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Sample records for lewis number

  1. Direct simulations of premixed turbulent flames with nonunity Lewis numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Rutland, C.J.; Trouve, A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA . Center for Turbulence Research)

    1993-07-01

    A principal effect of turbulence on premixed flames in the flamelet regime is to wrinkle the flame fronts. For nonunity Lewis numbers, Le [ne] 1, the local flame structure is altered in curved regions. This effect is examined using direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional isotropic turbulence with constant density, single-step Arrhenius kinetics chemistry. Simulations of Lewis numbers 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 are compared. At the local level, curvature effects dominated changes to the flame structure while strain effects were insignificant. A strong Lewis-number-dependent correlation was found between surface curvature and the local flame speed. The correlation was positive for Le < 1 and negative for Le > 1. At the global level, strain-related effects were more significant than curvature effects. The turbulent flame speed changed significantly with Lewis number, increasing as Le decreased. This was found to be due to strain effect that have a nonzero mean over the flame surface, rather than to curvature effects that have a nearly zero mean. The mean product temperature was also found to vary with Lewis number, being higher for Le > 1 and lower for Le < 1.

  2. Direct simulations of premixed turbulent flames with nonunity Lewis numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutland, C. J.; Trouve, A.

    1993-01-01

    A principal effect of turbulence on premixed flames in the flamelet regime is to wrinkle the flame fronts. For nonunity Lewis numbers, Le is not equal to 1, the local flame structure is altered in curved regions. This effect is examined using direct numerical simulations of 3D isotropic turbulence with constant density, single-step Arrhenius kinetics chemistry. Simulations of Lewis numbers 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 are compared. At the local level, curvature effects dominated changes to the flame structure while strain effects were insignificant. A strong Lewis-number-dependent correlation was found between surface curvature and the local flame speed. The correlation was positive for Le less than 1 and negative for Le greater than 1. At the global level, strain-related effects were more significant than curvature effects. The turbulent flame speed changed significantly with Lewis number, increasing as Le decreased. This was found to be due to strain effects that have a nonzero mean over the flame surface, rather than to curvature effects that have a nearly zero mean. The mean product temperature was also found to vary with Lewis number, being higher for Le greater than 1 and lower for Le less than 1.

  3. Effects of non-unity Lewis numbers in diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linan, A.; Orlandi, P.; Verzicco, R.; Higuera, F. J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to carry out direct numerical simulations of diffusion controlled combustion with non-unity Lewis numbers for the reactants and products, thus accounting for the differential diffusion effects of the temperature and concentration fields. We use a formulation based on combining the conservation equations in a way to eliminate the reaction terms similar to the method used by Burke and Schumann (1928) for unity Lewis numbers. We present calculations for an axisymmetric fuel jet and for a planar, time evolving mixing layer, leaving out the effects of thermal expansion and variations of the transport coefficients due to the heat release. Our results show that the front of the flame shifts toward the fuel or oxygen sides owing to the effect of the differential diffusion and that the location of maximum temperature may not coincide with the flame. The dependence of the distribution of the reaction products on their Lewis number has been investigated.

  4. Effects of Lewis Number on Temperatures of Spherical Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santa, K. J.; Sun, Z.; Chao, B. H.; Sunderland, P. B.; Axelbaum, R. I.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.

    2007-01-01

    Spherical diffusion flames supported on a porous sphere were studied numerically and experimentally. Experiments were performed in 2.2 s and 5.2 s microgravity facilities. Numerical results were obtained from a Chemkin-based program. The program simulates flow from a porous sphere into a quiescent environment, yields both steady-state and transient results, and accounts for optically thick gas-phase radiation. The low flow velocities and long residence times in these diffusion flames lead to enhanced radiative and diffusive effects. Despite similar adiabatic flame temperatures, the measured and predicted temperatures varied by as much as 700 K. The temperature reduction correlates with flame size but characteristic flow times and, importantly, Lewis number also influence temperature. The numerical results show that the ambient gas Lewis number would have a strong effect on flame temperature if the flames were steady and nonradiating. For example, a 10% decrease in Lewis number would increase the steady-state flame temperature by 200 K. However, for these transient, radiating flames the effect of Lewis number is small. Transient predictions of flame sizes are larger than those observed in microgravity experiments. Close agreement could not be obtained without either increasing the model s thermal and mass diffusion properties by 30% or reducing mass flow rate by 25%.

  5. Liquid-fuel burning with nonunitary Lewis number

    SciTech Connect

    Sirignano, William A.

    2007-02-15

    An analysis is presented for liquid-fuel vaporization and burning with nonunitary Lewis number (i.e., nonsimilar heat and mass diffusion) in a general geometrical situation, e.g., a dense spray. Variable transport properties are considered and only Stefan flow is allowed. The analysis builds on the approach of Imaoka and Sirignano for unitary Lewis number. Fickian diffusion with differing diffusivities for each species is considered. It is shown that the problem can conveniently be separated, using a mass-flux potential function, into a one-dimensional problem for the quasi-steady, gas-phase scalar properties and a three-dimensional problem for the mass-flux potential, which satisfies Laplace's equation. This allows some previous calculations of the potential function for unitary Lewis number to be used for the potential-function solution. The scalar properties are shown to be functions of the mass-flux potential only. It is demonstrated that a mass-flux-weighted sensible specific enthalpy is more natural and convenient than the traditional mass-weighted value. This modification results in a new definition of the Lewis number. A generalization of the classical Spalding heat transfer number is presented. The theory predicts scalar gas-phase profiles, flame position, and vaporization rates. Quantitative results are presented for special cases where the Lewis number is piecewise constant. The thin-flame temperature and the effective latent heat of vaporization can be determined as functions of the liquid-surface temperature via solution of nonlinear algebraic equations; these values do not depend on the specific configuration and therefore have some universality. (author)

  6. Lewis number effects on turbulent premixed flame structure

    SciTech Connect

    Goix, P.J. , 230 - Mont-Saint-Aignan . URA CORIA); Shepherd, I.G. )

    1992-09-01

    The influence of the Lewis number on turbulent flame front geometry is investigated in a premixed turbulent stagnation point flame. A laser tomography technique is used to obtain the flame shape, a fractal analysis of the multiscale flame edges is performed and the distribution of local flame front curvature is determined. Lean H[sub 2]/Air and C[sub 3]H[sub 8]/Air mixtures with similar burning rates were investigated with Lewis numbers of 0.33 and 1.85 respectively. At the conditions studied the laminar H[sub 2]/Air mixture is unstable and a cellular structure is observed. Turbulence in the reactant is generated by a perforated plate and the turbulent length scale (3mm) and intensity (7%) at the nozzle exit are fixed. The equivalence ratio is set so that the burning velocity is the same for all the cases. Results show clearly that the turbulent flame surface area is dependent on the Lewis number. For a Lewis number less than unity surface area production is observed. The shape of the flame front curvature distribution is not found to be very sensitive to the Lewis number. For the H[sub 2]/Air mixture the distribution is skewed toward the positive values indicating the presence of cusps while for the C[sub 3]H[sub 8]/Air mixture the distribution is more symmetrical. In both cases the average curvature is found to be zero, and if the local burning speed varies linearly with curvature, the local positive and negative burning velocity variations due to curvature will balance.

  7. Lewis number effects on turbulent premixed flame structure

    SciTech Connect

    Goix, P.J.; Shepherd, I.G.

    1992-09-01

    The influence of the Lewis number on turbulent flame front geometry is investigated in a premixed turbulent stagnation point flame. A laser tomography technique is used to obtain the flame shape, a fractal analysis of the multiscale flame edges is performed and the distribution of local flame front curvature is determined. Lean H{sub 2}/Air and C{sub 3}H{sub 8}/Air mixtures with similar burning rates were investigated with Lewis numbers of 0.33 and 1.85 respectively. At the conditions studied the laminar H{sub 2}/Air mixture is unstable and a cellular structure is observed. Turbulence in the reactant is generated by a perforated plate and the turbulent length scale (3mm) and intensity (7%) at the nozzle exit are fixed. The equivalence ratio is set so that the burning velocity is the same for all the cases. Results show clearly that the turbulent flame surface area is dependent on the Lewis number. For a Lewis number less than unity surface area production is observed. The shape of the flame front curvature distribution is not found to be very sensitive to the Lewis number. For the H{sub 2}/Air mixture the distribution is skewed toward the positive values indicating the presence of cusps while for the C{sub 3}H{sub 8}/Air mixture the distribution is more symmetrical. In both cases the average curvature is found to be zero, and if the local burning speed varies linearly with curvature, the local positive and negative burning velocity variations due to curvature will balance.

  8. Structure Of Flame Balls At Low Lewis-number (SOFBALL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1995-01-01

    The work has encompassed several topics related to the experimental and theoretical study of combustion limits in premixed flames at microgravity. These topics include (1) flame structure and stability at low Lewis number (which is the basis for the SOFBALL space flight experiment), (2) flame propagation and extinction in cylindrical tubes, and (3) experimental simulation of combustion processes using autocatalytic chemical reactions. Progress on each of these topics is outlined.

  9. Structure Of Flame Balls At Low Lewis-numbers (SOFBALL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Structure Of Flame Balls At Low Lewis-numbers (SOFBALL) Experiment Mounting Structure (EMS) was used to conduct the SOFBALL experiment on Combustion Module-1. The EMS was inserted into the CM-1 combustion chamber. The chamber was filled with a lean fuel/oxidizer mixture and a spark igniter on the EMS ignited the gas. Very small, weak flames, in the shape of spheres, were formed and studied.

  10. Structures Of Flameballs at Low-Lewis number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The potential for investigating combustion at the limits of flammability, and the implications for spacecraft fire safety, led to the Structures Of Flame Balls At Low Lewis-number (SOFBALL) experiment flown twice aboard the Space Shuttle in 1997. The success there led to reflight on STS-107 Research 1 mission plarned for 2002. All the combustion in a flame ball takes place in a razor-thin reaction zone that depends on diffusion to keep the ball alive. Such a fragile balance is impossible on Earth. The principal investigator is Dr. Paul Ronney of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. Glenn Research in Cleveland, OH, manages the project.

  11. Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J.; Ronney, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-Number (SOFBALL) experiment explored the behavior of a newly discovered flame phenomena called "flame balls." These spherical, stable, stationary flame structures, observed only in microgravity, provide a unique opportunity to study the interactions of the two most important processes necessary for combustion (chemical reaction and heat and mass transport) in the simplest possible configuration. The previously unobtainable experimental data provided a comparison with models of flame stability and flame propagation limits that are crucial both in assessing fire safety and in designing efficient, clean-burning combustion engines.

  12. Structures Of Flameballs at Low-Lewis number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The potential for investigating combustion at the limits of flammability, and the implications for spacecraft fire safety, led to the Structures Of Flame Balls At Low Lewis-number (SOFBALL) experiment flown twice aboard the Space Shuttle in 1997. The success there led to reflight on STS-107 Research 1 mission plarned for 2002. Theory does not always predict behavior, thus the need for experiments. Three different published chemical reaction models (lines) for hydrogen-airflame balls proved to be quite different from what was observed (dots) during SOFBALL tests in space. The principal investigator is Dr. Paul Ronney of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. Glenn Research in Cleveland, OH, manages the project.

  13. Surface properties of turbulent premixed propane/air flames at various Lewis numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.W.; North, G.L.; Santavicca, D.A. )

    1993-06-01

    Surface properties of turbulent premixed flames including the wrinkled flame perimeter, fraction of the flame pocket perimeter, flame curvature, and orientation distributions have been measured for propane-air flames at Lewis numbers ranging from 0.98 to 1.86 and u[prime]/S[sub L] = 1.42-5.71. The wrinkled flame perimeter is found to be greater for the thermodiffusively unstable Lewis number (Le < 1) by up to 30% in comparison to the most stable condition (Le = 1.86) tested, while the fraction of the flame pocket perimeter shows a similar tendency to be greater for Le < 1. The flame curvature probability density functions are nearly symmetric with respect to the zero mean at all Lewis numbers throughout the range of u[prime]/S[sub L] tested, and show a much stronger dependence on the turbulence condition than on the Lewis number. Similarly, the flame orientation distributions show a trend from anisotropy toward a more uniform distribution with increasing u[prime]/S[sub L] at a similar rate for all Lewis numbers. Thus, for turbulent premixed propane/air flames for a practical range of Lewis number from 0.98 to 1.86, the effect of Lewis number is primarily to affect the flame structures and thereby flame surface areas and flame pocket areas, while the flame curvature and orientation statistics are essentially determined by the turbulence properties.

  14. Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis Number (SOFBALL) Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis (SOFBALL) experiment, was run on Space Shuttle Columbia in 2003 for STS-107. The experiment tested various fuel-oxygen-inert gas mixtures in microgravity to produce flame balls, which are spherical steady flames that reveal combustion processes hidden by the volatile effects of gravity on Earth. In this video, a hydrogen-oxygen-sulfur hexafluoride gas mixture produced nine flame balls, the most ever created at once, one of which lasted 81 minutes making it the longest lasting flame ball ever burned in space.

  15. Effects of Lewis number on turbulent scalar transport and its modelling in turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Cant, R.S.

    2009-07-15

    The behaviour of the turbulent scalar flux in premixed flames has been studied using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) with emphasis on the effects of Lewis number in the context of Reynolds-averaged closure modelling. A database was obtained from DNS of three-dimensional freely propagating statistically planar turbulent premixed flames with simplified chemistry and a range of global Lewis numbers from 0.34 to 1.2. Under the same initial conditions of turbulence, flames with low Lewis numbers are found to exhibit counter-gradient transport, whereas flames with higher Lewis numbers tend to exhibit gradient transport. The Reynolds-averaged transport equation for the turbulent scalar flux is analysed in detail and the performance of existing models for the unclosed terms is assessed with respect to corresponding quantities extracted from DNS data. Based on this assessment, existing models which are able to address the effects of non-unity Lewis number on turbulent scalar flux transport are identified, and new or modified models are suggested wherever necessary. In this way, a complete set of closure models for the scalar flux transport equation is prescribed for use in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations. (author)

  16. Linear analysis of diffusional-thermal instability in diffusion flames with Lewis numbers close to unity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. S.

    1997-03-01

    A general theory of diffusional-thermal instability for diffusion flames is developed by considering the diffusion-flame regime of activation-energy asymptotics. Attention is focused on near-extinction flames in a distinguished limit in which Lewis numbers deviate from unity by a small amount. This instability analysis differs from that of premixed flames in that two orders of the inner reaction-zone analyses are required to obtain the dispersion relation. The results, illustrated for a one-dimensional convective diffusion flame as a model, exhibit two types of unstable solution branches, depending on whether Lewis number is less than or greater than unity. For flames with Lewis numbers sufficiently less than unity, a cellular instability is predicted, which can give rise to stripe patterns of the flame-quenching zones with maximum growth rate occuring at a finite wavelength comparable with the thickness of the mixing layer. The result for the critical Lewis number shows that the tendency toward cellular instability diminishes as the Peclét number of the flame decreases. On the other hand, for flames with Lewis numbers sufficiently greater than unity, a pulsating instability is predicted, which occurs most strongly when the Peclét number is small. For this type of instability, the planar disturbance is found to be most unstable with a real grow rate, and a conjugate pair of complex solutions bifurcates from the turning point of the real-solution branch and extends to higher wave numbers. An increase of the reaction intensity is found to stabilize the flame at all wavelengths. Employing the Peclét number as a small parameter, an approximate dispersion relation is derived as a quadratic equation, which correctly predicts all of the qualitative characteristics of the instability.

  17. Pre-mixed flame simulations for non-unity Lewis numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutland, C. J.; Trouve, A.

    1990-01-01

    A principal effect of turbulence on premixed flames in the flamelet region is to wrinkle the flame fronts. For non-unity Lewis numbers (Le), the local flame structure is altered in curved regions. This effect is examined using direct numerical simulations of the three dimensional, constant density, decaying isotropic turbulence with a single step, finite rate chemical reaction. Simulations of Lewis numbers 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 are compared. The turbulent flame speed, S(sub T), increases as Le decreases. The correlation between S(sub T) and u prime found in previous Le = 1 simulations has a strong Lewis number dependency. The variance of the pdf of the flame curvature increases as Le decreases, indicating that the flames become more wrinkled. A strong correlation between local flame speed and curvature was found. For Le greater than 1, the flame speed increases in regions concave towards the products and decreases in convex regions. The opposite correlation was found for Le less than 1. The mean temperature of the products was also found to vary with Lewis number. For Le = 0.8, it is less than the adiabatic flame temperature and for Le = 1.2 it is greater.

  18. Lewis number effects on premixed flames interacting with turbulent Karman vortex streets

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.G.; Lee, T.W.; Nye, D.A.; Santavicca, D.A. )

    1995-01-01

    The effects of Lewis number on the global and local structure of premixed flames interacting with turbulent Karman vortex streets are experimentally investigated using OH planar-laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF). The OH PLIF results show that over the range of Lewis numbers studied, i.e., Le = 0.21, 0.94 and 1.79, the flame area increases and the flame front is oriented more randomly as Lewis number decreases, while the flame curvature pdfs are unchanged. The relationship between the local flame structure and the local flame curvature is found to be consistent with the results of stretched laminar flame theory. the correlation between the local maximum OH fluorescence intensity and the local curvature tends to level off for large positive curvature as U/S ratio increases, indicating that the response of the flame to large flame stretch may be non-linear at high U/S ratio. The pdfs of peak OH LIF intensity suggest that the mean burning rate of the H[sub 2]/He/air flame at U/S ratios = 3.3 is increased approximately by 10% in comparison to the undisturbed laminar flame. The present results imply that even though the local fame curvature may strongly influence the local structure and burning rate of nonunity Lewis number flames through the effect of flame stretch on the local burning rate, these variations tend to cancel in the mean due to the linear relationship between local burning rate and curvature for the most probable values of curvature and due to the symmetry and zero mean of the curvature distribution. Therefore, the main effect of turbulence and Lewis number is to wrinkle the flame and produce flame area, while increasing the mean burning rate per unit surface area by relatively small amount through flow strain effects.

  19. A Validated All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model and Lewis Number Effects for a Binary Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.

    1999-01-01

    The differences between subcritical liquid drop and supercritical fluid drop behavior are discussed. Under subcritical, evaporative high emission rate conditions, a film layer is present in the inner part of the drop surface which contributes to the unique determination of the boundary conditions; it is this film layer which contributes to the solution's convective-diffusive character. In contrast, under supercritical condition as the boundary conditions contain a degree of arbitrariness due to the absence of a surface, and the solution has then a purely diffusive character. Results from simulations of a free fluid drop under no-gravity conditions are compared to microgravity experimental data from suspended, large drop experiments at high, low and intermediary temperatures and in a range of pressures encompassing the sub-and supercritical regime. Despite the difference between the conditions of the simulations and experiments (suspension vs. free floating), the time rate of variation of the drop diameter square is remarkably well predicted in the linear curve regime. The drop diameter is determined in the simulations from the location of the maximum density gradient, and agrees well with the data. It is also shown that the classical calculation of the Lewis number gives qualitatively erroneous results at supercritical conditions, but that an effective Lewis number previously defined gives qualitatively correct estimates of the length scales for heat and mass transfer at all pressures.

  20. NASA Lewis Stirling SPRE testing and analysis with reduced number of cooler tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Cairelli, James E.; Swec, Diane M.; Doeberling, Thomas J.; Lakatos, Thomas F.; Madi, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    Free-piston Stirling power converters are candidates for high capacity space power applications. The Space Power Research Engine (SPRE), a free-piston Stirling engine coupled with a linear alternator, is being tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center in support of the Civil Space Technology Initiative. The SPRE is used as a test bed for evaluating converter modifications which have the potential to improve the converter performance and for validating computer code predictions. Reducing the number of cooler tubes on the SPRE has been identified as a modification with the potential to significantly improve power and efficiency. Experimental tests designed to investigate the effects of reducing the number of cooler tubes on converter power, efficiency and dynamics are described. Presented are test results from the converter operating with a reduced number of cooler tubes and comparisons between this data and both baseline test data and computer code predictions.

  1. NASA Lewis Stirling SPRE testing and analysis with reduced number of cooler tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.A.; Cairelli, J.E.; Swec, D.M.; Doeberling, T.J.; Lakatos, T.F.; Madi, F.J.

    1994-09-01

    Free-piston Stirling power converters are a candidate for high capacity space power applications. The Space Power Research Engine (SPRE), a free-piston Stirling engine coupled with a linear alternator, is being tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center in support of the Civil Space Technology Initiative. The SPRE is used as a test bed for evaluating converter modifications which have the potential to improve converter performance and for validating computer code predictions. Reducing the number of cooler tubes on the SPRE has been identified as a modification with the potential to significantly improve power and efficiency. This paper describes experimental tests designed to investigate the effects of reducing the number of cooler tubes on converter power, efficiency and dynamics. Presented are test results from the converter operating with a reduced number of cooler tubes and comparisons between this data and both baseline test data and computer code predictions.

  2. NASA Lewis Stirling SPRE testing and analysis with reduced number of cooler tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Cairelli, James E.; Swec, Diane M.; Doeberling, Thomas J.; Lakatos, Thomas F.; Madi, Frank J.

    1992-08-01

    Free-piston Stirling power converters are candidates for high capacity space power applications. The Space Power Research Engine (SPRE), a free-piston Stirling engine coupled with a linear alternator, is being tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center in support of the Civil Space Technology Initiative. The SPRE is used as a test bed for evaluating converter modifications which have the potential to improve the converter performance and for validating computer code predictions. Reducing the number of cooler tubes on the SPRE has been identified as a modification with the potential to significantly improve power and efficiency. Experimental tests designed to investigate the effects of reducing the number of cooler tubes on converter power, efficiency and dynamics are described. Presented are test results from the converter operating with a reduced number of cooler tubes and comparisons between this data and both baseline test data and computer code predictions.

  3. Effects of Lewis number on conditional fluid velocity statistics in low Damköhler number turbulent premixed combustion: A direct numerical simulation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Lipatnikov, Andrei N.

    2013-04-01

    The effects of global Lewis number Le on the statistics of fluid velocity components conditional in unburned reactants and fully burned products in the context of Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes simulations have been analysed using a Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) database of statistically planar turbulent premixed flames with a low Damköhler number and Lewis number ranging from 0.34 to 1.2. The conditional velocity statistics extracted from DNS data have been analysed with respect to the well-known Bray-Moss-Libby (BML) expressions which were derived based on bi-modal probability density function of reaction progress variable for high Damköhler number flames. It has been shown that the Lewis number substantially affects the mean velocity and the velocity fluctuation correlation conditional in products, with the effect being particularly pronounced for low Le. As far as the mean velocity and the velocity fluctuation correlation conditional in reactants are concerned, the BML expressions agree reasonably well with the DNS data reported in the present work. Based on a priori analysis of present and previously reported DNS data, the BML expressions have been empirically modified here in order to account for Lewis number effects, and the non-bimodal distribution of reaction progress variable. Moreover, it has been demonstrated for the first time that surface averaged velocity components and Reynolds stresses conditional in unburned reactants can be modelled without invoking expressions involving the Lewis number, as these surface averaged conditional quantities remain approximately equal to their conditionally averaged counterparts in the unburned mixture.

  4. Effects of Lewis number on vorticity and enstrophy transport in turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Konstantinou, Ilias; Lipatnikov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    The effects of Lewis number Le on both vorticity and enstrophy transport within the flame brush have been analysed using direct numerical simulation data of freely propagating statistically planar turbulent premixed flames, representing the thin reaction zone regime of premixed turbulent combustion. In the simulations, Le was ranged from 0.34 to 1.2 by keeping the laminar flame speed, thermal thickness, Damköhler, Karlovitz, and Reynolds numbers unchanged. The enstrophy has been shown to decay significantly from the unburned to the burned gas side of the flame brush in the Le ≈ 1.0 flames. However, a considerable amount of enstrophy generation within the flame brush has been observed for the Le = 0.34 case and a similar qualitative behaviour has been observed in a much smaller extent for the Le = 0.6 case. The vorticity components have been shown to exhibit anisotropic behaviour within the flame brush, and the extent of anisotropy increases with decreasing Le. The baroclinic torque term has been shown to be principally responsible for this anisotropic behaviour. The vortex stretching and viscous dissipation terms have been found to be the leading order contributors to the enstrophy transport for all cases, but the baroclinic torque and the sink term due to dilatation play increasingly important role for flames with decreasing Le. Furthermore, the correlation between the fluctuations of enstrophy and dilatation rate has been shown to play an important role in determining the material derivative of enstrophy based on the mean flow in the case of a low Le.

  5. Excitable dynamics in high-Lewis number premixed gas combustion at normal and microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard

    1995-01-01

    Freely-propagating, premixed gas flames in high-Lewis (Le) number, quiescent mixtures are studied experimentally in tubes of various diameter at normal (lg) and microgravity (mu g). A premixture of lean butane and oxygen diluted with helium, argon, neon, nitrogen or a mixture of multiple diluents is examined such that the thermal diffusivity of the mixture (and to a lesser extent, the mass diffusivity of the rate-limiting component) is systematically varied. In effect, different diluents allow variation of the Le without changing the chemistry. The flames are recorded with high speed cinematography and their stability is visually assessed. Different modes of propagation were observed depending on the diameter of the tubes (different conductive heat loss), the composition of the mixture and the g-level. At 1g, four modes of propagation were observed in small and intermediate diameter tubes (large conductive heat loss): (1) steadily propagating flames, (2) radial and longitudinal pulsating flames, (3) 'wavering' flames, and (4) rotating spiral flames. As the diameter of the tube increases, the radial modes become more pronounced while the longitudinal modes systematically disappear. Also, multiple, simultaneous, spatially-separated 'pacemaker' sites are observed in intermediate and large diameter tubes. Each site starts as a small region of high luminosity and develops into a flamelet which assumes the form of one of the fore mentioned modes. These flamelets eventually interact, annihilate each other in their regions of intersection and merge at their newly created free-ends. For very large tubes, radially-propagating wave-trains (believed to be 'trigger waves') are observed. These are analogous to the radial pulsations observed in the smaller diameter tubes. At mu g, three modes of propagation have been observed: (1) steadily propagating flames, (2) radial and longitudinal pulsating flames, and (3) multi-armed, rotating flames. Since the pulsating mode exists at mu

  6. Great (Flame) Balls of Fire! Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-number-2 (SOFBALL-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul; Weiland, Karen J.; Over, Ann (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Everyone knows that an automobile engine wastes fuel and energy when it runs with a fuel-rich mixture. 'Lean' burning, mixing in more air and less fuel, is better for the environment. But lean mixtures also lead to engine misfiring and rough operation. No one knows the ultimate limits for lean operation, for 'weak' combustion that is friendly to the environment while still moving us around. This is where the accidental verification of a decades-old prediction may have strong implications for designing and running low-emissions engines in the 21st century. In 1944, Soviet physicist Yakov Zeldovich predicted that stationary, spherical flames are possible under limited conditions in lean fuel-air mixtures. Dr. Paul Ronney of the University of Southern California accidentally discovered such 'flame balls' in experiments with lean hydrogen-air mixtures in 1984 during drop-tower experiments that provided just 2.2 seconds of near weightlessness. Experiments aboard NASA's low-g aircraft confirmed the results, but a thorough investigation was hampered by the aircraft's bumpy ride. And stable flame balls can only exist in microgravity. The potential for investigating combustion at the limits of flammability, and the implications for spacecraft fire safety, led to the Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-number (SOFBALL) experiment flown twice aboard the Space Shuttle on the Microgravity Sciences Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) in 1997. Success there led to the planned reflight on STS-107. Flame balls are the weakest fires yet produced in space or on Earth. Typically each flame ball produced only 1 watt of thermal power. By comparison, a birthday candle produces 50 watts. The Lewis-number measures the rate of diffusion of fuel into the flame ball relative to the rate of diffusion of heat away from the flame ball. Lewis-number mixtures conduct heat poorly. Hydrogen and methane are the only fuels that provide low enough Lewis-numbers to produce stable flame balls, and even then only for

  7. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power-law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of the potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied include the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings (and hence the direction of the radial electric field), the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  8. A Stereo Imaging Velocimetry Technique for Analyzing Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-Number (SOFBALL) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Stereo Imaging Velocimetry (SIV) is a NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) developed fluid physics technique for measuring threedimensional (3-D) velocities in any optically transparent fluid that can be seeded with tracer particles. SIV provides a means to measure 3-D fluid velocities quantitatively and qualitatively at many points. This technique provides full-field 3-D analysis of any optically clear fluid or gas experiment using standard off-the-shelf CCD cameras to provide accurate and reproducible 3-D velocity profiles for experiments that require 3-D analysis. A flame ball is a steady flame in a premixed combustible atmosphere which, due to the transport properties (low Lewis-number) of the mixture, does not propagate but is instead supplied by diffusive transport of the reactants, forming a premixed flame. This flame geometry presents a unique environment for testing combustion theory. We present our analysis of flame ball phenomena utilizing SIV technology in order to accurately calculate the 3-D position of a flame ball(s) during an experiment, which can be used as a direct comparison of numerical simulations.

  9. Effects of Lewis number, density ratio and gravity on burning velocity and conditional statistics in stagnating turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jaesung; Huh, Kang Y.

    2014-09-01

    DNS is performed to analyse the effects of Lewis number (Le), density ratio and gravity in stagnating turbulent premixed flames. The results show good agreement with those of Lee and Huh (Combustion and Flame, Vol. 159, 2012, pp. 1576-1591) with respect to the turbulent burning velocity, ST, in terms of turbulent diffusivity, flamelet thickness, mean curvature and displacement speed at the leading edge. In all four stagnating flames studied, a mean tangential strain rate resulting in a mean flamelet thickness smaller than the unstretched laminar flame thickness leads to an increase in ST. A flame cusp of positive curvature involves a superadiabatic burned gas temperature due to diffusive-thermal instability for an Le less than unity. Wrinkling tends to be suppressed at a larger density ratio, not enhanced by hydrodynamic instability, in the stagnating flow configuration. Turbulence is produced, resulting in highly anisotropic turbulence with heavier unburned gas accelerating through a flame brush by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Results are also provided on brush thickness, flame surface density and conditional velocities in burned and unburned gas and on flame surfaces to represent the internal brush structures for all four test flames.

  10. Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-Number (SOFBALL): Preliminary Results From the STS-83 and STS-94 Space Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.; Wu, Ming-Shin; Pearlman, Howard G.; Weiland, Karen J.

    1998-01-01

    Results from the Structure Of Flame Balls At Low Lewis-number (SOFBALL) space flight experiment conducted on the MSL-1 Space Shuttle missions are reported. Several new insights were obtained, including: much lower buoyancy-induced drift speed than anticipated pre-flight; repulsion of adjacent flame balls due to their mutual interaction; remarkable sensitivity of flame balls to small accelerations resulting from Orbiter attitude control maneuvers; and very similar net heat release for all flame balls in all mixtures tested. Comparison of experimental results to computational predictions reveals limitations in current models of H2-02 chemistry for very lean mixtures. It is discussed how the results of these space experiments may provide an improved understanding of the interactions of the two most important phenomena in combusting materials, namely chemical reaction and transport processes, in the unequivocally simplest possible configuration.

  11. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  12. Factors affecting ion kinetic temperature, number density, and containment time in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The degree of toroidal symmetry of the plasma, the number of midplane electrode rings, the configuration of electrode rings, and the location of the diagnostic instruments with respect to the electrode rings used to generate the plasma are discussed. Impurities were deliberately introduced into the plasma, and the effects of the impurity fraction on ion kinetic temperature and electron number density were observed. It is concluded that, if necessary precautions are taken, the plasma communicates extremely well along the magnetic field lines and displays a high degree of symmetry from sector to sector for a wide range of electrode ring configurations and operating conditions. Finally, some characteristic data taken under nonoptimized conditions are presented, which include the highest electron number density and the longest particle containment time (1.9 msec) observed. Also, evidence from a paired comparison test is presented which shows that the electric field acting along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma improves the plasma density and the calculated containment time more than an order of magnitude if the electric field points inward, relative to the values observed when it points (and pushes ions) radially outward.

  13. Lewy Body Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Lewy body disease is one of the most common causes of dementia in the elderly. Dementia is the loss of mental ... to affect normal activities and relationships. Lewy body disease happens when abnormal structures, called Lewy bodies, build ...

  14. Lewy Body Dementia Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... individuals, it may also be due to the natural course of the disease. All Rights Reserved Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc. 912 Killian Hill Road S.W., Lilburn, GA 30047 © 2016 Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc. Connect ...

  15. Lewy Body Dementia Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alzheimer's when Lewy Bodies are present Lewy body pathology is found in up to 50% of cases ... between people who have autopsy-verified Alzheimer’s disease pathology alone versus those who have both Alzheimer’s and ...

  16. Discovering Lewis and Clark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Ken

    2006-01-01

    Writer and historian Bernard DeVoto observed more than 50 years ago that a dismaying amount of American history has been written without regards to the Indians. Such disregard is glaring in many mainstream stories of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Lewis and Clark began preparing for their historic journey in 1803 and officially launched the…

  17. Lewy Body Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of symptoms, including Changes in alertness and attention Hallucinations Problems with movement and posture Muscle stiffness Confusion Loss of memory Lewy body disease can be hard to diagnose, because Parkinson's ...

  18. Experimental evaluation of wall Mach number distributions of the octagonal test section proposed for NASA Lewis Research Center's altitude wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Douglas E.; Burley, Richard R.; Corban, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    Wall Mach number distributions were determined over a range of test-section free-stream Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.92. The test section was slotted and had a nominal porosity of 11 percent. Reentry flaps located at the test-section exit were varied from 0 (fully closed) to 9 (fully open) degrees. Flow was bled through the test-section slots by means of a plenum evacuation system (PES) and varied from 0 to 3 percent of tunnel flow. Variations in reentry flap angle or PES flow rate had little or no effect on the Mach number distributions in the first 70 percent of the test section. However, in the aft region of the test section, flap angle and PES flow rate had a major impact on the Mach number distributions. Optimum PES flow rates were nominally 2 to 2.5 percent wtih the flaps fully closed and less than 1 percent when the flaps were fully open. The standard deviation of the test-section wall Mach numbers at the optimum PES flow rates was 0.003 or less.

  19. Dementia with lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Posner, H; Chin, S; Marder, K

    2001-10-17

    In this case study, we describe the symptoms, neuropsychological testing, and brain pathology of a man with dementia with Lewy bodies. Dementia with Lewy bodies might be the second most common form of degenerative dementia in the elderly. Progressive cognitive decline, well-formed visual hallucinations, and parkinsonism are core features of this disease. This case was marked by preserved verbal expression despite impairment in memory, visuospatial skills, and attention span. Development of visual symptoms and parkinsonism occurred very early in the course of the disease. PMID:14602963

  20. Symptoms of Lewy Body Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the environment or personal interactions, and the natural progression of the disease. All Rights Reserved Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc. 912 Killian Hill Road S.W., Lilburn, GA 30047 © 2016 Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc. Connect ...

  1. Lewy body dementias.

    PubMed

    Walker, Zuzana; Possin, Katherine L; Boeve, Bradley F; Aarsland, Dag

    2015-10-24

    The broad importance of dementia is undisputed, with Alzheimer's disease justifiably getting the most attention. However, dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease dementia, now called Lewy body dementias, are the second most common type of degenerative dementia in patients older than 65 years. Despite this, Lewy body dementias receive little attention and patients are often misdiagnosed, leading to less than ideal management. Over the past 10 years, considerable effort has gone into improving diagnostic accuracy by refining diagnostic criteria and using imaging and other biomarkers. Dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease dementia share the same pathophysiology, and effective treatments will depend not only on successful treatment of symptoms but also on targeting the pathological mechanisms of disease, ideally before symptoms and clinical signs develop. We summarise the most pertinent progress from the past 10 years, outlining some of the challenges for the future, which will require refinement of diagnosis and clarification of the pathogenesis, leading to disease-modifying treatments. PMID:26595642

  2. Dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferman, Tanis J.; Boeve, Bradley F.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The advent of new immunostains have improved our ability to detect limbic and cortical Lewy bodies, and it is now evident that Dementa with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative dementia, after Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Distinguishing DLB from AD has important implications for treatment, in terms of substances that may worsen symptoms (i.e., anticholinergic and certain neuroleptic medications) and those that may improve them (i.e., cholinesterase inhibitors, carbidopa-levodopa). Neurocognitive patterns, psychiatric features, extrapyramidal signs and sleep disturbance are helpful in differentiating DLB from AD early in the disease course. Differences in the severity of cholinergic depletion as well as type and distribution of neuropathology contribute to these clinical differences, though DLB patients with a high density of co-occuring AD pathology are less clinical distinguishable from AD. PMID:17659188

  3. Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Douglas W

    2015-08-19

    The articulation of the notion of "frustrated Lewis pairs" (FLPs), which emerged from the discovery that H2 can be reversibly activated by combinations of sterically encumbered Lewis acids and bases, has prompted a great deal of recent activity. Perhaps the most remarkable consequence has been the development of FLP catalysts for the hydrogenation of a range of organic substrates. In the past 9 years, the substrate scope has evolved from bulky polar species to include a wide range of unsaturated organic molecules. In addition, effective stereoselective metal-free hydrogenation catalysts have begun to emerge. The mechanism of this activation of H2 has been explored, and the nature and range of Lewis acid/base combinations capable of effecting such activation have also expanded to include a variety of non-metal species. The reactivity of FLPs with a variety of other small molecules, including olefins, alkynes, and a range of element oxides, has also been developed. Although much of this latter chemistry has uncovered unique stoichiometric transformations, metal-free catalytic hydroamination, CO2 reduction chemistry, and applications in polymerization have also been achieved. The concept is also beginning to find applications in bioinorganic and materials chemistry as well as heterogeneous catalysis. This Perspective highlights many of these developments and discusses the relationship between FLPs and established chemistry. Some of the directions and developments that are likely to emerge from FLP chemistry in the future are also presented. PMID:26214241

  4. [Diffuse Lewy body disease].

    PubMed

    Kosaka, K

    1995-12-01

    Diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD), which we have proposed since 1976, has received great attention among both researchers and clinicians. Recently, it was reported by some English and American research groups that DLBD is the second most frequent dementing illness in the elderly, following Alzheimer-type dementia (ATD). Our recent research of 79 autopsied dementia cases in a hospital disclosed that DLBD (15.4%) was the second most common degenerative dementia, following ATD (43.6%). In 1980 we proposed Lewy body disease, and classified it into three types: brain stem type, transitional type, and diffuse type. Diffuse type of LBD is now called DLBD. In 1990 we divided DLBD into two forms: common form and pure form. The common form of DLBD has more or less Alzheimer pathology, and pure form has none. Very recently, we proposed the cerebral type of LBD, in which numerous Lewy bodies are found in the cerebral cortex and amygdala, but no PD pathology is present in the brain stem. Therefore, LBD is now classified as follows: [table: see text] PMID:8752428

  5. Edwin W. Lewis, Jr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Edwin W. Lewis Jr. is a research pilot in the Airborne Science program, Flight Crew Branch, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. He currently flies the DC-8, F/A-18, Lear Jet 24, King Air, and T-34C in support of Dryden's flight operations and is mentor pilot for the King Air and the Lear Jet. Prior to accepting this assignment Lewis was a pilot for eight years at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, flying 10 different aircraft - C-130B, DC-8-72, UH-1, SH-3, King Air, Lear 24, T-38A, T-39G and YO-3A - in support of NASA flight missions. Lewis also flew the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (a modified civilian version of the Lockheed C-141 Starlifter). He was project pilot for Ames' 747 and T-38 programs. Lewis was born in New York City on May 19, 1936, and began flight training as a Civil Air Patrol cadet in 1951, ultimately earning his commercial pilot's certificate in 1958. He received a bachelor of arts degree in biology from Hobart College, Geneva, N.Y., and entered the U.S. Air Force through the Reserve Officer Training Corps. Following pilot training he was assigned to Moody Air Force Base, Ga., as an instructor pilot, for both the T-33 and T-37 aircraft. He served in Vietnam in 1965 and 1966, where he was a forward air controller, instructor and standardization/evaluation pilot, flying more than 1,000 hours in the O-1 'Bird Dog.' Lewis separated from the regular Air Force and joined Pan American World Airways and the 129th Air Commando Group, California Air National Guard (ANG) based in Hayward, California. During his 18-year career with the California ANG he flew the U-6, U-10, C-119, HC-130 aircraft and the HH-3 helicopter. He retired as commander, 129th Air Rescue and Recovery Group, a composite combat rescue group, in the grade of colonel. During his 22 years as an airline pilot, he flew the Boeing 707, 727 and 747. He took early retirement from Pan American in 1989 to become a pilot with NASA.

  6. Lewis Incubator for Technology (LIFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Wayne P.; King, Joseph B.; Jankura, Richard E., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done to operate the Lewis Incubator for Technology for the period October 2000 through September 2004. The Lewis Incubator helped the startup and growth of technology based businesses with the potential to incorporate technology from the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  7. A Biography of Distinguished Scientist Gilbert Newton Lewis (by Edward S. Lewis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Reviewed By Harold H.

    1999-11-01

    until 1904, when he accepted a position that would not be considered a shrewd career move: Superintendent of Weights and Measures in Manila, Philippines! He was there only one year, but it was apparently a productive time, both in a minimally equipped laboratory and with the possible nascence of some of his ideas about bonding. In 1905, Lewis accepted a staff position at MIT, under A. A. Noyes, where he remained until 1912. At MIT, he continued his experimental work on thermodynamic systems and the development of modern thermodynamics, following the lead of J. W. Gibbs, whose work was being largely ignored by other chemists. As Noyes moved increasingly into administrative responsibilities, Lewis took over more and more of the supervision of scientific work in the laboratory. It was the capable job that he did for Noyes that led to his being offered a Professorship and Chair of the College of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. The same spirit of adventure that took Lewis to Manila may be what led to his moving to scientifically backward California. In 1912, there was no serious science going on the Left Coast, and Berkeley was isolated from the nearest civilization (Chicago) by days of travel. Lewis initiated the expansion of great science westward, not only to Berkeley, but also to Caltech (in those days Throop Institute), UCLA, and Stanford. By dint of his contributions to thermodynamics and bonding theory (suggesting that electrons bond in pairs, long before there was quantum mechanical justification for such a strange idea), and his organizational and leadership talents, he turned the Berkeley Chemistry Department from a nonentity into one of the finest anywhere. Later in his career, he contributed to the understanding of the role of isotopes in chemistry and physics. This biography includes a useful listing of Lewis's 168 scientific publications. In an age when many renowned scientists have multiples of this number, it is perhaps good to be

  8. [Dementia with Lewy bodies].

    PubMed

    Orimo, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    It is important to differentiate dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and other dementia, especially Alzheimer disease (AD), because the medical treatment, management, and the prognosis of these diseases are different. In regard to clinical features, DLB patients have relatively mild memory disturbance, fluctuating cognition, more severe disturbances of attention, executive function, visuospacial function, visual hallucination, depression, autonomic symptoms, REM sleep behavior disorder, and idiopathic parkinsonism compared to AD patients. In regard to imaging tools, DLB patients have milder atrophy of medial temporal lobe by brain MRI, reduced occipital activity by SPECT or PET, reduced MIBG uptake by MIBG cardiac scintigraphy, and low dopamine transporter activity in the basal ganglia by SPECT or PET. PMID:27025091

  9. Lewy body disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    KOSAKA, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    In 1976 we reported our first autopsied case with diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD), the term of which we proposed in 1984. We also proposed the term “Lewy body disease” (LBD) in1980. Subsequently, we classified LBD into three types according to the distribution pattern of Lewy bodies: a brain stem type, a transitional type and a diffuse type. Later, we added the cerebral type. As we have proposed since 1980, LBD has recently been used as a generic term to include Parkinson’s disease (PD), Parkinson’s disease with dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), which was proposed in 1996 on the basis of our reports of DLBD. DLB is now known to be the second most frequent dementia following Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In this paper we introduce our studies of DLBD and LBD. PMID:25311140

  10. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical contributions announced in 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of Lewis authored publications and publications resulting from Lewis managed contracts which were announced in the 1976 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts) are presented. Research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and these are included. The arrangement is by NASA subject category. Citations indicate report literature (identified by their N-numbers) and the journal and conference presentations (identified by their A-numbers). A grouping of indexes helps locate specific publications by author (including contractor authors), contractor organization, contract number, and report number.

  11. An interview with Lewis Wolpert.

    PubMed

    Wolpert, Lewis; Vicente, Catarina

    2015-08-01

    Lewis Wolpert is a retired developmental biologist who, over his long career, has made many important contributions to the field, from his French Flag model and the concept of positional information to the famous quote that it is "not birth, marriage or death, but gastrulation which is truly the most important time in your life." In addition to his scientific contributions, Lewis is also a prolific writer, from the textbook 'Developmental Biology' to books about popular science, religion and his battle with depression. Although born in South Africa, it was in the United Kingdom that Lewis spent most of his scientific career. We met Lewis at the Spring Meeting of the British Society for Developmental Biology, where he was awarded the Waddington Medal. PMID:26243866

  12. Significance of Lewis phenotyping using saliva and gastric tissue: comparison with the Lewis phenotype inferred from Lewis and secretor genotypes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yun Ji; Hwang, Sang Mee; Kim, Taek Soo; Song, Eun Young; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Han, Kyou-Sup

    2014-01-01

    Lewis phenotypes using various types of specimen were compared with the Lewis phenotype predicted from Lewis and Secretor genotypes. This is the first logical step in explaining the association between the Lewis expression and Helicobacter pylori. We performed a study of the followings on 209 patients who underwent routine gastroscopy: erythrocyte and saliva Lewis phenotyping, gastric Lewis phenotyping by the tissue array, and the Lewis and Secretor genes genotyping. The results of phenotyping were as follows [Le(a-b-), Le(a+b-), Le(a-b+), and Le(a+b+), respectively, in order]: erythrocyte (12.4%, 25.8%, 61.2%, and 0.5%); saliva (2.4%, 27.3%, 70.3%, and 0.0%); gastric mucosa (8.1%, 6.7%, 45.5%, and 39.7%). The frequency of Le, le (59/508) , le (59/1067) , and le (59) alleles was 74.6%, 21.3%, 3.1%, and 1.0%, respectively, among 418 alleles. The saliva Lewis phenotype was completely consistent with the Lewis phenotype inferred from Lewis and Secretor genotypes, but that of gastric mucosa could not be predicted from genotypes. Lewis phenotyping using erythrocytes is only adequate for transfusion needs. Saliva testing for the Lewis phenotype is a more reliable method for determining the peripheral Lewis phenotype of an individual and the gastric Lewis phenotype must be used for the study on the association between Helicobacter pylori and the Lewis phenotype. PMID:24783214

  13. Dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Murray, Melissa E.; Lowe, Val J.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Ferman, Tanis J.; Przybelski, Scott A.; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Smith, Glenn E.; Knopman, David S.; Jack, Clifford R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate clinical, imaging, and pathologic associations of the cingulate island sign (CIS) in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Methods: We retrospectively identified and compared patients with a clinical diagnosis of DLB (n = 39); patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) matched by age, sex, and education (n = 39); and cognitively normal controls (n = 78) who underwent 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and C11 Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET scans. Among these patients, we studied those who came to autopsy and underwent Braak neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) staging (n = 10). Results: Patients with a clinical diagnosis of DLB had a higher ratio of posterior cingulate to precuneus plus cuneus metabolism, cingulate island sign (CIS), on FDG-PET than patients with AD (p < 0.001), a finding independent of β-amyloid load on PiB-PET (p = 0.56). Patients with CIS positivity on visual assessment of FDG-PET fit into the group of high- or intermediate-probability DLB pathology and received clinical diagnosis of DLB, not AD. Higher CIS ratio correlated with lower Braak NFT stage (r = −0.96; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study found that CIS on FDG-PET is not associated with fibrillar β-amyloid deposition but indicates lower Braak NFT stage in patients with DLB. Identifying biomarkers that measure relative contributions of underlying pathologies to dementia is critical as neurotherapeutics move toward targeted treatments. PMID:25056580

  14. Pareidolias: complex visual illusions in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Makoto; Nishio, Yoshiyuki; Yokoi, Kayoko; Hirayama, Kazumi; Imamura, Toru; Shimomura, Tatsuo; Mori, Etsuro

    2012-08-01

    Patients rarely experience visual hallucinations while being observed by clinicians. Therefore, instruments to detect visual hallucinations directly from patients are needed. Pareidolias, which are complex visual illusions involving ambiguous forms that are perceived as meaningful objects, are analogous to visual hallucinations and have the potential to be a surrogate indicator of visual hallucinations. In this study, we explored the clinical utility of a newly developed instrument for evoking pareidolic illusions, the Pareidolia test, in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies-one of the most common causes of visual hallucinations in the elderly. Thirty-four patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, 34 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 26 healthy controls were given the Pareidolia test. Patients with dementia with Lewy bodies produced a much greater number of pareidolic illusions compared with those with Alzheimer's disease or controls. A receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that the number of pareidolias differentiated dementia with Lewy bodies from Alzheimer's disease with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 88%. Full-length figures and faces of people and animals accounted for >80% of the contents of pareidolias. Pareidolias were observed in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies who had visual hallucinations as well as those who did not have visual hallucinations, suggesting that pareidolias do not reflect visual hallucinations themselves but may reflect susceptibility to visual hallucinations. A sub-analysis of patients with dementia with Lewy bodies who were or were not treated with donepzil demonstrated that the numbers of pareidolias were correlated with visuoperceptual abilities in the former and with indices of hallucinations and delusional misidentifications in the latter. Arousal and attentional deficits mediated by abnormal cholinergic mechanisms and visuoperceptual dysfunctions are likely to contribute to the development

  15. A Biography of Distinguished Scientist Gilbert Newton Lewis (by Edward S. Lewis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Reviewed By Harold H.

    1999-11-01

    until 1904, when he accepted a position that would not be considered a shrewd career move: Superintendent of Weights and Measures in Manila, Philippines! He was there only one year, but it was apparently a productive time, both in a minimally equipped laboratory and with the possible nascence of some of his ideas about bonding. In 1905, Lewis accepted a staff position at MIT, under A. A. Noyes, where he remained until 1912. At MIT, he continued his experimental work on thermodynamic systems and the development of modern thermodynamics, following the lead of J. W. Gibbs, whose work was being largely ignored by other chemists. As Noyes moved increasingly into administrative responsibilities, Lewis took over more and more of the supervision of scientific work in the laboratory. It was the capable job that he did for Noyes that led to his being offered a Professorship and Chair of the College of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. The same spirit of adventure that took Lewis to Manila may be what led to his moving to scientifically backward California. In 1912, there was no serious science going on the Left Coast, and Berkeley was isolated from the nearest civilization (Chicago) by days of travel. Lewis initiated the expansion of great science westward, not only to Berkeley, but also to Caltech (in those days Throop Institute), UCLA, and Stanford. By dint of his contributions to thermodynamics and bonding theory (suggesting that electrons bond in pairs, long before there was quantum mechanical justification for such a strange idea), and his organizational and leadership talents, he turned the Berkeley Chemistry Department from a nonentity into one of the finest anywhere. Later in his career, he contributed to the understanding of the role of isotopes in chemistry and physics. This biography includes a useful listing of Lewis's 168 scientific publications. In an age when many renowned scientists have multiples of this number, it is perhaps good to be

  16. 100 years of Lewy pathology.

    PubMed

    Goedert, Michel; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Del Tredici, Kelly; Braak, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    In 1817, James Parkinson described the symptoms of the shaking palsy, a disease that was subsequently defined in greater detail, and named after Parkinson, by Jean-Martin Charcot. Parkinson expected that the publication of his monograph would lead to a rapid elucidation of the anatomical substrate of the shaking palsy; in the event, this process took almost a century. In 1912, Fritz Heinrich Lewy identified the protein aggregates that define Parkinson disease (PD) in some brain regions outside the substantia nigra. In 1919, Konstantin Nikolaevich Tretiakoff found similar aggregates in the substantia nigra and named them after Lewy. In the 1990s, α-synuclein was identified as the main constituent of the Lewy pathology, and its aggregation was shown to be central to PD, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy. In 2003, a staging scheme for idiopathic PD was introduced, according to which α-synuclein pathology originates in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagal nerve and progresses from there to other brain regions, including the substantia nigra. In this article, we review the relevance of Lewy's discovery 100 years ago for the current understanding of PD and related disorders. PMID:23183883

  17. Lewis Carroll's formula for calendar calculating.

    PubMed

    Spitz, H H

    1994-03-01

    One of the extraordinary skills occasionally displayed by individuals of low intelligence (so-called idiots savants) is the ability to name, within seconds, the day of the week for any given date, sometimes over a range of centuries. A number of scholarly papers contain references to formulas that can be used in making this calculation, but none cites one of the earliest published methods, that of Lewis Carroll. However, formulas such as Carroll's are too complex to be self-taught by idiots savants and, consequently, cannot account for their remarkable performance. Alternative explanatory hypotheses were briefly discussed. PMID:8192906

  18. Lewis and Clark as Naturalists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. National Museum of Natural History.

    Intended for use in elementary and high school education, this Web site includes a teacher's guide and three lesson plans. The site contains images of museum specimens, scientific drawings, and field photos of the plant and animal species observed by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, along with journal excerpts, historical notes, and references…

  19. Lewis & Clark: An Interdisciplinary Expedition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brugar, Kristy

    2004-01-01

    On January 18, 1803 President Thomas Jefferson asked Congress to fund an expedition to the source of the Missouri River. This expedition would become known as the Corps of Discovery, which would spend twenty-eight months exploring, studying, and documenting the wonders of the western frontier. Led by Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark,…

  20. Space Chemical Propulsion Test Facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio, has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especially encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. An overview of the Lewis test facilities is presented.

  1. National space test centers - Lewis Research Center Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskilly, Ronald R.

    1990-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center, NASA, presently has a number of test facilities that constitute a significant national space test resource. It is expected this capability will continue to find wide application in work involving this country's future in space. Testing from basic research to applied technology, to systems development, to ground support will be performed, supporting such activities as Space Station Freedom, the Space Exploration Initiative, Mission to Planet Earth, and many others. The major space test facilities at both Cleveland and Lewis' Plum Brook Station are described. Primary emphasis is on space propulsion facilities; other facilities of importance in space power and microgravity are also included.

  2. Who Needs Lewis Structures to Get VSEPR Geometries?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindmark, Alan F.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching the VSEPR (valence shell electron-pair repulsion) model can be a tedious process. Traditionally, Lewis structures are drawn and the number of "electron clouds" (groups) around the central atom are counted and related to the standard VSEPR table of possible geometries. A simpler method to deduce the VSEPR structure without first drawing…

  3. Lewy Body Pathology in Familial Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leverenz, James B.; Fishel, Mark A.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Montine, Thomas J.; Nochlin, David; Steinbart, Ellen; Raskind, Murray A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Bird, Thomas D.; Tsuang, Debby

    2006-01-01

    Background The origin and significance of Lewy bodies and neurites (Lewy body pathology [LBP]) in Alzheimer disease (AD) are poorly understood. Objective To examine LBP in the brainstem, limbic cortex, and neocortex of a large number of familial AD cases with mutations in 2 presenilin (PSEN) genes. Methods Twenty-five familial AD cases with 9 known PSEN 1 mutations and 14 familial AD cases with a single PSEN 2 mutation (N141I) were examined for LBP using α-synuclein immunohistochemistry and sampling of multiple brainstem and cortical regions. Results The amygdala was the most vulnerable site for LBP. In fact, virtually all (24 [96%] of 25 cases) of the PSEN 1 mutation cases had LBP in the amygdala. The PSEN 1 mutation cases also had more frequent LBP in the amygdala and neocortex than those with the PSEN 2 mutation. However, within families with a single mutation of either PSEN 1 or PSEN 2, there was frequent variability of the LBP. Conclusion These findings suggest that there are genetic influences on the presence of LBP in familial AD as demonstrated by the differences between PSEN 1 and PSEN 2 mutation cases. PMID:16533963

  4. Dr. Lewis' 10-Year Audit.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Joey

    2015-11-01

    Kaufman pediatrician Charles Turner Lewis, MD, battled fraud allegations levied against him by the Office of Inspector General (OIG) from 2005 to 2008 and emerged victorious. To his dismay, he is once again on the receiving end of an OIG letter alleging Medicaid overpayment. The 2015 Texas Legislature responded to TMA's call for improvements in OIG Medicaid fraud investigations of physicians with passage of Senate Bill 207. Organized medicine hopes the law's safeguards will afford due process to doctors under investigation. PMID:26536514

  5. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center Technical Publications announced in 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This compilation of over 1100 abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1979. All the publications were announced in the 1979 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses are included. Subject, author, corporate source, contract number, and report number indexes are provided.

  6. Superconducting Microwave Electronics at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Joseph D.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Leonard, Regis F.

    1991-01-01

    Over the last three years, NASA Lewis Research Center has investigated the application of newly discovered high temperature superconductors to microwave electronics. Using thin films of YBa2Cu3O7-delta and Tl2Ca2Ba2Cu3Ox deposited on a variety of substrates, including strontium titanate, lanthanum gallate, lanthanum aluminate and magnesium oxide, a number of microwave circuits have been fabricated and evaluated. These include a cavity resonator at 60 GHz, microstrip resonators at 35 GHz, a superconducting antenna array at 35 GHz, a dielectric resonator at 9 GHz, and a microstrip filter at 5 GHz. Performance of some of these circuits as well as suggestions for other applications are reported.

  7. Cholinesterase Inhibitors for Lewy Body Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yasue, Ichiro; Iwata, Nakao

    2016-01-01

    Background: We performed a meta-analysis of cholinesterase inhibitors for patients with Lewy body disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, Parkinson’s disease dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies. Methods: The meta-analysis included only randomized controlled trials of cholinesterase inhibitors for Lewy body disorders. Results: Seventeen studies (n = 1798) were assessed. Cholinesterase inhibitors significantly improved cognitive function (standardized mean difference [SMD] = −0.53], behavioral disturbances (SMD = −0.28), activities of daily living (SMD = −0.28), and global function (SMD = −0.52) compared with control treatments. Changes in motor function were not significantly different from control treatments. Furthermore, the cholinesterase inhibitor group had a higher all-cause discontinuation (risk ratio [RR] = 1.48, number needed to harm [NNH] = 14), discontinuation due to adverse events (RR = 1.59, NNH = 20), at least one adverse event (RR = 1.13, NNH = 11), nausea (RR = 2.50, NNH = 13), and tremor (RR = 2.30, NNH = 20). Conclusions: Cholinesterase inhibitors appear beneficial for the treatment of Lewy body disorders without detrimental effects on motor function. However, a careful monitoring of treatment compliance and side effects is required. PMID:26221005

  8. Fort Lewis Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebdon, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Located in the shadow of Mt. Rainier, Fort Lewis is the home of the highest per capita exceptional family member population in the Army. Ideally located on the Northwest coast of Washington State, Fort Lewis is home to the Strykers and First Brigade. Combined with its close proximity to McChord Air Force Base, the installation is ideally suited to…

  9. Decreased vasopressin content in parvocellular CRH neurosecretory system of Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Whitnall, M H; Anderson, K A; Lane, C A; Mougey, E H; Neta, R; Perlstein, R S

    1994-08-15

    Rats possess stress-responsive, vasopressin (VP)-expressing and stress-nonresponsive, VP-deficient subpopulations of parvocellular corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurosecretory cells. Both subpopulations are activated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cytokines. Lewis rats exhibit hyporesponsive hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axes (HPAAs). The Lewis CRH neurosecretory system has been reported to be defective in females and normal in males. We used post-embedding electron microscopic (EM) immunocytochemistry to study baseline levels and LPS-stimulated depletion of neurosecretory vesicles. Male Lewis rats possessed normal numbers of CRH+/VP- varicosities and low numbers of CRH+/VP+ varicosities, indicating abnormally low release of VP into portal blood. This defect contrasts with the reported increase in VP content and release in magnocellular neurosecretory cells in Lewis rats. PMID:7819536

  10. Wind tunnel investigation of the Titan Forward Skirt compartment vent from a free-stream Mach number of 0.80 to 1.96. [conducted in the Lewis Research Center 8 by 6 foot supersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    A test was conducted to determine the flow characteristics of the Titan forward skirt compartment vent over a free stream Mach number range of 0.80 to 1.96. The vent was mounted in a flat plate and the plate was flush mounted to the tunnel side wall with coinciding center lines. Air was discharged from a duct, located on the tunnel side wall behind the plate, through a canted aft 30 deg honeycomb vent into the free stream. Data for the analysis of the Titan forward skirt compartment venting during ascent through the atmosphere are provided. Full scale simulated flight hardware, such as the honeycomb vent, duct corrugations and field joint ring were used. Boundary layer thicknesses were used to vary boundary height. The highest vent discharge coefficient for any given Mach number and vent pressure ratio generally occurred at the maximum displacement thickness. With no vent flow the static pressure in the vent region was generally less than the free stream static pressure. With vent flow, the static pressures upstream of the vent increased, and those downstream of the vent decreased.

  11. Thioarsenides: A case for long-range Lewis acid-base-directed van der Waals interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Wallace, Adam F.; Downs, R. T.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-04-01

    Electron density distributions, bond paths, Laplacian and local energy density properties have been calculated for a number of As4Sn (n = 3,4,5) thioarsenide molecular crystals. On the basis of the distributions, the intramolecular As-S and As-As interactions classify as shared bonded interactions and the intermolecular As-S, As-As and S-S interactions classify as closed-shell van der Waals bonded interactions. The bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths link regions of locally concentrated electron density (Lewis base regions) with aligned regions of locally depleted electron density (Lewis acid regions) on adjacent molecules. The paths are comparable with intermolecular paths reported for several other molecular crystals that link aligned Lewis base and acid regions in a key-lock fashion, interactions that classified as long range Lewis acid-base directed van der Waals interactions. As the bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths (~70%) link Lewis acid-base regions on adjacent molecules, it appears that molecules adopt an arrangement that maximizes the number of As-S Lewis acid-base intermolecular bonded interactions. The maximization of the number of Lewis acid-base interactions appears to be connected with the close-packed array adopted by molecules: distorted cubic close-packed arrays are adopted for alacránite, pararealgar, uzonite, realgar and β-AsS and the distorted hexagonal close-packed arrays adopted by α- and β-dimorphite. A growth mechanism is proposed for thioarsenide molecular crystals from aqueous species that maximizes the number of long range Lewis acid-base vdW As-S bonded interactions with the resulting directed bond paths structuralizing the molecules as a molecular crystal.

  12. Thioarsenides: a case for long-range Lewis acid-base-directed van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Wallace, A. F.; Downs, R. T.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.; Rosso, K. M.

    2011-04-01

    Electron density distributions, bond paths, Laplacian and local-energy density properties have been calculated for a number of As4S n ( n = 3, 4 and 5) thioarsenide molecular crystals. On the basis of the distributions, the intramolecular As-S and As-As interactions classify as shared bonded interactions, and the intermolecular As-S, As-As and S-S interactions classify as closed-shell van der Waals (vdW) bonded interactions. The bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths link regions of locally concentrated electron density (Lewis-base regions) with aligned regions of locally depleted electron density (Lewis-acid regions) on adjacent molecules. The paths are comparable with intermolecular paths reported for several other molecular crystals that link aligned Lewis base and acid regions in a key-lock fashion, interactions that classified as long-range Lewis acid-base-directed vdW interactions. As the bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths (~70%) link Lewis acid-base regions on adjacent molecules, it appears that molecules adopt an arrangement that maximizes the number of As-S Lewis acid-base intermolecular bonded interactions. The maximization of the number of Lewis acid-base interactions appears to be connected with the close-packed array adopted by molecules: distorted cubic close-packed arrays are adopted for alacránite, pararealgar, uzonite, realgar and β-AsS and the distorted hexagonal close-packed arrays adopted by α- and β-dimorphite. A growth mechanism is proposed for thioarsenide molecular crystals from aqueous species that maximizes the number of long-range Lewis acid-base vdW As-S bonded interactions with the resulting directed bond paths structuralizing the molecules as a molecular crystal.

  13. Prodromal dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Sato, Kiyoshi; Iseki, Eizo

    2015-07-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative dementing disorder after Alzheimer's disease (AD), but there is limited information regarding the prodromal DLB state compared with that of AD. Parkinson's disease (PD) and DLB share common prodromal symptoms with Lewy body disease (LBD), allowing us to use a common strategy for identifying the individuals with an underlying pathophysiology of LBD. Dysautonomia, olfactory dysfunction, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and psychiatric symptoms antedate the onset of dementia by years or even decades in patients with DLB. Although RBD is the most potentially accurate prodromal predictor of DLB, disease progression before the onset of dementia could differ between the prodromal DLB state with and without RBD. Experts who specialize in idiopathic RBD and DLB might need communication in order to clarify the clinical relevance of RBD with the disease progression of DLB. The presence of prodromal LBD symptoms or findings of occipital hypoperfusion/hypometabolism helps us to predict the possible pathophysiological process of LBD in non-demented patients. This approach might provide the opportunity for additional neuroimaging, including cardiac (123) I-metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy and dopamine transporter imaging. Although limited radiological findings in patients with prodromal DLB states have been reported, there is now a need for larger clinical multisite studies with pathological verification. The long prodromal phase of DLB provides a critical opportunity for potential intervention with disease-modifying therapy, but only if we are able to clearly identify the diversity in the clinical courses of DLB. In the present article, we reviewed the limited literature regarding the clinical profiles of prodromal DLB. PMID:25690399

  14. Lewis Research Center R and D Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) defines and develops advanced technology for high priority national needs. The work of the Center is directed toward new propulsion, power, and communications technologies for application to aeronautics and space, so that U.S. leadership in these areas is ensured. The end product is knowledge, usually in a report, that is made fully available to potential users--the aircraft engine industry, the energy industry, the automotive industry, the space industry, and other NASA centers. In addition to offices and laboratories for almost every kind of physical research in such fields as fluid mechanics, physics, materials, fuels, combustion, thermodynamics, lubrication, heat transfer, and electronics, LeRC has a variety of engineering test cells for experiments with components such as compressors, pumps, conductors, turbines, nozzles, and controls. A number of large facilities can simulate the operating environment for a complete system: altitude chambers for aircraft engines; large supersonic wind tunnels for advanced airframes and propulsion systems; space simulation chambers for electric rockets or spacecraft; and a 420-foot-deep zero-gravity facility for microgravity experiments. Some problems are amenable to detection and solution only in the complete system and at essentially full scale. By combining basic research in pertinent disciplines and generic technologies with applied research on components and complete systems, LeRC has become one of the most productive centers in its field in the world. This brochure describes a number of the facilities that provide LeRC with its exceptional capabilities.

  15. Modeling Lewis acidity of transition aluminas by numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, L.J.; Blumenfeld, A.L.; Fripiat, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    The bulk and surface features of an alumina particle obtained by molecular-dynamics simulation are used to support the experimental distribution of aluminums with respect to their coordination number obtained by NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance). This information was obtained by using results of various editing procedures of the {sup 27}Al nuclear magnetic resonance, such as the classical one-pulse (1P) magic angle spinning, the cross polarization (CP) from the protons of chemisorbed ammonia and the 1P or CP rotational echo double resonance (REDOR). Because the REDOR technique revealed that the acid Lewis sites are constituted by pairs of four or fivefold coordinated aluminum atoms about 3 {Angstrom} apart, these pairs were counted in the simulated particle. The agreement with experimental surface density of Lewis sites is satisfactory. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Space chemical propulsion test facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especiallly encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. This paper presents an overview of the Lewis test facilities. These facilities are clustered into three test areas: the Rocket Engine Test Facilities (RETF), the Rocket Laboratory (RL), and the Cryogenic Components Laboratory (CCL).

  17. Dementia with Lewy bodies in Meige Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ho Yin; Yu, Chi Shing

    2012-01-01

    Meige syndrome is a rare form of segmental dystonia characterized by blepharospasm and oromandibular dystonia. A few case reports of Meige syndrome have been associated with Lewy body pathologies, and the syndrome was also proposed for inclusion in the spectrum of Lewy body disease. We report a case of an elderly gentleman with a history of Meige syndrome for more than 10 years who developed dementia with Lewy bodies. Updated clinical and pathological evidence of linkages between these two conditions is also presented. PMID:22984651

  18. The Use of C. S. Lewis's "Poems" for Oral Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Carolyn

    Suggestions are offered in this paper for adapting C. S. Lewis's poems for oral interpretation. A discussion of Lewis's lifelong correspondence with his friend Arthur Greeves provides insights into Lewis's perceptions of his own writing. Eighty poems selected from Lewis's "Poems" as appropriate for oral interpretation are classified according to…

  19. Development of a Lewis Base Catalyzed Selenocyclization Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, William

    2009-01-01

    The concept of Lewis base activation of selenium Lewis acids has been effectively reduced to practice in the Lewis base catalyzed selenofunctionalization of unactivated olefins. In this reaction, the weakly acidic species, "N"-phenylselenyl succinimide, is cooperatively activated by the addition of a "soft" Lewis base donor (phosphine sulfides,…

  20. Abegg, Lewis, Langmuir, and the Octet Rule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses major events leading to the development of the octet rule. Three conclusions based on the work of Mendeleev, Abegg, Thompson, Kossel, Lewis, and Langmuir are considered as is the debate over the rule's validity. (JN)

  1. 90 Seconds of Discovery: Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Kathmann, Shawn; Schenter, Greg; Autrey, Tom

    2014-02-14

    Hydrogen activating catalysts play an important role in producing valuable chemicals, such as biofuels and ammonia. As a part of efforts to develop the next generation of these catalysts, PNNL researchers have found potential in Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

  2. 90 Seconds of Discovery: Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    ScienceCinema

    Kathmann, Shawn; Schenter, Greg; Autrey, Tom

    2014-07-21

    Hydrogen activating catalysts play an important role in producing valuable chemicals, such as biofuels and ammonia. As a part of efforts to develop the next generation of these catalysts, PNNL researchers have found potential in Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

  3. Pueblo Pottery: Continuity and Change. Lucy Lewis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, Melanie

    1991-01-01

    Describes Lucy Lewis' ceramic work which is inspired by the ancient pottery of her Acoma Pueblo artistic heritage. Discusses concepts of tradition, artistic heritage, and change over time. Outlines related ceramic and discussion activities for elementary and secondary students. (KM)

  4. Excerpts from the Books of Bernard Lewis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Bernard

    1990-01-01

    Presents excerpts from the books of Bernard Lewis on Arab culture and history; Islamic religion, history, and politics; Orientalism; and slavery in the Middle East. Includes an excerpt on historiography and the problems of historical scholarship. (RW)

  5. SSTI- Lewis Spacecraft Nickel-Hydrogen Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, R. F.

    1997-01-01

    Topics considered include: NASA-Small Spacecraft Technology Initiative (SSTI) objectives, SSTI-Lewis overview, battery requirement, two cells Common Pressure Vessel (CPV) design summary, CPV electric performance, battery design summary, battery functional description, battery performance.

  6. G. N. Lewis and the Chemical Bond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Linus

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the contributions of G. N. Lewis to chemistry, focusing on his formulation of the basic principle of the chemical bond--the idea that the chemical bond consists of a pair of electrons held jointly by two atoms. (JN)

  7. Lewis Research Center: Commercialization Success Stories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyward, Ann O.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio, has a portfolio of research and technology capabilities and facilities that afford opportunities for productive partnerships with industry in a broad range of industry sectors. In response to the President's agenda in the area of technology for economic growth (Clinton/Gore 1993), the National Performance Review (1993), NASA's Agenda for Change (1994), and the needs of its customers, NASA Lewis Research Center has sought and achieved significant successes in technology transfer and commercialization. This paper discusses a sampling of Lewis Research Center's successes in this area, and lessons learned that Lewis Research Center is applying in pursuit of continuous improvement and excellence in technology transfer and commercialization.

  8. Research and technology, Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's research and technology accomplishments for fiscal year 1985 are summarized. The report is organized into five major sections covering aeronautics, aerospace technology, spaceflight systems, space station systems, and computational technology support. This organization of the report roughly parallels the organization of the Center into directorates. Where appropriate, subheadings are used to identify special topics under the major headings. Results of all research and technology work performed during the fiscal year are contained in Lewis-published technical reports and presentations prepared either by Lewis scientists and engineers or by contractor personnel. In addition, significant results are presented by university faculty or graduate students in technical sessions and in journals of the technical societies. For the reader who desires more information about a particular subject, the Lewis contact will provide that information or references. In 1985, five Lewis products were selected by Research and Development Magazine for IR-100 awards. All are described and identified. In addition, the Lewis Distinguished Paper for 1984 to 1985, which was selected by the Chief Scientist and a research advisory board, is included and so identified.

  9. Polysomnographic Findings in Dementia With Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Pao, Winnie C.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Ferman, Tanis J.; Lin, Sioung-Chi; Smith, Glenn E.; Knopman, David S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Silber, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The clinical features of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) during wakefulness are well known. Other than REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), only limited data exists on other sleep disturbances and disorders in DLB. We sought to characterize the polysomnographic (PSG) findings in a series of DLB patients with sleep-related complaints. Methods Retrospective study of patients with DLB who underwent clinical PSG at Mayo Clinic Rochester or Mayo Clinic Jacksonville over an almost 11 year span for evaluation of dream enactment behavior, excessive nocturnal movements, sleep apnea, hypersomnolence, or insomnia. The following variables were analyzed: respiratory disturbance index (RDI) in disordered breathing events/hour, periodic limb movement arousal index (PLMAI), arousals for no apparent reason (AFNAR), total arousal index (TAI), presence of REM sleep without atonia (RSWA), and percent sleep efficiency (SE). Results Data on 78 patients (71M, 7F) were analyzed. The mean age was 71 ± 8 years. Seventy-five (96%) patients had histories of recurrent dream enactment during sleep with 83% showing confirmation of RSWA +/- dream enactment during PSG. Mean RDI = 11.9 ± 5.8, PLMAI = 5.9 ± 8.5, AFNARI = 10.7 ± 12.0, and TAI = 26.6 ± 17.4. SE was <80% in 72% of the sample, <70% in 49%, and <60% in 24%. In patients who did not show evidence of significant disordered breathing (23 with RDI<5), 62% of arousals were AFNARs. In those patients who had significant disordered breathing (55 with RDI ≥ 5), 36% of arousals were AFNARs. Six patients underwent evaluations with PSG plus MSLT. Two patients had mean initial sleep latencies less than five minutes, and both had RDI<5. No patient had any sleep onset rapid eye movement periods. Nineteen patients have undergone neuropathologic examination, and 18 have had limbic- or neocortical-predominant Lewy body pathology. One had progressive supranuclear palsy, but no REM sleep was recorded in prior PSG. Conclusions In patients

  10. 77 FR 16316 - Kentucky Disaster Number KY-00044

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ...: Jefferson, Switzerland. Kentucky: Bourbon, Clark, Fleming, Gallatin, Henry, Lewis, Nicholas, Owen, Pike... unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) Joseph P. Loddo,...

  11. Fluctuation spectra in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, C. M.; Krawczonek, W. M.; Roth, J. R.; Hong, J. Y.; Powers, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    The electrostatic potential fluctuation spectrum in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus plasma was studied with capacitive probes in the low pressure (high impedance) mode and in the high pressure (low impedance) mode. Under different operating conditions, the plasma exhibited electrostatic potential fluctuations (1) at a set of discrete frequencies, (2) at a continuum of frequencies, and (3) as incoherent high-frequency turbulence. The frequencies and azimuthal wave numbers were determined from digitally implemented autopower and cross-power spectra. The azimuthal dispersion characteristics of the unstable waves were examined by varying the electrode voltage, the polarity of the voltage, and the neutral background density at a constant magnetic field strength.

  12. Hall current effects in the Lewis magnetohydrodynamic generator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, L. D.; Sovie, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Data obtained in the Lewis MHD generator are compared with theoretical values calculated using the Dzung (1966) theory. The generator is operated with cesium seeded argon as the working fluid. The gas temperature varies from 1800 to 2100 K, the gas pressure from 19 to 22 N/sq cm, the Mach number from .3 to .5, and the magnetic field strength from .2 to 1.6 tesla. The analysis indicates that there is incomplete seed vaporization and that Hall current shorting paths (through the working fluid to ground at both the entrance and exit of the channel) are limiting generator performance.

  13. NASA Lewis Wind Tunnel Model Systems Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, Ronald H.; Haller, Henry C.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes criteria for the design, analysis, quality assurance, and documentation of models or test articles that are to be tested in the aeropropulsion facilities at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The report presents three methods for computing model allowable stresses on the basis of the yield stress or ultimate stress, and it gives quality assurance criteria for models tested in Lewis' aeropropulsion facilities. Both customer-furnished model systems and in-house model systems are discussed. The functions of the facility manager, project engineer, operations engineer, research engineer, and facility electrical engineer are defined. The format for pretest meetings, prerun safety meetings, and the model criteria review are outlined Then, the format for the model systems report (a requirement for each model that is to be tested at NASA Lewis) is described, the engineers that are responsible for developing the model systems report are listed, and the time table for its delivery to the facility manager is given.

  14. Rocket Propulsion Research at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Virginia P.

    1992-01-01

    A small contingent of engineers at NASA Lewis Research Center pioneered in basic research on liquid propellants for rockets shortly after World War II. Carried on through the 1950s, this work influenced the important early decisions made by Abe Silverstein when he took charge of the Office of Space Flight Programs for NASA. He strongly supported the development of liquid hydrogen as a propulsion fuel in the face of resistance from Wernher von Braun. Members of the Lewis staff played an important role in bringing liquid hydrogen technology to the point of reliability through their management of the Centaur Program. This paper demonstrates how the personality and engineering intuition of Abe Silverstein shaped the Centaur program and left a lasting imprint on the laboratory research tradition. Many of the current leaders of Lewis Research Center received their first hands-on engineering experience when they worked on the Centaur program in the 1960s.

  15. UPDATE ON DEMENTIA WITH LEWY BODIES

    PubMed Central

    Karantzoulis, Stella; Galvin, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer disease (AD). DLB is characterized pathologically by Lewy body and Lewy neuritic pathology, often with variable levels of Alzheimer-type pathology. Core clinical features include fluctuating cognition, visual hallucinations, and parkinsonism resulting in greater impairments of quality of life, more caregiver burden, and higher health-related costs compared with AD. These issues, together with a high sensitivity to adverse events with treatment with antipsychotic agents, make the need for an early and accurate diagnosis of DLB essential. Unfortunately, current consensus criteria are highly specific but lack sufficient sensitivity. Use of composite risk scores may improve accuracy of clinical diagnosis. Imaging findings, particularly targeting dopaminergic systems have shown promise as potential markers to differentiate DLB from AD. A combination of non-pharmacologic treatments and pharmacotherapy interventions may maximize cognitive function and overall quality of life in DLB patients. PMID:25379359

  16. Lewis hybrid computing system, users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruton, W. M.; Cwynar, D. S.

    1979-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's Hybrid Simulation Lab contains a collection of analog, digital, and hybrid (combined analog and digital) computing equipment suitable for the dynamic simulation and analysis of complex systems. This report is intended as a guide to users of these computing systems. The report describes the available equipment' and outlines procedures for its use. Particular is given to the operation of the PACER 100 digital processor. System software to accomplish the usual digital tasks such as compiling, editing, etc. and Lewis-developed special purpose software are described.

  17. Intramolecular cooperativity in frustrated Lewis pairs.

    PubMed

    Körte, Leif A; Blomeyer, Sebastian; Heidemeyer, Shari; Mix, Andreas; Neumann, Beate; Mitzel, Norbert W

    2016-08-01

    The doubly Lewis-acid functionalised aniline PhN[(CH2)3B(C6F5)2]2 features two competing boron functions in fast exchange for binding to the central Lewis base. It shows catalytic activity typical for FLPs in H/D-scrambling and catalytic hydrogenation experiments. By contrast, the singly acid-functionalised PhMeN(CH2)3B(C6F5)2 reveals a dramatically smaller catalytic activity in analogous experiments. PMID:27440500

  18. In dementia with Lewy bodies, Braak stage determines phenotype, not Lewy body distribution.

    PubMed

    Weisman, D; Cho, M; Taylor, C; Adame, A; Thal, L J; Hansen, L A

    2007-07-24

    We used an autopsy series to determine whether the newest dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) consensus pathologic classification correlates with premortem diagnosis of DLB. Neocortical sections from a total of 95 cases with Lewy bodies were stained with alpha-synuclein antibodies. We assigned cases according to the DLB consensus' categories and found a significant association with the premortem clinical diagnosis of DLB. Clinical diagnosis of DLB, however, depended on the presence of low Alzheimer disease pathology (by Braak staging) rather than on Lewy body distribution. PMID:17646627

  19. Lewy Body Dementia: Information for Patients, Families, and Professionals

    MedlinePlus

    ... About ADEAR Lewy Body Dementia: Information for Patients, Families, and Professionals Introduction Lewy body dementia mostly affects ... find a cure—people with LBD and their families struggle day to day to get an accurate ...

  20. Composites research at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.; Duffy, Stephen; Vary, Alex; Nathal, Michael V.; Miner, Robert V.; Arnold, Steven M.; Castelli, Michael G.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Meador, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    Composites research at NASA Lewis is focused on their applications in aircraft propulsion, space propulsion, and space power, with the first being predominant. Research on polymer-, metal-, and ceramic-matrix composites is being carried out from an integrated materials and structures viewpoint. This paper outlines some of the topics being pursued from the standpoint of key technical issues, current status, and future directions.

  1. Teaching a Model for Writing Lewis Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardo, Juan Quilez

    1989-01-01

    Presents a didactic model to improve the teaching/learning process in the representation of Lewis structures. Places special emphasis on the calculation and reduction of formal charges, and in the representation of molecules in which the central atom has expanded its valence shell. (MVL)

  2. Lewis Carroll's Formula for Calendar Calculating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitz, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents Lewis Carroll's formula for mentally calculating the day of the week of a given date. The paper concludes that such formulas are too complex for individuals of low intelligence to learn by themselves, and thus "idiots savants" who perform such calendar calculations must be using other systems. (JDD)

  3. Reply to Tone Kvernbekk and Ann Lewis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tangen, Reidun

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this reply to Kvernbekk and Lewis's comments regarding the discussion on epistemological and ethical problems of listening to children's voices, is not to propose a coherent foundation free from any epistemological tensions. Rather, Tangen's intent is primarily to explore different perspectives in order to disclose some of their…

  4. Lewis and Clark--Indiana Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Pamela J., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    The state of Indiana has an important, recognized connection to the Lewis and Clark Expedition. That connection is reinforced with a National Signature Event in Clarksville (Indiana) during October 2003. Until the expedition party left its winter camp in May 1804, it remained in Indiana Territory, governed from Vincennes (Indiana) by William Henry…

  5. Celebrating the Bicentennial of Lewis and Clark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ronald V.; McNeely, Jean

    2005-01-01

    Lewis, Clark, and the Corps of Discovery traveled westward from 1803 to 1806; therefore, the bicentennial of the expedition is being celebrated from 2003 until 2006. Students and teachers celebrating the bicentennial and Jefferson's Louisiana Purchase in 1803 can use social studies classes to help them connect with their community and to reach a…

  6. Teaching Beginning Chemistry Students Simple Lewis Dot Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassiff, Peter; Czerwinski, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    Students beginning their initial study of chemistry often have a difficult time mastering simple Lewis dot structures. Textbooks show students how to manipulate Lewis structures by moving valence electron dots around the chemical structure so each atom has an octet or duet. However, an easier method of teaching Lewis structures for simple…

  7. An Overview of Lewis Basicity and Affinity Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurence, Christian; Graton, Jerome; Gal, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    The impossibility of establishing a universal scale of Lewis basicity does not prevent the determination of the quantitative behavior of Lewis bases, thanks to scales constructed against particular Lewis acids: BF[subscript 3], 4-FC[subscript 6]H[subscript 4]OH, I[subscript 2], Li[superscript +], Na[superscript +], K[superscript +], Al[superscript…

  8. Getting the Weights of Lewis Structures out of Huckel Theory: Huckel-Lewis Configuration Interaction (HL-CI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humbel, Stephane

    2007-01-01

    A simple method is proposed based on energies obtained with the Huckel theory to compute the weights of the structures. The Huckel-Lewis CI technique extends to the Huckel theory the field of the resonance between Lewis structures.

  9. Clinicians' ability to diagnose dementia with Lewy bodies is not affected by β-amyloid load

    PubMed Central

    Attems, Johannes; Thomas, Alan; Brown, Andrew; Jaros, Evelyn; Lett, Debbie J.; Ossola, Maria; Perry, Robert H.; Ramsay, Lynne; Walker, Lauren; McKeith, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether an increasing load of β-amyloid and/or neuritic plaques influences the phenotype, and thus the clinical diagnostic accuracy, of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Methods: A series of 64 subjects with autopsy-proven DLB was studied. Last diagnosis before death was used to determine the clinical diagnostic accuracy of DLB in relation to Lewy body distribution and extent of Alzheimer β-amyloid and/or neuritic pathology. DLB pathologic diagnosis was made according to consensus criteria, using α-synuclein immunostaining for Lewy body identification. β-Amyloid immunostaining was used for quantifying β-amyloid deposits. The Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease criteria and Braak stage were applied for semiquantitative grading of neuritic plaque and neurofibrillary tangle pathology. Results: Overall clinical diagnostic accuracy for the entire DLB cohort was high (80%), reflecting the high prevalence of core clinical features (fluctuations [81%], parkinsonism [77%], visual hallucinations [70%]). Lower frequencies of core clinical features of DLB, resulting in lower accuracy of its clinical diagnosis, were associated with decreasing Lewy body distribution (p < 0.0001) and with increasing neuritic plaque pathology (p = 0.035), but not with the number of β-amyloid plaque deposits. Conclusions: The likelihood of occurrence of the DLB clinical syndrome is positively related to the extent of Lewy body pathology and negatively related to the severity of Alzheimer neuritic pathology, while β-amyloid load has no effect. PMID:25552579

  10. Cellular transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis employing suckling and adult Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, R S; Paterson, P Y

    1981-07-01

    Experiments designed to assess the importance of age of donors and recipients in cellular transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in inbred Lewis rats indicate: (a) that lymph node cells (LNC) of suckling rats sensitized to neuroantigen-adjuvant are just as effective in transfer of the disease to adult recipients as LNC from similarly sensitized adult donors, (b) that EAE can be transferred to suckling rats just as well as adults using lymphoid cells from either suckling or adult donors, and (c) while relatively low numbers of sensitized splenocytes from suckling or adult donors may transfer EAE, relatively large numbers of spleen cells do not. Based on additional EAE transfer experiments, in which recipients received combinations of sensitized LNC and normal splenocytes, no evidence could be secured that the spleen exerts a suppressive influence on cellular transfer of the disease in Lewis s may transfer EAE, relatively large numbers of spleen cells do not. Based on additional EAE transfer experiments, in which recipients received combinations of sensitized LNC and normal splenocytes, no evidence could be secured that the spleen exerts a suppressive influence on cellular transfer of the disease in Lewis s may transfer EAE, relatively large numbers of spleen cells do not. Based on additional EAE transfer experiments, in which recipients received combinations of sensitized LNC and normal splenocytes, no evidence could be secured that the spleen exerts a suppressive influence on cellular transfer of the disease in Lewis rats. PMID:6973635

  11. Modern Exploration of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Lewis and Clark Geosystem is an online collection of private, state, local, and Federal data resources associated with the geography of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Data were compiled from key partners including NASA s Stennis Space Center, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the University of Montana, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, and from a collection of Lewis and Clark scholars. It combines modern views of the landscape with historical aerial photography, cartography, and other geographical data resources and historical sources, including: The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, the Academy of Natural Science's Lewis and Clark Herbarium, high-resolution copies of the American Philosophical Society s primary-source Lewis and Clark Journals, The Library of Congress Lewis and Clark cartography collection, as well as artifacts from the Smithsonian Institution and other sources.

  12. The NASA-Lewis terrestrial photovoltaics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, D. T.

    1974-01-01

    Those parts of the present NASA-Lewis research and technology effort on solar cells and arrays having relevance to terrestrial uses are outlined. These include raising cell efficiency, developing the FEP-covered module concept, and exploring low-cost cell concepts. Solar cell-battery power systems for remote weather stations have been built to demonstrate the capabilities of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  13. Fuels research studies at NASA Lewis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1982-01-01

    Fuels research studies carried out in a variety of areas related to aviation propulsion, ground transportation, and stationary power generation systems are discussed. The major efforts are directed to studies on fuels for jet aircraft. These studies involve fuels preparation, fuels analysis, and fuel quality evaluations. The scope and direction of research activities in these areas is discussed, descriptions of Lewis capabilities and facilities given, and results of recent research efforts reported.

  14. Lewis Research Center earth resources program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, H.

    1972-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center earth resources program efforts are in the areas of: (1) monitoring and rapid evaluation of water quality; (2) determining ice-type and ice coverage distribution to aid operations in a possible extension of the Great Lakes ice navigation and shipping season; (3) monitoring spread of crop viruses; and (4) extent of damage to strip mined areas as well as success of efforts to rehabilitate such areas for agriculture.

  15. Lewis Information Network (LINK): Background and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, Roger R.

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center supports many research facilities with many isolated buildings, including wind tunnels, test cells, and research laboratories. These facilities are all located on a 350 acre campus adjacent to the Cleveland Hopkins Airport. The function of NASA-Lewis is to do basic and applied research in all areas of aeronautics, fluid mechanics, materials and structures, space propulsion, and energy systems. These functions require a great variety of remote high speed, high volume data communications for computing and interactive graphic capabilities. In addition, new requirements for local distribution of intercenter video teleconferencing and data communications via satellite have developed. To address these and future communications requirements for the next 15 yrs, a project team was organized to design and implement a new high speed communication system that would handle both data and video information in a common lab-wide Local Area Network. The project team selected cable television broadband coaxial cable technology as the communications medium and first installation of in-ground cable began in the summer of 1980. The Lewis Information Network (LINK) became operational in August 1982 and has become the backbone of all data communications and video.

  16. Lewis' Educational and Research Collaborative Internship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyward, Ann; Gott, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The Lewis Educational and Research Collaborative Internship Program (LERCIP) is a collaborative undertaking by the Office of Educational Programs at NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (formerly NASA Lewis Research Center) and the Ohio Aerospace Institute. This program provides 10-week internships in addition to summer and winter extensions if funding is available and/or is requested by mentor (no less than 1 week no more than 4 weeks) for undergraduate/graduate students and secondary school teachers. Students who meet the travel reimbursement criteria receive up to $500 for travel expenses. Approximately 178 interns are selected to participate in this program each year and begin arriving the fourth week in May. The internships provide students with introductory professional experiences to complement their academic programs. The interns are given assignments on research and development projects under the personal guidance of NASA professional staff members. Each intern is assigned a NASA mentor who facilitates a research assignment. In addition to the research assignment, the summer program includes a strong educational component that enhances the professional stature of the participants. The educational activities include a research symposium and a variety of workshops, and lectures. An important aspect of the program is that it includes students with diverse social, cultural and economic backgrounds. The purpose of this report is to document the program accomplishments for 2004.

  17. A Biographical Sketch of Lewis Dexter

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Madhuri

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Lewis Dexter was an outstanding cardiovascular physiologist and clinician, a respected teacher and scientist, and, most importantly, a fine human being. During his life, he brought the cardiac catheter from the laboratory to the patient and trained several generations of cardiologists. Dexter's laboratory was the first to elucidate the pathophysiologic alterations present in many forms of congenital heart disease, including atrial septal defects, patent ductus arteriosus, tetralogy of Fallot, ventricular septal defects, and pulmonic stenosis. Subsequent work in Dexter's laboratory led to the 1st measurements of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and to the precise calculation of stenotic valve areas from hemodynamic parameters measured during cardiac catheterization. During a teaching exercise, Dexter demonstrated that exercise with a cardiac catheter in the heart was safe and produced clinically important data, by having a cardiac catheter inserted in himself. Over the years, many significant pathophysiologic studies that explored pulmonary embolism, valvular heart disease, right and left ventricular function, and pulmonary hypertension were published from Dexter's laboratory. But Lewis Dexter was more than a brilliant researcher. “Lew” was very close to his fellows and students, whom he considered extensions of his family. Dexter was a remarkable teacher, a compassionate physician, and a scrupulously honest investigator. Dr. Lewis Dexter had a major impact on modern medicine and was one of the great cardiologists of the 20th century. PMID:11453126

  18. Dual Lewis Acid/Lewis Base Catalyzed Acylcyanation of Aldehydes: A Mechanistic Study.

    PubMed

    Laurell Nash, Anna; Hertzberg, Robin; Wen, Ye-Qian; Dahlgren, Björn; Brinck, Tore; Moberg, Christina

    2016-03-01

    A mechanistic investigation, which included a Hammett correlation analysis, evaluation of the effect of variation of catalyst composition, and low-temperature NMR spectroscopy studies, of the Lewis acid-Lewis base catalyzed addition of acetyl cyanide to prochiral aldehydes provides support for a reaction route that involves Lewis base activation of the acyl cyanide with formation of a potent acylating agent and cyanide ion. The cyanide ion adds to the carbonyl group of the Lewis acid activated aldehyde. O-Acylation by the acylated Lewis base to form the final cyanohydrin ester occurs prior to decomplexation from titanium. For less reactive aldehydes, the addition of cyanide is the rate-determining step, whereas, for more reactive, electron-deficient aldehydes, cyanide addition is rapid and reversible and is followed by rate-limiting acylation. The resting state of the catalyst lies outside the catalytic cycle and is believed to be a monomeric titanium complex with two alcoholate ligands, which only slowly converts into the product. PMID:26592522

  19. Frustrated Lewis pairs: from concept to catalysis.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Douglas W

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Frustrated Lewis pair (FLP) chemistry has emerged in the past decade as a strategy that enables main-group compounds to activate small molecules. This concept is based on the notion that combinations of Lewis acids and bases that are sterically prevented from forming classical Lewis acid-base adducts have Lewis acidity and basicity available for interaction with a third molecule. This concept has been applied to stoichiometric reactivity and then extended to catalysis. This Account describes three examples of such developments: hydrogenation, hydroamination, and CO2 reduction. The most dramatic finding from FLP chemistry was the discovery that FLPs can activate H2, thus countering the long-existing dogma that metals are required for such activation. This finding of stoichiometric reactivity was subsequently evolved to employ simple main-group species as catalysts in hydrogenations. While the initial studies focused on imines, subsequent studies uncovered FLP catalysts for a variety of organic substrates, including enamines, silyl enol ethers, olefins, and alkynes. Moreover, FLP reductions of aromatic anilines and N-heterocycles have been developed, while very recent extensions have uncovered the utility of FLP catalysts for ketone reductions. FLPs have also been shown to undergo stoichiometric reactivity with terminal alkynes. Typically, either deprotonation or FLP addition reaction products are observed, depending largely on the basicity of the Lewis base. While a variety of acid/base combinations have been exploited to afford a variety of zwitterionic products, this reactivity can also be extended to catalysis. When secondary aryl amines are employed, hydroamination of alkynes can be performed catalytically, providing a facile, metal-free route to enamines. In a similar fashion, initial studies of FLPs with CO2 demonstrated their ability to capture this greenhouse gas. Again, modification of the constituents of the FLP led to the discovery of reaction

  20. An enzymatic ruler modulates Lewis antigen glycosylation of Helicobacter pylori LPS during persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Christina; Skoglund, Anna; Moran, Anthony P.; Annuk, Heidi; Engstrand, Lars; Normark, Staffan

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes about half the human population and contributes to the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. This organism has evolved means to structurally alter its surface characteristics to evade innate and adaptive immune responses. H. pylori produces LPS O-antigen units that can be posttranslationally fucosylated to generate Lewis antigens, structures also found on human epithelial cells. We demonstrate an extensive diversity of Lewis x and Lewis y expression in LPS O-antigen units, occurring over time and in different regions of the human stomach. Lewis expression patterns were correlated with the on/off status of the three fucosyltransferases (FucT), FutA, FutB, and FutC, which are regulated via slipped-strand mispairing in intragenic polyC tract regions of the corresponding genes. The α1,3-FucT, FutA and FutB, each contain a C-terminal heptad repeat region, consisting of a variable number of DD/NLRV/INY tandem repeats. Variations in the number of heptad repeats correlated to the sizes of O-antigen polymers to become decorated by fucose residues. Our data support a molecular ruler mechanism for how H. pylori varies its LPS fucosylation pattern, where one heptad repeat in the enzyme corresponds to one N-acetyl-β-lactosamine unit in the O-antigen polysaccharide. PMID:16477004

  1. Transition-Metal Oxos as the Lewis Basic Component of Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    PubMed

    Lambic, Nikola S; Sommer, Roger D; Ison, Elon A

    2016-04-13

    The reaction of oxorhenium complexes that incorporate diamidopyridine (DAP) ligands with B(C6F5)3 results in the formation of classical Lewis acid-base adducts. The adducts effectively catalyze the hydrogenation of a variety of unactivated olefins at 100 °C. Control reactions with these complexes or B(C6F5)3 alone did not yield any hydrogenated products under these conditions. Mechanistic studies suggest a frustrated Lewis pair is generated between the oxorhenium DAP complexes and B(C6F5)3, which is effective at olefin hydrogenation. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that the incorporation of a transition-metal oxo in a frustrated Lewis pair can have a synergistic effect and results in enhanced catalytic activity. PMID:27002927

  2. NASA Lewis Propulsion Systems Laboratory Customer Guide Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, Ronald H.

    1994-01-01

    This manual describes the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) at NASA Lewis Research Center. The PSL complex supports two large engine test cells (PSL-3 and PSL-4) that are capable of providing flight simulation to altitudes of 70,000 ft. Facility variables at the engine or test-article inlet, such as pressure, temperature, and Mach number (up to 3.0 for PSL-3 and up to 6.0 planned for PSL-4), are discussed. Support systems such as the heated and cooled combustion air systems; the altitude exhaust system; the hydraulic system; the nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen systems; hydrogen burners; rotating screen assemblies; the engine exhaust gas-sampling system; the infrared imaging system; and single- and multiple-axis thrust stands are addressed. Facility safety procedures are also stated.

  3. Transport Coefficients for the NASA Lewis Chemical Equilibrium Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, Roger A.

    1995-01-01

    The new transport property data that will be used in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Chemical Equilibrium and Applications Program (CEA) is presented. It complements a previous publication that documented the thermodynamic and transport property data then in use. Sources of the data and a brief description of the method by which the data were obtained are given. Coefficients to calculate the viscosity, thermal conductivity, and binary interactions are given for either one, or usually, two temperature intervals, typically 300 to 1000 K and 1000 to 5000 K. The form of the transport equation is the same as used previously. The number of species was reduced from the previous database. Many species for which the data were estimated were eliminated from the database. Some ionneutral interactions were added.

  4. Mars Pathfinder Rover-Lewis Research Center Technology Experiments Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Steven M.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Mars Pathfinder Program is given and the development and role of three technology experiments from NASA's Lewis Research Center and carried on the Mars Pathfinder rover is described. Two recent missions to Mars were developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and launched late last year: Mars Global Surveyor in November 1996 and Mars Pathfinder in December 1996. Mars Global Surveyor is an orbiter which will survey the planet with a number of different instruments, and will arrive in September 1997, and Mars Pathfinder which consists of a lander and a small rover, landing on Mars July 4, 1997. These are the first two missions of the Mars Exploration Program consisting of a ten year series of small robotic martian probes to be launched every 26 months. The Pathfinder rover will perform a number of technology and operational experiments which will provide the engineering information necessary to design and operate more complex, scientifically oriented surface missions involving roving vehicles and other machinery operating in the martian environment. Because of its expertise in space power systems and technologies, space mechanisms and tribology, Lewis Research Center was asked by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is heading the Mars Pathfinder Program, to contribute three experiments concerning the effects of the martian environment on surface solar power systems and the abrasive qualities of the Mars surface material. In addition, rover static charging was investigated and a static discharge system of several fine Tungsten points was developed and fixed to the rover. These experiments and current findings are described herein.

  5. Dementia with Lewy bodies: early diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Iseki, Eizo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Kasanuki, Koji; Chiba, Yuhei; Ota, Kazumi; Murayama, Norio; Sato, Kiyoshi

    2013-06-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is defined pathologically as neurodegeneration associated with Lewy bodies (LB). LB-related symptoms, including olfactory dysfunction, dysautonomia, and mood and sleep disorders, are increasingly recognized as clinical signs that enable the early detection of DLB, because these symptoms often antedate dementia by years or even decades. It remains unknown if the clinical history of LB-related symptoms is sufficient for the prodromal state of DLB to be suspected in memory clinics. We retrospectively investigated the clinical courses, including olfactory dysfunction, dysautonomia, depression, and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, of 90 patients with probable DLB. The timing of LB-related symptoms that preceded or followed relative to the onset of memory loss was calculated. LB-related symptoms were present in 79 of 90 patients (87.8%) with probable DLB before or at the time of memory loss onset. These symptoms preceded the onset of memory loss between 1.2 and 9.3 years. We also report on four non-demented patients with a clinical history of LB-related symptoms in our memory clinic. All four patients showed reduced cardiac [(123) I]-metaiodobenzylguanidine levels. Moreover, [(18) F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography scans revealed glucose hypometabolism in the occipital cortex in two patients. One patient converted to probable DLB with the development of parkinsonism 2 years after major depression was diagnosed. Based on a clinical history of LB-related symptoms, we propose a conceptual framework to identify these symptomatic but non-demented individuals that led us to suspect the underlying pathophysiology of Lewy body disease. Further prospective study is warranted to determine the clinical significance of LB-related symptoms in non-demented patients. PMID:23909972

  6. NASA Lewis Research Center photovoltaic application experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratajczak, A.; Bifano, W.; Martz, J.; Odonnell, P.

    1978-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has installed 16 geographically dispersed terrestrial photovoltaic systems as part of the DOE National Photovoltaic Program. Four additional experiments are in progress. Currently, operating systems are powering refrigerators, a highway warning sign, forest lookout towers, remote weather stations, a water chiller and insect survey traps. Experiments in progress include the world's first village power system, an air pollution monitor and seismic sensors. Under a separate activity, funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, a PV-powered water pump and grain grinder is being prepared for an African village. System descriptions and status are included in this report.

  7. Microglia in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Streit, Wolfgang J; Xue, Qing-Shan

    2016-07-01

    Microglial activation (neuroinflammation) is often cited as a pathogenic factor in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. However, there are significant caveats associated with the idea that inflammation directly causes either α-synuclein pathology or neurofibrillary degeneration (NFD). We have performed immunohistochemical studies on microglial cells in five cases of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), median age 87, and nine cases of non-demented (ND) controls, median age 74, using tissue samples from the temporal lobe and the superior frontal gyrus. Three different antibodies known to label microglia and macrophages were employed: iba1, anti-CD68, and anti-ferritin. All DLB cases showed both α-synuclein pathology (Lewy bodies and neurites) and NFD ranging from Braak stage II to IV. In contrast, all controls were devoid of α-synuclein pathology but did show NFD ranging from Braak stage I to III. Using iba1 labeling, our current results show a notable absence of activated microglia in all cases with the exception of two controls that showed small focal areas of microglial activation and macrophage formation. Both iba1 and ferritin antibodies revealed a mixture of ramified and dystrophic microglial cells throughout the regions examined, and there were no measurable differences in the prevalence of dystrophic microglial cells between DLB and controls. Double-labeling for α-synuclein and iba1-positive microglia showed that cortical Lewy bodies were surrounded by both ramified and dystrophic microglial cells. We found an increase in CD68 expression in DLB cases relative to controls. Since microglial dystrophy has been linked to NFD and since it did not appear to be worse in DLB cases over controls, our findings support the idea that the additional Lewy body pathology in DLB is not the result of intensified microglial dystrophy. CD68 is likely associated with lipofuscin deposits in microglial cells which may be increased in DLB cases because of impaired

  8. NASA Lewis Research Center Futuring Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boroush, Mark; Stover, John; Thomas, Charles

    1987-01-01

    On October 21 and 22, 1986, the Futures Group ran a two-day Futuring Workshop on the premises of NASA Lewis Research Center. The workshop had four main goals: to acquaint participants with the general history of technology forecasting; to familiarize participants with the range of forecasting methodologies; to acquaint participants with the range of applicability, strengths, and limitations of each method; and to offer participants some hands-on experience by working through both judgmental and quantitative case studies. Among the topics addressed during this workshop were: information sources; judgmental techniques; quantitative techniques; merger of judgment with quantitative measurement; data collection methods; and dealing with uncertainty.

  9. Ultrafast hydrolysis of a Lewis photoacid.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Joseph D; Suchyta, Scott; Kohler, Bern

    2015-02-12

    This study explores the concept that electronic excitation can dramatically enhance Lewis acidity. Specifically, it is shown that photoexcitation transforms an electron-deficient organic compound of negligible Lewis acidity in its electronic ground state into a potent excited-state Lewis acid that releases a proton from a nearby water molecule in 3.1 ps. It was shown previously (Peon et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2001, 105, 5768) that the excited state of methyl viologen (MV(2+)) is quenched rapidly in aqueous solution with the formation of an unidentified photoproduct. In this study, the quenching mechanism and the identity of the photoproduct were investigated by the femtosecond transient absorption and fluorescence upconversion techniques. Transient absorption signals at UV probe wavelengths reveal a long-lived species with a pH-dependent lifetime due to reaction with hydronium ions at a bimolecular rate of 3.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). This species is revealed to be a charge-transfer complex consisting of a ground-state MV(2+) ion and a hydroxide ion formed when a water molecule transfers a proton to the bulk solvent. Formation of a contact ion pair between MV(2+) and hydroxide shifts the absorption spectrum of the former ion by a few nm to longer wavelengths, yielding a transient absorption spectrum with a distinctive triangle wave appearance. The slight shift of this spectrum, which is in excellent agreement with steady-state difference spectra recorded for MV(2+) at high pH, is consistent with an ion pair but not with a covalent adduct (pseudobase). The long lifetime of the ion pair at neutral pH indicates that dissociation occurs many orders of magnitude more slowly than predicted by the Smoluchowski-Debye equation. Remarkably, there is no evidence of geminate recombination, suggesting that the proton that is transferred to the solvent is conducted at least several water shells away. Although the hydrolysis mechanism has yet to be fully established, evidence suggests

  10. Neurophysiological biomarkers for Lewy body dementias

    PubMed Central

    Cromarty, Ruth A.; Elder, Greg J.; Graziadio, Sara; Baker, Mark; Bonanni, Laura; Onofrj, Marco; O’Brien, John T.; Taylor, John-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lewy body dementias (LBD) include both dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson’s disease with dementia (PDD), and the differentiation of LBD from other neurodegenerative dementias can be difficult. Currently, there are few biomarkers which might assist early diagnosis, map onto LBD symptom severity, and provide metrics of treatment response. Traditionally, biomarkers in LBD have focussed on neuroimaging modalities; however, as biomarkers need to be simple, inexpensive and non-invasive, neurophysiological approaches might also be useful as LBD biomarkers. Methods In this review, we searched PubMED and PsycINFO databases in a semi-systematic manner in order to identify potential neurophysiological biomarkers in the LBDs. Results We identified 1491 studies; of these, 37 studies specifically examined neurophysiological biomarkers in LBD patients. We found that there was substantial heterogeneity with respect to methodologies and patient cohorts. Conclusion Generally, many of the findings have yet to be replicated, although preliminary findings reinforce the potential utility of approaches such as quantitative electroencephalography and motor cortical stimulation paradigms. Significance Various neurophysiological techniques have the potential to be useful biomarkers in the LBDs. We recommend that future studies focus on maximising the diagnostic specificity and sensitivity of the most promising neurophysiological biomarkers. PMID:26183755

  11. Can we clinically diagnose dementia with Lewy bodies yet?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) was initially identified and confirmed primarily by pathology, but is soon to be incorporated into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual criteria as a clinical disease entity. Despite these advances over more than 20 years, current data suggest that the sensitivity of accurate clinical diagnosis of DLB is still very low, although there is mounting evidence that supportive features may increase diagnostic accuracy. Although DLB remains easy to identify pathologically with different cellular pathologies differentiating it from other dementia syndromes, pathological identification using only Lewy body pathology has been shown to be inaccurate due to overlap with patients without dementia symptoms. A number of studies now suggest that a combination of cellular pathologies, which include α-synuclein and β-amyloid deposition as well as dopamine denervation, assist with differentiating this dementia syndrome from others. The clinical and pathological overlap with the tauopathy of Alzheimer’s disease still remains to be clarified. To determine more robust and independent clinicopathological correlates from Alzheimer’s disease, longitudinal prospective studies, using specific clinical batteries on dementia patients reaching the proposed criteria for DLB, with post-mortem assessment of the multiple pathologies associated with dementia, are required. Identifying genetic causes for DLB is another approach to investigate the pathogenesis of DLB. However this approach has been hindered to date by difficulties with identifying DLB clinically. The use of novel techniques is likely to advance knowledge on the pathogenesis of DLB and assist with redefining clinical and pathologic diagnostic criteria. To achieve the goal of more accurate clinical diagnosis of DLB, breakthroughs are necessary on the pathogenesis of DLB. PMID:23398715

  12. Interview with Smithsonian NASM Spacesuit Curator Dr. Cathleen Lewis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Cathleen; Wright, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Cathleen Lewis was interviewed by Rebecca Wright during the presentation of an "Interview with Smithsonian NASM Spacesuit Curator Dr. Cathleen Lewis" on May 14, 2012. Topics included the care, size, and history of the spacesuit collection at the Smithsonian and the recent move to the state-of-the-art permanent storage facility at the Udvar-Hazy facility in Virginia.

  13. Thoughts on Teaching: John L. Lewis, Jesus, and President Bush.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starnes, Bobby Ann

    2004-01-01

    Bobby Ann Starnes, the author of this article, grew up with portraits of two important people displayed prominently in her home, Jesus, and John L. Lewis. Lewis, a giant among American leaders in the first half of the twentieth century, sent hundreds of organizers to help create some of the nation's leading labor unions, including the United…

  14. Difficulty Processing Temporary Syntactic Ambiguities in Lewy Body Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Murray; Gross, Rachel G.; Moore, Peachie; Dreyfuss, Michael; McMillan, Corey T.; Cook, Philip A.; Ash, Sherry; Siderowf, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    While grammatical aspects of language are preserved, executive deficits are prominent in Lewy body spectrum disorder (LBSD), including Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). We examined executive control during sentence processing in LBSD by assessing temporary structural ambiguities. Using an…

  15. Impairments of Speech Fluency in Lewy Body Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Sharon; McMillan, Corey; Gross, Rachel G.; Cook, Philip; Gunawardena, Delani; Morgan, Brianna; Boller, Ashley; Siderowf, Andrew; Grossman, Murray

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have examined connected speech in demented and non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We assessed the speech production of 35 patients with Lewy body spectrum disorder (LBSD), including non-demented PD patients, patients with PD dementia (PDD), and patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), in a semi-structured…

  16. The Organization of Narrative Discourse in Lewy Body Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Sharon; McMillan, Corey; Gross, Rachel G.; Cook, Philip; Morgan, Brianna; Boller, Ashley; Dreyfuss, Michael; Siderowf, Andrew; Grossman, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Narrative discourse is an essential component of day-to-day communication, but little is known about narrative in Lewy body spectrum disorder (LBSD), including Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). We performed a detailed analysis of a semi-structured speech sample in 32 non-aphasic…

  17. Technology requirements to be addressed by the NASA Lewis Research Center Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Rudland, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for the planning and execution of a scientific program which will provide advance in space cryogenic fluid management technology. A number of future space missions were identified that require or could benefit from this technology. These fluid management technology needs were prioritized and a shuttle attached reuseable test bed, the cryogenic fluid management facility (CFMF), is being designed to provide the experimental data necessary for the technology development effort.

  18. Formylborane formation with frustrated Lewis pair templates.

    PubMed

    Sajid, Muhammad; Kehr, Gerald; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Erker, Gerhard

    2014-01-20

    Boranes R2 BH react with carbon monoxide by forming the respective borane carbonyl compounds R2 BH(CO). The formation of (C6 F5 )2 BH(CO) derived from the Piers borane, HB(C6 F5 )2 , is a typical example. Subsequent CO-hydroboration does not take place, since the formation of the formylborane is usually endothermic. However, an "η(2) -formylborane" was formed by CO-hydroboration with the Piers borane at vicinal phosphane/borane frustrated Lewis pair (FLP) templates. Subsequent treatment with pyridine liberated the intact formylborane from the FLP framework, and (pyridine)(C6 F5 )2 BCHO was then isolated as a stable compound. This product underwent typical reactions of carbonyl compounds, such as Wittig olefination. PMID:24338931

  19. [Differential diagnosis of dementia with lewy bodies].

    PubMed

    Orimo, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    Kosaka and colleagues first reported dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) in 1976. They have also established the concept of DLB. It is important to differentiate DLB from other dementia, especially Alzheimer disease (AD), because the medical treatment, management, and prognosis of DLB and AD are different. We have used several clinical features and imaging tools to differentiate between DLB and AD. With regard to clinical features, patients with DLB have relatively mild memory disturbances and fluctuating cognition. However, compared to patients with AD they have more severe disturbances of attention and executive, visuospatial functions, visual hallucination, depression, autonomic symptoms. In addition, they show the presence of REM sleep behavior disorder and idiopathic parkinsonism. On performing imaging analysis, patients with DLB showed milder atrophy in the medial temporal lobe on brain MRI, reduced occipital activity on SPECT or PET, reduced MIBG uptake on MIBG cardiac scintigraphy, and low dopamine transporter activity in the basal ganglia on SPECT or PET. PMID:25846590

  20. Aluminium Diphosphamethanides: Hidden Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    PubMed

    Styra, Steffen; Radius, Michael; Moos, Eric; Bihlmeier, Angela; Breher, Frank

    2016-07-01

    The synthesis and characterisation of two aluminium diphosphamethanide complexes, [Al(tBu)2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (3) and [Al(C6 F5 )2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (4), and the silylated analogue, Mes*PCHP(SiMe3 )Mes* (5), are reported. The aluminium complexes feature four-membered PCPAl core structures consisting of diphosphaallyl ligands. The silylated phosphine 5 was found to be a valuable precursor for the synthesis of 4 as it cleanly reacts with the diaryl aluminium chloride [(C6 F5 )2 AlCl]2 . The aluminium complex 3 reacts with molecular dihydrogen at room temperature under formation of the acyclic σ(2) λ(3) ,σ(3) λ(3) -diphosphine Mes*PCHP(H)Mes* and the corresponding dialkyl aluminium hydride [tBu2 AlH]3 . Thus, 3 belongs to the family of so-called hidden frustrated Lewis pairs. PMID:27271936

  1. NASA Lewis Meshed VSAT Workshop meeting summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William

    1993-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Space Electronics Division (SED) hosted a workshop to address specific topics related to future meshed very small-aperture terminal (VSAT) satellite communications networks. The ideas generated by this workshop will help to identify potential markets and focus technology development within the commercial satellite communications industry and NASA. The workshop resulted in recommendations concerning these principal points of interest: the window of opportunity for a meshed VSAT system; system availability; ground terminal antenna sizes; recommended multifrequency for time division multiple access (TDMA) uplink; a packet switch design concept for narrowband; and fault tolerance design concepts. This report presents a summary of group presentations and discussion associated with the technological, economic, and operational issues of meshed VSAT architectures that utilize processing satellites.

  2. Lewis pair polymerization by classical and frustrated Lewis pairs: acid, base and monomer scope and polymerization mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuetao; Miyake, Garret M; John, Mallory G; Falivene, Laura; Caporaso, Lucia; Cavallo, Luigi; Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2012-08-14

    Classical and frustrated Lewis pairs (LPs) of the strong Lewis acid (LA) Al(C(6)F(5))(3) with several Lewis base (LB) classes have been found to exhibit exceptional activity in the Lewis pair polymerization (LPP) of conjugated polar alkenes such as methyl methacrylate (MMA) as well as renewable α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone (MBL) and γ-methyl-α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone (γ-MMBL), leading to high molecular weight polymers, often with narrow molecular weight distributions. This study has investigated a large number of LPs, consisting of 11 LAs as well as 10 achiral and 4 chiral LBs, for LPP of 12 monomers of several different types. Although some more common LAs can also be utilized for LPP, Al(C(6)F(5))(3)-based LPs are far more active and effective than other LA-based LPs. On the other hand, several classes of LBs, when paired with Al(C(6)F(5))(3), can render highly active and effective LPP of MMA and γ-MMBL; such LBs include phosphines (e.g., P(t)Bu(3)), chiral chelating diphosphines, N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs), and phosphazene superbases (e.g., P(4)-(t)Bu). The P(4)-(t)Bu/Al(C(6)F(5))(3) pair exhibits the highest activity of the LP series, with a remarkably high turn-over frequency of 9.6 × 10(4) h(-1) (0.125 mol% catalyst, 100% MMA conversion in 30 s, M(n) = 2.12 × 10(5) g mol(-1), PDI = 1.34). The polymers produced by LPs at RT are typically atactic (P(γ)MMBL with ∼47% mr) or syndio-rich (PMMA with ∼70-75% rr), but highly syndiotactic PMMA with rr ∼91% can be produced by chiral or achiral LPs at -78 °C. Mechanistic studies have identified and structurally characterized zwitterionic phosphonium and imidazolium enolaluminates as the active species of the current LPP system, which are formed by the reaction of the monomer·Al(C(6)F(5))(3) adduct with P(t)Bu(3) and NHC bases, respectively. Kinetic studies have revealed that the MMA polymerization by the (t)Bu(3)P/Al(C(6)F(5))(3) pair is zero-order in monomer concentration after an initial

  3. High-fat diet enhances and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency attenuates bone loss in mice with Lewis Lung carcinoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study determined the effects of a high-fat diet and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency (PAI-1-/-) on bone structure in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in lungs. Reduction in bone volume fraction (BV/TV) by 22% and 21%, trabecular number (Tb.N) by 8% and 4% and bone mineral de...

  4. Fragmentation of Lewis-type trisaccharides in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamagaki, Tohru; Tachibana, Kazuo; Fukui, Kazuhiko

    2008-11-01

    The mechanisms of fragmentation of the chlorinated Lewis-type trisaccharides Lewis a and Lewis X were studied by using experimental and theoretical methods. In the fragment ion spectra obtained by ESI-CID-MS, C- and Z-type fragmentations corresponding to 4- and 3-linked glycosyl bond cleavages of the N-acetylglucosamine moiety were observed. The relationships of the relative ion intensities of C- and Z-type fragmentations were Z > C in Lewis a and C > Z in Lewis X, suggesting that the relationships of the activation energies were C > Z in Lewis a and Z > C in Lewis X. Anomeric and acetoamide groups were assumed to be included in the mechanisms of C- and Z-type fragmentation; we therefore analyzed 3-fucosyllactose and methylated Lewis-type trisaccharides, which are the derivatives of Lewis-type trisaccharides. These analyses revealed that C-type fragmentation was little influenced by anomeric group and that Z-type fragmentation was influenced by both the anomeric and the acetoamide groups. Fragmentation mechanisms were proposed on the basis of the experimental results and were calculated at the HF/3-21G(d), HF/6-31G(d) levels. From the calculations, C-type fragmentation of the 4-linkage was considered to take place by electron transfer from the acetoamide group, and Z-type fragmentation at the 3-linkage was considered to take place in two steps: (i) elimination of the 3-linked saccharide moiety, and (ii) deprotonation of an anomeric proton by a chloride anion. The activation energies for C- and Z-type fragmentations, as determined by HF calculations, were consistent with the experimentally assumed trends.

  5. Lewis Acid-Base, Molecular Modeling, and Isotopic Labeling in a Sophomore Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nataro, Chip; Ferguson, Michelle A.; Bocage, Katherine M.; Hess, Brian J.; Ross, Vincent J.; Swarr, Daniel T.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment to prepare a deuterium labeled adduct of a Lewis acid and Lewis base, to use computational methods allowing students to visualize the LUMO of Lewis acids, the HOMO of Lewis bases and the molecular orbitals of the adduct that is formed is developed. This allows students to see the interplay between calculated and experimental results.

  6. Clinical Features of Alzheimer Disease With and Without Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun Joo; Babulal, Ganesh M.; Monsell, Sarah E.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Roe, Catherine M.; Morris, John C.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Lewy bodies are a frequent coexisting pathology in late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD). Previous studies have examined the contribution of Lewy bodies to the clinical phenotype of late-onset AD with variable findings. OBJECTIVE To determine whether the presence of Lewy body pathology influences the clinical phenotype and progression of symptoms in longitudinally assessed participants with AD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective clinical and pathological cohort study of 531 deceased participants who met the neuropathologic criteria for intermediate or high likelihood of AD according to the National Institute on Aging–Ronald Reagan Institute guidelines for the neuropathologic diagnosis of AD. All participants had a clinical assessment within 2 years of death. The data were obtained from 34 AD centers maintained by the National Alzheimer Coordinating Center and spanned from September 12, 2005, to April 30, 2013. EXPOSURES Standardized neuropathologic assessment and then brain autopsy after death. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Clinical and neuropsychiatric test scores. RESULTS The mean (SD) age at death was statistically significantly younger for participants who had AD with Lewy bodies (77.9 [9.5] years) than for participants who had AD without Lewy bodies (80.2 [11.1] years) (P = .01). The mean (SD) age at onset of dementia symptoms was also younger for participants who had AD with Lewy bodies (70.0 [9.9] years) than for participants who had AD without Lewy bodies (72.2 [12.3] years) (P = .03). More men than women had AD with Lewy bodies (P = .01). The frequency of having at least 1 APOE ε4 allele was higher for participants who had AD with Lewy bodies than for participants who had AD without Lewy bodies (P = .03). After adjusting for age, sex, education, frequency of plaques (neuritic and diffuse), and tangle stage, we found that participants who had AD with Lewy bodies had a statistically significantly higher mean (SD) Neuropsychiatric

  7. FEATURE B. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH LEWIS MOUNT, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE B. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH LEWIS MOUNT, VIEW FACING NORTHWEST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Machine Gun Positions, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  8. FEATURE B. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH LEWIS MOUNT, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE B. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH LEWIS MOUNT, VIEW FACING NORTHWEST (with scale stick). - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Machine Gun Positions, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  9. Distance Learning With NASA Lewis Research Center's Learning Technologies Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Ruth

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's Learning Technologies Project (LTP) has responded to requests from local school district technology coordinators to provide content for videoconferencing workshops. Over the past year we have offered three teacher professional development workshops that showcase NASA Lewis-developed educational products and NASA educational Internet sites. In order to determine the direction of our involvement with distance learning, the LTP staff conducted a survey of 500 U.S. schools. We received responses from 72 schools that either currently use distance learning or will be using distance learning in 98-99 school year. The results of the survey are summarized in the article. In addition, the article provides information on distance learners, distance learning technologies, and the NASA Lewis LTP videoconferencing workshops. The LTP staff will continue to offer teacher development workshops through videoconferencing during the 98-99 school year. We hope to add workshops on new educational products as they are developed at NASA Lewis.

  10. 123I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine Myocardial Scintigraphy in Lewy Body-Related Disorders: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun Joo; Kim, Sang Jin

    2015-01-01

    Lewy body-related disorders are characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, which have abnormal aggregations of α-synuclein in the nigral and extranigral areas, including in the heart. 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy is a well-known tool to evaluate cardiac sympathetic denervation in the Lewy body-related disorders. MIBG scintigraphy showed low uptake of MIBG in the Lewy body-related disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, pure autonomic failure and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. This review summarizes previous results on the diagnostic applications of MIBG scintigraphy in Lewy body-related disorders. PMID:26090077

  11. 1. 1943 Plan View of 'Fort Lewis Station Hospital, Section ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 1943 Plan View of 'Fort Lewis Station Hospital, Section No. 5.' Drawn by V. Steinbrueck for J.C. Boespflug Construction Co. July 23, 1943. HABS 8x10' negative was made from an 8.5 x 11' copy on card stock in the collection of the Community Library, Madigan Army Medical Center, Fort Lewis, WA. - Madigan Hospital, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, DuPont, Pierce County, WA

  12. Lewis Research Center space station electric power system test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.; Martin, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center facilities were developed to support testing of the Space Station Electric Power System. The capabilities and plans for these facilities are described. The three facilities which are required in the Phase C/D testing, the Power Systems Facility, the Space Power Facility, and the EPS Simulation Lab, are described in detail. The responsibilities of NASA Lewis and outside groups in conducting tests are also discussed.

  13. Exome sequencing in dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Keogh, M J; Kurzawa-Akanbi, M; Griffin, H; Douroudis, K; Ayers, K L; Hussein, R I; Hudson, G; Pyle, A; Cordell, H J; Attems, J; McKeith, I G; O'Brien, J T; Burn, D J; Morris, C M; Thomas, A J; Chinnery, P F

    2016-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common form of degenerative dementia. Siblings of affected individuals are at greater risk of developing DLB, but little is known about the underlying genetic basis of the disease. We set out to determine whether mutations in known highly penetrant neurodegenerative disease genes are found in patients with DLB. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on 91 neuropathologically confirmed cases of DLB, supplemented by independent APOE genotyping. Genetic variants were classified using established criteria, and additional neuropathological examination was performed for putative mutation carriers. Likely pathogenic variants previously described as causing monogenic forms of neurodegenerative disease were found in 4.4% of patients with DLB. The APOE ɛ4 allele increased the risk of disease (P=0.0001), conferred a shorter disease duration (P=0.043) and earlier age of death (P=0.0015). In conclusion, although known pathogenic mutations in neurodegenerative disease genes are uncommon in DLB, known genetic risk factors are present in >60% of cases. APOE ɛ4 not only modifies disease risk, but also modulates the rate of disease progression. The reduced penetrance of reported pathogenic alleles explains the lack of a family history in most patients, and the presence of variants previously described as causing frontotemporal dementia suggests a mechanistic overlap between DLB and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26836416

  14. NASA Lewis Stirling engine computer code evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    In support of the US Department of Energy's Stirling Engine Highway Vehicle Systems program, the NASA Lewis Stirling engine performance code was evaluated by comparing code predictions without engine-specific calibration factors to GPU-3, P-40, and RE-1000 Stirling engine test data. The error in predicting power output was /minus/11 percent for the P-40 and 12 percent for the RE-1000 at design conditions and 16 percent for the GPU-3 at near-design conditions (2000 rpm engine speed versus 3000 rpm at design). The efficiency and heat input predictions showed better agreement with engine test data than did the power predictions. Concerning all data points, the error in predicting the GPU-3 brake power was significantly larger than for the other engines and was mainly a result of inaccuracy in predicting the pressure phase angle. Analysis into this pressure phase angle prediction error suggested that improvement to the cylinder hysteresis loss model could have a significant effect on overall Stirling engine performance predictions. 13 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. NASA Lewis Stirling engine computer code evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Stirling Engine Highway Vehicle Systems program, the NASA Lewis Stirling engine performance code was evaluated by comparing code predictions without engine-specific calibration factors to GPU-3, P-40, and RE-1000 Stirling engine test data. The error in predicting power output was -11 percent for the P-40 and 12 percent for the Re-1000 at design conditions and 16 percent for the GPU-3 at near-design conditions (2000 rpm engine speed versus 3000 rpm at design). The efficiency and heat input predictions showed better agreement with engine test data than did the power predictions. Concerning all data points, the error in predicting the GPU-3 brake power was significantly larger than for the other engines and was mainly a result of inaccuracy in predicting the pressure phase angle. Analysis into this pressure phase angle prediction error suggested that improvements to the cylinder hysteresis loss model could have a significant effect on overall Stirling engine performance predictions.

  16. Intramolecular Tetrylene Lewis Adducts: Synthesis and Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Julia; Krebs, Kilian M; Freitag, Sarah; Eichele, Klaus; Schubert, Hartmut; Wesemann, Lars

    2016-07-01

    A series of benzyl(diphenylphosphino) and o-phenyl(diphenlyphosphino) substituted germylenes and plumbylenes were synthesized by nucleophilic substitution between the respective lithium reagent and tetrylene halide. The Lewis pairs were characterized by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. The reactivity of the tetrylenes was investigated with respect to azide addition. In the germylene case, the germaniumimide was formed as the kinetically controlled product, which rearranges upon heating to give the phosphinimide. The stannylene and plumbylene derivatives react with adamantylazide to give the azide adducts. 1-Pentene reacts diastereoselectively with the phosphagermirane to give a cyclic addition product. Trimethysilylacetylene shows an addition with the benzylphosphino-substituted germylene and plumbylene to give the cycloheteropentene molecules. The addition product between phenylacetylene and the four membered Ge-P adduct shows after addition at room temperature a 1,4-phenylmigration to give a cyclic phosphine. Alkylnitrene insertion into a Ge-C bond of the alkyne addition product of the phosphagermirane was found in reaction with adamantylazide. PMID:27273819

  17. ISDN at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakes, Catherine Murphy; Goldberg, Fredric; Eubanks, Steven W.

    1992-01-01

    An expository investigation of the potential impact of the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) at NASA Lewis Research Center is described. To properly frame the subject, the paper contains a detailed survey of the components of Narrowband ISDN. The principles and objectives are presented as decreed by the Consultative Committee for International Telephone and Telegraph (CCITT). The various channel types are delineated and their associated service combinations are described. The subscriber-access network functions are explained pictorially via the ISDN reference configuration. A section on switching techniques is presented to enable the reader to understand the emergence of the concept of fast packet switching. This new technology is designed to operate over the high bandwidth, low error rate transmission media that characterizes the LeRC environment. A brief introduction to the next generation of networks is covered with sections on Broadband ISDM (B-ISDN), Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), and Synchronous Optical Networks (SONET). Applications at LeRC are presented, first in terms of targets of opportunity, then in light of compatibility constraints. In-place pilot projects and testing are described that demonstrate actual usage at LeRC.

  18. Lewy body pathology in fetal grafts.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yaping; Kordower, Jeffrey H

    2010-01-01

    Although fetal nigral transplants have been shown to survive grafting into the striatum, increased [(18)F]6-fluroro-L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine ((18)F-DOPA) uptake and improved motor function in open-label assessments have failed to establish any clinical benefits in double-blind, sham-controlled studies. To understand morphological and neurochemical alterations of grafted neurons, we performed postmortem analyses on six Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who had received fetal tissue transplantation 18-19 months, 4 years, and 14 years previously. These studies revealed robust neuronal survival with normal dopaminergic phenotypes in 18-month-old grafts and decreased dopamine transporter and increased cytoplasmic alpha-synuclein in 4-year-old grafts. We also found a decline of both dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase and the formation of Lewy body-like inclusions in 14-year-old grafts, which stained positive for alpha-synuclein and ubiquitin proteins. These pathological changes suggest that PD is an ongoing process that affects grafted cells in the striatum in a manner similar to how resident dopamine neurons are affected in the substantia nigra. PMID:20146690

  19. False memories in Lewy-body disease.

    PubMed

    Algarabel, Salvador; Pitarque, Alfonso; Sales, Alicia; Meléndez, Juan Carlos; Escudero, Joaquín

    2015-12-01

    Recently, de Boysson, Belleville, Phillips et al. (2011) found that patients with Lewy-body disease (LBD) showed significantly lower rates of false memories than healthy controls, using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) experimental procedure. Given that this result could be explained by the practically null rate of true recognition in the LBD group (0.09), we decided to replicate the study by de Boysson et al. (2011), but including a new condition that would maximize the true recognition rate (and analyze its effect on the rate of false memories). Specifically, in a DRM experiment, we manipulated (within subjects) two study and recognition conditions: in the "immediate" condition, both the LBD patients and the control group of healthy older people received a different recognition test after each study list (containing twelve words associated with a non-presented critical word), while in the "delayed" condition (similar to the one in de Boysson et al., 2011), the participants received the entire series of study lists and then took only one recognition test. The results showed that, in both samples, the "immediate" condition produced higher corrected rates of both true and false recognition than the "delayed" condition, although they were both lower in the LBD patients, which shows that these patients are capable of encoding and recognizing the general similitude underlying information (gist memory) in the right conditions. PMID:26355527

  20. Exome sequencing in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Keogh, M J; Kurzawa-Akanbi, M; Griffin, H; Douroudis, K; Ayers, K L; Hussein, R I; Hudson, G; Pyle, A; Cordell, H J; Attems, J; McKeith, I G; O'Brien, J T; Burn, D J; Morris, C M; Thomas, A J; Chinnery, P F

    2016-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common form of degenerative dementia. Siblings of affected individuals are at greater risk of developing DLB, but little is known about the underlying genetic basis of the disease. We set out to determine whether mutations in known highly penetrant neurodegenerative disease genes are found in patients with DLB. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on 91 neuropathologically confirmed cases of DLB, supplemented by independent APOE genotyping. Genetic variants were classified using established criteria, and additional neuropathological examination was performed for putative mutation carriers. Likely pathogenic variants previously described as causing monogenic forms of neurodegenerative disease were found in 4.4% of patients with DLB. The APOE ɛ4 allele increased the risk of disease (P=0.0001), conferred a shorter disease duration (P=0.043) and earlier age of death (P=0.0015). In conclusion, although known pathogenic mutations in neurodegenerative disease genes are uncommon in DLB, known genetic risk factors are present in >60% of cases. APOE ɛ4 not only modifies disease risk, but also modulates the rate of disease progression. The reduced penetrance of reported pathogenic alleles explains the lack of a family history in most patients, and the presence of variants previously described as causing frontotemporal dementia suggests a mechanistic overlap between DLB and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26836416

  1. Cyclic Oxidation Testing and Modelling: A NASA Lewis Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Nesbitt, J. A.; Barrett, C. A.; Lowell, C. E.

    2000-01-01

    The Materials Division of the NASA Lewis Research Center has been heavily involved in the cyclic oxidation of high temperature materials for 30 years. Cyclic furnace and burner rig apparati have been developed, refined, and replicated to provide a large scale facility capable of evaluating many materials by a standard technique. Material behavior is characterized by weight change data obtained throughout the test, which has been modelled in a step-wise process of scale growth and spallation. This model and a coupled diffusion model have successfully described cyclic behavior for a number of systems and have provided insights regarding life prediction and variations in the spalling process. Performance ranking and mechanistic studies are discussed primarily for superalloys and coating alloys. Similar cyclic oxidation studies have been performed on steels, intermetallic compounds, thermal barrier coatings, ceramics, and ceramic composites. The most common oxidation test was performed in air at temperatures ranging from 800 deg. to 1600 C, for times up to 10000 h, and for cycle durations of 0.1 to 1000 h. Less controlled, but important, test parameters are the cooling temperature and humidity level. Heating and cooling rates are not likely to affect scale spallation. Broad experience has usually allowed for considerable focus and simplification of these test parameters, while still revealing the principal aspects of material behavior and performance. Extensive testing has been performed to statistically model the compositional effects of experimental alloys and to construct a comprehensive database of complex commercial alloys.

  2. Lewis base activation of Lewis acids: catalytic, enantioselective vinylogous aldol addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R

    2007-07-20

    The generality of Lewis base catalyzed, Lewis acid mediated, enantioselective vinylogous aldol addition reactions has been investigated. The combination of silicon tetrachloride and chiral phosphoramides is a competent catalyst for highly selective additions of a variety of alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone-, 1,3-diketone-, and alpha,beta-unsaturated amide-derived dienolates to aldehydes. These reactions provided high levels of gamma-site selectivity for a variety of substitution patterns on the dienyl unit. Both ketone- and morpholine amide-derived dienol ethers afforded high enantio- and diastereoselectivity in the addition to conjugated aldehydes. Although alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone-derived dienolate did not react with aliphatic aldehydes, alpha,beta-unsaturated amide-derived dienolates underwent addition at reasonable rates affording high yields of vinylogous aldol product. The enantioselectivities achieved with the morpholine derived-dienolate in the addition to aliphatic aldehydes was the highest afforded to date with the silicon tetrachloride-chiral phosphoramide system. Furthermore, the ability to cleanly convert the morpholine amide to a methyl ketone was demonstrated. PMID:17583959

  3. Neuroimaging characteristics of dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B; O'Brien, John T

    2014-01-01

    This review summarises the findings and applications from neuroimaging studies in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), highlighting key differences between DLB and other subtypes of dementia. We also discuss the increasingly important role of imaging biomarkers in differential diagnosis and outline promising areas for future research in DLB. DLB shares common clinical, neuropsychological and pathological features with Parkinson's disease dementia and other dementia subtypes, such as Alzheimer's disease. Despite the development of consensus diagnostic criteria, the sensitivity for differential diagnosis of DLB in clinical practice remains low and many DLB patients will be misdiagnosed. The importance of developing accurate imaging markers in dementia is highlighted by the potential for treatments targeting specific molecular abnormalities as well as the responsiveness to cholinesterase inhibitors and marked neuroleptic sensitivity of DLB. We review various brain imaging techniques that have been applied to investigate DLB, including the characteristic nigrostriatal degeneration in DLB using positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers. Dopamine transporter loss has proven to reliably differentiate DLB from other dementias and has been incorporated into the revised clinical diagnostic criteria for DLB. To date, this remains the 'gold standard' for diagnostic imaging of DLB. Regional cerebral blood flow, 18 F-fluorodeoxygluclose-PET and SPECT have also identified marked deficits in the occipital regions with relative sparing of the medial temporal lobe when compared to Alzheimer's disease. In addition, structural, diffusion, and functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques have shown alterations in structure, white matter integrity, and functional activity in DLB. We argue that the multimodal identification of DLB-specific biomarkers has the potential to improve ante-mortem diagnosis and contribute to our

  4. Elk Monitoring Protocol for Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, Version 1.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Kurt J.; Griffin, Paul C.; Boetsch, John R.; Cole, Carla

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti) herds that frequent Lewis and Clark National Historical Park (NHP) is central to the park’s purpose of preserving the historic, cultural, scenic, and natural resources. Elk were critical to sustaining the members of the Lewis and Clark expedition by providing food and clothing over the winter of 1805-1806. Today, elk viewing opportunities in the park and surrounding region generate broad appeal with the visiting public, which number over 250,000 per year at the Fort Clatsop visitor center. This protocol describes procedures for monitoring trends in the use of the Fort Clatsop area by Roosevelt elk. Specific objectives of elk monitoring in Lewis and Clark NHP are to measure the relative use and proportion of area used by elk during winter in the Fort Clatsop Unit of the park, and the rate at which elk are sighted from roads in and around the park. Relative use and the proportion of area used by elk are determined from elk fecal pellet surveys conducted every other year in the Fort Clatsop park unit. Pairs of observers visit a systematic array of permanent plots in the fall to clear them of elk fecal pellets, and return to the plots in late winter to count elk fecal pellets that have accumulated during winter. Half of the subplots are counted by two independent observers, which allows for the estimation of relative use and proportion of area occupied by elk with analyses of detection biases that account for unseen elk pellet groups. Standardized road surveys are conducted in and near the Fort Clatsop park unit three or four times monthly during alternate months. Data from road surveys are used to quantify the rate that park visitors would be expected to see elk, when driving the selected set of routes. The monitoring protocol is based on three field seasons of development and testing. The protocol narrative describes the background, rationale, sampling design, field methods, analytical methods, data management, reporting

  5. Lewis rats have greater response impulsivity than Fischer rats.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Potenza, Marc N; Grunberg, Neil E

    2014-11-01

    Impulsivity, a tendency toward immediate action without consideration of future consequences, is associated with a wide array of problematic behaviors. Response impulsivity, a type of behaviorally-assessed impulsivity characterized by behavioral disinhibition, is also associated with health risk behaviors. Response impulsivity is distinct from choice impulsivity, which is characterized by intolerance for delay. Lewis rats have higher levels of choice impulsivity than Fischer rats (Anderson & Woolverton, 2005; Madden et al., 2008; Stein et al., 2012). However, no studies have examined whether Lewis and Fischer rats have different levels of response impulsivity. The present research examined response impulsivity in the two rat strains. Subjects were 16 male Lewis and Fischer rats. Rats' response impulsivity was measured using the Five Choice Serial Reaction Time Task (5-CSRTT). In addition, their locomotor activity was measured in locomotor activity chambers. Lewis rats had more premature responses than Fischer rats during the 5-CSRTT assessment [F(1, 14)=5.34, p<0.05], indicating higher levels of response impulsivity. Locomotor activity did not differ between rat strain groups [F(1, 14)=3.05, p=.10], suggesting that overall movement did not account for group differences in response impulsivity on the 5-CSRTT. It can be concluded from this research that Lewis rats have higher levels of response impulsivity than Fischer rats, and therefore provide a valid rat model of individual differences in impulsivity. PMID:24613059

  6. Cortical Lewy body dementia: clinical features and classification.

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, W R; Luthert, P J; Janota, I; Lantos, P L

    1989-01-01

    Seven patients, aged 65-72 years, are described with dementia and cortical Lewy bodies. In one patient a Parkinsonian syndrome was followed by dementia and motor neuron disease. In the remaining six patients dementia was accompanied by dysphasia, dyspraxia and agnosia. One developed a Parkinsonian syndrome before the dementia, in three cases a Parkinsonian syndrome occurred later, and in two cases not at all. All patients showed Lewy bodies and cell loss in the substantia nigra, locus coeruleus and dorsal vagal nucleus, as in Parkinson's disease. The severity of cell loss in the nucleus basalis varied from mild to severe. Lewy bodies were also present in the parahippocampus and cerebral cortex, but Alzheimer-type pathology was mild or absent, and insufficient for a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Patients with moderate or severe dementia, some with temporal or parietal features, may have cortical Lewy body disease, Alzheimer's disease, or a combination of the two. Cortical Lewy body disease may be associated with dementia in Parkinson's disease more often than realised, but is not necessarily associated with extensive Alzheimer pathology. Images PMID:2467966

  7. The spectrum of cognitive impairment in Lewy body diseases

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Jennifer G.; Williams-Gray, Caroline; Barker, Roger A.; Duda, John E.; Galvin, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairment represents an important and often defining component of the clinical syndromes of Lewy body disorders: Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. The spectrum of cognitive deficits in these Lewy body diseases encompasses a broad range of clinical features, severity of impairment, and timing of presentation. Cognitive dysfunction is now recognized to occur not only in more advanced Parkinson’s disease, but also in early, untreated patients, and even in those patients with pre-motor syndromes such as REM behavior disorder and hyposmia. In recent years, the concept of “mild cognitive impairment” as a transitional or pre-dementia state in Parkinson’s disease has emerged. While this has led to much research regarding the diagnosis, prognosis, and underlying neurobiology of mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s disease, it has also raised questions regarding the usefulness of this concept and its application in clinical and research settings. In addition, the conundrum of whether Parkinson’s disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies represent the same or different entities remains unresolved. While these disorders overlap in many aspects of their presentations and pathophysiology, they differ in other aspects such as timing of cognitive, behavioral, and motor symptoms, medication responses, and neuropathological contributions. This article examines the spectrum and evolution of cognitive impairment in Lewy body disorders and debates these controversial issues in the field using point-counterpoint approaches. PMID:24757110

  8. A Surprising Mechanistic “Switch” in Lewis Acid Activation: A Bifunctional, Asymmetric Approach to α-Hydroxy Acid Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Ciby J.; Paull, Daniel H.; Bekele, Tefsit; Scerba, Michael T.; Dudding, Travis; Lectka, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We report a detailed synthetic and mechanistic study of an unusual bifunctional, sequential hetero-Diels–Alder/ring-opening reaction in which chiral, metal complexed ketene enolates react with o-quinones to afford highly enantioenriched, α-hydroxylated carbonyl derivatives in excellent yield. A number of Lewis acids were screened in tandem with cinchona alkaloid derivatives; surprisingly, trans-(Ph3P)2PdCl2 was found to afford the most dramatic increase in yield and rate of reaction. A series of Lewis acid binding motifs were explored through molecular modeling, as well as IR, UV and NMR spectroscopy. Our observations document a fundamental mechanistic “switch” – namely the formation of a tandem Lewis base/Lewis acid activated metal enolate in preference to a metal-coordinated quinone species (as observed in other reactions of o-quinone derivatives). This new method was applied to the syntheses of several pharmaceutical targets, each of which was obtained in high yield and enantioselectivity. PMID:19053448

  9. Risk factors for dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Boot, Brendon P.; Orr, Carolyn F.; Ahlskog, J. Eric; Ferman, Tanis J.; Roberts, Rosebud; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Parisi, Joseph; Aakre, Jeremiah A.; Geda, Yonas E.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the risk factors associated with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Methods: We identified 147 subjects with DLB and sampled 2 sex- and age-matched cognitively normal control subjects for each case. We also identified an unmatched comparison group of 236 subjects with Alzheimer disease (AD). We evaluated 19 candidate risk factors in the study cohort. Results: Compared with controls, subjects with DLB were more likely to have a history of anxiety (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval) (7.4; 3.5–16; p < 0.0001), depression (6.0; 3.7–9.5; p < 0.0001), stroke (2.8; 1.3–6.3; p = 0.01), a family history of Parkinson disease (PD) (4.6; 2.5–8.6; p < 0.0001), and carry APOE ε4 alleles (2.2; 1.5–3.3; p < 0.0001), but less likely to have had cancer (0.44; 0.27–0.70; p = 0.0006) or use caffeine (0.29; 0.14–0.57; p < 0.0001) with a similar trend for alcohol (0.65; 0.42–1.0; p = 0.0501). Compared with subjects with AD, subjects with DLB were younger (72.5 vs 74.9 years, p = 0.021) and more likely to be male (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval) (5.3; 3.3–8.5; p < 0.0001), have a history of depression (4.3; 2.4–7.5; p < 0.0001), be more educated (2.5; 1.1–5.6; p = 0.031), have a positive family history of PD (5.0; 2.4–10; p < 0.0001), have no APOE ε4 alleles (0.61; 0.40–0.93; p = 0.02), and to have had an oophorectomy before age 45 years (7.6; 1.5–39; p = 0.015). Conclusion: DLB risk factors are an amalgam of those for AD and PD. Smoking and education, which have opposing risk effects on AD and PD, are not risk factors for DLB; however, depression and low caffeine intake, both risk factors for AD and PD, increase risk of DLB more strongly than in either. PMID:23892702

  10. Lewy Bodies: A Spectator or Salient Killer?

    PubMed

    Sian-Hulsmann, Jeswinder; Monoranu, Camelia; Strobel, S; Riederer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Lewy bodies (LBs) are characteristic hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, their role in the pathology of PD is not established yet. Are they primary events in the neurodegenerative process or only secondary phenomena? Are they signs of protecting neurons from toxicity or are they toxic per se? How are they are formed? Are LBs targets for therapeutic strategies? Addressing these questions may be of pivotal importance to unravel the basic mechanisms of neurodegeneration in PD. On the basis of current evidence, we intend to elucidate the possible role of LBs as triggers and/or markers of disease progression in PD. We present evidence for the morphogenesis of brain stem and cortical LBs, the role in neuronal cell death mechanisms, which seem to be correlated with the adhesion of LBs to and finally disruption of their inner neuronal membrane. Taken as such, LBs would be salient killers of nerve cells. However, they may also play a neuroprotective role in the early phases of neuronal pathology (LBs as a spectator), yet harmful to neuronal stability in later stages of LB development. Generation of LB pathology in the periphery (early subclinical Braak stage) might be due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to (chronic) bacteria-induced and/or otherwise intestinal inflammation, both leading to alpha-synuclein structural changes, oligomerization, seeding and propagation in a prion-like mechanism. If so, LB generation is a secondary process following ROS/inflammation pathology. Therapeutic implication based on LB pathology include drug development to inhibit protein misfolding, templating and transmission or vaccination against LBs, neuron regeneration strategies, anti-inflammatory and anti-biotic drugs as well as nutritional specialities to prevent intestine intoxications. In conclusion, evidence suggests LBs to be secondary hallmarks of PD pathology, induced by ROS/inflammation or other pathological triggers able to modify protein (alpha-synuclein) steric

  11. NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, Ronald H.

    1993-01-01

    This manual describes the 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel at the Lewis Research Center and provides information for users who wish to conduct experiments in this atmospheric facility. Tunnel variables such as pressures, temperatures, available tests section area, and Mach number ranges (0.05 to 0.20) are discussed. In addition, general support systems such as air systems, hydraulic system, hydrogen system, laser system, flow visualization system, and model support systems are described. Instrumentation and data processing and acquisition systems are also discussed.

  12. Maxima of |Ψ|2: a connection between quantum mechanics and Lewis structures.

    PubMed

    Lüchow, Arne

    2014-04-30

    The maxima of squared electronic wave functions |Ψ|2 are analyzed for a number of small molecules. They are in principle observables and show considerable chemical insight from first principles. The maxima contain substantial information about the relative electron positions in a molecule, such as the pairing of opposite spin electrons and the Pauli repulsion which are lost in the electron density. Single bond and double bond as well as polar bond pairs and lone pairs are obtained from the maximum analysis. In many cases, we find a correspondence to the electron arrangements in molecules as assumed by Lewis in 1916. PMID:24532243

  13. Helicopter transmission testing at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Coy, John J.

    1987-01-01

    The helicopter has evolved into a highly valuable air mobile vehicle for both military and civilian needs. The helicopter transmission requires advanced studies to develop a technology base for future rotorcraft advances. A joint helicopter transmission research program between the NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command has existed since 1970. Program goals are to reduce weight and noise and to increase life and reliability. The current experimental activities at Lewis consist of full-scale helicopter transmission testing, a base effort in gearing technology, and a future effort in noise reduction technology. The experimental facilities at Lewis for helicopter transmission testing are described. A description of each of the rigs is presented along with some significant results and near-term plans.

  14. Sudden Death: An Uncommon Occurrence in Dementia with Lewy Bodies.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Joery P; Wilbers, Joyce; Aerts, Marjolein B; Leijten, Quinten H; van Dijk, Jan G; Esselink, Rianne A; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-01-01

    We present a 75-year-old woman with dementia and parkinsonism who developed severe orthostatic hypotension and eventually died. Autopsy revealed extensive Lewy body formation in the midbrain, limbic system, intermediate spinal cord, and medulla oblongata. Furthermore, a vast amount of Lewy bodies was seen in the paravertebral sympathetic ganglia which likely explained the severe autonomic failure. We speculate that this autonomic failure caused sudden death through dysregulation of respiration or heart rhythm, reminiscent of sudden death in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Clinicians should be aware of this complication in patients presenting with parkinsonism and autonomic dysfunction, and that sudden death may occur in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) as it does in MSA. PMID:26891177

  15. Langerhans' cell expression of the selectin ligand, sialyl Lewis x.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, E L; Barker, J N; Allen, M H; Chu, A C; Groves, R W; MacDonald, D M

    1994-01-01

    Cellular adhesion molecules play a central role in leucocyte migration through peripheral blood and tissues. A crucial stage in these events in selectin-mediated adhesion involving E-selectin expressed on activated endothelium interacting with a range of carbohydrate ligands expressed by specific subpopulations of leucocytes. As such mechanisms may be relevant to bone marrow-derived dendritic epidermal Langerhans' cell (LC) migration, expression of these carbohydrate ligands was assessed immunocytochemically in whole skin biopsies and in epidermal cell suspensions obtained from adult humans. Double-labelling experiments revealed that sialyl Lewis x, recognized by the monoclonal antibody CSLEX1, was expressed on epidermal LC (n = 9). Furthermore, expression was enhanced at 24 hr following epicutaneous application of antigen and in the inflammatory disorder psoriasis (n = 10). E-selectin was concomitantly strongly expressed on dermal endothelium in psoriasis and allergic contact dermatitis. Intradermal injection of the T-cell-derived cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) led to increased LC expression of sialyl Lewis x. In epidermal cell suspensions, in contrast to keratinocytes, CD1a+ cells expressed sialyl Lewis x, intensity of which was enhanced after 4 days in culture. CSLEX1 staining could be abolished and CD15 (non-sialated Lewis x) expression induced by saponification and treatment with neuraminidase. Expression of other selectin ligands was also examined. While the cutaneous lymphocyte antigen defined by the monoclonal antibody HECA-452 reacted with a small minority of LC, sialyl Lewis a and sulphatide were not expressed under any experimental conditions. These studies indicate that E-selectin-sialyl Lewis x interactions are potentially important in LC migration, both into and out of skin. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7512530

  16. Lewis Acid Coupled Electron Transfer of Metal-Oxygen Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-12-01

    Redox-inactive metal ions and Brønsted acids that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the redox reactivity of metal-oxygen intermediates, such as metal-oxo and metal-peroxo complexes. The mechanisms of the oxidative CH bond cleavage of toluene derivatives, sulfoxidation of thioanisole derivatives, and epoxidation of styrene derivatives by mononuclear nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complexes in the presence of triflic acid (HOTf) and Sc(OTf)3 have been unified as rate-determining electron transfer coupled with binding of Lewis acids (HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 ) by iron(III)-oxo complexes. All logarithms of the observed second-order rate constants of Lewis acid-promoted oxidative CH bond cleavage, sulfoxidation, and epoxidation reactions of iron(IV)-oxo complexes exhibit remarkably unified correlations with the driving forces of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and metal ion-coupled electron transfer (MCET) in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer when the differences in the formation constants of precursor complexes were taken into account. The binding of HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 to the metal-oxo moiety has been confirmed for Mn(IV) -oxo complexes. The enhancement of the electron-transfer reactivity of metal-oxo complexes by binding of Lewis acids increases with increasing the Lewis acidity of redox-inactive metal ions. Metal ions can also bind to mononuclear nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complexes, resulting in acceleration of the electron-transfer reduction but deceleration of the electron-transfer oxidation. Such a control on the reactivity of metal-oxygen intermediates by binding of Lewis acids provides valuable insight into the role of Ca(2+) in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II. PMID:26404482

  17. Gear and Transmission Research at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is a review of some of the research work of the NASA Lewis Research Center Mechanical Components Branch. It includes a brief review of the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Mechanical Components Branch. The research topics discussed are crack propagation of gear teeth, gear noise of spiral bevel and other gears, design optimization methods, methods we have investigated for transmission diagnostics, the analytical and experimental study of gear thermal conditions, the analytical and experimental study of split torque systems, the evaluation of several new advanced gear steels and transmission lubricants and the evaluation of various aircraft transmissions. The area of research needs for gearing and transmissions is also discussed.

  18. A revision of Megalocraerus Lewis, 1902 (Coleoptera, Histeridae: Exosternini)

    PubMed Central

    Caterino, Michael S.; Tishechkin, Alexey K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The formely monotypic Neotropical genus Megalocraerus Lewis is revised to include five species, known from southeastern Brazil to Costa Rica: Megalocraerus rubricatus Lewis, Megalocraerus mandibularis sp. n., Megalocraerus chico sp. n., Megalocraerus madrededios sp. n., and Megalocraerus tiputini sp. n. We describe the species, map their distributions, and provide a key for their identification. Their subcylindrical body form and emarginate mesosternum have previously hindered placement to tribe, although their curent assignment to Exosternini now appears well supported by morphological evidence. Nothing is known of the natural history of the species. PMID:26877699

  19. Utilization of NASA Lewis mobile terminals for the Hermes satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelman, E. A.; Fiala, J. L.; Rizzolla, L.

    1977-01-01

    The high power of the Hermes satellite enables two-way television and voice communication with small ground terminals. The Portable Earth Terminal (PET) and the Transportable Earth Terminal (TET) were developed and built by NASA-Lewis to provide communications capability to short-term users. The NASA-Lewis mobile terminals are described in terms of vehicles and onboard equipment, as well as operation aspects, including use in the field. The section on demonstrations divides the uses into categories of medicine, education, technology and government. Applications of special interest within each category are briefly described.

  20. Summary of Research Report Lewis Incubator for Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Wayne P.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done to establish and operate the Lewis Incubator for Technology (LIFT) for the period July 1996 through September 2000. The Lewis Incubator helps the startup and growth of technology-based businesses with the potential to incorporate technology from the NASA Glenn Research Center. During the grant period, LIFT began operation, met or exceeded all key performance measures, and continues its operation through a new cooperative agreement with NASA Glenn and also through continued funding from the State of Ohio.

  1. Crystalline, Lewis base-free, cationic phosphoranimines (iminophosphonium salts).

    PubMed

    Dielmann, Fabian; Moore, Curtis E; Rheingold, Arnold L; Bertrand, Guy

    2013-09-25

    Cationic phosphoranimines have been postulated as intermediates in phosphazene polymerization chemistry. However, the high electrophilicity of the phosphorus center has so far prevented their characterization. Here, we report the synthesis of two Lewis base-free iminophosphonium salts, obtained by reaction of a stable phosphinonitrene with methyl trifluoromethanesulfonate and trifluoromethanesulfonic acid. These cationic species were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Using 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine, a corresponding Lewis-base adduct has also been isolated. PMID:24007472

  2. Fort Lewis natural gas and fuel oil energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Brodrick, J.R. ); Daellenbach, K.K.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Secrest, T.J.; Shankle, S.A. )

    1993-02-01

    The mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to lead the improvement of energy efficiency and fuel flexibility within the federal sector. Through the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), FEMP is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations; this procedure is entitled the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. Through a cooperative program between FEMP and the Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) for providing technical assistance to FORSCOM installations, PNL has been working with the Fort Lewis Army installation to develop the FEDS procedure. The natural gas and fuel oil assessment contained in this report was preceded with an assessment of electric energy usage that was used to implement a cofunded program between Fort Lewis and Tacoma Public Utilities to improve the efficiency of the Fort's electric-energy-using systems. This report extends the assessment procedure to the systems using natural gas and fuel oil to provide a baseline of consumption and an estimate of the energy-efficiency potential that exists for these two fuel types at Fort Lewis. The baseline is essential to segment the end uses that are targets for broad-based efficiency improvement programs. The estimated fossil-fuel efficiency resources are estimates of the available quantities of conservation for natural gas, fuel oils [number sign]2 and [number sign]6, and fuel-switching opportunities by level of cost-effectiveness. The intent of the baseline and efficiency resource estimates is to identify the major efficiency resource opportunities and not to identify all possible opportunities; however, areas of additional opportunity are noted to encourage further effort.

  3. Fort Lewis natural gas and fuel oil energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Brodrick, J.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Secrest, T.J.; Shankle, S.A.

    1993-02-01

    The mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to lead the improvement of energy efficiency and fuel flexibility within the federal sector. Through the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), FEMP is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations; this procedure is entitled the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. Through a cooperative program between FEMP and the Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) for providing technical assistance to FORSCOM installations, PNL has been working with the Fort Lewis Army installation to develop the FEDS procedure. The natural gas and fuel oil assessment contained in this report was preceded with an assessment of electric energy usage that was used to implement a cofunded program between Fort Lewis and Tacoma Public Utilities to improve the efficiency of the Fort`s electric-energy-using systems. This report extends the assessment procedure to the systems using natural gas and fuel oil to provide a baseline of consumption and an estimate of the energy-efficiency potential that exists for these two fuel types at Fort Lewis. The baseline is essential to segment the end uses that are targets for broad-based efficiency improvement programs. The estimated fossil-fuel efficiency resources are estimates of the available quantities of conservation for natural gas, fuel oils {number_sign}2 and {number_sign}6, and fuel-switching opportunities by level of cost-effectiveness. The intent of the baseline and efficiency resource estimates is to identify the major efficiency resource opportunities and not to identify all possible opportunities; however, areas of additional opportunity are noted to encourage further effort.

  4. Wind tunnel and analytical investigation of over-the-wing propulsion/air frame interferences for a short-haul aircraft at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.78. [conducted in the Lewis 8 by 6 foot tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, O. D.; Lopez, M. L.; Welge, H. R.; Henne, P. A.; Sewell, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    Results of analytical calculations and wind tunnel tests at cruise speeds of a representative four engine short haul aircraft employing upper surface blowing (USB) with a supercritical wing are discussed. Wind tunnel tests covered a range of Mach number M from 0.6 to 0.78. Tests explored the use of three USB nozzle configurations. Results are shown for the isolated wing body and for each of the three nozzle types installed. Experimental results indicate that a low angle nacelle and streamline contoured nacelle yielded the same interference drag at the design Mach number. A high angle powered lift nacelle had higher interference drag primarily because of nacelle boattail low pressures and flow separation. Results of varying the spacing between the nacelles and the use of trailing edge flap deflections, wing upper surface contouring, and a convergent-divergent nozzle to reduce potential adverse jet effects were also discussed. Analytical comparisons with experimental data, made for selected cases, indicate favorable agreement.

  5. Telling Lewis Hine's Story: Russell Freedman's "Kids at Work."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarnowski, Myra

    In "Kids at Work," Russell Freedman explores the world of child labor during the years 1908-1918 when Lewis Hine, "teacher-crusader," worked as an investigative photographer for the National Child Labor Committee (NCLC). Hine's writing and the photos he gathered from across the country revealed a "shocking reality that most Americans had never…

  6. Ada H. H. Lewis Middle School Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia School District, PA. Office of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This curriculum guide describes the instructional program at the Ada H. H. Lewis Middle School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In brief, the goals of the program are to provide the schools' fifth-grade through eighth-grade students with educational opportunities based on an eclectic team-teaching approach. Four separate "houses" accommodate…

  7. LAPWAI CREEK STUDY, LEWIS AND NEZ PERCE COUNTIES, IDAHO. 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    During Water Year 1979, a water quality study was conducted on the Lapwai Creek in Nez Perce and Lewis Counties, Idaho (17060306) to obtain background information on nonpoint source pollution impacts and for effluent limitation development. The study involved approximately bi-mo...

  8. Alleged Mercury Discharge by the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbluum, L.

    1971-01-01

    Water sample analysis, site visits, and effluent reports are examined in an attempt to identify the sources contributing to mercury pollution of the Great Lakes. Two sources were identified, Lewis Research Center and Dow Chemical of Canada. Tests were made during a period from April to September 1970.

  9. Q & A with Ed Tech Leaders: Interview with Brian Lewis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Fulgham, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Brian Lewis, International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) chief executive officer, is an education advocate and leader specializing in management and governance, policy, corporate communications, branding, and marketing. He provides leadership to ISTE's Washington, DC, and Eugene, Oregon, offices and directs organizational…

  10. 162. Photocopy of Photograph (original in Roger Lewis' private collection). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    162. Photocopy of Photograph (original in Roger Lewis' private collection). Photographer and date unknown. MILNER DAM, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; NORTH DAM, NORTH VIEW, SHOWS ROCK BEING TAKEN FROM FUTURE NORTHSIDE CANAL SITE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  11. 168. Photocopy of Photograph (original in Roger Lewis' private collection). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    168. Photocopy of Photograph (original in Roger Lewis' private collection). Photographer and date unknown. MILNER DAM TUNNEL CONSTRUCTION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; WORKERS STANDING IN TUNNEL (ONE CAN BE SEEN AT FAR END OF TUNNEL). - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  12. Impact of Predatory Threat on Fear Extinction in Lewis Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goswami, Sonal; Cascardi, Michele; Rodriguez-Sierra, Olga E.; Duvarci, Sevil; Pare, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Humans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are deficient at extinguishing conditioned fear responses. A study of identical twins concluded that this extinction deficit does not predate trauma but develops as a result of trauma. The present study tested whether the Lewis rat model of PTSD reproduces these features of the human syndrome.…

  13. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1982 is described. All the publications were announced in the 1982 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  14. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes over 780 research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses resulting from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1980. All the publications were announced in Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports and/or International Aerospace Abstracts.

  15. Lewis Terman: Genetic Study of Genius--Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolly, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Although the field of gifted education generally recognizes the foundational work of Lewis Terman, rarely does one stop to examine the details of his longitudinal study and their connection to present-day gifted education. This article reexamines the beginnings of Terman's longitudinal study with a focus on elementary-school-aged children.…

  16. "Termanal" Science? The Work of Lewis Terman Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vialle, Wilma

    1994-01-01

    This article place's Lewis Terman's work in the context of his time and space, in response to criticism of biases against women and certain ethnic groups in his work. The paper concludes that, notwithstanding the unacceptability of his ideas on women and race, Terman's work provides an important foundation for the field of gifted education.…

  17. Lewis M. Terman and the "World" of Test Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minton, Henry L.

    The association between Lewis M. Terman and the World Book Company is traced in order to gain insight about the role of test publishing in the testing movement. The test publisher assumes the position of an intermediary between the test developer and the educational administrator responsible for making decisions about test adoption. Terman began…

  18. Mach 6 Integrated Systems Tests of Lewis' Hypersonic Tunnel Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A series of 15 integrated systems tests were conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center's Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) with test conditions simulating flight up to Mach 6. Facility stagnation conditions up to 3050 R and 1050 psia were obtained with typical test times of 20 to 45 sec.

  19. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center Technical Publications announced in 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1991. All the publications were announced in the 1991 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  20. 175. Photocopy of Photograph (original in Roger Lewis' private collection). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    175. Photocopy of Photograph (original in Roger Lewis' private collection). Photographer and date unknown. CENTER ISLAND, CRAWFORD WATER WHEEL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM DAM SITE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  1. 174. Photocopy of Photograph (original in Roger Lewis' private collection). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    174. Photocopy of Photograph (original in Roger Lewis' private collection). Photographer and date unknown. SNAKE RIVER BELOW MILNER DAM SITE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; RAPIDS JUST BELOW MILNER TOWNSITE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  2. A Legacy of Dandelions: Carolyn Lewis Attneave (1990-1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckman-Stone, Carolyn

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the legacy of Carolyn Lewis Attneave who was, according to T. D. LaFromboise and J. E. Trimble (1966), "undoubtedly the most well-known psychologist of American Indian background." Reviews Attneave's work in organizations across the United States promoting the causes of American Indian families and community mental health and her skill…

  3. 32 CFR 552.168 - Fort Lewis Area Access Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis... permits. The group leader permit is not transferable. (3) Events requiring commitment of land must be processed per § 552.166. (f) Aside from the land commitment coordination time requirement in §...

  4. 32 CFR 552.168 - Fort Lewis Area Access Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis... permits. The group leader permit is not transferable. (3) Events requiring commitment of land must be processed per § 552.166. (f) Aside from the land commitment coordination time requirement in §...

  5. 32 CFR 552.168 - Fort Lewis Area Access Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis... permits. The group leader permit is not transferable. (3) Events requiring commitment of land must be processed per § 552.166. (f) Aside from the land commitment coordination time requirement in §...

  6. 32 CFR 552.168 - Fort Lewis Area Access Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis... permits. The group leader permit is not transferable. (3) Events requiring commitment of land must be processed per § 552.166. (f) Aside from the land commitment coordination time requirement in §...

  7. 32 CFR 552.168 - Fort Lewis Area Access Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis... permits. The group leader permit is not transferable. (3) Events requiring commitment of land must be processed per § 552.166. (f) Aside from the land commitment coordination time requirement in §...

  8. Seals Related Research at NASA. Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    Some current efforts in seal research at the Lewis Research Center include self-sealing linear segmented ceramic configurations, the T700 brush seal engine test, flow and duration characteristics of brush seals and other configurations, cryogenic hydrogen brush seal tests, and a brush seal tester. Information is given in diagram and graphs for a labyrinth seal and a straight cylindrical seal.

  9. Modified NASA-Lewis chemical equilibrium code for MHD applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacks, R. A.; Geyer, H. K.; Grammel, S. J.; Doss, E. D.

    1979-01-01

    A substantially modified version of the NASA-Lewis Chemical Equilibrium Code was recently developed. The modifications were designed to extend the power and convenience of the Code as a tool for performing combustor analysis for MHD systems studies. The effect of the programming details is described from a user point of view.

  10. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes over 800 technical publications that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1983. Announced in the 1983 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts), the documents cited include research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  11. Research and technology highlights of the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Highlights of research accomplishments of the Lewis Research Center for fiscal year 1984 are presented. The report is divided into four major sections covering aeronautics, space communications, space technology, and materials and structures. Six articles on energy are included in the space technology section.

  12. Diffuse Lewy body disease with immediate post-partum onset.

    PubMed

    Opeskin, K; Gonzales, M; Borenstein, R; Anderson, R

    1993-01-01

    A previously healthy 27 years-old woman developed psychotic depression and parkinsonism shortly after delivery of her first child. Her neuropsychiatric symptoms progressed to dementia and she died 5 years after onset. Diffuse Lewy body disease was found at autopsy. This case is unusual because of the early age of onset and the abrupt development of symptoms following pregnancy. PMID:8442413

  13. Blood group variation in the Isle of Lewis.

    PubMed

    Clegg, E J; Tills, D; Warlow, A; Wilkinson, J; Marin, A

    1985-01-01

    Blood groups and protein and enzyme polymorphism distributions were studied in 285 residents on the Isle of Lewis, in the Outer Hebrides. As well as gene frequency calculations for individual loci, genetic distance estimations were made and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. The results indicated several major differences from North-west European populations, with high values of R2(CDe), Rz(CDE) and P1. Among protein and enzyme polymorphisms Hp1, EAPA and PGM1(1) had very high frequencies. Genetic distances show Lewis to be unlike both Western and Eastern North European populations, while the phylogenetic tree shows a common, but rather distant, ancestry with Icelanders. This genetic uniqueness of Lewis as a whole is accompanied by a considerable degree of heterogeneity within the island itself, especially in the ABO and Rh systems. Stornoway, with a greater proportion of residents descended from immigrant stock, shows a greater degree of similarity with neighbouring populations. The reasons for both the overall uniqueness and the heterogeneity within Lewis are discussed, but in the absence of a large time-depth and adequate vital records, the various roles of selection, drift and migration in producing them are difficult to establish. PMID:3929670

  14. False Recognition in Lewy-Body Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Boysson, C.; Belleville, S.; Phillips, N. A.; Johns, E. K.; Goupil, D.; Souchay, C.; Bouchard, R.; Chertkow, H.

    2011-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the false recognition phenomenon in persons with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and those with Lewy-body disease (LBD). Patients with LBD (n=10) or FTD (n=15) and their corresponding controls (n=30) were subjected to the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm to induce false recognition. Patients were…

  15. Beyond "Discovery": Lewis & Clark from an Indigenous Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlebear, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Recontextualizes the history of the Lewis and Clark expedition from a Native American perspective. Argues that the success of the expedition hastened killing of American Indians and more firmly entrenched U.S. government policies toward indigenous peoples. Stresses that education, particularly at tribal colleges, is the key to success for…

  16. NASA. Lewis Research Center materials research and technology: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1990-01-01

    The Materials Division at the Lewis Research Center has a long record of contributions to both materials and process technology as well as to the understanding of key high-temperature phenomena. This paper overviews the division staff, facilities, past history, recent progress, and future interests.

  17. Liquid droplet radiator program at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presler, A. F.; Coles, C. E.; Diem-Kirsop, P. S.; White, K. A., III

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory (AFRPL) are jointly engaged in a program for technical assessment of the Liquid Droplet Radiator (LDR) concept as an advanced high performance heat ejection component for future space missions. NASA Lewis has responsibility for the technology needed for the droplet generator, for working fluid qualification, and for investigating the physics of droplets in space; NASA Lewis is also conducting systems/mission analyses for potential LDR applications with candidate space power systems. For the droplet generator technology task, both micro-orifice fabrication techniques and droplet stream formation processes have been experimentally investigated. High quality micro-orifices (to 50 micron diameter) are routinely fabricated with automated equipment. Droplet formation studies have established operating boundaries for the generation of controlled and uniform droplet streams. A test rig is currently being installed for the experimental verification, under simulated space conditions, of droplet radiation heat transfer performance analyses and the determination of the effect radiative emissivity of multiple droplet streams. Initial testing has begun in the NASA Lewis Zero-Gravity Facility for investigating droplet stream behavior in microgravity conditions. This includes the effect of orifice wetting on jet dynamics and droplet formation. Results for both Brayton and Stirling power cycles have identified favorable mass and size comparisons of the LDR with conventional radiator concepts.

  18. 75 FR 42460 - Minor Boundary Revision at Lewis and Clark National Historical Park

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... National Park Service Minor Boundary Revision at Lewis and Clark National Historical Park AGENCY: National..., pursuant to 16 U.S.C. 460l- (9)(c)(1), the boundary of Lewis and Clark National Historical Park is modified... boundary of the Sunset Beach portion of Lewis and Clark National Historical Park. The boundary revision...

  19. [Effects of ethanol on metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in male mice with different social states].

    PubMed

    Il'nitskaia, S I; Nikolin, V P; Popova, N A; Avgustinovich, D F; Kaledin, V I; Kudriavtseva, N N

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of ethanol on experimental metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in male mice in positive or negative emotional states. Sensory contact model was used for generating animals with repeated experience of social victories or defeats. Tumor cells were injected into the tail vein after 20 days of agonistic interactions, and the number of metastases in the lung was calculated 16 days later. Group-housed mice were used as the controls. Mice of all experimental groups were chronically treated with ethanol (20%, 2 ml/kg of weight, i.p.) and saline during 7 days starting with the day of tumor cells injections. The experimental metastasis was shown to develop differently in mice with opposing social experience: saline-treated winners had significantly less metastases in the lung than the saline-treated losers. Chronic ethanol injections decreased the number of metastases in the losers, increased it in the winners and did not affect the controls. The results obtained indicate that effects if ethanol on Lewis lung carcinoma metastasis depend on psychoemotional status in male mice. PMID:19323446

  20. User manual for NASA Lewis 10 by 10 foot supersonic wind tunnel. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, Ronald H.

    1995-01-01

    This manual describes the 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Lewis Research Center and provides information for users who wish to conduct experiments in this facility. Tunnel performance operating envelopes of altitude, dynamic pressure, Reynolds number, total pressure, and total temperature as a function of test section Mach number are presented. Operating envelopes are shown for both the aerodynamic (closed) cycle and the propulsion (open) cycle. The tunnel test section Mach number range is 2.0 to 3.5. General support systems, such as air systems, hydraulic system, hydrogen system, fuel system, and Schlieren system, are described. Instrumentation and data processing and acquisition systems are also described. Pretest meeting formats and schedules are outlined. Tunnel user responsibility and personnel safety are also discussed.

  1. NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, Ronald H.

    1993-01-01

    The 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) at Lewis Research Center is available for use by qualified researchers. This manual contains tunnel performance maps which show the range of total temperature, total pressure, static pressure, dynamic pressure, altitude, Reynolds number, and mass flow as a function of test section Mach number. These maps are applicable for both the aerodynamic and propulsion cycle. The 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel is an atmospheric facility with a test section Mach number range from 0.36 to 2.0. General support systems (air systems, hydraulic system, hydrogen system, infrared system, laser system, laser sheet system, and schlieren system are also described as are instrumentation and data processing and acquisition systems. Pretest meeting formats are outlined. Tunnel user responsibility and personal safety requirements are also stated.

  2. Impairment of script comprehension in Lewy body spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Gross, Rachel G; Camp, Emily; McMillan, Corey T; Dreyfuss, Michael; Gunawardena, Delani; Cook, Philip A; Morgan, Brianna; Siderowf, Andrew; Hurtig, Howard I; Stern, Matthew B; Grossman, Murray

    2013-06-01

    A disabling impairment of higher-order language function can be seen in patients with Lewy body spectrum disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). We focus on script comprehension in patients with Lewy body spectrum disorders. While scripts unfold sequentially, constituent events are thought to contain an internal organization. Executive dysfunction in patients with Lewy body spectrum disorders may interfere with comprehension of this internal structure. We examined 42 patients (30 non-demented PD and 12 mildly demented PDD/DLB patients) and 12 healthy seniors. We presented 22 scripts (e.g., "going fishing"), each consisting of six events. Pilot data from young controls provided the basis for organizing associated events into clusters and arranging them hierarchically into scripts. We measured accuracy and latency to judge the order of adjacent events in the same cluster versus adjacent events in different clusters. PDD/DLB patients were less accurate in their ordering judgments than PD patients and controls. Healthy seniors and PD patients were significantly faster to judge correctly the order of highly associated within-cluster event pairs relative to less closely associated different-cluster event pairs, while PDD/DLB patients did not consistently distinguish between these event-pair types. This relative insensitivity to the clustered-hierarchical organization of events was related to executive impairment and to frontal atrophy as measured by volumetric MRI. These findings extend prior work on script processing to patients with Lewy body spectrum disorders and highlight the potential impact of frontal/executive dysfunction on the daily lives of affected patients. PMID:23566691

  3. Microgravity noncontact temperature requirements at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G.

    1989-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is currently supporting 66 microgravity science and applications projects. The 66 projects are separated into 23 flight projects and 43 ground-based projects. The part of the NASA Lewis program dealing with flight experiments is divided into six areas: Combustion Science, Materials Science, Fluid Physics, Instrumentation/Equipment, Advanced Technology Development, and Space Station Multi-User Facility studies. The part of the NASA Lewis program dealing with ground-based experiments is coincidentally also divided into six areas: Electronic Materials, Combustion Science, Fluid Dynamics and Transport Phenomena, Metals and Alloys, Glasses and Ceramics, and Physics and Chemistry Experiments. Several purposes exist for ground-based experimenting. Preliminary information is necessary before a decision can be made for flight status, the short low gravity durations available in ground facilities are adequate for a particular study, or extensive ground-based research must be conducted to define and support the microgravity science endeavors contemplated for space. Not all of the 66 microgravity science and application projects at NASA Lewis have temperature requirements, but most do. Since space allocation does not permit a review of all the pertinent projects, a decision was made to restrict the coverage to the science flight projects, flight projects minus the advanced technology development, and multiuser facility efforts. Very little is lost by this decision as the types of temperature requirements for science flight projects can be considered representative of those for the ground-based projects. The noncontact temperature needs at NASA Lewis, as represented by the science flight projects are discussed by describing briefly the experiments themselves, by displaying an illustration of each experimental setup, and by specifying their temperature requisites.

  4. The brainstem pathologies of Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Seidel; Josefine, Mahlke; Siswanto, Sonny; Reijko, Krüger; Helmut, Heinsen; Georg, Auburger; Mohamed, Bouzrou; Grinberg, LT; Helmut, Wicht; Horst-Werner, Korf; Wilfred, den Dunnen; Udo, Rüb

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are among the human synucleinopathies, which share the neuropathological features of alpha-synuclein immunoreactive neuronal and/or glial aggregations, as well as progressive neuronal loss in select brain regions (e.g. dopaminergic substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, cholinergic pedunculopontine nucleus). Despite a number of studies about brainstem pathologies in PD and DLB, there is currently no detailed information available regarding the presence of alpha-synuclein immunoreactive inclusions (a) in the cranial nerve, precerebellar, vestibular and oculomotor brainstem nuclei and (b) in brainstem fiber tracts and oligodendroctyes. Therefore, we performed a detailed analysis of the alpha-synuclein immunoreactive inclusion pathologies in the brainstem nuclei (Lewy bodies, LB; Lewy neurites, LN; coiled bodies, CB) and fiber tracts (LN, CB) of clinically diagnosed and neuropathologically confirmed PD and DLB patients. As also reported in previous studies, LB and LN were most prevalent in the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, pedunculopontine and raphe nuclei, periaqueductal gray, locus coeruleus, parabrachial nuclei, reticular formation, prepositus hypoglossal, dorsal motor vagal, and solitary nuclei. However, we for the first time demonstrated LB and LN in all cranial nerve nuclei, premotor oculomotor, precerebellar and vestibular brainstem nuclei, as well as LN in all brainstem fiber tracts. CB were present in nearly all brainstem nuclei and brainstem fiber tracts containing LB and/or LN. These novel brainstem findings can account for or contribute to a large variety of less well-explained PD and DLB symptoms (e.g. gait and postural instability, impaired balance and postural reflexes, falls, ingestive and oculomotor dysfunctions), and point to the occurrence of disturbances of intra-axonal transport processes and a transneuronal spread of the underlying pathological processes of PD and

  5. Imaging and acetylcholinesterase inhibitor response in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Boeve, Bradley F; Pedraza, Otto; Ferman, Tanis J; Przybelski, Scott; Lesnick, Timothy G; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Senjem, Matthew L; Smith, Glenn E; Knopman, David S; Lowe, Val; Jack, Clifford R; Petersen, Ronald C; Kantarci, Kejal

    2012-08-01

    Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are commonly used to treat patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. Hippocampal atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging and amyloid-β load on positron emission tomography are associated with the Alzheimer's disease-related pathology in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. To date, few studies have investigated imaging markers that predict treatment response in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. Our objective was to determine whether imaging markers of Alzheimer's disease-related pathology such as hippocampal volume, brain amyloid-β load on (11)C Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography predict treatment response to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. We performed a retrospective analysis on consecutive treatment-naive patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 54) from the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Centre who subsequently received acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and underwent magnetic resonance imaging with hippocampal volumetry. Baseline and follow-up assessments were obtained with the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale. Subjects were divided into three groups (reliable improvement, stable or reliable decline) using Dementia Rating Scale reliable change indices determined previously. Associations between hippocampal volumes and treatment response were tested with analysis of covariance adjusting for baseline Dementia Rating Scale, age, gender, magnetic resonance field strength and Dementia Rating Scale interval. Seven subjects underwent (11)C Pittsburgh compound B imaging within 12 weeks of magnetic resonance imaging. Global cortical (11)C Pittsburgh compound B retention (scaled to cerebellar retention) was calculated in these patients. Using a conservative psychometric method of assessing treatment response, there were 12 patients with reliable decline, 29 stable cases and 13 patients with reliable improvement. The improvers had significantly larger

  6. Next-generation sequencing reveals substantial genetic contribution to dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Joshua T; Ding, Jinhui; Crain, Barbara; Pletnikova, Olga; Letson, Christopher; Dawson, Ted M; Rosenthal, Liana S; Pantelyat, Alexander; Gibbs, J Raphael; Albert, Marilyn S; Hernandez, Dena G; Hillis, Argye E; Stone, David J; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John A; Troncoso, Juan C; Scholz, Sonja W

    2016-10-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Although an increasing number of genetic factors have been connected to this debilitating condition, the proportion of cases that can be attributed to distinct genetic defects is unknown. To provide a comprehensive analysis of the frequency and spectrum of pathogenic missense mutations and coding risk variants in nine genes previously implicated in DLB, we performed exome sequencing in 111 pathologically confirmed DLB patients. All patients were Caucasian individuals from North America. Allele frequencies of identified missense mutations were compared to 222 control exomes. Remarkably, ~25% of cases were found to carry a pathogenic mutation or risk variant in APP, GBA or PSEN1, highlighting that genetic defects play a central role in the pathogenesis of this common neurodegenerative disorder. In total, 13% of our cohort carried a pathogenic mutation in GBA, 10% of cases carried a risk variant or mutation in PSEN1, and 2% were found to carry an APP mutation. The APOE ε4 risk allele was significantly overrepresented in DLB patients (p-value <0.001). Our results conclusively show that mutations in GBA, PSEN1, and APP are common in DLB and consideration should be given to offer genetic testing to patients diagnosed with Lewy body dementia. PMID:27312774

  7. Microfluidic studies of CO2 sequestration by frustrated Lewis pairs.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Dan; Abolhasani, Milad; Choueiri, Rachelle; Lestari, Gabriella; Seiler, Caroline; Menard, Gabriel; Greener, Jesse; Guenther, Axel; Stephan, Douglas W; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2014-03-12

    Frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) comprising sterically hindered Lewis acids and bases offer the capability to reversibly capture CO2 under mild reaction conditions. The determination of equilibrium constants and thermodynamic properties of these reactions should enable assessment of the efficiency of a particular FLP system for CO2 sequestration and provide insights for design of new, efficient formulations of FLP catalysts for CO2 capture. We have developed a microfluidic approach to studies of FLP-CO2 reactions, which provides their thermodynamic characterization that is not accessible otherwise. The approach enables the determination of the equilibrium reaction constants at different temperatures, the enthalpy, the entropy, and the Gibbs energy of these reactions, as well as the enhancement factor. The microfluidic methodology has been validated by applying it to the well-characterized reaction of CO2 with a secondary amine. The microfluidic approach can be applied for fundamental thermodynamic studies of other gas-liquid reactions. PMID:24555752

  8. Familial Dementia With Lewy Bodies With an Atypical Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Lauren T.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Cherrier, Monique M.; Eugenio, Charisma J.; Du, Jennifer Q.; Steinbart, Ellen J.; Limprasert, Pornprot; La Spada, Albert R.; Seltzer, Benjamin; Bird, Thomas D.; Leverenz, James B.

    2006-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 64-year-old male with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) pathology at autopsy who did not manifest the core symptoms of DLB until very late in his clinical course. His initial presentation of early executive and language dysfunction suggested a cortical dementia similar to frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Core symptoms of DLB including dementia, hallucination, and parkinsonian symptoms were not apparent until late in the course of his illness. Autopsy revealed both brainstem and cortical Lewy bodies and AD pathology. Family history revealed 7 relatives with a history of dementia including 4 with possible or probable DLB. This case is unique because of the FTLD-like presentation, positive family history of dementia, and autopsy confirmation of DLB. PMID:12641375

  9. Engines and innovation: Lewis Laboratory and American propulsion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Virginia Parker

    1991-01-01

    This book is an institutional history of the NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio, from 1940, when Congress authorized funding for a third laboratory for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, through the 1980s. The history of the laboratory is discussed in relation to the development of American propulsion technology, with particular focus on the transition in the 1940s from the use of piston engines in airplanes to jet propulsion and that from air-breathing engines to rocket technology when the National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958. The personalities and research philosophies of the people who shaped the history of the laboratory are discussed, as is the relationship of Lewis Research Center to the Case Institute of Technology.

  10. Review of recent thermophotovoltaic (TPV) research at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Wilt, David M.; Lowe, Roland A.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Hoffman, Richard H.; Scheiman, David

    1996-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) research at NASA Lewis Research Center that began in the late 1980's is reviewed. This work has been concentrated on low bandgap indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) PV cells and rare earth yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) thin film selective emitters, as well as, TPV system studies. An emittance theory has been developed for the thin film emitters. Experimental spectral emittance results for erbium Er-YAG and holmium Ho-YAG show excellent emittance (greater than or equal to .7) within the emission bands. The .75 eV InGaAs PV cells fabricated at Lewis have excellent quantum efficiency. An efficiency of 13% has been measured for this cell coupled to an Er-YAG selective emitter and a short pass IR filter.

  11. Review of Recent Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) Research at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Wilt, David M.; Lowe, Roland A.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Hoffman, Richard H.; Scheiman, David

    1995-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) research at NASA Lewis Research Center that began in the late 1980's is reviewed. This work has been concentrated on low bandgap indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) PV calls and rare earth - yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) thin film selective emitters, as well as, TPV system studies. An emittance theory has been developed for the thin film emitters. Experimental spectral emittance results for erbium Er-YAG and holmium Ho-YAG show excellent emittance (greater than or equal to 0.7) within the emission bands. The 0.75 eV InGaAs PV cells fabricated at Lewis have excellent quantum efficiency. An efficiency of 130% has been measured for this cell coupled to an Er-YAG selective emitter and a short pass IR filter.

  12. The organization of narrative discourse in Lewy body spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Ash, Sharon; McMillan, Corey; Gross, Rachel G; Cook, Philip; Morgan, Brianna; Boller, Ashley; Dreyfuss, Michael; Siderowf, Andrew; Grossman, Murray

    2011-10-01

    Narrative discourse is an essential component of day-to-day communication, but little is known about narrative in Lewy body spectrum disorder (LBSD), including Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). We performed a detailed analysis of a semi-structured speech sample in 32 non-aphasic patients with LBSD, and we related their narrative impairments to gray matter (GM) atrophy using voxel-based morphometry. We found that patients with PDD and DLB have significant difficulty organizing their narrative speech. This was correlated with deficits on measures of executive functioning and speech fluency. Regression analyses associated this deficit with reduced cortical volume in inferior frontal and anterior cingulate regions. These findings are consistent with a model of narrative discourse that includes executive as well as language components and with an impairment of the organizational component of narrative discourse in patients with PDD and DLB. PMID:21689852

  13. The Organization of Narrative Discourse in Lewy Body Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Sharon; McMillan, Corey; Gross, Rachel G.; Cook, Philip; Morgan, Brianna; Boller, Ashley; Dreyfuss, Michael; Siderowf, Andrew; Grossman, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Narrative discourse is an essential component of day-to-day communication, but little is known about narrative in Lewy Body spectrum disorder (LBSD), including Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). We performed a detailed analysis of a semi-structured speech sample in 32 non-aphasic patients with LBSD, and we related their narrative impairments to gray matter (GM) atrophy using voxel-based morphometry. We found that patients with PDD and DLB have significant difficulty organizing their narrative speech. This was correlated with deficits on measures of executive functioning and speech fluency. Regression analyses associated this deficit with reduced cortical volume in inferior frontal and anterior cingulate regions. These findings are consistent with a model of narrative discourse that includes executive as well as language components and with an impairment of the organizational component of narrative discourse in patients with PDD and DLB. PMID:21689852

  14. Diamond like carbon coatings: Categorization by atomic number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, John C.

    1986-01-01

    Dense diamond-like hydrocarbon films grown at the NASA Lewis Research Center by radio frequency self bias discharge and by direct ion beam deposition were studied. A new method for categorizing hydrocarbons based on their atomic number density and elemental composition was developed and applied to the diamond-like hydrocarbon films. It was shown that the diamond-like hydrocarbon films are an entirely new class of hydrocarbons with atomic number densities lying between those of single crystal diamond and adamantanes. In addition, a major review article on these new materials was completed in cooperation with NASA Lewis Research Center personnel.

  15. A Comparison of Lead Abatement Technologies at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeziorowski, Luz Y.; Calla, Joanne

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, Lewis participated in a pilot test of Lead Specifications. The Specifications were sponsored by the Center to Protect Worker's Rights (CPWR). Entitled "Model Specifications for the Protection of Worker's from Lead on Steel Structures", one aspect of this endeavor was to test and compare several lead abatement technologies. The project overview, objectives, team, and requirements as well as abatement methods and materials are outlined.

  16. Ion Thruster Development at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Hamley, John A.; Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent ion propulsion technology efforts at NASA's Lewis Research Center including development of kW-class xenon ion thrusters, high power xenon and krypton ion thrusters, and power processors are reviewed. Thruster physical characteristics, performance data, life projections, and power processor component technology are summarized. The ion propulsion technology program is structured to address a broad set of mission applications from satellite stationkeeping and repositioning to primary propulsion using solar or nuclear power systems.

  17. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This bibliography contains abstracts of the technical reports that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1988. Subject, author, and corporate source indexes are also included. All the publications were announced in the 1988 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  18. Chemical Inventory Management at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Shirley S.; Homan, Joseph R.; Bajorek, Michael J.; Dominguez, Manuel B.; Smith, Vanessa L.

    1997-01-01

    The Chemical Management System (CMS) is a client/server application developed with Power Builder and Sybase for the Lewis Research Center (LeRC). Power Builder is a client-server application development tool, Sybase is a Relational Database Management System. The entire LeRC community can access the CMS from any desktop environment. The multiple functions and benefits of the CMS are addressed.

  19. Update to the NASA Lewis Ice Accretion Code LEWICE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.

    1994-01-01

    This report is intended as an update to NASA CR-185129 'User's Manual for the NASA Lewis Ice Accretion Prediction Code (LEWICE).' It describes modifications and improvements made to this code as well as changes to the input and output files, interactive input, and graphics output. The comparison of this code to experimental data is shown to have improved as a result of these modifications.

  20. Lewis Structures Technology, 1988. Volume 1: Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The specific purpose of the symposium was to familiarize the engineering structures community with the depth and range of research performed by the Structures Division of the Lewis Research Center and its academic and industrial partners. Sessions covered vibration control, fracture mechanics, ceramic component reliability, parallel computing, nondestructive testing, dynamical systems, fatigue and damage, wind turbines, hot section technology, structural mechanics codes, computational methods for dynamics, structural optimization, and applications of structural dynamics.

  1. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1985. All the publications were announced in the 1985 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  2. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1993. All the publications were announced in the 1993 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  3. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1984. All the publications were announced in the 1984 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  4. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1981 are indexed and abstracted. All the publications were announced in the 1981 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patent applications, and theses. A total of 384 technical publications is listed.

  5. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1986. All the publications were announced in the 1986 issues of Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR) and/or International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  6. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1992. All the publications were announced in the 1992 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  7. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1989. All the publications were announced in the 1989 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  8. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1990. All the publications were announced in the 1990 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  9. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes over 780 technical reports resulting from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1977. All the publications were announced in the 1977 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Documents cited include research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  10. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1987. All the publications were announced in the 1987 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.