Implications for Stomatal Responses to Vapor Pressure Deficit across Land Plants.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Scott A M; Brodribb, Timothy J

    2016-07-01

    Stomatal responses to changes in vapor pressure deficit (VPD) constitute the predominant form of daytime gas-exchange regulation in plants. Stomatal closure in response to increased VPD is driven by the rapid up-regulation of foliar abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis and ABA levels in angiosperms; however, very little is known about the physiological trigger for this increase in ABA biosynthesis at increased VPD Using a novel method of modifying leaf cell turgor by the application of external pressures, we test whether changes in turgor pressure can trigger increases in foliar ABA levels over 20 min, a period of time most relevant to the stomatal response to VPD We found in angiosperm species that the biosynthesis of ABA was triggered by reductions in leaf turgor, and in two species tested, that a higher sensitivity of ABA synthesis to leaf turgor corresponded with a higher stomatal sensitivity to VPD In contrast, representative species from nonflowering plant lineages did not show a rapid turgor-triggered increase in foliar ABA levels, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating passive stomatal responses to changes in VPD in these lineages. Our method provides a new tool for characterizing the response of stomata to water availability. PMID:27208264

  16. Carbonic anhydrases are upstream regulators of CO2-controlled stomatal movements in guard cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Honghong; Boisson-Dernier, Aurélien; Israelsson-Nordström, Maria; Böhmer, Maik; Xue, Shaowu; Ries, Amber; Godoski, Jan; Kuhn, Josef M; Schroeder, Julian I

    2010-01-01

    The continuing rise in atmospheric CO2 causes stomatal pores in leaves to close and thus globally affects CO2 influx into plants, water use efficiency and leaf heat stress. However, the CO2-binding proteins that control this response remain unknown. Moreover, which cell type responds to CO2, mesophyll or guard cells, and whether photosynthesis mediates this response are matters of debate. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant plants in the beta-carbonic anhydrases betaCA1 and betaCA4 show impaired CO2-regulation of stomatal movements and increased stomatal density, but retain functional abscisic-acid and blue-light responses. betaCA-mediated CO2-triggered stomatal movements are not, in first-order, linked to whole leaf photosynthesis and can function in guard cells. Furthermore, guard cell betaca-overexpressing plants exhibit instantaneous enhanced water use efficiency. Guard cell expression of mammalian alphaCAII complements the reduced sensitivity of ca1 ca4 plants, showing that carbonic anhydrase-mediated catalysis is an important mechanism for betaCA-mediated CO2-induced stomatal closure and patch clamp analyses indicate that CO2/HCO3- transfers the signal to anion channel regulation. These findings, together with ht1-2 (ref. 9) epistasis analysis demonstrate that carbonic anhydrases function early in the CO2 signalling pathway, which controls gas-exchange between plants and the atmosphere. PMID:20010812

  17. Diagnostic evaluation of a reverse transcribed real time PCR assay for vesicular stomatitis in horses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is a viral infection that affects a variety of domesticated species including cattle, sheep, pigs, and horses. The symptoms vary among species, but VS usually manifests as vesicles on the epithelium of the nose, tongue, mouth, udder, and coronary bands. Vesicular stomatit...

  18. Nocturnal and daytime stomatal conductance respond to root-zone temperature in ‘Shiraz’ grapevines

    PubMed Central

    Rogiers, Suzy Y.; Clarke, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Daytime root-zone temperature may be a significant factor regulating water flux through plants. Water flux can also occur during the night but nocturnal stomatal response to environmental drivers such as root-zone temperature remains largely unknown. Methods Here nocturnal and daytime leaf gas exchange was quantified in ‘Shiraz’ grapevines (Vitis vinifera) exposed to three root-zone temperatures from budburst to fruit-set, for a total of 8 weeks in spring. Key Results Despite lower stomatal density, night-time stomatal conductance and transpiration rates were greater for plants grown in warm root-zones. Elevated root-zone temperature resulted in higher daytime stomatal conductance, transpiration and net assimilation rates across a range of leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficits, air temperatures and light levels. Intrinsic water-use efficiency was, however, lowest in those plants with warm root-zones. CO2 response curves of foliar gas exchange indicated that the maximum rate of electron transport and the maximum rate of Rubisco activity did not differ between the root-zone treatments, and therefore it was likely that the lower photosynthesis in cool root-zones was predominantly the result of a stomatal limitation. One week after discontinuation of the temperature treatments, gas exchange was similar between the plants, indicating a reversible physiological response to soil temperature. Conclusions In this anisohydric grapevine variety both night-time and daytime stomatal conductance were responsive to root-zone temperature. Because nocturnal transpiration has implications for overall plant water status, predictive climate change models using stomatal conductance will need to factor in this root-zone variable. PMID:23293018

  19. Enhanced Photosynthesis and Growth in atquac1 Knockout Mutants Are Due to Altered Organic Acid Accumulation and an Increase in Both Stomatal and Mesophyll Conductance.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, David B; Martins, Samuel C V; Cavalcanti, João Henrique F; Daloso, Danilo M; Martinoia, Enrico; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; DaMatta, Fábio M; Fernie, Alisdair R; Araújo, Wagner L

    2016-01-01

    Stomata control the exchange of CO2 and water vapor in land plants. Thus, whereas a constant supply of CO2 is required to maintain adequate rates of photosynthesis, the accompanying water losses must be tightly regulated to prevent dehydration and undesired metabolic changes. Accordingly, the uptake or release of ions and metabolites from guard cells is necessary to achieve normal stomatal function. The AtQUAC1, an R-type anion channel responsible for the release of malate from guard cells, is essential for efficient stomatal closure. Here, we demonstrate that mutant plants lacking AtQUAC1 accumulated higher levels of malate and fumarate. These mutant plants not only display slower stomatal closure in response to increased CO2 concentration and dark but are also characterized by improved mesophyll conductance. These responses were accompanied by increases in both photosynthesis and respiration rates, without affecting the activity of photosynthetic and respiratory enzymes and the expression of other transporter genes in guard cells, which ultimately led to improved growth. Collectively, our results highlight that the transport of organic acids plays a key role in plant cell metabolism and demonstrate that AtQUAC1 reduce diffusive limitations to photosynthesis, which, at least partially, explain the observed increments in growth under well-watered conditions. PMID:26542441

  20. Effects of chemical inhibitors and apyrase enzyme further document a role for apyrases and extracellular ATP in the opening and closing of stomates in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Greg; Darwin, Cameron; Mehta, Viraj; Jackobs, Faith; Perry, Tyler; Hougaard, Katia; Roux, Stan

    2013-11-01

    In Arabidopsis leaves there is a bi-phasic dose-response to applied nucleotides; i.e., lower concentrations induce stomatal opening, while higher concentrations induce closure. Two mammalian purinoceptor antagonists, PPADS and RB2, block both nucleotide-induced stomatal opening and closing. These antagonists also partially block ABA-induced stomatal closure and light-induced stomatal opening. There are two closely related Arabidopsis apyrases, AtAPY1 and AtAPY2, which are both expressed in guard cells. Here we report that low levels of apyrase chemical inhibitors can induce stomatal opening in the dark, while apyrase enzyme blocks ABA-induced stomatal closure. We also demonstrate that high concentrations of ATP induce stomatal closure in the light. Application of ATPγS and chemical apyrase inhibitors at concentrations that have no effect on stomatal closure can lower the threshold for ABA-induced closure. The closure induced by ATPγS was not observed in gpa1-3 loss-of-function mutants. These results further confirm the role of extracellular ATP in regulating stomatal apertures. PMID:23989340

  1. Mechanisms of abscisic acid-mediated control of stomatal aperture.

    PubMed

    Munemasa, Shintaro; Hauser, Felix; Park, Jiyoung; Waadt, Rainer; Brandt, Benjamin; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-12-01

    Drought stress triggers an increase in the level of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA), which initiates a signaling cascade to close stomata and reduce water loss. Recent studies have revealed that guard cells control cytosolic ABA concentration through the concerted actions of biosynthesis, catabolism as well as transport across membranes. Substantial progress has been made at understanding the molecular mechanisms of how the ABA signaling core module controls the activity of anion channels and thereby stomatal aperture. In this review, we focus on our current mechanistic understanding of ABA signaling in guard cells including the role of the second messenger Ca(2+) as well as crosstalk with biotic stress responses. PMID:26599955

  2. Optimal stomatal behaviour around the world

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yan-Shih; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Duursma, Remko A.; Prentice, I. Colin; Wang, Han; Baig, Sofia; Eamus, Derek; de Dios, Victor Resco; Mitchell, Patrick; Ellsworth, David S.; de Beeck, Maarten Op; Wallin, Göran; Uddling, Johan; Tarvainen, Lasse; Linderson, Maj-Lena; Cernusak, Lucas A.; Nippert, Jesse B.; Ocheltree, Troy W.; Tissue, David T.; Martin-StPaul, Nicolas K.; Rogers, Alistair; Warren, Jeff M.; De Angelis, Paolo; Hikosaka, Kouki; Han, Qingmin; Onoda, Yusuke; Gimeno, Teresa E.; Barton, Craig V. M.; Bennie, Jonathan; Bonal, Damien; Bosc, Alexandre; Löw, Markus; Macinins-Ng, Cate; Rey, Ana; Rowland, Lucy; Setterfield, Samantha A.; Tausz-Posch, Sabine; Zaragoza-Castells, Joana; Broadmeadow, Mark S. J.; Drake, John E.; Freeman, Michael; Ghannoum, Oula; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Kelly, Jeff W.; Kikuzawa, Kihachiro; Kolari, Pasi; Koyama, Kohei; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Meir, Patrick; Lola da Costa, Antonio C.; Mikkelsen, Teis N.; Salinas, Norma; Sun, Wei; Wingate, Lisa

    2015-03-02

    Stomatal conductance (gs) is a key land-surface attribute as it links transpiration, the dominant component of global land evapotranspiration, and photosynthesis, the driving force of the global carbon cycle. Despite the pivotal role of gs in predictions of global water and carbon cycle changes, a global-scale database and an associated globally applicable model of gs that allow predictions of stomatal behaviour are lacking. Here, we present a database of globally distributed gs obtained in the field for a wide range of plant functional types (PFTs) and biomes. We find that stomatal behaviour differs among PFTs according to their marginal carbon cost of water use, as predicted by the theory underpinning the optimal stomatal model1 and the leaf and wood economics spectrum2,3. We also demonstrate a global relationship with climate. In conclusion, these findings provide a robust theoretical framework for understanding and predicting the behaviour of gs across biomes and across PFTs that can be applied to regional, continental and global-scale modelling of ecosystem productivity, energy balance and ecohydrological processes in a future changing climate.

  3. Optimal stomatal behaviour around the world

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lin, Yan-Shih; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Duursma, Remko A.; Prentice, I. Colin; Wang, Han; Baig, Sofia; Eamus, Derek; de Dios, Victor Resco; Mitchell, Patrick; Ellsworth, David S.; et al

    2015-03-02

    Stomatal conductance (gs) is a key land-surface attribute as it links transpiration, the dominant component of global land evapotranspiration, and photosynthesis, the driving force of the global carbon cycle. Despite the pivotal role of gs in predictions of global water and carbon cycle changes, a global-scale database and an associated globally applicable model of gs that allow predictions of stomatal behaviour are lacking. Here, we present a database of globally distributed gs obtained in the field for a wide range of plant functional types (PFTs) and biomes. We find that stomatal behaviour differs among PFTs according to their marginal carbonmore » cost of water use, as predicted by the theory underpinning the optimal stomatal model1 and the leaf and wood economics spectrum2,3. We also demonstrate a global relationship with climate. In conclusion, these findings provide a robust theoretical framework for understanding and predicting the behaviour of gs across biomes and across PFTs that can be applied to regional, continental and global-scale modelling of ecosystem productivity, energy balance and ecohydrological processes in a future changing climate.« less

  4. Optimal stomatal behaviour around the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yan-Shih; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Duursma, Remko A.; Prentice, I. Colin; Wang, Han; Baig, Sofia; Eamus, Derek; de Dios, Victor Resco; Mitchell, Patrick; Ellsworth, David S.; de Beeck, Maarten Op; Wallin, Göran; Uddling, Johan; Tarvainen, Lasse; Linderson, Maj-Lena; Cernusak, Lucas A.; Nippert, Jesse B.; Ocheltree, Troy W.; Tissue, David T.; Martin-Stpaul, Nicolas K.; Rogers, Alistair; Warren, Jeff M.; de Angelis, Paolo; Hikosaka, Kouki; Han, Qingmin; Onoda, Yusuke; Gimeno, Teresa E.; Barton, Craig V. M.; Bennie, Jonathan; Bonal, Damien; Bosc, Alexandre; Löw, Markus; Macinins-Ng, Cate; Rey, Ana; Rowland, Lucy; Setterfield, Samantha A.; Tausz-Posch, Sabine; Zaragoza-Castells, Joana; Broadmeadow, Mark S. J.; Drake, John E.; Freeman, Michael; Ghannoum, Oula; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Kelly, Jeff W.; Kikuzawa, Kihachiro; Kolari, Pasi; Koyama, Kohei; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Meir, Patrick; Lola da Costa, Antonio C.; Mikkelsen, Teis N.; Salinas, Norma; Sun, Wei; Wingate, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    Stomatal conductance (gs) is a key land-surface attribute as it links transpiration, the dominant component of global land evapotranspiration, and photosynthesis, the driving force of the global carbon cycle. Despite the pivotal role of gs in predictions of global water and carbon cycle changes, a global-scale database and an associated globally applicable model of gs that allow predictions of stomatal behaviour are lacking. Here, we present a database of globally distributed gs obtained in the field for a wide range of plant functional types (PFTs) and biomes. We find that stomatal behaviour differs among PFTs according to their marginal carbon cost of water use, as predicted by the theory underpinning the optimal stomatal model and the leaf and wood economics spectrum. We also demonstrate a global relationship with climate. These findings provide a robust theoretical framework for understanding and predicting the behaviour of gs across biomes and across PFTs that can be applied to regional, continental and global-scale modelling of ecosystem productivity, energy balance and ecohydrological processes in a future changing climate.

  5. Directionality of affective priming: effects of trait anxiety and activation level.

    PubMed

    Maier, Markus A; Berner, Michael P; Pekrun, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    Among the most influential models of automatic affective processing is the spreading activation account (Fazio, Sanbonmatsu, Powell, & Kardes, 1986). However, investigations of this model by different research groups using the pronunciation task in an affective priming paradigm yielded contradictory results. Whereas one research group reported congruency effects, another obtained reversed priming effects (contrast effects), and still another found null effects. In Experiment 1, we were able to show an influence of trait anxiety on the direction of the affective priming effect. By using a multiple priming paradigm in Experiment 2, we were able to link the occurrence of reversed priming effects to increased levels of activation of affective representations. We propose that this relation might underlie the influence of trait anxiety on the direction of affective priming effects. Both experiments indicate that automatic evaluation in an affective network is substantially moderated by personality traits and activation level. PMID:12693196

  6. Meta-analysis of stomatitis in clinical studies of everolimus: incidence and relationship with efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Rugo, H. S.; Hortobagyi, G. N.; Yao, J.; Pavel, M.; Ravaud, A.; Franz, D.; Ringeisen, F.; Gallo, J.; Rouyrre, N.; Anak, O.; Motzer, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Everolimus, an oral mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, is used to treat solid tumors and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Stomatitis, an inflammation of the mucous membranes of the mouth, is a common adverse event associated with mTOR inhibitors, including everolimus. We conducted a meta-analysis of data from seven randomized, double-blind phase 3 clinical trials of everolimus to determine the clinical impact of stomatitis on efficacy and safety. Patients and methods Data were pooled from the safety sets of solid tumor [breast cancer (BOLERO-2 and BOLERO-3), renal cell carcinoma (RECORD-1), carcinoid tumors (RADIANT-2), and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (RADIANT-3)] and TSC studies (EXIST-1 and EXIST-2). Data from solid tumor trials and TSC trials were analyzed separately. Results The rate of stomatitis was 67% in the solid tumor trials (973/1455 patients) and 70% in the TSC trials (110/157 patients). Most stomatitis events were grade 1/2, with grade 3/4 events reported in only 9% (solid tumor trials) and 8% (TSC trials) of patients. Low TSC patient numbers prevented an in-depth evaluation of stomatitis and response. In the solid tumor trials, most first stomatitis episodes (89%; n = 870) were observed within 8 weeks of starting everolimus. Patients with stomatitis occurring within 8 weeks of everolimus initiation had longer progression-free survival (PFS) than everolimus-treated patients without stomatitis in BOLERO-2 {8.5 versus 6.9 months, respectively; hazard ratio (HR), 0.78 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.62–1.00]} and RADIANT-3 [13.9 versus 8.3 months, respectively; HR, 0.70 (95% CI, 0.48–1.04)]. A similar trend was observed in RECORD-1 [HR, 0.90 (95% CI, 0.66–1.22)] and RADIANT-2 [HR, 0.87 (95% CI, 0.61–1.22)] but not in BOLERO-3 [HR, 1.01 (95% CI, 0.75–1.36)]. Conclusions Stomatitis did not adversely affect PFS, supporting the administration of everolimus in accordance with standard management guidelines. PMID

  7. Ecological concerns following Superstorm Sandy: stressor level and recreational activity levels affect perceptions of ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coastal habitats are vulnerable to storms, and with increasing urbanization, sea level rise, and storm frequency, some urban populations are at risk. This study examined perceptions of respondents in coastal and central New Jersey to Superstorm Sandy, including: 1) concerns about ecological resources and effects (open-ended question), 2) information sources for ecology of the coast (open-ended), and 3) ratings of a list of ecological services as a function of demographics, location (coastal, central Jersey), stressor level (power outages, high winds, flooding) and recreational rates. “Wildlife” and “fish” were the ecological concerns mentioned most often, while beaches and dunes were most often mentioned for environmental concerns. Television, radio, and web/internet were sources trusted for ecological information. The data indicate 1) stressor level was a better predictor of ratings of ecological services than geographical location, but days engaged in recreation contributed the most to variations in ratings, 2) ecological services were rated the highest by respondents with the highest stressor levels, and by those from the coast, compared to others, 3) Caucasians rated ecological services higher than all others, and 4) recreational rates were highest for coastal respondents, and ratings for ecological services increased with recreational rates. Only 20 % of respondents listed specific ecological services as one of their three most important environmental concerns. These data will be useful for increasing preparedness, enhancing educational strategies for shore protection, and providing managers and public policy makers with data essential to developing resiliency strategies. PMID:27011729

  8. PdEPF1 regulates water-use efficiency and drought tolerance by modulating stomatal density in poplar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congpeng; Liu, Sha; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Ying; Geng, Anke; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2016-03-01

    Water deficiency is a critical environmental condition that is seriously reducing global plant production. Improved water-use efficiency (WUE) and drought tolerance are effective strategies to address this problem. In this study, PdEPF1, a member of the EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR (EPF) family, was isolated from the fast-growing poplar clone NE-19 [Populus nigra × (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra)]. Significantly, higher PdEPF1 levels were detected after induction by dehydration and abscisic acid. To explore the biological functions of PdEPF1, transgenic triploid white poplars (Populus tomentosa 'YiXianCiZhu B385') overexpressing PdEPF1 were constructed. PdEPF1 overexpression resulted in increased water deficit tolerance and greater WUE. We confirmed that the transgenic lines with greater instantaneous WUE had approximately 30% lower transpiration but equivalent CO2 assimilation. Lower transpiration was associated with a 28% reduction in abaxial stomatal density. PdEPF1 overexpression not only strongly enhanced WUE, but also greatly improved drought tolerance, as measured by the leaf relative water content and water potential, under limited water conditions. In addition, the growth of these oxPdEPF1 plants was less adversely affected by reduced water availability than plants with a higher stomatal density, indicating that plants with a low stomatal density may be well suited to grow in water-scarce environments. Taken together, our data suggest that PdEPF1 improves WUE and confers drought tolerance in poplar; thus, it could be used to breed drought-tolerant plants with increased production under conditions of water deficiency. PMID:26228739

  9. Edge type affects leaf-level water relations and estimated transpiration of Eucalyptus arenacea.

    PubMed

    Wright, Thomas E; Tausz, Michael; Kasel, Sabine; Volkova, Liubov; Merchant, Andrew; Bennett, Lauren T

    2012-03-01

    While edge effects on tree water relations are well described for closed forests, they remain under-examined in more open forest types. Similarly, there has been minimal evaluation of the effects of contrasting land uses on the water relations of open forest types in highly fragmented landscapes. We examined edge effects on the water relations and gas exchange of a dominant tree (Eucalyptus arenacea Marginson & Ladiges) in an open forest type (temperate woodland) of south-eastern Australia. Edge effects in replicate woodlands adjoined by cleared agricultural land (pasture edges) were compared with those adjoined by 7- to 9-year-old eucalypt plantation with a 25m fire break (plantation edges). Consistent with studies in closed forest types, edge effects were pronounced at pasture edges where photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance were greater for edge trees than interior trees (75m into woodlands), and were related to greater light availability and significantly higher branch water potentials at woodland edges than interiors. Nonetheless, gas exchange values were only ∼50% greater for edge than interior trees, compared with ∼200% previously found in closed forest types. In contrast to woodlands adjoined by pasture, gas exchange in winter was significantly lower for edge than interior trees in woodlands adjoined by plantations, consistent with shading and buffering effects of plantations on edge microclimate. Plantation edge effects were less pronounced in summer, although higher water use efficiency of edge than interior woodland trees indicated possible competition for water between plantation trees and woodland edge trees in the drier months (an effect that might have been more pronounced were there no firebreak between the two land uses). Scaling up of leaf-level water relations to stand transpiration using a Jarvis-type phenomenological model indicated similar differences between edge types. That is, transpiration was greater at pasture than

  10. Photosynthesis-dependent/independent control of stomatal responses to CO2 in mutant barley with surplus electron transport capacity and reduced SLAH3 anion channel transcript.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Javier; Molina-Cano, José-Luis; Pérez, Pilar; Morcuende, Rosa; Moralejo, Marian; Savé, Robert; Martínez-Carrasco, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms of stomatal sensitivity to CO2 are yet to be fully understood. The role of photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic factors in stomatal responses to CO2 was investigated in wild-type barley (Hordeum vulgare var. Graphic) and in a mutant (G132) with decreased photochemical and Rubisco capacities. The CO2 and DCMU responses of stomatal conductance (gs), gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and levels of ATP, with a putative transcript for stomatal opening were analysed. G132 had greater gs than the wild-type, despite lower photosynthesis rates and higher intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci). The mutant had Rubisco-limited photosynthesis at very high CO2 levels, and higher ATP contents than the wild-type. Stomatal sensitivity to CO2 under red light was lower in G132 than in the wild-type, both in photosynthesizing and DCMU-inhibited leaves. Under constant Ci and red light, stomatal sensitivity to DCMU inhibition was higher in G132. The levels of a SLAH3-like slow anion channel transcript, involved in stomatal closure, decreased sharply in G132. The results suggest that stomatal responses to CO2 depend partly on the balance of photosynthetic electron transport to carbon assimilation capacities, but are partially regulated by the CO2 signalling network. High gs can improve the adaptation to climate change in well-watered conditions. PMID:26398787

  11. Exploring Factors Affecting Girls' Education at Secondary Level: A Case of Karak District, Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suleman, Qaiser; Aslam, Hassan Danial; Habib, Muhammad Badar; Yasmeen, Kausar; Jalalian, Mehrdad; Akhtar, Zaitoon; Akhtar, Basreen

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the factors that affect girls' education at secondary school level in Karak District, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan). All the female heads, teachers and students serving and studying at secondary school level in Karak District constituted the population of the study. The study was delimited to only 30 girls' secondary schools in…

  12. Nitric oxide, stomatal closure, and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Neill, Steven; Barros, Raimundo; Bright, Jo; Desikan, Radhika; Hancock, John; Harrison, Judith; Morris, Peter; Ribeiro, Dimas; Wilson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Various data indicate that nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenous signal in plants that mediates responses to several stimuli. Experimental evidence in support of such signalling roles for NO has been obtained via the application of NO, usually in the form of NO donors, via the measurement of endogenous NO, and through the manipulation of endogenous NO content by chemical and genetic means. Stomatal closure, initiated by abscisic acid (ABA), is effected through a complex symphony of intracellular signalling in which NO appears to be one component. Exogenous NO induces stomatal closure, ABA triggers NO generation, removal of NO by scavengers inhibits stomatal closure in response to ABA, and ABA-induced stomatal closure is reduced in mutants that are impaired in NO generation. The data indicate that ABA-induced guard cell NO generation requires both nitric oxide synthase-like activity and, in Arabidopsis, the NIA1 isoform of nitrate reductase (NR). NO stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity and cGMP production. Both these NO-stimulated events are required for ABA-induced stomatal closure. ABA also stimulates the generation of H2O2 in guard cells, and pharmacological and genetic data demonstrate that NO accumulation in these cells is dependent on such production. Recent data have extended this model to maize mesophyll cells where the induction of antioxidant defences by water stress and ABA required the generation of H2O2 and NO and the activation of a MAPK. Published data suggest that drought and salinity induce NO generation which activates cellular processes that afford some protection against the oxidative stress associated with these conditions. Exogenous NO can also protect cells against oxidative stress. Thus, the data suggest an emerging model of stress responses in which ABA has several ameliorative functions. These include the rapid induction of stomatal closure to reduce transpirational water loss and the activation of antioxidant defences

  13. Honey and Radiation-Induced Stomatitis in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bahramnezhad, Fatemeh; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Bassampour, Shiva Sadat; Khajeh, Mahboobeh; Asgari, Parvaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stomatitis is a common oral complication which affects 100% of patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy. Acute stomatitis might cause failure and delay radiotherapy. Attention to mouth hygiene, particularly using mouthwash, has a fundamental importance for these patients. Objectives: The current study came to addresses the effects of pure natural honey on radiation-induced stomatitis in patients with a variety of head and neck cancers. Patients and Methods: The present single-blinded nonrandomized controlled trial was conducted on 105 patients undergoing radiotherapy due to head and neck cancer at the radiation unit of Shafa hospital in Kerman, Iran, from October 2012 to March 2012. The research groups were selected by writing the names of the protocols (the mouthwashes of chamomile, honey and the common caring protocol at ward which uses water) on three cubes. The first extracted cube was related to the chamomile mouthwash (Matrica), the second to the honey mouthwash and the last cube to the water mouthwash. The first experimental group (n = 35) gurgled a solution containing 20 mL diluted honey, the second group gurgled a solution containing German chamomile, and the 35 patients in the control group were advised to gurgle 20 mL water (the ward routine). Results: The results showed that severe stomatitis in groups of honey, chamomile and control was 0, 5.7%, and 17.6%, respectively. On the 14th day, it was 0, 0, and 17.6%, respectively. There were significant differences between the three groups regarding the severity of stomatitis in the 14th day (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The application of natural honey is effective in managing and preventing radiation-induced stomatitis in patients with head and neck cancers. PMID:26568850

  14. Glucose- and mannose-induced stomatal closure is mediated by ROS production, Ca(2+) and water channel in Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Xu, ShanShan; Gao, Jing; Pan, Sha; Wang, GenXuan

    2016-03-01

    Sugars act as vital signaling molecules that regulate plant growth, development and stress responses. However, the effects of sugars on stomatal movement have been unclear. In our study, we explored the effects of monosaccharides such as glucose and mannose on stomatal aperture. Here, we demonstrate that glucose and mannose trigger stomatal closure in a dose- and time-dependent manner in epidermal peels of broad bean (Vicia faba). Pharmacological studies revealed that glucose- and mannose-induced stomatal closure was almost completely inhibited by two reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers, catalase (CAT) and reduced glutathione (GSH), was significantly abolished by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI), whereas they were hardly affected by a peroxidase inhibitor, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM). Furthermore, glucose- and mannose-induced stomatal closure was strongly inhibited by a Ca(2+) channel blocker, LaCl3 , a Ca(2+) chelator, ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and two water channel blockers, HgCl2 and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO); whereas the inhibitory effects of the water channel blockers were essentially abolished by the reversing agent β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME). These results suggest that ROS production mainly via NADPH oxidases, Ca(2+) and water channels are involved in glucose- and mannose-induced stomatal closure. PMID:26046775

  15. Extracellular ATP promotes stomatal opening of Arabidopsis thaliana through heterotrimeric G protein α subunit and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Hao, Li-Hua; Wang, Wei-Xia; Chen, Chen; Wang, Yu-Fang; Liu, Ting; Li, Xia; Shang, Zhong-Lin

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) has been reported to exist in apoplasts of plant cells as a signal molecule. Extracellular ATP (eATP) plays important roles in plant growth, development, and stress tolerance. Here, extracellular ATP was found to promote stomatal opening of Arabidopsis thaliana in light and darkness. ADP, GTP, and weakly hydrolyzable ATP analogs (ATPγS, Bz-ATP, and 2meATP) showed similar effects, whereas AMP and adenosine did not affect stomatal movement. Apyrase inhibited stomatal opening. ATP-promoted stomatal opening was blocked by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor (diphenylene iodonium) or deoxidizer (dithiothreitol), and was impaired in null mutant of NADPH oxidase (atrbohD/F). Added ATP triggered ROS generation in guard cells via NADPH oxidase. ATP also induced Ca(2+) influx and H(+) efflux in guard cells. In atrbohD/F, ATP-induced ion flux was strongly suppressed. In null mutants of the heterotrimeric G protein α subunit, ATP-promoted stomatal opening, cytoplasmic ROS generation, Ca(2+) influx, and H(+) efflux were all suppressed. These results indicated that eATP-promoted stomatal opening possibly involves the heterotrimeric G protein, ROS, cytosolic Ca(2+), and plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. PMID:22138967

  16. The stomatal CO2 proxy does not saturate at high atmospheric CO2 concentrations: evidence from stomatal index responses of Araucariaceae conifers.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Matthew; Elliott-Kingston, Caroline; McElwain, Jennifer C

    2011-09-01

    The inverse relationship between the number of stomata on a leaf surface and the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO(2)]) in which the leaf developed allows plants to optimise water-use efficiency (WUE), but it also permits the use of fossil plants as proxies of palaeoatmospheric [CO(2)]. The ancient conifer family Araucariaceae is often represented in fossil floras and may act as a suitable proxy of palaeo-[CO(2)], yet little is known regarding the stomatal index (SI) responses of extant Araucariaceae to [CO(2)]. Four Araucaria species (Araucaria columnaris, A. heterophylla, A. angustifolia and A. bidwillii) and Agathis australis displayed no significant relationship in SI to [CO(2)] below current ambient levels (~380 ppm). However, representatives of the three extant genera within the Araucariaceae (A. bidwillii, A. australis and Wollemia nobilis) all exhibited significant reductions in SI when grown in atmospheres of elevated [CO(2)] (1,500 ppm). Stomatal conductance was reduced and WUE increased when grown under elevated [CO(2)]. Stomatal pore length did not increase alongside reduced stomatal density (SD) and SI in the three araucariacean conifers when grown at elevated [CO(2)]. These pronounced SD and SI reductions occur at higher [CO(2)] levels than in other species with more recent evolutionary origins, and may reflect an evolutionary legacy of the Araucariaceae in the high [CO(2)] world of the Mesozoic Era. Araucariacean conifers may therefore be suitable stomatal proxies of palaeo-[CO(2)] during periods of "greenhouse" climates and high [CO(2)] in the Earth's history. PMID:21461935

  17. Clustered Stomates in "Begonia": An Exercise in Data Collection & Statistical Analysis of Biological Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Joann M.; Korn, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a laboratory exercise in data collection and statistical analysis in biological space using clustered stomates on leaves of "Begonia" plants. The exercise can be done in middle school classes by students making their own slides and seeing imprints of cells, or at the high school level through collecting data of…

  18. Stomatal Dimorphism of Neodiplogaster acaloleptae (Diplogastromorpha: Diplogastridae)

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Natsumi

    2016-01-01

    Several genera belonging to the nematode family Diplogastridae show characteristic dimorphism in their feeding structures; specifically, they have microbial feeding stenostomatous and predatory eurystomatous morphs. A diplogastrid satellite model species, Pristionchus pacificus, and its close relatives have become a model system for studying this phenotypic plasticity, with intensive physiological and structural studies having been undertaken. However, the many other species that are morphologically and phylogenetically divergent from P. pacificus have not been examined to date. In the present study, the detailed stomatal structure and induction of dimorphism in Neodiplogaster acaloleptae were examined. N. acaloleptae has a fungal feeding stenostomatous morph and a predatory eurystomatous morph. The predatory morph was induced by starvation, high population density, and co-culturing with its potential prey, Caenorhabditis elegans. The feeding behavior of the stenostomatous and eurystomatous morphs of N. acaloleptae was confirmed, demonstrating that 1) the stomatal and pharyngeal movements of the two morphs were basically identical, and 2) the stomatal elements were protracted to cut open the hyphae and/or prey to feed when a N. acaloleptae flips its dorsal movable tooth dorsally and tilts its subventral stegostomatal cylinder ventrally, forming a pair of scissors to cut the food source. The stoma morphology of N. acaloleptae with a single movable tooth and a long stoma is markedly different from that of Pristionchus, which has two movable teeth and a short stoma. It is, however, similar to that of Mononchoides, tentatively a sister to Neodiplogaster. PMID:27196730

  19. Denture-Related Stomatitis Is Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Osmenda, Grzegorz; Nowakowski, Daniel; Wilk, Grzegorz; Maciąg, Anna; Mikołajczyk, Tomasz; Sagan, Agnieszka; Filip, Magdalena; Dróżdż, Mirosław; Guzik, Tomasz J.

    2014-01-01

    Oral inflammation, such as periodontitis, can lead to endothelial dysfunction, accelerated atherosclerosis, and vascular dysfunction. The relationship between vascular dysfunction and other common forms of oral infections such as denture-related stomatitis (DRS) is unknown. Similar risk factors predispose to both conditions including smoking, diabetes, age, and obesity. Accordingly, we aimed to investigate endothelial function and major vascular disease risk factors in 44 consecutive patients with dentures with clinical and microbiological features of DRS (n = 20) and without DRS (n = 24). While there was a tendency for higher occurrence of diabetes and smoking, groups did not differ significantly in respect to major vascular disease risk factors. Groups did not differ in main ambulatory blood pressure, total cholesterol, or even CRP. Importantly, flow mediated dilatation (FMD) was significantly lower in DRS than in non-DRS subjects, while nitroglycerin induced vasorelaxation (NMD) or intima-media thickness (IMT) was similar. Interestingly, while triglyceride levels were normal in both groups, they were higher in DRS subjects, although they did not correlate with either FMD or NMD. Conclusions. Denture related stomatitis is associated with endothelial dysfunction in elderly patients with dentures. This is in part related to the fact that diabetes and smoking increase risk of both DRS and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25045683

  20. Competitive binding of antagonistic peptides fine-tunes stomatal patterning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Suk; Hnilova, Marketa; Maes, Michal; Lin, Ya-Chen Lisa; Putarjunan, Aarthi; Han, Soon-Ki; Avila, Julian; Torii, Keiko U

    2015-06-25

    During development, cells interpret complex and often conflicting signals to make optimal decisions. Plant stomata, the cellular interface between a plant and the atmosphere, develop according to positional cues, which include a family of secreted peptides called epidermal patterning factors (EPFs). How these signalling peptides orchestrate pattern formation at a molecular level remains unclear. Here we report in Arabidopsis that Stomagen (also called EPF-LIKE9) peptide, which promotes stomatal development, requires ERECTA (ER)-family receptor kinases and interferes with the inhibition of stomatal development by the EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR 2 (EPF2)-ER module. Both EPF2 and Stomagen directly bind to ER and its co-receptor TOO MANY MOUTHS. Stomagen peptide competitively replaced EPF2 binding to ER. Furthermore, application of EPF2, but not Stomagen, elicited rapid phosphorylation of downstream signalling components in vivo. Our findings demonstrate how a plant receptor agonist and antagonist define inhibitory and inductive cues to fine-tune tissue patterning on the plant epidermis. PMID:26083750

  1. Nitric Oxide (NO) Measurements in Stomatal Guard Cells.

    PubMed

    Agurla, Srinivas; Gayatri, Gunja; Raghavendra, Agepati S

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in plant cells acquired great importance, in view of the multifaceted function and involvement of NO as a signal in various plant processes. Monitoring of NO in guard cells is quite simple because of the large size of guard cells and ease of observing the detached epidermis under microscope. Stomatal guard cells therefore provide an excellent model system to study the components of signal transduction. The levels and functions of NO in relation to stomatal closure can be monitored, with the help of an inverted fluorescence or confocal microscope. We can measure the NO in guard cells by using flouroprobes like 4,5-diamino fluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA). This fluorescent dye, DAF-2DA, is cell permeable and after entry into the cell, the diacetate group is removed by the cellular esterases. The resulting DAF-2 form is membrane impermeable and reacts with NO to generate the highly fluorescent triazole (DAF-2T), with excitation and emission wavelengths of 488 and 530 nm, respectively. If time-course measurements are needed, the epidermis can be adhered to a cover-glass or glass slide and left in a small petri dishes. Fluorescence can then be monitored at required time intervals; with a precaution that excitation is done minimally, only when a fluorescent image is acquired. The present method description is for the epidermis of Arabidopsis thaliana and Pisum sativum and should work with most of the other dicotyledonous plants. PMID:27094410

  2. Ozone deposition to an orange orchard: Partitioning between stomatal and non-stomatal sinks.

    PubMed

    Fares, Silvano; Weber, Robin; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Gentner, Drew; Karlik, John; Goldstein, Allen H

    2012-10-01

    Orange trees are widely cultivated in regions with high concentrations of tropospheric ozone. Citrus absorb ozone through their stomata and emit volatile organic compounds (VOC), which, together with soil emissions of NO, contribute to non-stomatal ozone removal. In a Valencia orange orchard in Exeter, California, we used fast sensors and eddy covariance to characterize water and ozone fluxes. We also measured meteorological parameters necessary to model other important sinks of ozone deposition. We present changes in magnitude of these ozone deposition sinks over the year in response to environmental parameters. Within the plant canopy, the orchard constitutes a sink for ozone, with non-stomatal ozone deposition larger than stomatal uptake. In particular, soil deposition and reactions between ozone, VOC and NO represented the major sinks of ozone. This research aims to help the development of metrics for ozone-risk assessment and advance our understanding of citrus in biosphere-atmosphere exchange. PMID:22341155

  3. Xanthomonas campestris Overcomes Arabidopsis Stomatal Innate Immunity through a DSF Cell-to-Cell Signal-Regulated Virulence Factor1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E.; Torres, Pablo S.; Vojnov, Adrián A.

    2009-01-01

    Pathogen-induced stomatal closure is part of the plant innate immune response. Phytopathogens using stomata as a way of entry into the leaf must avoid the stomatal response of the host. In this article, we describe a factor secreted by the bacterial phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) capable of interfering with stomatal closure induced by bacteria or abscisic acid (ABA). We found that living Xcc, as well as ethyl acetate extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, are capable of reverting stomatal closure induced by bacteria, lipopolysaccharide, or ABA. Xcc ethyl acetate extracts also complemented the infectivity of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) mutants deficient in the production of the coronatine toxin, which is required to overcome stomatal defense. By contrast, the rpfF and rpfC mutant strains of Xcc, which are unable to respectively synthesize or perceive a diffusible molecule involved in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling, were incapable of reverting stomatal closure, indicating that suppression of stomatal response by Xcc requires an intact rpf/diffusible signal factor system. In addition, we found that guard cell-specific Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase3 (MPK3) antisense mutants were unresponsive to bacteria or lipopolysaccharide in promotion of stomatal closure, and also more sensitive to Pst coronatine-deficient mutants, showing that MPK3 is required for stomatal immune response. Additionally, we found that, unlike in wild-type Arabidopsis, ABA-induced stomatal closure in MPK3 antisense mutants is not affected by Xcc or by extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, suggesting that the Xcc factor might target some signaling component in the same pathway as MPK3. PMID:19091877

  4. Responses of two semiarid conifer tree species to reduced precipitation and warming reveal new perspectives for stomatal regulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garcia-Forner, Nuria; Adams, Henry D.; Sevanto, Sanna; Collins, Adam D.; Dickman, Lee T.; Hudson, Patrick J.; Zeppel, Melanie J. B.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Powers, Heath; Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi; et al

    2015-08-08

    Here, relatively anisohydric species are predicted to be more predisposed to hydraulic failure than relatively isohydric species, as they operate with narrower hydraulic safety margins. We subjected co-occurring anisohydric Juniperus monosperma and isohydric Pinus edulis trees to warming, reduced precipitation, or both, and measured their gas exchange and hydraulic responses. We found that reductions in stomatal conductance and assimilation by heat and drought were more frequent during relatively moist periods, but these effects were not exacerbated in the combined heat and drought treatment. Counter to expectations, both species exhibited similar gs temporal dynamics in response to drought. Further, whereas P.more » edulis exhibited chronic embolism, J. monosperma showed very little embolism due to its conservative stomatal regulation and maintenance of xylem water potential above the embolism entry point. This tight stomatal control and low levels of embolism experienced by juniper refuted the notion that very low water potentials during drought are associated with loose stomatal control and with the hypothesis that anisohydric species are more prone to hydraulic failure than isohydric species. Because direct association of stomatal behaviour with embolism resistance can be misleading, we advocate consideration of stomatal behaviour relative to embolism resistance for classifying species drought response strategies.« less

  5. Responses of two semiarid conifer tree species to reduced precipitation and warming reveal new perspectives for stomatal regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Forner, Nuria; Adams, Henry D.; Sevanto, Sanna; Collins, Adam D.; Dickman, Lee T.; Hudson, Patrick J.; Zeppel, Melanie J. B.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Powers, Heath; Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi; Mcdowell, Nate G.

    2015-08-08

    Here, relatively anisohydric species are predicted to be more predisposed to hydraulic failure than relatively isohydric species, as they operate with narrower hydraulic safety margins. We subjected co-occurring anisohydric Juniperus monosperma and isohydric Pinus edulis trees to warming, reduced precipitation, or both, and measured their gas exchange and hydraulic responses. We found that reductions in stomatal conductance and assimilation by heat and drought were more frequent during relatively moist periods, but these effects were not exacerbated in the combined heat and drought treatment. Counter to expectations, both species exhibited similar gs temporal dynamics in response to drought. Further, whereas P. edulis exhibited chronic embolism, J. monosperma showed very little embolism due to its conservative stomatal regulation and maintenance of xylem water potential above the embolism entry point. This tight stomatal control and low levels of embolism experienced by juniper refuted the notion that very low water potentials during drought are associated with loose stomatal control and with the hypothesis that anisohydric species are more prone to hydraulic failure than isohydric species. Because direct association of stomatal behaviour with embolism resistance can be misleading, we advocate consideration of stomatal behaviour relative to embolism resistance for classifying species drought response strategies.

  6. Responses of two semiarid conifer tree species to reduced precipitation and warming reveal new perspectives for stomatal regulation.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Forner, Núria; Adams, Henry D; Sevanto, Sanna; Collins, Adam D; Dickman, Lee T; Hudson, Patrick J; Zeppel, Melanie J B; Jenkins, Michael W; Powers, Heath; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Mcdowell, Nate G

    2016-01-01

    Relatively anisohydric species are predicted to be more predisposed to hydraulic failure than relatively isohydric species, as they operate with narrower hydraulic safety margins. We subjected co-occurring anisohydric Juniperus monosperma and isohydric Pinus edulis trees to warming, reduced precipitation, or both, and measured their gas exchange and hydraulic responses. We found that reductions in stomatal conductance and assimilation by heat and drought were more frequent during relatively moist periods, but these effects were not exacerbated in the combined heat and drought treatment. Counter to expectations, both species exhibited similar gs temporal dynamics in response to drought. Further, whereas P. edulis exhibited chronic embolism, J. monosperma showed very little embolism due to its conservative stomatal regulation and maintenance of xylem water potential above the embolism entry point. This tight stomatal control and low levels of embolism experienced by juniper refuted the notion that very low water potentials during drought are associated with loose stomatal control and with the hypothesis that anisohydric species are more prone to hydraulic failure than isohydric species. Because direct association of stomatal behaviour with embolism resistance can be misleading, we advocate consideration of stomatal behaviour relative to embolism resistance for classifying species drought response strategies. PMID:26081870

  7. WRKY1 regulates stomatal movement in drought-stressed Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhu; Li, Chun-Long; Zhang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    A key response of plants to moisture stress is stomatal closure, a process mediated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). Closure is affected by changes in the turgor of the stomatal guard cell. The transcription factor WRKY1 is a part of the regulatory machinery underlying stomatal movements, and through this, in the plant's response to drought stress. The loss-of-function T-DNA insertion mutant wrky1 was particularly sensitive to ABA, with respect to both ion channel regulation and stomatal movements, and less sensitive to drought than the wild type. Complementation of the wrky1 mutant resulted in the recovery of the wild type phenotype. The WRKY1 product localized to the nucleus, and was shown able to bind to the W-box domain in the promoters of MYB2, ABCG40, DREB1A and ABI5, and thereby to control their transcription in response to drought stress or ABA treatment. WRKY1 is thought to act as a negative regulator in guard cell ABA signalling. PMID:26820136

  8. Stomatal penetration by aqueous solutions--an update involving leaf surface particles.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Juergen; Basi, Sabin; Pariyar, Shyam; Hunsche, Mauricio

    2012-11-01

    The recent visualization of stomatal nanoparticle uptake ended a 40-yr-old paradigm. Assuming clean, hydrophobic leaf surfaces, the paradigm considered stomatal liquid water transport to be impossible as a result of water surface tension. However, real leaves are not clean, and deposited aerosols may change hydrophobicity and water surface tension. Droplets containing NaCl, NaClO(3), (NH(4))(2) SO(4), glyphosate, an organosilicone surfactant or various combinations thereof were evaporated on stomatous abaxial and astomatous adaxial surfaces of apple (Malus domestica) leaves. The effects on photosynthesis, necrosis and biomass were determined. Observed using an environmental scanning electron microscope, NaCl and NaClO(3) crystals on hydrophobic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cuticles underwent several humidity cycles, causing repeated deliquescence and efflorescence of the salts. All physiological parameters were more strongly affected by abaxial than adaxial treatments. Spatial expansion and dendritic crystallization of the salts occurred and cuticular hydrophobicity was decreased more rapidly by NaClO(3) than NaCl. The results confirmed the stomatal uptake of aqueous solutions. Humidity fluctuations promote the spatial expansion of salts into the stomata. The ion-specific effects point to the Hofmeister series: chaotropic ions reduce surface tension, probably contributing to the defoliant action of NaClO(3), whereas the salt spray tolerance of coastal plants is probably linked to the kosmotropic nature of chloride ions. PMID:22985197

  9. Spontaneous mutation 7B-1 in tomato impairs blue light-induced stomatal opening.

    PubMed

    Hlavinka, Jan; Nauš, Jan; Fellner, Martin

    2013-08-01

    It was reported earlier that 7B-1 mutant in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), an ABA overproducer, is defective in blue light (BL) signaling leading to BL-specific resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. In this work, we examine responses of stomata to blue, red and white lights, fusicoccin, anion channel blockers (anthracene-9-carboxylic acid; 9-AC and niflumic acid; NIF) and ABA. Our results showed that the aperture of 7B-1 stomata does not increase in BL, suggesting that 7B-1 mutation impairs an element of BL signaling pathway involved in stomatal opening. Similar stomatal responses of 7B-1 and wild type (WT) to fusicoccin or 9-AC points out that activity of H(+)-ATPase and 9-AC-sensitive anion channels per se is not likely affected by the mutation. Since 9-AC restored stomatal opening of 7B-1 in BL, it seems that 9-AC and BL could block similar type of anion channels. The stomata of both genotypes did not respond to NIF neither in darkness nor in any light conditions tested. In light, 9-AC but not NIF restored stomatal opening inhibited by ABA in WT and 7B-1. We suggest that in comparison to WT, the activity of S-type anion channels in 7B-1 is more promoted by increased ABA content, and less reduced by BL, because of the mutant resistance to BL. PMID:23759105

  10. Basic Factors that Affect General Academic Motivation Levels of Candidate Preschool Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celikoz, Nadir

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate some personal and familial factors that affect overall academic motivation levels of candidate preschool teachers. The study group of this research consists of 285 students attending the child development and preschool education department at Selcuk University Faculty of Vocational Education in the…

  11. Affective, Normative, and Continuance Commitment Levels across Cultures: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, John P.; Stanley, David J.; Jackson, Timothy A.; McInnis, Kate J.; Maltin, Elyse R.; Sheppard, Leah

    2012-01-01

    With increasing globalization of business and diversity within the workplace, there has been growing interest in cultural differences in employee commitment. We used meta-analysis to compute mean levels of affective (AC; K=966, N=433,129), continuance (CC; K=428, N=199,831), and normative (NC; K=336, N=133,277) organizational commitment for as…

  12. Neutral models as a way to evaluate the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A commonly used landscape model to simulate wetland change – the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model(SLAMM) – has rarely been explicitly assessed for its prediction accuracy. Here, we evaluated this model using recently proposed neutral models – including the random constraint matc...

  13. New Approaches to the Biology of Stomatal Guard Cells

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Juntaro; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Kusumi, Kensuke; Iba, Koh

    2014-01-01

    CO2 acts as an environmental signal that regulates stomatal movements. High CO2 concentrations reduce stomatal aperture, whereas low concentrations trigger stomatal opening. In contrast to our advanced understanding of light and drought stress responses in guard cells, the molecular mechanisms underlying stomatal CO2 sensing and signaling are largely unknown. Leaf temperature provides a convenient indicator of transpiration, and can be used to detect mutants with altered stomatal control. To identify genes that function in CO2 responses in guard cells, CO2-insensitive mutants were isolated through high-throughput leaf thermal imaging. The isolated mutants are categorized into three groups according to their phenotypes: (i) impaired in stomatal opening under low CO2 concentrations; (ii) impaired in stomatal closing under high CO2 concentrations; and (iii) impaired in stomatal development. Characterization of these mutants has begun to yield insights into the mechanisms of stomatal CO2 responses. In this review, we summarize the current status of the field and discuss future prospects. PMID:24104052

  14. Drought induces alterations in the stomatal development program in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Malcolm M

    2012-01-01

    Much is known about the physiological control of stomatal aperture as a means by which plants adjust to water availability. By contrast, the role played by the modulation of stomatal development to limit water loss has received much less attention. The control of stomatal development in response to water deprivation in the genus Populus is explored here. Drought induced declines in stomatal conductance as well as an alteration in stomatal development in two genotypes of Populus balsamifera. Leaves that developed under water-deficit conditions had lower stomatal indices than leaves that developed under well-watered conditions. Transcript abundance of genes that could hypothetically underpin drought-responsive changes in stomatal development was examined, in two genotypes, across six time points, under two conditions, well-watered and with water deficit. Populus homologues of STOMAGEN, ERECTA (ER), STOMATA DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION 1 (SDD1), and FAMA had variable transcript abundance patterns congruent with their role in the modulation of stomatal development in response to drought. Conversely, there was no significant variation in transcript abundance between genotypes or treatments for the Populus homologues of YODA (YDA) and TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM). The findings highlight the role that could be played by stomatal development during leaf expansion as a longer term means by which to limit water loss from leaves. Moreover, the results point to the key roles played by the regulation of the homologues of STOMAGEN, ER, SDD1, and FAMA in the control of this response in poplar. PMID:22760471

  15. Stomatal Blue Light Response Is Present in Early Vascular Plants.

    PubMed

    Doi, Michio; Kitagawa, Yuki; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Light is a major environmental factor required for stomatal opening. Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening in higher plants as a signal under the photosynthetic active radiation. The stomatal BL response is not present in the fern species of Polypodiopsida. The acquisition of a stomatal BL response might provide competitive advantages in both the uptake of CO2 and prevention of water loss with the ability to rapidly open and close stomata. We surveyed the stomatal opening in response to strong red light (RL) and weak BL under the RL with gas exchange technique in a diverse selection of plant species from euphyllophytes, including spermatophytes and monilophytes, to lycophytes. We showed the presence of RL-induced stomatal opening in most of these species and found that the BL responses operated in all euphyllophytes except Polypodiopsida. We also confirmed that the stomatal opening in lycophytes, the early vascular plants, is driven by plasma membrane proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase and K(+) accumulation in guard cells, which is the same mechanism operating in stomata of angiosperms. These results suggest that the early vascular plants respond to both RL and BL and actively regulate stomatal aperture. We also found three plant species that absolutely require BL for both stomatal opening and photosynthetic CO2 fixation, including a gymnosperm, C. revoluta, and the ferns Equisetum hyemale and Psilotum nudum. PMID:26307440

  16. New approaches to the biology of stomatal guard cells.

    PubMed

    Negi, Juntaro; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Kusumi, Kensuke; Iba, Koh

    2014-02-01

    CO2 acts as an environmental signal that regulates stomatal movements. High CO2 concentrations reduce stomatal aperture, whereas low concentrations trigger stomatal opening. In contrast to our advanced understanding of light and drought stress responses in guard cells, the molecular mechanisms underlying stomatal CO2 sensing and signaling are largely unknown. Leaf temperature provides a convenient indicator of transpiration, and can be used to detect mutants with altered stomatal control. To identify genes that function in CO2 responses in guard cells, CO2-insensitive mutants were isolated through high-throughput leaf thermal imaging. The isolated mutants are categorized into three groups according to their phenotypes: (i) impaired in stomatal opening under low CO2 concentrations; (ii) impaired in stomatal closing under high CO2 concentrations; and (iii) impaired in stomatal development. Characterization of these mutants has begun to yield insights into the mechanisms of stomatal CO2 responses. In this review, we summarize the current status of the field and discuss future prospects. PMID:24104052

  17. TWIN SISTER OF FT, GIGANTEA, and CONSTANS have a positive but indirect effect on blue light-induced stomatal opening in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ando, Eigo; Ohnishi, Masato; Wang, Yin; Matsushita, Tomonao; Watanabe, Aiko; Hayashi, Yuki; Fujii, Miho; Ma, Jian Feng; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2013-07-01

    FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) is the major regulatory component controlling photoperiodic floral transition. It is expressed in guard cells and affects blue light-induced stomatal opening induced by the blue-light receptor phototropins phot1 and phot2. Roles for other flowering regulators in stomatal opening have yet to be determined. We show in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF), CONSTANS (CO), and GIGANTEA (GI) provide a positive effect on stomatal opening. TSF, which is the closest homolog of FT, was transcribed in guard cells, and light-induced stomatal opening was repressed in tsf-1, a T-DNA insertion mutant of TSF. Overexpression of TSF in a phot1 phot2 mutant background gave a constitutive open-stomata phenotype. Then, we examined whether CO and GI, which are upstream regulators of FT and TSF in photoperiodic flowering, are involved in stomatal opening. Similar to TSF, light-induced stomatal opening was suppressed in the GI and CO mutants gi-1 and co-1. A constitutive open-stomata phenotype was observed in GI and CO overexpressors with accompanying changes in the transcription of both FT and TSF. In photoperiodic flowering, photoperiod is sensed by photoreceptors such as the cryptochromes cry1 and cry2. We examined stomatal phenotypes in a cry1 cry2 mutant and in CRY2 overexpressors. Light-induced stomatal opening was suppressed in cry1 cry2, and the transcription of FT and TSF was down-regulated. In contrast, the stomata in CRY2 overexpressors opened even in the dark, and FT and TSF transcription was up-regulated. We conclude that the photoperiodic flowering components TSF, GI, and CO positively affect stomatal opening. PMID:23669744

  18. Inactivation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Herbert S.

    1970-01-01

    Twenty-four chemical disinfectants considered to be viricidal were tested. Ten disinfectants were not viricidal for vesicular stomatitis virus within 10 min at 20 C when an LD50 titer of 108.5 virus units per 0.1 ml were to be inactivated. Quantitative inactivation experiments were done with acid, alkaline, and a substituted phenolic disinfectant to determine the kinetics of the virus inactivation. Substituted phenolic disinfectants, halogens, and cresylic and hydrochloric acids were viricidal. Basic compounds such as lye and sodium metasilicate were not viricidal. PMID:4313317

  19. Effect of fasting during Ramadan on serum lithium level and mental state in bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Saeed; Nazar, Zahid; Akhtar, Javaid; Akhter, Javed; Irfan, Muhammad; Irafn, Mohammad; Subhan, Fazal; Ahmed, Zia; Khan, Ejaz Hassan; Khatak, Ijaz Hassan; Naeem, Farooq

    2010-11-01

    The Muslims fast every year during the month of Ramadan. A fasting day can last 12-17 h. The effects of fasting on serum lithium levels and the mood changes in patients suffering from bipolar affective disorder during Ramadan are not well studied. We aimed to compare the serum lithium levels, side effects, toxicity and mental state in patients suffering from bipolar affective disorder and on prophylactic lithium therapy before, during and after Ramadan. Sixty-two patients meeting the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Research Diagnostic Criteria of bipolar affective disorder receiving lithium treatment for prophylaxis were recruited in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Peshawar, Pakistan. Serum lithium, electrolytes, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) were assessed at three points, 1 week before Ramadan, midRamadan and 1 week after Ramadan. The side effects and toxicity were measured by a symptoms and signs checklist. There was no significant difference in mean serum lithium levels at three time points (preRamadan=0.45±0.21, midRamadan=0.51±0.20 and postRamadan=0.44±0.23 milli equivalents/litre, P=0.116). The scores on HDRS and YMRS showed significant decrease during Ramadan (F=34.12, P=0.00, for HDRS and F=15.6, P=0.000 for YMRS). The side effects and toxicity also did not differ significantly at three points. In conclusion, the patients who have stable mental state and lithium levels before Ramadan can be maintained on lithium during Ramadan. Fasting in an average temperature of 28°C for up to 12 h per day did not result in elevated serum lithium levels or more side effects and did not have adverse effects on mental state of patients suffering from bipolar affective disorder. PMID:20827213

  20. [Relationships of wheat leaf stomatal traits with wheat yield and drought-resistance].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Guang; Li, Zhong-Qing; Jia, Shou-Shan; Sun, Dai-Zhen; Shi, Yu-Gang; Fan, Hua; Liang, Zeng-Hao; Jing, Rui-Lian

    2013-06-01

    Taking the DH population of wheat cultivar Hanxuan10/Lumai14 as test object, and by the methods of correlation analysis and path analysis, this paper studied the relationships of the flag leaf stomatal density (SD), stomatal length and width (SL and SW), stomatal conductance (g(s)), photosynthetic rate (P(n)), and transpiration rate (T(r)) on the 10th and 20th day after anthesis with the yield and the index of drought-resistance under the conditions of drought stress and normal irrigation. Under the two conditions, most of the test leaf traits on the 10th day after anthesis had less correlation with the yield and the index of drought-resistance, whereas the leaf traits on the 20th day after anthesis had significant positive correlations with thousand kernel weight but less correlation with grain number per ear, grain yield per plant, and index of drought-resistance. Path analysis showed that g(s), P(n), and T(r) were the main factors affecting the grain yield per plant (YPP) and the index of drought resistance (IDR), and the effects were stronger both in direct and in indirect ways. The direct and indirect effects of SD, SL, and SW on the YPP and IDR were lesser. Under both drought stress and normal irrigation, and on the 10th and 20th day after anthesis, there were significant correlations between SD and SL, and between SL and SW, g(s), P(n), and Tr, but the correlations of SD and SL with g(s), P(n), and T(r) changed with water condition or growth stage. Therefore, it would be not always a good means to select the leaf stomatal density and size as the targets for breeding to improve the leaf stomatal conductance, photosynthetic rate, and transpiration rate, and further, to promote the yield. PMID:24066547

  1. Induction of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by vesicular stomatitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Felt, Sébastien A.; Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan J.; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2014-01-01

    Effective oncolytic virus (OV) therapy is dependent on the ability of replication-competent viruses to kill infected cancer cells. We previously showed that human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell lines are highly heterogeneous in their permissiveness to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), in part due to differences in type I interferon (IFN) signaling. Here, using ten human PDAC cell lines and three different VSV recombinants (expressing ΔM51 or wild type matrix protein), we examined cellular and viral factors affecting VSV-mediated apoptosis activation in PDACs. In most cell lines VSVs activated both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways, and VSV-ΔM51 primarily activated the type II extrinsic pathway. In cells with defective IFN signaling, all VSV recombinants induced robust apoptosis, whereas VSV-ΔM51 was a more effective apoptosis activator in PDACs with virus-inducible IFN signaling. Three cell lines constitutively expressing high levels of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) were resistant to apoptosis under most experimental conditions, even when VSV replication levels were dramatically increased by Jak inhibitor I treatment. Two of these cell lines also poorly activated apoptosis when treated with Fas activating antibody, suggesting a general defect in apoptosis. PMID:25463614

  2. Modelling ozone stomatal flux of wheat under mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Fernández, I.; Bermejo, V.; Elvira, S.; de la Torre, D.; González, A.; Navarrete, L.; Sanz, J.; Calvete, H.; García-Gómez, H.; López, A.; Serra, J.; Lafarga, A.; Armesto, A. P.; Calvo, A.; Alonso, R.

    2013-03-01

    Correct estimation of leaf-level stomatal conductance (gsto) is central for current ozone (O3) risk assessment of wheat yield loss based on the absorbed O3 phytotoxic dose (POD). The gsto model parameterizations developed in Europe must be checked in the different climatic regions where they are going to be applied in order to reduce the uncertainties associated with the POD approach. This work proposes a new gsto model parameterization for estimating POD of Triticum aestivum and Triticum durum under Mediterranean conditions, based on phenological observations over 25 years and gsto field measurements during 5 growing seasons. Results show that POD in the Mediterranean area might be higher than previously estimated. However, caution must be paid when assessing the risk of yield loss for wheat in this area since field validation of O3 impacts is still limited.

  3. Phototropins But Not Cryptochromes Mediate the Blue Light-Specific Promotion of Stomatal Conductance, While Both Enhance Photosynthesis and Transpiration under Full Sunlight12[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Boccalandro, Hernán E.; Giordano, Carla V.; Ploschuk, Edmundo L.; Piccoli, Patricia N.; Bottini, Rubén; Casal, Jorge J.

    2012-01-01

    Leaf epidermal peels of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants lacking either phototropins 1 and 2 (phot1 and phot2) or cryptochromes 1 and 2 (cry1 and cry2) exposed to a background of red light show severely impaired stomatal opening responses to blue light. Since phot and cry are UV-A/blue light photoreceptors, they may be involved in the perception of the blue light-specific signal that induces the aperture of the stomatal pores. In leaf epidermal peels, the blue light-specific effect saturates at low irradiances; therefore, it is considered to operate mainly under the low irradiance of dawn, dusk, or deep canopies. Conversely, we show that both phot1 phot2 and cry1 cry2 have reduced stomatal conductance, transpiration, and photosynthesis, particularly under the high irradiance of full sunlight at midday. These mutants show compromised responses of stomatal conductance to irradiance. However, the effects of phot and cry on photosynthesis were largely nonstomatic. While the stomatal conductance phenotype of phot1 phot2 was blue light specific, cry1 cry2 showed reduced stomatal conductance not only in response to blue light, but also in response to red light. The levels of abscisic acid were elevated in cry1 cry2. We conclude that considering their effects at high irradiances cry and phot are critical for the control of transpiration and photosynthesis rates in the field. The effects of cry on stomatal conductance are largely indirect and involve the control of abscisic acid levels. PMID:22147516

  4. Treatment of aphthous stomatitis with saturated potassium nitrate/dimethyl isosorbide.

    PubMed

    Hodosh, Milton; Hodosh, Steven H; Hodosh, Alex J

    2004-02-01

    Concentrated potassium nitrate has been used to lessen the pain caused by aphthous stomatitis. The problem with this approach is that it can have difficulty penetrating into the deeper layers of mucosae or skin, and for this reason, its beneficial affects are not routinely predictable. When dimethyl isosorbide is added to potassium nitrate in an aqueous hydroxyethyl cellulose gel, it enhances the capacity of potassium nitrate to more completely permeate these tissues and predictably promote rapid pain control and aphthae healing. PMID:15000637

  5. Linking Turgor with ABA Biosynthesis: Implications for Stomatal Responses to Vapor Pressure Deficit across Land Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    McAdam, Scott A.M.; Brodribb, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Stomatal responses to changes in vapor pressure deficit (VPD) constitute the predominant form of daytime gas-exchange regulation in plants. Stomatal closure in response to increased VPD is driven by the rapid up-regulation of foliar abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis and ABA levels in angiosperms; however, very little is known about the physiological trigger for this increase in ABA biosynthesis at increased VPD. Using a novel method of modifying leaf cell turgor by the application of external pressures, we test whether changes in turgor pressure can trigger increases in foliar ABA levels over 20 min, a period of time most relevant to the stomatal response to VPD. We found in angiosperm species that the biosynthesis of ABA was triggered by reductions in leaf turgor, and in two species tested, that a higher sensitivity of ABA synthesis to leaf turgor corresponded with a higher stomatal sensitivity to VPD. In contrast, representative species from nonflowering plant lineages did not show a rapid turgor-triggered increase in foliar ABA levels, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating passive stomatal responses to changes in VPD in these lineages. Our method provides a new tool for characterizing the response of stomata to water availability. PMID:27208264

  6. Urban Legends Series: Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Baccaglini, Lorena; Lalla, Rajesh V.; Bruce, Alison J.; Sartori-Valinotti, Julio C.; Latortue, Marie C.; Carrozzo, Marco; Rogers, Roy S.

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common idiopathic intraoral ulcerative disease in the USA. Aphthae typically occur in apparently healthy individuals, although an association with certain systemic diseases has been reported. Despite the unclear etiopathogenesis, new drug trials are continuously conducted in an attempt to reduce pain and dysfunction. We investigated four controversial topics: (1) Is complex aphthosis a mild form of Behçet’s disease (BD)? (2) Is periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome a distinct medical entity? (3) Is RAS associated with other systemic diseases (e.g., celiac disease and B12 deficiency)? (4) Are there any new RAS treatments? Results from extensive literature searches, including a systematic review of RAS trials, suggested that: (1) Complex aphthosis is not a mild form of BD in North America or Western Europe; (2) Diagnostic criteria for PFAPA have low specificity and the characteristics of the oral ulcers warrant further studies; (3) Oral ulcers may be associated with celiac disease; however, these ulcers may not be RAS; RAS is rarely associated with B12 deficiency; nevertheless, B12 treatment may be beneficial, via mechanisms that warrant further study; (4) Thirty-three controlled trials published in the past 6 years reported some effectiveness, though potential for bias was high. PMID:21812866

  7. Pore size regulates operating stomatal conductance, while stomatal densities drive the partitioning of conductance between leaf sides

    PubMed Central

    Fanourakis, Dimitrios; Giday, Habtamu; Milla, Rubén; Pieruschka, Roland; Kjaer, Katrine H.; Bolger, Marie; Vasilevski, Aleksandar; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fiorani, Fabio; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf gas exchange is influenced by stomatal size, density, distribution between the leaf adaxial and abaxial sides, as well as by pore dimensions. This study aims to quantify which of these traits mainly underlie genetic differences in operating stomatal conductance (gs) and addresses possible links between anatomical traits and regulation of pore width. Methods Stomatal responsiveness to desiccation, gs-related anatomical traits of each leaf side and estimated gs (based on these traits) were determined for 54 introgression lines (ILs) generated by introgressing segments of Solanum pennelli into the S. lycopersicum ‘M82’. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis for stomatal traits was also performed. Key Results A wide genetic variation in stomatal responsiveness to desiccation was observed, a large part of which was explained by stomatal length. Operating gs ranged over a factor of five between ILs. The pore area per stomatal area varied 8-fold among ILs (2–16 %), and was the main determinant of differences in operating gs between ILs. Operating gs was primarily positioned on the abaxial surface (60–83 %), due to higher abaxial stomatal density and, secondarily, to larger abaxial pore area. An analysis revealed 64 QTLs for stomatal traits in the ILs, most of which were in the direction of S. pennellii. Conclusions The data indicate that operating and maximum gs of non-stressed leaves maintained under stable conditions deviate considerably (by 45–91 %), because stomatal size inadequately reflects operating pore area (R2 = 0·46). Furthermore, it was found that variation between ILs in both stomatal sensitivity to desiccation and operating gs is associated with features of individual stoma. In contrast, genotypic variation in gs partitioning depends on the distribution of stomata between the leaf adaxial and abaxial epidermis. PMID:25538116

  8. Analysis of factors affecting satisfaction level on problem based learning approach using structural equation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Nur Farahin Mee; Zahid, Zalina

    2014-12-01

    Nowadays, in the job market demand, graduates are expected not only to have higher performance in academic but they must also be excellent in soft skill. Problem-Based Learning (PBL) has a number of distinct advantages as a learning method as it can deliver graduates that will be highly prized by industry. This study attempts to determine the satisfaction level of engineering students on the PBL Approach and to evaluate their determinant factors. The Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to investigate how the factors of Good Teaching Scale, Clear Goals, Student Assessment and Levels of Workload affected the student satisfaction towards PBL approach.

  9. Method for creating stomatal impressions directly onto archivable microscope slides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stomatal density has been shown to be a primary determinant of water use efficiency, limitation to CO2 assimilation rate and yield. Widely used methods of stomatal impressioning sample small regions of the leaf, are labor intensive, or do not yield stable archivable samples for potentially revisitin...

  10. Methods for creating stomatal impressions directly onto archivable slides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stomatal density has been shown to be a primary determinant of crop yield, water use efficiency, and limitation to CO2 assimilation rate. Widely used methods of assessing stomatal density sample relatively small regions of the leaf, are labor intensive, or do not yield stable archivable samples for ...

  11. Environmental noise levels affect the activity budget of the Florida manatee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L.; Donaghay, Percy L.; Miller, James H.; Tyack, Peter L.

    2005-09-01

    Manatees inhabit coastal bays, lagoons, and estuaries because they are dependent on the aquatic vegetation that grows in shallow waters. Food requirements force manatees to occupy the same areas in which human activities are the greatest. Noise produced from human activities has the potential to affect these animals by eliciting responses ranging from mild behavioral changes to extreme aversion. This study quantifies the behavioral responses of manatees to both changing levels of ambient noise and transient noise sources. Results indicate that elevated environmental noise levels do affect the overall activity budget of this species. The proportion of time manatees spend feeding, milling, and traveling in critical habitats changed as a function of noise level. More time was spent in the directed, goal-oriented behaviors of feeding and traveling, while less time was spent milling when noise levels were highest. The animals also responded to the transient noise of approaching vessels with changes in behavioral state and movements out of the geographical area. This suggests that manatees detect and respond to changes in environmental noise levels. Whether these changes legally constitute harassment and produce biologically significant effects need to be addressed with hypothesis-driven experiments and long-term monitoring. [For Animal Bioacoustics Best Student Paper Award.

  12. Sensitivity analysis of hydrogeological parameters affecting groundwater storage change caused by sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, J.; Kim, K.-H.; Lee, K.-K.

    2012-04-01

    Sea level rise, which is one of the representative phenomena of climate changes caused by global warming, can affect groundwater system. The rising trend of the sea level caused by the global warming is reported to be about 3 mm/year for the most recent 10 year average (IPCC, 2007). The rate of sea level rise around the Korean peninsula is reported to be 2.30±2.22 mm/yr during the 1960-1999 period (Cho, 2002) and 2.16±1.77 mm/yr (Kim et al., 2009) during the 1968-2007 period. Both of these rates are faster than the 1.8±0.5 mm/yr global average for the similar 1961-2003 period (IPCC, 2007). In this study, we analyzed changes in the groundwater environment affected by the sea level rise by using an analytical methodology. We tried to find the most effective parameters of groundwater amount change in order to estimate the change in fresh water amount in coastal groundwater. A hypothetical island model of a cylindrical shape in considered. The groundwater storage change is bi-directional as the sea level rises according to the natural and hydrogeological conditions. Analysis of the computation results shows that topographic slope and hydraulic conductivity are the most sensitive factors. The contributions of the groundwater recharge rate and the thickness of aquifer below sea level are relatively less effective. In the island with steep seashore slopes larger than 1~2 degrees or so, the storage amount of fresh water in a coastal area increases as sea level rises. On the other hand, when sea level drops, the storage amount decreases. This is because the groundwater level also rises with the rising sea level in steep seashores. For relatively flat seashores, where the slope is smaller than around 1-2 degrees, the storage amount of coastal fresh water decreases when the sea level rises because the area flooded by the rising sea water is increased. The volume of aquifer fresh water in this circumstance is greatly reduced in proportion to the flooded area with the sea

  13. Spatial and phylogenetic analysis of the vesicular stomatitis virus epidemic in the southwestern United States in 2004-2006

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The southwestern United States has been incidentally affected by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) epidemics during the last 100 years. By the time this manuscript was written, the last episodes were reported in 2004-2006. Results of space clustering and phylogenetic analysis techniques used here sug...

  14. Compound stress response in stomatal closure: a mathematical model of ABA and ethylene interaction in guard cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stomata are tiny pores in plant leaves that regulate gas and water exchange between the plant and its environment. Abscisic acid and ethylene are two well-known elicitors of stomatal closure when acting independently. However, when stomata are presented with a combination of both signals, they fail to close. Results Toshed light on this unexplained behaviour, we have collected time course measurements of stomatal aperture and hydrogen peroxide production in Arabidopsis thaliana guard cells treated with abscisic acid, ethylene, and a combination of both. Our experiments show that stomatal closure is linked to sustained high levels of hydrogen peroxide in guard cells. When treated with a combined dose of abscisic acid and ethylene, guard cells exhibit increased antioxidant activity that reduces hydrogen peroxide levels and precludes closure. We construct a simplified model of stomatal closure derived from known biochemical pathways that captures the experimentally observed behaviour. Conclusions Our experiments and modelling results suggest a distinct role for two antioxidant mechanisms during stomatal closure: a slower, delayed response activated by a single stimulus (abscisic acid ‘or’ ethylene) and another more rapid ‘and’ mechanism that is only activated when both stimuli are present. Our model indicates that the presence of this rapid ‘and’ mechanism in the antioxidant response is key to explain the lack of closure under a combined stimulus. PMID:23176679

  15. Convergence and Divergence of Signaling Events in Guard Cells during Stomatal Closure by Plant Hormones or Microbial Elicitors

    PubMed Central

    Agurla, Srinivas; Raghavendra, Agepati S.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of stomatal aperture is essential for plants to optimize water use and CO2 uptake. Stomatal opening or closure is accompanied by the modulation of guard cell turgor. Among the events leading to stomatal closure by plant hormones or microbial elicitors, three signaling components stand out as the major converging points. These are reactive oxygen species (ROS), cytosolic free Ca2+, and ion channels. Once formed, the ROS and free Ca2+ of guard cells regulate both downstream and upstream events. A major influence of ROS is to increase the levels of NO and cytosolic free Ca2+ in guard cells. Although the rise in NO is an important event during stomatal closure, the available evidences do not support the description of NO as the point of convergence. The rise in ROS and NO would cause an increase of free Ca2+ and modulate ion channels, through a network of events, in such a way that the guard cells lose K+/Cl−/anions. The efflux of these ions decreases the turgor of guard cells and leads to stomatal closure. Thus, ROS, NO, and cytosolic free Ca2+ act as points of divergence. The other guard cell components, which are modulated during stomatal closure are G-proteins, cytosolic pH, phospholipids, and sphingolipids. However, the current information on the role of these components is not convincing so as to assign them as the points of convergence or divergence. The interrelationships and interactions of ROS, NO, cytosolic pH, and free Ca2+ are quite complex and need further detailed examination. Our review is an attempt to critically assess the current status of information on guard cells, while emphasizing the convergence and divergence of signaling components during stomatal closure. The existing gaps in our knowledge are identified to stimulate further research. PMID:27605934

  16. Convergence and Divergence of Signaling Events in Guard Cells during Stomatal Closure by Plant Hormones or Microbial Elicitors.

    PubMed

    Agurla, Srinivas; Raghavendra, Agepati S

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of stomatal aperture is essential for plants to optimize water use and CO2 uptake. Stomatal opening or closure is accompanied by the modulation of guard cell turgor. Among the events leading to stomatal closure by plant hormones or microbial elicitors, three signaling components stand out as the major converging points. These are reactive oxygen species (ROS), cytosolic free Ca(2+), and ion channels. Once formed, the ROS and free Ca(2+) of guard cells regulate both downstream and upstream events. A major influence of ROS is to increase the levels of NO and cytosolic free Ca(2+) in guard cells. Although the rise in NO is an important event during stomatal closure, the available evidences do not support the description of NO as the point of convergence. The rise in ROS and NO would cause an increase of free Ca(2+) and modulate ion channels, through a network of events, in such a way that the guard cells lose K(+)/Cl(-)/anions. The efflux of these ions decreases the turgor of guard cells and leads to stomatal closure. Thus, ROS, NO, and cytosolic free Ca(2+) act as points of divergence. The other guard cell components, which are modulated during stomatal closure are G-proteins, cytosolic pH, phospholipids, and sphingolipids. However, the current information on the role of these components is not convincing so as to assign them as the points of convergence or divergence. The interrelationships and interactions of ROS, NO, cytosolic pH, and free Ca(2+) are quite complex and need further detailed examination. Our review is an attempt to critically assess the current status of information on guard cells, while emphasizing the convergence and divergence of signaling components during stomatal closure. The existing gaps in our knowledge are identified to stimulate further research. PMID:27605934

  17. Do Amplitudes of Water Level Fluctuations Affect the Growth and Community Structure of Submerged Macrophytes?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mo-Zhu; Liu, Zheng-Yuan; Luo, Fang-Li; Lei, Guang-Chun; Li, Hong-Li

    2016-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes are subjected to potential mechanical stresses associated with fluctuating water levels in natural conditions. However, few experimental studies have been conducted to further understand the effects of water level fluctuating amplitude on submerged macrophyte species and their assemblages or communities. We designed a controlled experiment to investigate the responses of three submerged macrophyte species (Hydrilla verticillata, Ceratophyllum demersum and Elodea nuttallii) and their combinations in communities to three amplitudes (static, ± 30 cm, ± 60 cm) of water level fluctuations. Results showed that water level fluctuating amplitude had little effects on the community performance and the three tested species responded differently. H. verticillata exhibited more growth in static water and it was negatively affected by either of the water level fluctuations amplitude, however, growth parameters of H. verticillata in two fluctuating water level treatments (i.e., ± 30 cm, ± 60 cm) were not significantly different. On the other hand, the growth of C. demersum was not significantly correlated with different amplitude treatments. However, it became more abundant when water levels fluctuated. E. nuttallii was inhibited by the two fluctuating water level treatments, and was less in growth parameters compared to the other species especially in water level fluctuating conditions. The inherent differences in the adaptive capabilities of the tested species indicate that C. demersum or other species with similar responses may be dominant species to restore submerged macrophyte communities with great fluctuating water levels. Otherwise, H. verticillata, E. nuttallii or other species with similar responses could be considered for constructing the community in static water conditions. PMID:26735689

  18. Elevated atmospheric CO2 levels affect community structure of rice root-associated bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Takashi; Liu, Dongyan; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ikeda, Seishi; Asakawa, Susumu; Tokida, Takeshi; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Aoki, Naohiro; Ishimaru, Ken; Ujiie, Kazuhiro; Usui, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Hayashi, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that elevated atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) affects rice yields and grain quality. However, the responses of root-associated bacteria to [CO2] elevation have not been characterized in a large-scale field study. We conducted a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment (ambient + 200 μmol.mol−1) using three rice cultivars (Akita 63, Takanari, and Koshihikari) and two experimental lines of Koshihikari [chromosome segment substitution and near-isogenic lines (NILs)] to determine the effects of [CO2] elevation on the community structure of rice root-associated bacteria. Microbial DNA was extracted from rice roots at the panicle formation stage and analyzed by pyrosequencing the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to characterize the members of the bacterial community. Principal coordinate analysis of a weighted UniFrac distance matrix revealed that the community structure was clearly affected by elevated [CO2]. The predominant community members at class level were Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria in the control (ambient) and FACE plots. The relative abundance of Methylocystaceae, the major methane-oxidizing bacteria in rice roots, tended to decrease with increasing [CO2] levels. Quantitative PCR revealed a decreased copy number of the methane monooxygenase (pmoA) gene and increased methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) in elevated [CO2]. These results suggest elevated [CO2] suppresses methane oxidation and promotes methanogenesis in rice roots; this process affects the carbon cycle in rice paddy fields. PMID:25750640

  19. Homocysteine levels in schizophrenia and affective disorders—focus on cognition

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Hewedi, Doaa H.; Eissa, Abeer M.; Frydecka, Dorota; Misiak, Błażej

    2014-01-01

    Although homocysteine (Hcy) has been widely implicated in the etiology of various physical health impairments, especially cardiovascular diseases, overwhelming evidence indicates that Hcy is also involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and affective disorders. There are several mechanisms linking Hcy to biological underpinnings of psychiatric disorders. It has been found that Hcy interacts with NMDA receptors, initiates oxidative stress, induces apoptosis, triggers mitochondrial dysfunction and leads to vascular damage. Elevated Hcy levels might also contribute to cognitive impairment that is widely observed among patients with affective disorders and schizophrenia. Supplementation of vitamins B and folic acid has been proved to be effective in lowering Hcy levels. There are also studies showing that this supplementation strategy might be beneficial for schizophrenia patients with respect to alleviating negative symptoms. However, there are no studies addressing the influence of add-on therapies with folate and vitamins B on cognitive performance of patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders. In this article, we provide an overview of Hcy metabolism in psychiatric disorders focusing on cognitive correlates and indicating future directions and perspectives. PMID:25339876

  20. Modification of non-stomatal limitation and photoprotection due to K and Na nutrition of olive trees.

    PubMed

    Erel, Ran; Yermiyahu, Uri; Ben-Gal, Alon; Dag, Arnon; Shapira, Or; Schwartz, Amnon

    2015-04-01

    Potassium (K) is an essential macronutrient shown to play a fundamental role in photosynthetic processes and may facilitate photoinhibition resistance. In some plant species, sodium (Na) can partially substitute for K. Although photosynthetic enhancement has been well established, the mechanisms by which K or Na affects photosynthesis are not fully understood. Olive (Olea europaea L.) trees were previously shown to benefit from Na nutrition when K is limiting. In order to study the effect of K and Na on photosynthetic performance, we measured gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence in young olive trees supplied with either K, Na or no fertilizer, and subjected to manipulated levels of CO2, O2 and radiation. Light and CO2 response curves indicate substantially superior photosynthetic capacity of K-sufficient trees, while Na substitution generated intermediate results. The enhanced performance of K, and to a lesser extent, Na-supplied trees was found to be related mainly to modification of non-stomatal limitation. This indicates that K deficiency promotes inhibition of enzymatic-photochemical processes. Results indicate lower chlorophyll content and altered Rubisco activity as probable causes of photosynthetic impairment. Potassium deficiency was found to diminish photoprotection mechanisms due to reduced photosynthetic and photorespiratory capacity. The lower CO2 and O2 assimilation rate in K-deficient trees caused elevated levels of exited energy. Consequently, non-photochemical quenching, an alternative energy dispersion pathway, was increased. Nonetheless, K-deficient trees were shown to suffer from photodamage to photosystem-II. Sodium replacement considerably diminished the negative effect of K deficiency on photoprotection mechanisms. The overall impact of K and Na nutrition plays down any indirect effect on stomatal limitation and rather demonstrates the centrality of these elements in photochemical processes of photosynthesis and photoprotection. PMID

  1. Ecological and physiological factors affecting brood patch area and prolactin levels in arctic-nesting geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jonsson, J.E.; Afton, A.D.; Alisauskas, R.T.; Bluhm, C.K.; El Halawani, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated effects of ecological and physiological factors on brood patch area and prolactin levels in free-ranging Lesser Snow Geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens; hereafter "Snow Geese") and Ross's Geese (C. rossii). On the basis of the body-size hypothesis, we predicted that the relationships between prolactin levels, brood patch area, and body condition would be stronger in Ross's Geese than in the larger Snow Geese. We found that brood patch area was positively related to clutch volume and inversely related to prolactin levels in Ross's Geese, but not in Snow Geese. Nest size, nest habitat, and first egg date did not affect brood patch area in either species. Prolactin levels increased as incubation progressed in female Snow Geese, but this relationship was not significant in Ross's Geese. Prolactin levels and body condition (as indexed by size-adjusted body mass) were inversely related in Ross's Geese, but not in Snow Geese. Our findings are consistent with the prediction that relationships between prolactin levels, brood patch area, and body condition are relatively stronger in Ross's Geese, because they mobilize endogenous reserves at faster rates than Snow Geese. ?? The American Ornithologists' Union, 2006. Printed in USA.

  2. Performance level affects the dietary supplement intake of both individual and team sports athletes.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulou, Ifigenia; Noutsos, Kostantinos; Apostolidis, Nikolaos; Bayios, Ioannis; Nassis, George P

    2013-01-01

    Dietary supplement (DS) intake is high in elite level athletes, however few studies have investigated the impact that the performance level of the athletes has on supplementation intake in individual and team sports. The purpose of the study was to determine and compare the DS intake among individual and team sport athletes of various performance levels. A total of 2845 participants (athletes: 2783, controls: 62) between the ages of 11 and 44 years old participated in the study. A 3-page questionnaire was developed to assess the intake of DS. Athletes were categorized based on participation in individual (n = 775) and team sports (n = 2008). To assess the effect of performance level in supplementation intake, athletes were categorized based on training volume, participation in the national team, and winning at least one medal in provincial, national, international or Olympic games. Overall, 37% of all athletes of various performance levels reported taking at least one DS in the last month. A higher prevalence of DS intake was reported in individual (44%) compared to team sport athletes (35%) (p < 0.001). Athletes of high performance level reported greater DS intake compared to lower performance athletes. Males reported a significantly greater prevalence of DS intake compared to females. The most popular supplement reported was amino acid preparation with the main reason of supplementation being endurance improvements. In conclusion, performance level and type of sport appear to impact the DS practices of male and female athletes. These findings should be validated in other populations. Key points37% of Mediterranean athletes of various sports and levels have reported taking dietary supplements.The performance level of the athletes affects the dietary supplementation intake.Athletes in individual sports appear to have a higher DS intake compared to team sport athletes.Male athletes appear to take more dietary supplements compared to female athletes. PMID:24149744

  3. Elevated Progesterone Levels on the Day of Oocyte Maturation May Affect Top Quality Embryo IVF Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Ren, Xinling; Wu, Li; Zhu, Lixia; Xu, Bei; Li, Yufeng; Ai, Jihui; Jin, Lei

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the impact of elevated progesterone on endometrial receptivity, the data on whether increased progesterone levels affects the quality of embryos is still limited. This study retrospectively enrolled 4,236 fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles and sought to determine whether increased progesterone is associated with adverse outcomes with regard to top quality embryos (TQE). The results showed that the TQE rate significantly correlated with progesterone levels on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) trigger (P = 0.009). Multivariate linear regression analysis of factors related to the TQE rate, in conventional IVF cycles, showed that the TQE rate was negatively associated with progesterone concentration on the day of hCG (OR was -1.658, 95% CI: -2.806 to -0.510, P = 0.005). When the serum progesterone level was within the interval 2.0–2.5 ng/ml, the TQE rate was significantly lower (P <0.05) than when the progesterone level was < 1.0 ng/ml; similar results were obtained for serum progesterone levels >2.5 ng/ml. Then, we choose a progesterone level at 1.5ng/ml, 2.0 ng/ml and 2.5 ng/ml as cut-off points to verify this result. We found that the TQE rate was significantly different (P <0.05) between serum progesterone levels < 2.0 ng/ml and >2.0 ng/ml. In conclusion, the results of this study clearly demonstrated a negative effect of elevated progesterone levels on the day of hCG trigger, on TQE rate, regardless of the basal FSH, the total gonadotropin, the age of the woman, or the time of ovarian stimulation. These data demonstrate that elevated progesterone levels (>2.0 ng/ml) before oocyte maturation were consistently detrimental to the oocyte. PMID:26745711

  4. Energized by love: thinking about romantic relationships increases positive affect and blood glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Sarah C E; Campbell, Lorne; Loving, Timothy J

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the impact of thinking of a current romantic partner on acute blood glucose responses and positive affect over a short period of time. Participants in romantic relationships were randomly assigned to reflect on their partner, an opposite-sex friend, or their morning routine. Blood glucose levels were assessed prior to reflection, as well as at 10 and 25 min postreflection. Results revealed that individuals in the routine and friend conditions exhibited a decline in glucose over time, whereas individuals in the partner condition did not exhibit this decline (rather, a slight increase) in glucose over time. Reported positive affect following reflection was positively associated with increases in glucose, but only for individuals who reflected on their partner, suggesting this physiological response reflects eustress. These findings add to the literature on eustress in relationships and have implications for relationship processes. PMID:24924647

  5. Factors Affecting Parent's Perception on Air Quality-From the Individual to the Community Level.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yulin; Liu, Fengfeng; Lu, Yuanan; Mao, Zongfu; Lu, Hanson; Wu, Yanyan; Chu, Yuanyuan; Yu, Lichen; Liu, Yisi; Ren, Meng; Li, Na; Chen, Xi; Xiang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The perception of air quality significantly affects the acceptance of the public of the government's environmental policies. The aim of this research is to explore the relationship between the perception of the air quality of parents and scientific monitoring data and to analyze the factors that affect parents' perceptions. Scientific data of air quality were obtained from Wuhan's environmental condition reports. One thousand parents were investigated for their knowledge and perception of air quality. Scientific data show that the air quality of Wuhan follows an improving trend in general, while most participants believed that the air quality of Wuhan has deteriorated, which indicates a significant difference between public perception and reality. On the individual level, respondents with an age of 40 or above (40 or above: OR = 3.252; 95% CI: 1.170-9.040), a higher educational level (college and above: OR = 7.598; 95% CI: 2.244-25.732) or children with poor healthy conditions (poor: OR = 6.864; 95% CI: 2.212-21.302) have much more negative perception of air quality. On the community level, industrial facilities, vehicles and city construction have major effects on parents' perception of air quality. Our investigation provides baseline information for environmental policy researchers and makers regarding the public's perception and expectation of air quality and the benefits to the environmental policy completing and enforcing. PMID:27187432

  6. Oral mucosal disease: recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Scully, Crispian; Porter, Stephen

    2008-04-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS; aphthae; canker sores) is common worldwide. Characterised by multiple, recurrent, small, round, or ovoid ulcers with circumscribed margins, erythematous haloes, and yellow or grey floors, it usually presents first in childhood or adolescence. Its aetiology and pathogenesis is not entirely clear, but there is genetic predisposition, with strong associations with interleukin genotypes, and sometimes a family history. Diagnosis is on clinical grounds alone, and must be differentiated from other causes of recurrent ulceration, particularly Behçet disease - a systemic disorder in which aphthous-like ulcers are associated with genital ulceration, and eye disease (particularly posterior uveitis). Management remains unsatisfactory, as topical corticosteroids and most other treatments only reduce the severity of the ulceration, but do not stop recurrence. PMID:17850936

  7. Management of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Montgomery-Cranny, Jodie A; Wallace, Ann; Rogers, Helen J; Hughes, Sophie C; Hegarty, Anne M; Zaitoun, Halla

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulceration is common and may present in childhood. Causes of recurrent oral ulceration are numerous and there may be an association with underlying systemic disease. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common underlying diagnosis in children. The discomfort of oral ulcers can impact negatively on quality of life of a child, interfering with eating, speaking and may result in missed school days. The role of the general dental practitioner is to identify patients who can be treated with simple measures in primary dental care and those who require assessment and treatment in secondary care. Management may include topical agents for symptomatic relief, topical corticosteroids and, in severe recalcitrant cases, systemic agents may be necessary. PMID:26506812

  8. Stomatal conductance of lettuce grown under or exposed to different light qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyeon-Hye; Goins, Gregory D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Sager, John C.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The objective of this research was to examine the effects of differences in light spectrum on the stomatal conductance (Gs) and dry matter production of lettuce plants grown under a day/night cycle with different spectra, and also the effects on Gs of short-term exposure to different spectra. METHODS: Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) plants were grown with 6 h dark and 18 h light under four different spectra, red-blue (RB), red-blue-green (RBG), green (GF) and white (CWF), and Gs and plant growth were measured. KEY RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Conductance of plants grown for 23 d under CWF rose rapidly on illumination to a maximum in the middle of the light period, then decreased again before the dark period when it was minimal. However, the maximum was smaller in plants grown under RB, RGB and GF. This demonstrates that spectral quality during growth affects the diurnal pattern of stomatal conductance. Although Gs was smaller in plants grown under RGB than CWF, dry mass accumulation was greater, suggesting that Gs did not limit carbon assimilation under these spectral conditions. Temporarily changing the spectral quality of the plants grown for 23 d under CWF, affected stomatal responses reversibly, confirming studies on epidermal strips. This study provides new information showing that Gs is responsive to spectral quality during growth and, in the short-term, is not directly coupled to dry matter accumulation.

  9. Functional convergence of oxylipin and abscisic acid pathways controls stomatal closure in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Tatyana; Kolla, Venkat A; Wang, Chang-Quan; Nasafi, Zainab; Hicks, Derrick R; Phadungchob, Bpantamars; Chehab, Wassim E; Brandizzi, Federica; Froehlich, John; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2014-03-01

    Membranes are primary sites of perception of environmental stimuli. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are major structural constituents of membranes that also function as modulators of a multitude of signal transduction pathways evoked by environmental stimuli. Different stresses induce production of a distinct blend of oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids, "oxylipins." We employed three Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotypes to examine the oxylipin signature in response to specific stresses and determined that wounding and drought differentially alter oxylipin profiles, particularly the allene oxide synthase branch of the oxylipin pathway, responsible for production of jasmonic acid (JA) and its precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (12-OPDA). Specifically, wounding induced both 12-OPDA and JA levels, whereas drought induced only the precursor 12-OPDA. Levels of the classical stress phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) were also mainly enhanced by drought and little by wounding. To explore the role of 12-OPDA in plant drought responses, we generated a range of transgenic lines and exploited the existing mutant plants that differ in their levels of stress-inducible 12-OPDA but display similar ABA levels. The plants producing higher 12-OPDA levels exhibited enhanced drought tolerance and reduced stomatal aperture. Furthermore, exogenously applied ABA and 12-OPDA, individually or combined, promote stomatal closure of ABA and allene oxide synthase biosynthetic mutants, albeit most effectively when combined. Using tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Brassica napus verified the potency of this combination in inducing stomatal closure in plants other than Arabidopsis. These data have identified drought as a stress signal that uncouples the conversion of 12-OPDA to JA and have revealed 12-OPDA as a drought-responsive regulator of stomatal closure functioning most effectively together with ABA. PMID:24429214

  10. Allyl isothiocyanate induces stomatal closure in Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Sobahan, Muhammad Abdus; Akter, Nasima; Okuma, Eiji; Uraji, Misugi; Ye, Wenxiu; Mori, Izumi C; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Isothiocyanates are enzymatically produced from glucosinolates in plants, and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) induces stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we investigated stomatal responses to AITC in Vicia faba. AITC-induced stomatal closure accompanied by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NO production, cytosolic alkalization and glutathione (GSH) depletion in V. faba. GSH monoethyl ester induced stomatal reopening and suppressed AITC-induced GSH depletion in guard cells. Exogenous catalase and a peroxidase inhibitor, salicylhydroxamic acid, inhibited AITC-induced stomatal closure, unlike an NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium chloride. The peroxidase inhibitor also abolished the AITC-induced ROS production, NO production, and cytosolic alkalization. AITC-induced stomatal closure was suppressed by an NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, and an agent to acidify cytosol, butyrate. These results indicate that AITC-induced stomatal closure in V. faba as well as in A. thaliana and suggest that AITC signaling in guard cells is conserved in both plants. PMID:26027691

  11. Reconstructing Atmospheric CO2 Through The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum Using Stomatal Index and Stomatal Density Values From Ginkgo adiantoides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, R. S.; Wing, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    CIE coincides in part with the 'pre-warming' interval documented from δ18O in mammalian tooth enamel from the Bighorn Basin. Stomatal density values increase ~30ka prior to the CIE, suggesting a decrease in cell size from water stress, a change that closely matches the timing of a trend towards drier paleosols in the same region of the Bighorn Basin. All evidence collected to date suggests a long-term rise in pCO2 and temperature, and drying of soils prior to the prominent CIE. Presumably the source for CO2 released prior to the CIE did not significantly alter the isotopic value of atmospheric CO2. As suggested by previous authors, warming prior to the CIE may have triggered the release of carbon from a source depleted in 13C at the onset of the PETM. Well-preserved dispersed cuticle has been extracted from stratigraphic levels within the CIE, and may permit reconstruction of changes in pCO2 during the PETM.

  12. Calcium-sensing receptor regulates stomatal closure through hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in response to extracellular calcium in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Hua; Yi, Xiao-Qian; Han, Ai-Dong; Liu, Ting-Wu; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Dong, Xue-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis calcium-sensing receptor CAS is a crucial regulator of extracellular calcium-induced stomatal closure. Free cytosolic Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(i)) increases in response to a high extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(o)) level through a CAS signalling pathway and finally leads to stomatal closure. Multidisciplinary approaches including histochemical, pharmacological, fluorescent, electrochemical, and molecular biological methods were used to discuss the relationship of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and nitric oxide (NO) signalling in the CAS signalling pathway in guard cells in response to Ca(2+)(o). Here it is shown that Ca(2+)(o) could induce H(2)O(2) and NO production from guard cells but only H(2)O(2) from chloroplasts, leading to stomatal closure. In addition, the CASas mutant, the atrbohD/F double mutant, and the Atnoa1 mutant were all insensitive to Ca(2+)(o)-stimulated stomatal closure, as well as H(2)O(2) and NO elevation in the case of CASas. Furthermore, it was found that the antioxidant system might function as a mediator in Ca(2+)(o) and H(2)O(2) signalling in guard cells. The results suggest a hypothetical model whereby Ca(2+)(o) induces H(2)O(2) and NO accumulation in guard cells through the CAS signalling pathway, which further triggers Ca(2+)(i) transients and finally stomatal closure. The possible cross-talk of Ca(2+)(o) and abscisic acid signalling as well as the antioxidant system are discussed. PMID:21940718

  13. Prenatal Thyroxine Treatment Disparately Affects Peripheral and Amygdala Thyroid Hormone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Pradeep K.; Sittig, Laura J.; Andrus, Brian M.; Schaffer, Daniel J.; Batra, Kanchi K.; Redei, Eva E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary A prenatal hypothyroid state is associated with behavioral abnormalities in adulthood. Wistar–Kyoto (WKY) rats exhibit hypothyroidism and increased depressive and anxiety-like behaviors. Thus, the WKY could illuminate the mechanisms by which the reversal of developmental hypothyroidism in humans and animals results in adult behavioral improvement. We examined the outcome of maternal thyroxine (T4) treatment on thyroid hormone-regulated functions and adult behavior of the WKY offspring. Pregnant WKY dams completed gestation with and without T4 administration and their adult male offspring were tested. Measures included depressive and anxiety-like behaviors, and thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in both plasma and specific brain regions. In addition, the expression of two proteins affecting thyroid hormone trafficking and metabolism, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT-8) and iodothyronine deiodinase type III (Dio3), and of several behavior-altering molecules, glucocorticoid receptor (GR), prepro-thyrotropin releasing hormone (prepro-TRH) and corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH), were determined in the hippocampus and amygdala of the offspring. Prenatal T4 treatment of WKYs did not affect adult depressive behavior but increased anxiety-like behavior and decreased plasma levels of THs. In the hippocampus of males treated with T4 in utero, Dio3 and MCT-8 protein levels were increased, while in the amygdala, there were increases of free T4, MCT-8, GR, prepro-TRH protein and CRH mRNA levels. These results show that T4 administration in utero programs adult peripheral and amygdalar thyroid hormone levels divergently, and that the resulting upregulation of anxiety-related genes in the amygdala could be responsible for the exacerbated anxiety-like behavior seen in WKYs after prenatal T4 treatment. PMID:20005050

  14. Maternal vitamin levels in pregnancies affected by congenital malformations other than neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Marie; Mills, James L.; Molloy, Anne M.; Troendle, James F.; Brody, Lawrence C.; Conley, Mary; Mc Donnell, Robert; Scott, John M.; Kirke, Peadar N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Periconceptional use of folic acid prevents most neural tube defects (NTDs). Whether folic acid and/or multivitamins can prevent other congenital anomalies is not clear. This study tested whether maternal blood levels of folate and vitamin B12 in pregnancies affected by congenital malformations excluding NTDs are lower when compared to non-affected pregnancies. Methods We measured pregnancy red cell folate (RCF), vitamin B12, and homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations in blood samples taken at the first antenatal clinic in Dublin maternity hospitals in 1986–1990 when vitamin supplementation was rare. The cases were mothers who delivered a baby with a congenital malformation other than NTD identified by the Dublin EUROCAT Registry; controls were a systematic sample of mothers of offspring without congenital malformations from the same hospitals in the same time period. Results The median maternal levels of RCF and tHcy did not differ significantly between cases and controls for any of the congenital malformation groups examined (RCF: all malformations 275.9 ug/L v controls 271.2; p=0.77; tHcy: all malformations 7.5 umol/L v controls 7.6; p=0.57). In an unadjusted analysis vitamin B12 was significantly higher in case-mothers whose babies had cleft palate only (p=0.006), musculoskeletal malformations (p=0.034) and midline defects (p=0.039) but not after adjustment for multiple testing. Conclusions Our data suggest that low maternal folate and B12 levels or high tHcy levels in early pregnancy are not associated with all congenital malformations excluding NTDs. Fortification with folic acid or B12 may not have a beneficial effect in the prevention of these anomalies. PMID:21591245

  15. Isolation of the envelope of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Taube, S E; Rothfield, L I

    1978-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus was disrupted by a combination of freezing and thawing, osmotic shock, and sonic treatment. Subviral components were separated by isopycnic centrifugation. The low-density, lipid-rich fractions were pooled and shown to contain primarily viral glycoprotein. Further purification of this material resulted in the isolation of a preparation of vesicles which contained only the G protein and the same phospholipids as in the intact virions and exhibited spikelike structures similar to those on intact vesicular stomatitis virions. We conclude that we have isolated fragments of native vesicular stomatitis virus envelopes. Images PMID:209217

  16. Transpiration, CO2 assimilation, WUE, and stomatal aperture in leaves of Viscum album (L.): Effect of abscisic acid (ABA) in the xylem sap of its host (Populus x euamericana).

    PubMed

    Escher, Peter; Peuke, Andreas D; Bannister, Peter; Fink, Siegfried; Hartung, Wolfram; Jiang, Fan; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2008-01-01

    Leaves of the mistletoe Viscum album (L.) show a high rate of transpiration, even when the host is under severe drought stress. The hypothesis that a strong control of ABA influx from the xylem sap of the host into the mistletoe prevents stomatal closure in mistletoe leaves was tested under the following conditions: sections of poplar twigs carrying a mistletoe were perfused with artificial xylem sap that contained different ABA concentrations and both transpiration and ABA levels were analysed in mistletoe leaves. Despite variation by a factor of 10(4), the ABA content of the host xylem did not affect ABA levels, leaf transpiration, CO(2) assimilation, WUE, or the degree of stomatal aperture in mistletoe leaves. These observations support the hypothesis of a strong control of ABA influx from the host of the xylem into the mistletoe, although degradation of ABA before it enters the mistletoe leaves cannot be excluded. This mechanism may ensure a water and nutritional status favourable for the mistletoe, even if the water status of the host is impaired. Despite the lack of short-term sensitivity of ABA levels in mistletoe leaves to even strong changes of ABA levels in the xylem sap of the host, ABA levels in mistletoe leaves were relatively high compared to ABA levels in the leaves of several tree species including poplar. Since significant transpiration of the mistletoe leaves was observed despite high ABA levels, a diminished sensitivity of the stomata of mistletoe leaves to ABA has to be concluded. The stomatal density of adaxial Viscum leaves of 89+/-23 stomata per mm is lower than those reported in a study performed at the end of the 19th century. PMID:18042393

  17. Tadpole swimming performance and activity affected by acute exposure to sublethal levels of carbaryl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    General activity and swimming performance (i.e., sprint speed and distance) of plains leopard frog tadpoles (Rana blairi) were examined after acute exposure to three sublethal concentrations of carbaryl (3.5, 5.0, and 7.2 mg/L). Both swimming performance and spontaneous swimming activity are important for carrying out life history functions (e.g., growth and development) and for escaping from predators. Measured tadpole activity diminished by nearly 90% at 3.5 mg/L carbaryl and completely ceased at 7.2 mg/L. Sprint speed and sprint distance also decreased significantly following exposure. Carbaryl affected both swimming performance and activity after just 24 h, suggesting that 24 h may be an adequate length of exposure to determine behavioral effects on tadpoles. Slight recovery of activity levels was noted at 24 and 48 h post-exposure; no recovery of swimming performance was observed. Reduction in activity and swimming performance may result in increased predation rates and, because activity is closely associated with feeding, may result in slowed growth leading to a failure to emerge before pond drying or an indirect reduction in adult fitness. Acute exposure to sublethal toxicants such as carbaryl may not only affect immediate survival of tadpoles but also impact critical life history functions and generate changes at the local population level.

  18. An evaluation of supervised classifiers for indirectly detecting salt-affected areas at irrigation scheme level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Sybrand Jacobus; van Niekerk, Adriaan

    2016-07-01

    Soil salinity often leads to reduced crop yield and quality and can render soils barren. Irrigated areas are particularly at risk due to intensive cultivation and secondary salinization caused by waterlogging. Regular monitoring of salt accumulation in irrigation schemes is needed to keep its negative effects under control. The dynamic spatial and temporal characteristics of remote sensing can provide a cost-effective solution for monitoring salt accumulation at irrigation scheme level. This study evaluated a range of pan-fused SPOT-5 derived features (spectral bands, vegetation indices, image textures and image transformations) for classifying salt-affected areas in two distinctly different irrigation schemes in South Africa, namely Vaalharts and Breede River. The relationship between the input features and electro conductivity measurements were investigated using regression modelling (stepwise linear regression, partial least squares regression, curve fit regression modelling) and supervised classification (maximum likelihood, nearest neighbour, decision tree analysis, support vector machine and random forests). Classification and regression trees and random forest were used to select the most important features for differentiating salt-affected and unaffected areas. The results showed that the regression analyses produced weak models (<0.4 R squared). Better results were achieved using the supervised classifiers, but the algorithms tend to over-estimate salt-affected areas. A key finding was that none of the feature sets or classification algorithms stood out as being superior for monitoring salt accumulation at irrigation scheme level. This was attributed to the large variations in the spectral responses of different crops types at different growing stages, coupled with their individual tolerances to saline conditions.

  19. Natural Disaster Induced Losses at Household Level: A Study on the Disaster Affected Migrants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishtiaque, A.; Nazem, N. I.; Jerin, T.

    2015-12-01

    Given its geographical location Bangladesh frequently confronts natural disasters. Disaster induced losses often obligate socio-economic dislocation from rural areas to large urban centers. After incurring what type/amount of losses people migrate is still unknown. In this paper we focus on migrants who migrated due to natural disasters. Thus, the objectives of this paper are, first, ascertaining the proportion of disaster migrants in Dhaka city; second, determining types of natural disasters which compel rural out-migration; third, assessing the resource and economic losses stem from these disasters at household level. Using the slum database (N = 4966), we select eight slums randomly with a purpose to include migrants from maximum districts available. In order to identify the proportion of disaster affected migrants a census is conducted in 407 households of those 8 slums and the result demonstrates that 18.43% of the migrants are disaster affected, which was only 5% in 1993. Out of all hydro-meteorological disasters, river bank erosion (RBE), followed by flood, drives most people out of their abode. However, unlike RBE migrants, migrants affected by flood usually return to their origin after certain period. In-depth interviews on the disaster migrants reveal that RBE claims total loss of homestead land & agricultural land while flood causes 20% and 23% loss respectively. Agricultural income decreases 96% because of RBE whereas flood victims encounter 98% decrease. People also incur 79% & 69% loss in livestock owing to RBE and flood severally. These disasters cause more than eighty percent reduction in total monthly income. Albeit RBE appears more vigorous but total economic loss is greater in flood- on average each household experiences a loss of BDT 350,555 due to flood and BDT 300,000 on account of RBE. Receiving no substantial support from community or government the affected people are compelled to migrate.

  20. Obesity And Laboratory Diets Affects Tissue Malondialdehyde (MDA) Levels In Obese Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Parimal; Scott, Joseph; Holley, Andy; Hakkak, Reza

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the interaction of obesity and laboratory diets on tissue malondialdehyde levels in rats. Female Zucker obese and lean rats were maintained on either regular grain-based diet or purified casein diet for two weeks, orally gavaged at day 50 with 65 mg/kg DMBA and sacrificed 24 hrs later. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured in blood and harvested tissues. Data were recorded as mean ± SEM and analyzed statistically. Results show that the obese group on purified casein diet had reduction of MDA levels in the brain, duodenum, liver, lung and kidney tissues as compared to lean group, p <0.05. Obese group on grain-based diet showed significant increase in MDA levels only in the duodenum, p <0.05. We conclude that dietary intervention differentially affects the oxidative markers in obese rats. It appears that purified casein diets were more effective than grain-based diet in reduction of oxidative stress in obese rats.

  1. Social competition affects electric signal plasticity and steroid levels in the gymnotiform fish Brachyhypopomus gauderio

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Vielka L.; Stoddard, Philip K.

    2009-01-01

    Sexually-selected communication signals can be used by competing males to settle contests without incurring the costs of fighting. Steroid regulation of these signals can render them as reliable indicators of a male's physiological state. We investigated how plasticity in electrocommunication signals is driven by social competition for mates, mediated by steroid hormones, and subject to the effects of past social experience. We measured the electric waveform's amplitude and duration and steroid hormone levels of male gymnotiform electric fish (Brachyhypopomus gauderio) following week-long periods of social isolation, and low or high social competition. To quantify the effect of social history on the modulation of the electric signal, six groups of six males experienced all the above three social conditions but in different order. We found that males differentially modulate their electric signals depending on the order they experienced these conditions. Thus, past social interactions affect both present and future social electric signals. Cortisol levels and the amplitude of the electric signal appeared to track the intensity of competition, while androgen levels and the duration of the electric signal only responded to the presence (low and high competition) or absence (isolation) of a social environment (low and high androgens respectively). In addition, cortisol levels were related to the body size of the males at high social competition. Taken together, these findings suggest that the capacity of males to modulate their signals in response to social competition is regulated by steroids. PMID:19647742

  2. Host tree phenology affects vascular epiphytes at the physiological, demographic and community level

    PubMed Central

    Einzmann, Helena J. R.; Beyschlag, Joachim; Hofhansl, Florian; Wanek, Wolfgang; Zotz, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The processes that govern diverse tropical plant communities have rarely been studied in life forms other than trees. Structurally dependent vascular epiphytes, a major part of tropical biodiversity, grow in a three-dimensional matrix defined by their hosts, but trees differ in their architecture, bark structure/chemistry and leaf phenology. We hypothesized that the resulting seasonal differences in microclimatic conditions in evergreen vs. deciduous trees would affect epiphytes at different levels, from organ physiology to community structure. We studied the influence of tree leaf phenology on vascular epiphytes on the Island of Barro Colorado, Panama. Five tree species were selected, which were deciduous, semi-deciduous or evergreen. The crowns of drought-deciduous trees, characterized by sunnier and drier microclimates, hosted fewer individuals and less diverse epiphyte assemblages. Differences were also observed at a functional level, e.g. epiphyte assemblages in deciduous trees had larger proportions of Crassulacean acid metabolism species and individuals. At the population level a drier microclimate was associated with lower individual growth and survival in a xerophytic fern. Some species also showed, as expected, lower specific leaf area and higher δ13C values when growing in deciduous trees compared with evergreen trees. As hypothesized, host tree leaf phenology influences vascular epiphytes at different levels. Our results suggest a cascading effect of tree composition and associated differences in tree phenology on the diversity and functioning of epiphyte communities in tropical lowland forests. PMID:25392188

  3. Muscular activity level during pedalling is not affected by crank inertial load.

    PubMed

    Duc, S; Villerius, V; Bertucci, W; Pernin, J N; Grappe, F

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of gear ratio (GR) and thus crank inertial load (CIL), on the activity levels of lower limb muscles. Twelve competitive cyclists performed three randomised trials with their own bicycle equipped with a SRM crankset and mounted on an Axiom ergometer. The power output ( approximately 80% of maximal aerobic power) and the pedalling cadence were kept constant for each subject across all trials but three different GR (low, medium and high) were indirectly obtained for each trial by altering the electromagnetic brake of the ergometer. The low, medium and high GR (mean +/- SD) resulted in CIL of 44 +/- 3.7, 84 +/- 6.5 and 152 +/- 17.9 kg.m(2), respectively. Muscular activity levels of the gluteus maximus (GM), the vastus medialis (VM), the vastus lateralis (VL), the rectus femoris (RF), the medial hamstrings (MHAM), the gastrocnemius (GAS) and the soleus (SOL) muscles were quantified and analysed by mean root mean square (RMS(mean)). The muscular activity levels of the measured lower limb muscles were not significantly affected when the CIL was increased approximately four fold. This suggests that muscular activity levels measured on different cycling ergometers (with different GR and flywheel inertia) can be compared among each other, as they are not influenced by CIL. PMID:16032416

  4. Recalibrating the Ginkgo Stomatal Index Proxy for Past CO2 with Herbarium Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, G. D.; Retallack, G.

    2015-12-01

    The stomatal index of plant cuticles is inversely related to atmospheric CO2 concentrations, as calibrated from greenhouse experiments and herbarium specimens. Such calibration data for Ginkgo biloba are available for the ongoing rise in atmospheric CO2 and for high levels of CO2 anticipated in the future, but lacking for low CO2 levels of preindustrial and glacial ages. The oldest modern specimen that we have been able to obtain consists of leaf fragments collected in 1829 and provided by Arne Anderberg from the Swedish Natural History Museum. The specimen was labeled "Argentina", but also "Hortus Botanicus Augustinus", a garden founded in 1638 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Ginkgo has a very thin cuticle that is difficult to prepare, but images very similar to cuticular preparation can be obtained by backscatter SEM imagery. We also obtained secondary SEM images of the same areas and counted 13 images with 6,184 cells from five leaf fragments. Our analyses yield a stomatal index of 10.9 ± 0.9 % for an atmospheric CO2 of 286 ppm, as determined by ice core data from Ciais and Sabine for IPCC-2013. This value is lower than from previous calibration curves for this level of CO2 and changes their curvature. With additional late nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first century leaves, we can improve both the precision and lower limits of the transfer function for atmospheric CO2 from Ginkgo stomatal index last revised in 2009.

  5. SLAC1 is required for plant guard cell S-type anion channel function in stomatal signalling

    PubMed Central

    Vahisalu, Triin; Kollist, Hannes; Wang, Yong-Fei; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Chan, Wai-Yin; Valerio, Gabriel; Lamminmäki, Airi; Brosché, Mikael; Moldau, Heino; Desikan, Radhika; Schroeder, Julian I.; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2010-01-01

    Stomatal pores, formed by two surrounding guard cells in the epidermis of plant leaves, allow influx of atmospheric carbon dioxide in exchange for transpirational water loss. Stomata also restrict the entry of ozone—an important air pollutant that has an increasingly negative impact on crop yields, and thus global carbon fixation1 and climate change2. The aperture of stomatal pores is regulated by the transport of osmotically active ions and metabolites across guard cell membranes3,4. Despite the vital role of guard cells in controlling plant water loss3,4, ozone sensitivity1,2 and CO2 supply2,5–7, the genes encoding some of the main regulators of stomatal movements remain unknown. It has been proposed that guard cell anion channels function as important regulators of stomatal closure and are essential in mediating stomatal responses to physiological and stress stimuli3,4,8. However, the genes encoding membrane proteins that mediate guard cell anion efflux have not yet been identified. Here we report the mapping and characterization of an ozone-sensitive Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, slac1. We show that SLAC1 (SLOW ANION CHANNEL-ASSOCIATED 1) is preferentially expressed in guard cells and encodes a distant homologue of fungal and bacterial dicarboxylate/malic acid transport proteins. The plasma membrane protein SLAC1 is essential for stomatal closure in response to CO2, abscisic acid, ozone, light/dark transitions, humidity change, calcium ions, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide. Mutations in SLAC1 impair slow (S-type) anion channel currents that are activated by cytosolic Ca2+ and abscisic acid, but do not affect rapid (R-type) anion channel currents or Ca2+ channel function. A low homology of SLAC1 to bacterial and fungal organic acid transport proteins, and the permeability of S-type anion channels to malate9 suggest a vital role for SLAC1 in the function of S-type anion channels. PMID:18305484

  6. Fibrillin levels in a severely affected Marfan syndrome patient with a null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, M.; Withers, A.P.; Al-Ghaban, Z. |

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by defects in the cardiovascular, skeletal and ocular systems. A patient was first examined in 1992 having survived an acute sortic dissection with subsequent composite repair and insertion of a prosthetic aortic valve. Clinical examination revealed arachnodactyly, narrow, high arched palate with dental crowding, an arm span exceeding her height by 10.5 cm, joint laxity and bilateral lens subluxation. Analysis of the family showed affected members in three generations and the fibrillin gene, FBN1, was shown to segregate with the disease when using polymorphic markers including an RsaI polymorphism in the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the gene. Analysis of patient mRNA for this RsaI polymorphism by RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-PCR) amplification and restriction enzyme digestion of the PCR products showed that the copy of the gene segregating with the disease was not transcribed. No low level expression of this allele was observed despite RT-PCR amplification incorporating radioactively labelled dCTP, thus revealing a null allele phenotype. Western blotting analysis of fibrillin secreted by the patient`s dermal fibroblasts using fibrillin-specific antibodies showed only normal sized fibrillin protein. However, immunohistochemical studies of the patient`s tissue and fibroblasts showed markedly lowered levels in staining of microfibrillar structures compared with age-matched controls. This low level of expression of the protein affected in Marfan syndrome in a patient with such severe clinical manifestations is surprising since current understanding would suggest that this molecular phenotype should lead to a mild clinical disorder.

  7. Sediment size distribution and composition in a reservoir affected by severe water level fluctuations.

    PubMed

    López, Pilar; López-Tarazón, José A; Casas-Ruiz, Joan P; Pompeo, Marcelo; Ordoñez, Jaime; Muñoz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The reservoir sediments are important sinks for organic carbon (OC), the OC burial being dependent on two opposite processes, deposition and mineralization. Hence factors such as severe water level fluctuations are expected to influence the rate of OC accumulation as they may affect both deposition and mineralization. The Barasona Reservoir has been historically threatened by siltation, whilst the use of water for irrigation involves a drastic decrease of the water level. In this context, we have studied the physical and chemical characteristics (grain size, major and minor elemental compositions, organic and inorganic carbon, and nitrogen) of the recent sediments of the Barasona Reservoir and the relationships among them in order to: a) elucidate the main processes governing OC accumulation, b) evaluate the rate of OC mineralization and c) approach the effect of drought on the sediment characteristics in this system. Our results indicated that Barasona sediments were dominated by fine silts (>60%) and clays (>20%), the mean particle size decreasing from tail to dam. Desiccation increased particle sorting and size distribution became bimodal, but no effect on average size was observed. Attending to the composition, Barasona sediments were very homogeneous with low concentrations of nitrogen (TN) and phosphorus (<1.2 g kg(-1) dw and <0.6 g kg(-1) dw, respectively) and high concentration of OC (≈36 g kg(-1) dw). TN was negatively related to dry weight. Sediment mixing due to drastic changes in water level may have favoured the observed homogeneity of Barasona sediments affecting carbon, major ions and grain size. The high amount of OC deposited in Barasona sediment suggested that the adsorption of OC onto fine particles was more important than in boreal lakes. The rate of oxygen consumption by wet sediment ranged from 2.26 to 3.15 mg O2 m(-2) day(-1), values close to those compiled for Mediterranean running waters. PMID:26105704

  8. Ethylene-induced flavonol accumulation in guard cells suppresses reactive oxygen species and moderates stomatal aperture.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Justin M; Hechler, Paul J; Muday, Gloria K

    2014-04-01

    Guard cell swelling controls the aperture of stomata, pores that facilitate gas exchange and water loss from leaves. The hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has a central role in regulation of stomatal closure through synthesis of second messengers, which include reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS accumulation must be minimized by antioxidants to keep concentrations from reaching damaging levels within the cell. Flavonols are plant metabolites that have been implicated as antioxidants; however, their antioxidant activity in planta has been debated. Flavonols accumulate in guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana, but not surrounding pavement cells, as visualized with a flavonol-specific dye. The expression of a reporter driven by the promoter of CHALCONE SYNTHASE, a gene encoding a flavonol biosynthetic enzyme, in guard cells, but not pavement cells, suggests guard cell-specific flavonoid synthesis. Increased levels of ROS were detected using a fluorescent ROS sensor in guard cells of transparent testa4-2, which has a null mutation in CHALCONE SYNTHASE and therefore synthesizes no flavonol antioxidants. Guard cells of transparent testa4-2 show more rapid ABA-induced closure than the wild type, suggesting that flavonols may dampen the ABA-dependent ROS burst that drives stomatal closing. The levels of flavonols are positively regulated in guard cells by ethylene treatment in the wild type, but not in the ethylene-insensitive2-5 mutant. In addition, in both ethylene-overproducing1 and ethylene-treated wild-type plants, elevated flavonols lead to decreasing ROS and slower ABA-mediated stomatal closure. These results are consistent with flavonols suppressing ROS accumulation and decreasing the rate of ABA-dependent stomatal closure, with ethylene-induced increases in guard cell flavonols modulating these responses. PMID:24596331

  9. Ozone treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis: a double blinded study

    PubMed Central

    AL-Omiri, Mahmoud K.; Alhijawi, Mohannad; AlZarea, Bader K.; Abul Hassan, Ra’ed S.; Lynch, Edward

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of ozone to treat recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). Consecutive sixty-nine participants with RAS were recruited into this non-randomized double blind, controlled cohort observational study (test group). A control group of 69 RAS patients who matched test group with age and gender was recruited. RAS lesions in test group were exposed to ozone in air for 60 seconds while controls received only air. Ulcer size and pain were recorded for each participant at baseline and daily for 15 days. Ulcer duration was determined by recording the time taken for ulcers to disappear. The main outcome measures were pain due to the ulcer, ulcer size and ulcer duration. 138 RAS participants (69 participants and 69 controls) were analyzed. Ulcer size was reduced starting from the second day in test group and from the fourth day in controls (p ≤ 0.004). Pain levels were reduced starting from the first day in the test group and from the third day in controls (p ≤ 0.001). Ulcer duration, ulcer size after day 2 and pain levels were more reduced in the test group. In conclusion, application of ozone on RAS lesions for 60 seconds reduced pain levels and enhanced ulcers’ healing by reducing ulcers’ size and duration. PMID:27301301

  10. Protein level affects the relative lysine requirement of growing rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fry.

    PubMed

    Bodin, Noelie; Govaerts, Bernadette; Abboudi, Tarik; Detavernier, Christel; De Saeger, Sarah; Larondelle, Yvan; Rollin, Xavier

    2009-07-01

    The effect of two digestible protein levels (310 and 469 g/kg DM) on the relative lysine (Lys; g Lys/kg DM or g Lys/100 g protein) and the absolute Lys (g Lys intake/kg 0.75 per d) requirements was studied in rainbow trout fry using a dose-response trial. At each protein level, sixteen isoenergetic (22-23 MJ digestible energy/kg DM) diets were tested, involving a full range (2-70 g/kg DM) of sixteen Lys levels. Each diet was given to one group of sixty rainbow trout fry (mean initial body weight 0.78 g) reared at 15 degrees C for 31 feeding d. The Lys requirements were estimated based on the relationships between weight, protein, and Lys gains (g/kg 0.75 per d) and Lys concentration (g/kg DM or g/100 g protein) or Lys intake (g/kg 0.75 per d), using the broken-line model (BLM) and the non-linear four-parameter saturation kinetics model (SKM-4). Both the model and the response criterion chosen markedly impacted the relative Lys requirement. The relative Lys requirement for Lys gain of rainbow trout estimated with the BLM (and SKM-4 at 90 % of the maximum response) increased from 16.8 (19.6) g/kg DM at a low protein level to 23.4 (24.5) g/kg DM at a high protein level. However, the dietary protein content affected neither the absolute Lys requirement nor the relative Lys requirement expressed as g Lys/100 g protein nor the Lys requirement for maintenance (21 mg Lys/kg 0.75 per d). PMID:19138439

  11. Arabidopsis OST1 protein kinase mediates the regulation of stomatal aperture by abscisic acid and acts upstream of reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Mustilli, Anna-Chiara; Merlot, Sylvain; Vavasseur, Alain; Fenzi, Francesca; Giraudat, Jérôme

    2002-12-01

    During drought, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) triggers stomatal closure, thus reducing water loss. Using infrared thermography, we isolated two allelic Arabidopsis mutants (ost1-1 and ost1-2) impaired in the ability to limit their transpiration upon drought. These recessive ost1 mutations disrupted ABA induction of stomatal closure as well as ABA inhibition of light-induced stomatal opening. By contrast, the ost1 mutations did not affect stomatal regulation by light or CO(2), suggesting that OST1 is involved specifically in ABA signaling. The OST1 gene was isolated by positional cloning and was found to be expressed in stomatal guard cells and vascular tissue. In-gel assays indicated that OST1 is an ABA-activated protein kinase related to the Vicia faba ABA-activated protein kinase (AAPK). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were shown recently to be an essential intermediate in guard cell ABA signaling. ABA-induced ROS production was disrupted in ost1 guard cells, whereas applied H(2)O(2) or calcium elicited the same degree of stomatal closure in ost1 as in the wild type. These results suggest that OST1 acts in the interval between ABA perception and ROS production. The relative positions of ost1 and the other ABA-insensitive mutations in the ABA signaling network (abi1-1, abi2-1, and gca2) are discussed. PMID:12468729

  12. Hyperpolization-activated Ca(2+) channels in guard cell plasma membrane are involved in extracellular ATP-promoted stomatal opening in Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Jia, Juanjuan; Wang, Yufang; Wang, Weixia; Chen, Yuling; Liu, Ting; Shang, Zhonglin

    2014-09-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) plays essential roles in plant growth, development, and stress tolerance. Extracellular ATP-regulated stomatal movement of Arabidopsis thaliana has been reported. Here, ATP was found to promote stomatal opening of Vicia faba in a dose-dependent manner. Three weakly hydrolysable ATP analogs (adenosine 5'-O-(3-thio) triphosphate (ATPγS), 3'-O-(4-benzoyl) benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate (Bz-ATP) and 2-methylthio-adenosine 5'-triphosphate (2meATP)) showed similar effects, indicating that ATP acts as a signal molecule rather than an energy charger. ADP promoted stomatal opening, while AMP and adenosine did not affect stomatal movement. An ATP-promoted stomatal opening was blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI), the reductant dithiothreitol (DTT) or the Ca(2+) channel blockers GdCl3 and LaCl3. A hyperpolarization-activated Ca(2+) channel was detected in plasma membrane of guard cell protoplast. Extracellular ATP and weakly hydrolyzable ATP analogs activated this Ca(2+) channel significantly. Extracellular ATP-promoted Ca(2+) channel activation was markedly inhibited by DPI or DTT. These results indicated that eATP may promote stomatal opening via reactive oxygen species that regulate guard cell plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels. PMID:25014259

  13. Role of Sucrose in Emerging Mechanisms of Stomatal Aperture Regulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Outlaw, W. H.

    2000-09-15

    Focused on the second of 2 hypotheses that were proposed for testing that transpiration rate determines the extent to which suc accumulates in the GC wall providing a mechanism for regulating stomatal aperture size.

  14. Investigating Polyploidy: Using Marigold Stomates and Fingernail Polish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Kimberly L.; Leone, Rebecca S.; Kohlhepp, Kimberly; Hunter, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a science activity on polyploidy targeting middle and high school students which can be used to discuss topics such as chromosomes, cells, plant growth, and functions of stomates. Integrates mathematics in data collection. (Contains 13 references.) (YDS)

  15. Observations on the Stomatal Control of NO2 Exchange.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesselmeier, J.; Chaparro-Suarez, I. G.; Meixner, F. X.

    2005-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides play a central role in tropospheric chemistry especially in the formation of tropospheric ozone, acid rain and hydroxyl radical as well as in CH4 and CO oxidation processes. NO2 can be assimilated and emitted by the plant leaves as well. We investigated the impact of the stomatal regulation with four tree species (Betula pendula, Fagus sylvatica, Quercus ilex und Pinus sylvestris) by exposure of leaves to the hormone abscisic acid inducing stomatal closure. The results showed that the NO2 uptake was strongly dependent on stomatal aperture. The uptake correlated linearly with stomatal (leaf) conductance in case of all four tree species investigated. In contrast an NO2 emission was observed with beech in the dark when stomata were basically closed.

  16. Diminished FoxP2 levels affect dopaminergic modulation of corticostriatal signaling important to song variability.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Malavika; Harward, Stephen; Scharff, Constance; Mooney, Richard

    2013-12-18

    Mutations of the FOXP2 gene impair speech and language development in humans and shRNA-mediated suppression of the avian ortholog FoxP2 disrupts song learning in juvenile zebra finches. How diminished FoxP2 levels affect vocal control and alter the function of neural circuits important to learned vocalizations remains unclear. Here we show that FoxP2 knockdown in the songbird striatum disrupts developmental and social modulation of song variability. Recordings in anesthetized birds show that FoxP2 knockdown interferes with D1R-dependent modulation of activity propagation in a corticostriatal pathway important to song variability, an effect that may be partly attributable to reduced D1R and DARPP-32 protein levels. Furthermore, recordings in singing birds reveal that FoxP2 knockdown prevents social modulation of singing-related activity in this pathway. These findings show that reduced FoxP2 levels interfere with the dopaminergic modulation of vocal variability, which may impede song and speech development by disrupting reinforcement learning mechanisms. PMID:24268418

  17. Low-level lasers affect Escherichia coli cultures in hyperosmotic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, C. C.; Barboza, L. L.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    Physical characteristics and practical properties have made lasers of interest for biomedical applications. Effects of low-level lasers on biological tissues could occur or be measurable depending on cell type, presence of a pathologic process or whether the cells are in an adverse environment. The objective of this work was to evaluate the survival, morphology and filamentation of E. coli cells proficient and deficient in the repair of oxidative DNA lesions exposed low-level red and infrared lasers submitted to hyperosmotic stress. Wild type and endonuclease VIII deficient E. coli cells in exponential and stationary growth phase were exposed to red and infrared lasers and submitted to hyperosmotic stress. Cell viability, filamentation phenotype and cell morphology were evaluated. Cell viability was not significantly altered but previous laser exposure induced filamentation and an altered area of stressed cells depending on physiologic condition and presence of the DNA repair. Results suggest that previous exposure to low-level red and infrared lasers could not affect viability but induced morphologic changes in cells submitted to hyperosmotic stress depending on physiologic conditions and repair of oxidative DNA lesions.

  18. Utilizing systems biology to unravel stomatal function and the hierarchies underpinning its control.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, David B; Daloso, Danilo M; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nikoloski, Zoran; Araújo, Wagner L

    2015-08-01

    Stomata control the concomitant exchange of CO2 and transpiration in land plants. While a constant supply of CO2 is need to maintain the rate of photosynthesis, the accompanying water losses must be tightly regulated to prevent dehydration and undesired metabolic changes. The factors affecting stomatal movement are directly coupled with the cellular networks of guard cells. Although the guard cell has been used as a model for characterization of signaling pathways, several important questions about its functioning remain elusive. Current modeling approaches describe the stomatal conductance in terms of relatively few easy-to-measure variables being unsuitable for in silico design of genetic manipulation strategies. Here, we argue that a system biology approach, combining modeling and high-throughput experiments, may be used to elucidate the mechanisms underlying stomata control and to determine targets for modulation of stomatal responses to environment. In support of our opinion, we review studies demonstrating how high-throughput approaches have provided a systems-view of guard cells. Finally, we emphasize the opportunities and challenges of genome-scale modeling and large-scale data integration for in silico manipulation of guard cell functions to improve crop yields, particularly under stress conditions which are of pertinence both to climate change and water use efficiency. PMID:25689387

  19. Effects of carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbonic anhydrase on stomatal conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakir, D.; Stimler, K.; Berry, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    The potential use of COS as tracer of the gross, one-way, CO2 flux into plants is based on its co-diffusion with CO2 into leaves without outflux stimulated research on COS-CO2 interactions during leaf gas exchange. We carried out gas exchange measurements of COS and CO2 in 22 plant species representing deciduous and evergreen trees, grasses, and shrubs, under a range of light intensities and ambient COS concentrations, using mid IR laser spectroscopy. A narrow range in the normalized ratio of the net uptake rates of COS (As) and CO2 (Ac; As/Ac*[CO2]/[COS]) was observed, with a mean value of 1.61±0.26. These results reflect the dominance of stomatal conductance over both COS and CO2 uptake, imposing a relatively constant ratio between the two fluxes (except under low light conditions when CO2, but not COS, metabolism is light limited). A relatively constant ratio under common ambient conditions will facilitate the application of COS as a tracer of gross photosynthesis from leaf to global scales. However, its effect on stomatal conductance may require a special attention. Increasing COS concentrations between 250 and 2800 pmol mol-1 (enveloping atmospheric levels) seems to stimulate stomatal conductance. We examined the stimulation of conductance by COS in a range of species and show that there is a large variation with some species showing almost no response while others are highly responsive (up to doubling stomatal conductance). Using C3 and C4 plants with antisense lines abolishing carbonic anhydrase activity, we show that the activity of this enzyme is essential for both the uptake of COS and the enhancement of stomatal conductance by COS. Since carbonic anhydrase catalyzes the conversion of COS to CO2 and H2S it seems likely that the stomata are responding to H2S produced in the mesophyll. In all natural species examined the uptake of COS and CO2 were highly correlated, and there was no relationship between the sensitivity of stomata and the rate of COS uptake

  20. An experimental survey of the factors that affect leaching from low-level radioactive waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, D.R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1988-09-01

    This report represents the results of an experimental survey of the factors that affect leaching from several types of solidified low-level radioactive waste forms. The goal of these investigations was to determine those factors that accelerate leaching without changing its mechanism(s). Typically, although not in every case,the accelerating factors include: increased temperature, increased waste loading (i.e., increased waste to binder ratio), and decreased size (i.e., decreased waste form volume to surface area ratio). Additional factors that were studied were: increased leachant volume to waste form surface area ratio, pH, leachant composition (groundwaters, natural and synthetic chelating agents), leachant flow rate or replacement frequency and waste form porosity and surface condition. Other potential factors, including the radiation environment and pressure, were omitted based on a survey of the literature. 82 refs., 236 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. [Reading poems to oneself affects emotional state and level of distraction].

    PubMed

    Morita, Haruka; Sugamura, Genji

    2014-12-01

    Bibliotherapy has occasionally been used as a counseling technique. However, most reports are basically single-case studies and the psychological effect of this approach remains unclear. Two experiments using 96 healthy college volunteers were conducted to determine how the reading of emotionally positive, negative, or neutral passages affect one's mood and level of distraction. Study 1 revealed that participants felt more relaxed after reading positive poems with either personal or social content than after reading negativie ones, and they felt least refreshed and calm after reading negative poems with personal content. Study 2 showed that participants reported less depressed feelings, both after reading an excerpt from an explanatory leaflet and after a controlled rest period. These results were discussed in terms of the mood congruence effect. Future research may evaluate the effects of reading novels, manga, and life teachings on self-narratives and views of life in normal and clinical populations. PMID:25639026

  2. FOUR LIPS and MYB88 conditionally restrict the G1/S transition during stomatal formation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, EunKyoung; Liu, Xuguang; Eglit, Yana; Sack, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Consistent with their valve-like function in shoot–atmosphere gas exchange, guard cells are smaller than other epidermal cells and usually harbour 2C DNA levels in diploid plants. The paralogous Arabidopsis R2R3 MYB transcription factors, FOUR LIPS and MYB88, ensure that stomata contain just two guard cells by restricting mitosis. The loss of both FLP and MYB88 function in flp myb88 double mutants induces repeated mitotic divisions that lead to the formation of clusters of stomata in direct contact. By contrast, CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASE B1 function is required for the symmetric division that precedes stomatal maturation. It was found that blocking mitosis by chemically disrupting microtubules or by the combined loss of FLP/MYB88 and CDKB1 function, causes single (undivided) guard cells (sGCs) to enlarge and attain mean DNA levels of up to 10C. The loss of both FLP and CDKB1 function also dramatically increased plastid number, led to the formation of multiple nuclei in GCs, altered GC and stomatal shape, and disrupted the fate of lineage-specific stem cells. Thus, in addition to respectively restricting and promoting symmetric divisions, FLP and CDKB1 together also conditionally restrict the G1/S transition and chloroplast and nuclear number, and normally maintain fate and developmental progression throughout the stomatal cell lineage. PMID:24123248

  3. Making pore choices: repeated regime shifts in stomatal ratio.

    PubMed

    Muir, Christopher D

    2015-08-22

    Ecologically important traits do not evolve without limits. Instead, evolution is constrained by the set of available and viable phenotypes. In particular, natural selection may only favour a narrow range of adaptive optima constrained within selective regimes. Here, I integrate data with theory to test whether selection explains phenotypic constraint. A global database of 599 plant species from 94 families shows that stomatal ratio, a trait affecting photosynthesis and defence against pathogens, is highly constrained. Most plants have their stomata on the lower leaf surface (hypostomy), but species with half their stomata on each surface (amphistomy) form a distinct mode in the trait distribution. A model based on a trade-off between maximizing photosynthesis and a fitness cost of upper stomata predicts a limited number of adaptive solutions, leading to a multimodal trait distribution. Phylogenetic comparisons show that amphistomy is the most common among fast-growing species, supporting the view that CO2 diffusion is under strong selection. These results indicate that selective optima stay within a relatively stable set of selective regimes over macroevolutionary time. PMID:26269502

  4. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV’s broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV’s neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a safe vector. Therefore, it is very important to understand the determinants of VSV tropism and develop strategies to alter it. VSV glycoprotein (G) and matrix (M) protein play major roles in its cell tropism. VSV G protein is responsible for VSV broad cell tropism and is often used for pseudotyping other viruses. VSV M affects cell tropism via evasion of antiviral responses, and M mutants can be used to limit cell tropism to cell types defective in interferon signaling. In addition, other VSV proteins and host proteins may function as determinants of VSV cell tropism. Various approaches have been successfully used to alter VSV tropism to benefit basic research and clinically relevant applications. PMID:23796410

  5. Telomere protein RAP1 levels are affected by cellular aging and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Mark J.; Baribault, Michelle E.; Israel, Joanna N.; Bae, Nancy S.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are important for maintaining the integrity of the genome through the action of the shelterin complex. Previous studies indicted that the length of the telomere did not have an effect on the amount of the shelterin subunits; however, those experiments were performed using immortalized cells with stable telomere lengths. The interest of the present study was to observe how decreasing telomere lengths over successive generations would affect the shelterin subunits. As neonatal human dermal fibroblasts aged and their telomeres became shorter, the levels of the telomere-binding protein telomeric repeat factor 2 (TRF2) decreased significantly. By contrast, the levels of one of its binding partners, repressor/activator protein 1 (RAP1), decreased to a lesser extent than would be expected from the decrease in TRF2. Other subunits, TERF1-interacting nuclear factor 2 and protection of telomeres protein 1, remained stable. The decrease in RAP1 in the older cells occurred in the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stress was used as an artificial means of aging in the cells, and this resulted in RAP1 levels decreasing, but the effect was only observed in the nuclear portion. Similar results were obtained using U251 glioblastoma cells treated with H2O2 or grown in serum-depleted medium. The present findings indicate that TRF2 and RAP1 levels decrease as fibroblasts naturally age. RAP1 remains more stable compared to TRF2. RAP1 also responds to oxidative stress, but the response is different to that observed in aging. PMID:27446538

  6. Differences in the response sensitivity of stomatal index to atmospheric CO2 among four genera of Cupressaceae conifers

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Matthew; Heath, James; McElwain, Jennifer C.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The inverse relationship between stomatal density (SD: number of stomata per mm2 leaf area) and atmospheric concentration of CO2 ([CO2]) permits the use of plants as proxies of palaeo-atmospheric CO2. Many stomatal reconstructions of palaeo-[CO2] are based upon multiple fossil species. However, it is unclear how plants respond to [CO2] across genus, family or ecotype in terms of SD or stomatal index (SI: ratio of stomata to epidermal cells). This study analysed the stomatal numbers of conifers from the ancient family Cupressaceae, in order to examine the nature of the SI–[CO2] relationship, and potential implications for stomatal reconstructions of palaeo-[CO2]. Methods Stomatal frequency measurements were taken from historical herbarium specimens of Athrotaxis cupressoides, Tetraclinis articulata and four Callitris species, and live A. cupressoides grown under CO2-enrichment (370, 470, 570 and 670 p.p.m. CO2). Key Results T. articulata, C. columnaris and C. rhomboidea displayed significant reductions in SI with rising [CO2]; by contrast, A. cupressoides, C. preissii and C. oblonga show no response in SI. However, A. cupressoides does reduce SI to increases in [CO2] above current ambient (approx. 380 p.p.m. CO2). This dataset suggests that a shared consistent SI–[CO2] relationship is not apparent across the genus Callitris. Conclusions The present findings suggest that it is not possible to generalize how conifer species respond to fluctuations in [CO2] based upon taxonomic relatedness or habitat. This apparent lack of a consistent response, in conjunction with high variability in SI, indicates that reconstructions of absolute palaeo-[CO2] based at the genus level, or upon multiple species for discrete intervals of time are not as reliable as those based on a single or multiple temporally overlapping species. PMID:20089556

  7. DNA topoisomerase III localizes to centromeres and affects centromeric CENP-A levels in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Prasad, Punit; Ekwall, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Centromeres are specialized chromatin regions marked by the presence of nucleosomes containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes is intimately linked to DNA topology, and DNA topoisomerases have previously been implicated in the dynamics of canonical H3 nucleosomes. Here we show that Schizosaccharomyces pombe Top3 and its partner Rqh1 are involved in controlling the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) at centromeres. Both top3 and rqh1 mutants display defects in chromosome segregation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarrays, we show that Top3, unlike Top1 and Top2, is highly enriched at centromeric central domains, demonstrating that Top3 is the major topoisomerase in this region. Moreover, centromeric Top3 occupancy positively correlates with CENP-A(Cnp1) occupancy. Intriguingly, both top3 and rqh1 mutants display increased relative enrichment of CENP-A(Cnp1) at centromeric central domains. Thus, Top3 and Rqh1 normally limit the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) in this region. This new role is independent of the established function of Top3 and Rqh1 in homologous recombination downstream of Rad51. Therefore, we hypothesize that the Top3-Rqh1 complex has an important role in controlling centromere DNA topology, which in turn affects the dynamics of CENP-A(Cnp1) nucleosomes. PMID:23516381

  8. DNA Topoisomerase III Localizes to Centromeres and Affects Centromeric CENP-A Levels in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Prasad, Punit; Ekwall, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Centromeres are specialized chromatin regions marked by the presence of nucleosomes containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes is intimately linked to DNA topology, and DNA topoisomerases have previously been implicated in the dynamics of canonical H3 nucleosomes. Here we show that Schizosaccharomyces pombe Top3 and its partner Rqh1 are involved in controlling the levels of CENP-ACnp1 at centromeres. Both top3 and rqh1 mutants display defects in chromosome segregation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarrays, we show that Top3, unlike Top1 and Top2, is highly enriched at centromeric central domains, demonstrating that Top3 is the major topoisomerase in this region. Moreover, centromeric Top3 occupancy positively correlates with CENP-ACnp1 occupancy. Intriguingly, both top3 and rqh1 mutants display increased relative enrichment of CENP-ACnp1 at centromeric central domains. Thus, Top3 and Rqh1 normally limit the levels of CENP-ACnp1 in this region. This new role is independent of the established function of Top3 and Rqh1 in homologous recombination downstream of Rad51. Therefore, we hypothesize that the Top3-Rqh1 complex has an important role in controlling centromere DNA topology, which in turn affects the dynamics of CENP-ACnp1 nucleosomes. PMID:23516381

  9. How the initial level of visibility and limited resource affect the evolution of cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dun; Li, Dandan; Sun, Mei

    2016-01-01

    This work sheds important light on how the initial level of visibility and limited resource might affect the evolution of the players’ strategies under different network structure. We perform the prisoner’s dilemma game in the lattice network and the scale-free network, the simulation results indicate that the average density of death in lattice network decreases with the increases of the initial proportion of visibility. However, the contrary phenomenon is observed in the scale-free network. Further results reflect that the individuals’ payoff in lattice network is significantly larger than the one in the scale-free network. In the lattice network, the visibility individuals could earn much more than the invisibility one. However, the difference is not apparent in the scale-free network. We also find that a high Successful-Defection-Payoff (SDB) and a rich natural environment have relatively larger deleterious cooperation effects. A high SDB is beneficial to raising the level of visibility in the heterogeneous network, however, that has adverse visibility consequences in homogeneous network. Our result reveals that players are more likely to cooperate voluntarily under homogeneous network structure. PMID:27250335

  10. Aircraft noise exposure affects rat behavior, plasma norepinephrine levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe*

    PubMed Central

    Di, Guo-qing; Zhou, Bing; Li, Zheng-guang; Lin, Qi-li

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the physiological effects of airport noise exposure on organisms, in this study, we exposed Sprague-Dawley rats in soundproof chambers to previously recorded aircraft-related noise for 65 d. For comparison, we also used unexposed control rats. Noise was arranged according to aircraft flight schedules and was adjusted to its weighted equivalent continuous perceived noise levels (L WECPN) of 75 and 80 dB for the two experimental groups. We examined rat behaviors through an open field test and measured the concentrations of plasma norepinephrine (NE) by high performance liquid chromatography-fluorimetric detection (HPLC-FLD). We also examined the morphologies of neurons and synapses in the temporal lobe by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results showed that rats exposed to airport noise of 80 dB had significantly lower line crossing number (P<0.05) and significantly longer center area duration (P<0.05) than control animals. After 29 d of airport noise exposure, the concentration of plasma NE of exposed rats was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). We also determined that the neuron and synapsis of the temporal lobe of rats showed signs of damage after aircraft noise of 80 dB exposure for 65 d. In conclusion, exposing rats to long-term aircraft noise affects their behaviors, plasma NE levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe. PMID:22135145

  11. Lead level in seminal plasma may affect semen quality for men without occupational exposure to lead

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Infertility affects approximately 10–15% of reproductive-age couples. Poor semen quality contributes to about 25% of infertile cases. Resulting from the direct effect on testicular function or hormonal alterations, heavy metals exposure has been related to impaired semen quality. The objective of this study was to assess the level of lead in the seminal plasma in men without occupational exposure to lead, and to determine the relationship between semen quality and lead concentration in the semen. Methods This is a prospective and nonrandomized clinical study conducted in University infertility clinic and academic research laboratory. Three hundred and forty-one male partners of infertile couples undergoing infertility evaluation and management were recruited to the study. Semen samples collected for the analyses of semen quality were also used for the measurement of lead concentrations. Semen samples were evaluated according to the WHO standards. Results All subjects were married and from infertile couples without occupational exposure to lead. There is a significant inverse correlation between the lead concentration in seminal plasma and sperm count. A higher semen lead concentration was correlated with lower sperm count, but not with semen volume, sperm motility or sperm morphology as assessed by simple linear regression. Conclusions We found that semen lead concentration was significantly higher among the patients with lower sperm count. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that a high level of lead accumulation in semen may reduce the sperm count contributing to infertility of men without occupational exposure to lead. PMID:23137356

  12. Ethanol exposure affects gene expression in the embryonic organizer and reduces retinoic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Yelin, Ronit; Schyr, Racheli Ben-Haroush; Kot, Hadas; Zins, Sharon; Frumkin, Ayala; Pillemer, Graciela; Fainsod, Abraham

    2005-03-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is a set of developmental malformations caused by alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), the strongest manifestation of FASD, results in short stature, microcephally and facial dysmorphogenesis including microphthalmia. Using Xenopus embryos as a model developmental system, we show that ethanol exposure recapitulates many aspects of FAS, including a shortened rostro-caudal axis, microcephally and microphthalmia. Temporal analysis revealed that Xenopus embryos are most sensitive to ethanol exposure between late blastula and early/mid gastrula stages. This window of sensitivity overlaps with the formation and early function of the embryonic organizer, Spemann's organizer. Molecular analysis revealed that ethanol exposure of embryos induces changes in the domains and levels of organizer-specific gene expression, identifying Spemann's organizer as an early target of ethanol. Ethanol also induces a defect in convergent extension movements that delays gastrulation movements and may affect the overall length. We show that mechanistically, ethanol is antagonistic to retinol (Vitamin A) and retinal conversion to retinoic acid, and that the organizer is active in retinoic acid signaling during early gastrulation. The model suggests that FASD is induced in part by an ethanol-dependent reduction in retinoic acid levels that are necessary for the normal function of Spemann's organizer. PMID:15708568

  13. How the initial level of visibility and limited resource affect the evolution of cooperation.

    PubMed

    Han, Dun; Li, Dandan; Sun, Mei

    2016-01-01

    This work sheds important light on how the initial level of visibility and limited resource might affect the evolution of the players' strategies under different network structure. We perform the prisoner's dilemma game in the lattice network and the scale-free network, the simulation results indicate that the average density of death in lattice network decreases with the increases of the initial proportion of visibility. However, the contrary phenomenon is observed in the scale-free network. Further results reflect that the individuals' payoff in lattice network is significantly larger than the one in the scale-free network. In the lattice network, the visibility individuals could earn much more than the invisibility one. However, the difference is not apparent in the scale-free network. We also find that a high Successful-Defection-Payoff (SDB) and a rich natural environment have relatively larger deleterious cooperation effects. A high SDB is beneficial to raising the level of visibility in the heterogeneous network, however, that has adverse visibility consequences in homogeneous network. Our result reveals that players are more likely to cooperate voluntarily under homogeneous network structure. PMID:27250335

  14. Plant volatiles induced by herbivore egg deposition affect insects of different trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Fatouros, Nina E; Lucas-Barbosa, Dani; Weldegergis, Berhane T; Pashalidou, Foteini G; van Loon, Joop J A; Dicke, Marcel; Harvey, Jeffrey A; Gols, Rieta; Huigens, Martinus E

    2012-01-01

    Plants release volatiles induced by herbivore feeding that may affect the diversity and composition of plant-associated arthropod communities. However, the specificity and role of plant volatiles induced during the early phase of attack, i.e. egg deposition by herbivorous insects, and their consequences on insects of different trophic levels remain poorly explored. In olfactometer and wind tunnel set-ups, we investigated behavioural responses of a specialist cabbage butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and two of its parasitic wasps (Trichogramma brassicae and Cotesia glomerata) to volatiles of a wild crucifer (Brassica nigra) induced by oviposition of the specialist butterfly and an additional generalist moth (Mamestra brassicae). Gravid butterflies were repelled by volatiles from plants induced by cabbage white butterfly eggs, probably as a means of avoiding competition, whereas both parasitic wasp species were attracted. In contrast, volatiles from plants induced by eggs of the generalist moth did neither repel nor attract any of the tested community members. Analysis of the plant's volatile metabolomic profile by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the structure of the plant-egg interface by scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the plant responds differently to egg deposition by the two lepidopteran species. Our findings imply that prior to actual feeding damage, egg deposition can induce specific plant responses that significantly influence various members of higher trophic levels. PMID:22912893

  15. LRRK2 Affects Vesicle Trafficking, Neurotransmitter Extracellular Level and Membrane Receptor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Spissu, Ylenia; Sanna, Giovanna; Xiong, Yulan; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Galioto, Manuela; Rocchitta, Gaia; Biosa, Alice; Serra, Pier Andrea; Carri, Maria Teresa; Crosio, Claudia; Iaccarino, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene was found to play a role in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). LRRK2 encodes a large multi-domain protein that is expressed in different tissues. To date, the physiological and pathological functions of LRRK2 are not clearly defined. In this study we have explored the role of LRRK2 in controlling vesicle trafficking in different cellular or animal models and using various readouts. In neuronal cells, the presence of LRRK2G2019S pathological mutant determines increased extracellular dopamine levels either under basal conditions or upon nicotine stimulation. Moreover, mutant LRRK2 affects the levels of dopamine receptor D1 on the membrane surface in neuronal cells or animal models. Ultrastructural analysis of PC12-derived cells expressing mutant LRRK2G2019S shows an altered intracellular vesicle distribution. Taken together, our results point to the key role of LRRK2 to control vesicle trafficking in neuronal cells. PMID:24167564

  16. How the initial level of visibility and limited resource affect the evolution of cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dun; Li, Dandan; Sun, Mei

    2016-06-01

    This work sheds important light on how the initial level of visibility and limited resource might affect the evolution of the players’ strategies under different network structure. We perform the prisoner’s dilemma game in the lattice network and the scale-free network, the simulation results indicate that the average density of death in lattice network decreases with the increases of the initial proportion of visibility. However, the contrary phenomenon is observed in the scale-free network. Further results reflect that the individuals’ payoff in lattice network is significantly larger than the one in the scale-free network. In the lattice network, the visibility individuals could earn much more than the invisibility one. However, the difference is not apparent in the scale-free network. We also find that a high Successful-Defection-Payoff (SDB) and a rich natural environment have relatively larger deleterious cooperation effects. A high SDB is beneficial to raising the level of visibility in the heterogeneous network, however, that has adverse visibility consequences in homogeneous network. Our result reveals that players are more likely to cooperate voluntarily under homogeneous network structure.

  17. Aircraft noise exposure affects rat behavior, plasma norepinephrine levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Di, Guo-Qing; Zhou, Bing; Li, Zheng-Guang; Lin, Qi-Li

    2011-12-01

    In order to investigate the physiological effects of airport noise exposure on organisms, in this study, we exposed Sprague-Dawley rats in soundproof chambers to previously recorded aircraft-related noise for 65 d. For comparison, we also used unexposed control rats. Noise was arranged according to aircraft flight schedules and was adjusted to its weighted equivalent continuous perceived noise levels (L(WECPN)) of 75 and 80 dB for the two experimental groups. We examined rat behaviors through an open field test and measured the concentrations of plasma norepinephrine (NE) by high performance liquid chromatography-fluorimetric detection (HPLC-FLD). We also examined the morphologies of neurons and synapses in the temporal lobe by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results showed that rats exposed to airport noise of 80 dB had significantly lower line crossing number (P<0.05) and significantly longer center area duration (P<0.05) than control animals. After 29 d of airport noise exposure, the concentration of plasma NE of exposed rats was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). We also determined that the neuron and synapsis of the temporal lobe of rats showed signs of damage after aircraft noise of 80 dB exposure for 65 d. In conclusion, exposing rats to long-term aircraft noise affects their behaviors, plasma NE levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe. PMID:22135145

  18. Plant Volatiles Induced by Herbivore Egg Deposition Affect Insects of Different Trophic Levels

    PubMed Central

    Fatouros, Nina E.; Lucas-Barbosa, Dani; Weldegergis, Berhane T.; Pashalidou, Foteini G.; van Loon, Joop J. A.; Dicke, Marcel; Harvey, Jeffrey A.; Gols, Rieta; Huigens, Martinus E.

    2012-01-01

    Plants release volatiles induced by herbivore feeding that may affect the diversity and composition of plant-associated arthropod communities. However, the specificity and role of plant volatiles induced during the early phase of attack, i.e. egg deposition by herbivorous insects, and their consequences on insects of different trophic levels remain poorly explored. In olfactometer and wind tunnel set-ups, we investigated behavioural responses of a specialist cabbage butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and two of its parasitic wasps (Trichogramma brassicae and Cotesia glomerata) to volatiles of a wild crucifer (Brassica nigra) induced by oviposition of the specialist butterfly and an additional generalist moth (Mamestra brassicae). Gravid butterflies were repelled by volatiles from plants induced by cabbage white butterfly eggs, probably as a means of avoiding competition, whereas both parasitic wasp species were attracted. In contrast, volatiles from plants induced by eggs of the generalist moth did neither repel nor attract any of the tested community members. Analysis of the plant’s volatile metabolomic profile by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the structure of the plant-egg interface by scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the plant responds differently to egg deposition by the two lepidopteran species. Our findings imply that prior to actual feeding damage, egg deposition can induce specific plant responses that significantly influence various members of higher trophic levels. PMID:22912893

  19. Chronic exposure to hypergravity affects thyrotropin-releasing hormone levels in rat brainstem and cerebellum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, N. G.; Tang, F.; Corcoran, M. L.; Fox, R. A.; Man, S. Y.

    1998-01-01

    In studies to determine the neurochemical mechanisms underlying adaptation to altered gravity we have investigated changes in neuropeptide levels in brainstem, cerebellum, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex by radioimmunoassay. Fourteen days of hypergravity (hyperG) exposure resulted in significant increases in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) content of brainstem and cerebellum, but no changes in levels of other neuropeptides (beta-endorphin, cholecystokinin, met-enkephalin, somatostatin, and substance P) examined in these areas were found, nor were TRH levels significantly changed in any other brain regions investigated. The increase in TRH in brainstem and cerebellum was not seen in animals exposed only to the rotational component of centrifugation, suggesting that this increase was elicited by the alteration in the gravitational environment. The only other neuropeptide affected by chronic hyperG exposure was met-enkephalin, which was significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex. However, this alteration in met-enkephalin was found in both hyperG and rotation control animals and thus may be due to the rotational rather than the hyperG component of centrifugation. Thus it does not appear as if there is a generalized neuropeptide response to chronic hyperG following 2 weeks of exposure. Rather, there is an increase only of TRH and that occurs only in areas of the brain known to be heavily involved with vestibular inputs and motor control (both voluntary and autonomic). These results suggest that TRH may play a role in adaptation to altered gravity as it does in adaptation to altered vestibular input following labyrinthectomy, and in cerebellar and vestibular control of locomotion, as seen in studies of ataxia.

  20. Prenatal exposure to perfluorinated compounds affects thyroid hormone levels in newborn girls.

    PubMed

    Shah-Kulkarni, Surabhi; Kim, Byung-Mi; Hong, Yun-Chul; Kim, Hae Soon; Kwon, Eun Jin; Park, Hyesook; Kim, Young Ju; Ha, Eun-Hee

    2016-09-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are ubiquitous in the environment and have been detected in humans and wildlife. Exposure to PFCs has decreased in the United States recently, while exposure to PFCs continues in Asian countries, which represents a public health concern. Various mechanisms by which PFCs affect fetal growth have been proposed, such as activation of peroxisome proliferators, disruption of thyroid hormones and changes in lipid metabolism. However, the overall evidence for an association with thyroid hormones is not strong. Therefore, we examined the effect of various prenatal PFCs on cord blood thyroid hormones: triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels, and explored the endocrine disrupting effect of these PFCs on thyroid hormone levels in children according to gender. Two hundred and seventy-nine study participants were selected from among the enrolled participants in the Ewha Birth & Growth Retrospective Cohort, a retrospective birth cohort study conducted at Ewha Womans University Hospital, Seoul, Korea between 2006 and 2010. A generalized linear model was constructed to explore the association of PFCs and thyroid hormones. Further, an analysis stratified by gender was conducted. Our study shows that cord blood perfluoro n-pentanoic acid (PFPeA) was positively associated with cord blood T4 (p=0.01) level. Gender-specific analysis showed that prenatal PFCs: PFPeA and Perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS) exposure significantly increased T4 (p<0.01) and T3 (p=0.03), respectively, while perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) decreased TSH (p=0.04) concentration in newborn girls. Thus, prenatal PFC exposure may disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis. Thyroid hormones play a crucial role in fetal development and may have gender specific action. Hence, these results are of utmost importance in high-risk groups, such as pregnant women and children. PMID:27395336

  1. Chronic Exposure to Ambient Levels of Urban Particles Affects Mouse Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Mauad, Thais; Rivero, Dolores Helena Rodriguez Ferreira; de Oliveira, Regiani Carvalho; de Faria Coimbra Lichtenfels, Ana Julia; Guimarães, Eliane Tigre; de Andre, Paulo Afonso; Kasahara, David Itiro; de Siqueira Bueno, Heloisa Maria; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic exposure to air pollution has been associated with adverse effects on children's lung growth. Objectives: We analyzed the effects of chronic exposure to urban levels of particulate matter (PM) on selected phases of mouse lung development. Methods: The exposure occurred in two open-top chambers (filtered and nonfiltered) placed 20 m from a street with heavy traffic in São Paulo, 24 hours/day for 8 months. There was a significant reduction of the levels of PM2.5 inside the filtered chamber (filtered = 2.9 ± 3.0 μg/m3, nonfiltered = 16.8 ± 8.3 μg/m3; P = 0.001). At this exposure site, vehicular sources are the major components of PM2.5 (PM ≤ 2.5μm). Exposure of the parental generation in the two chambers occurred from the 10th to the 120th days of life. After mating and birth of offspring, a crossover of mothers and pups occurred within the chambers, resulting in four groups of pups: nonexposed, prenatal, postnatal, and pre+postnatal. Offspring were killed at the age of 15 (n = 42) and 90 (n = 35) days; lungs were analyzed by morphometry for surface to volume ratio (as an estimator of alveolization). Pressure–volume curves were performed in the older groups, using a 20-ml plethysmograph. Measurements and Main Results: Mice exposed to PM2.5 pre+postnatally presented a smaller surface to volume ratio when compared with nonexposed animals (P = 0.036). The pre+postnatal group presented reduced inspiratory and expiratory volumes at higher levels of transpulmonary pressure (P = 0.001). There were no differences among prenatal and postnatal exposure and nonexposed animals. Conclusions: Our data provide anatomical and functional support to the concept that chronic exposure to urban PM affects lung growth. PMID:18596224

  2. Gravitoinertial force background level affects adaptation to coriolis force perturbations of reaching movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; Dizio, P.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the combined effects on reaching movements of the transient, movement-dependent Coriolis forces and the static centrifugal forces generated in a rotating environment. Specifically, we assessed the effects of comparable Coriolis force perturbations in different static force backgrounds. Two groups of subjects made reaching movements toward a just-extinguished visual target before rotation began, during 10 rpm counterclockwise rotation, and after rotation ceased. One group was seated on the axis of rotation, the other 2.23 m away. The resultant of gravity and centrifugal force on the hand was 1.0 g for the on-center group during 10 rpm rotation, and 1.031 g for the off-center group because of the 0.25 g centrifugal force present. For both groups, rightward Coriolis forces, approximately 0.2 g peak, were generated during voluntary arm movements. The endpoints and paths of the initial per-rotation movements were deviated rightward for both groups by comparable amounts. Within 10 subsequent reaches, the on-center group regained baseline accuracy and straight-line paths; however, even after 40 movements the off-center group had not resumed baseline endpoint accuracy. Mirror-image aftereffects occurred when rotation stopped. These findings demonstrate that manual control is disrupted by transient Coriolis force perturbations and that adaptation can occur even in the absence of visual feedback. An increase, even a small one, in background force level above normal gravity does not affect the size of the reaching errors induced by Coriolis forces nor does it affect the rate of reacquiring straight reaching paths; however, it does hinder restoration of reaching accuracy.

  3. Prenatal and lactation nicotine exposure affects Sertoli cell and gonadotropin levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Paccola, C C; Miraglia, S M

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is largely consumed in the world as a component of cigarettes. It can cross the placenta and reach the milk of smoking mothers. This drug induces apoptosis, affects sex hormone secretion, and leads to male infertility. To investigate the exposure to nicotine during the whole intrauterine and lactation phases in Sertoli cells, pregnant rats received nicotine (2 mg/kg per day) through osmotic minipumps. Male offsprings (30, 60, and 90 days old) had blood collected for hormonal analysis (FSH and LH) and their testes submitted for histophatological study, analysis of the frequency of the stages of seminiferous epithelium cycle, immunolabeling of apoptotic epithelial cells (TUNEL and Fas/FasL), analysis of the function and structure of Sertoli cells (respectively using transferrin and vimentin immunolabeling), and analysis of Sertoli-germ cell junctional molecule (β-catenin immunolabeling). The exposure to nicotine increased the FSH and LH plasmatic levels in adult rats. Although nicotine had not changed the number of apoptotic cells, neither in Fas nor FasL expression, it provoked an intense sloughing of epithelial cells and also altered the frequency of some stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle. Transferrin and β-catenin expressions were not changed, but vimentin was significantly reduced in the early stages of the seminiferous cycle of the nicotine-exposed adult rats. Thus, we concluded that nicotine exposure during all gestational and lactation periods affects the structure of Sertoli cells by events causing intense germ cell sloughing observed in the tubular lumen and can compromise the fertility of the offspring. PMID:26556892

  4. A new stomatal paradigm for earth system models? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonan, G. B.; Williams, M. D.; Fisher, R. A.; Oleson, K. W.; Lombardozzi, D.

    2013-12-01

    The land component of climate, and now earth system, models has simulated stomatal conductance since the introduction in the mid-1980s of the so-called second generation models that explicitly represented plant canopies. These second generation models used the Jarvis-style stomatal conductance model, which empirically relates stomatal conductance to photosynthetically active radiation, temperature, vapor pressure deficit, CO2 concentration, and other factors. Subsequent models of stomatal conductance were developed from a more mechanistic understanding of stomatal physiology, particularly that stomata are regulated so as to maximize net CO2 assimilation (An) and minimize water loss during transpiration (E). This concept is embodied in the Ball-Berry stomatal conductance model, which relates stomatal conductance (gs) to net assimilation (An), scaled by the ratio of leaf surface relative humidity to leaf surface CO2 concentration, or the Leuning variant which replaces relative humidity with a vapor pressure deficit term. This coupled gs-An model has been widely used in climate and earth system models since the mid-1990s. An alternative approach models stomatal conductance by directly optimizing water use efficiency, defined as the ratio An/gs or An/E. Conceptual developments over the past several years have shown that the Ball-Berry style model can be derived from optimization theory. However, an explicit optimization model has not been tested in an earth system model. We compare the Ball-Berry model with an explicit optimization model, both implemented in a new plant canopy parameterization developed for the Community Land Model, the land component of the Community Earth System Model. The optimization model is from the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere (SPA) model, which integrates plant and soil hydraulics, carbon assimilation, and gas diffusion. The canopy parameterization is multi-layer and resolves profiles of radiation, temperature, vapor pressure, leaf water stress

  5. Overexpression of the Mg-chelatase H subunit in guard cells confers drought tolerance via promotion of stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, Tomo; Takahashi, Koji; Tomiyama, Masakazu; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2013-01-01

    The Mg-chelatase H subunit (CHLH) has been shown to mediate chlorophyll biosynthesis, as well as plastid-to-nucleus and abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated signaling. A recent study using a novel CHLH mutant, rtl1, indicated that CHLH specifically affects ABA-induced stomatal closure, but also that CHLH did not serve as an ABA receptor in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the molecular mechanism by which CHLH engages in ABA-mediated signaling in guard cells remains largely unknown. In the present study, we examined CHLH function in guard cells and explored whether CHLH expression might influence stomatal aperture. Incubation of rtl1 guard cell protoplasts with ABA induced expression of the ABA-responsive genes RAB18 and RD29B, as also observed in wild-type (WT) cells, indicating that CHLH did not affect the expression of ABA-responsive genes. Earlier, ABA was reported to inhibit blue light (BL)-mediated stomatal opening, at least in part through dephosphorylating/inhibiting guard cell H+-ATPase (which drives opening). Therefore, we immunohistochemically examined the phosphorylation status of guard cell H+-ATPase. Notably, ABA inhibition of BL-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase was impaired in rtl1 cells, suggesting that CHLH influences not only ABA-induced stomatal closure but also inhibition of BL-mediated stomatal opening by ABA. Next, we generated CHLH-GFP-overexpressing plants using CER6 promoter, which induces gene expression in the epidermis including guard cells. CHLH-transgenic plants exhibited a closed stomata phenotype even when brightly illuminated. Moreover, plant growth experiments conducted under water-deficient conditions showed that CHLH transgenic plants were more tolerant of drought than WT plants. In summary, we show that CHLH is involved in the regulation of stomatal aperture in response to ABA, but not in ABA-induced gene expression, and that manipulation of stomatal aperture via overexpression of CHLH in guard cells improves plant drought tolerance

  6. Guard cell SLAC1-type anion channels mediate flagellin-induced stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Guzel Deger, Aysin; Scherzer, Sönke; Nuhkat, Maris; Kedzierska, Justyna; Kollist, Hannes; Brosché, Mikael; Unyayar, Serpil; Boudsocq, Marie; Hedrich, Rainer; Roelfsema, M Rob G

    2015-10-01

    During infection plants recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), and this leads to stomatal closure. This study analyzes the molecular mechanisms underlying this MAMP response and its interrelation with ABA signaling. Stomata in intact Arabidopsis thaliana plants were stimulated with the bacterial MAMP flg22, or the stress hormone ABA, by using the noninvasive nanoinfusion technique. Intracellular double-barreled microelectrodes were applied to measure the activity of plasma membrane ion channels. Flg22 induced rapid stomatal closure and stimulated the SLAC1 and SLAH3 anion channels in guard cells. Loss of both channels resulted in cells that lacked flg22-induced anion channel activity and stomata that did not close in response to flg22 or ABA. Rapid flg22-dependent stomatal closure was impaired in plants that were flagellin receptor (FLS2)-deficient, as well as in the ost1-2 (Open Stomata 1) mutant, which lacks a key ABA-signaling protein kinase. By contrast, stomata of the ABA protein phosphatase mutant abi1-1 (ABscisic acid Insensitive 1) remained flg22-responsive. These data suggest that the initial steps in flg22 and ABA signaling are different, but that the pathways merge at the level of OST1 and lead to activation of SLAC1 and SLAH3 anion channels. PMID:25932909

  7. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) uptake by vegetation controlled by atmospheric concentrations and plant stomatal aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaparro-Suarez, I. G.; Meixner, F. X.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2011-10-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exchange between the atmosphere and five European tree species was investigated in the laboratory using a dynamic branch enclosure system (consisting of two cuvettes) and a highly specific NO2 analyzer. NO2 measurements were performed with a sensitive gas phase chemiluminescence NO detector combined with a NO2 specific (photolytic) converter, both from Eco-Physics (Switzerland). This highly specific detection system excluded bias from other nitrogen compounds. Investigations were performed at two light intensities (Photosynthetic Active Radiation, PAR, 450 and 900 μmol m-2 s-1) and NO2 concentrations between 0 and 5 ppb. Ambient parameters (air temperature and relative humidity) were held constant. The data showed dominant NO2 uptake by the respective tree species under all conditions. The results did not confirm the existence of a compensation point within a 95% confidence level, though we cannot completely exclude emission of NO2 under very low atmospheric concentrations. Induced stomatal stricture, or total closure, by changing light conditions, as well as by application of the plant hormone ABA (Abscisic Acid) caused a corresponding decrease of NO2 uptake. No loss of NO2 to plant surfaces was observed under stomatal closure and species dependent differences in uptake rates could be clearly related to stomatal behavior.

  8. Arabidopsis phot1 and phot2 phosphorylate BLUS1 kinase with different efficiencies in stomatal opening.

    PubMed

    Takemiya, Atsushi; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2016-03-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, phototropins (phot1 and phot2), light-activated receptor kinases, redundantly regulate various photoresponses such as phototropism, chloroplast photorelocation movement, stomatal opening, and leaf flattening. However, it is still unclear how phot1 and phot2 signals are integrated into a common target and regulate physiological responses. In the present study, we provide evidence that phot1 and phot2 phosphorylate BLUE LIGHT SIGNALING1 (BLUS1) kinase as a common substrate in stomatal opening. Biochemical analysis revealed that the recombinant phot2 protein directly phosphorylated BLUS1 in vitro in a blue light-dependent manner, as reported for phot1. BLUS1 phosphorylation was observed in both phot1 and phot2 mutants, and phot2 mutant exhibited higher phosphorylation of BLUS1 than did phot1 mutant. Transgenic plants expressing phot1-GFP (P1G) and phot2-GFP (P2G) at a similar level under the PHOT2 promoter demonstrated that P1G initiated higher phosphorylation of BLUS1 than P2G, suggesting that phot1 phosphorylates BLUS1 more efficiently. Similarly, P1G mediated a higher activation of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase and stomatal opening than P2G, indicating that the phosphorylation status of BLUS1 is a key determinant of physiological response. Together, these findings provide insights into the signal integration and different properties of phot1 and phot2 signaling. PMID:26780063

  9. Stomatal-scale modelling of the competition between ozone sinks at the air-leaf interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altimir, Nuria; Vesala, Timo; Aalto, Tuula; Bäck, Jaana; Hari, Pertti

    2008-07-01

    This paper analyses the existence and relative strength of ozone (O3) sinks at the leaf level, in particular the implications for the partition of the O3 flux amongst the several physically, chemically and physiologically differing inner and outer surfaces of a leaf. We used a single-stomatal scale theoretical model to simulate the O3 transfer into leaves and estimate the flux partition. The theoretical scenarios were compared with experimental values from shoot-scale measurements of O3 flux onto Scots pine. The conditions where external sinks would prevent the stomatal diffusion involved the existence of very strong sinks at the external surfaces but yielded unrealistically high flux values. Only the possibility of a strong sink localized in the antechamber and/or pore could be of significance. Results also showed that in most instances a significant proportion of the total flux was generated by the external surfaces. For scenarios that consider strong scavenging in the mesophyll and weaker removal in the exterior, the proportion was about 60-80% for small stomatal apertures (~0.5 μm), and 10-40% for larger apertures (~1.5 μm). In these cases, however big the proportion of total flux is due to the external surfaces, the existence of sinks at the external surfaces does not prevent the diffusion through open and unoccluded stomata.

  10. Simple relations for different stomatal control mechanisms link partially drying soil and transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Katrin; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Stomata can close to regulate plant water loss under unfavourable water availability. This closure can be triggered by hydraulic ('H') and/or chemical signals ('C', 'H+C'). By combining plant hydraulic relations with a model for stomatal conductance, including chemical signalling, our aim was to derive a simple relation that links soil water availability, expressed as the fraction of roots in dry soil, to transpiration. We used the detailed mechanistic soil-root water flow model R-SWMS to verify this relation. Virtual split root experiments were simulated, comparing horizontally and vertically split domains with varying fractions of roots in dry soil and comparing different strengths of stomatal regulation by chemical and hydraulic signals. Transpiration predicted by the relation was in good agreement with numerical simulations. Under certain conditions H+C control leads to isohydric plant behaviour, which means that stomata close to keep leaf water potential constant after reaching a certain level. C control on the other hand exerts anisohydric behaviour, meaning that stomata remain fully open during changes in leaf water potential. For C control the relation between transpiration reduction and fraction of roots in dry soil becomes independent of transpiration rate whereas H+C control results in stronger reduction for higher transpiration rates. Simple relations that link effective soil and leaf water potential can describe different stomatal control resulting in contrasting behaviour.

  11. LPS alters pattern of sickness behavior but does not affect glutathione level in aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Wrotek, Sylwia; Jędrzejewski, Tomasz; Nowakowska, Anna; Kozak, Wiesław

    2016-08-01

    Behavioral symptoms of sickness, such as fever and motor activity are a coordinated set of changes that develop during infection. The aim of study was to compare the sickness behaviour (SB) in healthy old and young rats treated with pyrogenic dose of endotoxin and to check their glutathione level. Before experimentation male Wistar rats were selected according to standard body mass, motor activity, and white blood cells count. Intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli was used to provoke SB. The level of liver glutathione, interleukin (IL) -6, deep body temperature (Tb) and motor activity were measured. Glutathione level in old and young rats did not differ significantly. In both young and old rats LPS administration provoked fever (the mean value of Tb was 38.06 ± 0.01 °C in old rats, and 38.19 ± 0.06 °C in young rats). LPS injection affected night-time activity in both groups (12 h averages were 1.56 ± 0.40 counts in old LPS-treated rats vs 2.74 ± 0.53 counts in not-treated old rats and 3.44 ± 0.60 counts for young LPS-treated vs 4.28 ± 0.57 counts for young not-treated rats). The injection of LPS provoked an elevation of plasma IL-6 concentration (from values below the lowest detectable standard in not-treated groups of animals to 6322.82 ± 537.00 pg/mL in old LPS-treated rats and 7415.62 ± 451.88 pg/mL in young LPS-treated rats). Based on these data, we conclude that good health of aged rats prevents decrease in the glutathione level. Old rats are still able to develop SB in response to pyrogenic dose of LPS, although its components have changed pattern compared to young animals. PMID:26829940

  12. Estimating stomatal conductance with thermal imagery.

    PubMed

    Leinonen, I; Grant, O M; Tagliavia, C P P; Chaves, M M; Jones, H G

    2006-08-01

    Most thermal methods for the study of drought responses in plant leaves are based on the calculation of 'stress indices'. This paper proposes and compares three main extensions of these for the direct estimation of absolute values of stomatal conductance to water vapour (gs) using infrared thermography (IRT). All methods use the measured leaf temperature and two environmental variables (air temperature and boundary layer resistance) as input. Additional variables required, depending on the method, are the temperatures of wet and dry reference surfaces, net radiation and relative humidity. The methods were compared using measured gs data from a vineyard in Southern Portugal. The errors in thermal estimates of conductance were of the same order as the measurement errors using a porometer. Observed variability was also compared with theoretical estimates of errors in estimated gs determined on the basis of the errors in the input variables (leaf temperature, boundary layer resistance, net radiation) and the partial derivatives of the energy balance equations used for the gs calculations. The full energy balance approach requires accurate estimates of net radiation absorbed, which may not be readily available in field conditions, so alternatives using reference surfaces are shown to have advantages. A new approach using a dry reference leaf is particularly robust and recommended for those studies where the specific advantages of thermal imagery, including its non-contact nature and its ability to sample large numbers of leaves, are most apparent. Although the results suggest that estimates of the absolute magnitude of gs are somewhat subjective, depending on the skill of the experimenter at selecting evenly exposed leaves, relative treatment differences in conductance are sensitively detected by different experimenters. PMID:16898014

  13. Reduction in DNA topoisomerase I level affects growth, phenotype and nucleoid architecture of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wareed; Menon, Shruti; Karthik, Pullela V; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-02-01

    The steady-state negative supercoiling of eubacterial genomes is maintained by the action of DNA topoisomerases. Topoisomerase distribution varies in different species of mycobacteria. While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) contains a single type I (TopoI) and a single type II (Gyrase) enzyme, Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) and other members harbour additional relaxases. TopoI is essential for Mtb survival. However, the necessity of TopoI or other relaxases in Msm has not been investigated. To recognize the importance of TopoI for growth, physiology and gene expression of Msm, we have developed a conditional knock-down strain of TopoI in Msm. The TopoI-depleted strain exhibited extremely slow growth and drastic changes in phenotypic characteristics. The cessation of growth indicates the essential requirement of the enzyme for the organism in spite of having additional DNA relaxation enzymes in the cell. Notably, the imbalance in TopoI level led to the altered expression of topology modulatory proteins, resulting in a diffused nucleoid architecture. Proteomic and transcript analysis of the mutant indicated reduced expression of the genes involved in central metabolic pathways and core DNA transaction processes. RNA polymerase (RNAP) distribution on the transcription units was affected in the TopoI-depleted cells, suggesting global alteration in transcription. The study thus highlights the essential requirement of TopoI in the maintenance of cellular phenotype, growth characteristics and gene expression in mycobacteria. A decrease in TopoI level led to altered RNAP occupancy and impaired transcription elongation, causing severe downstream effects. PMID:25516959

  14. Changes in serum calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium levels in captive ruminants affected by diet manipulation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michele; Weber, Martha; Valdes, Eduardo V; Neiffer, Donald; Fontenot, Diedre; Fleming, Gregory; Stetter, Mark

    2010-09-01

    A combination of low serum calcium (Ca), high serum phosphorus (P), and low serum magnesium (Mg) has been observed in individual captive ruminants, primarily affecting kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros), eland (Taurotragus oryx), nyala (Tragelaphus angasii), bongo (Tragelaphus eurycerus), and giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis). These mineral abnormalities have been associated with chronic laminitis, acute tetany, seizures, and death. Underlying rumen disease secondary to feeding highly fermentable carbohydrates was suspected to be contributing to the mineral deficiencies, and diet changes that decreased the amount of starch fed were implemented in 2003. Serum chemistry values from before and after the diet change were compared. The most notable improvement after the diet change was a decrease in mean serum P. Statistically significant decreases in mean serum P were observed for the kudu (102.1-66.4 ppm), eland (73.3-58.4 ppm), and bongo (92.1-64.2 ppm; P < 0.05). Although not statistically significant, mean serum P levels also decreased for nyala (99.3-86.8 ppm) and giraffe (82.6-68.7 ppm). Significant increases in mean serum Mg were also observed for kudu (15.9-17.9 ppm) and eland (17.1-19.7 ppm). A trend toward increased serum Mg was also observed in nyala, bongo, and giraffe after the diet change. No significant changes in mean serum Ca were observed in any of the five species evaluated, and Ca was within normal ranges for domestic ruminants. The mean Ca:P ratio increased to greater than one in every species after the diet change, with kudu, eland, and bongo showing a statistically significant change. The results of this study indicate that the diet change had a generally positive effect on serum P and Mg levels. PMID:20945636

  15. HIV-protease inhibitors block the replication of both vesicular stomatitis and influenza viruses at an early post-entry replication step

    SciTech Connect

    Federico, Maurizio

    2011-08-15

    The inhibitors of HIV-1 protease (PIs) have been designed to block the activity of the viral aspartyl-protease. However, it is now accepted that this family of inhibitors can also affect the activity of cell proteases. Since the replication of many virus species requires the activity of host cell proteases, investigating the effects of PIs on the life cycle of viruses other than HIV would be of interest. Here, the potent inhibition induced by saquinavir and nelfinavir on the replication of both vesicular stomatitis and influenza viruses is described. These are unrelated enveloped RNA viruses infecting target cells upon endocytosis and intracellular fusion. The PI-induced inhibition was apparently a consequence of a block at the level of the fusion between viral envelope and endosomal membranes. These findings would open the way towards the therapeutic use of PIs against enveloped RNA viruses other than HIV.

  16. Attention to local and global levels of hierarchical Navon figures affects rapid scene categorization.

    PubMed

    Brand, John; Johnson, Aaron P

    2014-01-01

    In four experiments, we investigated how attention to local and global levels of hierarchical Navon figures affected the selection of diagnostic spatial scale information used in scene categorization. We explored this issue by asking observers to classify hybrid images (i.e., images that contain low spatial frequency (LSF) content of one image, and high spatial frequency (HSF) content from a second image) immediately following global and local Navon tasks. Hybrid images can be classified according to either their LSF, or HSF content; thus, making them ideal for investigating diagnostic spatial scale preference. Although observers were sensitive to both spatial scales (Experiment 1), they overwhelmingly preferred to classify hybrids based on LSF content (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, we demonstrated that LSF based hybrid categorization was faster following global Navon tasks, suggesting that LSF processing associated with global Navon tasks primed the selection of LSFs in hybrid images. In Experiment 4, replicating Experiment 3 but suppressing the LSF information in Navon letters by contrast balancing the stimuli examined this hypothesis. Similar to Experiment 3, observers preferred to classify hybrids based on LSF content; however and in contrast, LSF based hybrid categorization was slower following global than local Navon tasks. PMID:25520675

  17. Using photovoice to examine community level barriers affecting maternal health in rural Wakiso district, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Musoke, David; Ekirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth; Ndejjo, Rawlance; George, Asha

    2015-05-01

    Uganda continues to have poor maternal health indicators including a high maternal mortality ratio. This paper explores community level barriers affecting maternal health in rural Wakiso district, Uganda. Using photovoice, a community-based participatory research approach, over a five-month period, ten young community members aged 18-29 years took photographs and analysed them, developing an understanding of the emerging issues and engaging in community dialogue on them. From the study, known health systems problems including inadequate transport, long distance to health facilities, long waiting times at facilities and poor quality of care were confirmed, but other aspects that needed to be addressed were also established. These included key gender-related determinants of maternal health, such as domestic violence, low contraceptive use and early teenage pregnancy, as well as problems of unclean water, poor sanitation and women's lack of income. Community members appreciated learning about the research findings precisely hence designing and implementing appropriate solutions to the problems identified because they could see photographs from their own local area. Photovoice's strength is in generating evidence by community members in ways that articulate their perspectives, support local action and allow direct communication with stakeholders. PMID:26278841

  18. Neuroleptics Affect Neuropeptide S and NPSR mRNA Levels in the Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Pałasz, Artur; Rojczyk, Ewa

    2015-11-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) has a multidirectional regulatory activity, especially when considered as a potent endogenous anxiolytic factor. Accumulating data suggests that neuroleptics affect peptidergic signaling in various brain structures. However, there is no information regarding the influence of treatment with antipsychotics on brain NPS expression. In the current study, we assessed the NPS and NPS receptor (NPSR) mRNA levels in the brains of rats shortly and chronically treated with chlorpromazine and olanzapine using quantitative real-time PCR. Both single-dose and long-term (4 months) olanzapine treatment led to the upregulation of NPS expression in the rat hypothalamus. It supports the hypothesis that NPS is involved in the dopamine-dependent anxiolytic actions of selected neuroleptics and possibly also in the pathophysiology of mental disorders. On the other hand, NPSR expression decreased after single-dose and chronic chlorpromazine administration in the hypothalamus, as well as after chronic olanzapine and chlorpromazine administration in the striatum and hippocampus. These results cast a new light on the pharmacology of antipsychotics and contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for their action. Furthermore, our findings underline the complex nature of potential interactions between dopamine receptors and brain peptidergic pathways, which has potential clinical applications. PMID:26227793

  19. CO2-induced decrease of canopy stomatal conductance of mature conifer and broadleaved trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tor-ngern, P.; Oren, R.; Ward, E. J.; Palmroth, S.; McCarthy, H. R.; domec, J.

    2013-12-01

    Together with canopy leaf area, mean canopy stomatal conductance (GS) controls forest-atmosphere exchanges of energy and mass. Expectations for stomatal response to elevated atmospheric [CO2] (CO2E) based on seedling studies range from large decreases of conductance in foliage of broadleaved species to little or no response in conifers. These responses are not directly translatable to forest canopies, and their underlying mechanisms are ill-defined. The uncertainty of canopy-scale stomatal response to CO2E reduces confidence in modeled predictions of future forest productivity and carbon sequestration, and of partitioning of net radiation between latent and sensible heat flux. Thus, debates on the potential effects of CO2E-induced stomatal closure continue. We used a Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment in a 27-year-old, 25 m tall forest, to generate a whole-canopy CO2-response and test whether canopy-scale GS response to CO2E of widely distributed, fast growing shade-intolerant species, Pinus taeda (L.) and co-occurring broadleaved species dominated by Liquidambar styraciflua (L.), was indirectly affected by slow changes such as hydraulic adjustments and canopy development, as opposed to quickly responding to CO2 concentrations in the leaf-internal air space. Our results show indirect CO2E-induced reductions of GS of 10% and 30%, respectively, and no signs of a direct stomatal response even as CO2E was pushed to 685 μmol mol-1 (~1.8 of ambient). Modeling the effect of CO2E on the water, energy and carbon cycles of forests must consider slow-response indirect mechanisms producing large variation in the reduction of GS, such as the previously observed inconsistent CO2E effect on canopy leaf area and plant hydraulics. Moreover, the new generation of CO2E studies in forests must allow indirect effects caused by, e.g., hydraulic adjustments and canopy development, to play out. Such acclimation will be particularly prolonged in slowly developing ecosystems, such

  20. Exposure to Palladium Nanoparticles Affects Serum Levels of Cytokines in Female Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Corbi, Maddalena; Leso, Veruscka; Marinaccio, Alessandro; Leopold, Kerstin; Schindl, Roland; Sgambato, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background Information currently available on the impact of palladium on the immune system mainly derives from studies assessing the biological effects of palladium salts. However, in the last years, there has been a notable increase in occupational and environmental levels of fine and ultrafine palladium particles released from automobile catalytic converters, which may play a role in palladium sensitization. In this context, the evaluation of the possible effects exerted by palladium nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) on the immune system is essential to comprehensively assess palladium immunotoxic potential. Aim Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Pd-NPs on the immune system of female Wistar rats exposed to this xenobiotic for 14 days, by assessing possible quantitative changes in a number of cytokines: IL-1α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, GM-CSF, INF-γ and TNF-α. Methods Twenty rats were randomly divided into four exposure groups and one of control. Animals were given a single tail vein injection of vehicle (control group) and different concentrations of Pd-NPs (0.012, 0.12, 1.2 and 12 μg/kg). A multiplex biometric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to evaluate cytokine serum levels. Results The mean serum concentrations of all cytokines decreased after the administration of 0.012 μg/kg of Pd-NPs, whereas exceeded the control levels at higher exposure doses. The highest concentration of Pd-NPs (12 μg/kg) induced a significant increase of IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, GM-CSF and INF-γ compared to controls. Discussion and Conclusions These results demonstrated that Pd-NP exposure can affect the immune response of rats inducing a stimulatory action that becomes significant at the highest administered dose. Our findings did not show an imbalance between cytokines produced by CD4+ T helper (Th) cells 1 and 2, thus suggesting a generalized stimulation of the immune system with a simultaneous activation and polarization of the

  1. The levels and composition of persistent organic pollutants in alluvial agriculture soils affected by flooding.

    PubMed

    Maliszewska-Kordybach, Barbara; Smreczak, Bozena; Klimkowicz-Pawlas, Agnieszka

    2013-12-01

    The concentrations and composition of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were determined in alluvial soils subjected to heavy flooding in a rural region of Poland. Soil samples (n = 30) were collected from the upper soil layer from a 70-km(2) area. Chemical determinations included basic physicochemical properties and the contents of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, 16 compounds). The median concentrations of Σ7PCB (PCB28 + PCB52 + PCB101 + PCB118 + PCB138 + PCB153 + PCB180), Σ3HCH (α-HCH + β-HCH + γ-HCH) and Σ3pp'(DDT + DDE + DDD) were 1.60 ± 1.03, 0.22 ± 0.13 and 25.18 ± 82.70 μg kg(-1), respectively. The median concentrations of the most abundant PAHs, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene were 50 ± 37, 38 ± 27, 29 ± 30, 45 ± 36 and 24 ± 22 μg kg(-1), respectively. Compared with elsewhere in the world, the overall level of contamination with POPs was low and similar to the levels in agricultural soils from neighbouring countries, except for benzo[a]pyrene and DDT. There was no evidence that flooding affected the levels of POPs in the studied soils. The patterns observed for PAHs and PCBs indicate that atmospheric deposition is the most important long-term source of these contaminants. DDTs were the dominant organochlorine pesticides (up to 99%), and the contribution of the parent pp' isomer was up to 50 % of the ΣDDT, which indicates the advantage of aged contamination. A high pp'DDE/pp'DDD ratio suggests the prevalence of aerobic transformations of parent DDT. Dominance of the γ isomer in the HCHs implies historical use of lindane in the area. The effect of soil properties on the POP concentrations was rather weak, although statistically significant links with the content of the <0.02-mm fraction, Ctotal or Ntotal were observed for some individual compounds in the PCB group. PMID:23877573

  2. Protein Phosphorylation and Redox Modification in Stomatal Guard Cells.

    PubMed

    Balmant, Kelly M; Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modification (PTM) is recognized as a major process accounting for protein structural variation, functional diversity, and the dynamics and complexity of the proteome. Since PTMs can change the structure and function of proteins, they are essential to coordinate signaling networks and to regulate important physiological processes in eukaryotes. Plants are constantly challenged by both biotic and abiotic stresses that reduce productivity, causing economic losses in crops. The plant responses involve complex physiological, cellular, and molecular processes, with stomatal movement as one of the earliest responses. In order to activate such a rapid response, stomatal guard cells employ cellular PTMs of key protein players in the signaling pathways to regulate the opening and closure of the stomatal pores. Here we discuss two major types of PTMs, protein phosphorylation and redox modification that play essential roles in stomatal movement under stress conditions. We present an overview of PTMs that occur in stomatal guard cells, especially the methods and technologies, and their applications in PTM identification and quantification. Our focus is on PTMs that modify molecular components in guard cell signaling at the stages of signal perception, second messenger production, as well as downstream signaling events and output. Improved understanding of guard cell signaling will enable generation of crops with enhanced stress tolerance, and increased yield and bioenergy through biotechnology and molecular breeding. PMID:26903877

  3. Protein Phosphorylation and Redox Modification in Stomatal Guard Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balmant, Kelly M.; Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modification (PTM) is recognized as a major process accounting for protein structural variation, functional diversity, and the dynamics and complexity of the proteome. Since PTMs can change the structure and function of proteins, they are essential to coordinate signaling networks and to regulate important physiological processes in eukaryotes. Plants are constantly challenged by both biotic and abiotic stresses that reduce productivity, causing economic losses in crops. The plant responses involve complex physiological, cellular, and molecular processes, with stomatal movement as one of the earliest responses. In order to activate such a rapid response, stomatal guard cells employ cellular PTMs of key protein players in the signaling pathways to regulate the opening and closure of the stomatal pores. Here we discuss two major types of PTMs, protein phosphorylation and redox modification that play essential roles in stomatal movement under stress conditions. We present an overview of PTMs that occur in stomatal guard cells, especially the methods and technologies, and their applications in PTM identification and quantification. Our focus is on PTMs that modify molecular components in guard cell signaling at the stages of signal perception, second messenger production, as well as downstream signaling events and output. Improved understanding of guard cell signaling will enable generation of crops with enhanced stress tolerance, and increased yield and bioenergy through biotechnology and molecular breeding. PMID:26903877

  4. PtrABF of Poncirus trifoliata functions in dehydration tolerance by reducing stomatal density and maintaining reactive oxygen species homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinghua; Wang, Min; Hu, Jianbing; Wang, Wei; Fu, Xingzheng; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE)-binding factors (ABFs) play important roles in abiotic stress responses; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, it is reported that overexpression of Poncirus trifoliata PtrABF significantly enhanced dehydration tolerance. The transgenic lines displayed smaller stomatal apertures, reduced stomatal density/index, and lower expression levels of genes associated with stomatal development. PtrABF was found to interact with PtrICE1, a homologue of ICE1 (Inducer of CBF Expression 1) that has been shown to be critical for stomatal development. Microarray analysis revealed that a total of 70 genes were differentially expressed in the transgenic line, 42 induced and 28 repressed. At least two units of ABREs and coupling elements were present in the promoters of most of the induced genes, among which peroxidase and arginine decarboxylase were verified as bona fide targets of PtrABF. Transgenic plants exhibited higher antioxidant enzyme activities and free polyamine levels, but lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde. Polyamines were revealed to be associated with ROS scavenging in the transgenic plants due to a modulation of antioxidant enzymes triggered by signalling mediated by H2O2 derived from polyamine oxidase (PAO)-mediated catabolism. Taken together, the results indicate that PtrABF functions positively in dehydration tolerance by limiting water loss through its influence on stomatal movement or formation and maintaining ROS homeostasis via modulation of antioxidant enzymes and polyamines through transcriptional regulation of relevant target genes. PMID:26116025

  5. PtrABF of Poncirus trifoliata functions in dehydration tolerance by reducing stomatal density and maintaining reactive oxygen species homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; Wang, Min; Hu, Jianbing; Wang, Wei; Fu, Xingzheng; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE)-binding factors (ABFs) play important roles in abiotic stress responses; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, it is reported that overexpression of Poncirus trifoliata PtrABF significantly enhanced dehydration tolerance. The transgenic lines displayed smaller stomatal apertures, reduced stomatal density/index, and lower expression levels of genes associated with stomatal development. PtrABF was found to interact with PtrICE1, a homologue of ICE1 (Inducer of CBF Expression 1) that has been shown to be critical for stomatal development. Microarray analysis revealed that a total of 70 genes were differentially expressed in the transgenic line, 42 induced and 28 repressed. At least two units of ABREs and coupling elements were present in the promoters of most of the induced genes, among which peroxidase and arginine decarboxylase were verified as bona fide targets of PtrABF. Transgenic plants exhibited higher antioxidant enzyme activities and free polyamine levels, but lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde. Polyamines were revealed to be associated with ROS scavenging in the transgenic plants due to a modulation of antioxidant enzymes triggered by signalling mediated by H2O2 derived from polyamine oxidase (PAO)-mediated catabolism. Taken together, the results indicate that PtrABF functions positively in dehydration tolerance by limiting water loss through its influence on stomatal movement or formation and maintaining ROS homeostasis via modulation of antioxidant enzymes and polyamines through transcriptional regulation of relevant target genes. PMID:26116025

  6. Population dynamics of dechlorinators and factors affecting the level and products of PCB dechlorination in sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Sokol, R.C.; Liu, X.; Bethoney, C.M.; Rhee, G.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Microbial dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) often stops although a significant number of removable chlorines remain. To determine the reason for the cessation, we investigated the limitation of organic carbon, PCB bioavailability, and inhibition by metabolic products. Enrichment with carbon sources did not induce additional chlorination, indicating the plateau was not due to depletion of organic carbon. The bioavailability was not limiting, since a subcritical micelle concentration of the surfactant, which enhanced desorption without inhibiting dechlorinating microorganisms, failed to lower the plateau. Neither was it due to accumulation of metabolites, since no additional dechlorination was detected when plateau sediments were incubated with fresh medium. Similarly, dechlorination was not inhibited in freshly spiked sediment slurries. Dechlorination ended up at the same level with nearly identical congener profiles, regardless of treatment. These results indicate that cessation of dechlorination was due to the accumulation of daughter congeners, which cannot be used as electron acceptors by microbes. To determine whether the decreasing availability affected the microorganisms, we determined the population dynamics of dechlorinators using the most probable number technique. The growth dynamics of the dechlorinators mirrored the time course of dechlorination. It started when the population increased by two orders of magnitude. Once dechlorination stopped the dechlorinating population also began to decrease. When dechlorinators were inoculated into PCB-free sediments, the population decreased over time. The decrease of the population as dechlorination ceased confirms that the diminishing availability of congeners was the reason for the incomplete dechlorination. Recent findings have shown that a second phase of dechlorination of certain congeners can occur after a long lag. 45 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Low doses of estradiol partly inhibit release of GH in sheep without affecting basal levels.

    PubMed

    Hudmon, A; Davenport, G; Coleman, E S; Sartin, J L

    2009-10-01

    Estradiol increases basal growth hormone (GH) concentrations in sheep and cattle. This study sought to determine the effects of estradiol on GH-releasing hormone (GRH)-stimulated GH release in sheep. Growth hormone secretory characteristics, the GH response to GRH, and steady-state GH mRNA concentrations were determined in castrated male lambs treated with 2 different doses of estradiol 17-beta for a 28-d experimental period. Although no differences between treatments in mean GH, basal GH, or GH pulse number were observed after 28 d of estradiol treatment, GH pulse amplitude was greater (P < 0.05) in the 2.00-cm implant-treated animals than in the control and 0.75-cm implant group. The effect of estradiol treatment on GRH-stimulated GH release revealed differences between the control and estradiol-treated animals (P < 0.05). The 15-min GH responses to 0.075 microg/kg hGRH in the control, 0.75-cm, and 2.00-cm implant groups, respectively, were 76 +/- 10, 22.6 +/- 2.1, and 43.6 +/- 15.0 ng/mL. Growth hormone mRNA content was determined for pituitary glands from the different treatment groups, and no differences in steady-state GH mRNA levels were observed. There were no differences in the mean plasma concentrations of IGF-I, cortisol, T(3), or T(4) from weekly samples. Growth hormone release from cultured ovine pituitary cells from control sheep was not affected by estradiol after 72 h or in a subsequent 3-h incubation with estradiol combined with GRH. These data suggest that estradiol has differing actions on basal and GRH-stimulated GH concentrations in plasma, but the increase in pulse amplitude does not represent an increased pituitary sensitivity to GRH. PMID:19616401

  8. Role of the intergenic dinucleotide in vesicular stomatitis virus RNA transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, J N; Whelan, S P; Wertz, G W

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the role played by the intergenic dinucleotide sequence of the conserved vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) gene junction in modulation of polymerase activity, we analyzed the RNA synthesis activities of bicistrionic genomic analogs that contained either the authentic N/P gene junction or gene junctions that had been altered to contain either the 16 possible dinucleotide combinations, single nucleotide intergenic sequences, or no intergenic sequence at all. Quantitative measurements of the amounts of upstream, downstream, and readthrough mRNAs that were transcribed by these mutant templates showed that the behavior of the viral polymerase was profoundly affected by the nucleotide sequence that it encountered as it traversed the gene junction, although the polymerase was able to accommodate a remarkable degree of sequence variation without altogether losing the ability to terminate and reinitiate transcription. Alteration or removal of the intergenic sequence such that the U tract responsible for synthesis of the upstream mRNA poly(A) tail was effectively positioned adjacent to the consensus downstream gene start signal resulted in almost complete abrogation of downstream mRNA synthesis, thus defining the intergenic sequence as an essential sequence element of the gene junction. Many genome analogs with altered intergenic sequences directed abundant synthesis of a readthrough transcript without correspondingly high levels of downstream mRNA, an observation inconsistent with the shunting model of VSV transcription, which suggests that polymerase molecules are prepositioned at gene junctions, awaiting a push from upstream. Instead, the findings of this study support a model of sequential transcription in which initiation of downstream mRNA can occur only following termination of the preceding transcript. PMID:9032308

  9. Genomes of the Parapoxviruses Orf Virus and Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Delhon, G.; Tulman, E. R.; Afonso, C. L.; Lu, Z.; de la Concha-Bermejillo, A.; Lehmkuhl, H. D.; Piccone, M. E.; Kutish, G. F.; Rock, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and orf virus (ORFV), members of the genus Parapoxvirus of the Poxviridae, are etiologic agents of worldwide diseases affecting cattle and small ruminants, respectively. Here we report the genomic sequences and comparative analysis of BPSV strain BV-AR02 and ORFV strains OV-SA00, isolated from a goat, and OV-IA82, isolated from a sheep. Parapoxvirus (PPV) BV-AR02, OV-SA00, and OV-IA82 genomes range in size from 134 to 139 kbp, with an average nucleotide composition of 64% G+C. BPSV and ORFV genomes contain 131 and 130 putative genes, respectively, and share colinearity over 127 genes, 88 of which are conserved in all characterized chordopoxviruses. BPSV and ORFV contain 15 and 16 open reading frames (ORFs), respectively, which lack similarity to other poxvirus or cellular proteins. All genes with putative roles in pathogenesis, including a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-like gene, are present in both viruses; however, BPSV contains two extra ankyrin repeat genes absent in ORFV. Interspecies sequence variability is observed in all functional classes of genes but is highest in putative virulence/host range genes, including genes unique to PPV. At the amino acid level, OV-SA00 is 94% identical to OV-IA82 and 71% identical to BV-AR02. Notably, ORFV 006/132, 103, 109, 110, and 116 genes (VEGF, homologues of vaccinia virus A26L, A33R, and A34R, and a novel PPV ORF) show an unusual degree of intraspecies variability. These genomic differences are consistent with the classification of BPSV and ORFV as two PPV species. Compared to other mammalian chordopoxviruses, PPV shares unique genomic features with molluscum contagiosum virus, including a G+C-rich nucleotide composition, three orthologous genes, and a paucity of nucleotide metabolism genes. Together, these data provide a comparative view of PPV genomics. PMID:14671098

  10. Contribution of PsbS Function and Stomatal Conductance to Foliar Temperature in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kulasek, Milena; Bernacki, Maciej Jerzy; Ciszak, Kamil; Witoń, Damian; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Natural capacity has evolved in higher plants to absorb and harness excessive light energy. In basic models, the majority of absorbed photon energy is radiated back as fluorescence and heat. For years the proton sensor protein PsbS was considered to play a critical role in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of light absorbed by PSII antennae and in its dissipation as heat. However, the significance of PsbS in regulating heat emission from a whole leaf has never been verified before by direct measurement of foliar temperature under changing light intensity. To test its validity, we here investigated the foliar temperature changes on increasing and decreasing light intensity conditions (foliar temperature dynamics) using a high resolution thermal camera and a powerful adjustable light-emitting diode (LED) light source. First, we showed that light-dependent foliar temperature dynamics is correlated with Chl content in leaves of various plant species. Secondly, we compared the foliar temperature dynamics in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type, the PsbS null mutant npq4-1 and a PsbS-overexpressing transgenic line under different transpiration conditions with or without a photosynthesis inhibitor. We found no direct correlations between the NPQ level and the foliar temperature dynamics. Rather, differences in foliar temperature dynamics are primarily affected by stomatal aperture, and rapid foliar temperature increase during irradiation depends on the water status of the leaf. We conclude that PsbS is not directly involved in regulation of foliar temperature dynamics during excessive light energy episodes. PMID:27273581

  11. The Development and Application of Affective Assessment in an Upper-Level Cell Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchen, Elizabeth; Reeve, Suzanne; Bell, John D.; Sudweeks, Richard R.; Bradshaw, William S.

    2007-01-01

    This study exemplifies how faculty members can develop instruments to assess affective responses of students to the specific features of the courses they teach. Means for assessing three types of affective responses are demonstrated: (a) student attitudes towards courses with differing instructional objectives and methodologies, (b) student…

  12. Treatment of radiation- and chemotherapy-induced stomatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Carnel, S.B.; Blakeslee, D.B.; Oswald, S.G.; Barnes, M. )

    1990-04-01

    Severe stomatitis is a common problem encountered during either radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Most therapeutic regimens are empirical, with no scientific basis. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of various topical solutions in the treatment of radiation- or chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. Eighteen patients were entered into a prospective double-blinded study to test several topical solutions: (1) viscous lidocaine with 1% cocaine; (2) dyclonine hydrochloride 1.0% (Dyclone); (3) kaolin-pectin solution, diphenhydramine plus saline (KBS); and (4) a placebo solution. Degree of pain relief, duration of relief, side effects, and palatability were evaluated. The results showed that Dyclone provided the most pain relief. Dyclone and viscous lidocaine with 1% cocaine provided the longest pain relief, which averaged 50 minutes This study provides objective data and defines useful guidelines for treatment of stomatitis.

  13. Remote sensing of vegetation canopy photosynthetic and stomatal conductance efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myneni, R. B.; Ganapol, B. D.; Asrar, G.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of remote sensing the canopy photosynthetic and stomatal conductance efficiencies is investigated with the aid of one- and three-dimensional radiative transfer methods coupled to a semi-empirical mechanistic model of leaf photosynthesis and stomatal conductance. Desertlike vegetation is modeled as clumps of leaves randomly distributed on a bright dry soil with partial ground cover. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), canopy photosynthetic (Ep), and stomatal efficiencies (Es) are calculated for various geometrical, optical, and illumination conditions. The contribution of various radiative fluxes to estimates of Ep is evaluated and the magnitude of errors in bulk canopy formulation of problem parameters are quantified. The nature and sensitivity of the relationship between Ep and Es to NDVI is investigated, and an algorithm is proposed for use in operational remote sensing.

  14. The role of brassinosteroids and abscisic acid in stomatal development.

    PubMed

    Serna, Laura

    2014-08-01

    Gas exchange with the atmosphere is regulated through the stomata. This process relies on both the degree and duration of stomatal opening, and the number and patterning of these structures in the plant surface. Recent work has revealed that brassinosteroids and abscisic acid (ABA), which control stomatal opening, also repress stomatal development in cotyledons and leaves of at least some plants. It is speculated that, in Arabidopsis, these phytohormones control the same steps of this developmental process, most probably, through the regulation of the same mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase module. The conservation, in seeds plants, of components downstream of this module with MAP kinase target domains, suggests that these proteins are also regulated by these cascades, which, in turn, may be regulated by brassinosteroids and/or ABA. PMID:25017164

  15. Root hydraulic conductivity and adjustments in stomatal conductance: hydraulic strategy in response to salt stress in a halotolerant species.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Victoria; Bellati, Jorge; Soto, Gabriela; Ayub, Nicolás D; Amodeo, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances at the molecular level are introducing a new scenario that needs to be integrated into the analysis of plant hydraulic properties. Although it is not yet clear to what extent this scenario alters the current proposal for the hydraulic circuit models, it introduces new insights when studying plants that are able to easily overcome water restrictions. In this context, our aim was to explore water adjustments in a halotolerant model (Beta vulgaris) by studying the coordination between the root in terms of root hydraulic conductivity (Lpr) and the shoot as reflected in the stomatal conductance (gs). The root water pathways were also analysed in terms of root suberization (apoplastic barrier) and aquaporin transcript levels (cell-to-cell pathway). Beta vulgaris showed the ability to rapidly lose (4 h) and gain (24 h) turgor when submitted to salt stress (200 mM). The reduction profile observed in Lpr and gs was consistent with a coupled process. The tuning of the root water flow involved small variations in the studied aquaporin's transcripts before anatomical modifications occurred. Exploring Lpr enhancement after halting the stress contributed to show not only a different profile in restoring Lpr but also the capacity to uncouple Lpr from gs. Beta vulgaris root plays a key role and can anticipate water loss before the aerial water status is affected. PMID:26602985

  16. Root hydraulic conductivity and adjustments in stomatal conductance: hydraulic strategy in response to salt stress in a halotolerant species

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Victoria; Bellati, Jorge; Soto, Gabriela; Ayub, Nicolás D.; Amodeo, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances at the molecular level are introducing a new scenario that needs to be integrated into the analysis of plant hydraulic properties. Although it is not yet clear to what extent this scenario alters the current proposal for the hydraulic circuit models, it introduces new insights when studying plants that are able to easily overcome water restrictions. In this context, our aim was to explore water adjustments in a halotolerant model (Beta vulgaris) by studying the coordination between the root in terms of root hydraulic conductivity (Lpr) and the shoot as reflected in the stomatal conductance (gs). The root water pathways were also analysed in terms of root suberization (apoplastic barrier) and aquaporin transcript levels (cell-to-cell pathway). Beta vulgaris showed the ability to rapidly lose (4 h) and gain (24 h) turgor when submitted to salt stress (200 mM). The reduction profile observed in Lpr and gs was consistent with a coupled process. The tuning of the root water flow involved small variations in the studied aquaporin's transcripts before anatomical modifications occurred. Exploring Lpr enhancement after halting the stress contributed to show not only a different profile in restoring Lpr but also the capacity to uncouple Lpr from gs. Beta vulgaris root plays a key role and can anticipate water loss before the aerial water status is affected. PMID:26602985

  17. Transcriptional control of cell fate in the stomatal lineage.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Abigail R; Bergmann, Dominique C

    2016-02-01

    The Arabidopsis stomatal lineage is a microcosm of development; it undergoes selection of precursor cells, asymmetric and stem cell-like divisions, cell commitment and finally, acquisition of terminal cell fates. Recent transcriptomic approaches revealed major shifts in gene expression accompanying each fate transition, and mechanistic analysis of key bHLH transcription factors, along with mathematical modeling, has begun to unravel how these major shifts are coordinated. In addition, stomatal initiation is proving to be a tractable model for defining the genetic and epigenetic basis of stable cell identities and for understanding the integration of environmental responses into developmental programs. PMID:26550955

  18. Optimal Stomatal Behaviour Around the World: Synthesis of a Global Stomatal Conductance Database and Scaling from Leaf to Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. S.; Medlyn, B. E.; Duursma, R.; Prentice, I. C.; Wang, H.

    2014-12-01

    Stomatal conductance (gs) is a key land surface attribute as it links transpiration, the dominant component of global land evapotranspiration and a key element of the global water cycle, and photosynthesis, the driving force of the global carbon cycle. Despite the pivotal role of gs in predictions of global water and carbon cycles, a global scale database and an associated globally applicable model of gs that allow predictions of stomatal behaviour are lacking. We present a unique database of globally distributed gs obtained in the field for a wide range of plant functional types (PFTs) and biomes. We employed a model of optimal stomatal conductance to assess differences in stomatal behaviour, and estimated the model slope coefficient, g1, which is directly related to the marginal carbon cost of water, for each dataset. We found that g1 varies considerably among PFTs, with evergreen savanna trees having the largest g1 (least conservative water use), followed by C3 grasses and crops, angiosperm trees, gymnosperm trees, and C4 grasses. Amongst angiosperm trees, species with higher wood density had a higher marginal carbon cost of water, as predicted by the theory underpinning the optimal stomatal model. There was an interactive effect between temperature and moisture availability on g1: for wet environments, g1 was largest in high temperature environments, indicated by high mean annual temperature during the period when temperature above 0oC (Tm), but it did not vary with Tm across dry environments. We examine whether these differences in leaf-scale behaviour are reflected in ecosystem-scale differences in water-use efficiency. These findings provide a robust theoretical framework for understanding and predicting the behaviour of stomatal conductance across biomes and across PFTs that can be applied to regional, continental and global-scale modelling of productivity and ecohydrological processes in a future changing climate.

  19. Salivary oxidant/ antioxidant status and hematological parameters in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Babaee, Neda; Hosseinkazemi, Hamed; Pouramir, Mahdi; Khakbaz Baboli, Oveis; Salehi, Maede; Khadir, Fatemeh; Bijani, Ali; Mehryari, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common inflammatory ulcerative condition of oral cavity. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of the salivary Malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and blood parameter in RAS versus healthy controls. Methods: This case-control study consisted of 28 patients with RAS and 28 age and sex -matched control without RAS. Cell blood count was assessed by sysmex system, serum iron and total iron binding capacity was measured by standard laboratory kit and for ferritin ELISA kit was utilized. Salivary TAC and MDA level determined using FRAP and TBARS method respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS Version 21, chi-square test was used to compare proportions, and student’s t-test and Mann Whitney U-test were used for the comparison of quantitative variables Results: Salivary MDA level was significantly higher (p<0.001) and TAC level was significantly lower (p<0.042) in RAS as compared with the control group. Also, serum ferritin level was significantly higher in RAS patients (p<0.008). Conclusion: These findings indicate the alteration of oxidant/antioxidant status was observed in recurrent aphthous stomatitis, may be also associated with changing several hematinic parameters in this study. The finding maybe helpful to clarify the etiologies of RAS and possibely to improve the management or preventive options. PMID:26958327

  20. Adverse childhood experiences associate to reduced glutamate levels in the hippocampus of patients affected by mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Sara; Locatelli, Clara; Falini, Andrea; Colombo, Cristina; Benedetti, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) can possibly permanently alter the stress response system, affect the glutamatergic system and influence hippocampal volume in mood disorders. The aim of the study is to investigate the association between glutamate levels in the hippocampus, measured through single proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), and ACE in patients affected by mood disorders and healthy controls. Higher levels of early stress associate to reduced levels of Glx/Cr in the hippocampus in depressed patients but not in healthy controls. Exposure to stress during early life could lead to a hypofunctionality of the glutamatergic system in the hippocampus of depressed patients. Abnormalities of glutamatergic signaling could then possibly underpin the structural and functional abnormalities observed in patients affected by mood disorders. PMID:27449360

  1. Differences in affective behaviors and hippocampal allopregnanolone levels in adult rats of lines selectively bred for infantile vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Zimmerberg, Betty; Brunelli, Susan A; Fluty, Alyssa J; Frye, Cheryl A

    2005-04-30

    Allopregnanolone, 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 alpha-pregnan-20-one (3 alpha,5 alpha-THP), a progesterone metabolite, is an endogenous neurosteroid mediating affective behaviors via its positive modulation of GABA(A) receptors. In order to better understand the role of this neurosteroid in individual differences in affective behavior, we used an animal model based on selective breeding for an infantile affective trait, ultrasonic vocalizations (USV). Adult male and female (in either proestrus or diestrus) rats that had been bred for low (low line) or high (high line) rates of USV after maternal separation were tested in a series of affective behavioral tests: open field, emergence, social interaction, defensive freezing, and the Porsolt forced swim task. Concentrations of allopregnanolone in combined hippocampus and amygdala tissue were then measured. low line subjects showed significantly lower anxiety and depression responses in the emergence, open field, and Porsolt forced swim tasks than did high line subjects. Proestrus females exhibited less affective behaviors than diestrus females or males. Allopregnanolone levels in hippocampus/amygdala were significantly higher in low line subjects compared to high line subjects, and in proestrus females compared to diestrus females and males. These data indicate that: (1) affective behaviors in lines selectively bred for an infantile anxiety trait exhibit selection persistence into adulthood; and (2) levels of allopregnanolone in the limbic system parallel selected disparities in affective behavior, suggesting a selection for alterations in the neurosteroid/GABA(A) receptor system in these lines. PMID:15817193

  2. Low carbon dioxide concentrations can reverse stomatal closure during water stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf water potentials below threshold values result in reduced stomatal conductance. Stomatal closure at low leaf water potentials may serve to protect against cavitation of xylem. Possible control of stomatal conductance by leaf water potential or hydraulic conductance was tested by drying the root...

  3. Jasmonate-mediated stomatal closure under elevated CO2 revealed by time-resolved metabolomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar stomatal movements are critical for regulating plant water status and gas exchange. Elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are known to induce stomatal closure. However, current knowledge on CO2 signal transduction in stomatal guard cells is limited. Here we report the metabolomic respo...

  4. Assimilation of Cloud- and Land-affected TOVS/ATOVS Level 1b data at DAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Frank, Donald; daSilva, Arlindo; Bosilovich, Mike; Radacovich, Jon; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Despite significant advances in the assimilation of TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder/Advanced TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS)/(ATOVS) data over the last decade, there are still many unresolved issues. For example, at several centers, cloud-and land-affected TOVS data are not assimilated. In this study, we show positive impact from the use of cloud cleared and land-affected TOVS data in the NASA Data Assimilation Office's (DAO) Finite Volume Data Assimilation System (fv-DAS). We will discuss how treatment of TOVS data affects the stratosphere and tropopause in the fvDAS. We will also describe the use of TOVS data for land-surface analysis and assimilation and other developments regarding the use of TOVS data at the DAO.

  5. Extreme heterogeneity in populations of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Steinhauer, D A; de la Torre, J C; Meier, E; Holland, J J

    1989-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) sequence evolution and population heterogeneity were examined by T1 oligonucleotide mapping. Individual clones isolated from clonal pools of wild-type Indiana serotype VSV displayed identical T1 maps. This was observed even after one passage at high concentrations of the potent viral mutagen 5-fluorouracil. Under low-multiplicity passage conditions, the consensus T1 fingerprint of this virus remained unchanged after 523 passages. Interestingly, however, individual clones from this population (passage 523) differed significantly from each other and from consensus sequence. When virus population equilibria were disrupted by high-multiplicity passage (in which defective interfering particle interference is maximized) or passage in the presence of mutagenic levels of 5-fluorouracil, rapid consensus sequence evolution occurred and extreme population heterogeneity was observed (with some members of these population differing from others at hundreds of genome positions). A limited sampling of clones at one stage during high-multiplicity passages suggested the presence of at least several distinct master sequences, the related subpopulations of which exhibit at least transient competitive fitness within the total virus population (M. Eigen and C.K. Biebricher, p. 211-245, in E. Domingo, J.J. Holland, P. Ahlquist, ed., RNA Genetics, vol. 3, 1988). These studies further demonstrate the important role of selective pressure in determining the genetic composition of RNA virus populations. This is true under equilibrium conditions in which little consensus sequence evolution is observed owing to stabilizing selection as well as under conditions in which selective pressure is driving rapid RNA virus genome evolution. Images PMID:2539503

  6. INFECTIVITY AND PERSISTENCE OF VESICULAR STOMATITIS VIRUS IN CULICOIDES CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis, was recently shown to be a biologically competent vector for the arbovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). While arboviruses can be extremely pathogenic to mammalian cells, they typically do not exert deleterious effects on their insect vectors. Infectio...

  7. Design Calibration and Field Use of a Stomatal Diffusion Porometer

    PubMed Central

    Kanemasu, E. T.; Thurtell, G. W.; Tanner, C. B.

    1969-01-01

    Modifications of the design and calibration procedure of a diffusion porometer permit determinations of stomatal resistance which agree well with results obtained by leaf energy balance. The energy balance and the diffusion porometer measurements indicate that the boundary layer resistances of leaves in the field are substantially less than those predicted from heat transport formulas based on wind flow and leaf size. PMID:16657142

  8. WATER STRESS REDUCES OZONE INJURY VIA A STOMATAL MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various studies have shown that water-stressed plants are more tolerant of ozone exposures than are unstressed plants. Two probable explanations for this tolerance are (a) stomatal closure which reduces ozone uptake and (b) biochemical or anatomical changes within the leaves. Pha...

  9. Detecting the Differences in Responses of Stomatal Conductance to Moisture Stresses between Deciduous Shrubs and Artemisia Subshrubs

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiong; Yu, Mei; Zhou, Chan

    2013-01-01

    Shrubs and subshrubs can tolerate wider ranges of moisture stresses in both soil and air than other plant life forms, and thus represent greater nonlinearity and uncertainty in ecosystem physiology. The objectives of this paper are to model shrub/subshrub stomatal conductance by synthesizing the field leaf gas exchanges data of 24 species in China, in order to detect the differences between deciduous shrubs and Artemisia subshrubs in their responses of stomatal conductance to changes in the moisture stresses. We revised a model of stomatal conductance by incorporating the tradeoff between xylem hydraulic efficiency and cavitation loss risk. We then fit the model at the three hierarchical levels: global (pooling all data as a single group), three functional groups (deciduous non-legume shrubs, deciduous legume shrubs, and subshrubs in Artemisia genus), and individual observations (species × sites). Bayesian inference with Markov Chain Monte Carlo method was applied to obtain the model parameters at the three levels. We found that the model at the level of functional groups is a significant improvement over that at the global level, indicating the significant differences in the stomatal behavior among the three functional groups. The differences in tolerance and sensitivities to changes in moisture stresses are the most evident between the shrubs and the subshrubs: The two shrub groups can tolerate much higher soil water stress than the subshrubs. The analysis at the observation level is also a significant improvement over that at the functional group level, indicating great variations within each group. Our analysis offered a clue for the equivocal issue of shrub encroachment into grasslands: While the invasion by the shrubs may be irreversible, the dominance of subshrubs, due to their lower resistance and tolerance to moisture stresses, may be put down by appropriate grassland management. PMID:24386351

  10. Canopy Stomatal Conductance Following Drought, Disturbance, and Death in an Upland Oak/Pine Forest of the New Jersey Pine Barrens, USA

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Karina Vera Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Stomatal conductance controls carbon and water fluxes in forest ecosystems. Therefore, its accurate characterization in land-surface flux models is necessary. Sap-flux scaled canopy conductance was used to evaluate the effect of drought, disturbance, and mortality of three oak species (Quercus prinus, Q. velutina, and Q. coccinea) in an upland oak/pine stand in the New Jersey Pine Barrens from 2005 to 2008. Canopy conductance (GC) was analyzed by performing boundary line analysis and selecting for the highest value under a given light condition. Regressing GC with the driving force vapor pressure deficit (VPD) resulted in reference canopy conductance at 1 kPa VPD (GCref). Predictably, drought in 2006 caused GCref to decline. Q. prinus GCref was least affected, followed by Q. coccinea, with Q. velutina having the highest reductions in GCref. A defoliation event in 2007 caused GCref to increase due to reduced leaf area and a possible increase in water availability. In Q. prinus, GCref quadrupled, while doubling in Q. velutina, and increasing by 50% in Q. coccinea. Tree mortality in 2008 led to higher GCref in the remaining Q. prinus but not in Q. velutina or Q. coccinea. Comparing light response curves of canopy conductance (GCref) and stomatal conductance (gS) derived from gas-exchange measurements showed marked differences in behavior. Canopy GCref failed to saturate under ambient light conditions whereas leaf-level gS saturated at 1,200 μmol m−2 s−1. The results presented here emphasize the differential responses of leaf and canopy-level conductance to saturating light conditions and the effects of various disturbances (drought, defoliation, and mortality) on the carbon and water balance of an oak-dominated forest. PMID:22639580

  11. Canopy stomatal conductance following drought, disturbance, and death in an upland oak/pine forest of the new jersey pine barrens, USA.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Karina Vera Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Stomatal conductance controls carbon and water fluxes in forest ecosystems. Therefore, its accurate characterization in land-surface flux models is necessary. Sap-flux scaled canopy conductance was used to evaluate the effect of drought, disturbance, and mortality of three oak species (Quercus prinus, Q. velutina, and Q. coccinea) in an upland oak/pine stand in the New Jersey Pine Barrens from 2005 to 2008. Canopy conductance (G(C)) was analyzed by performing boundary line analysis and selecting for the highest value under a given light condition. Regressing G(C) with the driving force vapor pressure deficit (VPD) resulted in reference canopy conductance at 1 kPa VPD (G(Cref)). Predictably, drought in 2006 caused G(Cref) to decline. Q. prinusG(Cref) was least affected, followed by Q. coccinea, with Q. velutina having the highest reductions in G(Cref). A defoliation event in 2007 caused G(Cref) to increase due to reduced leaf area and a possible increase in water availability. In Q. prinus, G(Cref) quadrupled, while doubling in Q. velutina, and increasing by 50% in Q. coccinea. Tree mortality in 2008 led to higher G(Cref) in the remaining Q. prinus but not in Q. velutina or Q. coccinea. Comparing light response curves of canopy conductance (G(Cref)) and stomatal conductance (g(S)) derived from gas-exchange measurements showed marked differences in behavior. Canopy G(Cref) failed to saturate under ambient light conditions whereas leaf-level g(S) saturated at 1,200 μmol m(-2) s(-1). The results presented here emphasize the differential responses of leaf and canopy-level conductance to saturating light conditions and the effects of various disturbances (drought, defoliation, and mortality) on the carbon and water balance of an oak-dominated forest. PMID:22639580

  12. Imbalanced Hemolymph Lipid Levels Affect Feeding Motivation in the Two-Spotted Cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus

    PubMed Central

    Konuma, Takahiro; Tsukamoto, Yusuke; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Nagata, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Insect feeding behavior is regulated by many intrinsic factors, including hemolymph nutrient levels. Adipokinetic hormone (AKH) is a peptide factor that modulates hemolymph nutrient levels and regulates the nutritional state of insects by triggering the transfer of lipids into the hemolymph. We recently demonstrated that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of the AKH receptor (AKHR) reduces hemolymph lipid levels, causing an increase in the feeding frequency of the two-spotted cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. This result indicated that reduced hemolymph lipid levels might motivate crickets to feed. In the present study, to elucidate whether hemolymph lipid levels contribute to insect feeding behavior, we attempted to manipulate hemolymph lipid levels via the lipophorin (Lp)-mediated lipid transferring system in G. bimaculatus. Of the constituent proteins in Lp, we focused on apolipophorin-III (GrybiApoLp-III) because of its possible role in facilitating lipid mobilization. First, we used RNAi to reduce the expression of GrybiApoLp-III. RNAi-mediated knockdown of GrybiApoLp-III had little effect on basal hemolymph lipid levels and the amount of food intake. In addition, hemolymph lipid levels remained static even after injecting AKH into GrybiApoLp-IIIRNAi crickets. These observations indicated that ApoLp-III does not maintain basal hemolymph lipid levels in crickets fed ad libitum, but is necessary for mobilizing lipid transfer into the hemolymph following AKH stimulation. Second, Lp (containing lipids) was injected into the hemolymph to induce a temporary increase in hemolymph lipid levels. Consequently, the initiation of feeding was delayed in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that increased hemolymph lipid levels reduced the motivation to feed. Taken together, these data validate the importance of basal hemolymph lipid levels in the control of energy homeostasis and for regulating feeding behavior in crickets. PMID:27144650

  13. Imbalanced Hemolymph Lipid Levels Affect Feeding Motivation in the Two-Spotted Cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Konuma, Takahiro; Tsukamoto, Yusuke; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Nagata, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Insect feeding behavior is regulated by many intrinsic factors, including hemolymph nutrient levels. Adipokinetic hormone (AKH) is a peptide factor that modulates hemolymph nutrient levels and regulates the nutritional state of insects by triggering the transfer of lipids into the hemolymph. We recently demonstrated that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of the AKH receptor (AKHR) reduces hemolymph lipid levels, causing an increase in the feeding frequency of the two-spotted cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. This result indicated that reduced hemolymph lipid levels might motivate crickets to feed. In the present study, to elucidate whether hemolymph lipid levels contribute to insect feeding behavior, we attempted to manipulate hemolymph lipid levels via the lipophorin (Lp)-mediated lipid transferring system in G. bimaculatus. Of the constituent proteins in Lp, we focused on apolipophorin-III (GrybiApoLp-III) because of its possible role in facilitating lipid mobilization. First, we used RNAi to reduce the expression of GrybiApoLp-III. RNAi-mediated knockdown of GrybiApoLp-III had little effect on basal hemolymph lipid levels and the amount of food intake. In addition, hemolymph lipid levels remained static even after injecting AKH into GrybiApoLp-IIIRNAi crickets. These observations indicated that ApoLp-III does not maintain basal hemolymph lipid levels in crickets fed ad libitum, but is necessary for mobilizing lipid transfer into the hemolymph following AKH stimulation. Second, Lp (containing lipids) was injected into the hemolymph to induce a temporary increase in hemolymph lipid levels. Consequently, the initiation of feeding was delayed in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that increased hemolymph lipid levels reduced the motivation to feed. Taken together, these data validate the importance of basal hemolymph lipid levels in the control of energy homeostasis and for regulating feeding behavior in crickets. PMID:27144650

  14. Student Cognitive and Affective Development in the Context of Classroom-Level Curriculum Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawer, Saad Fathy; Gilmore, Deanna; Banks-Joseph, Susan Rae

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the impact of teacher curriculum approaches (curriculum-transmitter/curriculum-developer/curriculum-maker) on student cognitive change (reading, writing, speaking, and listening abilities) and their affective change (motivation and interests). This study's conceptual framework was grounded in teacher curriculum…

  15. Dispositional Empathic Concern, Gender, Level of Experience, Teacher Efficacy, Attributions of Controllability and Teacher Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panik, Meredith Anne

    2010-01-01

    Teachers' pity and anger responses to students who fail often are interpreted by the students as indicative of the teachers' attributions for the cause behind the student failure. Students' interpretations of these emotional responses can affect their self-esteem and expectations for future success. The present study explored variables that may…

  16. Project BEST-PAL (Basic Education Skills Through-Parenting Affective Learning): Level II Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brevard Community Coll., Cocoa, FL.

    These eight learning modules were prepared for parents participating in Brevard Community College's Project BEST-PAL (Basic Education Skills Through-Parenting Affective Learning), which was designed for low socioeconomic parents who are in need of an opportunity to explore effective parenting. First, materials for the BEST-PAL volunteer sponsors…

  17. Project BEST-PAL (Basic Education Skills Through-Parenting Affective Learning): Level I Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brevard Community Coll., Cocoa, FL.

    These eight learning modules were prepared for parents participating in Brevard Community College's Project BEST-PAL (Basic Education Skills Through-Parenting Affective Learning), which was designed for low socioeconomic parents who are in need of an opportunity to explore effective parenting. First, materials for the BEST-PAL volunteer sponsors…

  18. Nitrogen supplementation does not affect level of an Alkaloid swainsonine in four locoweeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Locoweeds are legumes that can be highly poisonous to livestock and wild animals. Locoweed toxicity depends on the association of a plant and a fungal endophyte which produces the alkaloid swainsonine (SWA); however, environmental factors affecting SWA synthesis are unknown. Additionally, locoweeds ...

  19. Ozone stomatal flux and O3 concentration-based metrics for Astronium graveolens Jacq., a Brazilian native forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Cassimiro, Jéssica C; Moura, Bárbara B; Alonso, Rocio; Meirelles, Sérgio T; Moraes, Regina M

    2016-06-01

    The current levels of surface ozone (O3) are high enough to negatively affect trees in large regions of São Paulo State, southeastern Brazil, where standards for the protection of vegetation against the adverse effects of O3 do not exist. We evaluated three O3 metrics - phytotoxic ozone dose (POD), accumulated ozone exposure over the threshold of 40 ppb h (AOT40), and the sum of all hourly average concentrations (SUM00) - for the Brazilian native tropical tree species Astronium graveolens Jacq. We used the DO3SE (Deposition of Ozone for Stomatal Exchange) model and calculated PODY for different thresholds (from 0 to 6 mmol O3 m(-2) PLA s(-1)), evaluating the model's performance through the relationship between measured and modelled conductance. The response parameters were: visible foliar injury, considered as incidence (% injured plants), severity (% injured leaves in relation to the number of leaves on injured plants), and leaf abscission. The model performance was suitable and significant (R(2) = 0.58; p < 0.001). POD0 was better correlated to incidence and leaf abscission, and SUM00 was better correlated to severity. The highest values of O3 concentration-based metrics (AOT40 and SUM00) did not coincide with those of POD0. Further investigation may improve the model and contribute to the proposition of a national standard for the protection of native species. PMID:26805742

  20. The Effects of School Level Factors in Affecting Secondary School Teachers' Participation in Continuing Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Yan Fung; Kwong, Tsz Man

    This study investigated the effects of school-level and individual-level factors influencing the participation and nonparticipation of secondary school teachers in continuing professional education (CPE). Researchers randomly selected 25 out of Hong Kong's 442 secondary schools to participate. All teachers in the schools were invited to complete a…

  1. An Investigation of the Effects of ISCS Level One on Selected Affective Variables of Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauridsen, La Monte Irvy

    The study was designed to assess the effects of Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) Level One in terms of (1) fostering positive growth in the scientific attitudes associated with the nature of scientific laws, the limitations of science, and the desirability of science as a vocation; (2) enhancing the self-reliance level; and (3)…

  2. Parental Education Level Positively Affects Self-Esteem of Turkish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Ertugrul; Barut, Yasar; Ersanli, Ercüment

    2013-01-01

    Although the literature on self-esteem has a long and prolific history in Turkey regarding which demographics may influence the self-esteem of adolescents. The research findings are intricate and undermine the need of further research in Turkey. This cross-sectional study re-examined the effects of age, grade level and education level of a mother…

  3. Factors Affecting Mercury and Selenium Levels-in New Jersey Flatfish: Low Risk to Human Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Shukla, Sheila; Gochfeld, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Some fish contain high levels of mercury (Hg), which could pose a risk to fish eaters themselves or their children. In making decisions about fish consumption, people must decide whether to eat fish, how much to eat, what species to eat, and what size fish to eat, as well as suitable (or unsuitable) locations, among other factors. Yet to make sound decisions, people need to know the levels of Hg in fish as a function of species, size, and location of capture. Levels of Hg and selenium (Se) were examined in three species of flatfish (fluke or summer flounder [Paralichthys dentatus], winter flounder [Pseudopleuronectes americanus], and windowpane [Scophthalmus aquosus]) from New Jersey as a function of species, fish size, season, and location. Flatfish were postulated to have low levels of Hg because they are low on the food chain and are bottom feeders, and data were generated to provide individuals with information on a species that might be safe to eat regularly. Although there were interspecific differences in Hg levels in the 3 species, total Hg levels averaged 0.18, 0.14, and 0.06 ppm (μg/g, wet weigh) in windowpane, fluke, and winter flounder, and selenium levels averaged 0.36, 0.35, and 0.25 ppm, respectively. For windowpane, 15% had Hg levels above 0.3 ppm, but no individual fish had Hg levels over 0.5 ppm. There were no significant seasonal differences in Hg levels, although Se was significantly higher in fluke in summer compared to spring. There were few geographical differences among New Jersey locations. Correlations between Hg and Se levels were low. Data, based on 464 fish samples, indicate that Hg levels are below various advisory levels and pose little risk to typical New Jersey fish consumers. A 70-kg person eating 1 meal (8 oz or 227 g) per week would not exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reference dose of 0.1 μg/kg body weight/d of methylmercury (MeHg). However, high-end fish eaters consuming several such meals per week may exceed

  4. FACTORS AFFECTING THE USE OF CAF2:MN THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSIMETERS FOR LOW-LEVEL ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    An investigation was made of factors affecting the use of commercially-produced CaF2:Mn thermoluminescent dosimeters for low level environmental radiation monitoring. Calibration factors and self-dosing rates were quantified for 150 thermoluminescent dosimeters. Laboratory studie...

  5. Reproductive rate, not dominance status, affects fecal glucocorticoid levels in breeding female meerkats.

    PubMed

    Barrette, Marie-France; Monfort, Steven L; Festa-Bianchet, Marco; Clutton-Brock, Tim H; Russell, Andrew F

    2012-04-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs) have been studied intensively to understand the associations between physiological stress and reproductive skew in animal societies. However, we have little appreciation of the range of either natural levels within and among individuals, or the associations among dominance status, reproductive rate and GCs levels during breeding. To address these shortcomings, we examined variation in fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (fGC) during breeding periods in free-ranging female meerkats (Suricata suricatta) over 11 years. The vast majority of variation in fGC levels was found within breeding events by the same female (~87%), with the remaining variation arising among breeding events and among females. Concentrations of fGC generally tripled as pregnancy progressed. However, females with a high reproductive rate, defined as those conceiving within a month following parturition (mean = 9 days postpartum), showed significant reductions in fGC in the final 2 weeks before parturition. Despite these reductions, females with a high reproductive rate had higher fGC levels at conception of the following litter than those breeding at a low rate. After controlling for the higher reproductive rate of dominants, we found no association between levels of fGC and either age or dominance status. Our results suggest that one should be cautious about interpreting associations between dominance status, reproductive skew and GCs levels, without knowledge of the natural variation in GCs levels within and among females. PMID:22210199

  6. Do the Levels of Maternal Plasma Trace Elements Affect Fetal Nuchal Translucency Thickness?

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kai-Wei; Tsai, Ming-Song; Chang, Chia-Huang; Chien, Ling-Chu; Mao, I-Fang; Tsai, Yen-An; Chen, Mei-Lien

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fetal nuchal translucency (NT) thickness is an important marker for prenatal screening; however, studies focusing on the correlation between maternal trace element levels and NT thickness are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate maternal trace element levels during the first trimester and to investigate the association between maternal trace element levels and fetal NT thickness. Methods In total, 113 samples were obtained from singleton pregnant women. Maternal plasma samples were collected in the first trimester of gestation. Plasma trace element levels were measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Nuchal translucency thickness was measured using ultrasonography at 10–14 weeks of gestation. Results We found that maternal plasma potassium (K) levels had a significant negative correlation with both NT (r = -0.230, p < 0.05) and NT Multiples of the Median (NT MoM) (r = -0.206, p < 0.05). After adjustment for potential confounders, log-transformed maternal plasma potassium levels in the first trimester were significantly associated with fetal NT (NT MoM: β = -0.68, p < 0.05; NT: β = -1.20, p < 0.01). Although not statistically significant, the As, Hg and Pb levels in maternal plasma were positively correlated with NT, and the Mg, Cu, Zn, Na and Ca levels were negatively correlated with NT. Conclusion Maternal plasma K levels during the first trimester appeared to be associated with NT thickness. The essential elements tended to decrease NT thickness, and non-essential elements tended to increase it. PMID:26367380

  7. The role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase during C4 photosynthetic isotope exchange and stomatal conductance.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Asaph B; Baroli, Irene; Badger, Murray R; Ivakov, Alexander; Lea, Peter J; Leegood, Richard C; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2007-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) plays a key role during C(4) photosynthesis and is involved in anaplerotic metabolism, pH regulation, and stomatal opening. Heterozygous (Pp) and homozygous (pp) forms of a PEPC-deficient mutant of the C(4) dicot Amaranthus edulis were used to study the effect of reduced PEPC activity on CO(2) assimilation rates, stomatal conductance, and (13)CO(2) (Delta(13)C) and C(18)OO (Delta(18)O) isotope discrimination during leaf gas exchange. PEPC activity was reduced to 42% and 3% and the rates of CO(2) assimilation in air dropped to 78% and 10% of the wild-type values in the Pp and pp mutants, respectively. Stomatal conductance in air (531 mubar CO(2)) was similar in the wild-type and Pp mutant but the pp mutant had only 41% of the wild-type steady-state conductance under white light and the stomata opened more slowly in response to increased light or reduced CO(2) partial pressure, suggesting that the C(4) PEPC isoform plays an essential role in stomatal opening. There was little difference in Delta(13)C between the Pp mutant (3.0 per thousand +/- 0.4 per thousand) and wild type (3.3 per thousand +/- 0.4 per thousand), indicating that leakiness (), the ratio of CO(2) leak rate out of the bundle sheath to the rate of CO(2) supply by the C(4) cycle, a measure of the coordination of C(4) photosynthesis, was not affected by a 60% reduction in PEPC activity. In the pp mutant Delta(13)C was 16 per thousand +/- 3.2 per thousand, indicative of direct CO(2) fixation by Rubisco in the bundle sheath at ambient CO(2) partial pressure. Delta(18)O measurements indicated that the extent of isotopic equilibrium between leaf water and the CO(2) at the site of oxygen exchange () was low (0.6) in the wild-type and Pp mutant but increased to 0.9 in the pp mutant. We conclude that in vitro carbonic anhydrase activity overestimated as compared to values determined from Delta(18)O in wild-type plants. PMID:17827274

  8. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal phylogenetic groups differ in affecting host plants along heavy metal levels.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Yang, Haishui; Yu, Zhenxing; Tang, Jianjun; Xu, Ligen; Chen, Xin

    2014-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are important components of soil microbial communities, and play important role in plant growth. However, the effects of AMF phylogenetic groups (Glomeraceae and non-Glomeraceae) on host plant under various heavy metal levels are not clear. Here we conducted a meta-analysis to compare symbiotic relationship between AMF phylogenetic groups (Glomeraceae and non-Glomeraceae) and host plant functional groups (herbs vs. trees, and non-legumes vs. legumes) at three heavy metal levels. In the meta-analysis, we calculate the effect size (ln(RR)) by taking the natural logarithm of the response ratio of inoculated to non-inoculated shoot biomass from each study. We found that the effect size of Glomeraceae increased, but the effect size of non-Glomeraceae decreased under high level of heavy metal compared to low level. According to the effect size, both Glomeraceae and non-Glomeraceae promoted host plant growth, but had different effects under various heavy metal levels. Glomeraceae provided more benefit to host plants than non-Glomeraceae did under heavy metal condition, while non-Glomeraceae provided more benefit to host plants than Glomeraceae did under no heavy metal. AMF phylogenetic groups also differed in promoting plant functional groups under various heavy metal levels. Interacting with Glomeraceae, herbs and legumes grew better than trees and non-legumes did under high heavy metal level, while trees and legumes grew better than herbs and non-legumes did under medium heavy metal level. Interacting with non-Glomeraceae, herbs and legumes grew better than trees and non-legumes did under no heavy metal. We suggested that the combination of legume with Glomeraceae could be a useful way in the remediation of heavy metal polluted environment. PMID:25288547

  9. Does level of processing affect the transition from unconscious to conscious perception?

    PubMed

    Anzulewicz, Anna; Asanowicz, Dariusz; Windey, Bert; Paulewicz, Borysław; Wierzchoń, Michał; Cleeremans, Axel

    2015-11-01

    Recently, Windey, Gevers, and Cleeremans (2013) proposed a level of processing (LoP) hypothesis claiming that the transition from unconscious to conscious perception is influenced by the level of processing imposed by task requirements. Here, we carried out two experiments to test the LoP hypothesis. In both, participants were asked to classify briefly presented pairs of letters as same or different, based either on the letters' physical features (a low-level task), or on a semantic rule (a high-level task). Stimulus awareness was measured by means of the four-point Perceptual Awareness Scale (PAS). The results showed that low or moderate stimulus visibility was reported more frequently in the low-level task than in the high-level task, suggesting that the transition from unconscious to conscious perception is more gradual in the former than in the latter. Therefore, although alternative interpretations remain possible, the results of the present study fully support the LoP hypothesis. PMID:26057402

  10. Plasma taurine levels are not affected by vigabatrin in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Spelbrink, Emily M; Mabud, Tarub S; Reimer, Richard; Porter, Brenda E

    2016-08-01

    Vigabatrin is a highly effective antiseizure medication, but its use is limited due to concerns about retinal toxicity. One proposed mechanism for this toxicity is vigabatrin-mediated reduction of taurine. Herein we assess plasma taurine levels in a retrospective cohort of children with epilepsy, including a subset receiving vigabatrin. All children who underwent a plasma amino acid analysis as part of their clinical evaluation between 2006 and 2015 at Stanford Children's Health were included in the analysis. There were no significant differences in plasma taurine levels between children taking vigabatrin (n = 16), children taking other anti-seizure medications, and children not taking any anti-seizure medication (n = 556) (analysis of variance [ANOVA] p = 0.841). There were, however, age-dependent decreases in plasma taurine levels. Multiple linear regression revealed no significant association between vigabatrin use and plasma taurine level (p = 0.87) when controlling for age. These results suggest that children taking vigabatrin maintain normal plasma taurine levels, although they leave unanswered whether taurine supplementation is necessary or sufficient to prevent vigabatrin-associated visual field loss. They also indicate that age should be taken into consideration when evaluating taurine levels in young children. PMID:27344989

  11. How Does Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease Affect the Disc Deformation at the Cephalic Levels In Vivo?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaobai; Xia, Qun; Passias, Peter; Li, Weishi; Wood, Kirkham; Li, Guoan

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Case-control study. Objective . To evaluate the effect of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD) on the disc deformation at the adjacent level and at the level one above the adjacent level during end ranges of lumbar motion. Summary of Background Data It has been reported that in patients with DDD, the intervertebral discs adjacent to the diseased levels have a greater tendency to degenerate. Although altered biomechanics have been suggested to be the causative factors, few data have been reported on the deformation characteristics of the adjacent discs in patients with DDD. Methods Ten symptomatic patients with discogenic low back pain between L4 and S1 and with healthy discs at the cephalic segments were involved. Eight healthy subjects recruited in our previous studies were used as a reference comparison. The in vivo kinematics of L3–L4 (the cephalic adjacent level to the degenerated discs) and L2–L3 (the level one above the adjacent level) lumbar discs of both groups were obtained using a combined magnetic resonance imaging and dual fluoroscopic imaging technique at functional postures. Deformation characteristics, in terms of areas of minimal deformation (defined as less than 5%), deformations at the center of the discs, and maximum tensile and shear deformations, were compared between the two groups at the two disc levels. Results In the patients with DDD, there were significantly smaller areas of minimal disc deformation at L3–L4 and L2–L3 than the healthy subjects (18% compared with 45% of the total disc area, on average). Both L2–L3 and L3–L4 discs underwent larger tensile and shear deformations in all postures than the healthy subjects. The maximum tensile deformations were higher by up to 23% (of the local disc height in standing) and the maximum shear deformations were higher by approximately 25% to 40% (of the local disc height in standing) compared with those of the healthy subjects. Conclusion Both the discs of the adjacent

  12. Impact of the representation of stomatal conductance on model projections of heatwave intensity

    PubMed Central

    Kala, Jatin; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Pitman, Andy J.; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Wang, Ying-Ping; Lorenz, Ruth; Perkins-Kirkpatrick, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Stomatal conductance links plant water use and carbon uptake, and is a critical process for the land surface component of climate models. However, stomatal conductance schemes commonly assume that all vegetation with the same photosynthetic pathway use identical plant water use strategies whereas observations indicate otherwise. Here, we implement a new stomatal scheme derived from optimal stomatal theory and constrained by a recent global synthesis of stomatal conductance measurements from 314 species, across 56 field sites. Using this new stomatal scheme, within a global climate model, subtantially increases the intensity of future heatwaves across Northern Eurasia. This indicates that our climate model has previously been under-predicting heatwave intensity. Our results have widespread implications for other climate models, many of which do not account for differences in stomatal water-use across different plant functional types, and hence, are also likely under projecting heatwave intensity in the future. PMID:26996244

  13. Impact of the representation of stomatal conductance on model projections of heatwave intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kala, Jatin; de Kauwe, Martin G.; Pitman, Andy J.; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Wang, Ying-Ping; Lorenz, Ruth; Perkins-Kirkpatrick, Sarah E.

    2016-03-01

    Stomatal conductance links plant water use and carbon uptake, and is a critical process for the land surface component of climate models. However, stomatal conductance schemes commonly assume that all vegetation with the same photosynthetic pathway use identical plant water use strategies whereas observations indicate otherwise. Here, we implement a new stomatal scheme derived from optimal stomatal theory and constrained by a recent global synthesis of stomatal conductance measurements from 314 species, across 56 field sites. Using this new stomatal scheme, within a global climate model, subtantially increases the intensity of future heatwaves across Northern Eurasia. This indicates that our climate model has previously been under-predicting heatwave intensity. Our results have widespread implications for other climate models, many of which do not account for differences in stomatal water-use across different plant functional types, and hence, are also likely under projecting heatwave intensity in the future.

  14. Impact of the representation of stomatal conductance on model projections of heatwave intensity.

    PubMed

    Kala, Jatin; De Kauwe, Martin G; Pitman, Andy J; Medlyn, Belinda E; Wang, Ying-Ping; Lorenz, Ruth; Perkins-Kirkpatrick, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Stomatal conductance links plant water use and carbon uptake, and is a critical process for the land surface component of climate models. However, stomatal conductance schemes commonly assume that all vegetation with the same photosynthetic pathway use identical plant water use strategies whereas observations indicate otherwise. Here, we implement a new stomatal scheme derived from optimal stomatal theory and constrained by a recent global synthesis of stomatal conductance measurements from 314 species, across 56 field sites. Using this new stomatal scheme, within a global climate model, subtantially increases the intensity of future heatwaves across Northern Eurasia. This indicates that our climate model has previously been under-predicting heatwave intensity. Our results have widespread implications for other climate models, many of which do not account for differences in stomatal water-use across different plant functional types, and hence, are also likely under projecting heatwave intensity in the future. PMID:26996244

  15. Analysis of Factors Affecting Output Levels and Frequencies of MP3 Players

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of music that could lead to music induced hearing loss (MIHL) has been of recent interest especially for young adults, considering their excessive use of personal listening devices such as MP3 player. More attention should be drawn to MIHL for noting that early noise exposure leads to earlier onset of presbycusis. In search of appropriate and safe listening habits for young adults, this investigation was aimed to evaluate output levels and frequencies generated by the Samsung galaxy note MP3 player depending on two earphone types; ear-bud and over-the-ear earphones and three music genres; rock, hip-hop, ballade. A sound level meter was used to measure output level and frequency spectrum between 12.5 and 16000 Hz at all 1/3-octave bands. The following results can be summarized. 1) The earphone styles did not produce significant difference in output levels, but the music genres did. However, the results of music genres varied. 2) Neither earphone styles nor music genres produced significant difference in frequency response spectrum, except music genres at the volume settings we usually listen to. Additionally, volume levels should be lower than 50% for usual listening situation. Through this investigation, it was noted that the frequency range was substantial between 50 and 1000 Hz regardless of the styles of earphones and music genres, implying that we should be cautious of this frequency range when we listen to music. Researchers should give more attention to the effects of the mixture of output level and frequency spectrum, considering that the auditory system has frequency specificity from the periphery to the central to provide refined methods for protecting our ears from MIHL. PMID:24653908

  16. Analysis of Factors Affecting Output Levels and Frequencies of MP3 Players.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinsook

    2013-09-01

    Exposure to high levels of music that could lead to music induced hearing loss (MIHL) has been of recent interest especially for young adults, considering their excessive use of personal listening devices such as MP3 player. More attention should be drawn to MIHL for noting that early noise exposure leads to earlier onset of presbycusis. In search of appropriate and safe listening habits for young adults, this investigation was aimed to evaluate output levels and frequencies generated by the Samsung galaxy note MP3 player depending on two earphone types; ear-bud and over-the-ear earphones and three music genres; rock, hip-hop, ballade. A sound level meter was used to measure output level and frequency spectrum between 12.5 and 16000 Hz at all 1/3-octave bands. The following results can be summarized. 1) The earphone styles did not produce significant difference in output levels, but the music genres did. However, the results of music genres varied. 2) Neither earphone styles nor music genres produced significant difference in frequency response spectrum, except music genres at the volume settings we usually listen to. Additionally, volume levels should be lower than 50% for usual listening situation. Through this investigation, it was noted that the frequency range was substantial between 50 and 1000 Hz regardless of the styles of earphones and music genres, implying that we should be cautious of this frequency range when we listen to music. Researchers should give more attention to the effects of the mixture of output level and frequency spectrum, considering that the auditory system has frequency specificity from the periphery to the central to provide refined methods for protecting our ears from MIHL. PMID:24653908

  17. Dietary protein level affects iridescent coloration in Anna's hummingbirds, Calypte anna

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Melissa G.; Roudybush, Thomas E.; McGraw, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Many animal displays involve colorful ornamental traits that signal an individual's quality as a mate or rival. Brilliant iridescent ornaments are common, but little is currently known about their production cost and signaling value. One potential cost of colorful ornaments is the acquisition of limited dietary resources that may be involved, directly or indirectly, in their production. Protein, the primary component of bird feathers and of many nanostructural components of iridescent traits, is naturally restricted in hummingbird diets (comprised mostly of sugars), suggesting that iridescent coloration may be especially challenging to produce in these animals. In this study, we experimentally investigated the effect of dietary protein availability during molt on iridescent color expression in male Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna). We fed captive birds either a 6% (high) or a 3% (low) protein diet and stimulated molt by plucking half the gorget and crown ornaments on each bird as well as the non-ornamental iridescent green tail feathers. We found that birds receiving more protein grew significantly more colorful crown feathers (higher red chroma and redder hue) than those fed the low-protein diet. Diet did not affect gorget coloration, but regrowth of feathers in captivity affected both gorget and crown coloration. Additionally, birds on the high-protein diet grew yellower (higher hue) green tail feathers than birds on the low-protein diet. These results indicate that iridescent ornamental feathers are sensitive to diet quality and may serve as honest signals of nutrition to mates or rivals. Further, because both ornamental and non-ornamental iridescent coloration were affected by conditions during their growth, iridescent color in these birds appears to be generally condition dependent. PMID:22837446

  18. Dietary protein level affects iridescent coloration in Anna's hummingbirds, Calypte anna.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Melissa G; Roudybush, Thomas E; McGraw, Kevin J

    2012-08-15

    Many animal displays involve colorful ornamental traits that signal an individual's quality as a mate or rival. Brilliant iridescent ornaments are common, but little is currently known about their production cost and signaling value. One potential cost of colorful ornaments is the acquisition of limited dietary resources that may be involved, directly or indirectly, in their production. Protein, the primary component of bird feathers and of many nanostructural components of iridescent traits, is naturally restricted in hummingbird diets (comprised mostly of sugars), suggesting that iridescent coloration may be especially challenging to produce in these animals. In this study, we experimentally investigated the effect of dietary protein availability during molt on iridescent color expression in male Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna). We fed captive birds either a 6% (high) or a 3% (low) protein diet and stimulated molt by plucking half the gorget and crown ornaments on each bird as well as the non-ornamental iridescent green tail feathers. We found that birds receiving more protein grew significantly more colorful crown feathers (higher red chroma and redder hue) than those fed the low-protein diet. Diet did not affect gorget coloration, but regrowth of feathers in captivity affected both gorget and crown coloration. Additionally, birds on the high-protein diet grew yellower (higher hue) green tail feathers than birds on the low-protein diet. These results indicate that iridescent ornamental feathers are sensitive to diet quality and may serve as honest signals of nutrition to mates or rivals. Further, because both ornamental and non-ornamental iridescent coloration were affected by conditions during their growth, iridescent color in these birds appears to be generally condition dependent. PMID:22837446

  19. mef2 activity levels differentially affect gene expression during Drosophila muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Elgar, Stuart J.; Han, Jun; Taylor, Michael V.

    2008-01-01

    Cell differentiation is controlled by key transcription factors, and a major question is how they orchestrate cell-type-specific genetic programs. Muscle differentiation is a well studied paradigm in which the conserved Mef2 transcription factor plays a pivotal role. Recent genomic studies have identified a large number of mef2-regulated target genes with distinct temporal expression profiles during Drosophila myogenesis. However, the question remains as to how a single transcription factor can control such diverse patterns of gene expression. In this study we used a strategy combining genomics and developmental genetics to address this issue in vivo during Drosophila muscle development. We found that groups of mef2-regulated genes respond differently to changes in mef2 activity levels: some require higher levels for their expression than others. Furthermore, this differential requirement correlates with when the gene is first expressed during the muscle differentiation program. Genes that require higher levels are activated later. These results implicate mef2 in the temporal regulation of muscle gene expression, and, consistent with this, we show that changes in mef2 activity levels can alter the start of gene expression in a predictable manner. Together these results indicate that Mef2 is not an all-or-none regulator; rather, its action is more subtle, and levels of its activity are important in the differential expression of muscle genes. This suggests a route by which mef2 can orchestrate the muscle differentiation program and contribute to the stringent regulation of gene expression during myogenesis. PMID:18198273

  20. Does temperature affect the accuracy of vented pressure transducer in fine-scale water level measurement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    Submersible pressure transducers have been utilized for collecting water level data since the early 1960s. Together with a digital data logger, it is a convenient way to record water level fluctuations for long-term monitoring. Despite the wide use of pressure transducers for water level monitoring, little has been reported regarding their accuracy and performance under field conditions. The effects of temperature fluctuations on the output of vented pressure transducers were considered in this study. The pressure transducers were tested under both laboratory and field conditions. The results of this study indicate that temperature fluctuation has a strong effect on the transducer output. Rapid changes in temperature introduce noise and fluctuations in the water level readings under a constant hydraulic head while the absolute temperature is also related to sensor errors. The former is attributed to venting and the latter is attributed to temperature compensation effects in the strain gauges. Individual pressure transducers responded differently to the thermal fluctuations in the same testing environment. In the field of surface hydrology, especially when monitoring fine-scale water level fluctuations, ignoring or failing to compensate for the temperature effect can introduce considerable error into pressure transducer readings. It is recommended that a performance test for the pressure transducer is conducted before field deployment.

  1. Does temperature affect the accuracy of vented pressure transducer in fine-scale water level measurement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Higgins, C. W.

    2014-09-01

    Submersible pressure transducers have been utilized for collecting water level data since early 1960s. Together with a digital datalogger, it is a convenient way to record water level fluctuations for long-term monitoring. Despite the widely use of pressure transducers for water level monitoring, little has been reported for their accuracy and performance under field conditions. The effect of temperature fluctuations on the output of vented pressure transducers were discussed in this study. The pressure transducer was tested under both laboratory and field conditions. The results of this study indicate that temperature fluctuation has a strong effect on the transducer output. Rapid changes in temperature introduce noise and fluctuations in the water level readings under a constant hydraulic head while the absolute temperature is also related to sensor errors. The former is attributed to venting and the latter is attributed to temperature compensation effect in the strain gauges. Individual pressure transducers responded differently to the thermal fluctuations in the same testing environment. In the field of surface hydrology, especially when monitoring fine-scale water level fluctuations, ignoring or failing to compensate for the temperature effect can introduce considerable error into pressure transducer readings. It is recommended that a performance test for the pressure transducer is conducted before field deployment.

  2. Political Factors Affecting the Enactment of State-Level Clean Indoor Air Laws

    PubMed Central

    Vernick, Jon S.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Webster, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the effects of key political institutional factors on the advancement of state-level clean indoor air laws. Methods. We performed an observational study of state-level clean indoor air law enactment among all 50 US states from 1993 to 2010 by using extended Cox hazard models to assess risk of enacting a relevant law. Results. During the 18-year period from 1993 to 2010, 28 states passed a law covering workplaces, 33 states passed a law covering restaurants, 29 states passed a law covering bars, and 16 states passed a law covering gaming facilities. States with term limits had a 2.15 times greater hazard (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27, 3.65; P = .005) of enacting clean indoor air laws. The presence of state-level preemption of local clean indoor air laws was associated with a 3.26 times greater hazard (95% CI = 1.11, 9.53; P = .031) of state-level policy enactment. In the presence of preemption, increased legislative professionalism was strongly associated (hazard ratio = 3.28; 95% CI = 1.10, 9.75; P = .033) with clean indoor air law enactment. Conclusions. Political institutional factors do influence state-level clean indoor air law enactment and may be relevant to other public health policy areas. PMID:24825239

  3. Nitric oxide induces stomatal closure and enhances the adaptive plant responses against drought stress.

    PubMed

    García-Mata, C; García Mata, C; Lamattina, L

    2001-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a very active molecule involved in many and diverse biological pathways where it has proved to be protective against damages provoked by oxidative stress conditions. In this work, we studied the effect of two NO donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine SNP-treated on the response of wheat (Triticum aestivum) to water stress conditions. After 2 and 3 h of drought, detached wheat leaves pretreated with 150 microM SNP retained up to 15% more water than those pretreated with water or NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-). The effect of SNP treatment on water retention was also found in wheat seedlings after 7 d of drought. These results were consistent with a 20% decrease in the transpiration rate of SNP-treated detached wheat leaves for the same analyzed time. In parallel experiments, NO was also able to induce a 35%, 30%, and 65% of stomatal closure in three different species, Tradescantia sp. (monocotyledonous) and two dicotyledonous, Salpichroa organifolia and fava bean (Vicia faba), respectively. In SNP-treated leaves of Tradescantia sp., the stomatal closure was correlated with a 10% increase on RWC. Ion leakage, a cell injury index, was 25% lower in SNP-treated wheat leaves compared with control ones after the recovery period. Carboxy-PTIO (2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a specific NO scavenger, reverted SNP action by restoring the transpiration rate, stomatal aperture, and the ion leakage to the level found in untreated leaves. Northern-blot analysis showed that SNP-treated wheat leaves display a 2-fold accumulation of a group three late embryogenesis abundant transcript with respect to control leaves both after 2 and 4 h of drought periods. All together, these results suggest that the exogenous application of NO donors might confer an increased tolerance to severe drought stress conditions in plants. PMID:11457969

  4. Estimating Latest Cretaceous and Tertiary Atmospheric PCO2 from Stomatal Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, D. L.; Wing, S. L.; Beerling, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    Most modern C3 seed plants show an inverse relationship between PCO2 and stomatal index (SI), where SI is the proportion of epidermal cells that are stomatal packages. This plant-atmosphere response therefore provides a reliable approach for estimating paleo-CO2 levels. Since stomatal responses to CO2 are generally species-specific, one is limited in paleo-reconstructions to species that exist both in the fossil record and living today. Fossils morphologically similar to living Ginkgo biloba and Metasequoia glyptostroboides extend back to the early and late Cretaceous, respectively, indicating that the fossil and living forms are very closely related. Measurements of SI made on fossil Ginkgo and Metasequoia were calibrated with historical collections of G. biloba and M. glyptostroboides leaves from sites that developed during the anthropogenically-driven CO2 increases of the past 145 years (288-369 ppmv) and with saplings of G. biloba and M. glyptostroboides grown in CO2 controlled growth chambers (350-800 ppmv). Both nonlinear regressions are highly significant (Ginkgo: n = 40, r2 = 0.91; Metasequoia: n = 18; r2 = 0.85). Results from a sequence of 23 latest Cretaceous to early Eocene-aged Ginkgo-bearing sites indicate that CO2 remained between 300 and 450 ppmv with the exception of one high estimate ( ~800 ppmv) near the Paleocene/Eocene boundary, and results from 4 middle Miocene-aged Ginkgo- and Metasequoia-bearing sites indicate that CO2 was between 320 and 400 ppmv. If correct, the CO2 values estimated here are too low to explain via the CO2 greenhouse effect alone the higher global mean temperatures (e.g., 3-4 ° C for the early Eocene) inferred from models and geological data for these two intervals.

  5. Effects of Carbonyl Sulfide and Carbonic Anhydrase on Stomatal Conductance1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Stimler, Keren; Berry, Joseph A.; Yakir, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The potential use of carbonyl sulfide (COS) as tracer of CO2 flux into the land biosphere stimulated research on COS interactions with leaves during gas exchange. We carried out leaf gas-exchange measurements of COS and CO2 in 22 plant species representing deciduous and evergreen trees, grasses, and shrubs, under a range of light intensities, using mid-infrared laser spectroscopy. A narrow range in the normalized ratio of the net uptake rates of COS (As) and CO2 (Ac), leaf relative uptake (As/Ac × [CO2]/[COS]), was observed, with a mean value of 1.61 ± 0.26, which is advantageous to the use of COS in photosynthesis research. Notably, increasing COS concentrations between 250 and 2,800 pmol mol−1 (enveloping atmospheric levels) enhanced stomatal conductance (gs) to a variable extent in most plants examined (up to a normalized enhancement factor [ fe = (gs-max − gs-min)/gs-min] of 1). This enhancement was completely abolished in carbonic anhydrase (CA)-deficient antisense lines of both C3 and C4 plants. We suggest that the stomatal response is mediated by CA and may involve hydrogen sulfide formed in the reaction of COS and water with CA. In all species examined, the uptake rates of COS and CO2 were highly correlated, but there was no relationship between the sensitivity of stomata to COS and the rate of COS uptake (or, by inference, hydrogen sulfide production). The basis for the observed stomatal sensitivity and its variations is still to be determined. PMID:22106096

  6. Do vitamin D levels affect antibody titers produced in response to HPV vaccine?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Richard K; Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Raviotta, Jonathan M; Nowalk, Mary Patricia

    2015-01-01

    In addition to its well-known effects on bone metabolism, vitamin D is an immunomodulating hormone. Serum vitamin D levels in males 18–25 years were measured at baseline, and HPV antibody titers were measured one month following the third quadrivalent HPV vaccine dose. Vitamin D levels were ≥30 ng/ml (normal) in 60 males and <30 ng/ml (low) in 113 males. Reverse cumulative distribution curves and scatter plots showed higher antibody titers with low vitamin D for all vaccine strains (P < 0.05). In linear regression analyses, antibody titers for all HPV strains were significantly higher among those with lower vitamin D levels and among younger participants (P < 0.05). These relationships add to the body of knowledge of the complex role of vitamin D in immunoregulation. PMID:26176493

  7. Differential platelet levels affect response to taxane-based therapy in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Dalton, Heather J.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Cho, Min Soon; Haemmerle, Monika; Nick, Alpa M.; Pradeep, Sunila; Zand, Behrouz; Previs, Rebecca A.; Pecot, Chad V.; Crane, Erin King; Hu, Wei; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid; Sood, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We hypothesized that platelet levels during therapy could serve as a biomarker for response to therapy and that manipulation of platelet levels could impact responsiveness to chemotherapy. Experimental Design The medical records of patients with recurrent or progressive ovarian cancer were retrospectively queried for changes in platelet and CA-125 levels during primary therapy. In vitro co-culture experiments and in vivo orthotopic models of human ovarian cancer in mice were used to test the effect of modulating platelet levels on tumor growth and responsiveness to docetaxel. Results Thrombocytosis at the diagnosis of ovarian cancer correlated with decreased interval to progression (p = 0.05) and median overall survival (p = 0.007). Mean platelet levels corrected during primary therapy and rose at recurrence. Contrary to treatment-responsive patients, in a cohort of patients refractory to primary therapy, platelet levels did not normalize during therapy. In A2780, HeyA8, and SKOV3-ip1 ovarian cancer cell lines, platelet co-culture protected against apoptosis (p < 0.05). In orthotopic models of human ovarian cancer, platelet depletion resulted in 70% reduced mean tumor weight (p < 0.05). Compared to mice treated with docetaxel, mice treated with both docetaxel and platelet-depleting antibody had a 62% decrease in mean tumor weight (p = 0.04). Platelet transfusion increased mean aggregate tumor weight 2.4-fold (p < 0.05), blocked the effect of docetaxel on tumor growth (p = 0.55) and decreased tumor cell apoptosis. Pre-transfusion aspirinization of the platelets blocked the growth-promoting effects of transfusion. Conclusions Platelet-driven effects of chemotherapy response may explain clinical observations. PMID:25473001

  8. DNA Methylation of Lipid-Related Genes Affects Blood Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Liliane; Wahl, Simone; Pilling, Luke C.; Reischl, Eva; Sandling, Johanna K.; Kunze, Sonja; Holdt, Lesca M.; Kretschmer, Anja; Schramm, Katharina; Adamski, Jerzy; Klopp, Norman; Illig, Thomas; Hedman, Åsa K.; Roden, Michael; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Grallert, Harald; Gieger, Christian; Herder, Christian; Teupser, Daniel; Meisinger, Christa; Spector, Timothy D.; Kronenberg, Florian; Prokisch, Holger; Melzer, David; Peters, Annette; Deloukas, Panos; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waldenberger, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Background Epigenetic mechanisms might be involved in the regulation of interindividual lipid level variability and thus may contribute to the cardiovascular risk profile. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between genome-wide DNA methylation and blood lipid levels high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Observed DNA methylation changes were also further analyzed to examine their relationship with previous hospitalized myocardial infarction. Methods and Results Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns were determined in whole blood samples of 1776 subjects of the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg F4 cohort using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (Illumina). Ten novel lipid-related CpG sites annotated to various genes including ABCG1, MIR33B/SREBF1, and TNIP1 were identified. CpG cg06500161, located in ABCG1, was associated in opposite directions with both high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (β coefficient=−0.049; P=8.26E-17) and triglyceride levels (β=0.070; P=1.21E-27). Eight associations were confirmed by replication in the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg F3 study (n=499) and in the Invecchiare in Chianti, Aging in the Chianti Area study (n=472). Associations between triglyceride levels and SREBF1 and ABCG1 were also found in adipose tissue of the Multiple Tissue Human Expression Resource cohort (n=634). Expression analysis revealed an association between ABCG1 methylation and lipid levels that might be partly mediated by ABCG1 expression. DNA methylation of ABCG1 might also play a role in previous hospitalized myocardial infarction (odds ratio, 1.15; 95% confidence interval=1.06–1.25). Conclusions Epigenetic modifications of the newly identified loci might regulate disturbed blood lipid levels and thus contribute to the development of complex lipid-related diseases. PMID:25583993

  9. Transcranial light affects plasma monoamine levels and expression of brain encephalopsin in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Flyktman, Antti; Mänttäri, Satu; Nissilä, Juuso; Timonen, Markku; Saarela, Seppo

    2015-05-15

    Encephalopsin (OPN3) belongs to the light-sensitive transmembrane receptor family mainly expressed in the brain and retina. It is believed that light affects mammalian circadian rhythmicity only through the retinohypothalamic tract, which transmits light information to the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus. However, it has been shown that light penetrates the skull. Here, we present the effect of transcranial light treatment on OPN3 expression and monoamine concentrations in mouse brain and other tissues. Mice were randomly assigned to control group, morning-light group and evening-light group, and animals were illuminated transcranially five times a week for 8 min for a total of 4 weeks. The concentrations of OPN3 and monoamines were analysed using western blotting and HPLC, respectively. We report that transcranial light treatment affects OPN3 expression in different brain areas and plasma/adrenal gland monoamine concentrations. In addition, when light was administered at a different time of the day, the response varied in different tissues. These results provide new information on the effects of light on transmitters mediating mammalian rhythmicity. PMID:25805701

  10. The seroprevalence and salivary shedding of herpesviruses in Behçet's syndrome and recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Seoudi, Noha; Bergmeier, Lesley A.; Hagi-Pavli, Eleni; Bibby, David; Fortune, Farida

    2015-01-01

    Background Behçet's syndrome (BS) is one of the multisystemic diseases that presents with oral ulceration and several other systemic manifestations including genital ulceration, folliculitis, erythema nodosum-like lesions, uveitis, and arthropathy. Ocular manifestation, central nervous system involvement, and gastrointestinal manifestation account for most of the complications of this disease, whereas orogenital ulceration and dermatological involvement affects the quality of life. The cause of the disease is not fully elucidated; however, herpesviruses have long been thought to play a pivotal role in the disease pathogenesis. Objective To investigate the seroprevalence and salivary shedding of herpesviruses in BS. Method The levels of specific immunoglobulin G in six different herpesviruses in serum samples collected from 54 BS, 28 healthy controls (HC), and 7 recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) patients were investigated. Salivary viral load was also quantified for these viruses in matched saliva samples using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results The BS had lower cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgG level in comparison to HC (p=0.0226) and RAS (p=0.0450). There was statistically significant higher salivary shedding of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in BS in comparison to HC (p=0.0052), but not RAS (p=0.3318). Conclusions A high EBV shedding was observed in both BS and RAS and a lower level of CMV IgG was observed in BS only. The reason for the observed lower level of CMV IgG in BS is not clear. However, one explanation might be a defect in the cross-talk between innate and adaptive immune responses which was suggested by a previously described defect in the toll-like receptor 1 and 2 heterodimer formation and function, this being the initial receptor sensing of CMV. PMID:26051327

  11. Dose administration time from before breakfast to before dinner affect thyroid hormone levels?

    PubMed Central

    Ala, Shahram; Akha, Ozra; Kashi, Zahra; Asgari, Hossein; Bahar, Adeleh; Sasanpour, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Levothyroxine is commonly used in the treatment of patients with hypothyroidism. Levothyroxine is often administered in the morning, on an empty stomach, to increase its absorption. However, many patients have trouble for taking levothyroxine in the morning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of changing administration time of levothyroxine from before breakfast to before dinner on serum levels of TSH and T4. Methods: Fifty hypothyroidism patients aged 18-75 years old were included in the study and randomly divided into two groups. Each group received two tablets per day blindly (one levothyroxine tablet and one placebo tablet) before breakfast and before dinner. After two months, the administration time for the tablets was changed for each group, and the new schedule was continued for a further two-month period. The serum TSH and T4 levels were measured before and after treatment in each group. Results: Changing the levothyroxine administration time, resulted in 1.47±0.51 µIU/mL increase in TSH level (P=0.001) and 0.35±1.05µg/dL decrease in T4 level (P=0.3). Conclusion: Changing the levothyroxine administration time from before breakfast to before dinner minimally reduced the therapeutic efficacy of levothyroxine. PMID:26644879

  12. Level of Functioning in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Phenotypic Congruence among Affected Siblings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goin-Kochel, Robin P.; Mazefsky, Carla A.; Riley, Brien P.

    2008-01-01

    Little evidence supports that siblings with autism exhibit the same behaviors; however, some findings suggest that level of functioning shows familial aggregation. We tested this notion among multiplex families participating with the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) Consortium, using scores on the "Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Third…

  13. Low-level lasers affect uncoupling protein gene expression in skin and skeletal muscle tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Paoli, F.; Mencalha, A. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses of biological tissues to low-level lasers. Free radicals are involved in these responses acting as second messengers in intracellular signaling processes. Irradiated cells present defenses against these chemical species to avoid unwanted effects, such as uncoupling proteins (UCPs), which are part of protective mechanisms and minimize the effects of free radical generation in mitochondria. In this work UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA gene relative expression in the skin and skeletal muscle tissues of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Samples of the skin and skeletal muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and the evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression was differently altered in skin and skeletal muscle tissues exposed to lasers in a wavelength-dependent effect, with the UCP3 mRNA expression dose-dependent. Alteration on UCP gene expression could be part of the biostimulation effect and is necessary to make cells exposed to red and infrared low-level lasers more resistant or capable of adapting in damaged tissues or diseases.

  14. Realistic Fasting Does Not Affect Stable Isotope Levels of a Metabolically Efficient Salamander

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes are commonly used to examine various aspects of animal ecology. The use of stable isotopes generally proceeds under the implicit assumption that resource use is the only factor driving variation in stable isotope levels; however, a wealth of studies demonstrate a...

  15. CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT WATER LEAD (II) LEVELS AND LEAD (II) NEUROTOXICITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reports have attempted to show that certain approaches to fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of hexafl...

  16. Plant sterol consumption frequency affects plasma lipid levels and cholesterol kinetics in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background/Objectives: To compare the efficacy of single versus multiple doses of plant sterols on circulating lipid level and cholesterol trafficking. Subjects/Methods: A randomized, placebo-controlled, three-phase (6 days/phase) crossover, supervised feeding trial was conducted in 19 subjects. Sub...

  17. Dietary composition affect levels of trace elements in the predator Podisus maculiventris (Say) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insects require small amounts of dietary minerals because of the roles minerals serve as antioxidants, enzyme co-factors and as constituents of metalloproteins. We measured the levels of ten trace elements (Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Se and Zn) in the predatory insect, Podisus maculiventris rea...

  18. Environmental factors affecting the levels of legacy pesticides in the airshed of Delaware and Chesapeake Bays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weekly air (n=271) and event based rain samples (n=489) collected for the period 2000-2003 from three locations in the Delmarva Peninsula (MD and DE) were utilized to determine levels and temporal trends of legacy pesticides in the atmosphere. The goal was to assess the contribution of atmospheric i...

  19. How Levels of Interactivity in Tutorials Affect Students' Learning of Modeling Transportation Problems in a Spreadsheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seal, Kala Chand; Przasnyski, Zbigniew H.; Leon, Linda A.

    2010-01-01

    Do students learn to model OR/MS problems better by using computer-based interactive tutorials and, if so, does increased interactivity in the tutorials lead to better learning? In order to determine the effect of different levels of interactivity on student learning, we used screen capture technology to design interactive support materials for…

  20. Do Content, Format, and Level of Inquiry Affect Scores on Open-Ended Science Tasks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stecher, Brian M.; Klein, Stephen P.; Solano-Flores, Guillermo; McCaffrey, Dan; Robyn, Abby; Shavelson, Richard J.; Haertel, Edward

    This study investigated three factors that may contribute to the large variation in student performance across open-ended measures. These factors are content domain, format (whether the task required only pencil and paper or involved a hands-on manipulation of equipment), and level of inquiry (whether the task guided the student toward the…

  1. Even Low Levels of Alcohol during Pregnancy Can Affect Fetal Brain Development. Science Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Science Briefs" summarize the findings and implications of a recent study in basic science or clinical research. This brief reports on the study "Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure on GABAergic Neurons" (V. C. Cuzone; P. W. L. Yeh; Y. Yanagawa; K. Obata; and H. H. Yeh). Study results indicate that even exposure to low levels of alcohol during…

  2. Combined pesticide exposure severely affects individual- and colony-level traits in bees

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Richard J.; Ramos-Rodriguez, Oscar; Raine, Nigel E.

    2012-01-01

    Reported widespread declines of wild and managed insect pollinators have serious consequences for global ecosystem services and agricultural production1-3. Bees contribute around 80% of insect pollination, so it is imperative we understand and mitigate the causes of current declines4-6. Recent studies have implicated the role of pesticides as exposure to these chemicals has been associated with changes in bee behaviour7-11 and reductions in colony queen production12. However the key link between changes in individual behaviour and consequent impact at the colony level has not been shown. Social bee colonies depend on the collective performance of numerous individual workers. So whilst field-level pesticide concentrations can have a subtle/sublethal effect at the individual level8, it is not known whether bee societies can buffer such effects or if it results in a severe cumulative effect at the colony level. Furthermore, widespread agricultural intensification means bees are exposed to numerous pesticides when foraging13-15, yet the possible combinatorial effects of pesticide exposure have rarely been investigated16,17. Here we show that chronic exposure of bumblebees to two pesticides (neonicotinoid and pyrethroid) at concentrations that could approximate field-level exposure impairs natural foraging behaviour and increases worker mortality leading to significant reductions in brood development and colony success. We found worker foraging performance, particularly pollen collecting efficiency, was significantly reduced with observed knock-on effects for forager recruitment, worker losses and overall worker productivity. Moreover, we provide evidence that combinatorial exposure to pesticides increases the propensity of colonies to fail. PMID:23086150

  3. Circulating leptin and osteoprotegerin levels affect insulin resistance in healthy premenopausal obese women.

    PubMed

    Ugur-Altun, Betul; Altun, Armagan

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the relationship between circulating leptin and osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels and insulin resistance assessed by HOMA-IR in premenopausal obese and normal weight women. Thirty four obese women (age 31 +/- 8 years) (BMI 35 +/- 4 kg/m(2)) with 19 healthy controls (age 31 +/- 7 years) (BMI <25 kg/m(2)) (BMI 21 +/- 2 kg/m(2)) were included in the study. Women were healthy and had no osteoporosis. Circulating leptin levels were significantly higher in obese women (17.11 +/- 2.05 ng/mL vs. 8.38 +/- 4.71 ng/mL, p <0.0001) and decreased OPG levels were found (14.7 +/- 7.15 pg/mL vs. 19.17 +/- 6.37 pg/mL, p = 0.03). Leptin showed a positive correlation with BMI (r = 0.851, p <0.0001), waist-to-hip ratio (r = 0.692, p <0.0001), fasting insulin (r = 0.441, p <0.001), HOMA-IR (r = 0.412, p = 0.002), fibrinogen (r = 0.387, p = 0.004), uric acid (r = 0.293, p = 0.033), hematocrit (r = 0.394, p = 0.003), systolic (r = 0.504, p <0.0001), and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.363, p = 0.008). OPG showed a negative correlation with insulin (r = -0.341, p = 0.013) and HOMA-IR (r = -0.324, p = 0.018). In obese women group, the regression equation of HOMA-IR was (HOMA-IR = [0.095 x leptin]-[0.051 x OPG] + 1.71). However, there was no relation between leptin and OPG levels. In conclusion, circulating leptin and OPG levels were related to insulin resistance in premenopausal obese women. However, leptin had no interference in OPG in premenopausal women. PMID:17923273

  4. Stomatal responses to vapour pressure deficit are regulated by high speed gene expression in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Scott A M; Sussmilch, Frances C; Brodribb, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Plants dynamically regulate water use by the movement of stomata on the surface of leaves. Stomatal responses to changes in vapour pressure deficit (VPD) are the principal regulator of daytime transpiration and water use efficiency in land plants. In angiosperms, stomatal responses to VPD appear to be regulated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA), yet the origin of this ABA is controversial. After a 20 min exposure of plants, from three diverse angiosperm species, to a doubling in VPD, stomata closed, foliar ABA levels increased and the expression of the gene encoding the key, rate-limiting carotenoid cleavage enzyme (9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase, NCED) in the ABA biosynthetic pathway was significantly up-regulated. The NCED gene was the only gene in the ABA biosynthetic pathway to be up-regulated over the short time scale corresponding to the response of stomata. The closure of stomata and rapid increase in foliar ABA levels could not be explained by the release of ABA from internal stores in the leaf or the hydrolysis of the conjugate ABA-glucose ester. These results implicate an extremely rapid de novo biosynthesis of ABA, mediated by a single gene, as the means by which angiosperm stomata respond to natural changes in VPD. PMID:26353082

  5. Attention enhances stimulus representations in macaque visual cortex without affecting their signal-to-noise level

    PubMed Central

    Daliri, Mohammad Reza; Kozyrev, Vladislav; Treue, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of the attentional modulation of neuronal responses in visual cortex varies with stimulus contrast. Whether the strength of these attentional influences is similarly dependent on other stimulus properties is unknown. Here we report the effect of spatial attention on responses in the medial-temporal area (MT) of macaque visual cortex to moving random dots pattern of various motion coherences, i.e. signal-to-noise ratios. Our data show that allocating spatial attention causes a gain change in MT neurons. The magnitude of this attentional modulation is independent of the attended stimulus’ motion coherence, creating a multiplicative scaling of the neuron’s coherence-response function. This is consistent with the characteristics of gain models of attentional modulation and suggests that attention strengthens the neuronal representation of behaviorally relevant visual stimuli relative to unattended stimuli, but without affecting their signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:27283275

  6. Ethylene-Induced Flavonol Accumulation in Guard Cells Suppresses Reactive Oxygen Species and Moderates Stomatal Aperture1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Justin M.; Hechler, Paul J.; Muday, Gloria K.

    2014-01-01

    Guard cell swelling controls the aperture of stomata, pores that facilitate gas exchange and water loss from leaves. The hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has a central role in regulation of stomatal closure through synthesis of second messengers, which include reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS accumulation must be minimized by antioxidants to keep concentrations from reaching damaging levels within the cell. Flavonols are plant metabolites that have been implicated as antioxidants; however, their antioxidant activity in planta has been debated. Flavonols accumulate in guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana, but not surrounding pavement cells, as visualized with a flavonol-specific dye. The expression of a reporter driven by the promoter of CHALCONE SYNTHASE, a gene encoding a flavonol biosynthetic enzyme, in guard cells, but not pavement cells, suggests guard cell-specific flavonoid synthesis. Increased levels of ROS were detected using a fluorescent ROS sensor in guard cells of transparent testa4-2, which has a null mutation in CHALCONE SYNTHASE and therefore synthesizes no flavonol antioxidants. Guard cells of transparent testa4-2 show more rapid ABA-induced closure than the wild type, suggesting that flavonols may dampen the ABA-dependent ROS burst that drives stomatal closing. The levels of flavonols are positively regulated in guard cells by ethylene treatment in the wild type, but not in the ethylene-insensitive2-5 mutant. In addition, in both ethylene-overproducing1 and ethylene-treated wild-type plants, elevated flavonols lead to decreasing ROS and slower ABA-mediated stomatal closure. These results are consistent with flavonols suppressing ROS accumulation and decreasing the rate of ABA-dependent stomatal closure, with ethylene-induced increases in guard cell flavonols modulating these responses. PMID:24596331

  7. Level of deprivation does not affect degree of discounting in pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Luís; Calvert, Amanda L.; Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments tested the effects of food deprivation on discounting in pigeons. An adjusting-amount procedure was used to estimate the subjective value of food at delays ranging from 1 to 24 s. Experiment 1 compared pigeons’ discounting of delayed food reinforcers at 75-80% and 90-95% of free-feeding weight. Experiment 2 compared discounting under 1-hr and 23-hr food deprivation. In both experiments at both deprivation levels, discounting was well described by the hyperboloid discounting function. No systematic effect of level of deprivation on degree of discounting was observed in either experiment. This finding is consistent with the view that pigeons’ choices are controlled by the relative, rather than the absolute, value of reinforcers. PMID:22983791

  8. Level of deprivation does not affect degree of discounting in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luís; Calvert, Amanda L; Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel

    2013-06-01

    Two experiments tested the effects of food deprivation on discounting in pigeons. An adjusting-amount procedure was used to estimate the subjective value of food at delays ranging from 1 to 24 s. Experiment 1 compared pigeons' discounting of delayed food reinforcers at 75 %-80 % and 90 %-95 % of free-feeding weight. Experiment 2 compared discounting under 1- and 23-h food deprivation. In both experiments at both deprivation levels, discounting was well described by the hyperboloid discounting function. No systematic effect of level of deprivation on degree of discounting was observed in either experiment. This finding is consistent with the view that pigeons' choices are controlled by the relative, rather than the absolute, value of reinforcers. PMID:22983791

  9. Cholesterol level affects surface charge of lipid membranes in saline solution

    PubMed Central

    Magarkar, Aniket; Dhawan, Vivek; Kallinteri, Paraskevi; Viitala, Tapani; Elmowafy, Mohammed; Róg, Tomasz; Bunker, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important component of all biological membranes as well as drug delivery liposomes. We show here that increasing the level of cholesterol in a phospholipid membrane decreases surface charge in the physiological environment. Through molecular dynamics simulation we have shown that increasing the level of cholesterol decreases Na+ ion binding. Complementary experimental ζ – potential measurements have shown a decreased ζ – potential with increasing cholesterol content, indicative of reduced surface charge. Both experiments and simulations have been carried out on both saturated 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and monounsaturated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) membranes. This result is particularly important because membrane surface charge plays an important role in the interactions of biomembranes with peripheral membrane proteins and drug delivery liposomes with the immune system. PMID:24845659

  10. Transient exposure to low levels of insecticide affects metabolic networks of honeybee larvae.

    PubMed

    Derecka, Kamila; Blythe, Martin J; Malla, Sunir; Genereux, Diane P; Guffanti, Alessandro; Pavan, Paolo; Moles, Anna; Snart, Charles; Ryder, Thomas; Ortori, Catharine A; Barrett, David A; Schuster, Eugene; Stöger, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The survival of a species depends on its capacity to adjust to changing environmental conditions, and new stressors. Such new, anthropogenic stressors include the neonicotinoid class of crop-protecting agents, which have been implicated in the population declines of pollinating insects, including honeybees (Apis mellifera). The low-dose effects of these compounds on larval development and physiological responses have remained largely unknown. Over a period of 15 days, we provided syrup tainted with low levels (2 µg/L(-1)) of the neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid to beehives located in the field. We measured transcript levels by RNA sequencing and established lipid profiles using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry from worker-bee larvae of imidacloprid-exposed (IE) and unexposed, control (C) hives. Within a catalogue of 300 differentially expressed transcripts in larvae from IE hives, we detect significant enrichment of genes functioning in lipid-carbohydrate-mitochondrial metabolic networks. Myc-involved transcriptional response to exposure of this neonicotinoid is indicated by overrepresentation of E-box elements in the promoter regions of genes with altered expression. RNA levels for a cluster of genes encoding detoxifying P450 enzymes are elevated, with coordinated downregulation of genes in glycolytic and sugar-metabolising pathways. Expression of the environmentally responsive Hsp90 gene is also reduced, suggesting diminished buffering and stability of the developmental program. The multifaceted, physiological response described here may be of importance to our general understanding of pollinator health. Muscles, for instance, work at high glycolytic rates and flight performance could be impacted should low levels of this evolutionarily novel stressor likewise induce downregulation of energy metabolising genes in adult pollinators. PMID:23844170

  11. Is the fact of parenting couples cohabitation affecting the serum levels of persistent organohalogen pollutants?

    PubMed

    Góralczyk, Katarzyna; Struciński, Paweł; Wojtyniak, Bogdan; Rabczenko, Daniel; Lindh, Christian H; Jönsson, Bo A G; Toft, Gunnar; Lenters, Virissa; Czaja, Katarzyna; Hernik, Agnieszka; Bonde, Jens Peter; Pedersen, Henning S; Zvyezday, Valentyna; Ludwicki, Jan K

    2015-06-01

    Organohalogen compounds constitute one of the important groups of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Among them, due to their long-term health effects, one should pay attention on organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and perfluoroalkylated substances (PFASs). This paper is an attempt to answer the question about relation between the fact of cohabitation by couples expecting a child and the level of the organohalogen compounds in the blood serum of both parents. The study was done on a population of parent couples from Greenland, Poland and Ukraine, from whom blood samples were collected in order to establish the levels of marker organohalogen compounds. We selected, as the representative of these compounds, the most persistent metabolite of DDT, i.e. p,p'-DDE, the most frequently detected PCB congener - CB-153, and PFOS and PFOA as the representatives of PFASs. The results show that in case of all compounds under study the highest concentrations were present always in men in relation to the levels detected in the blood serum of their female partners, regardless of the country of origin of the couple. A positive correlation was noted between the concentrations of the studied compounds in the blood serum of men and women in parenting couples. In some cases these correlations were statistically significant, e.g. for concentrations of p,p'-DDE in pairs from Greenland and Ukraine, of CB-153 in pairs from Poland and Ukraine, and of PFOS for parents from Greenland and Poland, while for PFOA - only for couples from Greenland. The concentrations of the compounds included in the study were similar to the levels found in general population in other countries. Our results show that the exposure to POPs resulting from cohabitation plays a role in the general exposure to these compounds. PMID:25836759

  12. Habitat Degradation and Seasonality Affect Physiological Stress Levels of Eulemur collaris in Littoral Forest Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Balestri, Michela; Barresi, Marta; Campera, Marco; Serra, Valentina; Ramanamanjato, Jean Baptiste; Heistermann, Michael; Donati, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The littoral forest on sandy soil is among the most threatened habitats in Madagascar and, as such, it represents a hot-spot within a conservation hot-spot. Assessing the health of the resident lemur fauna is not only critical for the long-term viability of these populations, but also necessary for the future re-habilitation of this unique habitat. Since the Endangered collared brown lemur, Eulemur collaris, is the largest seed disperser of the Malagasy south-eastern littoral forest its survival in this habitat is crucial. In this study we compared fecal glucocorticoid metabolite (fGCM) levels, a measure of physiological stress and potential early indicator of population health, between groups of collared brown lemurs living in a degraded forest fragment and groups occurring in a more preserved area. For this, we analysed 279 fecal samples collected year-round from 4 groups of collared brown lemurs using a validated 11-oxoetiocholanolone enzyme immunoassay and tested if fGCM levels were influenced by reproductive stages, phenological seasons, sex, and habitat degradation. The lemurs living in the degraded forest had significantly higher fGCM levels than those living in the more preserved area. In particular, the highest fGCM levels were found during the mating season in all animals and in females during gestation in the degraded forest. Since mating and gestation are both occurring during the lean season in the littoral forest, these results likely reflect a combination of ecological and reproductive pressures. Our findings provide a clear indication that habitat degradation has additive effects to the challenges found in the natural habitat. Since increased stress hormone output may have long-term negative effects on population health and reproduction, our data emphasize the need for and may add to the development of effective conservation plans for the species. PMID:25229944

  13. COMBINED CIS-REGULATOR ELEMENTS AS IMPORTANT MECHANISM AFFECTING FXII PLASMA LEVELS

    PubMed Central

    Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chillón, Miguel; Mordillo, Carolina; Martínez, Ángel; Gil, Estel; Mateo, José; Blangero, John; Almasy, Laura; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Soria, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Factor XII (FXII) deficiency is a recessive Mendelian trait due to mutations in the F12 gene. There is no bleeding associated with FXII deficiency, but FXII deficiency has been reported to be associated with risk of thrombosis in some studies. Material and Methods We examined the functional effect of two naturally-occurring mutations in two Spanish FXII deficient families: a C/G substitution at position –8, and a C/T substitution at position –13. Both mutations were located on a putative HNF4 binding site of F12 gene promoter. We also analyzed the F12 C46T polymorphism (rs1801020), associated with a decrease in the FXII levels, which also segregated in both families. A fragment containing each one of both –8 and -13 mutations, was cloned 5′ of a reporter gene. We compared the in vitro expression of these constructs to the wild type expression. Results Our analyses confirm that the –8C/G and the –13C/T mutations decreased expression levels, demonstrating that both mutations are involved in the observed FXII deficiency. In addition, electrophoretic shift analyses suggest that they alter the union of nuclear proteins to the promoter. Coinheritance of these mutations with the C46T polymorphism, result in a significant genotype-phenotype correlation. Conclusions We have identified two naturally-occurring mutations in the F12 promoter that drastically reduce FXII levels. Knowing rare genetic alterations in the F12 gene, together with the C46T common variant, may yield further understanding about the genetic architecture of FXII levels, which may have a role in the risk of thrombosis. PMID:19786295

  14. Transient Exposure to Low Levels of Insecticide Affects Metabolic Networks of Honeybee Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Derecka, Kamila; Blythe, Martin J.; Malla, Sunir; Genereux, Diane P.; Guffanti, Alessandro; Pavan, Paolo; Moles, Anna; Snart, Charles; Ryder, Thomas; Ortori, Catharine A.; Barrett, David A.; Schuster, Eugene; Stöger, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The survival of a species depends on its capacity to adjust to changing environmental conditions, and new stressors. Such new, anthropogenic stressors include the neonicotinoid class of crop-protecting agents, which have been implicated in the population declines of pollinating insects, including honeybees (Apis mellifera). The low-dose effects of these compounds on larval development and physiological responses have remained largely unknown. Over a period of 15 days, we provided syrup tainted with low levels (2 µg/L−1) of the neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid to beehives located in the field. We measured transcript levels by RNA sequencing and established lipid profiles using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry from worker-bee larvae of imidacloprid-exposed (IE) and unexposed, control (C) hives. Within a catalogue of 300 differentially expressed transcripts in larvae from IE hives, we detect significant enrichment of genes functioning in lipid-carbohydrate-mitochondrial metabolic networks. Myc-involved transcriptional response to exposure of this neonicotinoid is indicated by overrepresentation of E-box elements in the promoter regions of genes with altered expression. RNA levels for a cluster of genes encoding detoxifying P450 enzymes are elevated, with coordinated downregulation of genes in glycolytic and sugar-metabolising pathways. Expression of the environmentally responsive Hsp90 gene is also reduced, suggesting diminished buffering and stability of the developmental program. The multifaceted, physiological response described here may be of importance to our general understanding of pollinator health. Muscles, for instance, work at high glycolytic rates and flight performance could be impacted should low levels of this evolutionarily novel stressor likewise induce downregulation of energy metabolising genes in adult pollinators. PMID:23844170

  15. Factors affecting the levels of tea polyphenols and caffeine in tea leaves.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Tsai, Yao-Jen; Tsay, Jyh-Shyan; Lin, Jen-Kun

    2003-03-26

    An isocratic HPLC procedure was developed for the simultaneous determination of caffeine and six catechins in tea samples. When 31 commercial teas extracted by boiling water or 75% ethanol were analyzed by HPLC, the levels of (-)-epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG), and total catechins in teas were in the order green tea (old leaves) > green tea (young leaves) and oolong tea > black tea and pu-erh tea. Tea samples extracted by 75% ethanol could yield higher levels of EGCG and total catechins. The contents of caffeine and catechins also have been measured in fresh tea leaves from the Tea Experiment Station in Wen-Shan or Taitung; the old tea leaves contain less caffeine but more EGCG and total catechins than young ones. To compare caffeine and catechins in the same tea but manufactured by different fermentation processes, the level of caffeine in different manufactured teas was in the order black tea > oolong tea > green tea > fresh tea leaf, but the levels of EGCG and total catechins were in the order green tea > oolong tea > fresh tea leaf > black tea. In addition, six commercial tea extracts were used to test the biological functions including hydroxyl radical scavenging, nitric oxide suppressing, and apoptotic effects. The pu-erh tea extracts protected the plasmid DNA from damage by the Fenton reaction as well as the control at a concentration of 100 microg/mL. The nitric oxide suppressing effect of tea extracts was in the order pu-erh tea >/= black tea > green tea > oolong tea. The induction of apoptosis by tea extract has been demonstrated by DNA fragmentation ladder and flow cytometry. It appeared that the ability of tea extracts to induce HL-60 cells apoptosis was in the order green tea > oolong > black tea > pu-erh tea. All tea extracts extracted by 75% ethanol have stronger biological functions than those extracted by boiling water. PMID:12643643

  16. Bacterial Communities in Malagasy Soils with Differing Levels of Disturbance Affecting Botanical Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Blasiak, Leah C.; Schmidt, Alex W.; Andriamiarinoro, Honoré; Mulaw, Temesgen; Rasolomampianina, Rado; Applequist, Wendy L.; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rejo-Fienena, Félicitée; Lowry, Porter P.; Schmidt, Thomas M.; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas. PMID:24465484

  17. Structural-level factors affecting implementation of the methadone maintenance therapy program in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chunqing; Wu, Zunyou; Rou, Keming; Yin, Wenyuan; Wang, Changhe; Shoptaw, Steven; Detels, Roger

    2010-03-01

    This study identifies structural-level factors influencing methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) program implementation in China. Twenty-eight service providers and 560 randomly selected clients from 28 MMT clinics in the study area underwent face-to-face interviews. Number of clients, retention rate, coverage, and structural-level factors were collected from a survey of service providers. Individual-level factors and self-reported illicit drug use information were obtained from clients. Urine specimens were collected from the client participants to test for heroin use. Clinics affiliated with the local Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had more clients, higher retention rates, and broader coverage than those not affiliated with the CDC. Longer operating hours, incentive for compliant clients, and comprehensive services were positively associated with client recruitment and coverage. Comprehensive services and incentives for compliant clients were negatively associated with concurrent illicit drug use. Comprehensive services should be incorporated into the MMT program. Extended operating hours and incentives for compliant clients should be implemented. PMID:20015606

  18. Lactic acid bacteria affect serum cholesterol levels, harmful fecal enzyme activity, and fecal water content

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Do Kyung; Jang, Seok; Baek, Eun Hye; Kim, Mi Jin; Lee, Kyung Soon; Shin, Hea Soon; Chung, Myung Jun; Kim, Jin Eung; Lee, Kang Oh; Ha, Nam Joo

    2009-01-01

    Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are beneficial probiotic organisms that contribute to improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract, as well as lower cholesterol. Although present in many foods, most trials have been in spreads or dairy products. Here we tested whether Bifidobacteria isolates could lower cholesterol, inhibit harmful enzyme activities, and control fecal water content. Methods In vitro culture experiments were performed to evaluate the ability of Bifidobacterium spp. isolated from healthy Koreans (20~30 years old) to reduce cholesterol-levels in MRS broth containing polyoxyethanylcholesterol sebacate. Animal experiments were performed to investigate the effects on lowering cholesterol, inhibiting harmful enzyme activities, and controlling fecal water content. For animal studies, 0.2 ml of the selected strain cultures (108~109 CFU/ml) were orally administered to SD rats (fed a high-cholesterol diet) every day for 2 weeks. Results B. longum SPM1207 reduced serum total cholesterol and LDL levels significantly (p < 0.05), and slightly increased serum HDL. B. longum SPM1207 also increased fecal LAB levels and fecal water content, and reduced body weight and harmful intestinal enzyme activities. Conclusion Daily consumption of B. longum SPM1207 can help in managing mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia, with potential to improve human health by helping to prevent colon cancer and constipation. PMID:19515264

  19. Brain Levels of Prostaglandins, Endocannabinoids, and Related Lipids Are Affected by Mating Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Jordyn M.; Paris, Jason J.; Frye, Cheryl; Bradshaw, Heather B.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) are involved in the development and regulation of reproductive behaviors. Likewise, prostaglandins (PGs) drive sexual differentiation and initiation of ovulation. Here, we use lipidomics strategies to test the hypotheses that mating immediately activates the biosynthesis and/or metabolism of eCBs and PGs and that specific mating strategies differentially regulate these lipids in the brain. Methods. Lipid extractions and tandem mass spectrometric analysis were performed on brains from proestrous rats that had experienced one of two mating strategies (paced or standard mating) and two nonmated groups (chamber exposed and home cage controls). Levels of PGs (PGE2 and PGF2alpha), eCBs (AEA and 2-AG, N-arachidonoyl glycine), and 4 related lipids (4 N-acylethanolamides) were measured in olfactory bulb, hypothalamus, hippocampus, thalamus, striatum, midbrain, cerebellum, and brainstem. Results. Overall, levels of these lipids were significantly lower among paced compared to standard mated rats with the most dramatic decreases observed in brainstem, hippocampus, midbrain, and striatum. However, chamber exposed rats had significantly higher levels of these lipids compared to home cage controls and paced mated wherein the hippocampus showed the largest increases. Conclusions. These data demonstrate that mating strategies and exposure to mating arenas influence lipid signaling in the brain. PMID:24369463

  20. Bacterial communities in Malagasy soils with differing levels of disturbance affecting botanical diversity.

    PubMed

    Blasiak, Leah C; Schmidt, Alex W; Andriamiarinoro, Honoré; Mulaw, Temesgen; Rasolomampianina, Rado; Applequist, Wendy L; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rejo-Fienena, Félicitée; Lowry, Porter P; Schmidt, Thomas M; Hill, Russell T

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas. PMID:24465484

  1. Evidence for several independent genetic variants affecting lipoprotein (a) cholesterol levels

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wensheng; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Keping; Wang, Hong; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Still, Christopher D.; Chu, Xin; Yang, Rongze; Parihar, Ankita; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Pollin, Toni I.; Angles-Cano, Eduardo; Quon, Michael J.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Fu, Mao

    2015-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis-related events that is under strong genetic control (heritability = 0.68–0.98). However, causal mutations and functional validation of biological pathways modulating Lp(a) metabolism are lacking. We performed a genome-wide association scan to identify genetic variants associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol levels in the Old Order Amish. We confirmed a previously known locus on chromosome 6q25-26 and found Lp(a) levels also to be significantly associated with a SNP near the APOA5–APOA4–APOC3–APOA1 gene cluster on chromosome 11q23 linked in the Amish to the APOC3 R19X null mutation. On 6q locus, we detected associations of Lp(a)-cholesterol with 118 common variants (P = 5 × 10−8 to 3.91 × 10−19) spanning a ∼5.3 Mb region that included the LPA gene. To further elucidate variation within LPA, we sequenced LPA and identified two variants most strongly associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol, rs3798220 (P = 1.07 × 10−14) and rs10455872 (P = 1.85 × 10−12). We also measured copy numbers of kringle IV-2 (KIV-2) in LPA using qPCR. KIV-2 numbers were significantly associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol (P = 2.28 × 10−9). Conditional analyses revealed that rs3798220 and rs10455872 were associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol levels independent of each other and KIV-2 copy number. Furthermore, we determined for the first time that levels of LPA mRNA were higher in the carriers than non-carriers of rs10455872 (P = 0.0001) and were not different between carriers and non-carriers of rs3798220. Protein levels of apo(a) were higher in the carriers than non-carriers of both rs10455872 and rs3798220. In summary, we identified multiple independent genetic determinants for Lp(a)-cholesterol. These findings provide new insights into Lp(a) regulation. PMID:25575512

  2. Rice Stomatal Closure Requires Guard Cell Plasma Membrane ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter RCN1/OsABCG5.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shuichi; Takano, Sho; Sato, Moeko; Furukawa, Kaoru; Nagasawa, Hidetaka; Yoshikawa, Shoko; Kasuga, Jun; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Nakazono, Mikio; Takamure, Itsuro; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2016-03-01

    Water stress is one of the major environmental stresses that affect agricultural production worldwide. Water loss from plants occurs primarily through stomatal pores. Here, we report that an Oryza sativa half-size ATP-binding cassette (ABC) subfamily G protein, RCN1/OsABCG5, is involved in stomatal closure mediated by phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation in guard cells. We found that the GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5-fusion protein was localized at the plasma membrane in guard cells. The percentage of guard cell pairs containing both ABA and GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5 increased after exogenous ABA treatment, whereas they were co-localized in guard cell pairs regardless of whether exogenous ABA was applied. ABA application resulted in a smaller increase in the percentage of guard cell pairs containing ABA in rcn1 mutant (A684P) and RCN1-RNAi than in wild-type plants. Furthermore, polyethylene glycol (drought stress)-inducible ABA accumulation in guard cells did not occur in rcn1 mutants. Stomata closure mediated by exogenous ABA application was strongly reduced in rcn1 mutants. Finally, rcn1 mutant plants had more rapid water loss from detached leaves than the wild-type plants. These results indicate that in response to drought stress, RCN1/OsABCG5 is involved in accumulation of ABA in guard cells, which is indispensable for stomatal closure. PMID:26708605

  3. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  4. Trends in stomatal density and 13C/12C ratios of Pinus flexilis needles during last glacial-interglacial cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van De Water, Peter K.; Leavitt, Steven W.; Betancourt, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of stomatal density and ?? 13C of limber pine (Pinus flexilis) needles (leaves) preserved in pack rat middens from the Great Basin reveal shifts in plant physiology and leaf morphology during the last 30,000 years. Sites were selected so as to offset glacial to Holocene climatic differences and thus to isolate the effects of changing atmospheric CO2 levels. Stomatal density decreased ~17 percent and ?? 13C decreased ~1.5 per mil during deglaciation from 15,000 to 12,000 years ago, concomitant with a 30 percent increase in atmospheric CO2. Water-use efficiency increased ~15 percent during deglaciation, if temperature and humidity were held constant and the proxy values for CO2 and ?? 13C of past atmospheres are accurate. The ??13C variations may help constrain hypotheses about the redistribution of carbon between the atmosphere and biosphere during the last glacial-interglacial cycle.

  5. Determination of stomatal conductance by means of infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajons, P.; Klinger, G.; Schlosser, V.

    2005-06-01

    The leaf energy balance equation is extended to obtain the boundary layer resistances to heat transfer and the stomatal resistance, the stomatal conductance respectively, of leaves in vivo. Calculations are based on the determination of temperature rise and fall times (thermal time constants of leaves in different states) which are caused by a sudden change of irradiation intensity. The change in the irradiation was performed by turning on/off a laser diode (675 nm). To measure the temperature and its changes without direct contact with the leaves, a commercial IR-imaging system (thermo-camera) was employed. Experiments were made on ivy leaves under laboratory conditions. The advantages and the applicability of the new method are demonstrated and experienced experimental difficulties are discussed.

  6. Solubilization and reconstitution of vesicular stomatitis virus envelope using octylglucoside.

    PubMed Central

    Paternostre, M; Viard, M; Meyer, O; Ghanam, M; Ollivon, M; Blumenthal, R

    1997-01-01

    Reconstituted vesicular stomatitis virus envelopes or virosomes are formed by detergent removal from solubilized intact virus. We have monitored the solubilization process of the intact vesicular stomatitis virus by the nonionic surfactant octylglucoside at various initial virus concentrations by employing turbidity measurements. This allowed us to determine the phase boundaries between the membrane and the mixed micelles domains. We have also characterized the lipid and protein content of the solubilized material and of the reconstituted envelope. Both G and M proteins and all of the lipids of the envelope were extracted by octylglucoside and recovered in the reconstituted envelope. Fusion activity of the virosomes tested either on Vero cells or on liposomes showed kinetics and pH dependence similar to those of the intact virus. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:9083672

  7. Remission of severe aphthous stomatitis of celiac disease with etanercept

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common autoimmune disease triggered by gluten-containing foods (wheat, barley and rye) in genetically predisposed individuals. We present a patient with celiac disease complicated by severe aphthous stomatitis resulting in impairing swallowing, chewing and speaking. This led to weight loss, psychosocial problems as well as inability to perform her work. A variety of topical and systemic medications used resulted in either no improvement or only partial alleviation of the patient’s symptoms. After informed consent, etanercept was initiated and resulted in complete remission of aphthous stomatitis, decrease in arthralgia and fatigue and considerable improvement in her quality of life. The use of newer biological agents for selected and severe manifestations of celiac disease may lead to improved morbidity in these patients, but more studies are needed to determine long-term efficacy as well as safety of these drugs in the mucosal and/or systemic complications of this disease. PMID:24365222

  8. Amphetamine withdrawal differentially affects hippocampal and peripheral corticosterone levels in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Bray, Brenna; Scholl, Jamie L; Tu, Wenyu; Watt, Michael J; Renner, Kenneth J; Forster, Gina L

    2016-08-01

    Amphetamine withdrawal is associated with heightened anxiety-like behavior, which is directly driven by blunted stress-induced glucocorticoid receptor-dependent serotonin release in the ventral hippocampus. This suggests that glucocorticoid availability in the ventral hippocampus during stress may be reduced during amphetamine withdrawal. Therefore, we tested whether amphetamine withdrawal alters either peripheral or hippocampal corticosterone stress responses. Adult male rats received amphetamine (2.5mg/kg, ip) or saline for 14 days followed by 2 weeks of withdrawal. Contrary to our prediction, microdialysis samples from freely-moving rats revealed that restraint stress-induced corticosterone levels in the ventral hippocampus are enhanced by amphetamine withdrawal relative to controls. In separate groups of rats, plasma corticosterone levels increased immediately after 20min of restraint and decreased to below stress-naïve levels after 1h, indicating negative feedback regulation of corticosterone following stress. However, plasma corticosterone responses were similar in amphetamine-withdrawn and control rats. Neither amphetamine nor stress exposure significantly altered protein expression or enzyme activity of the steroidogenic enzymes 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD1) or hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PD) in the ventral hippocampus. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that amphetamine withdrawal potentiates stress-induced corticosterone in the ventral hippocampus, which may contribute to increased behavioral stress sensitivity previously observed during amphetamine withdrawal. However, this is not mediated by either changes in plasma corticosterone or hippocampal steroidogenic enzymes. Establishing enhanced ventral hippocampal corticosterone as a direct cause of greater stress sensitivity may identify the glucocorticoid system as a novel target for treating behavioral symptoms of amphetamine withdrawal. PMID:27208490

  9. The Choice of Hemodialysis Membrane Affects Bisphenol A Levels in Blood.

    PubMed

    Bosch-Panadero, Enrique; Mas, Sebastian; Sanchez-Ospina, Didier; Camarero, Vanesa; Pérez-Gómez, Maria V; Saez-Calero, Isabel; Abaigar, Pedro; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus; González-Parra, Emilio

    2016-05-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a component of some dialysis membranes, accumulates in CKD. Observational studies have linked BPA exposure to kidney and cardiovascular injury in humans, and animal studies have described a causative link. Normal kidneys rapidly excrete BPA, but insufficient excretion may sensitize patients with CKD to adverse the effects of BPA. Using a crossover design, we studied the effect of dialysis with BPA-containing polysulfone or BPA-free polynephron dialyzers on BPA levels in 69 prevalent patients on hemodialysis: 28 patients started on polysulfone dialyzers and were switched to polynephron dialyzers; 41 patients started on polynephron dialyzers and were switched to polysulfone dialyzers. Results were grouped for analysis. Mean BPA levels increased after one hemodialysis session with polysulfone dialyzers but not with polynephron dialyzers. Chronic (3-month) use of polysulfone dialyzers did not significantly increase predialysis serum BPA levels, although a trend toward increase was detected (from 48.8±6.8 to 69.1±10.1 ng/ml). Chronic use of polynephron dialyzers reduced predialysis serum BPA (from 70.6±8.4 to 47.1±7.5 ng/ml, P<0.05). Intracellular BPA in PBMCs increased after chronic hemodialysis with polysulfone dialyzers (from 0.039±0.002 to 0.043±0.001 ng/10(6) cells, P<0.01), but decreased with polynephron dialyzers (from 0.045±0.001 to 0.036±0.001 ng/10(6) cells, P<0.01). Furthermore, chronic hemodialysis with polysulfone dialyzers increased oxidative stress in PBMCs and inflammatory marker concentrations in circulation. In vitro, polysulfone membranes released significantly more BPA into the culture medium and induced more cytokine production in cultured PBMCs than did polynephron membranes. In conclusion, dialyzer BPA content may contribute to BPA burden in patients on hemodialysis. PMID:26432902

  10. Light Levels Affect Carbon Utilisation in Tropical Seagrass under Ocean Acidification

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Under future ocean acidification (OA), increased availability of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in seawater may enhance seagrass productivity. However, the ability to utilise additional DIC could be regulated by light availability, often reduced through land runoff. To test this, two tropical seagrass species, Cymodocea serrulata and Halodule uninervis were exposed to two DIC concentrations (447 μatm and 1077 μatm pCO2), and three light treatments (35, 100, 380 μmol m-2 s-1) for two weeks. DIC uptake mechanisms were separately examined by measuring net photosynthetic rates while subjecting C. serrulata and H. uninervis to changes in light and addition of bicarbonate (HCO3-) use inhibitors (carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide) and TRIS buffer (pH 8.0). We observed a strong dependence on energy driven H+-HCO3- co-transport (TRIS, which disrupts H+ extrusion) in C. serrulata under all light levels, indicating greater CO2 dependence in low light. This was confirmed when, after two weeks exposure, DIC enrichment stimulated maximum photosynthetic rates (Pmax) and efficiency (α) more in C. serrulata grown under lower light levels (36–60% increase) than for those in high light (4% increase). However, C. serrulata growth increased with both DIC enrichment and light levels. Growth, NPP and photosynthetic responses in H. uninervis increased with higher light treatments and were independent of DIC availability. Furthermore, H. uninervis was found to be more flexible in HCO3- uptake pathways. Here, light availability influenced productivity responses to DIC enrichment, via both carbon fixation and acquisition processes, highlighting the role of water quality in future responses to OA. PMID:26938454

  11. Light Levels Affect Carbon Utilisation in Tropical Seagrass under Ocean Acidification.

    PubMed

    Ow, Yan X; Uthicke, Sven; Collier, Catherine J

    2016-01-01

    Under future ocean acidification (OA), increased availability of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in seawater may enhance seagrass productivity. However, the ability to utilise additional DIC could be regulated by light availability, often reduced through land runoff. To test this, two tropical seagrass species, Cymodocea serrulata and Halodule uninervis were exposed to two DIC concentrations (447 μatm and 1077 μatm pCO2), and three light treatments (35, 100, 380 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) for two weeks. DIC uptake mechanisms were separately examined by measuring net photosynthetic rates while subjecting C. serrulata and H. uninervis to changes in light and addition of bicarbonate (HCO3-) use inhibitors (carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide) and TRIS buffer (pH 8.0). We observed a strong dependence on energy driven H+-HCO3- co-transport (TRIS, which disrupts H+ extrusion) in C. serrulata under all light levels, indicating greater CO2 dependence in low light. This was confirmed when, after two weeks exposure, DIC enrichment stimulated maximum photosynthetic rates (Pmax) and efficiency (α) more in C. serrulata grown under lower light levels (36-60% increase) than for those in high light (4% increase). However, C. serrulata growth increased with both DIC enrichment and light levels. Growth, NPP and photosynthetic responses in H. uninervis increased with higher light treatments and were independent of DIC availability. Furthermore, H. uninervis was found to be more flexible in HCO3- uptake pathways. Here, light availability influenced productivity responses to DIC enrichment, via both carbon fixation and acquisition processes, highlighting the role of water quality in future responses to OA. PMID:26938454

  12. Factors affecting the energy cost of level running at submaximal speed.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Jean-René; Bourdin, Muriel

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic measurement is still the criterion for investigation of the efficiency of mechanical work and for analysis of endurance performance in running. Metabolic demand may be expressed either as the energy spent per unit distance (energy cost of running, C r) or as energy demand at a given running speed (running economy). Systematic studies showed a range of costs of about 20 % between runners. Factors affecting C r include body dimensions: body mass and leg architecture, mostly calcaneal tuberosity length, responsible for 60-80 % of the variability. Children show a higher C r than adults. Higher resting metabolism and lower leg length/stature ratio are the main putative factors responsible for the difference. Elastic energy storage and reuse also contribute to the variability of C r. The increase in C r with increasing running speed due to increase in mechanical work is blunted till 6-7 m s(-1) by the increase in vertical stiffness and the decrease in ground contact time. Fatigue induced by prolonged or intense running is associated with up to 10 % increased C r; the contribution of metabolic and biomechanical factors remains unclear. Women show a C r similar to men of similar body mass, despite differences in gait pattern. The superiority of black African runners is presumably related to their leg architecture and better elastic energy storage and reuse. PMID:25681108

  13. Water level changes affect carbon turnover and microbial community composition in lake sediments

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Lukas; Ulrich, Andreas; Moreano, Matilde; Gessler, Arthur; E. Kayler, Zachary; Steger, Kristin; Zeller, Bernd; Rudolph, Kristin; Knezevic-Jaric, Jelena; Premke, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Due to climate change, many lakes in Europe will be subject to higher variability of hydrological characteristics in their littoral zones. These different hydrological regimes might affect the use of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon sources. We used sandy sediment microcosms to examine the effects of different hydrological regimes (wet, desiccating, and wet-desiccation cycles) on carbon turnover. 13C-labelled particulate organic carbon was used to trace and estimate carbon uptake into bacterial biomass (via phospholipid fatty acids) and respiration. Microbial community changes were monitored by combining DNA- and RNA-based real-time PCR quantification and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA. The shifting hydrological regimes in the sediment primarily caused two linked microbial effects: changes in the use of available organic carbon and community composition changes. Drying sediments yielded the highest CO2 emission rates, whereas hydrological shifts increased the uptake of allochthonous organic carbon for respiration. T-RFLP patterns demonstrated that only the most extreme hydrological changes induced a significant shift in the active and total bacterial communities. As current scenarios of climate change predict an increase of drought events, frequent variations of the hydrological regimes of many lake littoral zones in central Europe are anticipated. Based on the results of our study, this phenomenon may increase the intensity and amplitude in rates of allochthonous organic carbon uptake and CO2 emissions. PMID:26902802

  14. Water level changes affect carbon turnover and microbial community composition in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Weise, Lukas; Ulrich, Andreas; Moreano, Matilde; Gessler, Arthur; Kayler, Zachary E; Steger, Kristin; Zeller, Bernd; Rudolph, Kristin; Knezevic-Jaric, Jelena; Premke, Katrin

    2016-05-01

    Due to climate change, many lakes in Europe will be subject to higher variability of hydrological characteristics in their littoral zones. These different hydrological regimes might affect the use of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon sources. We used sandy sediment microcosms to examine the effects of different hydrological regimes (wet, desiccating, and wet-desiccation cycles) on carbon turnover. (13)C-labelled particulate organic carbon was used to trace and estimate carbon uptake into bacterial biomass (via phospholipid fatty acids) and respiration. Microbial community changes were monitored by combining DNA- and RNA-based real-time PCR quantification and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA. The shifting hydrological regimes in the sediment primarily caused two linked microbial effects: changes in the use of available organic carbon and community composition changes. Drying sediments yielded the highest CO2 emission rates, whereas hydrological shifts increased the uptake of allochthonous organic carbon for respiration. T-RFLP patterns demonstrated that only the most extreme hydrological changes induced a significant shift in the active and total bacterial communities. As current scenarios of climate change predict an increase of drought events, frequent variations of the hydrological regimes of many lake littoral zones in central Europe are anticipated. Based on the results of our study, this phenomenon may increase the intensity and amplitude in rates of allochthonous organic carbon uptake and CO2 emissions. PMID:26902802

  15. Analysis of factors affecting milking claw vacuum levels using a simulated milking device.

    PubMed

    Enokidani, Masafumi; Kuruhara, Kana; Kawai, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Bovine mastitis is typically caused by microbial infection of the udder, but the factors responsible for this condition are varied. One potential cause is the milking system, and although previous studies have investigated various methods for inspecting these devices, most have not assessed methods for evaluating the milking units. With this in mind, we analyzed the factors that affect the vacuum inside the milking claw by using a simulated milking device and by measuring milking claw vacuum when adjusting the flow rate in five stages. The factors analyzed in each milking system were the vacuum pressure settings (high and low line system) , milk tube length (200-328 cm), aperture diameter (14-22.2 mm), constricted aperture diameter (12 mm), tubing configurations, lift formation (0-80 cm), claw type (bottom and top flow) and use or non-use of a milk sampler. The study findings demonstrated that all of these variables had a significant impact on claw vacuum and suggest that a diagnostic method using a simulated milking device should be considered when inspecting modern milking systems. PMID:26336796

  16. Receptor clustering affects signal transduction at the membrane level in the reaction-limited regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caré, Bertrand R.; Soula, Hédi A.

    2013-01-01

    Many types of membrane receptors are found to be organized as clusters on the cell surface. We investigate the potential effect of such receptor clustering on the intracellular signal transduction stage. We consider a canonical pathway with a membrane receptor (R) activating a membrane-bound intracellular relay protein (G). We use Monte Carlo simulations to recreate biochemical reactions using different receptor spatial distributions and explore the dynamics of the signal transduction. Results show that activation of G by R is severely impaired by R clustering, leading to an apparent blunted biological effect compared to control. Paradoxically, this clustering decreases the half maximal effective dose (ED50) of the transduction stage, increasing the apparent affinity. We study an example of inter-receptor interaction in order to account for possible compensatory effects of clustering and observe the parameter range in which such interactions slightly counterbalance the loss of activation of G. The membrane receptors’ spatial distribution affects the internal stages of signal amplification, suggesting a functional role for membrane domains and receptor clustering independently of proximity-induced receptor-receptor interactions.

  17. Geochemical factors affecting radionuclide transport through near and far fields at a Low-Level Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.; Seme, R.J.; Piepkho, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    The concentration of low-level waste (LLW) contaminants in groundwater is determined by the amount of contaminant present in the solid waste, rate of release from the waste and surrounding barriers, and a number of geochemical processes including adsorption, desorption, diffusion, precipitation, and dissolution. To accurately predict radionuclide transport through the subsurface, it is essential that the important geochemical processes affecting radionuclide transport be identified and, perhaps more importantly, accurately quantified and described in a mathematically defensible manner.

  18. Endogenous hormone levels affect the regeneration ability of callus derived from different organs in barley.

    PubMed

    Hisano, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mori, Izumi C; Yamane, Miki; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Hordeum vulgare (barley) is an important agricultural crop worldwide. A simple and efficient transformation system is needed to analyze the functions of barley genes and generate lines with improved agronomic traits. Currently, Golden Promise and Igri are the most amenable barley cultivars for stable transformation. Here we evaluated the regeneration ratios and endogenous hormone levels of calli derived from various malting barley cultivars, including Golden Promise, Haruna Nijo, and Morex. We harvested samples not only from immature embryos, but also from different explants of juvenile plants, cotyledons, coleoptiles, and roots. The callus properties differed among genotypes and explant types. Calli derived from the immature embryos of Golden Promise, which showed the highest ratio of regeneration of green shoots, had the highest contents of indoleacetic acid, trans-zeatin, and cis-zeatin. By contrast, calli derived from the cotyledons of Morex and the immature embryos of Haruna Nijo had elevated levels of salicylic acid and abscisic acid, respectively. We thus propose that the former phytohormones are positively associated with the regeneration ability of callus but the later phytohormones are negatively associated. PMID:26735586

  19. Will environmental interventions affect the level of mastery motivation among children with disabilities? A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Waldman-Levi, Amiya; Erez, Asnat Bar-Haim

    2015-03-01

    Children with developmental disabilities tend to demonstrate lower levels of mastery motivation in comparison with typically developing children. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of physical and social environmental interventions on the mastery motivation of children with disabilities. Participants included 19 children (from two classes) with disabilities between the ages of 2-4 years from an educational rehabilitation centre. The Individualized Assessment of Mastery Motivation was used to assess the level of mastery motivation; the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale - Revised and the Teacher-Child Interaction Observation were used to assess the physical and social environments. A counterbalance study design was used such that the children from the two classes received two phases of intervention, social and physical environmental interventions. The study's results point to the advantage of the social intervention, over the physical one, in improving the child's mastery motivation. However, the results lend support for the efficacy of using both aspects of environmental changes to the overall persistent score. The study findings, although preliminary, demonstrate the efficacy of providing both social and physical environmental interventions to improve mastery motivation. PMID:25308165

  20. Reducing the likelihood of future human activities that could affect geologic high-level waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geologic formations provides a means of isolating the waste from people until the radioactivity has decayed to safe levels. However, isolating people from the wastes is a different problem, since we do not know what the future condition of society will be. The Human Interference Task Force was convened by the US Department of Energy to determine whether reasonable means exist (or could be developed) to reduce the likelihood of future human unintentionally intruding on radioactive waste isolation systems. The task force concluded that significant reductions in the likelihood of human interference could be achieved, for perhaps thousands of years into the future, if appropriate steps are taken to communicate the existence of the repository. Consequently, for two years the task force directed most of its study toward the area of long-term communication. Methods are discussed for achieving long-term communication by using permanent markers and widely disseminated records, with various steps taken to provide multiple levels of protection against loss, destruction, and major language/societal changes. Also developed is the concept of a universal symbol to denote Caution - Biohazardous Waste Buried Here. If used for the thousands of non-radioactive biohazardous waste sites in this country alone, a symbol could transcend generations and language changes, thereby vastly improving the likelihood of successful isolation of all buried biohazardous wastes.

  1. How environmental conditions affect canopy leaf-level photosynthesis in four deciduous tree species

    SciTech Connect

    Bassow, S.L.; Bazzaz, F.A.

    1998-12-01

    Species composition of temperate forests vary with successional age and seems likely to change in response to significant global climate change. Because photosynthesis rates in co-occurring tree species can differ in their sensitivity to environmental conditions, these changes in species composition are likely to alter the carbon dynamics of temperate forests. To help improve their understanding of such atmosphere-biosphere interactions, the authors explored changes in leaf-level photosynthesis in a 60--70 yr old temperate mixed-deciduous forest in Petersham, Massachusetts (USA). Diurnally and seasonally varying environmental conditions differentially influenced in situ leaf-level photosynthesis rates in the canopies of four mature temperate deciduous tree species: red oak (Quercus rubra), red maple (Acer rubrum), white birch (Betula papyrifera), and yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis). The authors measured in situ photosynthesis at two heights within the canopies through a diurnal time course on 7 d over two growing seasons. They simultaneously measured a suite of environmental conditions surrounding the leaf at the time of each measurement. The authors used path analysis to examine the influence of environmental factors on in situ photosynthesis in the tree canopies.

  2. Maternal High Fat Diet Affects Offspring’s Vitamin K-Dependent Proteins Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lanham, Stuart; Cagampang, Felino R.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.

    2015-01-01

    Studies suggest bone growth & development and susceptibility to vascular disease in later life are influenced by maternal nutrition, during intrauterine and early postnatal life. There is evidence for a role of vitamin K-dependent proteins (VKDPs) including Osteocalcin, Matrix-gla protein, Periostin, and Gas6, in bone and vascular development. This study extends the analysis of VKDPs previously conducted in 6 week old offspring, into offspring of 30 weeks of age, to assess the longer term effects of a maternal and postnatal high fat (HF) diet on VKDP expression. Overall a HF maternal diet and offspring diet exacerbated the bone changes observed. Sex specific and tissue specific differences were observed in VKDP expression for both aorta and femoral tissues. In addition, significant correlations were observed between femoral OCN, Periostin Gas6, and Vkor expression levels and measures of femoral bone structure. Furthermore, MGP, OCN, Ggcx and Vkor expression levels correlated to mass and fat volume, in both sexes. In summary the current study has highlighted the importance of the long-term effects of maternal nutrition on offspring bone development and the correlation of VKDPs to bone structure. PMID:26381752

  3. Systems dynamic modeling of the stomatal guard cell predicts emergent behaviors in transport, signaling, and volume control.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-Hua; Hills, Adrian; Bätz, Ulrike; Amtmann, Anna; Lew, Virgilio L; Blatt, Michael R

    2012-07-01

    The dynamics of stomatal movements and their consequences for photosynthesis and transpirational water loss have long been incorporated into mathematical models, but none have been developed from the bottom up that are widely applicable in predicting stomatal behavior at a cellular level. We previously established a systems dynamic model incorporating explicitly the wealth of biophysical and kinetic knowledge available for guard cell transport, signaling, and homeostasis. Here we describe the behavior of the model in response to experimentally documented changes in primary pump activities and malate (Mal) synthesis imposed over a diurnal cycle. We show that the model successfully recapitulates the cyclic variations in H⁺, K⁺, Cl⁻, and Mal concentrations in the cytosol and vacuole known for guard cells. It also yields a number of unexpected and counterintuitive outputs. Among these, we report a diurnal elevation in cytosolic-free Ca²⁺ concentration and an exchange of vacuolar Cl⁻ with Mal, both of which find substantiation in the literature but had previously been suggested to require additional and complex levels of regulation. These findings highlight the true predictive power of the OnGuard model in providing a framework for systems analysis of stomatal guard cells, and they demonstrate the utility of the OnGuard software and HoTSig library in exploring fundamental problems in cellular physiology and homeostasis. PMID:22635112

  4. Effects of experimental warming on stomatal traits in leaves of maize (Zea may L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yunpu; Xu, Ming; Hou, Ruixing; Shen, Ruichang; Qiu, Shuai; Ouyang, Zhu

    2013-01-01

    We examined the warming effects on the stomatal frequency, stomatal aperture size and shape, and their spatial distribution pattern of maize (Zea may L.) leaves using a light microscope, an electron scanning microscope, and geostatistic techniques. A field manipulative experiment was conducted to elevate canopy temperature by 2.08°C, on average. We found that experimental warming had little effect on stomatal density, but significantly increased stomatal index due to the reduction in the number of epidermal cells under the warming treatment. Warming also significantly decreased stomatal aperture length and increased stomatal aperture width. As a result, warming significantly increased the average stomatal aperture area and stomatal aperture circumference. In addition, warming dramatically changed the stomatal spatial distribution pattern with a substantial increase in the average nearest neighbor distance between stomata on both adaxial and abaxial surfaces. The spatial distribution pattern of stomata was scale dependent with regular patterns at small scales and random patterns at larger scales on both leaf surfaces. Warming caused the stomatal distribution to become more regular on both leaf surfaces with smaller L(t) values (Ripley's K-function, L(t) is an expectation of zero for any value of t) in the warming plots than the control plots. PMID:24101997

  5. Tulip-poplar leaf diffusion resistance calculated from stomatal dimensions and varying environmental parameters

    SciTech Connect

    McConathy, R.K.

    1983-03-01

    The study describes the gradients of stomatal size and density in the crown of a mature forest-grown tulip-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) in eastern Tennessee. These data are used to predict leaf resistance to vapor diffusion in relation to stomatal width and boundary layer resistance. Stomatal density on individual leaves did not vary, but density increased with increasing crown height. Stomatal size decreased with increasing height of leaves within the crown. Stomatal size and density variations interacted to result in a constant number of stomata per leaf at all crown heights. Stomatal diffusive resistance values calculated from stomatal measurements and varying environmental parameters indicated that stomatal resistance controlled transpiration water losses only at small apertures (<0.6 ..mu..m). Boundary layer resistance was controlling at large stomatal apertures (>0.6 ..mu..m) and at low wind speeds (approx.100 cm/s). Under normal forest conditions tulip-poplar stomatal resistance exercised more control over transpiration than did boundary layer resistance.

  6. Take a deep breath: peptide signalling in stomatal patterning and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Lynn G L; Torii, Keiko U

    2013-12-01

    Stomata are pores in the leaf surface that open and close to regulate gas exchange and minimize water loss. In Arabidopsis, a pair of guard cells surrounds each stoma and they are derived from precursors distributed in an organized pattern on the epidermis. Stomatal differentiation follows a well-defined developmental programme, regulated by stomatal lineage-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, and stomata are consistently separated by at least one epidermal cell (referred to as the 'one-cell-spacing rule') to allow for proper opening and closure of the stomatal aperture. Peptide signalling is involved in regulating stomatal differentiation and in enforcing the one-cell-spacing rule. The cysteine-rich peptides EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR 1 (EPF1) and EPF2 negatively regulate stomatal differentiation in cells adjacent to stomatal precursors, while STOMAGEN/EPFL9 is expressed in the mesophyll of developing leaves and positively regulates stomatal development. These peptides work co-ordinately with the ERECTA family of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor-like kinases and the LRR receptor-like protein TOO MANY MOUTHS. Recently, specific ligand-receptor pairs were identified that function at two different stages of stomatal development to restrict entry into the stomatal lineage, and later to orient precursor division away from existing stomata. These studies have provided the groundwork to begin to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in cell-cell communication during stomatal development. PMID:23997204

  7. Closing gaps: linking elements that control stomatal movement.

    PubMed

    Kollist, Hannes; Nuhkat, Maris; Roelfsema, M Rob G

    2014-07-01

    Stomata are an attractive experimental system in plant biology, because the responses of guard cells to environmental signals can be directly linked to changes in the aperture of stomatal pores. In this review, the mechanics of stomatal movement are discussed in relation to ion transport in guard cells. Emphasis is placed on the ion pumps, transporters, and channels in the plasma membrane, as well as in the vacuolar membrane. The biophysical properties of transport proteins for H(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and anions are discussed and related to their function in guard cells during stomatal movements. Guard cell signaling pathways for ABA, CO2, ozone, microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) and blue light are presented. Special attention is given to the regulation of the slow anion channel (SLAC) and SLAC homolog (SLAH)-type anion channels by the ABA signalosome. Over the last decade, several knowledge gaps in the regulation of ion transport in guard cells have been closed. The current state of knowledge is an excellent starting point for tackling important open questions concerning stress tolerance in plants. PMID:24800691

  8. Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Julian I.

    2007-05-02

    Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

  9. Glutamate functions in stomatal closure in Arabidopsis and fava bean.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Riichiro; Mori, Izumi C; Kamizono, Nobuto; Shichiri, Yudai; Shimatani, Tetsuo; Miyata, Fumika; Honda, Kenji; Iwai, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells are indispensable for higher plants because they control gas exchange and water balance to maintain photosynthetic activity. The signaling processes that govern their movement are controlled by several factors, such as abscisic acid (ABA), blue light, pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and carbon dioxide. Herein, we demonstrated that the amino acid glutamate (Glu), a well-known mammalian neurotransmitter, functions as a novel signaling molecule in stomatal closure in both Arabidopsis and fava bean (Vicia faba L.). Pharmacological and electrophysiological analyses provided important clues for the participation of Glu-receptors, Ca(2+), and protein phosphorylation during the signaling process. Genetic analyses using Arabidopsis ABA-deficient (aba2-1) and ABA-insensitive (abi1-1 and abi2-1) mutants showed that ABA is not required for Glu signaling. However, loss-of-function of the Arabidopsis gene encoding Slow Anion Channel-Associated 1 (SLAC1) and Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 6 (CPK6) impaired the Glu response. Moreover, T-DNA knockout mutations of the Arabidopsis Glu receptor-like gene (GLR), GLR3.5, lost their sensitivity to Glu-dependent stomatal closure. Our results strongly support functional Glu-signaling in stomatal closure and the crucial roles of GLRs in this signaling process. PMID:26586261

  10. Does self-esteem affect body dissatisfaction levels in female adolescents?☆

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, Leonardo de Sousa; Cipriani, Flávia Marcele; Coelho, Fernanda Dias; Paes, Santiago Tavares; Ferreira, Maria Elisa Caputo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of self-esteem on levels of body dissatisfaction among adolescent females. Methods: A group of 397 adolescents aged 12 to 17 years were enrolled in the study. The Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ) was applied to assess body dissatisfaction. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale was used to assess self-esteem. Weight, height, and skinfold thickness were also measured. These anthropometric data were controlled in the statistical analyses. Results: The multiple regression model indicated influence of "positive self-esteem" (R2=0.16; p=0.001) and "negative self-esteem" (R2=0.23; p=0.001) subscales on the BSQ scores. Univariate analysis of covariance demonstrated differences in BSQ scores (p=0.001) according to groups of self-esteem. Conclusion: It was concluded that self-esteem influenced body dissatisfaction in adolescent girls from Juiz de Fora, MG. PMID:25479855

  11. Znf202 Affects High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels and Promotes Hepatosteatosis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vrins, Carlos L. J.; Out, Ruud; van Santbrink, Peter; van der Zee, André; Mahmoudi, Tokameh; Groenendijk, Martine; Havekes, Louis M.; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The zinc finger protein Znf202 is a transcriptional suppressor of lipid related genes and has been linked to hypoalphalipoproteinemia. A functional role of Znf202 in lipid metabolism in vivo still remains to be established. Methodology and Principal Findings We generated mouse Znf202 expression vectors, the functionality of which was established in several in vitro systems. Next, effects of adenoviral znf202 overexpression in vivo were determined in normo- as well as hyperlipidemic mouse models. Znf202 overexpression in mouse hepatoma cells mhAT3F2 resulted in downregulation of members of the Apoe/c1/c2 and Apoa1/c3/a4 gene cluster. The repressive activity of Znf202 was firmly confirmed in an apoE reporter assay and Znf202 responsive elements within the ApoE promoter were identified. Adenoviral Znf202 transfer to Ldlr−/− mice resulted in downregulation of apoe, apoc1, apoa1, and apoc3 within 24 h after gene transfer. Interestingly, key genes in bile flux (abcg5/8 and bsep) and in bile acid synthesis (cyp7a1) were also downregulated. At 5 days post-infection, the expression of the aforementioned genes was normalized, but mice had developed severe hepatosteatosis accompanied by hypercholesterolemia and hypoalphalipoproteinemia. A much milder phenotype was observed in wildtype mice after 5 days of hepatic Znf202 overexpression. Interestingly and similar to Ldl−/− mice, HDL-cholesterol levels in wildtype mice were lowered after hepatic Znf202 overexpression. Conclusion/Significance Znf202 overexpression in vivo reveals an important role of this transcriptional regulator in liver lipid homeostasis, while firmly establishing the proposed key role in the control of HDL levels. PMID:23469003

  12. Urban bat communities are affected by wetland size, quality, and pollution levels.

    PubMed

    Straka, Tanja Maria; Lentini, Pia Eloise; Lumsden, Linda Faye; Wintle, Brendan Anthony; van der Ree, Rodney

    2016-07-01

    Wetlands support unique biota and provide important ecosystem services. These services are highly threatened due to the rate of loss and relative rarity of wetlands in most landscapes, an issue that is exacerbated in highly modified urban environments. Despite this, critical ecological knowledge is currently lacking for many wetland-dependent taxa, such as insectivorous bats, which can persist in urban areas if their habitats are managed appropriately. Here, we use a novel paired landscape approach to investigate the role of wetlands in urban bat conservation and examine local and landscape factors driving bat species richness and activity. We acoustically monitored bat activity at 58 urban wetlands and 35 nonwetland sites (ecologically similar sites without free-standing water) in the greater Melbourne area, southeastern Australia. We analyzed bat species richness and activity patterns using generalized linear mixed-effects models. We found that the presence of water in urban Melbourne was an important driver of bat species richness and activity at a landscape scale. Increasing distance to bushland and increasing levels of heavy metal pollution within the waterbody also negatively influenced bat richness and individual species activity. Areas with high levels of artificial night light had reduced bat species richness, and reduced activity for all species except those adapted to urban areas, such as the White-striped free-tailed bat (Austronomus australis). Increased surrounding tree cover and wetland size had a positive effect on bat species richness. Our findings indicate that wetlands form critical habitats for insectivorous bats in urban environments. Large, unlit, and unpolluted wetlands flanked by high tree cover in close proximity to bushland contribute most to the richness of the bat community. Our findings clarify the role of wetlands for insectivorous bats in urban areas and will also allow for the preservation, construction, and management of wetlands

  13. Stomatal regulation, structural acclimation and metabolic shift towards defensive compounds reduce O3 load in birch under chronic O3 stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksanen, E.; Riikonen, J.; Kontunen-Soppela, S.; Maenpaa, M.; Rousi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Northern forests are encountering new threats due to continuously increasing load of oxidative stress, e.g. due to rising tropospheric O3 levels, and simultaneous climate warming, which is more intense in northern latitudes as compared to global means. The proportion of silver birch (Betula pendula) in Finnish forests is expected to increase with climate warming. Unfortunately, we have growing evidence that the vitality and the carbon sink strength of birch trees are weakened under chronic O3 stress. In this study we investigated the effects of slightly elevated O3 concentration (1.3 x the ambient), temperature (T) and their combination on the antioxidant defense, gas exchange and leaf growth of Betula pendula saplings (clone 12) growing in open-field conditions over two growing seasons. The plants were measured for SLA (specific leaf area), total leaf area, net photosynthesis (Pn), stomatal conductance (gs), maximum rate of carboxylation (Vc,max), maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax), relative stomatal limitation to photosynthesis (ls), dark respiration (Rd), apoplastic concentrations of AA (ascorbic acid), DHA (dehydroascobate) and total ascorbate, the redox state of apoplastic ascorbate, and total antioxidant capacity. Elevated O3 enhanced the total antioxidant capacity in the apoplast in the first year of the experiment at the ambient T. However, during the second year of the experiment, the saplings responded to elevated O3 level by closing the stomata and by developing leaves with a lower leaf area per mass, rather than by accumulating ascorbate in the apoplast. O3 did not affect the total leaf area, whereas Pn was slightly and gs significantly reduced in the second year. Elevated T enhanced the total leaf area, Pn and Vc,max, redox state of ascorbate and total antioxidant capacity in the apoplast. The effects of T and O3 on total leaf area and net photosynthesis were counteractive. We were not able to detect significant differences in Rd between the

  14. A case with tumor of left parotid gland and denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    MercuŢ, Veronica; Iorgulescu, Daniel; Popescu, Sanda Mihaela; Mărgăritescu, Claudiu; MercuŢ, Răzvan; CrăiŢoiu, Monica Mihaela; Scrieciu, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The article discuss the case of an edentulous patient presented to the dental clinic for pain and burning sensation of oral mucosa and diagnosed subsequently with oxyphilic adenoma. A 58-year-old patient, with maxillary edentulism, treated with complete denture, presented to the Clinic of Prosthetic Dentistry of the Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Romania, for pain of oral mucosa and bad stability of denture. The diagnosis of erythematous denture stomatitis as consequence of salivary flow reduction was establish after patient's clinical examination, and by unstimulated sialometry. Clinical exam suggested hyposalivation could be a consequence of a tumor situated at the level of the left parotid gland. The echography confirmed the diagnosis of left parotid gland tumor. The tumor was surgical removed and histopathological exam confirmed oxyphilic adenoma. Education of patient for wearing new denture while maintaining a strict oral hygiene and dealing with low salivary flow was the treatment for denture stomatitis. General dentist has an important role in finding and diagnosing patients with systemic diseases, especially salivary tumors. PMID:25826511

  15. Manipulating stomatal density enhances drought tolerance without deleterious effect on nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Christopher; Doheny-Adams, Timothy; Hunt, Lee; Cameron, Duncan D; Gray, Julie E

    2015-10-01

    Manipulation of stomatal density was investigated as a potential tool for enhancing drought tolerance or nutrient uptake. Drought tolerance and soil water retention were assessed using Arabidopsis epidermal patterning factor mutants manipulated to have increased or decreased stomatal density. Root nutrient uptake via mass flow was monitored under differing plant watering regimes using nitrogen-15 ((15) N) isotope and mass spectrometry. Plants with less than half of their normal complement of stomata, and correspondingly reduced levels of transpiration, conserve soil moisture and are highly drought tolerant but show little or no reduction in shoot nitrogen concentrations especially when water availability is restricted. By contrast, plants with over twice the normal density of stomata have a greater capacity for nitrogen uptake, except when water availability is restricted. We demonstrate the possibility of producing plants with reduced transpiration which have increased drought tolerance, with little or no loss of nutrient uptake. We demonstrate that increasing transpiration can enhance nutrient uptake when water is plentiful. PMID:26268722

  16. Spatial trends and factors affecting variation of organochlorine contaminants levels in Canadian Arctic beluga (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Stern, G A; Macdonald, C R; Armstrong, D; Dunn, B; Fuchs, C; Harwood, L; Muir, D C G; Rosenberg, B

    2005-12-01

    Organochlorine pesticides and PCBs were analysed in blubber from beluga (Delphinapterus leucas), or white whales, collected at 15 sites in the Canadian Arctic between 1993 and 2001. The objective of the study was to define and interpret the spatial trends of major organic contaminants in northern beluga in terms of sources and transport pathways, and the biological factors influencing accumulation. When compared on a lipid weight basis, the concentrations of beta-HCH, cis-CHL and SigmaCHL, cis-nonachlor, heptachlor epoxide and p,p'-DDT were significantly higher in males than females at all five sites in the eastern Arctic where the two sexes were harvested. The differences were attributed to losses from the females during fetal development and lactation as reported in previous studies. Major compounds increased with age in males at most sites, however the lack of a significant increase with age at some sites was in part due to high organochlorine concentrations in young year classes (2-5 years), particularly at eastern sites such as Iqaluit and Pangnirtung. Lower concentrations of SigmaHCH and SigmaDDT compounds in young males in 2001 relative to 1995 at Hendrickson Island could be due to declining levels in the environment, changes in the diet, or differences in organochlorine loads transferred from the female after birth. Age-corrected least square mean concentrations in males showed significantly higher levels of many compounds, such as p,p'-DDE and SigmaCHB, at south Baffin Island sites than those in the west. Two notable exceptions were HCBz and beta-HCH which were higher in the west. Methoxyclor was detected in males at Sanikiluaq (58 ng g-1) and in both sexes at Kimmirut, but at no other sites. Principal component analysis grouped the 16 sites into five major groupings based on the similarity of normalised organochlorine pesticide and PCB levels. Sites from the western Arctic were grouped by higher proportions of HCBz, beta-HCH and gamma-HCH and higher

  17. Behavioral Avoidance - Will Physiological Insecticide Resistance Level of Insect Strains Affect Their Oviposition and Movement Responses?

    PubMed Central

    Nansen, Christian; Baissac, Olivier; Nansen, Maria; Powis, Kevin; Baker, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural organisms, such as insect herbivores, provide unique opportunities for studies of adaptive evolutionary processes, including effects of insecticides on movement and oviposition behavior. In this study, Brassica leaves were treated with one of two non-systemic insecticides and exposed to two individual strains (referred to as single or double resistance) of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) (DBM) exhibiting physiological resistance. Behavioral responses by these two strains were compared as part of characterizing the relative effect of levels of physiological resistance on the likelihood of insects showing signs of behavioral avoidance. For each DBM strain, we used choice bioassays to quantify two possible types of behavioral avoidance: 1) females ovipositing predominantly on leaf surfaces without insecticides, and 2) larvae avoiding insecticide-treated leaf surfaces. In three-choice bioassays (leaves with no pesticide, 50% coverage with pesticide, or 100% coverage with pesticide), females from the single resistance DBM strain laid significantly more eggs on water treated leaves compared to leaves with 100% insecticide coverage (both gamma-cyhalothrin and spinetoram). Females from the double resistance DBM strain also laid significantly more eggs on water treated leaves compared to leaves with 100% gamma-cyhalothrin, while moths did not adjust their oviposition behavior in response to spinetoram. Larvae from the single resistance DBM strain showed a significant increase in mobility in response to both insecticides and avoided insecticide-treated portions of leaves when given a choice. On the other hand, DBM larvae from the double resistance strain showed a significant decrease in mobility in response to insecticides, and they did not avoid insecticide-treated portions of leaves when given a choice. Our results suggest that pest populations with physiological resistance may show behavioral avoidance, as resistant females avoided oviposition on

  18. Characterizing Soil Organic Matter Degradation Levels in Permafrost-affected Soils using Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matamala, R.; Jastrow, J. D.; Calderon, F.; Liang, C.; Miller, R. M.; Ping, C. L.; Michaelson, G. J.; Hofmann, S.

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse-reflectance Fourier-transform mid-infrared spectroscopy (MidIR) was used to (1) investigate soil quality along a latitudinal gradient of Alaskan soils, and in combination with soil incubations, (2) to assess the relative lability of soil organic matter in the active layer and upper permafrost for some of those soils. Twenty nine sites were sampled along a latitudinal gradient (78.79 N to 55.35 N deg). The sites included 8 different vegetation types (moss/lichen, non-acidic and acidic tundra, shrub areas, deciduous forests, mixed forests, coniferous forests, and grassland). At each site, soils were separated by soil horizons and analyzed for pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic and inorganic C, and total N. Samples were also scanned to obtain MidIR spectra, and ratios of characteristic bands previously suggested as indicators of organic matter quality or degradation level were calculated. Principal component analysis showed that axis 1 explained 70% of the variation and was correlated with the general Organic:Mineral ratio, soil organic C, total N, and CEC, but not with vegetation type. Axis 2 explained 25% of the variation and was correlated with most of the band ratios, with negative values for the condensation index (ratio of aromatic to aliphatic organic matter) and positive values for all humification ratios (HU1: ratio of aliphatic to polysaccharides; HU2: ratio of aromatics to polysaccharides; and HU3 ratio of lignin/phenols to polysaccharides) suggesting that axis 2 variations were related to differences in level of soil organic matter degradation. Active organic, active mineral and permafrost layers from selected tundra sites were incubated for two months at -1, 1, 4, 8 and 16 ⁰C. The same band ratios were correlated with total CO2 mineralized during the incubations. Data from 4⁰C showed that the cumulative respired CO2 from the active organic layer across all sites was negatively correlated with the HU1 humification ratio, suggesting

  19. Stomatal guard cells co-opted an ancient ABA-dependent desiccation survival system to regulate stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Lind, Christof; Dreyer, Ingo; López-Sanjurjo, Enrique J; von Meyer, Katharina; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Lang, Daniel; Zhao, Yang; Kreuzer, Ines; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Ronne, Hans; Reski, Ralf; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Geiger, Dietmar; Hedrich, Rainer

    2015-03-30

    During the transition from water to land, plants had to cope with the loss of water through transpiration, the inevitable result of photosynthetic CO2 fixation on land [1, 2]. Control of transpiration became possible through the development of a new cell type: guard cells, which form stomata. In vascular plants, stomatal regulation is mediated by the stress hormone ABA, which triggers the opening of the SnR kinase OST1-activated anion channel SLAC1 [3, 4]. To understand the evolution of this regulatory circuit, we cloned both ABA-signaling elements, SLAC1 and OST1, from a charophyte alga, a liverwort, and a moss, and functionally analyzed the channel-kinase interactions. We were able to show that the emergence of stomata in the last common ancestor of mosses and vascular plants coincided with the origin of SLAC1-type channels capable of using the ancient ABA drought signaling kinase OST1 for regulation of stomatal closure. PMID:25802151

  20. Implicit affective associations predict snack choice for those with low, but not high levels of eating disorder symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Erin M; Kiviniemi, Marc T; Cook-Cottone, Catherine

    2014-06-01

    The central purpose of the current study was to examine whether eating disorder symptomatology moderates the extent to which implicitly and explicitly measured affective associations with fruits, or the feelings individuals associate with them, predict food choice. Participants (N = 107) completed both implicit and explicit measures of affective associations with fruits, a self-report of eating disorder symptomatology. In a subsequent snack selection task, they selected either a granola bar or fruit as a measure of their food choice behavior. Logistic regression analyses revealed that eating disorder symptomatology moderated the relation of implicit affective associations on behavior, OR = 0.27, p = .024, 95% CI (0.085, 0.84). A test of the simple effects indicated that implicit affective associations predicted snack choice at or below mean symptomatology levels [OR = 2.073, p = .02, 95% CI (1.12, 3.84)], but not at high levels [OR = 0.56, p = .28, 95% CI (0.18, 1.74)]. The effects of explicit measures on eating behavior were not moderated by eating disorder symptomatology (ps > .05). These findings advance our understanding of both the relation of implicit affective associations on behavior, as well as the ways in which eating disorder symptomatology may impact the decision-making process, thereby perpetuating disorder-related eating behavior. As such, they have implications for both health decision-making theory, as well as for the study and treatment of eating disorders. PMID:24630936

  1. Implicit affective associations predict snack choice for those with low, but not high levels of eating disorder symptomatology

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Erin M.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.; Cook-Cottone, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The central purpose of the current study was to examine whether eating disorder symptomatology moderates the extent to which implicitly and explicitly measured affective associations with fruits, or the feelings and emotions individuals associate with them, predict food choice. METHOD Participants (N=107) completed both implicit and explicit measures of affective associations with fruits, a self-report of eating disorder symptomatology, and their cognitive beliefs about fruits. In a subsequent snack selection task, they selected either a granola bar or fruit as a measure of their food choice behavior. RESULTS Logistic regression analyses revealed that eating disorder symptomatology moderated the relation of implicit affective associations on behavior, OR=0.27, p=.024, 95% CI (0.085, 0.84). A test of the simple effects indicated that implicit affective associations predicted snack choice at or below mean symptomatology levels [OR=2.073, p=.02, 95% CI (1.12, 3.84)], but not at high levels [OR=0.56, p=.28, 95% CI (0.18, 1.74)]. The effects of explicit measures on eating behavior were not moderated by eating disorder symptomatology (ps>.05). CONCLUSION These findings advance our understanding of both the relation of implicit affective associations on behavior, as well as the ways in which eating disorder symptomatology may impact the decision-making process, thereby perpetuating disorder-related eating behavior. These findings have implications for both health decision-making theory and practice, as well as for the study and treatment of eating disorders. PMID:24630936

  2. Prefrontal Electrical Stimulation in Non-depressed Reduces Levels of Reported Negative Affects from Daily Stressors

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Adelaide; Jiga-Boy, Gabriela M.; Rea, Sara; Newstead, Simon A.; Roderick, Sian; Davis, Nick J.; Clement, R. Marc; Boy, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Negative emotional responses to the daily life stresses have cumulative effects which, in turn, impose wide-ranging negative constraints on emotional well being and neurocognitive performance (Kalueff and Nutt, 2007; Nadler et al., 2010; Charles et al., 2013). Crucial cognitive functions such as memory and problem solving, as well more short term emotional responses (e.g., anticipation of- and response to- monetary rewards or losses) are influenced by mood. The negative impact of these behavioral responses is felt at the individual level, but it also imposes major economic burden on modern healthcare systems. Although much research has been undertaken to understand the underlying mechanisms of depressed mood and design efficient treatment pathways, comparatively little was done to characterize mood modulations that remain within the boundaries of a healthy mental functioning. In one placebo-controlled experiment, we applied daily prefrontal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) at five points in time, and found reliable improvements on self-reported mood evaluation. Using a new team of experimenters, we replicated this finding in an independent double-blinded placebo-controlled experiment and showed that stimulation over a shorter period of time (3 days) is sufficient to create detectable mood improvements. Taken together, our data show that repeated bilateral prefrontal tDCS can reduce psychological distress in non-depressed individuals. PMID:26973591

  3. Factors affecting the job satisfaction levels and quit intentions of academic nurses.

    PubMed

    Altuntaş, Serap

    2014-04-01

    The descriptively designed study was conducted in order to determine academic nurses' job satisfaction levels, intention of leaving job and effective reasons. The study was implemented in 10 nursing schools offering postgraduate and doctoral education in Turkey, and data was collected from academics working in these schools who agreed to participate in the study. After obtaining the required approval from the ethics committees and institutional permissions, data was collected from 248 academic nurses using a personal information form and a "Job Satisfaction Scale" between June 2009 and January 2010. The data was analyzed by frequency and percentage distribution, using Cronbach's Alpha coefficient, ANOVA, Qui-Square and Tukey's HSD test for advanced analysis methods with SPSS 11.5 statistics packet software. This study concludes that academic nurses are moderately satisfied with their jobs. In addition, job satisfaction was found to be lower among research assistants, assistant professors, nurses with less than 10 years of academic experience, nurses who have completed their doctorate dissertations, or who are working on appointment or contract basis. PMID:23870689

  4. Prefrontal Electrical Stimulation in Non-depressed Reduces Levels of Reported Negative Affects from Daily Stressors.

    PubMed

    Austin, Adelaide; Jiga-Boy, Gabriela M; Rea, Sara; Newstead, Simon A; Roderick, Sian; Davis, Nick J; Clement, R Marc; Boy, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Negative emotional responses to the daily life stresses have cumulative effects which, in turn, impose wide-ranging negative constraints on emotional well being and neurocognitive performance (Kalueff and Nutt, 2007; Nadler et al., 2010; Charles et al., 2013). Crucial cognitive functions such as memory and problem solving, as well more short term emotional responses (e.g., anticipation of- and response to- monetary rewards or losses) are influenced by mood. The negative impact of these behavioral responses is felt at the individual level, but it also imposes major economic burden on modern healthcare systems. Although much research has been undertaken to understand the underlying mechanisms of depressed mood and design efficient treatment pathways, comparatively little was done to characterize mood modulations that remain within the boundaries of a healthy mental functioning. In one placebo-controlled experiment, we applied daily prefrontal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) at five points in time, and found reliable improvements on self-reported mood evaluation. Using a new team of experimenters, we replicated this finding in an independent double-blinded placebo-controlled experiment and showed that stimulation over a shorter period of time (3 days) is sufficient to create detectable mood improvements. Taken together, our data show that repeated bilateral prefrontal tDCS can reduce psychological distress in non-depressed individuals. PMID:26973591

  5. Contaminating levels of zinc found in commonly-used labware and buffers affect glycine receptor currents

    PubMed Central

    Cornelison, Garrett L.; Mihic, S. John

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is an allosteric modulator of glycine receptor function, enhancing the effects of glycine at nM to low μM concentrations, and inhibiting its effects at higher concentrations. Because of zinc’s high potency at the glycine receptor, there exists a possibility that effects attributed solely to exogenously-applied glycine in fact contain an undetected contribution of zinc acting as an allosteric modulator. We found that glycine solutions made up in standard buffers and using deionized distilled water produced effects that could be decreased by the zinc chelator tricine. This phenomenon was observed in three different vials tested and persisted even if vials were extensively washed, suggesting the zinc was probably present in the buffer constituents. In addition, polystyrene, but not glass, pipets bore a contaminant that enhanced glycine receptor function and that could also be antagonized by tricine. Our findings suggest that without checking for this effect using a chelator such as tricine, one cannot assume that responses elicited by glycine applied alone are not necessarily also partially due to some level of allosteric modulation by zinc. PMID:24177173

  6. Contaminating levels of zinc found in commonly-used labware and buffers affect glycine receptor currents.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, Garrett L; Mihic, S John

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is an allosteric modulator of glycine receptor function, enhancing the effects of glycine at nM to low μM concentrations, and inhibiting its effects at higher concentrations. Because of zinc's high potency at the glycine receptor, there exists a possibility that effects attributed solely to exogenously-applied glycine in fact contain an undetected contribution of zinc acting as an allosteric modulator. We found that glycine solutions made up in standard buffers and using deionized distilled water produced effects that could be decreased by the zinc chelator tricine. This phenomenon was observed in three different vials tested and persisted even if vials were extensively washed, suggesting the zinc was probably present in the buffer constituents. In addition, polystyrene, but not glass, pipets bore a contaminant that enhanced glycine receptor function and that could also be antagonized by tricine. Our findings suggest that without checking for this effect using a chelator such as tricine, one cannot assume that responses elicited by glycine applied alone are not necessarily also partially due to some level of allosteric modulation by zinc. PMID:24177173

  7. How genetics affects the brain to produce higher-level dysfunctions in myotonic dystrophy type 1

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Laura; Petrucci, Antonio; Spanò, Barbara; Torso, Mario; Olivito, Giusy; Lispi, Ludovico; Costanzi-Porrini, Sandro; Giulietti, Giovanni; Koch, Giacomo; Giacanelli, Manlio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Cercignani, Mara; Bozzali, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystemic disorder dominated by muscular impairment and brain dysfunctions. Although brain damage has previously been demonstrated in DM1, its associations with the genetics and clinical/neuropsychological features of the disease are controversial. This study assessed the differential role of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) damage in determining higher-level dysfunctions in DM1. Ten patients with genetically confirmed DM1 and 16 healthy matched controls entered the study. The patients underwent a neuropsychological assessment and quantification of CTG triplet expansion. All the subjects underwent MR scanning at 3T, with studies including T1-weighted volumes and diffusion-weighted images. Voxel-based morphometry and tract-based spatial statistics were used for unbiased quantification of regional GM atrophy and WM integrity. The DM1 patients showed widespread involvement of both tissues. The extent of the damage correlated with CTG triplet expansion and cognition. This study supports the idea that genetic abnormalities in DM1 mainly target the WM, but GM involvement is also crucial in determining the clinical characteristics of DM1. PMID:26214024

  8. Brain parcellation choice affects disease-related topology differences increasingly from global to local network levels.

    PubMed

    Lord, Anton; Ehrlich, Stefan; Borchardt, Viola; Geisler, Daniel; Seidel, Maria; Huber, Stefanie; Murr, Julia; Walter, Martin

    2016-03-30

    Network-based analyses of deviant brain function have become extremely popular in psychiatric neuroimaging. Underpinning brain network analyses is the selection of appropriate regions of interest (ROIs). Although ROI selection is fundamental in network analysis, its impact on detecting disease effects remains unclear. We investigated the impact of parcellation choice when comparing results from different studies. We investigated the effects of anatomical (AAL) and literature-based (Dosenbach) parcellation schemes on comparability of group differences in 35 female patients with anorexia nervosa and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Global and local network properties, including network-based statistics (NBS), were assessed on resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data obtained at 3T. Parcellation schemes were comparably consistent on global network properties, while NBS and local metrics differed in location, but not metric type. Location of local metric alterations varied for AAL (parietal and cingulate cortices) versus Dosenbach (insula, thalamus) parcellation approaches. However, consistency was observed for the occipital cortex. Patient-specific global network properties can be robustly observed using different parcellation schemes, while graph metrics characterizing impairments of individual nodes vary considerably. Therefore, the impact of parcellation choice on specific group differences varies depending on the level of network organization. PMID:27000302

  9. Salt tolerance and stress level affect plant biomass-density relationships and neighbor effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenxing; Chen, Wenwen; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Haishui; Tang, Jianjun; Weiner, Jacob; Chen, Xin

    2014-07-01

    It has been shown that plant biomass-density relationships are altered under extreme or stressed conditions. We do not know whether variation in biomass-density relationships is a direct result of stress tolerance or occurs via changes in plant-plant interactions. Here, we evaluated biomass-density relationships and neighbor effects in six plant species that differ in salt tolerance in a salt marsh, and conducted a literature review of biomass-density relationship under higher and lower stress levels. Our field study showed that both neighbor effects and the exponent of the biomass-density relationship (α) varied among plant species with different degrees of salt tolerance. There was a positive relationship between neighbor effects (measured as relative interaction index) and α-value among the tested species. The literature review showed that α and its variation increased under higher stress. Our results indicate that plant species with different salinity tolerance differ in the direction and strength of neighbor effects, resulting in variation in biomass-density relationships. Our results support the hypothesis that differences in biomass-density relationships among species are not due to differences in stress tolerance alone, they are mediated by changes in plant-plant interactions.

  10. Climate change affects low trophic level marine consumers: warming decreases copepod size and abundance.

    PubMed

    Garzke, Jessica; Ismar, Stefanie M H; Sommer, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    Concern about climate change has re-ignited interest in universal ecological responses to temperature variations: (1) biogeographical shifts, (2) phenology changes, and (3) size shifts. In this study we used copepods as model organisms to study size responses to temperature because of their central role in the pelagic food web and because of the ontogenetic length constancy between molts, which facilitates the definition of size of distinct developmental stages. In order to test the expected temperature-induced shifts towards smaller body size and lower abundances under warming conditions, a mesocosm experiment using plankton from the Baltic Sea at three temperature levels (ambient, ambient +4 °C, ambient -4 °C) was performed in summer 2010. Overall copepod and copepodit abundances, copepod size at all life stages, and adult copepod size in particular, showed significant temperature effects. As expected, zooplankton peak abundance was lower in warm than in ambient treatments. Copepod size-at-immature stage significantly increased in cold treatments, while adult size significantly decreased in warm treatments. PMID:25413864

  11. Cadmium accumulation in Panax notoginseng: levels, affecting factors and the non-carcinogenic health risk.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meilin; Jiang, Yang; Cui, Bin; Jiang, Yanxue; Cao, Hongbin; Zhang, Wensheng

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium (Cd) contamination has been reported to be a problem for the safe usage of Panax notoginseng (Sanchi); thus, it is necessary to elucidate the Cd accumulation in Sanchi and to assess its associated health risk. Samples were collected from major producing areas in Yunnan, China. The average concentration of Cd in Sanchi was 0.43 mg/kg, which exceeds the standard level for herbal medicine in China (0.3 mg/kg). A stepwise regression analysis showed that zinc and the pH were the related factors that most significantly impacted Cd in Sanchi roots. The hazard quotient values were estimated as 0.0010 (men) and 0.0012 (women) for consumers taking preparations and were 0.011 (men) and 0.013 (women) for consumers taking health products, implying that there is no non-carcinogenic hazard associated with Sanchi consumption. However, a Monte Carlo simulation showed that approximately 0.80 % of male and 1.02 % of female consumers via drug consumption and 36.28 % of male and 41.87 % of female consumers via health product consumption had an exposure exceeding the acceptable daily intake (ADI) of Cd from drugs (1 % of the total oral ADI as suggested by the World Health Organization). These people should control their oral Cd intake from both Sanchi consumption and diet as a whole. PMID:26070861

  12. Inhibition of mutant IDH1 decreases D-2-HG levels without affecting tumorigenic properties of chondrosarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Suijker, Johnny; Oosting, Jan; Koornneef, Annemarie; Struys, Eduard A.; Salomons, Gajja S.; Schaap, Frank G.; Waaijer, Cathelijn J.F.; Wijers-Koster, Pauline M.; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge H.; Haazen, Lizette; Riester, Scott M.; Dudakovic, Amel; Danen, Erik; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Bovée, Judith V.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 are found in a subset of benign and malignant cartilage tumors, gliomas and leukaemias. The mutant enzyme causes the production of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG), affecting CpG island and histone methylation. While mutations in IDH1/2 are early events in benign cartilage tumors, we evaluated whether these mutations play a role in malignant chondrosarcomas. Compared to IDH1/2 wildtype cell lines, chondrosarcoma cell lines harboring an endogenous IDH1 (n=3) or IDH2 mutation (n=2) showed up to a 100-fold increase in intracellular and extracellular D-2-HG levels. Specific inhibition of mutant IDH1 using AGI-5198 decreased levels of D-2-HG in a dose dependent manner. After 72 hours of treatment one out of three mutant IDH1 cell lines showed a moderate decrease in viability, while D-2-HG levels decreased >90%. Likewise, prolonged treatment (up to 20 passages) did not affect proliferation and migration. Furthermore, global gene expression, CpG island methylation as well as histone H3K4, -9, and -27 trimethylation levels remained unchanged. Thus, while IDH1/2 mutations cause enchondroma, malignant progression towards central chondrosarcoma renders chondrosarcoma growth independent of these mutations. Thus, monotherapy based on inhibition of mutant IDH1 appears insufficient for treatment of inoperable or metastasized chondrosarcoma patients. PMID:25895133

  13. Performance of low-light-level night vision device affected by backscattered electron from ion barrier film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lei; Shi, Feng; Cheng, Yaojin; Hou, Zhipeng; Shi, Hongli; Zhu, Wanping; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Ni

    2012-10-01

    In order to suggest the performance of low-light-level night vision device affected by backscattered electron from ion barrier film(IBF), in this paper, based on the idea of Monte-Carlo, the track of electron impinging and rebounding on ion barrier film is simulated. The Lambert distribution and Beta distribution are used to calculate electron's emission. The Mott cross section and the Bethe formula rewrited by Joy are used to describe and calculate the elastic and inelastic scattering electron traversing in the film. With the statistic of the total transmitted electron and the discussion on the effect of cathode voltage, proximity between ion barrier film and photocathode on performance of low-light-level night vision device, we get the point diffusion function of ion barrier film, and we conclude that in low light level backscattered electron hardly affect working of image intensifier and higher cathode voltage, closer proximity between cathode and ion film will reduce the impact of backscattered electron in high light level.

  14. Irisin Levels are Not Affected by Physical Activity in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Tobias; Elbelt, Ulf; Ahnis, Anne; Kobelt, Peter; Rose, Matthias; Stengel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Irisin was recently identified as muscle-derived hormone that increases energy expenditure. Studies in normal weight and obese subjects reported an increased irisin expression following physical activity, although inconsistent results were observed. Increased physical activity in a subgroup of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) complicates the course of the disease. Since irisin could account for differences in clinical outcomes, we investigated irisin levels in anorexic patients with high and moderate physical activity to evaluate whether irisin differs with increasing physical activity. Hospitalized female anorexic patients (n = 39) were included. Plasma irisin measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and locomotor activity were assessed at the same time. Patients were separated into two groups (n = 19/group; median excluded): moderate and high activity (6331 ± 423 vs. 13743 ± 1047 steps/day, p < 0.001). The groups did not differ in body mass index (14.2 ± 0.4 vs. 15.0 ± 0.4 kg/m2), irisin levels (558.2 ± 26.1 vs. 524.9 ± 25.2 ng/ml), and body weight-adjusted resting energy expenditure (17.6 ± 0.3 vs. 18.0 ± 0.3 kcal/kg/day, p > 0.05), whereas body weight-adjusted total energy expenditure (46.0 ± 1.4 vs. 41.1 ± 1.1 kcal/kg/day), metabolic equivalents (METs, 1.9 ± 0.1 vs. 1.7 ± 0.1 METs/day), body weight-adjusted exercise activity thermogenesis (1.8 ± 0.5 vs. 0.6 ± 0.3 kcal/kg/day), duration of exercise (18.6 ± 4.7 vs. 6.2 ± 3.1 min/day), and body weight-adjusted non-exercise activity thermogenesis (21.6 ± 1.0 vs. 18.8 ± 0.8 kcal/kg/day) were higher in the high activity compared to the moderate activity group (p < 0.05). No correlations were observed between irisin and activity parameters in the whole sample (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the current data do not support the concept of irisin being induced by exercise, at least not under

  15. How geomorphology and groundwater level affect the spatio-temporal variability of riverine cold water patches?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzyniak, Vincent; Piégay, Hervé; Allemand, Pascal; Vaudor, Lise; Goma, Régis; Grandjean, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Temperature is a key factor for river ecosystems. In summer, patches of cold water are formed in the river by groundwater seepage. These patches have strong ecological significance and extend to the surface water in a well-mixed riverine system. These patches can serve as thermal refuges for some fish species during summer. In this study, the temporal variability and spatial distribution of cold water patches were explored along a 50 km river reach (the lower Ain River, France) using thermal infrared airborne remote sensing. This study examines a new range of processes acting on cold water patches at different scales that have not previously been touched upon in the literature. Three airborne campaigns were conducted during the summers of 2010, 2011 and 2014. Based on these images, a large number of cold water patches were identified using an automated method. Four types of patches were observed: tributary plumes, cold side channels (former channels or point-bar backwater channels), side seeps (located directly in the river channel) and gravel bar seeps (occurring at the downstream end of gravel bars). Logistic regression was used to analyse the longitudinal distribution of cold water patches according to geomorphologic indicators reflecting current or past fluvial process. Side seeps were found to be related to the local geology. Cold side channels were correlated to contemporary and past lateral river mobility. Gravel bar seeps were related to the current development of bars and are more prevalent in wandering reaches than in single-bed incised and paved reaches. The logistic model was subsequently used to evaluate gravel bar seep variability in the past. The model suggests larger numbers of seeps in the mid-20th century when bar surface area was higher. Interannual variability in the occurrence and spatial extent of side seeps and gravel bar seeps appear to be related to groundwater level fluctuations. Cold side channels exhibited greater interannual stability

  16. Maternal HIV status affects the infant hemoglobin level: A comparative cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Feleke, Berhanu Elfu

    2016-08-01

    Children, especially infants, are highly vulnerable to iron-deficiency anemia because of their rapid growth of the brain and the rest of the body. The objectives of this study were to compare the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in infants born from HIV-positive mothers and HIV-negative mothers and to identify the determinants of iron-deficiency anemia in infants.A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in Bahir Dar city. Simple random sampling technique was used to select the study participants. Mothers were interviewed; blood samples were collected from mothers and infants to measure the hemoglobin level and anthropometric indicators were obtained from the infants using world health organization standards. Descriptive statistics were used to estimate the prevalence of infantile anemia. Binary logistic regression and multiple linear regressions were used to identify the determinants of infant anemia.A total of 1459 infants born from HIV-positive and HIV-negative mothers were included. The prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in infants born from HIV-positive and HIV-negative mothers was 41.9% (95% CI: 39-44). Infantile iron-deficiency anemia was associated with maternal HIV infection (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.54 [95% CI: 1.65-3.9]), stunting (AOR 3.46 [95% CI: 2.41-4.97]), low income (AOR 2.72 [95% CI: 2-3.73]), maternal malaria during pregnancy (AOR 1.81 [95% CI: 1.33-2.47]), use of cow milk before 6 month (AOR 1.82 [95% CI: 1.35-2.45]), residence (AOR 0.09 [95% CI: 0.06-0.13]), history of cough or fever 7 days preceding the survey (AOR 2.71 [95% CI: 1.99-3.69]), maternal hemoglobin (B 0.65 [95% CI: 0.61-0.68]), educational status of mother (B 0.22 [95% CI: 0.2-0.23]), age of the mother (B -0.03 [95% CI: -0.03, -0.02]), and family size (B -0.14 [95% CI: -0.18,-0.11]). PMID:27495044

  17. Aspartoacylase deficiency does not affect N-acetylaspartylglutamate level or glutamate carboxypeptidase II activity in the knockout mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Sankar; Ezell, Edward L; Quast, Michael J; Wei, Jingna; Tyring, Stephen K; Michals-Matalon, Kimberlee; Matalon, Reuben

    2004-08-01

    Aspartoacylase (ASPA)-deficient patients [Canavan disease (CD)] reportedly have increased urinary excretion of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), a neuropeptide abundant in the brain. Whether elevated excretion of urinary NAAG is due to ASPA deficiency, resulting in an abnormal level of brain NAAG, is examined using ASPA-deficient mouse brain. The level of NAAG in the knockout mouse brain was similar to that in the wild type. The NAAG hydrolyzing enzyme, glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II), activity was normal in the knockout mouse brain. These data suggest that ASPA deficiency does not affect the NAAG or GCP II level in the knockout mouse brain, if documented also in patients with CD. PMID:15246864

  18. Individual and Community Level Risk-Factors for Alcohol Use Disorder among Conflict-Affected Persons in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Bayard; Murphy, Adrianna; Chikovani, Ivdity; Makhashvili, Nino; Patel, Vikram; McKee, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background The evidence on alcohol use disorder among conflict-affected civilian populations remains extremely weak, despite a number of potential risk-factors. The aim of this study is to examine patterns of alcohol use disorder among conflict-affected persons in the Republic of Georgia. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 3600 randomly selected internally displaced persons (IDPs) and former IDPs. Two alcohol use disorder outcomes were measured: (i) having at least hazardous alcohol use (AUDIT score ≥8); (ii) episodic heavy drinking (consuming >60 grams of pure alcohol per drinking session at least once a week). Individual level demographic and socio-economic characteristics were also recorded, including mental disorders. Community level alcohol environment characteristics relating to alcohol availability, marketing and pricing were recorded in the respondents' communities and a factor analysis conducted to produce a summary alcohol environment factor score. Logistic regression analyses examined associations between individual and community level factors with the alcohol use disorder outcomes (among men only). Results Of the total sample, 71% of men and 16% of women were current drinkers. Of the current drinkers (N = 1386), 28% of men and 1% of women were classified as having at least hazardous alcohol use; and 12% of men and 2% of women as episodic heavy drinkers. Individual characteristics significantly associated with both outcomes were age and experiencing a serious injury, while cumulative trauma events and depression were also associated with having at least hazardous alcohol use. For the community level analysis, a one unit increase in the alcohol environment factor was associated with a 1.27 fold increase in episodic heavy drinking among men (no significant association with hazardous alcohol use). Conclusion The findings suggest potential synergies for treatment responses for alcohol use disorder and depression among conflict-affected populations in

  19. Adult attachment orientation and automatic processing of emotional information on a semantic level: A masked affective priming study.

    PubMed

    Donges, Uta-Susan; Zeitschel, Frank; Kersting, Anette; Suslow, Thomas

    2015-09-30

    Early adverse social experiences leading to attachment insecurity could cause heightened sensitivity to emotional information. Automatic processing of emotional stimuli conveys information about positive-negative differentiation and the so-called possessor vs. other-relevance of valence. The aim of the present study was to examine automatic processing of emotional and relevance type information on a semantic level as a function of adult attachment avoidance and anxiety. A masked affective priming task, varying valence and relevance of prime and target adjectives, was presented to a sample of 153 healthy adults. The Experiences in Close Relationships scale was administered to assess attachment orientation. Significant priming effects for valence and relevance were observed. Attachment avoidance, but not attachment anxiety, was significantly related to affective priming independently of trait anxiety and depression. Specifically, attachment avoidance was found to be related to affective priming effects based on other-relevant words. It can be concluded that automatic processing of emotional adjectives used to characterize safe or risky social environments is heightened in avoidant individuals. The avoidantly attached processing style has similarities with repressive coping, which is characterized by an enhanced early response to emotion stimuli followed by avoidant biases at a controlled processing level. PMID:26235477

  20. CO2 Sensing and CO2 Regulation of Stomatal Conductance: Advances and Open Questions.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Cawas B; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Negi, Juntaro; Israelsson-Nordström, Maria; Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Iba, Koh; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form epidermal stomatal gas-exchange valves in plants and regulate the aperture of stomatal pores in response to changes in the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration ([CO2]) in leaves. Moreover, the development of stomata is repressed by elevated CO2 in diverse plant species. Evidence suggests that plants can sense [CO2] changes via guard cells and via mesophyll tissues in mediating stomatal movements. We review new discoveries and open questions on mechanisms mediating CO2-regulated stomatal movements and CO2 modulation of stomatal development, which together function in the CO2 regulation of stomatal conductance and gas exchange in plants. Research in this area is timely in light of the necessity of selecting and developing crop cultivars that perform better in a shifting climate. PMID:26482956

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Inward-Rectifying K+ Channels in Conjunction with Stomatal Closure1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Papanatsiou, Maria; Scuffi, Denisse; Blatt, Michael R.; García-Mata, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third biological gasotransmitter, and in animals, it affects many physiological processes by modulating ion channels. H2S has been reported to protect plants from oxidative stress in diverse physiological responses. H2S closes stomata, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here, we report the selective inactivation of current carried by inward-rectifying K+ channels of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) guard cells and show its close parallel with stomatal closure evoked by submicromolar concentrations of H2S. Experiments to scavenge H2S suggested an effect that is separable from that of abscisic acid, which is associated with water stress. Thus, H2S seems to define a unique and unresolved signaling pathway that selectively targets inward-rectifying K+ channels. PMID:25770153

  2. The Effect of Drought on Stomatal Conductance in the Biosphere 2 Rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, J. D.; Van Haren, J. L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Drought is a major climate change concern for the Earth's rainforests; however little is currently known about how these forests and individual plants will respond to water stress. At the individual level, the ability of plants to regulate their stomatal conductance is an important preservation mechanism that helps to cool leaves, regulate water loss, and uptake carbon dioxide. At the ecosystem level, transpiration in rainforests is a major contributor to the positive feedback loop that returns moisture to the atmosphere for continued precipitation cycles. Nearly 60% of atmospheric moisture in the Amazon rain forests has been traced back to origins of transpiration from its plants. In relation to current climatic conditions, stomatal conductance rates are highly variable across rainforest species and environmental conditions. It is still unknown to what extent these rates will decrease at leaf and forest level in response to periods of drought. The University of Arizona's Biosphere 2 (B2) served as the study site for a simulated 4-week long drought because of its ability to mimic the micrometeorology of an Amazonian rainforest. Three species of plants were chosen at various levels in the canopy: Clitoria racemosa, Cissus sicyoides, and Hibiscus elatus. These plants were selected based on their relative abundance and distribution in the B2 forest. It was revealed that two out of the three species exhibited decreases in H20 efflux at each elevation, while one species (C. racemosa) proved much more resistant, at each elevation, to H20 loss. These results may be useful for future integrative modeling of how individual leaf level responses extend to entire ecosystem scales. It will be important to better understand how rainforests conserve, recycle, and lose water to gauge their response to warming climate, and increased periods of drought in the tropics.

  3. Iron nanoparticle-induced activation of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase promotes stomatal opening in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Oh, Youngjun; Yoon, Hakwon; Hwang, Inhwan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2015-01-20

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) enable the control and exploration of intermolecular interactions inside microscopic systems, but the potential environmental impacts of their inevitable release remain largely unknown. Plants exposed to ENMs display effects, such as increase in biomass and chlorophyll, distinct from those induced by exposure to their bulk counterparts, but few studies have addressed the mechanisms underlying such physiological results. The current investigation found that exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana to nano zerovalent iron (nZVI) triggered high plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity. The increase in activity caused a decrease in apoplastic pH, an increase in leaf area, and also wider stomatal aperture. Analysis of gene expression indicated that the levels of the H(+)-ATPase isoform responsible for stomatal opening, AHA2, were 5-fold higher in plants exposed to nZVI than in unexposed control plants. This is the first study to show that nZVI enhances stomatal opening by inducing the activation of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, leading to the possibility of increased CO2 uptake. PMID:25496563

  4. Low irradiances affect abscisic acid, indole-3-acidic acid, and cytokinin levels of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nan, R.; Carman, J. G.; Salisbury, F. B.

    1999-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants were grown under four irradiance levels: 1,400, 400, 200, and 100 micromol m-2 s-1. Leaves and roots were sampled before, during, and after the boot stage, and levels of abscisic acid (ABA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), zeatin, zeatin riboside, dihydrozeatin, dihydrozeatin riboside, isopentenyl adenine, and isopentenyl adenosine were quantified using noncompetitive indirect ELISA systems. Levels of IAA in leaves and roots of plants exposed to 100 micromol m-2 s-1 of irradiance were 0.7 and 2.9 micromol kg-1 dry mass (DM), respectively. These levels were 0.2 and 1.0 micromol kg-1 DM, respectively, when plants were exposed to 1,400 micromol m-2 s-1. Levels of ABA in leaves and roots of plants exposed to 100 micromol m-2 s-1 were 0.65 and 0.55 micromol kg-1 DM, respectively. They were 0.24 micromol kg-1 DM (both leaves and roots) when plants were exposed to 1,400 micromol m-2 s-1. Levels of isopentenyl adenosine in leaves (24.3 nmol kg-1 DM) and roots (29.9 nmol kg-1 DM) were not affected by differences in the irradiance regime. Similar values were obtained in a second experiment. Other cytokinins could not be detected (<10 nmol kg 1 DM) in either experiment with the sample sizes used (150-600 mg DM for roots and shoots, respectively).

  5. CYCLIN H;1 regulates drought stress responses and blue light-induced stomatal opening by inhibiting reactive oxygen species accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao Feng; Jin, Yin Hua; Yoo, Chan Yul; Lin, Xiao-Li; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Bressan, Ray A; Hasegawa, Paul M; Jin, Jing Bo

    2013-06-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE Ds (CDKDs) phosphorylate the C-terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Arabidopsis CYCLIN H;1 (CYCH;1) interacts with and activates CDKDs; however, the physiological function of CYCH;1 has not been determined. Here, we report that CYCH;1, which is localized to the nucleus, positively regulates blue light-induced stomatal opening. Reduced-function cych;1 RNA interference (cych;1 RNAi) plants exhibited a drought tolerance phenotype. CYCH;1 is predominantly expressed in guard cells, and its expression was substantially down-regulated by dehydration. Transpiration of intact leaves was reduced in cych;1 RNAi plants compared with the wild-type control in light but not in darkness. CYCH;1 down-regulation impaired blue light-induced stomatal opening but did not affect guard cell development or abscisic acid-mediated stomatal closure. Microarray and real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses indicated that CYCH;1 did not regulate the expression of abscisic acid-responsive genes or light-induced stomatal opening signaling determinants, such as MYB60, MYB61, Hypersensitive to red and blue1, and Protein phosphatase7. CYCH;1 down-regulation induced the expression of redox homeostasis genes, such as LIPOXYGENASE3 (LOX3), LOX4, ARABIDOPSIS GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE 7 (ATGPX7), EARLY LIGHT-INDUCIBLE PROTEIN1 (ELIP1), and ELIP2, and increased hydrogen peroxide production in guard cells. Furthermore, loss-of-function mutations in CDKD;2 or CDKD;3 did not affect responsiveness to drought stress, suggesting that CYCH;1 regulates the drought stress response in a CDKD-independent manner. We propose that CYCH;1 regulates blue light-mediated stomatal opening by controlling reactive oxygen species homeostasis. PMID:23656895

  6. Carbon dioxide and the stomatal control of water balance and photosynthesis in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Taiz, L.; Zeiger, E.; Mawson, B. T.; Cornish, K.; Radin, J. W.; Turcotte, E. L.; Hercovitz, S.; Tallman, G.; Karlsson, P. E.; Bogomolni, R. A.; Talbott, L. D.; Srivastava, A.

    1992-01-01

    Research continued into the investigation of the effects of carbon dioxide on stomatal control of water balance and photosynthesis in higher plants. Topics discussed this period include a method of isolating a sufficient number of guard cell chloroplasts for biochemical studies by mechanical isolation of epidermal peels; the measurement of stomatal apertures with a digital image analysis system; development of a high performance liquid chromatography method for quantification of metabolites in guard cells; and genetic control of stomatal movements in Pima cotton. (CBS)

  7. Anion channel sensitivity to cytosolic organic acids implicates a central role for oxaloacetate in integrating ion flux with metabolism in stomatal guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yizhou; Blatt, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Stomatal guard cells play a key role in gas exchange for photosynthesis and in minimizing transpirational water loss from plants by opening and closing the stomatal pore. The bulk of the osmotic content driving stomatal movements depends on ionic fluxes across both the plasma membrane and tonoplast, the metabolism of organic acids, primarily Mal (malate), and its accumulation and loss. Anion channels at the plasma membrane are thought to comprise a major pathway for Mal efflux during stomatal closure, implicating their key role in linking solute flux with metabolism. Nonetheless, little is known of the regulation of anion channel current (ICl) by cytosolic Mal or its immediate metabolite OAA (oxaloacetate). In the present study, we have examined the impact of Mal, OAA and of the monocarboxylic acid anion acetate in guard cells of Vicia faba L. and report that all three organic acids affect ICl, but with markedly different characteristics and sidedness to their activities. Most prominent was a suppression of ICl by OAA within the physiological range of concentrations found in vivo. These findings indicate a capacity for OAA to co-ordinate organic acid metabolism with ICl through the direct effect of organic acid pool size. The findings of the present study also add perspective to in vivo recordings using acetate-based electrolytes. PMID:21745184

  8. Anion channel sensitivity to cytosolic organic acids implicates a central role for oxaloacetate in integrating ion flux with metabolism in stomatal guard cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yizhou; Blatt, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    Stomatal guard cells play a key role in gas exchange for photosynthesis and in minimizing transpirational water loss from plants by opening and closing the stomatal pore. The bulk of the osmotic content driving stomatal movements depends on ionic fluxes across both the plasma membrane and tonoplast, the metabolism of organic acids, primarily Mal (malate), and its accumulation and loss. Anion channels at the plasma membrane are thought to comprise a major pathway for Mal efflux during stomatal closure, implicating their key role in linking solute flux with metabolism. Nonetheless, little is known of the regulation of anion channel current (I(Cl)) by cytosolic Mal or its immediate metabolite OAA (oxaloacetate). In the present study, we have examined the impact of Mal, OAA and of the monocarboxylic acid anion acetate in guard cells of Vicia faba L. and report that all three organic acids affect I(Cl), but with markedly different characteristics and sidedness to their activities. Most prominent was a suppression of ICl by OAA within the physiological range of concentrations found in vivo. These findings indicate a capacity for OAA to co-ordinate organic acid metabolism with I(Cl) through the direct effect of organic acid pool size. The findings of the present study also add perspective to in vivo recordings using acetate-based electrolytes. PMID:21745184

  9. Factors Affecting Parent’s Perception on Air Quality—From the Individual to the Community Level

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yulin; Liu, Fengfeng; Lu, Yuanan; Mao, Zongfu; Lu, Hanson; Wu, Yanyan; Chu, Yuanyuan; Yu, Lichen; Liu, Yisi; Ren, Meng; Li, Na; Chen, Xi; Xiang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The perception of air quality significantly affects the acceptance of the public of the government’s environmental policies. The aim of this research is to explore the relationship between the perception of the air quality of parents and scientific monitoring data and to analyze the factors that affect parents’ perceptions. Scientific data of air quality were obtained from Wuhan’s environmental condition reports. One thousand parents were investigated for their knowledge and perception of air quality. Scientific data show that the air quality of Wuhan follows an improving trend in general, while most participants believed that the air quality of Wuhan has deteriorated, which indicates a significant difference between public perception and reality. On the individual level, respondents with an age of 40 or above (40 or above: OR = 3.252; 95% CI: 1.170–9.040), a higher educational level (college and above: OR = 7.598; 95% CI: 2.244–25.732) or children with poor healthy conditions (poor: OR = 6.864; 95% CI: 2.212–21.302) have much more negative perception of air quality. On the community level, industrial facilities, vehicles and city construction have major effects on parents’ perception of air quality. Our investigation provides baseline information for environmental policy researchers and makers regarding the public’s perception and expectation of air quality and the benefits to the environmental policy completing and enforcing. PMID:27187432

  10. Female major histocompatibility complex type affects male testosterone levels and sperm number in the horse (Equus caballus)

    PubMed Central

    Burger, D.; Dolivo, G.; Marti, E.; Sieme, H.; Wedekind, C.

    2015-01-01

    Odours of vertebrates often contain information about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and are used in kin recognition, mate choice or female investment in pregnancy. It is, however, still unclear whether MHC-linked signals can also affect male reproductive strategies. We used horses (Equus caballus) to study this question under experimental conditions. Twelve stallions were individually exposed either to an unfamiliar MHC-similar mare and then to an unfamiliar MHC-dissimilar mare, or vice versa. Each exposure lasted over a period of four weeks. Peripheral blood testosterone levels were determined weekly. Three ejaculates each were collected in the week after exposure to both mares (i.e. in the ninth week) to determine mean sperm number and sperm velocity. We found high testosterone levels when stallions were kept close to MHC-dissimilar mares and significantly lower ones when kept close to MHC-similar mares. Mean sperm number per ejac