Science.gov

Sample records for lhc commissioning tests

  1. Commissioning the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector

    SciTech Connect

    Millet, F.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Perin, A.; Riddone, G.; Serio, L.; Soubiran, M.; Tavian, L.; Ronayette, L.; Rabehl, R.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The LHC machine, composed of eight sectors with superconducting magnets and accelerating cavities, requires a complex cryogenic system providing high cooling capacities (18 kW equivalent at 4.5 K and 2.4 W at 1.8 K per sector produced in large cold boxes and distributed via 3.3-km cryogenic transfer lines). After individual reception tests of the cryogenic subsystems (cryogen storages, refrigerators, cryogenic transfer lines and distribution boxes) performed since 2000, the commissioning of the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector has been under way since November 2006. After a brief introduction to the LHC cryogenic system and its specificities, the commissioning is reported detailing the preparation phase (pressure and leak tests, circuit conditioning and flushing), the cool-down sequences including the handling of cryogenic fluids, the magnet powering phase and finally the warm-up. Preliminary conclusions on the commissioning of the first LHC sector will be drawn with the review of the critical points already solved or still pending. The last part of the paper reports on the first operational experience of the LHC cryogenic system in the perspective of the commissioning of the remaining LHC sectors and the beam injection test.

  2. Commissioning of the cryogenics of the LHC long straight sections

    SciTech Connect

    Perin, A.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Claudet, S.; Darve, C.; Ferlin, G.; Millet, F.; Parente, C.; Rabehl, R.; Soubiran, M.; van Weelderen, R.; Wagner, U.; /CERN

    2010-01-01

    The LHC is made of eight circular arcs interspaced with eight Long Straight Sections (LSS). Most powering interfaces to the LHC are located in these sections where the particle beams are focused and shaped for collision, cleaning and acceleration. The LSSs are constituted of several unique cryogenic devices and systems like electrical feed-boxes, standalone superconducting magnets, superconducting links, RF cavities and final focusing superconducting magnets. This paper presents the cryogenic commissioning and the main results obtained during the first operation of the LHC Long Straight Sections.

  3. ATLAS LAr calorimeter performance and LHC Run-2 commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spettel, Fabian

    2016-07-01

    The ATLAS detector was built to study proton-proton collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center of mass energy of up to 14 TeV. The Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry as well as the hadronic calorimetry in the endcap and forward regions. They have shown excellent performance during the first LHC data taking campaign, from 2010 to 2012, so-called Run 1, at a peak luminosity of 8 ×1033cm-2s-1. During the next run, peak luminosities of 1.5 ×1034cm-2s-1 and even higher are expected at a 25 ns bunch spacing. Such a high collision rate may have an impact on the quality of the energy reconstruction which is attempted to be maintained at a high level using a calibration procedure described in this contribution. It also poses major challenges to the first level of the trigger system which is constrained to a maximal rate of 100 kHz. For Run-3, scheduled to start in 2019, instantaneous luminosity as high as 3 ×1034cm-2s-1 are foreseen imposing an upgrade of the LAr trigger system to maintain its performance. A demonstrator containing prototypes of the upgraded trigger electronic architecture has been installed on one of the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter readout front end crates to test it during the Run-2 campaign. The new architecture and its benefits for data taking will be discussed below as well as the results from first beam splash events.

  4. Commissioning and Initial LHC Run-2 operation of the ATLAS minimum bias trigger scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, M.

    2016-07-01

    The Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators (MBTS) are sub-detectors in ATLAS delivering the primary trigger for selecting events from low luminosity proton-proton, lead-lead and lead-proton collisions with the smallest possible bias. The MBTS have undergone a complete replacement before LHC Run-2 and several improvements have been implemented in the layout. Since 2014 the MBTS have been commissioned with cosmic rays and first LHC Run-2 beam splash events. We summarise the outcome of the commissioning.

  5. Design, production and first commissioning results of the electrical feedboxes of the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Perin, A.; Atieh, S.; Benda, V.; Bertarelli, A.; Bouillot, A.; Brodzinski, K.; Folch, R.; Fydrych, J.; Genet, M.; Koczorowski, S.; Metral, L.; /CERN /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab /CERN /Serpukhov, IHEP /CERN /Serpukhov, IHEP

    2007-12-01

    A total of 44 CERN designed cryogenic electrical feedboxes are needed to power the LHC superconducting magnets. The feedboxes include more than 1000 superconducting circuits fed by high temperature superconductor and conventional current leads ranging from 120 A to 13 kA. In addition to providing the electrical current to the superconducting circuits, they also ensure specific mechanical and cryogenic functions for the LHC. The paper focuses on the main design aspects and related production operations and gives an overview of specific technologies employed. Results of the commissioning of the feedboxes of the first LHC sectors are presented.

  6. Preparation and commissioning of LHCb for the Run II of LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, A.

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb experiment has performed very well during the Run I of the LHC, producing a large number of relevant physics results on a wide range of topics. The preparation and commissioning of the LHCb experiment for Run II is discussed here, with special emphasis on the changes in the trigger strategy and the addition of a new sub-detector to improve the physics reach of the experiment. An overview of the commissioning with the first collisions delivered by the LHC is also included.

  7. Machine Studies During Beam Commissioning of the SPS-to-LHC Transfer Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Meddahi, M.; Agapov, I.; Fuchsberger, K.; Goddard, B.; Herr, W.; Kain, V.; Mertens, V.; Missiaen, D.; Risselada, T.; Uythoven, J.; Wenninger, J.; /CERN /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    Through May to September 2008, further beam commissioning of the SPS-to-LHC transfer lines was performed. For the first time, optics and dispersion measurements were also taken in the last part of the lines, and into the LHC. Extensive trajectory and optics studies were conducted, in parallel with hardware checks. In particular dispersion measurements and their comparison with the beam line model were analysed in detail and led to propose the addition of a dispersion-free steering algorithm in the existing trajectory correction program. Its effectiveness was simulated and is briefly discussed.

  8. Validation and performance of the LHC cryogenic system through commissioning of the first sector

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, L.; Bouillot, A.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Chakravarty, A.; Claudet, S.; Gicquel, F.; Gomes, P.; Kumar, M.; Kush, P.K.; Millet, F.; Perin, A.; /CERN /Fermilab /Tata Inst. /CERN

    2007-12-01

    The cryogenic system [1] for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator is presently in its final phase of commissioning at nominal operating conditions. The refrigeration capacity for the LHC is produced using eight large cryogenic plants and eight 1.8 K refrigeration units installed on five cryogenic islands. Machine cryogenic equipment is installed in a 26.7-km circumference ring deep underground tunnel and are maintained at their nominal operating conditions via a distribution system consisting of transfer lines, cold interconnection boxes at each cryogenic island and a cryogenic distribution line. The functional analysis of the whole system during all operating conditions was established and validated during the first sector commissioning in order to maximize the system availability. Analysis, operating modes, main failure scenarios, results and performance of the cryogenic system are presented.

  9. Commissioning of the LHC Low Level RF System Remote Configuration Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Van Winkle, Daniel; Fox, John; Mastorides, Themis; Rivetta, Claudio; Baudrenghien, Philippe; Butterworth, Andrew; Molendijk, John; /CERN

    2010-08-26

    The LHC Low Level RF system (LLRF) is a complex multi-loop system used to regulate the superconductive cavity gap voltage as well as to reduce the impedance presented by RF stations to the beam. The RF system can have a profound impact on the stability of the beam; a mis-configured RF system has the potential of causing longitudinal instabilities, beam diffusion and beam loss. To configure the RF station for operation, a set of parameters in the LLRF multi-loop system have to be defined. Initial system commissioning as well as ongoing operation requires a consistent method of computer based remote measurement and model-based design of each RF station feedback system. This paper describes the suite of Matlab tools used for configuring the LHC RF system during the start up in Nov2009-Feb2010. We present a brief overview of the tool, examples of commissioning results, and basics of the model-based design algorithms. This work complements our previous presentation, where the algorithms and methodology followed in the tools were described.

  10. LARP LHC 4.8 GHZ Schottky System Initial Commissioning with Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Jansson, Andreas; Jones, O.Rhodri; Caspers, Fritz; /CERN

    2011-03-18

    The LHC Schottky system consists for four independent 4.8 GHz triple down conversion receivers with associated data acquisition systems. Each system is capable of measuring tune, chromaticity, momentum spread in either horizontal or vertical planes; two systems per beam. The hardware commissioning has taken place from spring through fall of 2010. With nominal bunch beam currents of 10{sup 11} protons, the first incoherent Schottky signals were detected and analyzed. This paper will report on these initial commissioning results. A companion paper will report on the data analysis curve fitting and remote control user interface of the system. The Schottky system for the LHC was proposed in 2004 under the auspices of the LARP collaboration. Similar systems were commissioned in 2003 in the Fermilab Tevatron and Recycler accelerators as a means of measuring tunes noninvasively. The Schottky detector is based on the stochastic cooling pickups that were developed for the Fermilab Antiproton Source Debuncher cooling upgrade completed in 2002. These slotted line waveguide pickups have the advantage of large aperture coupled with high beam coupling characteristics. For stochastic cooling, wide bandwidths are integral to cooling performance. The bandwidth of slotted waveguide pickups can be tailored by choosing the length of the pickup and slot spacing. The Debuncher project covered the 4-8 GHz band with eight bands of pickups, each with approximately 500 MHz of bandwidth. For use as a Schottky detector, bandwidths of 100-200 MHz are required for gating, resulting in higher transfer impedance than those used for stochastic cooling. Details of hardware functionality are reported previously.

  11. Commissioning of the Ground Test Accelerator RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Brown, S.; Connolly, R.; Garnett, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Little, C.; Lohson, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Saadatmand, K.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1992-09-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H{sup {minus}} beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The commissioning stages are the 35 key H{sup {minus}} injector, the 2.5 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), the Intertank Matching Section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2{beta}{gamma} Drift Tube Linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7 MeV 2{beta}{gamma} DTL (modules 1--5), and the 24 MeV GTA; all 10 DTL modules. Commissioning results from the RFQ beam experiments will be presented along with comparisons to simulations.

  12. Commissioning of the Ground Test Accelerator RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Brown, S.; Connolly, R.; Garnett, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Little, C.; Lohson, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Saadatmand, K.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1992-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H{sup {minus}} beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The commissioning stages are the 35 key H{sup {minus}} injector, the 2.5 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), the Intertank Matching Section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2{beta}{gamma} Drift Tube Linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7 MeV 2{beta}{gamma} DTL (modules 1--5), and the 24 MeV GTA; all 10 DTL modules. Commissioning results from the RFQ beam experiments will be presented along with comparisons to simulations.

  13. MINER{nu}A Test Beam Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Higuera, A.; Castorena, J.; Urrutia, Z.; Felix, J.; Zavala, G.

    2009-12-17

    MINER{nu}A Main INjector ExpeRiment {nu}-A is a high-statistic neutrino scattering experiment that will ran in the NuMI Beam Hall at Fermilab. To calibrate the energy response of the MINER{nu}A detector, a beamline is being designed for the MINER{nu}A Test Beam Detector (TBD). The TBD is a replica of the full MINER{nu}A detector at small scale for calibration studies of the main detector. The beamline design consists of the following parts: a copper target, used to generate tertiaries from an incoming secondary beam; a steel collimator for tertiaries, which also serves as a dump for the incoming beam; a time of fight system (scintillator planes); four wire chambers, for angle measurements and tracking; and two dipole magnets, used as an spectrometer. During last October, the first commissioning run of the MINER{nu}A Test Beam took place in the Meson Test Beam Facility at Fermilab. We commissioned the target and collimator of the new tertiary beamline.

  14. Commissioning of the upgraded ATLAS Pixel Detector for Run2 at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobos, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long showdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to the surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer, a fourth layer of pixel detectors, installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. An overview of the refurbishing of the Pixel Detector and of the IBL project as well as early performance tests using cosmic rays and beam data will be presented.

  15. Testing the Muon g-2 Anomaly at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, Ayres; Lykken, Joseph; Kell, Stefan; Westhoff, Susanne

    2014-05-29

    The long-standing difference between the experimental measurement and the standard-model prediction for the muon's anomalous magnetic moment, $a_{\\mu} = (g_{\\mu}-2)/2$, may be explained by the presence of new weakly interacting particles with masses of a few 100 GeV. Particles of this kind can generally be directly produced at the LHC, and thus they may already be constrained by existing data. In this work, we investigate this connection between $a_{\\mu}$ and the LHC in a model-independent approach, by introducing one or two new fields beyond the standard model with spin and weak isospin up to one. For each case, we identify the preferred parameter space for explaining the discrepancy of a_mu and derive bounds using data from LEP and the 8-TeV LHC run. Furthermore, we estimate how these limits could be improved with the 14-TeV LHC. We find that the 8-TeV results already rule out a subset of our simplified models, while almost all viable scenarios can be tested conclusively with 14-TeV data.

  16. Testing the Muon g-2 Anomaly at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Freitas, Ayres; Lykken, Joseph; Kell, Stefan; Westhoff, Susanne

    2014-05-29

    The long-standing difference between the experimental measurement and the standard-model prediction for the muon's anomalous magnetic moment,more » $$a_{\\mu} = (g_{\\mu}-2)/2$$, may be explained by the presence of new weakly interacting particles with masses of a few 100 GeV. Particles of this kind can generally be directly produced at the LHC, and thus they may already be constrained by existing data. In this work, we investigate this connection between $$a_{\\mu}$$ and the LHC in a model-independent approach, by introducing one or two new fields beyond the standard model with spin and weak isospin up to one. For each case, we identify the preferred parameter space for explaining the discrepancy of a_mu and derive bounds using data from LEP and the 8-TeV LHC run. Furthermore, we estimate how these limits could be improved with the 14-TeV LHC. We find that the 8-TeV results already rule out a subset of our simplified models, while almost all viable scenarios can be tested conclusively with 14-TeV data.« less

  17. Test results of LHC interaction regions quadrupoles produced by Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Chichili, D.R.; Feher, S.; Kerby, J.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, A.; Nicol, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Orris, D.; Page, T.; Peterson, T.; Rabehl, R.; Robotham, W.; Scanlan, R.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Strait, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Velev, G.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    The US-LHC Accelerator Project is responsible for the production of the Q2 optical elements of the final focus triplets in the LHC interaction regions. As part of this program Fermilab is in the process of manufacturing and testing cryostat assemblies (LQXB) containing two identical quadrupoles (MQXB) with a dipole corrector between them. The 5.5 m long Fermilab designed MQXB have a 70 mm aperture and operate in superfluid helium at 1.9 K with a peak field gradient of 215 T/m. This paper summarizes the test results of several production MQXB quadrupoles with emphasis on quench performance and alignment studies. Quench localization studies using quench antenna signals are also presented.

  18. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchmann, B.; Baer, T.; Bednarek, M.; Bellodi, G.; Bracco, C.; Bruce, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chetvertkova, V.; Dehning, B.; Granieri, P. P.; Hofle, W.; Holzer, E. B.; Lechner, A.; Nebot Del Busto, E.; Priebe, A.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Sapinski, M.; Schmidt, R.; Shetty, N.; Skordis, E.; Solfaroli, M.; Steckert, J.; Valuch, D.; Verweij, A.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    2015-06-01

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam-induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy deposition in the coils is compared to the quench levels predicted by electrothermal models, thus allowing one to validate and improve the models which are used to set beam-dump thresholds on beam-loss monitors for run 2.

  19. Testing the OPERA Superluminal Neutrino Anomaly at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2012-03-15

    The OPERA collaboration has reported the observation of superluminal muon neutrinos, whose speed v{sub {nu}} exceeds that of light c, with (v{sub {nu}}-c)/c {approx_equal} 2.5 x 10{sup -5}. In a recent work, Cohen and Glashow (CG) have refuted this claim by noting that such neutrinos will lose energy, by pair-emission of particles, at unacceptable rates. Following the CG arguments, we point out that pair-emissions consistent with the OPERA anomaly can lead to detectable signals for neutrinos originating from decays of highly boosted top quarks at the LHC, allowing an independent test of the superluminal neutrino hypothesis.

  20. A Cryogenic test stand for LHC quadrupole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Rabehl et al.

    2004-03-09

    A new test stand for testing LHC interaction region (IR) quadrupole magnets at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has been designed and operated. The test stand uses a double bath system with a lambda plate to provide the magnet with a stagnant bath of pressurized He II at 1.9 K and 0.13 MPa. A cryostated magnet 0.91 m in diameter and up to 13 m in length can be accommodated. This paper describes the system design and operation. Issues related to both 4.5 K and 1.9 K operations and magnet quenching are highlighted. An overview of the data acquisition and cryogenics controls systems is also included.

  1. Report of the Commission on Tests: II. Briefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, New York, NY.

    The second volume of the Commission on Tests' report contains the briefs submitted by individual members for the consideration of the full Commission. These briefs, which argued for 46 proposed recommendations, formed the basis for the recommendations made in the first volume. Each brief is accompanied by a record of the endorsements, comments,…

  2. TEST RESULTS FOR LHC INSERTION REGION DEPOLE MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    MURATORE, J.; JAIN, A.; ANERELLA, M.; COSSOLINO, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has made 20 insertion region dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. These 9.45 m-long, 8 cm aperture magnets have the same coil design as the arc dipoles now operating in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL and are of single aperture, twin aperture, and double cold mass configurations. They are required to produce fields up to 4.14 T for operation at 7.56 TeV. Eighteen of these magnets have been tested at 4.5 K using either forced flow supercritical helium or liquid helium. The testing was especially important for the twin aperture models, whose construction was very different from the RHIC dipoles, except for the coil design. This paper reports on the results of these tests, including spontaneous quench performance, verification of quench protection heater operation, and magnetic field quality.

  3. SUMMARY OF COUPLING AND TUNE FEEDBACK RESULTS DURING RHIC RUN 6, AND POSSIBLE IMPLICATIONS FOR LHC COMMISSIONING.

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON, P.; DELLAPENNA, A.; HOFF, L.; LUO, Y.; MARUSIC, A.; PTITSYN, V.; SCHULTHEISS, C.

    2006-06-26

    Early efforts [1] to implement tune feedback during the acceleration ramp in RHIC were hampered by large betatron coupling, as well as the requirement for large dynamic range. Both problems have been addressed, the first by implementation of continuous measurement of coupling, and the second by the development of an improved analog front end. With these improvements, simultaneous coupling and tune feedback were successfully implemented for acceleration ramp development during RHIC Run 6. During the course of this work it became clear that direct excitation of the betatron resonances by high harmonics of the 60Hz power frequency was an obstacle to making the system fully operational. They report here on these results from RHIC Run 6, and implications for LHC commissioning.

  4. Summary of coupling and tune feedback results during RHIC run 6, and possible implications for LHC commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, P.; DellaPenna, A.; Hoff, L.T.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Gasior, M.; Jones, O.R.; Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Early efforts to implement tune feedback during the acceleration ramp in RHIC were hampered by large betatron coupling, as well as the requirement for large dynamic range. Both problems have been addressed, the first by implementation of continuous measurement of coupling, and the second by the development of an improved analog front end. With these improvements, simultaneous coupling and tune feedback were successfully implemented for acceleration ramp development during RHIC Run 6. During the course of this work it became clear that direct excitation of the betatron resonances by high harmonics of the 60Hz power frequency was an obstacle to making the system fully operational. We report here on these results from RHIC Run 6, and implications for LHC commissioning.

  5. Design and prototyping of HL-LHC double quarter wave crab cavities for SPS test

    SciTech Connect

    Verdu-Andres, S.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Alberty, L.; Artoos, K.; Calaga, R.; Capatina, O.; Capelli, T.; Carra, F.; Leuxe, R.; Kuder, N.; Zanoni, C.; Li, Z.; Ratti, A.

    2015-05-03

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  6. Testing the minimal direct gauge mediation at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Koichi; Ibe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.; Yokozaki, Norimi

    2014-07-01

    We reexamine the models with gauge mediation in view of the minimality and the Higgs boson mass. As a result, we arrive at a very simple model of direct gauge mediation which does not suffer from the flavor problems nor the CP problems. The minimal supersymmetric Standard Model spectrum is determined by only three parameters, the size of the effective supersymmetry breaking, the messenger scale, and the messenger number. Surprisingly, such a very simple model is not only consistent with all the current constraints but also is testable at the upgraded LHC experiments. In particular, we show that the parameter space which is consistent with the Higgs boson mass at around 126 GeV can be tested through the stable stau searches at the 14 TeV run of the LHC. The gravitino is a viable candidate for a dark matter. We also give a short discussion on a possible connection of our model to the recently discovered x-ray line signal at 3.5 keV in the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission Newton x-ray observatory data.

  7. Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope: integration testing and commissioning planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Simon; Bulau, Scott E.; Gonzales, Kerry; Hansen, Eric; Goodrich, Bret; Hubbard, Robert P.; Johansson, Eric; Liang, Chen; Kneale, Ruth A.; McBride, William; Sekulic, Predrag; Williams, Timothy R.

    2014-08-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST), formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), has been in its construction phase since 2010, anticipating the onset of the integration, test, and commissioning (IT&C) phase late in 2016, and the commencement of science verification in early 2019. In this paper we describe the planning of the Integration, Testing and Commissioning (IT&C) phase of the project.

  8. Commissioning and operation of the horizontal test apparatus at SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraff, B.; Doleans, M.; Hannah, B.; Howell, M.; Kim, S.; Neustadt, T.; Saunders, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) has built, commissioned and operated a Horizontal Test Apparatus (HTA) vessel in the Radiofrequency Test Facility (RFTF) test cave. It can be operated at 4.5 K using the independent Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF). The HTA is designed to be a single cavity version of an SNS cryomodule with the ability to demount and replace the cavity. It provides the functionality for testing a single dressed SNS medium or high beta Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) cavity. The HTA is currently being used in support of R&D for in-situ plasma processing of the cavity's inner niobium surface. The design and commissioning of the HTA at 4.5 K will be presented as well as results from operating the HTA including cool-down, warm-up and steady state operations. Results from plasma processing a warm SCRF cavity in-between cold HTA tests will also be reported.

  9. Commissioning of the Ground Test Accelerator Intertank Matching Section

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Cole, R.; Connolly, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Ingalls, W.B.; Kersteins, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1992-09-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H{sup {minus}} beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The commissioning stages are the 35 keV H{sup {minus}} injector, the 2.5 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), the Intertank Matching Section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2{beta}{gamma} Drift Tube Linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7 MeV 2{beta}{gamma} DTL (modules 1--5), and the 24 MeV GTA; all 10 DTL modules. Commissioning results from the IMS beam experiments will be presented.

  10. Commissioning of the Ground Test Accelerator Intertank Matching Section

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Cole, R.; Connolly, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Ingalls, W.B.; Kersteins, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1992-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H{sup {minus}} beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The commissioning stages are the 35 keV H{sup {minus}} injector, the 2.5 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), the Intertank Matching Section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2{beta}{gamma} Drift Tube Linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7 MeV 2{beta}{gamma} DTL (modules 1--5), and the 24 MeV GTA; all 10 DTL modules. Commissioning results from the IMS beam experiments will be presented.

  11. Commissioning of the Fresno, California, Retrofit Unoccupied Test House

    SciTech Connect

    Stecher, D.; Imm, C.

    2013-06-01

    Commissioning of instrumentation and limited short-term testing have been completed on a retrofit unoccupied test house in Fresno, California. This house is intended to be used as a laboratory in which several different methods of space conditioning distribution will be evaluated. This report provides background on the project, including specifications of the house and models used in its development, along with models to be evaluated through its operation.

  12. Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Huta, L.G.

    1995-12-01

    Building managers often find that HVAC, lighting and other systems in new buildings need adjustments and modifications. The owner, architect and contractor may mistakenly assume that all of a building`s systems--architectural, mechanical, control and electrical--function according to the design intent. Thus, energy managers can optimize their building`s performance through commissioning, a process that looks for and corrects the defects in a building` operating system or design, immediately before and after it is occupied (following construction or renovation).

  13. Testing the light dark matter scenario of the MSSM at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Junjie; He, Yangle; Shang, Liangliang; Su, Wei; Zhang, Yang

    2016-03-01

    In the light dark matter (DM) scenario of the MSSM, the DM relic density puts non-trivial requirements on the spectrum of supersymmetric particles. As a result, the direct search for multi-lepton signals at the LHC has great impact on the scenario. In this work, we concentrate on the searches for sleptons and electroweak-inos at the LHC, investigate their constraints on the light DM scenario with the 8 TeV LHC data, and also study their capability to test the scenario at the 14 TeV LHC. For this purpose, we first get the samples of the scenario by scanning the vast parameter space of the MSSM with various available constraints considered. Then for the surviving samples, we simulate the 2 l + E T miss signal from slepton pair production process and the 2 l + E T miss and 3 l + E T miss signals from chargino and neutralino associated production processes at both the 8 TeV LHC and the 14 TeV LHC. Our simulations indicate that the 8 TeV LHC data have excluded a sizable portion of the samples, and the capability of the 14 TeV LHC will be much more powerful in testing the scenario. For example, in case that no excess of the multi-lepton signals is observed at the 14 TeV LHC, most samples of the light DM scenario will be excluded, especially a lower limit on the lightest neutralino mass will be set at 42 GeV and 44 GeV with 30 fb-1 and 100 fb-1 data respectively, and this limit can be further pushed up to 55 GeV with 300 fb-1 data.

  14. Testing ATLAS Z+MET excess with LHC Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Shirai, Satoshi; Terada, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    The ATLAS collaboration reported a 3σ excess in the search of events containing on- Z dilepton, jets, and large missing momentum (MET) in the 8 TeV LHC run. Motivated by this excess, many models of new physics have been proposed. Recently, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations reported new results for similar Z+MET channels in the 13 TeV run. In this paper, we comprehensively discuss the consistency between the proposed models and the LHC results of Run 1 and Run 2. We find that in models with heavy gluino production, there is generically some tension between the 8 TeV and 13 TeV results. On the other hand, models with light squark production provide relatively better fitting to both results.

  15. Leak testing United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission type b packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WTPP) is a one of its kind research and development facility operated by the Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office. Located in southeastern New Mexico, the WTPP is designed to demonstrate the safe, permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive nuclear waste, accumulated from 40 years of nuclear weapons production. Before the waste can be disposed of, it must first be safely transported from generator storage sites to the WIPP. To accomplish this, the TRUPACT-II was designed and fabricated. This double containment, non-vented waste packaging successfully completed a rigorous testing program, and in 1989 received a Certificate of Compliance (C of C) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Currently, the TRUPACT-II is in use at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to transport waste on site for characterization. The DOE/CAO is responsible for maintaining the TRUPACT-II C of C. The C of C requires performance of nondestructive examination (NDE), e.g., visual testing (VT), dimensional inspections, Liquid Dye Penetrant testing (PT), and Helium Leak Detection (HLD). The Waste Isolation Division (WID) uses HLD for verification of the containment integrity. The following HLD tests are performed on annual basis or when required, i.e. repairs or component replacement: (1) fabrication verification leak tests on both the outer containment vessel (OCV) and the inner containment vessel (ICV); (2) assembly verification leak tests on the OCV and ICV upper main o-rings; and (3) assembly verification leak tests on the OCV and the ICV vent port plugs. These tests are addressed in detail as part of this presentation.

  16. Status of LHC crab activity simulations and beam studies

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga,R.; Assman, R.; Barranco, J.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Caspers, F.; Ciapala, E.; De-Maria, R.; Koutchouk, J. P.; Linnecar, T.; Metral, E.; Morita, A.; Solyak, N.; Sun, Y.; Tomas, R.; Tuckmantel, J.; Weiler, T.; Zimmermann, F.

    2009-05-04

    The LHC crab cavity program is advancing rapidly towards a first prototype which is anticipated to be tested during the early stages of the LHC phase I upgrade and commissioning. The general project status and some aspects related to crab optics, collimation, aperture constraints, impedances, noise effects. beam transparency and machine protection critical for a safe and robust operation of LHC beams with crab cavities are addressed here.

  17. Design, tests and commissioning of the EMMA injection septum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, K.; Clarke, J. A.; Marks, N.; Tzenov, S.

    2013-02-01

    The paper describes the main steps taken during the design and commissioning stages of the EMMA injection and extraction septum magnets. A preliminary analysis of the problem is presented first followed by a discussion of the results obtained through finite element magnetic modeling and design optimization. The measures taken to suppress the stray field generated by the magnet are discussed in detail. Two sets of tests are performed on the magnet: magnetic field measurement resulting in a three-dimensional magnetic field map and measurement of the electron beam bending angle as a function of the magnet current. The values of the effective magnetic length resulting from the two sets of measurement are found to be in excellent agreement.

  18. Vibrational measurement for commissioning SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Leibfritz, J.; Martinez, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The commissioning of two cryomodule components is underway at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. The research at this facility supports the next generation high intensity linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These components, Cryomodule No.1 (CM1) and Capture Cavity II (CC2), which contain 1.3 GHz cavities are connected in series in the beamline and through cryogenic plumbing. Studies regarding characterization of ground motion, technical and cultural noise continue. Mechanical transfer functions between the foundation and critical beamline components have been measured and overall system displacement characterized. Baseline motion measurements given initial operation of cryogenic, vacuum systems and other utilities are considered.

  19. Commissioning of the cryogenic safety test facility PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidt, C.; Schön, H.; Stamm, M.; Grohmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    The sizing of cryogenic safety relief devices requires detailed knowledge on the evolution of the pressure increase in cryostats following hazardous incidents such as the venting of the insulating vacuum with atmospheric air. Based on typical design and operating conditions in liquid helium cryostats, the new test facility PICARD, which stands for Pressure Increase in Cryostats and Analysis of Relief Devices, has been constructed. The vacuum-insulated test stand has a cryogenic liquid volume of 100 liters and a nominal design pressure of 16 bar(g). This allows a broad range of experimental conditions with cryogenic fluids. In case of helium, mass flow rates through safety valves and rupture disks up to about 4kg/s can be measured. Beside flow rate measurements under various conditions (venting diameter, insulation, working fluid, liquid level, set pressure), the test stand will be used for studies on the impact of two-phase flow and for the measurement of flow coefficients of safety devices at low temperature. This paper describes the operating range, layout and instrumentation of the test stand and presents the status of the commissioning phase.

  20. Testing the Technicolor Interpretation of CDF's Dijet Excess at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Eichten, Estia; Lane, Kenneth; Martin, Adam; Pilon, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Under the assumption that the dijet excess seen by the CDF Collaboration near 150 Gev in Wjj production is due to the lightest technipion of the low-scale technicolor process $\\rho_T \\rightarrow W \\pi_T$, we study its observability in LHC detectors with 1--20 inverse femtobarns of data. We describe interesting new kinematic tests that can provide independent confirmation of this LSTC hypothesis. We find that cuts similar to those employed by CDF, and recently by ATLAS, cannot confirm the dijet signal. We propose cuts tailored to the LSTC hypothesis and its backgrounds at the LHC that may reveal $\\rho_T \\rightarrow \\ell\

  1. Testing radiative neutrino mass models at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi; Clarke, Jackson D.; Schmidt, Michael A.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2015-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider provides us new opportunities to search for the origin of neutrino mass. Beyond the minimal see-saw models a plethora of models exist which realise neutrino mass at tree- or loop-level, and it is important to be sure that these possibilities are satisfactorily covered by searches. The purpose of this paper is to advance a systematic approach to this problem. Majorana neutrino mass models can be organised by SM-gauge-invariant operators which violate lepton number by two units. In this paper we write down the minimal ultraviolet completions for all of the mass-dimension 7 operators. We predict vector-like quarks, vector-like leptons, scalar leptoquarks, a charged scalar, a scalar doublet, and a scalar quadruplet, whose properties are constrained by neutrino oscillation data. A detailed collider study is presented for and completions with a vector-like quark and a leptoquark . The existing LHC limits extracted from searches for vector-like fermions and sbottoms/stops are m χ ≳ 620 GeV and m ϕ ≳ 600 GeV.

  2. Cryogenic test of double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC High luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, B.; Alberty, L.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Cullen, C.; Capatina, O.; Hammons, L.; Li, Z.; Marques, C.; Skaritka, J.; Verdu-Andres, S.; Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109. We report the test results of this design.

  3. 75 FR 74025 - Procedural Manual for the Election Assistance Commission's Voting System Testing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... COMMISSION Procedural Manual for the Election Assistance Commission's Voting System Testing and Certification...; publication of Voting System Testing and Certification Manual, Version 2.0, for 60 day public comment period... manual for its Voting System Testing and Certification Program. This manual sets the...

  4. Final report on the Controlled Cold Helium Spill Test in the LHC tunnel at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufay-Chanat, L.; Bremer, J.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Chorowski, M.; Grabowski, M.; Jedrusyna, A.; Lindell, G.; Nonis, M.; Koettig, T.; Vauthier, N.; van Weelderen, R.; Winkler, T.

    2015-12-01

    The 27 km circumference LHC underground tunnel is a space in which the helium cooled LHC magnets are installed. The vacuum enclosures of the superconducting magnets are protected by over-pressure safety relief devices that open whenever cold helium escapes either from the magnet cold enclosure or from the helium supply headers, into this vacuum enclosure. A 3-m long no stay zone around these devices is defined based on scale model studies, protecting the personnel against cold burns or asphyxia caused by such a helium release event. Recently, several simulation studies have been carried out modelling the propagation of the helium/air mixture, resulting from the opening of such a safety device, along the tunnel. The released helium flows vary in the range between 1 kg/s and 0.1 kg/s. To validate these different simulation studies, real life mock-up tests have been performed inside the LHC tunnel, releasing helium flow rates of 1 kg/s, 0.3 kg/s and 0.1 kg/s. For each test, up to 1000 liters of liquid helium were released under standard operational tunnel conditions. The data recorded include oxygen concentration, temperature and flow speed measurements, and video footage used to assess qualitatively the visibility. These measurements have been made in the up- and downstream directions, with respect to the air ventilation flow, of the spill point. This paper presents the experimental set-up under which these release tests were made, the effects of these releases on the atmospheric tunnel condition as a function of the release flow rate. We discuss the modification to the personnel access conditions to the LHC tunnel that are presently implemented as a result of these tests.

  5. Mechanical and Thermal Prototype Testing for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results.

  6. Testing the Technicolor Interpretation of the CDF Dijet Excess at the 8-TeV LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Eichten, Estia; Lane, Kenneth; Martin, Adam; Pilon, Eric

    2012-10-01

    Under the assumption that the dijet excess seen by the CDF Collaboration near 150 Gev in Wjj production is due to the lightest technipion of the low-scale technicolor process $\\rho_T \\rightarrow W \\pi_T$, we study its observability in LHC detectors for 8 TeV collisions and 20 inverse femtobarns of integrated luminosity. We describe interesting new kinematic tests that can provide independent confirmation of this LSTC hypothesis. We show that cuts similar to those employed by CDF, and recently by ATLAS, cannot confirm the dijet signal. We propose cuts tailored to the LSTC hypothesis and its backgrounds at the LHC that may reveal $\\rho_T \\rightarrow \\ell\

  7. Design, implementation and test of the timing trigger and control receiver for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, A.; Ameli, F.; Bocci, V.; Della Pietra, M.; Giordano, R.; Izzo, V.

    2013-02-01

    The Timing Trigger and Control (TTC) system is an optical network which distributes the timing and synchronization signals of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine to the LHC experiments. It is also used to transmit the trigger information of each experiment to the on-detector electronics. The TTC system has been designed in the late 90's, by using VLSI processes available at that time. Thus, some elements of the system are now obsolete and, in particular, only a small number of the network receivers (TTCrx) is presently available to be deployed in the LHC experiments. In this paper we describe a possible implementation of the TTCrx, which should be used to replace the TTCrx chips on the off-detector electronics, where radiation is not a concern. Our design is based on the Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGAs, and uses fabric resources and embedded high speed serial link transceivers, in order to emulate the architecture and the main features of the TTCrx. By using our approach, the receiver part of the TTC can be easily implemented in commercial FPGAs, thus resulting in a fast design implementation, a simple layout and a cost-effective solution. In this paper, we present the details of the implementation and the test results.

  8. Universality test of the charged Higgs boson couplings at the LHC and at B factories

    SciTech Connect

    Cornell, Alan S.; Deandrea, Aldo; Gaur, Naveen; Itoh, Hideo; Klasen, Michael; Okada, Yasuhiro

    2010-06-01

    Many extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of charged Higgs bosons with substantial couplings to standard model particles, which would render them observable both directly at the LHC and indirectly at B-factories. For example, the charged Higgs boson couplings to fermions in two Higgs doublet models of type II are proportional to the ratio of the two Higgs doublet vacuum expectation values (tan{beta}) and fermionic mass factors and could thus be substantial at large tan{beta} and/or for heavy fermions. In this work we perform a model-independent study of the charged Higgs boson couplings at the LHC and at B-factories for large values of tan{beta}. We have shown that at high luminosity it is possible to measure the couplings of a charged Higgs boson to the third generation of quarks up to an accuracy of 10%. We further argue that by combining the possible measurements of the LHC and the B-factories, it is possible to perform a universality test of charged Higgs boson couplings to quarks.

  9. EPOS LHC: Test of collective hadronization with data measured at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierog, T.; Karpenko, Iu.; Katzy, J. M.; Yatsenko, E.; Werner, K.

    2015-09-01

    Epos is a Monte Carlo event generator for minimum bias hadronic interactions, used for both heavy ion interactions and cosmic ray air shower simulations. Since the last public release in 2009, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments have provided a number of very interesting data sets comprising minimum bias p -p ,p -Pb, and Pb-Pb interactions. We describe the changes required to the model to reproduce in detail the new data available from the LHC and the consequences in the interpretation of these data. In particular we discuss the effect of the collective hadronization in p -p scattering. A different parametrization of flow has been introduced in the case of a small volume with high density of thermalized matter (core) reached in p -p compared to large volume produced in heavy ion collisions. Both parametrizations depend only on the geometry and the amount of secondary particles entering in the core and not on the beam mass or energy. The transition between the two flow regimes can be tested with p -Pb data. Epos LHC is able to reproduce all minimum bias results for all particles with transverse momentum from pt=0 to a few GeV/c .

  10. Tests of Radiation-Hard Silicon Microstrip Sensors for CMS in S-LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Luukka, Panja; Maenpaa, Teppo; Tuovinen, Esa; Spiegel, Lenny; Flight, Robert; /Rochester U.

    2011-02-21

    The tests are to study the performance of various silicon microstrip sensors that are sufficiently radiation-hard to be considered as candidates for the CMS outer (R > 25cm) tracker in the second phase of the currently envisioned S-LHC upgrade. The main goal of the beam test is to test Float Zone (FZ) and Magnetic Czochralski (MCz) silicon sensors that have been procured from Hamamatsu by the CMS collaboration as possible replacements for the CMS outer tracker for phase 2 operations. The detectors under test (DUT) will be isntalled in a cold box that contains 10 slots for modules based on CMS Tracker hybrids. Slots 1-4 and 7-10 are occupied by reference planes and slots 5 and 6 are reserved for DUTs. The box is cooled by Peltier elements in thermal contact with the top and bottom aluminum baseplates and is typically operated at around -25 C. A PCI based version of the CMS DAQ is used to read out the 10 slots based on triggers provided by beam scintillation counters. Given the low rate of beam particles the hybrid APVs will be operated in Peak mode, which maximizes the signal-to-noise performance of the readout chips. The internal clock operates at the LHC frequency of 40 MHz.

  11. Construction and Bench Testing of a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the 30 high robust Phase I graphite secondary collimators with 30 high Z Phase II collimators. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. This paper reports on the final construction and testing of the prototype collimator to be installed in the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN. Bench-top measurements will demonstrate that the device is fully operational and has the mechanical and vacuum characteristics acceptable for installation in the SPS.

  12. The Drell-Yan process as a testing ground for parton distributions up to LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Eduardo; Bourrely, Claude; Pasechnik, Roman; Soffer, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    The Drell-Yan massive dilepton production in hadron-hadron collisions provides a unique tool, complementary to Deep Inelastic Scattering, for improving our understanding of hadronic substructure and in particular for testing parton distributions. We will consider measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections from FNAL Tevatron up to CERN LHC energies and they will be compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD calculations using most recent sets (CT14 and MMHT14) of parton distribution functions, as well as those provided by the statistical approach.

  13. Modelling of helium-mediated quench propagation in the LHC prototype test string-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, M.; Grzegory, P.; Serio, L.; van Weelderen, R.

    2000-08-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) prototype test string-1, hereafter referred to as the string, is composed of three 10-m long prototype dipole magnets and one 6-m long prototype quadrupole magnet. The magnets are immersed in a pressurized static bath of superfluid helium that is maintained at a pressure of about 1 bar and at a temperature of about 1.9 K. This helium bath constitutes one single hydraulic unit, extending along 42.5 m of the string length. We have measured the triggering of quenches of the string magnets due to the quenching of a single dipole magnet located at the string's extremity, i.e., "quench propagation". Previously reported measurements enabled to establish that in this configuration the quench propagation is mediated by the helium and not by the inter-magnet bus bar connections [L. Coull, D. Hagedorn, G. Krainz, F. Rodriguez-Mateos, R. Schmidt, Quench propagation tests on the LHC superconducting magnet string, in: S. Myers, A. Pacheco, R. Pascual, C. Petit-Jean-Genaz, J. Poole (Eds.), Fifth European Particle Accelerator Conference - EPAC '96, Sitges, Barcelona, Spain, 10-14 June 1996, IOP, Bristol, 1996; F. Rodriguez-Mateos, R. Schmidt, L. Serio, Thermo-hydraulic quench propagation at the LHC superconducting magnet string, in: D. Dew-Hughes, R.G. Scurlock, J.H.P. Watson (Eds), 17th International Cryogenic Engineering Conference (ICEC-17), Bournemouth, UK, 14-17 July 1998, IOP, Bristol, 1998]. We present a model of helium-mediated quench propagation based on the qualitative conclusions of these two previous papers, and on additional information gained from a dedicated series of quench propagation measurements that were not previously reported. We will discuss the specific mechanisms and their main parameters involved at different timescales of the propagation process, and apply the model to make quantitative predictions.

  14. R&D ERL: G5 test and commissioning plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kayran, D.; Pozdeyev, E.

    2010-02-10

    Gun-to-5-cell cavity (G5) setup (Fig 1-2) can be considered as the first stage of the final BNL ERL design. The goal of the G5 setup is to test critical ERL components with the beam and characterize the beam produced by the gun. Also, this test will be used to assess effectiveness of the zigzag merger, which will be installed later in the ERL setup. The major components under the test will include the SRF gun, the five-cell SRF cavity, vacuum components, parts of the control and diagnostic systems. G5 is designed to measure the following beam parameters: (1) projected bunch emittance (?) and Twiss parameters ({alpha}, {beta}); (2) slice emittance; (3) bunch length; and (4) longitudinal and transverse halo.

  15. 78 FR 22536 - Procedural Manual for the Election Assistance Commission's Voting System Test Laboratories...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ...The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) is publishing a procedural manual for its Voting System Testing and Certification Program. This manual sets the administrative procedures for becoming an EAC accredited test laboratory and guidelines for VSTL participation in the EAC Testing and Certification Program. The program is mandated by the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) at 42 US.C....

  16. Lepton flavour violating slepton decays to test type-I and II seesaw at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Villanova del Moral, Albert

    2010-02-10

    Searches at the LHC of lepton flavour violation (LFV) in slepton decays can indirectly test both type-I and II seesaw mechanisms. Assuming universal flavour-blind boundary conditions, LFV in the neutrino sector is related to LFV in the slepton sector by means of the renormalization group equations. Ratios of LFV slepton decay rates result to be a very effective way to extract the imprint left by the neutrino sector. Some neutrino scenarios within the type-I seesaw mechanism are studied. Moreover, for both type-I and II seesaw mechanisms, a scan over the minimal super-gravity parameter space is performed to estimate how large LFV slepton decay rates can be, while respecting current low-energy constraints.

  17. Commissioning and early operating experience with the Fermilab horizontal test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Chase, B.; Harms, E.; Hocker, A.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.; Rowe, A.; Theilacker, J.; Votava, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    Fermilab has constructed a facility for testing dressed superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cavities at 1.8 K with high-power pulsed RF. This test stand was designed to test both 9-cell 1.3 GHz TESLA-style cavities and 9-cell 3.9 GHz cavities being built by Fermilab for DESY's TTF-FLASH facility. An overview of the test stand and a description of its initial commissioning is described here.

  18. Development and Commissioning of a Small/Mid-Size Wind Turbine Test Facility: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Valyou, D.; Arsenault, T.; Janoyan, K.; Marzocca, P.; Post, N.; Grappasonni, G.; Arras, M.; Coppotelli, G.; Cardenas, D.; Elizalde, H.; Probst, O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and commissioning tests of the new Clarkson University/Center for Evaluation of Clean Energy Technology Blade Test Facility. The facility is a result of the collaboration between the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and Intertek, and is supported by national and international partners. This paper discusses important aspects associated with blade testing and includes results associated with modal, static, and fatigue testing performed on the Sandia National Laboratories' Blade Systems Design Studies blade. An overview of the test capabilities of the Blade Test Facility are also provided.

  19. Commissioning and periodic tests of the Esteya(®) electronic brachytherapy system.

    PubMed

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Niatsetski, Yury; Ouhib, Zoubir; Ballester, Facundo; Vijande, Javier; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2015-04-01

    A new electronic brachytherapy unit from Elekta, called Esteya(®), has recently been introduced to the market. As a part of the standards in radiation oncology, an acceptance testing and commissioning must be performed prior to treatment of the first patient. In addition, a quality assurance program should be implemented. A complete commissioning and periodic testing of the Esteya(®) device using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) guidelines for linacs and brachytherapy units as well as our personal experience is described in this paper. In addition to the methodology, recommendations on equipment required for each test are provided, taking into consideration their availability and traceability of the detectors. Finally, tolerance levels for all the tests are provided, and a specific frequency for each test is suggested. PMID:26034501

  20. Commissioning and periodic tests of the Esteya® electronic brachytherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Niatsetski, Yury; Ouhib, Zoubir; Ballester, Facundo; Vijande, Javier; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2015-01-01

    A new electronic brachytherapy unit from Elekta, called Esteya®, has recently been introduced to the market. As a part of the standards in radiation oncology, an acceptance testing and commissioning must be performed prior to treatment of the first patient. In addition, a quality assurance program should be implemented. A complete commissioning and periodic testing of the Esteya® device using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) guidelines for linacs and brachytherapy units as well as our personal experience is described in this paper. In addition to the methodology, recommendations on equipment required for each test are provided, taking into consideration their availability and traceability of the detectors. Finally, tolerance levels for all the tests are provided, and a specific frequency for each test is suggested. PMID:26034501

  1. Will Higher Education Pass "A Test of Leadership"? An Interview with Spellings Commission Chairman Charles Miller

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callan, Pat

    2007-01-01

    Charles Miller, former chairman of the University of Texas System's Board of Regents, chaired the recent Commission on the Future of Higher Education created by Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings. Here he is interviewed regarding the panel's widely discussed report, "A Test of Leadership," by Pat Callan, president of the National Center for…

  2. A new guide for commissioning air handling systems: Using a model functional test

    SciTech Connect

    Haasl, Tudi; Sellers, David; Friedman, Hannah; Piette, Mary Ann; Bourassa, Norman; Gillespie, Ken

    2002-05-01

    Functional tests are a set of detailed instructions for building commissioning that demand extensive HVAC system knowledge to write and perform. Understanding the energy use implications and theory behind the test procedures, estimating the costs and benefits of doing a particular test, implementing the tests correctly, and resolving problems require years of field experience. As part of a large research project now underway, a practical guide is being developed that communicates this knowledge. This paper presents the components and intended use of the Functional Testing Guide and Model Functional Test for Air Handling Systems. A series of model functional tests, starting at the outdoor air intake section and proceeding through the air handling unit, distribution system, and terminal equipment and ending at the exhaust air discharge point, are provided for many commonly installed air handling system configurations. The model functional tests contain advice for tailoring the test procedures to specific system configurations, desirable and undesirable testing outcomes, a calculation appendix, references to other resources, and examples of completed test forms. The guide is an educational resource, with background information that clarifies the principles behind testing configurations and results. The functional tests have been selected from an extensive commissioning test protocol library compiled by Pacific Gas and Electric in 2001. The guide also includes a design guideline for the selection of control and monitoring points and a design intent documentation form.

  3. Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    ATLAS Collaboration; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008, and is ready for the imminent LHC turn-on. The highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system are presented.

  4. ASSEMBLY AND TEST OF A 120 MM BORE 15 T NB3SN QUADRUPOLE FOR THE LHC UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, H.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R.; Joseph, J.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G. L.; Wang, X.; Anerella, M.; Ghosh, A. K.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bossert, R.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2010-05-23

    In support of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) has been developing a 1-meter long, 120 mm bore Nb{sub 3}Sn IR quadrupole magnet (HQ). With a design short sample gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K and a peak field approaching 15 T, one of the main challenges of this magnet is to provide appropriate mechanical support to the coils. Compared to the previous LARP Technology Quadrupole and Long Quadrupole magnets, the purpose of HQ is also to demonstrate accelerator quality features such as alignment and cooling. So far, 8 HQ coils have been fabricated and 4 of them have been assembled and tested in HQ01a. This paper presents the mechanical assembly and test results of HQ01a.

  5. A Semi-automated Commissioning Tool for VAV Air Handling Units:Functional Test Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Haves, Philip; Kim, Moosung; Najafi, Massieh; Xu, Peng

    2007-01-01

    A software tool that automates the analysis of functional tests for air-handling units is described. The tool compares the performance observed during manual tests with the performance predicted by simple models of the components under test that are configured using design and of information catalog data. Significant differences between observed and expected performance indicate the presence faults. Fault diagnosis is performed by analyzing the variation of these differences with operating points using expert rules and fuzzy inferencing. The tool has a convenient user interface to facilitate manual entry of measurements made during a test. A graphical display compares the measured and expected performance, highlighting significant differences that indicate the presence of faults. The tool is designed to be used by commissioning providers conducting functional tests as part of either new building commissioning or retrocommissioning as well as by building owners and operators conducting routine tests to check the performance of their HVAC systems. This paper describes the input data requirements of the tool, the software structure, and the graphical interface and summarizes the development and testing process used.

  6. Test bench to commission a third ion source beam line and a newly designed extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelmann, T.; Cee, R.; Haberer, T.; Naas, B.; Peters, A.

    2012-02-15

    The HIT (Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center) is the first hospital-based treatment facility in Europe where patients can be irradiated with protons and carbon ions. Since the commissioning starting in 2006 two 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are routinely used to produce a variety of ion beams from protons up to oxygen. In the future a helium beam for regular patient treatment is requested, therefore a third ion source (Supernanogan source from PANTECHNIK S.A.) will be integrated. This third ECR source with a newly designed extraction system and a spectrometer line is installed at a test bench at HIT to commission and validate this section. Measurements with different extraction system setups will be presented to show the improvement of beam quality for helium, proton, and carbon beams. An outlook to the possible integration scheme of the new ion source into the production facility will be discussed.

  7. Test bench to commission a third ion source beam line and a newly designed extraction system.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, T; Cee, R; Haberer, T; Naas, B; Peters, A

    2012-02-01

    The HIT (Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center) is the first hospital-based treatment facility in Europe where patients can be irradiated with protons and carbon ions. Since the commissioning starting in 2006 two 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are routinely used to produce a variety of ion beams from protons up to oxygen. In the future a helium beam for regular patient treatment is requested, therefore a third ion source (Supernanogan source from PANTECHNIK S.A.) will be integrated. This third ECR source with a newly designed extraction system and a spectrometer line is installed at a test bench at HIT to commission and validate this section. Measurements with different extraction system setups will be presented to show the improvement of beam quality for helium, proton, and carbon beams. An outlook to the possible integration scheme of the new ion source into the production facility will be discussed. PMID:22380336

  8. Testing the CP-violating MSSM in stau decays at the LHC and ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiner, Herbi; Kulkarni, Suchita; Marold, Anja; Kittel, Olaf

    2011-05-01

    We study CP violation in the two-body decay of a scalar tau into a neutralino and a tau, which should be probed at the LHC and ILC. From the normal tau polarization, a CP asymmetry is defined which is sensitive to the CP phases of the trilinear scalar coupling parameter A{sub {tau}}, the gaugino mass parameter M{sub 1}, and the Higgsino mass parameter {mu}, in the stau-neutralino sector of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. Asymmetries of more than 70% are obtained in scenarios with strong stau mixing. As a result, detectable CP asymmetries in stau decays at the LHC are found, motivating further detailed experimental studies for probing the supersymmetry CP phases.

  9. Commissioning and Testing the 1970's Era LASS Solenoid Magnet in JLab's Hall D

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Joshua T.; Biallas, George H.; Brown, G.; Butler, David E.; Carstens, Thomas J.; Chudakov, Eugene A.; Creel, Jonathan D.; Egiyan, Hovanes; Martin, F.; Qiang, Yi; Smith, Elton S.; Stevens, Mark A.; Spiegel, Scot L.; Whitlatch, Timothy E.; Wolin, Elliott J.; Ghoshal, Probir K.

    2015-06-01

    JLab refurbished and reconfigured the LASS1, 1.85m bore Solenoid and installed it as the principal analysis magnet for nuclear physics in the newly constructed, Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The magnet contains four superconducting coils within an iron yoke. The magnet was built in the early1970's at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and used a second time at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The coils were extensively refurbished and individually tested by JLab. A new Cryogenic Distribution Box provides cryogens and their control valving, current distribution bus, and instrumentation pass-through. A repurposed CTI 2800 refrigerator system and new transfer line complete the system. We describe the re-configuration, the process and problems of re-commissioning the magnet and the results of testing the completed magnet.

  10. Testing and Quality Assurance of the Control System During NIF Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Casavant, D; Carey, R; Cline, B; Lagin, L; Ludwigsen, P; Reddi, U; Van Arsdall, P

    2003-10-13

    The strategy used to develop the National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System (NIF ICCS) calls for incremental cycles of construction and formal test to deliver nearly one million lines of code. Software releases that implement specific functionality are approved for deployment when offline tests conducted in the ICCS Integration and Test Facility verify functional, performance and interface requirements using test procedures derived from system requirements. At this stage of the project the controls team has delivered approximately 3/4 of the planned software by performing dozens of development and test cycles within offline test facilities and followed by online tests to confirm integrated operation in the NIF. Test incidents are recorded and tracked from development to successful deployment by the verification team, with hardware and software changes approved by the appropriate change control board. Project metrics are generated by the Software Quality Assurance manager and monitored by ICCS management. Test results are summarized and reported to responsible individuals and Project managers under a work authorization and permit process that assesses risk and evaluates control system upgrade readiness. NIF is well into the first phases of its laser commissioning program to characterize and operate the first four laser beams and target systems. The integrated control system has successfully fired over 100 coordinated shots into beam diagnostics and an initial set of target diagnostics in the 10-m diameter target chamber. Extensive experience has been gained by integrating controls in prototype laboratories and in the NIF. This paper will discuss NIF's software QC and QA processes, capabilities of offline test facilities, and metrics collection.

  11. Planck-scale induced left-right gauge theory at LHC and experimental tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, M. K.; Sahoo, Biswonath

    2016-05-01

    Recent measurements at LHC have inspired searches for TeV scale left-right gauge theory originating from grand unified theories. We show that inclusion of Planck-scale induced effects due to dim . 5 operator not only does away with all the additional intermediate symmetries, but also it predicts the minimal set of light Higgs scalars tailored after neutrino masses and dilepton, or trilepton signals. The heavy-light neutrino mixings are predicted from charged fermion mass fits in SO (10) and LFV constraints which lead to new predictions for dilepton or trilepton production signals. Including fine-structure constant matching and two-loop, and threshold effects predict MWR =g2R10 4.3 ± 1.5 ± 0.2 GeV and proton lifetime τp =10 36.15 ± 5.8 ± 0.2 yrs with WR gauge boson coupling g2R = 0.56- 0.57. Predictions on lepton flavour and lepton number violations are accessible to ongoing experiments. Current CMS data on di-electron excess at √{ s} = 8 TeV are found to be consistent with WR gauge boson mass MWR ≥ 1.9- 2.2 TeV which also agrees with the values obtained from dijet resonance production data. We also discuss plausible explanations for diboson production excesses observed at LHC and make predictions expected at √{ s} = 14 TeV.

  12. Assembly Tests of the First Nb 3 Sn Low-Beta Quadrupole Short Model for the Hi-Lumi LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pan, H.; Felice, H.; Cheng, D. W.; Anderssen, E.; Ambrosio, G.; Perez, J. C.; Juchno, M.; Ferracin, P.; Prestemon, S. O.

    2016-01-18

    In preparation for the high-luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) in collaboration with CERN is pursuing the development of MQXF: a 150-mm-aperture high-field Nb3Sn quadrupole magnet. Moreover, the development phase starts with the fabrication and test of several short models (1.2-m magnetic length) and will continue with the development of several long prototypes. All of them are mechanically supported using a shell-based support structure, which has been extensively demonstrated on several R&D models within LARP. The first short model MQXFS-AT has been assembled at LBNL with coils fabricated by LARP and CERN.more » In our paper, we summarize the assembly process and show how it relies strongly on experience acquired during the LARP 120-mm-aperture HQ magnet series. We also present comparison between strain gauges data and finite-element model analysis. Finally, we present the implication of the MQXFS-AT experience on the design of the long prototype support structure.« less

  13. Commissioning of the first drift tube linac module in the Ground Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Bowling, S.; Cole, R.; Connolly, R.; Denney, P.; Erickson, J.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Ingalls, W.B.; Kersteins, D.; Kraus, R.; Lysenko, W.P.; McMurry, D.; Mottershead, C.T.; Power, J.; Rose, C.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P.; Schneider, J.D.; Smith, M.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1993-06-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology required for producing high-brightness, high-current H{sup {minus}} beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam-dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The major components are the 35-keV H{sup {minus}} injector, the 2.5-MeV radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), the intertank matching section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2{beta}{lambda} drift tube linac (DTL-1) module, and the 24-MeV GTA with 10 DTL modules. Results from the DTL-1 beam experiments will be presented.

  14. Concept, implementation and commissioning of the automation system for the accelerator module test facility AMTF

    SciTech Connect

    Böckmann, Torsten A.; Korth, Olaf; Clausen, Matthias; Schoeneburg, Bernd

    2014-01-29

    The European XFEL project launched on June 5, 2007 will require about 103 accelerator modules as a main part of the XFEL linear accelerator. All superconducting components constituting the accelerator module like cavities and magnets have to be tested before the assembly. For the tests of the individual cavities and the complete modules an XFEL Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) has been erected at DESY. The process control system EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used to control and operate the cryogenic plant and all its subcomponents. A complementary component of EPICS is the Open Source software suit CSS (Control System Studio). CSS is an integrated engineering, maintenance and operating tool for EPICS. CSS enables local and remote operating and monitoring of the complete system and thus represents the human machine interface. More than 250 PROFIBUS nodes work at the accelerator module test facility. DESY installed an extensive diagnostic and condition monitoring system. With these diagnostic tools it is possible to examine the correct installation and configuration of all PROFIBUS nodes in real time. The condition monitoring system based on FDT/DTM technology shows the state of the PROFIBUS devices at a glance. This information can be used for preventive maintenance which is mandatory for continuous operation of the AMTF facility. The poster will describe all steps form engineering to implementation and commissioning.

  15. Concept, implementation and commissioning of the automation system for the accelerator module test facility AMTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böckmann, Torsten A.; Korth, Olaf; Clausen, Matthias; Schoeneburg, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The European XFEL project launched on June 5, 2007 will require about 103 accelerator modules as a main part of the XFEL linear accelerator. All superconducting components constituting the accelerator module like cavities and magnets have to be tested before the assembly. For the tests of the individual cavities and the complete modules an XFEL Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) has been erected at DESY. The process control system EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used to control and operate the cryogenic plant and all its subcomponents. A complementary component of EPICS is the Open Source software suit CSS (Control System Studio). CSS is an integrated engineering, maintenance and operating tool for EPICS. CSS enables local and remote operating and monitoring of the complete system and thus represents the human machine interface. More than 250 PROFIBUS nodes work at the accelerator module test facility. DESY installed an extensive diagnostic and condition monitoring system. With these diagnostic tools it is possible to examine the correct installation and configuration of all PROFIBUS nodes in real time. The condition monitoring system based on FDT/DTM technology shows the state of the PROFIBUS devices at a glance. This information can be used for preventive maintenance which is mandatory for continuous operation of the AMTF facility. The poster will describe all steps form engineering to implementation and commissioning.

  16. Design and commissioning of vertical test cryostats for XFEL superconducting cavities measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Polinski, J.; Chorowski, M.; Duda, P.; Bozhko, Y.; Petersen, B.; Schaffran, J.

    2014-01-29

    The European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL), now under construction at DESY in Hamburg, will make an extensive use of 1.3 GHz superconducting cavities aimed at accelerating the electrons to the energy of 17.5 GeV. The cavities will be operated at 2 K with the use of saturated HeII. Prior to their assembly in accelerator cryomodules, the RF performance of the cavities will be cold-tested in two dedicated vertical cryostats. Each cryostat allows a simultaneous testing of 4 cavities mounted on a dedicated insert. The cryostats are equipped with external lines allowing their supply with liquid helium and further conversion of the helium into superfluid He II. The paper describes the test stand flow scheme, the technical key elements, including a recuperative heat exchanger, and the cold commissioning. The thermodynamic analysis of the cryostat cool down and steady-state operation is given. A Second Law of Thermodynamics based theoretical model of the heat exchanger performance, and the model experimental validation, is presented.

  17. Design parameters and commissioning of vertical inserts used for testing the XFEL superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffran, J.; Bozhko, Y.; Petersen, B.; Meissner, D.; Chorowski, M.; Polinski, J.

    2014-01-29

    The European XFEL is a new research facility currently under construction at DESY in the Hamburg area in Germany. From 2015 on, it will generate extremely intense X-ray flashes that will be used by researchers from all over the world. The superconducting XFEL linear accelerator consists of 100 accelerator modules with more than 800 RF-cavities inside. The accelerator modules, superconducting magnets and cavities will be tested in the accelerator module test facility (AMTF). This paper gives an overview of the design parameters and the commissioning of the vertical insert, used in two cryostats (XATC) of the AMTF-hall. The Insert serves as a holder for 4 nine-cell cavities. This gives the possibility to cool down 4 cavities to 2K in parallel and, consequently, to reduce the testing time. The following RF measurement, selected as quality check, will be done separately for each cavity. Afterwards the cavities will be warmed up again and will be sent to the accelerator module assembly.

  18. Preparations for Physics Studies with ATLAS During the First Years of the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    Fabiola Gianotti

    2010-01-08

    I will review the status of the ATLAS detector installation and commissioning, and discuss the preparation for physics with test-beam studies, detailed simulations, and runs with cosmics. I will then show examples of physics opportunities with the first LHC data.   

  19. The Design and Commissioning of a Micro-cogeneration Testing Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Evan

    The simultaneous production of heat and electricity onsite to serve residential loads can potentially yield a reduction in operating costs, primary energy use and related emissions over traditional technologies which meet these loads separately. Proper sizing and operation of units along with their required buffering and auxiliary systems are critical to the realization of both economical and environmental performance objectives. Further research is required to develop strategies to integrate micro-cogeneration technologies into Canadian residences as issues related to device type, capacity, design of balance of plant components, and controls remain largely unresolved. Building performance simulation is a highly flexible, and time-efficient method to systematically explore and evaluate different design options; however, the validity of the conclusions resulting from simulation based studies are dependent on the accuracy and reliability of the models employed. In order to support ongoing research relating to micro-cogeneration technologies through simulation based activities, a facility capable of subjecting units to controlled electrical and thermal loading was designed and commissioned to collect performance data suitable for device-specific model calibration. The facility can also be configured to provide realistic thermal and electrical loading to complete micro-cogeneration systems including thermal storage and auxiliary heating to evaluate the performance of complete systems. It provides a platform to experimentally investigate appropriate configurations to integrate units into residences through variations in the balance of plant components and control strategies. This thesis describes the design of the facility including its hardware, instrumentation, data acquisition and controls systems. Also described are experiments that were conducted during the commissioning phase to assess system level performance, to identify and correct hardware integration issues

  20. Test Equity for People Who Are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing: Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification Steps for Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saladin, Shawn P.; Reid, Christine; Shiels, John

    2011-01-01

    The Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) has taken a proactive stance on perceived test inequities of the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) exam as it relates to people who are prelingually deaf and hard of hearing. This article describes the process developed and implemented by the CRCC to help maximize test equity…

  1. VMAT linear accelerator commissioning and quality assurance: dose control and gantry speed tests.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael P; Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Greer, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    In VMAT treatment delivery the ability of the linear accelerator (linac) to accurately control dose versus gantry angle is critical to delivering the plan correctly. A new VMAT test delivery was developed to specifically test the dose versus gantry angle with the full range of allowed gantry speeds and dose rates. The gantry-mounted IBA MatriXX with attached inclinometer was used in movie mode to measure the instantaneous relative dose versus gantry angle during the plan every 0.54 s. The results were compared to the expected relative dose at each gantry angle calculated from the plan. The same dataset was also used to compare the instantaneous gan-try speeds throughout the delivery compared to the expected gantry speeds from the plan. Measurements performed across four linacs generally show agreement between measurement and plan to within 1.5% in the constant dose rate regions and dose rate modulation within 0.1 s of the plan. Instantaneous gantry speed was measured to be within 0.11°/s of the plan (1 SD). An error in one linac was detected in that the nominal gantry speed was incorrectly calibrated. This test provides a practical method to quality-assure critical aspects of VMAT delivery including dose versus gantry angle and gantry speed control. The method can be performed with any detector that can acquire time-resolved dosimetric information that can be synchronized with a measurement of gantry angle. The test fulfils several of the aims of the recent Netherlands Commission on Radiation Dosimetry (NCS) Report 24, which provides recommendations for comprehensive VMAT quality assurance. PMID:27167282

  2. Design and Construction of a 500 kW CW, 400 MHz Klystron to be used as RF Power Source for LHC/RF Component Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischholz, H.; Fowkes, W. R.; Pearson, C.

    1997-05-01

    A 500 kW CW klystron operating at 400 MHz was jointly developed and constructed by CERN and SLAC for use as a high power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could be incorporated in the LHC test klystron. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing frame, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned by using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with the aid of MAFIA. Details of the tube development and test results are presented. Finally the set-up of the LHC/RF test stand and the features of its auxiliary high-power RF equipment, such as circulator and absorber, are described.

  3. Ensuing Dog Fight: The AHA Commission on the Social Studies' Testing Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schul, James E.

    2013-01-01

    The American Historical Association's (AHA's) Commission on the Social Studies was a compilation of prominent scholars who, from 1929 to 1934, investigated social studies education in American public schools in order to provide some cohesive recommendations for teachers. The AHA Commission had a controversial ending, with one of its members,…

  4. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Commissioning Test Results for D-Zero's Helium Refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1997-06-30

    The test objectives are: (1) Make liquid helium and measure refrigerator capacity; (2) Measure liquid helium dewar heat leak, transfer line heat leak, and liquid nitrogen consumption rates; (3) Operate all cryogenic transfer lines; (4) Get some running time on all components; (5) Debug mechanical components, instrumentation, DMACs user interface, tune loops, and otherwise shake out any problems; (6) Get some operating time in to get familiar with system behavior; (7) Revise and/or improve operating procedures to actual practice; and (8) Identify areas for future improvement. D-Zero's stand alone helium refrigerator (STAR) liquified helium at a rate of 114 L/hr. This is consistent with other STAR installations. Refrigeration capacity was not measured due to lack of a calibrated heat load. Measured heat leaks were within design values. The helium dewar loss was measured at 2 to 4 watts or 9% per day, the solenoid and VLPC helium transfer lines had a heat leak of about 20 watts each. The liquid nitrogen consumption rates of the mobile purifier, STAR, and LN2 subcooler were measured at 20 gph, 20 to 64 gph, and 3 gph respectively. All cryogenic transfer lines including the solenoid and visible light photon counter (VLPC) transfer lines were cooled to their cryogenic operating temperatures. This included independent cooling of nitrogen shields and liquid helium components. No major problems were observed. The system ran quite well. Many problems were identified and corrected as they came up. Areas for improvement were noted and will be implemented in the future. The instrumentation and control system operated commendably during the test. The commissioning test run was a worthwhile and successful venture.

  5. Test and Commissioning of the AST3-1 Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Wang, Daxing

    2013-01-01

    The first of three Antarctic Survey Telescopes (AST3-1), a 50/68cm Schmidt-like equatorial-mount telescope, is the first trackable Chinese telescope operating on the Antarctic plateau. It was installed at Dome A (80°22', 77°21'E, 4,093m), the highest place on the Antarctic plateau, in 2012. The telescope is unmanned during night-time operations through the Austral winter. The telescope optics and mechanics, as well as the motors and position sensors, are exposed to a harsh environment. The mechanics is enclosed with a foldable tent-like dome to prevent snow, diamond dust and ice. While the control cabinet containing drive boxes, circuit board boxes, power converters and the Telescope Control Computer (TCC) is located inside the warm instrumental module. In about 15 weeks remote testing and commissioning, from January 24 when the expedition team left there to May 8, when the communication failed, we obtained images with the best FWHM of less than 2''. We also recorded the telescope movement performance and fine-tuned the dynamic properties of the telescope control system. Some experiences and lessons will be disscussed in this paper.

  6. 10 CFR 51.108 - Public hearings on Commission findings that inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CFR 52.103(b), the Commission will not admit any contentions on environmental issues, the adequacy of... finding under 10 CFR 52.103(g). materials licenses ..., tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria of combined licenses are met. 51.108 Section 51.108...

  7. 75 FR 34360 - Consumer Product Safety Act: Notice of Commission Action on the Stay of Enforcement of Testing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... a notice of requirements that appeared in the Federal Register on September 2, 2009. 74 FR 45428. On... testing and certification requirements for many products, including bicycles. 74 FR 6396. The Commission... of the CPSIA and their applicability.'' 74 FR 6396, 6398. On December 28, 2009, the...

  8. The history of the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-11

    Abstract: From the civil engineering, to the manufacturing of the various magnet types, each building block of this extraordinary machine required ambitious leaps in innovation. This lecture will review the history of the LHC project, focusing on the many challenges -- scientific, technological, managerial -- that had to be met during the various phases of R&D;, industrialization, construction, installation and commissioning.

  9. The history of the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Abstract: From the civil engineering, to the manufacturing of the various magnet types, each building block of this extraordinary machine required ambitious leaps in innovation. This lecture will review the history of the LHC project, focusing on the many challenges -- scientific, technological, managerial -- that had to be met during the various phases of R&D;, industrialization, construction, installation and commissioning.

  10. Commissioning of the CMS Forward Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashish; /SUNY, Buffalo

    2008-12-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is scheduled for physics data taking in summer 2009 after the commissioning of high energy proton-proton collisions at Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the core of the CMS all-silicon tracker is the silicon pixel detector, comprising three barrel layers and two pixel disks in the forward and backward regions, accounting for a total of 66 million channels. The pixel detector will provide high-resolution, 3D tracking points, essential for pattern recognition and precise vertexing, while being embedded in a hostile radiation environment. The end disks of the pixel detector, known as the Forward Pixel detector, has been assembled and tested at Fermilab, USA. It has 18 million pixel cells with dimension 100 x 150 {micro}m{sup 2}. The complete forward pixel detector was shipped to CERN in December 2007, where it underwent extensive system tests for commissioning prior to the installation. The pixel system was put in its final place inside the CMS following the installation and bake out of the LHC beam pipe in July 2008. It has been integrated with other sub-detectors in the readout since September 2008 and participated in the cosmic data taking. This report covers the strategy and results from commissioning of CMS forward pixel detector at CERN.

  11. Remote Operations for LHC and CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, E.E.; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    Commissioning the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments will be a vital part of the worldwide high energy physics program beginning in 2007. A remote operations center has been built at Fermilab to contribute to commissioning and operations of the LHC and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, and to develop new capabilities for real-time data analysis and monitoring for LHC, CMS, and grid computing. Remote operations will also be essential to a future International Linear Collider with its multiple, internationally distributed control rooms. In this paper we present an overview of Fermilab's LHC@FNAL remote operations center for LHC and CMS, describe what led up to the development of the center, and describe noteworthy features of the center.

  12. Beam Loss Monitoring for LHC Machine Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Eva Barbara; Dehning, Bernd; Effnger, Ewald; Emery, Jonathan; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Hajdu, Csaba; Jackson, Stephen; Kurfuerst, Christoph; Marsili, Aurelien; Misiowiec, Marek; Nagel, Markus; Busto, Eduardo Nebot Del; Nordt, Annika; Roderick, Chris; Sapinski, Mariusz; Zamantzas, Christos

    The energy stored in the nominal LHC beams is two times 362 MJ, 100 times the energy of the Tevatron. As little as 1 mJ/cm3 deposited energy quenches a magnet at 7 TeV and 1 J/cm3 causes magnet damage. The beam dumps are the only places to safely dispose of this beam. One of the key systems for machine protection is the beam loss monitoring (BLM) system. About 3600 ionization chambers are installed at likely or critical loss locations around the LHC ring. The losses are integrated in 12 time intervals ranging from 40 μs to 84 s and compared to threshold values defined in 32 energy ranges. A beam abort is requested when potentially dangerous losses are detected or when any of the numerous internal system validation tests fails. In addition, loss data are used for machine set-up and operational verifications. The collimation system for example uses the loss data for set-up and regular performance verification. Commissioning and operational experience of the BLM are presented: The machine protection functionality of the BLM system has been fully reliable; the LHC availability has not been compromised by false beam aborts.

  13. Design, Project Execution, and Commissioning of the 1.8 K Superfluid Helium Refrigeration System for SRF Cryomodule Testing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Treite, P.; Nuesslein, U.; Jia, Yi; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.

    2015-07-15

    The Fermilab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) provides a test bed to measure the performance of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CM). These SRF components form the basic building blocks of future high intensity accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and a Muon Collider. Linde Kryotechnik AG and Linde Cryogenics have designed, constructed and commissioned the superfluid helium refrigerator needed to support SRF component testing at the CMTF Facility. The hybrid refrigerator is designed to operate in a variety of modes and under a wide range of boundary conditions down to 1.8 Kelvin set by CM design. Special features ofmore » the refrigerator include the use of warm and cold compression and high efficiency turbo expanders.This paper gives an overview on the wide range of the challenging cooling requirements, the design, fabrication and the commissioning of the installed cryogenic system.« less

  14. Design, Project Execution, and Commissioning of the 1.8 K Superfluid Helium Refrigeration System for SRF Cryomodule Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Treite, P.; Nuesslein, U.; Jia, Yi; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.

    2015-07-15

    The Fermilab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) provides a test bed to measure the performance of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CM). These SRF components form the basic building blocks of future high intensity accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and a Muon Collider. Linde Kryotechnik AG and Linde Cryogenics have designed, constructed and commissioned the superfluid helium refrigerator needed to support SRF component testing at the CMTF Facility. The hybrid refrigerator is designed to operate in a variety of modes and under a wide range of boundary conditions down to 1.8 Kelvin set by CM design. Special features of the refrigerator include the use of warm and cold compression and high efficiency turbo expanders.This paper gives an overview on the wide range of the challenging cooling requirements, the design, fabrication and the commissioning of the installed cryogenic system.

  15. Design, Project Execution, and Commissioning of the 1.8 K Superfluid Helium Refrigeration System for SRF Cryomodule Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treite, P.; Nuesslein, U.; Jia, Yi; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.

    The Fermilab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) provides a test bed to measure the performance of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CM). These SRF components form the basic building blocks of future high intensity accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and a Muon Collider. Linde Kryotechnik AG and Linde Cryogenics have designed, constructed and commissioned the superfluid helium refrigerator needed to support SRF component testing at the CMTF Facility. The hybrid refrigerator is designed to operate in a variety of modes and under a wide range of boundary conditions down to 1.8 Kelvin set by CM design. Special features of the refrigerator include the use of warm and cold compression and high efficiency turbo expanders.This paper gives an overview on the wide range of the challenging cooling requirements, the design, fabrication and the commissioning of the installed cryogenic system.

  16. Comparison of three marine screening tests and four Oslo and Paris Commission procedures to evaluate toxicity of offshore chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Weideborg, M.; Vik, E.A.; Oefjord, G.D.; Kjoennoe, O.

    1997-02-01

    The results from the screening toxicity tests Artemia salina, Microtox{reg_sign}, and Mitochondria RET test were compared with those obtained from OSPAR (Oslo and Paris Commissions)-authorized procedures for testing of offshore chemicals (Skeletonema costatum, Acartia tonsa, Abra alba, and Corophium volutator). In this study 82 test substances (26 non-water soluble) were included. The Microtox test was found to be the most sensitive of the three screening tests. Microtox and Mitochondria RET test results showed good correlation with results from Acartia and Skeletonema testing, and it was concluded that the Microtox test was a suitable screening test as a base for assessment of further testing, especially regarding water-soluble chemicals. Sensitivity of Artemia salina to the tested chemicals was too low for it to be an appropriate bioassay organism for screening testing. A very good correlation was found between the results obtained with the Skeletonema and Acartia tests. The results indicated no need for more than one of the Skeletonema or Acartia tests if the Skeletonema median effective concentration or Acartia median lethal concentration was greater than 200 mg/L. The sediment-reworker tests (A. Alba or C. volutator) for chemicals that are likely to end up in the sediments (non-water soluble or surfactants) should be performed, independent of results from screening tests and other OSPAR species.

  17. Design and Construction of a 500 KW CW, 400 MHZ Klystron To Be Used As RF Power Source For LHC/RF Component Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Chris

    2003-05-05

    A 500 kW cw klystron operating at 400 MHz was developed and constructed jointly by CERN and SLAC for use as a high-power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could thus be incorporated in the LHC test klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing solenoid, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with the aid of MAFIA. Details of the tube development and test results are presented.

  18. Design, fabrication, commissioning, and testing of a 250 g/s, 2-K helium cold compressor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganni, V.; Arenius, D. M.; Bevins, B. S.; Chronis, W. C.; Creel, J. D.; Wilson, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    In June 1999 the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) Cryogenic Systems Group had completed the design, fabrication, and commissioning of a cold compressor system capable of pumping 250 g/s of 2-K helium vapor to a pressure above 1 bar. The 2-K cold box consists of five stages of centrifugal variable speed compressors with LN2 cooled drive motors and magnetic bearings, a plate fin heat exchanger, and an LN2 shield system. The new 2-K cold box (referred to as the SCN) was built as a redundant system to an existing four stage cold compressor SCM cold box that was commissioned in May 1994. The SCN has been in continuous service supporting the facility experiments since commissioning. This system has achieved a significant improvement in the total 2-K refrigeration system capacity and stability and has substantially increased the operating envelope both in cold compressor flow and operating pressure range. This paper describes the cold box configuration and the experiences in the design, fabrication, commissioning and performance evaluation. The capacity of the system for various operating pressures (0.040 to 0.025 bar at the load corresponding to a total compressor pressure ratio of 28 to 54) is presented. An effort is made to characterize the components and their operating data over the tested range. This includes the return side pressure drop in the distribution system, the heat exchanger, and the cold compressor characteristics. The system design parameters and their effects on performance are outlined.

  19. Design, fabrication, commissioning, and testing of a 250 g/s, 2-K helium cold compressor system

    SciTech Connect

    V. Ganni; D. M. Arenius; B. S. Bevins; W. C. Chronis; J. D. Creel; J. D. Wilson Jr.

    2002-05-10

    In June 1999 the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) Cryogenic Systems Group had completed the design, fabrication, and commissioning of a cold compressor system capable of pumping 250 g/s of 2-K helium vapor to a pressure above 1 bar. The 2-K cold box consists of five stages of centrifugal variable speed compressors with LN2 cooled drive motors and magnetic bearings, a plate fin heat exchanger, and an LN2 shield system. The new 2-K cold box (referred to as the SCN) was built as a redundant system to an existing four stage cold compressor SCM cold box that was commissioned in May 1994. The SCN has been in continuous service supporting the facility experiments since commissioning. This system has achieved a significant improvement in the total 2-K refrigeration system capacity and stability and has substantially increased the operating envelope both in cold compressor flow and operating pressure range. This paper describes the cold box configuration and the experience s in the design, fabrication, commissioning and performance evaluation. The capacity of the system for various operating pressures (0.040 to 0.025 bar at the load corresponding to a total compressor pressure ratio of 28 to 54) is presented. An effort is made to characterize the components and their operating data over the tested range. This includes the return side pressure drop in the distribution system, the heat exchanger, and the cold compressor characteristics. The system design parameters and their effects on performance are outlined.

  20. Data Analysis Techniques at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Boccali, Tommaso

    2005-10-12

    A review of the recent developments on data analysis techniques for the upcoming LHC experiments is presented, with the description of early tests ('Data Challenges'), which are being performed before the start-up, to validate the overall design.

  1. Test Results of 15 T Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnet HQ01 with a 120 mm Bore for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Schmalzle, J.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bingham, B.; Bossert, R.; Cheng, D.W.; Chlachidze, G.; Dietderich, D.R.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A.; Hafalia, A.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Joseph, J.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Sabbi, G.L.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer,; P.l Xiaorong, W.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2011-08-03

    In support of the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) has been developing a 1-meter long, 120 mm bore Nb{sub 3}Sn IR quadrupole magnet (HQ). With a short sample gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K and a conductor peak field of 15 T, the magnet will operate under higher forces and stored-energy levels than that of any previous LARP magnet models. In addition, HQ has been designed to incorporate accelerator quality features such as precise coil alignment and adequate cooling. The first 6 coils (out of the 8 fabricated so far) have been assembled and used in two separate tests-HQ01a and HQ01b. This paper presents design parameters, summary of the assemblies, the mechanical behavior as well as the performance of HQ01a and HQ01b.

  2. Continuing u.s. participation in the lhc accelerator program

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) was established to enable U.S. accelerator specialists to take on active and important roles in the LHC accelerator project during its commissioning and early operations, and to be a major collaborator in future LHC performance upgrades. It is hoped that this follow-on effort to the U.S. contributions to the LHC accelerator project will improve the capabilities of the U.S. accelerator community in accelerator science and technology in order to more effectively use, develop, and preserve unique U.S. resources and capabilities during the LHC era.

  3. Test beam results with a sampling calorimeter of cerium fluoride scintillating crystals and tungsten absorber plates for calorimetry at the HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, R.; Dissertori, G.; Djambazov, L.; Donegà, M.; Dröge, M.; Haller, C.; Horisberger, U.; Lustermann, W.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Quittnat, M.; Pandolfi, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Cavallari, F.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, M.; D`Imperio, G.; del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Jorda Lope, C.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nuccetelli, M.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pellegrino, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Martelli, A.; Monti, V.; Pastrone, N.; Trapani, P. P.; Candelise, V.; Della Ricca, G.

    2016-07-01

    A sampling calorimeter using cerium fluoride scintillating crystals as active material, interleaved with absorber plates made of tungsten, and read out by wavelength-shifting fibres has been tested with high-energy electron beams at the CERN SPS H4 beam line, as well as with lower-energy beams at the INFN Frascati Beam Test Facility in Italy. Energy resolution studies revealed a low stochastic term (< 10 % /√{ E }). This result, combined with high radiation hardness of the material used, marks this sampling calorimeter as a good candidate for the detectors' forward regions during the high luminosity phase of LHC.

  4. LHC Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-07-28

    The LHC is the world’s highest energy particle accelerator and scientists use it to record an unprecedented amount of data. This data is recorded in electronic format and it requires an enormous computational infrastructure to convert the raw data into conclusions about the fundamental rules that govern matter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln gives us a sense of just how much data is involved and the incredible computer resources that makes it all possible.

  5. Report of the Commission on the Use of Standardized Tests in Undergraduate Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for College Admission Counseling, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Standardized admission tests have become an increasingly important factor in undergraduate admission. At the same time, reforms in elementary and secondary education at both the state and federal level have elevated the importance of standardized tests as a tool to measure educational outcomes. Nevertheless, long-standing concerns with…

  6. CMS tracker performance and readiness for LHC Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viliani, L.

    2016-07-01

    The CMS tracker performance during LHC Run I is reviewed. The latest results of both pixel and strip detectors following the first LHC Long Shutdown (LS1) are then presented. Results from detector calibration and commissioning, together with a description of operations and repairs done during LS1, will be shown.

  7. Commissioning HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schiess, K.

    1995-12-01

    In recent years, commissioning has been viewed as a separate process that had to be specified and implemented by a specialized entity. This article discusses commissioning in the HVAC field and looks at it from an international perspective. The author has worked in Europe, South Africa (British system) and the USA. The differences between the British and the American methods of commissioning are discussed, with examples given where the American way was unsuccessful. It is the design engineer`s job to test and accept (commission) an installation after the contractor has demonstrated the performance to the satisfaction of the design engineer. Once the plant is commissioned, it is put into service.

  8. 10 CFR 51.108 - Public hearings on Commission findings that inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CFR 52.103(b), the Commission will not admit any contentions on environmental issues, the adequacy of... finding under 10 CFR 52.103(g). materials licenses ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING...

  9. 10 CFR 51.108 - Public hearings on Commission findings that inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CFR 52.103(b), the Commission will not admit any contentions on environmental issues, the adequacy of... finding under 10 CFR 52.103(g). materials licenses ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING...

  10. 10 CFR 51.108 - Public hearings on Commission findings that inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CFR 52.103(b), the Commission will not admit any contentions on environmental issues, the adequacy of... finding under 10 CFR 52.103(g). materials licenses ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING...

  11. 10 CFR 51.108 - Public hearings on Commission findings that inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CFR 52.103(b), the Commission will not admit any contentions on environmental issues, the adequacy of... finding under 10 CFR 52.103(g). materials licenses ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING...

  12. Experiment Dashboard - a generic, scalable solution for monitoring of the LHC computing activities, distributed sites and services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, J.; Cinquilli, M.; Dieguez, D.; Dzhunov, I.; Karavakis, E.; Karhula, P.; Kenyon, M.; Kokoszkiewicz, L.; Nowotka, M.; Ro, G.; Saiz, P.; Sargsyan, L.; Schovancova, J.; Tuckett, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Experiment Dashboard system provides common solutions for monitoring job processing, data transfers and site/service usability. Over the last seven years, it proved to play a crucial role in the monitoring of the LHC computing activities, distributed sites and services. It has been one of the key elements during the commissioning of the distributed computing systems of the LHC experiments. The first years of data taking represented a serious test for Experiment Dashboard in terms of functionality, scalability and performance. And given that the usage of the Experiment Dashboard applications has been steadily increasing over time, it can be asserted that all the objectives were fully accomplished.

  13. Testing the electroweak phase transition and electroweak baryogenesis at the LHC and a circular electron-positron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fa Peng; Gu, Pei-Hong; Yin, Peng-Fei; Yu, Zhao-Huan; Zhang, Xinmin

    2016-05-01

    We study the collider phenomenology of the electroweak phase transition and electroweak baryogenesis in the framework of the effective field theory. Our study shows that the effective theory using the dimension-6 operators can enforce strong first order phase transition and provide sizable C P violation to realize a successful electroweak baryogenesis. Such dimension-6 operators can induce interesting Higgs phenomenology that can be verified at colliders such as the LHC and the planning CEPC. We then demonstrate that this effective theory can originate from vectorlike quarks and the triplet Higgs.

  14. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  15. Total dose dependence of oxide charge, interstrip capacitance and breakdown behavior of sLHC prototype silicon strip detectors and test structures of the SMART collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Betancourt, C.; Heffern, R.; Henderson, I.; Pixley, J.; Polyakov, A.; Wilder, M.; Boscardin, M.; Piemonte, C.; Pozza, A.; Zorzi, N.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Resta, G.; Bruzzi, M.; Macchiolo, A.; Borrello, L.; Messineo, A.; Creanza, D.; Manna, N.

    2007-09-01

    Within the R&D Program for the luminosity upgrade proposed for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), silicon strip detectors (SSD) and test structures (TS) were manufactured on several high-resistivity substrates: p-type Magnetic Czochralski (MCz) and Float Zone (FZ), and n-type FZ. To test total dose (TID) effects they were irradiated with 60Co gammas and the impact of surface radiation damage on the detector properties was studied. Selected results from the pre-rad and post-rad characterization of detectors and TS are presented, in particular interstrip capacitance and resistance, break-down voltage, flatband voltage and oxide charge. Surface damage effects show saturation after 150 krad and breakdown performance improves considerably after 210 krad. Annealing was performed both at room temperature and at 60 °C, and large effects on the surface parameters observed.

  16. The ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor: Luminosity detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    After the first three years of the LHC running, the ATLAS experiment extracted its pixel detector system to refurbish and re-position the optical readout drivers and install a new barrel layer of pixels. The experiment has also taken advantage of this access to install a set of beam monitoring telescopes with pixel sensors, four each in the forward and backward regions. These telescopes are based on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond sensors to survive in this high radiation environment without needing extensive cooling. This paper describes the lessons learned in construction and commissioning of the ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). We show results from the construction quality assurance tests and commissioning performance, including results from cosmic ray running in early 2015.

  17. Design, simulation, fabrication, and preliminary tests of 3D CMS pixel detectors for the super-LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Koybasi, Ozhan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Hansen, Thor-Erik; Kok, Angela; Hansen, Trond Andreas; Lietaer, Nicolas; Jensen, Geir Uri; Summanwar, Anand; Bolla, Gino; Kwan, Simon Wing Lok; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The Super-LHC upgrade puts strong demands on the radiation hardness of the innermost tracking detectors of the CMS, which cannot be fulfilled with any conventional planar detector design. The so-called 3D detector architectures, which feature columnar electrodes passing through the substrate thickness, are under investigation as a potential solution for the closest operation points to the beams, where the radiation fluence is estimated to reach 10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. Two different 3D detector designs with CMS pixel readout electronics are being developed and evaluated for their advantages and drawbacks. The fabrication of full-3D active edge CMS pixel devices with p-type substrate has been successfully completed at SINTEF. In this paper, we study the expected post-irradiation behaviors of these devices with simulations and, after a brief description of their fabrication, we report the first leakage current measurement results as performed on wafer.

  18. Halo-independent tests of dark matter direct detection signals: local DM density, LHC, and thermal freeze-out

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Schwetz, Thomas; Vogl, Stefan

    2015-08-19

    From an assumed signal in a Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiment a lower bound on the product of the DM-nucleon scattering cross section and the local DM density is derived, which is independent of the local DM velocity distribution. This can be combined with astrophysical determinations of the local DM density. Within a given particle physics model the bound also allows a robust comparison of a direct detection signal with limits from the LHC. Furthermore, the bound can be used to formulate a condition which has to be fulfilled if the particle responsible for the direct detection signal is a thermal relic, regardless of whether it constitutes all DM or only part of it. We illustrate the arguments by adopting a simplified DM model with a Z{sup ′} mediator and assuming a signal in a future xenon direct detection experiment.

  19. Testing and Commissioning of a Multifunctional Tool for the Dismantling of the Activated Internals of the KNK Reactor Shaft - 13524

    SciTech Connect

    Rothschmitt, Stefan; Graf, Anja; Bauer, Stefan; Klute, Stefan; Koselowski, Eiko

    2013-07-01

    The Compact Sodium Cooled Reactor Facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype reactor to demonstrate the Fast Breeder Reactor Technology in Germany, was in operation from 1971 to 1991. The dismantling activities started in 1991. The project aim is the green field in 2020. Most of the reactor internals as well as the primary and secondary cooling loops are already dismantled. The total contaminated sodium inventory has already been disposed of. Only the high activated reactor vessel shielding structures are remaining. Due to the high dose rates these structures must be dismantled remotely. For the dismantling of the primary shielding of the reactor vessel, 12 stacked cast iron blocks with a total mass of 90 Mg and single masses up to 15.5 Mg, a remote-controlled multifunctional dismantling device (HWZ) was designed, manufactured and tested in a mock-up. After successful approval of the test sequences by the authorities, the HWZ was implemented into the reactor building containment for final assembling of the auxiliary equipment and subsequent hot commissioning in 2012. Dismantling of the primary shielding blocks is scheduled for early 2013. (authors)

  20. LHC detector upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Green

    2003-09-15

    The LHC detectors are well into their construction phase. The LHC schedule shows first beam to ATLAS and CMS in 2007. Because the LHC accelerator has begun to plan for a ten fold increase in LHC design luminosity (the SLHC or super LHC) it is none too soon to begin to think about the upgrades which will be required of the present LHC detectors. In particular, the tracking systems of ATLAS and CMS will need to be completely rebuilt. Given the time needed to do the R & D, make prototypes, and construct the new detectors and given the accelerator schedule for the SLHC, work needs to begin rather soon.

  1. The TOTEM GEM Telescope (T2) at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto, M.; Berretti, M.; David, E.; Garcia, F.; Greco, V.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Oliveri, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Scribano, A.; Turini, N.; van Stenis, M.

    2011-06-01

    The TOTEM T2 telescope will measure inelastically produced charged particles in the forward region of the LHC Interaction Point 5. Each arm of the telescope consists in a set of 20 triple-GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) detectors with tracking and trigger capabilities. The GEM technology has been considered for the design of TOTEM very forward T2 telescopes thanks to its characteristics: large active areas, good position and timing resolution, excellent rate capability and radiation hardness. Each of the four T2 half arms has been fully assembled and equipped with electronics at CERN and systematically tested in the SPS beam line H8 in 2008/09. After some optimization, the operation of the GEM chambers was fully satisfactory and the T2 telescopes were installed and commissioned in their final positions at the LHC interaction point. During the first LHC run (December 2009) the T2 telescopes have collected data, at 900 GeV and 2.36 TeV. We will present here the performances of the detector and the preliminary results obtained using the data collected.

  2. 76 FR 6765 - Consumer Product Safety Act: Notice of Commission Action on the Stay of Enforcement of Testing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ...'s metal jewelry). 74 FR 6396, 6397. The Commission committed to the stay for one year, explaining....'' 74 FR at 6398. With regard to lead content in metal components of children's metal jewelry, the... manufactured after March 23, 2009. 74 FR at 6397. On December 28, 2009, the Commission published a notice...

  3. Testing the color charge and mass dependence of parton energy loss with heavy-to-light ratios at BNL RHIC and CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Armesto, Nestor; Dainese, Andrea; Salgado, Carlos A.; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2005-03-01

    The ratio of nuclear modification factors of high-p{sub T} heavy-flavored mesons to light-flavored hadrons ('heavy-to-light ratio') in nucleus-nucleus collisions tests the partonic mechanism expected to underlie jet quenching. Heavy-to-light ratios are mainly sensitive to the mass and color-charge dependences of medium-induced parton energy loss. Here, we assess the potential for identifying these two effects in D and B meson production at RHIC and at the LHC. To this end, we supplement the perturbative QCD factorized formalism for leading hadron production with radiative parton energy loss. For D meson spectra at high but experimentally accessible transverse momentum (10 < or approx. p{sub T} < or approx. 20 GeV) in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC, we find that charm quarks behave essentially like light quarks. However, since light-flavored hadron yields are dominated by gluon parents, the heavy-to-light ratio of D mesons is a sensitive probe of the color-charge dependence of parton energy loss. In contrast, due to the larger b quark mass, the medium modification of B mesons in the same kinematical regime provides a sensitive test of the mass dependence of parton energy loss. At RHIC energies, the strategies for identifying and disentangling the color charge and mass dependence of parton energy loss are more involved because of the smaller kinematical range accessible. We argue that at RHIC, the kinematical regime best suited for such an analysis of D mesons is 7 < or approx. p{sub T} < or approx. 12 GeV, whereas the study of lower transverse momenta is further complicated due to the known dominant contribution of additional, particle species dependent, nonperturbative effects.

  4. Commissioning MMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Paul; Gramling, Cheryl; Stone, John; Smith, Patrick; Reiter, Jenifer

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses commissioning of NASAs Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Mission. The mission includes four identical spacecraft with a large, complex set of instrumentation. The planning for and execution of commissioning for this mission is described. The paper concludes by discussing lessons learned.

  5. Water supply for the Nuclear Rocket Development Station at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Nevada Test Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, Richard Arden

    1972-01-01

    The Nuclear Rocket Development Station, in Jackass Flats, occupies about 123 square miles in the southwestern part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Nevada Test Site. Jackass Flats, an intermontane valley bordered by highlands on all sides except for a drainage outlet in the southwestern corner, has an average annual rainfall of 4 inches. Jackass Flats is underlain by alluvium, colluvium, and volcanic rocks of Cenozoic age and, at greater depth, by sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic age. The alluvium and the colluvium lie above the saturated zone throughout nearly all of Jackass Flats. The Paleozoic sedimentary rocks contain limestone and dolomite units that are excellent water producers elsewhere ; however, these units are too deep in Jackass Flats to be economic sources of water. The only important water-producing unit known in the vicinity of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station is a welded-tuff aquifer, the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, which receives no significant recharge. This member contains about 500 feet of highly fractured rock underlying an area 11 miles long and 3 miles wide in western Jackass Flats. Permeability of the aquifer is derived mostly from joints and fractures; however, some permeability may be derived from gas bubbles in the upper part of the unit. Transmissivity, obtained from pumping tests, ranges from 68,000 to 488,000 gallons per day per foot. Volume of the saturated part of the aquifer is about 3.5 cubic miles, and the average specific yield probably ranges from 1 to 5 percent. The volume of ground water in storage is probably within the range of 37-187 billion gallons. This large amount of water should be sufficient to supply the needs of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station for many years. Water at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station is used for public supply, construction, test-cell coolant, exhaust cooling, and thermal shielding during nuclear reactor and engine testing, and washdown. Present (1967) average

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Materials Interface Interactions Test: Papers presented at the Commission of European Communities workshop on in situ testing of radioactive waste forms and engineered barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Molecke, M.A.; Sorensen, N.R.; Wicks, G.G.

    1993-08-01

    The three papers in this report were presented at the second international workshop to feature the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Materials Interface Interactions Test (MIIT). This Workshop on In Situ Tests on Radioactive Waste Forms and Engineered Barriers was held in Corsendonk, Belgium, on October 13--16, 1992, and was sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). The Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre D`Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN, Belgium), and the US Department of Energy (via Savannah River) also cosponsored this workshop. Workshop participants from Belgium, France, Germany, Sweden, and the United States gathered to discuss the status, results and overviews of the MIIT program. Nine of the twenty-five total workshop papers were presented on the status and results from the WIPP MIIT program after the five-year in situ conclusion of the program. The total number of published MIIT papers is now up to almost forty. Posttest laboratory analyses are still in progress at multiple participating laboratories. The first MIIT paper in this document, by Wicks and Molecke, provides an overview of the entire test program and focuses on the waste form samples. The second paper, by Molecke and Wicks, concentrates on technical details and repository relevant observations on the in situ conduct, sampling, and termination operations of the MIIT. The third paper, by Sorensen and Molecke, presents and summarizes the available laboratory, posttest corrosion data and results for all of the candidate waste container or overpack metal specimens included in the MIIT program.

  7. Commissioning of HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schiess, K.

    1995-06-01

    In recent years various presentation and discussions have taken place which looked at commissioning as a separate process that had to be specified and implemented by a specialized entity in a project. This presentation discusses commissioning in the HVAC field and looks at it from an international perspective. The author has worked in Europe, South Africa (British system) and in the USA. The differences are discussed between the British and the American methods with some examples where the American way of commissioning was unsuccessful. The conclusion is that it is the design engineer`s job to test and accept (commission) an installation after the contractor has demonstrated the performance to the satisfaction of the design engineer. Once the plant is commissioned, it is put into service.

  8. LHC - a "Why" Facility

    ScienceCinema

    Gordon Kane

    2010-01-08

    The Standard Models of particle physics and cosmology describe the world we see, and how it works, very well. But we want to understand (not just accommodate) much more ? how does the Higgs mechanism work, what is the dark matter, why is the universe matter and not antimatter, why is parity violated, why are the particles (quarks and leptons) what they are, and why are the forces that act on them to make our world what they are, and more. Today is an exciting time to be doing particle physics ? on the experimental side we have data coming from LHC and dark matter experiments that will provide clues to these questions, and on the theoretical side we have a framework (string theory) that addresses all these ?why? questions. LHC data will not qualitatively improve our description ? rather, it may provide the data that will allow us to learn about the dark matter, the Higgs physics, the matter asymmetry, etc, to test underlying theories such as string theory, and begin to answer the ?why? questions. Supersymmetry is the best motivated discovery, and it would also open a window to the underlying theory near the Planck scale.

  9. The Test of Our Progress: The Clinton Record on Civil Rights. Report of the Citizens' Commission on Civil Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Corinne M., Ed.; Taylor, William L., Ed.

    The first part of this report consists of the findings of the Citizens' Commission on Civil Rights on the record of the Clinton administration on civil rights. Six years into President Clinton's term, he continues to speak with understanding and empathy about the plight of people trapped in racial and ethnic isolation, but his administration has…

  10. SU-F-BRE-16: VMAT Commissioning and Quality Assurance (QA) of An Elekta Synergy-STM Linac Using ICOM Test HarnessTM

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, A; Rajaguru, P; He, R; Yang, C; Kaurin, D; Paul, T; Plowman, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To establish a set of tests based on the iCOM software that can be used to commission and perform periodic QA of VMAT delivery on the Elekta Synergy-S, commonly known as the Beam Modulator (BM). Methods: iCOM is used to create and deliver customized treatment fields to characterize the system in terms of 1) MLC positioning accuracy under static and dynamic delivery with full gantry rotation, 2) MLC positioning with known errors, 3) Maximum dose rate, 4) Maximum MLC speed, 5) Maximum gantry speed, 6) Synchronization: gantry speed versus dose rate, and 7) Synchronization: MLC speed versus dose rate. The resulting images were captured on the iView GT and exported in DICOM format to Dosimetry Check™ system for visual and quantitative analysis. For the initial commissioning phase, the system tests described should be supplemented with extensive patient QAs covering all clinically relevant treatment sites. Results: The system performance test suite showed that on our Synergy-S, MLC positioning was accurate under both static and dynamic deliveries. Intentional errors of 1 mm were also easily identified on both static and dynamic picket fence tests. Maximum dose rate was verified with stop watch to be consistently between 475-480 MU/min. Maximum gantry speed and MLC speed were 5.5 degree/s and 2.5 cm/s respectively. After accounting for beam flatness, both synchronization tests, gantry versus dose rate and MLC speed versus dose rate, were successful as the fields were uniform across the strips and there were no obvious cold/hot spots. Conclusion: VMAT commissioning and quality assurance should include machine characterization tests in addition to patient QAs. Elekta iCOM is a valuable tool for the design of customized VMAT field with specific MU, MLC leaf positions, dose rate, and indirect control of MLC and gantry speed at each of its control points.

  11. International Commission on Trichinellosis: recommendations on the use of serological tests for the detection of Trichinella infection in animals and man.

    PubMed

    Gamble, H R; Pozio, E; Bruschi, F; Nöckler, K; Kapel, C M; Gajadhar, A A

    2004-03-01

    The use of serological tests to detect Trichinella infection in domestic and wild animals and in humans has not been standardised yet. This review provides an uniform set of recommendations for the development and use of serological tests to detect circulating antibodies in serum samples. The recommendations are based on the best scientific published information and on the unpublished data from laboratories with a great expertise in this field and represent the official position of the International Commission on Trichinellosis regarding acceptable methods and the evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity. These recommendations are subject to change as new scientific information becomes available. PMID:15071823

  12. The experimental setup of the Interaction in Crystals for Emission of RADiation collaboration at Mainzer Mikrotron: Design, commissioning, and tests

    SciTech Connect

    Lietti, D.; Backe, H.; Lauth, W.; Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Germogli, G.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Berra, A.; Prest, M.; Carturan, S.; De Salvador, D.; Vallazza, E.

    2015-04-15

    Silicon/germanium flat/bent crystals are thin devices able to efficiently deflect charged particle GeV-energy beams up to a few hundreds of μrad; moreover, high intensity photons can be efficiently produced in the so-called Multi-Volume Reflection (MVR) and Multiple Volume Reflections in One Crystal (MVROC) conditions. In the last years, the research interest in this field has moved to the dynamic studies of light negative leptons in the low energy range: the possibility to deflect negative particles and to produce high intensity γ sources via the coherent interactions with crystals in the sub-GeV energy range has been proved by the ICE-RAD (Interaction in Crystals for Emission of RADiation) Collaboration at the MAinzer MIkrotron (MAMI, Germany). This paper describes the setup used by the ICE-RAD experiment for the crystals characterization (both in terms of deflection and radiation emission properties): a high precision goniometer is used to align the crystals with the incoming beam, while a silicon based profilometer and an inorganic scintillator reconstruct, respectively, the particle position and the photon spectra after the samples. The crystals manufacturing process and their characterization, the silicon profilometer commissioning at the CERN PS T9 beamline, and the commissioning of the whole setup installed at MAMI are presented.

  13. The experimental setup of the Interaction in Crystals for Emission of RADiation collaboration at Mainzer Mikrotron: Design, commissioning, and tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietti, D.; Backe, H.; Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Berra, A.; Carturan, S.; De Salvador, D.; Germogli, G.; Guidi, V.; Lauth, W.; Mazzolari, A.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.

    2015-04-01

    Silicon/germanium flat/bent crystals are thin devices able to efficiently deflect charged particle GeV-energy beams up to a few hundreds of μrad; moreover, high intensity photons can be efficiently produced in the so-called Multi-Volume Reflection (MVR) and Multiple Volume Reflections in One Crystal (MVROC) conditions. In the last years, the research interest in this field has moved to the dynamic studies of light negative leptons in the low energy range: the possibility to deflect negative particles and to produce high intensity γ sources via the coherent interactions with crystals in the sub-GeV energy range has been proved by the ICE-RAD (Interaction in Crystals for Emission of RADiation) Collaboration at the MAinzer MIkrotron (MAMI, Germany). This paper describes the setup used by the ICE-RAD experiment for the crystals characterization (both in terms of deflection and radiation emission properties): a high precision goniometer is used to align the crystals with the incoming beam, while a silicon based profilometer and an inorganic scintillator reconstruct, respectively, the particle position and the photon spectra after the samples. The crystals manufacturing process and their characterization, the silicon profilometer commissioning at the CERN PS T9 beamline, and the commissioning of the whole setup installed at MAMI are presented.

  14. The experimental setup of the Interaction in Crystals for Emission of RADiation collaboration at Mainzer Mikrotron: Design, commissioning, and tests.

    PubMed

    Lietti, D; Backe, H; Bagli, E; Bandiera, L; Berra, A; Carturan, S; De Salvador, D; Germogli, G; Guidi, V; Lauth, W; Mazzolari, A; Prest, M; Vallazza, E

    2015-04-01

    Silicon/germanium flat/bent crystals are thin devices able to efficiently deflect charged particle GeV-energy beams up to a few hundreds of μrad; moreover, high intensity photons can be efficiently produced in the so-called Multi-Volume Reflection (MVR) and Multiple Volume Reflections in One Crystal (MVROC) conditions. In the last years, the research interest in this field has moved to the dynamic studies of light negative leptons in the low energy range: the possibility to deflect negative particles and to produce high intensity γ sources via the coherent interactions with crystals in the sub-GeV energy range has been proved by the ICE-RAD (Interaction in Crystals for Emission of RADiation) Collaboration at the MAinzer MIkrotron (MAMI, Germany). This paper describes the setup used by the ICE-RAD experiment for the crystals characterization (both in terms of deflection and radiation emission properties): a high precision goniometer is used to align the crystals with the incoming beam, while a silicon based profilometer and an inorganic scintillator reconstruct, respectively, the particle position and the photon spectra after the samples. The crystals manufacturing process and their characterization, the silicon profilometer commissioning at the CERN PS T9 beamline, and the commissioning of the whole setup installed at MAMI are presented. PMID:25933892

  15. Commissioning of the ALICE data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anticic, T.; Barroso, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Cobanoglu, O.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Kiss, T.; Makhlyueva, I.; Ozok, F.; Roukoutakis, F.; Schossmaier, K.; Soós, C.; Vyvre, P. V.; Vergara, S.

    2008-07-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A flexible, large bandwidth Data Acquisition System (DAQ) has been designed and deployed to collect sufficient statistics in the short running time foreseen per year for heavy ions and to accommodate very different requirements originated from the 18 sub-detectors. The Data Acquisition and Test Environment (DATE) is the software framework handling the data from the detector electronics up to the mass storage. This paper reviews the DAQ software and hardware architecture, including the latest features of the final design, such as the handling of the numerous calibration procedures in a common framework. We also discuss the large scale tests conducted on the real hardware to assess the standalone DAQ performances, its interfaces with the other online systems and the extensive commissioning performed in order to be ready for cosmics data taking scheduled to start in November 2007. The test protocols followed to integrate and validate each sub-detector with DAQ and Trigger hardware synchronized by the Experiment Control System are described. Finally, we give an overview of the experiment logbook, and some operational aspects of the deployment of our computing facilities. The implementation of a Transient Data Storage able to cope with the 1.25 GB/s recorded by the event-building machines and the data quality monitoring framework are covered in separate papers.

  16. Modeling and Commissioning of a Cold Compressor String for the Superfluid Cryogenic Plant at Fermilab's Cryo-module Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueresin, C.; Decker, L.; Treite, P.

    In 2011, Linde Cryogenics, a division of Linde Process Plants, Tulsa, Oklahoma, was awarded the contract to deliver a 500 W at 2 K superfluid cryogenic plant to Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Batavia, Illinois, USA. This system includes a cold compressor string with three centrifugal compressors and a vacuum pump skid with five volumetric pumps in parallel used to pump down helium to its saturation pressure corresponding to 2 K. Linde Kryotechnik AG, Pfungen Switzerland engineered and supplied the cold compressor system and commissioned it with its control logic to cover the complete range of system operation. The paper outlines issues regarding compressor design, compressor string modeling, control algorithms, controller performance, and surge protection.

  17. Supersymmetry At LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Shaaban

    2008-04-21

    One of the main motivation of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), scheduled to start around 2006, is to search for supersymmetric particles. The region of the parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, where supersymmetry can be discovered is investigated. We show that if supersymmetry exists at electroweak scale, it would be easy to find signals for it at the LHC. If the LHC does find supersymmetry, this would be one of the greatest achievements in the history of theoretical physics.

  18. Preliminary results from Charpy impact testing of irradiated JPDR weld metal and commissioning of a facility for machining of irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Hutton, J.T.; Creech, L.E.; Nanstad, R.K.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Rosseel, T.M.; Bishop, P.S.

    1999-09-01

    Forty two full-size Charpy specimens were machined from eight trepans that originated from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). They were also successfully tested and the preliminary results are presented in this report. The trends appear to be reasonable with respect to the location of the specimens with regards to whether they originated from the beltline or the core regions of the vessel, and also whether they were from the inside or outside regions of the vessel wall. A short synopsis regarding commissioning of the facility to machine irradiated materials is also provided.

  19. ATF2 Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, A.; Christian, G.; Parker, B.; Schulte, D.; Delahaye, J.-P.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.; Wolski, A.; Elsen, E.; Sanuki, T.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Ross, M.; Wendt, M.; Takahashi, T.; Bai, S.; Gao, J.; Bolzon, B.; Geffroy, N.; Jeremie, A.; Apsimon, R.; Burrows, P.; /Oxford U., JAI /Kyoto U., Inst. Chem. Res. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Orsay, LAL /Phang Accelerator Lab /Royal Holloway, U. of London /SLAC /Daresbury /University Coll. London /Manchester U. /Univ. of Tokyo U.

    2009-10-30

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line that aims to focus the low-emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a beam size of about 37 nm, and at the same time to demonstrate nm beam stability, using numerous advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools. The construction has been finished at the end of 2008 and the beam commissioning of ATF2 has started in December of 2008. ATF2 is constructed and commissioned by ATF international collaborations with strong US, Asian and European participation.

  20. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavian, L.; Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Wagner, U.; van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  1. ALICE TPC commissioning results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, D. T.; Alice Tpc Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    ALICE is a dedicated heavy-ion experiment at CERN LHC aiming to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. A lead-lead collision might produce several 10 00 new particles. Detailed study of the event requires precise measurements of the particle tracks. A 90 m3 Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with more than 500 000 read-out pads was built as the main central barrel tracker. Collisions can be recorded at a rate of up to about 1 kHz. The front-end electronics, designed from FPGAs and custom ASICs, performs shaping, amplification, digitisation and digital filtering of the signals. The data are forwarded to DAQ via 216 1.25 Gb/s fibre-optical links. Configuration, control and monitoring is done by an embedded Linux system on the front-end electronics. Before production runs with beam, extensive commissioning using tracks from cosmics and from the laser system as well as clusters from radioactive krypton gas is needed. Extensive results have been obtained with respect to the performance of the TPC including its sub-systems.

  2. Commissioning of CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Hutton

    1994-06-01

    Construction of the CEBAF accelerator, a 4 GeV CW recirculating linac, is virtually complete. The 338 power sources and superconducting RF cavities, which have all run above nominal operating gradient in vertical tests (average 10.7 MeV/m), are installed. All the major components of the nine recirculation arcs are installed and aligned. Pre-commissioning was performed in parallel with construction. Ninety-nine superconducting cavities were operated simultaneously at the nominal gradient of 5 MeV/m. A maximum beam current of 110 PA CW (ZOO PA design) was reached. A cryomodule with eight cavities has operated at 8 MeV/m. Commissioning of the entire machine began in May 94. Results obtained during commissioning of the two linacs and the first arc are presented. 600 MeV beam is ready to be brought to the first experimental hall meeting a DOE milestone established in 1988.

  3. The LHC Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-11

    The Large Hadron Collider or LHC is the world’s biggest particle accelerator, but it can only get particles moving very quickly. To make measurements, scientists must employ particle detectors. There are four big detectors at the LHC: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln introduces us to these detectors and gives us an idea of each one’s capabilities.

  4. ALICE and The state of matter at LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Assembly and installation of ALICE, the LHC heavy ion experiment dedicated to the study of matter at extreme temperature and pressure, is nearing completion and the commissioning of the detector is well under way. A good time to look back, to the making of ALICE, and to look forward, to the first physics with proton and heavy ion beams.

  5. Operation of the upgraded ATLAS Central Trigger Processor during the LHC Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelsen, H.; Carrillo Montoya, G.; Deviveiros, P.-O.; Eifert, T.; Galster, G.; Glatzer, J.; Haas, S.; Marzin, A.; Silva Oliveira, M. V.; Pauly, T.; Schmieden, K.; Spiwoks, R.; Stelzer, J.

    2016-02-01

    The ATLAS Central Trigger Processor (CTP) is responsible for forming the Level-1 trigger decision based on the information from the calorimeter and muon trigger processors. In order to cope with the increase of luminosity and physics cross-sections in Run 2, several components of this system have been upgraded. In particular, the number of usable trigger inputs and trigger items have been increased from 160 to 512 and from 256 to 512, respectively. The upgraded CTP also provides extended monitoring capabilities and allows to operate simultaneously up to three independent combinations of sub-detectors with full trigger functionality, which is particularly useful for commissioning, calibration and test runs. The software has also undergone a major upgrade to take advantage of all these new functionalities. An overview of the commissioning and the operation of the upgraded CTP during the LHC Run 2 is given.

  6. Developments and tests of double-sided silicon strip detectors and read-out electronics for the Internal Tracking System of ALICE at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, J. P.; Alice Collaboration

    1999-12-01

    The internal-tracking-system (ITS) of the ALICE detector at LHC, consists of six concentrical barrels of silicon detectors. The outmost two layers are made of double-sided strip detectors (SSD). In the framework of a R&D, the characteristics and performances of these devices, manufactured by two different companies, associated with their designed read-out electronics, have been studied off- and in-beam at the SPS (CERN). The results are presented and discussed.

  7. Monitoring distant fallout: the role of the Atomic Energy Commission Health and Safety Laboratory during the Pacific tests, with special attention to the events following BRAVO.

    PubMed

    Eisenbud, M

    1997-07-01

    The fallout from test BRAVO in March 1954 has had scientific, political, and social implications that have continued for more than 40 years. The test resulted in serious injury to the people of the Marshall Islands and 23 men on a nearby Japanese fishing boat. Prior to BRAVO there was insufficient appreciation of the dangers of fallout to people living downwind from surface or near-surface explosions of megaton weapons. In the absence of sufficient preplanning for fallout monitoring beyond the test-sites of earlier smaller yield tests, and as a result of the concern of the photographic film manufacturers, the Atomic Energy Commission Health and Safety Laboratory, now the Department of Energy Environmental Measurements Laboratory, was requested to develop a program of fallout surveillance. Beginning with Operation IVY in 1952, these surveys included aerial monitoring of the islands of the mid and western Pacific, as well as establishment of fallout monitoring stations in the United States and abroad. The first evidence of the post-BRAVO fallout was detected by a Atomic Energy Commission Health and Safety Laboratory instrument installed on the atoll of Rongerik, where 28 military personnel were stationed. The results of radiation surveys conducted immediately after BRAVO, as well as the reports of medical investigations, radioecological studies, and dose reconstruction that have been conducted by many laboratories over the years have been available from the beginning in unclassified form. However, from the time of the fallout, and continuing to the present, there have been many unanswered questions about what happened during the hours immediately after the fallout was reported. No formal investigation of the circumstances of the fallout was ever conducted, and there were serious misrepresentations of the facts in the official statements made at the time. PMID:9199215

  8. First Beam and High-Gradient Cryomodule Commissioning Results of the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Darren; et al.

    2015-06-01

    The advanced superconducting test accelerator at Fermilab has accelerated electrons to 20 MeV and, separately, the International Linear Collider (ILC) style 8-cavity cryomodule has achieved the ILC performance milestone of 31.5 MV/m per cavity. When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one ILC-type cryomodule, multiple accelerator R&D beamlines, and a downstream beamline to inject 300 MeV electrons into the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We report on the results of first beam, the achievement of our cryomodule to ILC gradient specifications, and near-term future plans for the facility.

  9. HTS power lead testing at the Fermilab magnet test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has tested high-temperature superconductor (HTS) power leads for cryogenic feed boxes to be placed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) interaction regions and at the new BTeV C0 interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron. A new test facility was designed and operated, successfully testing 20 pairs of HTS power leads for the LHC and 2 pairs of HTS power leads for the BTeV experiment. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. Results from the facility commissioning are included, as is the performance of a new insulation method to prevent frost accumulation on the warm ends of the power leads.

  10. The design and commissioning of an acoustic liner for propeller noise testing in the ARA transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M. E.; Neuman, D. A.

    1991-12-01

    An acoustic liner was designed and manufactured for use in a transonic wind tunnel to provide an acoustically acceptable environment for propeller noise testing up to high subsonic Mach number. Details of the aerodynamic design and development are presented and calibration of the liner with propeller model support systems is included. It is shown how the design of the acoustic treatment was aided by the use of a theoretical model for the tunnel reverberant field. An acoustic development program was undertaken involving horn tests to improve the quality of the liner. The success of this is demonstrated by propeller noise results. These results also provided the basis for definition of the practical acoustic regime of a lined tunnel suitable for the accurate measurement of propeller noise.

  11. Design, installation, commissioning and operation of a beamlet monitor in the negative ion beam test stand at NIFS

    SciTech Connect

    Antoni, V.; Agostinetti, P.; Brombin, M.; Cervaro, V.; Delogu, R.; Fasolo, D.; Franchin, L.; Ghiraldelli, R.; Molon, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G. Tollin, M.; Veltri, P.; De Muri, M.; Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Nakano, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Muraro, A.

    2015-04-08

    In the framework of the accompanying activity for the development of the two neutral beam injectors for the ITER fusion experiment, an instrumented beam calorimeter is being designed at Consorzio RFX, to be used in the SPIDER test facility (particle energy 100keV; beam current 50A), with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation. The main components of the instrumented calorimeter are one-directional carbon-fibre-carbon composite tiles. Some prototype tiles have been used as a small-scale version of the entire calorimeter in the test stand of the neutral beam injectors of the LHD experiment, with the aim of characterising the beam features in various operating conditions. The extraction system of the NIFS test stand source was modified, by applying a mask to the first gridded electrode, in order to isolate only a subset of the beamlets, arranged in two 3×5 matrices, resembling the beamlet groups of the ITER beam sources. The present contribution gives a description of the design of the diagnostic system, including the numerical simulations of the expected thermal pattern. Moreover the dedicated thermocouple measurement system is presented. The beamlet monitor was successfully used for a full experimental campaign, during which the main parameters of the source, mainly the arc power and the grid voltages, were varied. This contribution describes the methods of fitting and data analysis applied to the infrared images of the camera to recover the beamlet optics characteristics, in order to quantify the response of the system to different operational conditions. Some results concerning the beamlet features are presented as a function of the source parameters.

  12. Design, installation, commissioning and operation of a beamlet monitor in the negative ion beam test stand at NIFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, V.; Agostinetti, P.; Brombin, M.; Cervaro, V.; Delogu, R.; De Muri, M.; Fasolo, D.; Franchin, L.; Ghiraldelli, R.; Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Molon, F.; Muraro, A.; Nakano, H.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Takeiri, Y.; Tollin, M.; Tsumori, K.; Veltri, P.

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the accompanying activity for the development of the two neutral beam injectors for the ITER fusion experiment, an instrumented beam calorimeter is being designed at Consorzio RFX, to be used in the SPIDER test facility (particle energy 100keV; beam current 50A), with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation. The main components of the instrumented calorimeter are one-directional carbon-fibre-carbon composite tiles. Some prototype tiles have been used as a small-scale version of the entire calorimeter in the test stand of the neutral beam injectors of the LHD experiment, with the aim of characterising the beam features in various operating conditions. The extraction system of the NIFS test stand source was modified, by applying a mask to the first gridded electrode, in order to isolate only a subset of the beamlets, arranged in two 3×5 matrices, resembling the beamlet groups of the ITER beam sources. The present contribution gives a description of the design of the diagnostic system, including the numerical simulations of the expected thermal pattern. Moreover the dedicated thermocouple measurement system is presented. The beamlet monitor was successfully used for a full experimental campaign, during which the main parameters of the source, mainly the arc power and the grid voltages, were varied. This contribution describes the methods of fitting and data analysis applied to the infrared images of the camera to recover the beamlet optics characteristics, in order to quantify the response of the system to different operational conditions. Some results concerning the beamlet features are presented as a function of the source parameters.

  13. Correction: AIDS commission.

    PubMed

    1987-11-01

    A recent article by William Booth on the President's AIDS commission (News & Comment, 16 Oct., p. 262) incorrectly states that commission member Cory SerVaas, publisher of the Saturday Evening Post, drives her AIDS Mobile around the country. SerVaas does not drive the traveling van that offers free AIDS testing. Rather, she often flies to meet it as it travels around the country, stopping at shopping malls and churches by prearrangement with local civic and religious groups. SerVaas denies saying that homosexuals are "deviants." "We have helped homosexuals for many years," she says, pointing out that although her group primarily tests people who have a low risk of being infected, such as recipients of blood transfusions and women who may become pregnant, members of high-risk groups such as homosexuals and drug addicts are not excluded. PMID:17814691

  14. Exploring the Pomeron structure at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royon, Christophe; Saimpert, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    We present some physics topics that will allow us to constrain the Pomeron structure at the LHC in terms of gluon and quark densities using the dijet and γ+jet events and tagged protons in AFP (ATLAS) and CMS-TOTEM. We also discuss the possibility to test the BFKL dynamics using jet-gap-jet events.

  15. The LHCb Detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LHCb Collaboration; Alves, A. Augusto, Jr.; Filho, L. M. Andrade; Barbosa, A. F.; Bediaga, I.; Cernicchiaro, G.; Guerrer, G.; Lima, H. P., Jr.; Machado, A. A.; Magnin, J.; Marujo, F.; de Miranda, J. M.; Reis, A.; Santos, A.; Toledo, A.; Akiba, K.; Amato, S.; de Paula, B.; de Paula, L.; da Silva, T.; Gandelman, M.; Lopes, J. H.; Maréchal, B.; Moraes, D.; Polycarpo, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Ballansat, J.; Bastian, Y.; Boget, D.; DeBonis, I.; Coco, V.; David, P. Y.; Decamp, D.; Delebecque, P.; Drancourt, C.; Dumont-Dayot, N.; Girard, C.; Lieunard, B.; Minard, M. N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Rambure, T.; Rospabe, G.; T'Jampens, S.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bohner, G.; Bonnefoy, R.; Borras, D.; Carloganu, C.; Chanal, H.; Conte, E.; Cornat, R.; Crouau, M.; Delage, E.; Deschamps, O.; Henrard, P.; Jacquet, P.; Lacan, C.; Laubser, J.; Lecoq, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Magne, M.; Martemiyanov, M.; Mercier, M.-L.; Monteil, S.; Niess, V.; Perret, P.; Reinmuth, G.; Robert, A.; Suchorski, S.; Arnaud, K.; Aslanides, E.; Babel, J.; Benchouk, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P.; Cogan, J.; Derue, F.; Dinkespiler, B.; Duval, P.-Y.; Garonne, V.; Favard, S.; LeGac, R.; Leon, F.; Leroy, O.; Liotard, P.-L.; Marin, F.; Menouni, M.; Ollive, P.; Poss, S.; Roche, A.; Sapunov, M.; Tocco, L.; Viaud, B.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Amhis, Y.; Barrand, G.; Barsuk, S.; Beigbeder, C.; Beneyton, R.; Breton, D.; Callot, O.; Charlet, D.; D'Almagne, B.; Duarte, O.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jean-Marie, B.; Lefrancois, J.; Machefert, F.; Robbe, P.; Schune, M.-H.; Tocut, V.; Videau, I.; Benayoun, M.; David, P.; DelBuono, L.; Gilles, G.; Domke, M.; Futterschneider, H.; Ilgner, Ch; Kapusta, P.; Kolander, M.; Krause, R.; Lieng, M.; Nedos, M.; Rudloff, K.; Schleich, S.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Warda, K.; Agari, M.; Bauer, C.; Baumeister, D.; Bulian, N.; Fuchs, H. P.; Fallot-Burghardt, W.; Glebe, T.; Hofmann, W.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Löchner, S.; Ludwig, A.; Maciuc, F.; Sanchez Nieto, F.; Schmelling, M.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sexauer, E.; Smale, N. J.; Trunk, U.; Voss, H.; Albrecht, J.; Bachmann, S.; Blouw, J.; Deissenroth, M.; Deppe, H.; Dreis, H. B.; Eisele, F.; Haas, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Hennenberger, S.; Knopf, J.; Moch, M.; Perieanu, A.; Rabenecker, S.; Rausch, A.; Rummel, C.; Rusnyak, R.; Schiller, M.; Stange, U.; Uwer, U.; Walter, M.; Ziegler, R.; Avoni, G.; Balbi, G.; Bonifazi, F.; Bortolotti, D.; Carbone, A.; D'Antone, I.; Galli, D.; Gregori, D.; Lax, I.; Marconi, U.; Peco, G.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vecchi, S.; Bonivento, W.; Cardini, A.; Cadeddu, S.; DeLeo, V.; Deplano, C.; Furcas, S.; Lai, A.; Oldeman, R.; Raspino, D.; Saitta, B.; Serra, N.; Baldini, W.; Brusa, S.; Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Evangelisti, F.; Franconieri, A.; Germani, S.; Gianoli, A.; Guoming, L.; Landi, L.; Malaguti, R.; Padoan, C.; Pennini, C.; Savriè, M.; Squerzanti, S.; Zhao, T.; Zhu, M.; Bizzeti, A.; Graziani, G.; Lenti, M.; Lenzi, M.; Maletta, F.; Pennazzi, S.; Passaleva, G.; Veltri, M.; Alfonsi, M.; Anelli, M.; Balla, A.; Battisti, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Campana, P.; Carletti, M.; Ciambrone, P.; Corradi, G.; Dané, E.; Di Virgilio, A.; DeSimone, P.; Felici, G.; Forti, C.; Gatta, M.; Lanfranchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Pistilli, M.; Poli Lener, M.; Rosellini, R.; Santoni, M.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Zossi, A.; Ameri, M.; Cuneo, S.; Fontanelli, F.; Gracco, V.; Miní, G.; Parodi, M.; Petrolini, A.; Sannino, M.; Vinci, A.; Alemi, M.; Arnaboldi, C.; Bellunato, T.; Calvi, M.; Chignoli, F.; DeLucia, A.; Galotta, G.; Mazza, R.; Matteuzzi, C.; Musy, M.; Negri, P.; Perego, D.; Pessina, G.; Auriemma, G.; Bocci, V.; Buccheri, A.; Chiodi, G.; Di Marco, S.; Iacoangeli, F.; Martellotti, G.; Nobrega, R.; Pelosi, A.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Rinaldi, W.; Rossi, A.; Santacesaria, R.; Satriano, C.; Carboni, G.; Iannilli, M.; Massafferri Rodrigues, A.; Messi, R.; Paoluzzi, G.; Sabatino, G.; Santovetti, E.; Satta, A.; Amoraal, J.; van Apeldoorn, G.; Arink, R.; van Bakel, N.; Band, H.; Bauer, Th; Berkien, A.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bos, E.; Bron, Ch; Ceelie, L.; Doets, M.; van der Eijk, R.; Fransen, J.-P.; de Groen, P.; Gromov, V.; Hierck, R.; Homma, J.; Hommels, B.; Hoogland, W.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jansen, L.; Jaspers, M.; Kaan, B.; Koene, B.; Koopstra, J.; Kroes, F.; Kraan, M.; Langedijk, J.; Merk, M.; Mos, S.; Munneke, B.; Palacios, J.; Papadelis, A.; Pellegrino, A.; van Petten, O.; du Pree, T.; Roeland, E.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Schimmel, A.; Schuijlenburg, H.; Sluijk, T.; Spelt, J.; Stolte, J.; Terrier, H.; Tuning, N.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Vankov, P.; Verkooijen, J.; Verlaat, B.; Vink, W.; de Vries, H.; Wiggers, L.; Ybeles Smit, G.; Zaitsev, N.; Zupan, M.; Zwart, A.; van den Brand, J.; Bulten, H. J.; de Jong, M.; Ketel, T.; Klous, S.; Kos, J.; M'charek, B.; Mul, F.; Raven, G.; Simioni, E.; Cheng, J.; Dai, G.; Deng, Z.; Gao, Y.; Gong, G.; Gong, H.; He, J.; Hou, L.; Li, J.; Qian, W.; Shao, B.; Xue, T.; Yang, Z.; Zeng, M.; Muryn, B.; Ciba, K.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Blocki, J.; Galuszka, K.; Hajduk, L.; Michalowski, J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Polok, G.; Stodulski, M.; Witek, M.; Brzozowski, K.; Chlopik, A.; Gawor, P.; Guzik, Z.; Nawrot, A.; Srednicki, A.; Syryczynski, K.; Szczekowski, M.; Anghel, D. V.; Cimpean, A.; Coca, C.; Constantin, F.; Cristian, P.; Dumitru, D. D.; Dumitru, D. T.; Giolu, G.; Kusko, C.; Magureanu, C.; Mihon, Gh; Orlandea, M.; Pavel, C.; Petrescu, R.; Popescu, S.; Preda, T.; Rosca, A.; Rusu, V. L.; Stoica, R.; Stoica, S.; Tarta, P. D.; Filippov, S.; Gavrilov, Yu; Golyshkin, L.; Gushchin, E.; Karavichev, O.; Klubakov, V.; Kravchuk, L.; Kutuzov, V.; Laptev, S.; Popov, S.; Aref'ev, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Dolgoshein, V.; Egorychev, V.; Golutvin, A.; Gushchin, O.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Korolko, I.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Machikhiliyan, I.; Malyshev, S.; Mayatskaya, E.; Prokudin, M.; Rusinov, D.; Rusinov, V.; Shatalov, P.; Shchutska, L.; Tarkovskiy, E.; Tayduganov, A.; Voronchev, K.; Zhiryakova, O.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Eidelman, S.; Kozlinsky, A.; Shekhtman, L.; Beloous, K. S.; Dzhelyadin, R. I.; Gelitsky, Yu V.; Gouz, Yu P.; Kachnov, K. G.; Kobelev, A. S.; Matveev, V. D.; Novikov, V. P.; Obraztsov, V. F.; Ostankov, A. P.; Romanovsky, V. I.; Rykalin, V. I.; Soldatov, A. P.; Soldatov, M. M.; Tchernov, E. N.; Yushchenko, O. P.; Bochin, B.; Bondar, N.; Fedorov, O.; Golovtsov, V.; Guets, S.; Kashchuk, A.; Lazarev, V.; Maev, O.; Neustroev, P.; Sagidova, N.; Spiridenkov, E.; Volkov, S.; Vorobyev, An; Vorobyov, A.; Aguilo, E.; Bota, S.; Calvo, M.; Comerma, A.; Cano, X.; Dieguez, A.; Herms, A.; Lopez, E.; Luengo, S.; Garra, J.; Garrido, Ll; Gascon, D.; Gaspar de Valenzuela, A.; Gonzalez, C.; Graciani, R.; Grauges, E.; Perez Calero, A.; Picatoste, E.; Riera, J.; Rosello, M.; Ruiz, H.; Vilasis, X.; Xirgu, X.; Adeva, B.; Cid Vidal, X.; MartÉnez Santos, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Fungueiriño Pazos, J. L.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Gómez, C. Lois; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pérez Trigo, E.; Pló Casasús, M.; Rodriguez Cobo, C.; Rodríguez Pérez, P.; Saborido, J. J.; Seco, M.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Bartalini, P.; Bay, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; Blanc, F.; Borel, J.; Carron, B.; Currat, C.; Conti, G.; Dormond, O.; Ermoline, Y.; Fauland, P.; Fernandez, L.; Frei, R.; Gagliardi, G.; Gueissaz, N.; Haefeli, G.; Hicheur, A.; Jacoby, C.; Jalocha, P.; Jimenez-Otero, S.; Hertig, J.-P.; Knecht, M.; Legger, F.; Locatelli, L.; Moser, J.-R.; Needham, M.; Nicolas, L.; Perrin-Giacomin, A.; Perroud, J.-P.; Potterat, C.; Ronga, F.; Schneider, O.; Schietinger, T.; Steele, D.; Studer, L.; Tareb, M.; Tran, M. T.; van Hunen, J.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Zwahlen, N.; Bernet, R.; Büchler, A.; Gassner, J.; Lehner, F.; Sakhelashvili, T.; Salzmann, C.; Sievers, P.; Steiner, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; van Tilburg, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Ziegler, M.; Dovbnya, A.; Ranyuk, Yu; Shapoval, I.; Borisova, M.; Iakovenko, V.; Kyva, V.; Kovalchuk, O.; Okhrimenko, O.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Yu; Adinolfi, M.; Brook, N. H.; Head, R. D.; Imong, J. P.; Lessnoff, K. A.; Metlica, F. C. D.; Muir, A. J.; Rademacker, J. H.; Solomin, A.; Szczypka, P. M.; Barham, C.; Buszello, C.; Dickens, J.; Gibson, V.; Haines, S.; Harrison, K.; Jones, C. R.; Katvars, S.; Kerzel, U.; Lazzeroni, C.; Li, Y. Y.; Rogers, G.; Storey, J.; Skottowe, H.; Wotton, S. A.; Adye, T. J.; Densham, C. J.; Easo, S.; Franek, B.; Loveridge, P.; Morrow, D.; Morris, J. V.; Nandakumar, R.; Nardulli, J.; Papanestis, A.; Patrick, G. N.; Ricciardi, S.; Woodward, M. L.; Zhang, Z.; Chamonal, R. J. U.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, P.; Eisenhardt, S.; Gilardi, N.; Khan, A.; Kim, Y. M.; Lambert, R.; Lawrence, J.; Main, A.; McCarron, J.; Mclean, C.; Muheim, F.; Osorio-Oliveros, A. F.; Playfer, S.; Styles, N.; Xie, Y.; Bates, A.; Carson, L.; da Cunha Marinho, F.; Doherty, F.; Eklund, L.; Gersabeck, M.; Haddad, L.; Macgregor, A. A.; Melone, J.; McEwan, F.; Petrie, D. M.; Paterson, S. K.; Parkes, C.; Pickford, A.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rodrigues, E.; Saavedra, A. F.; Soler, F. J. P.; Szumlak, T.; Viret, S.; Allebone, L.; Awunor, O.; Back, J.; Barber, G.; Barnes, C.; Cameron, B.; Clark, D.; Clark, I.; Dornan, P.; Duane, A.; Eames, C.; Egede, U.; Girone, M.; Greenwood, S.; Hallam, R.; Hare, R.; Howard, A.; Jolly, S.; Kasey, V.; Khaleeq, M.; Koppenburg, P.; Miller, D.; Plackett, R.; Price, D.; Reece, W.; Savage, P.; Savidge, T.; Simmons, B.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Websdale, D.; Affolder, A.; Anderson, J. S.; Biagi, S. F.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Carroll, J. L.; Casse, G.; Cooke, P.; Donleavy, S.; Dwyer, L.; Hennessy, K.; Huse, T.; Hutchcroft, D.; Jones, D.; Lockwood, M.; McCubbin, M.; McNulty, R.; Muskett, D.; Noor, A.; Patel, G. D.; Rinnert, K.; Shears, T.; Smith, N. A.; Southern, G.; Stavitski, I.; Sutcliffe, P.; Tobin, M.; Traynor, S. M.; Turner, P.; Whitley, M.; Wormald, M.; Wright, V.; Bibby, J. H.; Brisbane, S.; Brock, M.; Charles, M.; Cioffi, C.; Gligorov, V. V.; Handford, T.; Harnew, N.; Harris, F.; John, M. J. J.; Jones, M.; Libby, J.; Martin, L.; McArthur, I. A.; Muresan, R.; Newby, C.; Ottewell, B.; Powell, A.; Rotolo, N.; Senanayake, R. S.; Somerville, L.; Soroko, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sullivan, P.; Stokes-Rees, I.; Topp-Jorgensen, S.; Xing, F.; Wilkinson, G.; Artuso, M.; Belyaev, I.; Blusk, S.; Lefeuvre, G.; Menaa, N.; Menaa-Sia, R.; Mountain, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Abadie, L.; Aglieri-Rinella, G.; Albrecht, E.; André, J.; Anelli, G.; Arnaud, N.; Augustinus, A.; Bal, F.; Barandela Pazos, M. C.; Barczyk, A.; Bargiotti, M.; Batista Lopes, J.; Behrendt, O.; Berni, S.; Binko, P.; Bobillier, V.; Braem, A.; Brarda, L.; Buytaert, J.; Camilleri, L.; Cambpell, M.; Castellani, G.; Cataneo, F.; Cattaneo, M.; Chadaj, B.; Charpentier, P.; Cherukuwada, S.; Chesi, E.; Christiansen, J.; Chytracek, R.; Clemencic, M.; Closier, J.; Collins, P.; Colrain, P.; Cooke, O.; Corajod, B.; Corti, G.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Damodaran, B.; David, C.; de Capua, S.; Decreuse, G.; Degaudenzi, H.; Dijkstra, H.; Droulez, J.-P.; Duarte Ramos, D.; Dufey, J. P.; Dumps, R.; Eckstein, D.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Flegel, W.; Forty, R.; Fournier, C.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Gaidioz, B.; Gaspar, C.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gavillet, P.; Go, A.; Gracia Abril, G.; Graulich, J.-S.; Giudici, P.-A.; Guirao Elias, A.; Guglielmini, P.; Gys, T.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.; Harvey, J.; Hay, B.; Hernando Morata, J.-A.; Herranz Alvarez, J.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hilke, H. J.; von Holtey, G.; Hulsbergen, W.; Jacobsson, R.; Jamet, O.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Kanaya, N.; Knaster Refolio, J.; Koestner, S.; Koratzinos, M.; Kristic, R.; Lacarrère, D.; Lasseur, C.; Lastovicka, T.; Laub, M.; Liko, D.; Lippmann, C.; Lindner, R.; Losasso, M.; Maier, A.; Mair, K.; Maley, P.; Mato Vila, P.; Moine, G.; Morant, J.; Moritz, M.; Moscicki, J.; Muecke, M.; Mueller, H.; Nakada, T.; Neufeld, N.; Ocariz, J.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Parzefall, U.; Patel, M.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Piedigrossi, D.; Pivk, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ponce, S.; Ranjard, F.; Riegler, W.; Renaud, J.; Roiser, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, L.; Ruf, T.; Ruffinoni, D.; Saladino, S.; Sambade Varela, A.; Santinelli, R.; Schmelling, S.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Schöning, A.; Schopper, A.; Seguinot, J.; Snoeys, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, A. C.; Somogyi, P.; Stoica, R.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; Toledo Alarcon, J.; Ullaland, O.; Valassi, A.; Vannerem, P.; Veness, R.; Wicht, P.; Wiedner, D.; Witzeling, W.; Wright, A.; Wyllie, K.; Ypsilantis, T.

    2008-08-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva). The initial configuration and expected performance of the detector and associated systems, as established by test beam measurements and simulation studies, is described.

  16. First commissioning results with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS.

    PubMed

    Thomae, R; Conradie, J; Delsink, H; Du Plessis, H; Fourie, D; Hitz, D; Klopp, M; Kohler, I; Kuechler, D; Lussi, C; McAlister, R; Ntshangase, S; Sakildien, M

    2012-02-01

    iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Science (iThemba LABS) is a multi-disciplinary accelerator facility. One of its main activities is the operation of a separated-sector cyclotron with a K-value of 200, which provides beams of various ion species. These beams are used for fundamental nuclear physics research in the intermediate energy region, radioisotope production, and medical physics applications. Due to the requirements of nuclear physics for new ion species and higher energies, the decision was made to install a copy of the so-called Grenoble test source (GTS) at iThemba LABS. In this paper, we will report on the experimental setup and the first results obtained with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS. PMID:22380170

  17. First commissioning results with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABSa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomae, R.; Conradie, J.; Delsink, H.; Du Plessis, H.; Fourie, D.; Hitz, D.; Klopp, M.; Kohler, I.; Kuechler, D.; Lussi, C.; McAlister, R.; Ntshangase, S.; Sakildien, M.

    2012-02-01

    iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Science (iThemba LABS) is a multi-disciplinary accelerator facility. One of its main activities is the operation of a separated-sector cyclotron with a K-value of 200, which provides beams of various ion species. These beams are used for fundamental nuclear physics research in the intermediate energy region, radioisotope production, and medical physics applications. Due to the requirements of nuclear physics for new ion species and higher energies, the decision was made to install a copy of the so-called Grenoble test source (GTS) at iThemba LABS. In this paper, we will report on the experimental setup and the first results obtained with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS.

  18. First commissioning results with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomae, R.; Conradie, J.; Delsink, H.; Du Plessis, H.; Fourie, D.; Klopp, M.; Kohler, I.; Lussi, C.; McAlister, R.; Ntshangase, S.; Sakildien, M.; Hitz, D.

    2012-02-15

    iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Science (iThemba LABS) is a multi-disciplinary accelerator facility. One of its main activities is the operation of a separated-sector cyclotron with a K-value of 200, which provides beams of various ion species. These beams are used for fundamental nuclear physics research in the intermediate energy region, radioisotope production, and medical physics applications. Due to the requirements of nuclear physics for new ion species and higher energies, the decision was made to install a copy of the so-called Grenoble test source (GTS) at iThemba LABS. In this paper, we will report on the experimental setup and the first results obtained with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS.

  19. Run II of the LHC: The Accelerator Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redaelli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    In 2015 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) starts its Run II operation. After the successful Run I at 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV in the 2010-2013 period, a first long shutdown (LS1) was mainly dedicated to the consolidation of the LHC magnet interconnections, to allow the LHC to operate at its design beam energy of 7 TeV. Other key accelerator systems have also been improved to optimize the performance reach at higher beam energies. After a review of the LS1 activities, the status of the LHC start-up progress is reported, addressing in particular the status of the LHC hardware commissioning and of the training campaign of superconducting magnets that will determine the operation beam energy in 2015. Then, the plans for the Run II operation are reviewed in detail, covering choice of initial machine parameters and strategy to improve the Run II performance. Future prospects of the LHC and its upgrade plans are also presented.

  20. FELIX. A full acceptance detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avati, V.; Eggert, K.; Taylor, C.

    1999-03-01

    The FELIX collaboration has proposed the construction of a full acceptance detector for the LHC, to be located at Intersection Region 4, and to be commissioned concurrently with the LHC. The primary mission of FELIX is QCD: to provide comprehensive and definitive observations of a very broad range of strong-interaction processes. This paper reviews the detector concept and performance characteristics, the physics menu, and plans for integration of FELIX into the collider lattice and physical environment. The current status of the FELIX Letter of Intent is discussed.

  1. Experimental Setup and Commissioning of a Test Facility for Gain Evaluation of Microchannel-Plate Photomultipliers in High Magnetic Field at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringley, Eric; Cao, Tongtong; Ilieva, Yordonka; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Park, Kijun; Zorn, Carl

    2014-09-01

    At the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) a research and development project for a Detector of Internally-Reflected Cherenkov light for the upcoming Electron Ion Collider is underway. One goal is the development of a compact readout camera that can operate in high magnetic fields. Small-size photon sensors, such as Microchannel-Plate Photomultipliers (MCP-PMT), are key components of the readout. Here we present our work to set up and commission a dedicated test facility at JLab where MCP-PMT gain is evaluated in magnetic fields of up to 5 T, and to develop a test procedure and analysis software to determine the gain. We operate the setup in a single-photon mode, where a light-emitting diode delivers photons to the sensor's photocathode. The PMT spectrum is measured with a flash Analog-to-Digital converter (fADC). We model the spectrum as a sum of an exponential background and a convolution of Poisson and Gaussian distributions of the pedestal and multiple photoelectron peaks, respectively. We determine the PMT's gain from the position of the single-photoelectron peak obtained by fitting the fADC spectrum to the model. Our gain uncertainty is <10%. The facility is now established and will have a long-lasting value for sensor tests and beyond-nuclear-physics applications.

  2. Commissioning the Majorana Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenqin; Majorana Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator deploys high purity germanium (HPGe) detector modules to search for neutrinoless double beta (0 νββ) decay in 76Ge. The experiment is aimed at demonstrating the technical feasibility and low backgrounds for a next generation Ge-based BBz experiment. The program of testing and commissioning the Demonstrator modules is a critical step to debug and improve the experimental apparatus, to establish and refine operational procedures, and to develop data analysis tools. In this talk, we will discuss our experience commissioning the Demonstrator modules and show how this program leads to successful data-taking. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  3. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  4. LHC forward physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cartiglia, N.; Royon, C.

    2015-10-02

    The goal of this report is to give a comprehensive overview of the rich field of forward physics, with a special attention to the topics that can be studied at the LHC. The report starts presenting a selection of the Monte Carlo simulation tools currently available, chapter 2, then enters the rich phenomenology of QCD at low, chapter 3, and high, chapter 4, momentum transfer, while the unique scattering conditions of central exclusive production are analyzed in chapter 5. The last two experimental topics, Cosmic Ray and Heavy Ion physics are presented in the chapter 6 and 7 respectively. Chapter 8 is dedicated to the BFKL dynamics, multiparton interactions, and saturation. The report ends with an overview of the forward detectors at LHC. Each chapter is correlated with a comprehensive bibliography, attempting to provide to the interested reader with a wide opportunity for further studies.

  5. SU-E-I-65: The Joint Commission's Requirements for Annual Diagnostic Physics Testing of Nuclear Medicine Equipment, and a Clinically Relevant Methodology for Testing Low-Contrast Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    West, W. Geoffrey; Gray, David Clinton

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To introduce the Joint Commission's requirements for annual diagnostic physics testing of all nuclear medicine equipment, effective 7/1/2014, and to highlight an acceptable methodology for testing lowcontrast resolution of the nuclear medicine imaging system. Methods: The Joint Commission's required diagnostic physics evaluations are to be conducted for all of the image types produced clinically by each scanner. Other accrediting bodies, such as the ACR and the IAC, have similar imaging metrics, but do not emphasize testing low-contrast resolution as it relates clinically. The proposed method for testing low contrast resolution introduces quantitative metrics that are clinically relevant. The acquisition protocol and calculation of contrast levels will utilize a modified version of the protocol defined in AAPM Report #52. Results: Using the Rose criterion for lesion detection with a SNRpixel = 4.335 and a CNRlesion = 4, the minimum contrast levels for 25.4 mm and 31.8 mm cold spheres were calculated to be 0.317 and 0.283, respectively. These contrast levels are the minimum threshold that must be attained to guard against false positive lesion detection. Conclusion: Low contrast resolution, or detectability, can be properly tested in a manner that is clinically relevant by measuring the contrast level of cold spheres within a Jaszczak phantom using pixel values within ROI's placed in the background and cold sphere regions. The measured contrast levels are then compared to a minimum threshold calculated using the Rose criterion and a CNRlesion = 4. The measured contrast levels must either meet or exceed this minimum threshold to prove acceptable lesion detectability. This research and development activity was performed by the authors while employed at West Physics Consulting, LLC. It is presented with the consent of West Physics, which has authorized the dissemination of the information and/or techniques described in the work.

  6. EMACK electromagnetic launcher commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deis, D. W.; Scherbarth, D. W.; Ferrentino, G. L.

    1984-03-01

    The Laboratory Demonstration Electromagnetic Launcher Program (EMACK) was initiated in April 1979, with the objective to design, construct, and demonstrate a complete electromagnetic launcher (EML) system capable of accelerating projectiles of substantial mass to velocities significantly greater than those achievable with conventional chemical systems. The last hardware was installed in late 1981. During February 1982, a series of five test shots was made to evaluate the system's performance. Particular attention is given to the parameters of the final, as-built hardware, and the results of the commissioning tests. The results of these tests have demonstrated the viability of the components required for large scale electromagnetic launchers. It has been shown that large projectiles with velocities significantly greater than those achievable by chemical systems can be accelerated intact.

  7. A novel Beam Halo Monitor for the CMS experiment at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orfanelli, S.; Dabrowski, A. E.; Giunta, M.; Loos, R.; Ambrose, M. J.; Mans, J.; Rusack, R.; Stifter, K.; Stickland, D.; Fabbri, F.; Manna, A.; Montanari, A.; Tosi, N.; Calvelli, V.

    2015-11-01

    A novel Beam Halo Monitor (BHM) has been designed and built for the CMS experiment at the LHC. It will provide an online, bunch-by-bunch measurement of background particles created by interactions of the proton beam with residual gas molecules in the vacuum chamber or with collimator material upstream of CMS. The BHM consists of two arrays of twenty detectors that are mounted around the outer forward shielding of the CMS experiment. Each detector is comprised of a cylindrical quartz radiator, optically coupled to a fast ultraviolet-sensitive photomultiplier tube from one end and painted black at the opposite end. Particles moving towards the photomultiplier tube will be detected with time resolution of a few nanoseconds, allowing to measure the flux of background particles produced upstream of CMS and suppress signals from collision-induced products. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to optimise the detector design. Prior to installation, the performance of the prototype detectors was measured in test beams quantifying the detector's direction-sensitive response and time resolution. The BHM was installed during the first LHC long shutdown (LS1) and is currently being commissioned. Design considerations, results from the test-beams supporting the design and the installation of the BHM in the CMS are presented.

  8. Higgs Boson Search at LHC (and LHC/CMS status)

    SciTech Connect

    Korytov, Andrey

    2008-11-23

    Presented are the results of the most recent studies by the CMS and ATLAS collaborations on the expected sensitivity of their detectors to observing a Higgs boson at LHC. The overview is preceded with a brief summary of the LHC and the CMS Experiment status.

  9. Gap between jets at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royon, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    We describe a NLL BFKL calculation implemented in the HERWIG MC of the gap between jets cross section, that represent a test of BFKL dynamics. We compare the predictions with recent measurements at the Tevatron and present predictions for the LHC. We also discuss the interesting process of looking for gap between jets in diffractive events when protons are detected in the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) detectors.

  10. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  11. LNV Higgses at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiezza, Alessio; Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio

    2016-06-01

    Lepton number is a fundamental symmetry that can be probed at the LHC. Here, we study the Higgs sector of theories responsible for neutrino mass generation. After a brief discussion of simple see-saw scenarios, we turn to theories where heavy Majorana neutrino mass is protected by a gauge symmetry and focus on the Left-Right symmetric theory. There, the SM-like Higgs boson can decay to a pair of heavy neutrinos and provide enough information to establish the origin of neutrino mass.

  12. Monotops at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea, J.; Fuks, B.

    2011-10-01

    We explore scenarios where top quarks may be produced singly in association with missing energy, a very distinctive signature, which, in analogy with monojets, we dub monotops. We find that monotops can be produced in a variety of modes, typically characterized by baryon number-violating or flavorchanging neutral interactions. We build a simplified model that encompasses all the possible (tree-level) production mechanisms and study the LHC sensitiveness to a few representative scenarios by considering fully hadronic top decays. We find that constraints on such exotic models can already be set with 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at {radical}(s)=7 TeV.

  13. Economic Commission Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Summarizing presentations and discussions of the Economic Commission of the International Non-Governmental Organizations Conference on Discrimination Against Indigenous Populations (1977), this report addresses: multinational corporations; the land question; and the Commission's recommended "Plan of Action". (JC)

  14. Operating the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid: current and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flix Molina, J.; Forti, A.; Girone, M.; Sciaba, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Wordwide LHC Computing Grid project (WLCG) provides the computing and storage resources required by the LHC collaborations to store, process and analyse their data. It includes almost 200,000 CPU cores, 200 PB of disk storage and 200 PB of tape storage distributed among more than 150 sites. The WLCG operations team is responsible for several essential tasks, such as the coordination of testing and deployment of Grid middleware and services, communication with the experiments and the sites, followup and resolution of operational issues and medium/long term planning. In 2012 WLCG critically reviewed all operational procedures and restructured the organisation of the operations team as a more coherent effort in order to improve its efficiency. In this paper we describe how the new organisation works, its recent successes and the changes to be implemented during the long LHC shutdown in preparation for the LHC Run 2.

  15. The LHC Vacuum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröbner, O.

    1997-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, involves two proton storage rings with colliding beams of 7 TeV. The machine will be housed in the existing LEP tunnel and requires 16 m long superconducting bending magnets. The vacuum chamber will be the inner wall of the cryostat and hence at the temperature of the magnet cold bore, i.e. at 1.9 K and therefore a very good cryo-pump. To reduce the cryogenic power consumption, the heat load from synchrotron radiation and from the image currents in the vacuum chamber will be absorbed on a 'beam screen', which operates between 5 and 20 K, inserted in the magnet cold bore. The design pressure necessary for operation must provide a lifetime of many days and a stringent requirement comes from the power deposition in the superconducting magnet coils due to protons scattered on the residual gas which could lead to a magnet quench. Cryo-pumping of gas on the cold surfaces provides the necessary low gas densities but it must be ensured that the vapour pressure of cryo-sorbed molecules, of which H2 and He would be the most critical species, remains within acceptable limits. The room temperature sections of the LHC, specifically in the experiments, the vacuum must be stable against ion induced desorption and ISR-type 'pressure bumps'.

  16. Supersymmetry at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bartl, A.; Soederqvist, J.; Paige, F.

    1996-11-22

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) is an appealing concept which provides a plausible solution to the fine tuning problem, while leaving the phenomenological success of the Standard Model (SM) unchanged. Moreover, some SUSY models allow for the unification of gauge couplings at a scale of M{sub GUT} {approx} 10{sup 16} GeV. A further attractive feature is the possibility of radiative breaking of the electro-weak symmetry group SU(2) {times} U(1). The masses of the SUSY partners of the SM particles are expected to be in the range 100 GeV to 1 TeV. One of the main goals of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be either to discover weak-scale SUSY or to exclude it over the entire theoretically allowed parameter space. The authors have developed a strategy for the analysis of experimental data at LHC which will allow them to determine the scale for supersymmetry, to limit the model parameter space, and to make precision measurements of model parameters.

  17. ATLAS Distributed Computing in LHC Run2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, Simone

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing infrastructure has evolved after the first period of LHC data taking in order to cope with the challenges of the upcoming LHC Run-2. An increase in both the data rate and the computing demands of the Monte-Carlo simulation, as well as new approaches to ATLAS analysis, dictated a more dynamic workload management system (Prodsys-2) and data management system (Rucio), overcoming the boundaries imposed by the design of the old computing model. In particular, the commissioning of new central computing system components was the core part of the migration toward a flexible computing model. A flexible computing utilization exploring the use of opportunistic resources such as HPC, cloud, and volunteer computing is embedded in the new computing model; the data access mechanisms have been enhanced with the remote access, and the network topology and performance is deeply integrated into the core of the system. Moreover, a new data management strategy, based on a defined lifetime for each dataset, has been defined to better manage the lifecycle of the data. In this note, an overview of an operational experience of the new system and its evolution is presented.

  18. Vector dark matter at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jason; Marfatia, Danny; Yaylali, David

    2015-11-01

    We consider monojet searches at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for spin-1 dark matter that interacts with quarks through a contact operator. If the dark matter particles are produced with longitudinal polarizations, then the production matrix element is enhanced by factors of the energy. We show that this particularly effective search strategy can test models for which the energy suppression scale of the operator is as large as 105 TeV . As such, these searches can probe a large class of models for which the contact-operator approximation is valid. We find that for contact operators that permit velocity-independent dark matter-nucleon scattering, LHC monojet searches for spin-1 dark matter are competitive with or far surpass direct-detection searches depending on whether the scattering is spin independent or spin dependent, respectively.

  19. Cornering diphoton resonance models at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backović, Mihailo; Kulkarni, Suchita; Mariotti, Alberto; Sessolo, Enrico Maria; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We explore the ability of the high luminosity LHC to test models which can explain the 750 GeV diphoton excess. We focus on a wide class of models where a 750 GeV singlet scalar couples to Standard Model gauge bosons and quarks, as well as dark matter. Including both gluon and photon fusion production mechanisms, we show that LHC searches in channels correlated with the diphoton signal will be able to probe wide classes of diphoton models with L ˜ 3000 fb-1 of data. Furthermore, models in which the scalar is a portal to the dark sector can be cornered with as little as L ˜ 30 fb-1.

  20. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Jon; Carrazza, Stefano; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; De Roeck, Albert; Feltesse, Joël; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; McNulty, Ronan; Morsch, Andreas; Nadolsky, Pavel; Radescu, Voica; Rojo, Juan; Thorne, Robert

    2016-02-01

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+{α }s uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new generation of PDFs, which include substantial information from experimental data from the Run I of the LHC. We then propose a new prescription for the combination of a suitable subset of the available PDF sets, which is presented in terms of a single combined PDF set. We finally discuss tools which allow for the delivery of this combined set in terms of optimized sets of Hessian eigenvectors or Monte Carlo replicas, and their usage, and provide some examples of their application to LHC phenomenology. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Guido Altarelli (1941-2015), whose seminal work made possible the quantitative study of PDFs.

  1. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Butterworth, Jon; Carrazza, Stefano; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Roeck, Albert De; Feltesse, Joel; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; et al

    2016-01-06

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+αs uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new generation of PDFs, which include substantial information from experimental data from the Run I of the LHC. We then propose a new prescription for the combination of a suitable subset of the available PDF sets, which is presented in terms of a single combined PDF set. Lastly, we finally discuss tools which allow for themore » delivery of this combined set in terms of optimized sets of Hessian eigenvectors or Monte Carlo replicas, and their usage, and provide some examples of their application to LHC phenomenology.« less

  2. GREGOR telescope: start of commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkmer, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Denker, C.; Solanki, S.; Balthasar, H.; Berkefeld, T.; Caligari, P.; Collados, M.; Halbgewachs, C.; Heidecke, F.; Hofmann, A.; Klvana, M.; Kneer, F.; Lagg, A.; Popow, E.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Sobotka, M.; Soltau, D.; Strassmeier, K.

    2010-07-01

    With the integration of a 1-meter Cesic primary mirror the GREGOR telescope pre-commissioning started. This is the first time, that the entire light path has seen sunlight. The pre-commissioning period includes testing of the main optics, adaptive optics, cooling system, and pointing system. This time was also used to install a near-infrared grating spectro-polarimeter and a 2D-spectropolarimeter for the visible range as first-light science instruments. As soon as the final 1.5 meter primary mirror is installed, commissioning will be completed, and an extended phase of science verification will follow. In the near future, GREGOR will be equipped with a multi-conjugate adaptive optics system that is presently under development at KIS.

  3. Precision Electroweak Physics at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Ayres

    2015-04-01

    The current status of precision tests of the electroweak Standard Model is summarized, and a short review of the theory input from higher-order loop corrections is given. The most constraining quantities are the masses and couplings of the W and Z bosons, and it is shown how these put strong bounds on various examples of new physics. Furthermore, the impact of current and future LHC data on electroweak precision tests is described in some detail. It is also briefly discussed how measurements of anomalous gauge boson couplings provide complementary information about the electroweak theory.

  4. Guidelines for residential commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-01-31

    Currently, houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict, largely because they are field assembled and there is no consistent process to identify problems or to correct them. Residential commissioning is a solution to this problem. This guide is the culmination of a 30-month project that began in September 1999. The ultimate objective of the project is to increase the number of houses that undergo commissioning, which will improve the quality, comfort, and safety of homes for California citizens. The project goal is to lay the groundwork for a residential commissioning industry in California focused on end-use energy and non-energy issues. As such, we intend this guide to be a beginning and not an end. Our intent is that the guide will lead to the programmatic integration of commissioning with other building industry processes, which in turn will provide more value to a single site visit for people such as home energy auditors and raters, home inspectors, and building performance contractors. Project work to support the development of this guide includes: a literature review and annotated bibliography, which facilitates access to 469 documents related to residential commissioning published over the past 20 years (Wray et al. 2000), an analysis of the potential benefits one can realistically expect from commissioning new and existing California houses (Matson et al. 2002), and an assessment of 107 diagnostic tools for evaluating residential commissioning metrics (Wray et al. 2002). In this guide, we describe the issues that non-experts should consider in developing a commissioning program to achieve the benefits we have identified. We do this by providing specific recommendations about: how to structure the commissioning process, which diagnostics to use, and how to use them to commission new and existing houses. Using examples, we also demonstrate the potential benefits of applying the recommended whole-house commissioning approach to

  5. Optics Studies of the LHC Beam Transfer Line TI8

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wenninger; G. Arduini; B. Goddard; D. Jacquet; V. Kain; M. Lamont; V. Mertens; J.A. Uythoven; Y.-C. Chao

    2005-05-16

    The optics of the newly commissioned LHC beam transfer line TI 8 was studied with beam trajectories, dispersion and profile measurements. Steering magnet response measurements were used to analyze the quality of the steering magnets and of the beam position monitors. A simultaneous fit of the quadrupole strengths was used to search for setting or calibration errors. Residual coupling between the planes was evaluated using high statistics samples of trajectories. Initial conditions for the optics at the entrance of the transfer line were reconstructed from beam profile measurements with Optical Transition Radiation monitors. The paper presents the various analysis methods and their errors. The expected emittance growth arising from optical mismatch into the LHC is evaluated.

  6. THE COLLEGE COMMISSIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOOKS, JOYCE LANE

    THE HISTORIES, ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES, MODES OF OPERATION, GOALS, AND SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES OF EIGHT COLLEGE SCIENCE COMMISSIONS ARE PRESENTED. THE GOAL OF THE EIGHT COLLEGE SCIENCE COMMISSIONS IS TO BRING UNDERGRADUATE SCIENCE INSTRUCTION CLOSER TO THE RESEARCH FRONTIER, UPDATE COURSES, AND FOSTER THE SPIRIT OF INQUIRY. INTERCOMMISSION…

  7. Tevatron-for-LHC Report of the QCD Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael G.; Begel, M.; Bourilkov, D.; Campanelli, M.; Chlebana, F.; De Roeck, A.; Dittmann, J.R.; Ellis, S.D.; Field, B.; Field, R.; Gallinaro, M.; /Fermilab /Rochester U. /Florida U. /Geneva U. /CERN /Baylor U. /Washington U., Seattle /Florida State U. /Rockefeller U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Michigan State U.

    2006-10-01

    The experiments at Run 2 of the Tevatron have each accumulated over 1 fb{sup -1} of high-transverse momentum data. Such a dataset allows for the first precision (i.e. comparisons between theory and experiment at the few percent level) tests of QCD at a hadron collider. While the Large Hadron Collider has been designed as a discovery machine, basic QCD analyses will still need to be performed to understand the working environment. The Tevatron-for-LHC workshop was conceived as a communication link to pass on the expertise of the Tevatron and to test new analysis ideas coming from the LHC community. The TeV4LHC QCD Working Group focused on important aspects of QCD at hadron colliders: jet definitions, extraction and use of Parton Distribution Functions, the underlying event, Monte Carlo tunes, and diffractive physics. This report summarizes some of the results achieved during this workshop.

  8. FINAL REPORT START-UP AND COMMISSIONING TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-01R0100-2 REV 0 1/20/03

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BRANDYS M; WILSON CN; SCHATZ TR; GONG W; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from commissioning tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM 1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part BI [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plan. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Report. The DM1200 system will be used for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. This will include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The results presented in this report are from the initial series of short-duration tests that were conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system prior to conducting the main body of development tests that have been planned for this system. These tests were directed primarily at system 'debugging,' operator training, and procedure refinement. The AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing was selected for these tests.

  9. Quality control and beam test of GEM detectors for future upgrades of the CMS muon high rate region at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaneo, D.; Abbas, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abi Akl, M.; Ahmed, W.; Ahmed, W.; Altieri, P.; Aly, R.; Armaingaud, C.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ashfaq, A.; Aspell, P.; Assran, Y.; Awan, I.; Bally, S.; Ban, Y.; Banerjee, S.; Barria, P.; Benussi, L.; Bhopatkar, V.; Bianco, S.; Bos, J.; Bouhali, O.; Braibant, S.; Buontempo, S.; Cai, J.; Calabria, C.; Caponero, M.; Caputo, C.; Cassese, F.; Castaneda, A.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Cavallo, F. R.; Celik, A.; Choi, M.; Choi, K.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, J.; Cimmino, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Colaleo, A.; Conde Garcia, A.; Dabrowski, M. M.; De Lentdecker, G.; De Oliveira, R.; De Robertis, G.; Dildick, S.; Dildick, S.; Dorney, B.; Elmetenawee, W.; Fabrice, G.; Ferrini, M.; Ferry, S.; Flanagan, W.; Giacomelli, P.; Gilmore, J.; Guiducci, L.; Gutierrez, A.; Hadjiiska, R. M.; Hassan, A.; Hauser, J.; Hoepfner, K.; Hohlmann, M.; Hoorani, H.; Jeng, Y. G.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kim, H. S.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, S.; Kumar, A.; Lee, J.; Lenzi, T.; Litov, L.; Loddo, F.; Maerschalk, T.; Magazzu, G.; Maggi, M.; Maghrbi, Y.; Magnani, A.; Majumdar, N.; Mal, P. K.; Mandal, K.; Marchioro, A.; Marinov, A.; Merlin, J. A.; Mohammed, N.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, A.; Muhammad, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Oliveri, E.; Pant, L. M.; Paolucci, P.; Park, I.; Passeggio, G.; Pavlov, B.; Philipps, B.; Phipps, M.; Piccolo, D.; Postema, H.; Pugliese, G.; Baranac, A. Puig; Radi, A.; Radogna, R.; Raffone, G.; Ramkrishna, S.; Ranieri, A.; Riccardi, C.; Rodrigues, A.; Ropelewski, L.; RoyChowdhury, S.; Ryu, M. S.; Ryu, G.; Safonov, A.; Sakharov, A.; Salva, S.; Saviano, G.; Sharma, A.; Swain, S. K.; Talvitie, J. P.; Talvitie, J. P.; Tamma, C.; Tatarinov, A.; Teng, H.; Turini, N.; Tuuva, T.; Twigger, J.; Tytgat, M.; Vai, I.; Van Stenis, M.; Venditi, R.; Verhagen, E.; Verwilligen, P.; Vitulo, P.; Wang, D.; Wang, M.; Yang, U.; Yang, Y.; Yonamine, R.; Zaganidis, N.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, A.

    2015-03-01

    Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM) are a proven position sensitive gas detector technology which nowadays is becoming more widely used in High Energy Physics. GEMs offer an excellent spatial resolution and a high particle rate capability, with a close to 100% detection efficiency. In view of the high luminosity phase of the CERN Large Hadron Collider, these aforementioned features make GEMs suitable candidates for the future upgrades of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector. In particular, the CMS GEM Collaboration proposes to cover the high-eta region of the muon system with large-area triple-GEM detectors, which have the ability to provide robust and redundant tracking and triggering functions. In this contribution, after a general introduction and overview of the project, the construction of full-size trapezoidal triple-GEM prototypes will be described in more detail. The procedures for the quality control of the GEM foils, including gain uniformity measurements with an x-ray source will be presented. In the past few years, several CMS triple-GEM prototype detectors were operated with test beams at the CERN SPS. The results of these test beam campaigns will be summarised.

  10. Federal Trade Commission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Press Releases Commission Actions Media Resources Consumer Finance Mergers and Competition Mobile Technology The Do Not ... Advice For Consumers Business Center Advertising & Marketing Credit & Finance Guidance Privacy & Security Selected Industries Legal Resources Business ...

  11. Commissioning the LCLS Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Akre, R.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Schmerge, J.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project presently under construction at SLAC. The injector section, from drive laser and RF photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane, was installed in fall 2006. Initial system commissioning with an electron beam was completed in August 2007, with the goal of a 1.2-micron emittance in a 1-nC bunch clearly demonstrated. The second phase of commissioning, including second bunch compressor and full linac, is planned for 2008, with FEL commissioning in 2009. We report experimental results and experience gained in the first phase of commissioning, including the photo-cathode drive laser, RF gun, photocathode, S-band and X-band RF systems, first bunch compressor, and the various beam diagnostics.

  12. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM).

  13. Commission 53: Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan; Lecavelier des Etangs, Alain; Mayor, Michel; Bodenheimer, Peter; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Mardling, Rosemary; Minniti, Dante; Queloz, Didier

    2012-04-01

    Commission 53 was created at the 2006 Prague General Assembly (GA) of the IAU, in recognition of the outburst of astronomical progress in the field of extrasolar planet discovery, characterization, and theoretical work that has occurred since the discovery of the first planet in orbit around a solar-type star in 1995. Commission 53 is the logical successor to the IAU Working Group on Extrasolar Planets (WGESP), which ended its six years of existence in August 2006. The founding President of Commission 53 was Michael Mayor, in honor of his seminal contributions to this new field of astronomy. The current President is Alan Boss, the former chair of the WGESP. The current members of the Commission 53 (C53) Organizing Committee (OC) began their service in August 2009 at the conclusion of the Rio de Janeiro IAU GA.

  14. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM).

  15. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect

    Kent Norris

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan is to assess the approach to be taken for intended testing activities. The plan typically identifies the items to be tested, the requirements being tested, the testing to be performed, test schedules, personnel requirements, reporting requirements, evaluation criteria, and any risks requiring contingency planning. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

  16. First LHC beam induced tracks reconstructed in the LHCb VELO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, C.; Borghi, S.; Bates, A.; Eklund, L.; Gersabeck, M.; Marinho, F.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rodrigues, E.; Szumlak, T.; Affolder, A.; Bowcock, T.; Casse, G.; Donleavy, S.; Hennessy, K.; Huse, T.; Hutchcroft, D.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Noor, A.; Patel, G.; Rinnert, K.; Smith, N. A.; Shears, T.; Tobin, M.; John, M.; Bay, A.; Frei, R.; Haefeli, G.; Keune, A.; Anderson, J.; McNulty, R.; Traynor, S.; Basiladze, S.; Leflat, A.; Artuso, M.; Borgia, A.; Lefeuvre, G.; Mountain, R.; Wang, J.; Akiba, K.; van Beuzekom, M.; Jans, E.; Ketel, T.; Mous, I.; Papadelis, A.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Verlaat, B.; de Vries, H.; Behrendt, O.; Buytaert, J.; de Capua, S.; Collins, P.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.

    2009-06-01

    The Vertex Locator of the LHCb experiment has been used to fully reconstruct beam induced tracks at the LHC. A beam of protons was collided with a beam absorber during the LHC synchronisation test of the anti-clockwise beam on the weekend 22nd-24th August 2008. The resulting particles have been observed by the Vertex Locator. The LHCb Vertex Locator is a silicon micro-strip detector containing 21 planes of modules. Tracks were observed passing through up to 19 modules (38 silicon sensors). A total of over 700 tracks were reconstructed, and are being used to study the calibration and alignment of the detector.

  17. SPEAR3 Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Harkay, K.; Sajaev, V.; Boland, M.J.; Tan, Y.E.; Krinsky, S.; Podobedov, B.; Decking, W.; Ropert, A.; Byrd, J.M.; Robin, D.; Scarvie, T.; Steier, C.; Fedurin, M.G.; Jines, P.; Chang, H.-P.; Kuo, C.-C.; Tsai, H.-J.; Yoon, M.H.; Boge, M.; Allison, S.; Bellomo, P.; /SLAC, SSRL /SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin

    2005-05-09

    The successful commissioning of the new SPEAR3 light source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) will be reviewed. Orbit control, beam-based alignment, and an orbit interlock were commissioned. Orbit motion was characterized as a function of frequency. The linear optics was corrected for ID focusing and coupling errors. The nonlinear optics were investigated with dynamic aperture measurements as a function of energy and tune.

  18. Commission 4: Ephemerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio; Kaplan, George H.; Krasinsky, George A.; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Bangert, John A.; Hohenkerk, Catherine; Lara, Martin; Pitjeva, Elena V.; Urban, Sean E.; Vondrak, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Dr. George Kaplan, the current Vice-President of the Commission was nominated to be the new President. Dr. Catherine Hohenkerk was elected to be the next Vice-President of the Commission. As for the Membership of the Organizing Committee, Dr. Vondrak stepped down and Drs William Folkner of JPL and Steve Bell of HMNAO have been added. In the below, we present summaries of the reports from various institutions presented at the business session.

  19. Le LHC, un tunnel cosmique

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Et si la lumière au bout du tunnel du LHC était cosmique ? En d?autres termes, qu?est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter dans la connaissance de l?Univers ? Car la montée en énergie des accélérateurs de particules nous permet de mieux appréhender l?univers primordial, chaud et dense. Mais dans quel sens dit-on que le LHC reproduit des conditions proches du Big bang ? Quelles informations nous apporte-t-il sur le contenu de l?Univers ? La matière noire est-elle détectable au LHC ? L?énergie noire ? Pourquoi l?antimatière accumulée au CERN est-elle si rare dans l?Univers ? Et si le CERN a bâti sa réputation sur l?exploration des forces faibles et fortes qui opèrent au sein des atomes et de leurs noyaux, est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter des informations sur la force gravitationnelle qui gouverne l?évolution cosmique ? Depuis une trentaine d?années, notre compréhension de l?univers dans ses plus grandes dimensions et l?appréhension de son comportement aux plus petites distances sont intimement liées : en quoi le LHC va-t-il tester expérimentalement cette vision unifiée ? Tout public, entrée libre / Réservations au +41 (0)22 767 76 76

  20. 77 FR 10599 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... conducted by the Commission on February 16, 2012; notice of which was published in 77 FR 3321, January 23... COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on March 15, 2012, in...

  1. Constraints on sneutrino dark matter from LHC Run 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arina, Chiara; Catalan, Maria Eugenia Cabrera; Kraml, Sabine; Kulkarni, Suchita; Laa, Ursula

    2015-05-01

    A mostly right-handed sneutrino as the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is an interesting dark matter candidate, leading to LHC signatures which can be quite distinct from those of the conventional neutralino LSP. Using SModelS v1.0.1 for testing the model against the limits published by ATLAS and CMS in the context of so-called Simplified Model Spectra (SMS), we investigate to what extent the supersymmetry searches at Run 1 of the LHC constrain the sneutrino-LSP scenario. Moreover, we discuss the most relevant topologies for which no SMS results are provided by the experimental collaborations but which would allow to put more stringent constraints on sneutrino LSPs. These include, for instance, the mono-lepton signature which should be particularly interesting to consider at Run 2 of the LHC.

  2. Experimental Methods at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korytov, Andrey

    The lectures presented below cover the basics of proton-proton collisions at the LHC, the principles of particle detection, the methodologies employed for reconstruction of individual collision events, general strategies for signal event selection, data-driven techniques for evaluating signal efficiencies and background rates, as well as the main statistical concepts used for physics inference from selected data. The described principles and concepts are then illustrated on an example of a search for a Higgs boson and measurement of its properties in the H → ZZ → 4ℓ decay mode. The discussion is largely based on CMS, taken as a representative LHC experiment.

  3. L'Aventure du LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Cette présentation s?adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l?engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  4. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-04-15

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  5. B Physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gersabeck, Marco

    2010-02-10

    The LHC is scheduled to start its first physics data taking period later in 2009. Primarily LHCb but also ATLAS and CMS will start a rich B physics programme with the potential of revealing New Physics in the heavy flavour sector. This contribution will cover the prospects for B physics at the LHC with particular emphasis to early measurements. This includes CP violation measurements in B{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} decays, searches for rare decays such as B{sub s}{sup 0}->{mu}{mu}, as well as semileptonic and radiative channels.

  6. L'Aventure du LHC

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-11

    Cette présentation s’adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l’engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  7. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-04

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  8. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkovszky, László; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-04-01

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  9. LHC Symposium 2003: Summary Talk

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Appel

    2003-08-12

    This summary talk reviews the LHC 2003 Symposium, focusing on expectations as we prepare to leap over the current energy frontier into new territory. We may learn from what happened in the two most recent examples of leaping into new energy territory. Quite different scenarios appeared in those two cases. In addition, they review the status of the machine and experiments as reported at the Symposium. Finally, I suggest an attitude which may be most appropriate as they look forward to the opportunities anticipated for the first data from the LHC.

  10. A Practical Guide for Commissioning Existing Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Haasl, T.

    1999-05-11

    Although this guide focuses on the retrocommissioning process and its advantages, all three types of commissioning--retrocommissioning, commissioning, and recommissioning--play an equally important role in ensuring that buildings perform efficiently and provide comfortable, safe, and productive work environments for owners and occupants. For new construction and retrofit projects, commissioning should be incorporated early, during design, and last throughout the length of the project. For buildings that were never commissioned, the retrocommissioning process can yield a wealth of cost-saving opportunities while enhancing a building's environment. Finally, once a building is commissioned or retrocommissioned, incorporating recommissioning into the organization's O and M program (by periodically reapplying the original diagnostic testing and checklist procedures) helps ensure that cost savings and other benefits gained from the original process persist over time.

  11. A Practical Guide for Commissioning Existing Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Haasl, T.; Sharp, T.

    1999-04-01

    Although this guide focuses on the retrocommissioning process and its advantages, all three types of commissioning--retrocommissioning, commissioning, and recommissioning--play an equally important role in ensuring that buildings perform efficiently and provide comfortable, safe, and productive work environments for owners and occupants. For new construction and retrofit projects, commissioning should be incorporated early, during design, and last throughout the length of the project. For buildings that were never commissioned, the retrocommissioning process can yield a wealth of cost-saving opportunities while enhancing a building's environment. Finally, once a building is commissioned or retrocommissioned, incorporating recommissioning into the organization's O and M program (by periodically reapplying the original diagnostic testing and checklist procedures) helps ensure that cost savings and other benefits gained from the original process persist over time.

  12. Surrogacy commissioning fathers and HIV.

    PubMed

    Jordaan, Donrich W

    2014-01-01

    Surrogacy is not regulated by a single legal instrument only, nor is confirmation of a surrogacy agreement by the High Court an unqualified green light for the surrogacy process to proceed. In the context of the HIV status of the commissioning father, whose gametes are to be used for the conception of the child in pursuance of a surrogacy agreement, the intended in vitro fertilisation of the surrogate mother may only take place on condition that the commissioning father, and his semen, have been tested for HIV; that he has consented to his HIV status being made available to the surrogate mother, and if he is HIV-positive, that sperm washing will be used to minimise the risk of infection and that the surrogate mother has been informed of his HIV status, and given her informed consent.  PMID:24388075

  13. Torsion phenomenology at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, A. S.; Shapiro, I. L.; Vale, M. A. B. do

    2007-02-01

    We explore the potential of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to test the dynamical torsion parameters. The form of the torsion action can be established from the requirements of consistency of effective quantum field theory. The most phenomenologically relevant part of the torsion tensor is dual to a massive axial vector field. This axial vector has geometric nature, that means it does not belong to any representation of the gauge group of the SM extension or GUT theory. At the same time, torsion should interact with all fermions, that opens the way for the phenomenological applications. We demonstrate that LHC collider can establish unique constraints on the interactions between fermions and torsion field considerably exceeding present experimental lower bounds on the torsion couplings and its mass. It is also shown how possible nonuniversal nature of torsion couplings due to the renormalization group running between the Planck and TeV energy scales can be tested via the combined analysis of Drell-Yan and tt production processes.

  14. Radiation tolerant programmable power supply for the LHC beam screen heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, J.; Trikoupis, N.

    2014-03-01

    For the next LHC run, it is required to install 200 W of heating capacity per LHC beam screen heater to regenerate the beam screen by desorption of gas trapped on its walls. In the LHC, there are 272 beam screen heaters and the associated electronics limit presently the heating capacity to 25 W. Those electronics are, for the most part, installed inside the LHC tunnel and exposed to its radiation environment. This paper describes the development of a new programmable power supply card that will be integrated into the existing LHC radiation tolerant electronic infrastructure used by the cryogenic system. Radiation tests were undertaken to qualify a power switch capable of coping with the 230 Vrms grid voltage and an analog signal multiplexer; these components are required respectively for satisfying the higher power requirements and for reducing the overall cost by using a single analog to digital converter to sample all the signals.

  15. Plans for Deployment of Hollow Electron Lenses at the LHC for Enhanced Beam Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Redaelli, S.; Bertarelli, A.; Bruce, R.; Perini, D.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.

    2015-06-01

    Hollow electron lenses are considered as a possible means to improve the LHC beam collimation system, providing active control of halo diffusion rates and suppressing the population of transverse halos. After a very successful experience at the Tevatron, a conceptual design of a hollow e-lens optimized for the LHC was produced. Recent further studies have led to a mature preliminary technical design. In this paper, possible scenarios for the deployment of this technology at the LHC are elaborated in the context of the scheduled LHC long shutdowns until the full implementation of the HL-LHC upgrade in 2023. Possible setups of electron beam test stands at CERN and synergies with other relevant electron beam programmes are also discussed.

  16. Commissioning and initial acceptance tests for a commercial convolution dose calculation algorithm for radiotherapy treatment planning in comparison with Monte Carlo simulation and measurement

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Farhad; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabi; Mostaar, Ahmad; Motamedi, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    In this study the commissioning of a dose calculation algorithm in a currently used treatment planning system was performed and the calculation accuracy of two available methods in the treatment planning system i.e., collapsed cone convolution (CCC) and equivalent tissue air ratio (ETAR) was verified in tissue heterogeneities. For this purpose an inhomogeneous phantom (IMRT thorax phantom) was used and dose curves obtained by the TPS (treatment planning system) were compared with experimental measurements and Monte Carlo (MCNP code) simulation. Dose measurements were performed by using EDR2 radiographic films within the phantom. Dose difference (DD) between experimental results and two calculation methods was obtained. Results indicate maximum difference of 12% in the lung and 3% in the bone tissue of the phantom between two methods and the CCC algorithm shows more accurate depth dose curves in tissue heterogeneities. Simulation results show the accurate dose estimation by MCNP4C in soft tissue region of the phantom and also better results than ETAR method in bone and lung tissues. PMID:22973081

  17. Commissioning and initial acceptance tests for a commercial convolution dose calculation algorithm for radiotherapy treatment planning in comparison with Monte Carlo simulation and measurement.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Farhad; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabi; Mostaar, Ahmad; Motamedi, Mohsen

    2012-07-01

    In this study the commissioning of a dose calculation algorithm in a currently used treatment planning system was performed and the calculation accuracy of two available methods in the treatment planning system i.e., collapsed cone convolution (CCC) and equivalent tissue air ratio (ETAR) was verified in tissue heterogeneities. For this purpose an inhomogeneous phantom (IMRT thorax phantom) was used and dose curves obtained by the TPS (treatment planning system) were compared with experimental measurements and Monte Carlo (MCNP code) simulation. Dose measurements were performed by using EDR2 radiographic films within the phantom. Dose difference (DD) between experimental results and two calculation methods was obtained. Results indicate maximum difference of 12% in the lung and 3% in the bone tissue of the phantom between two methods and the CCC algorithm shows more accurate depth dose curves in tissue heterogeneities. Simulation results show the accurate dose estimation by MCNP4C in soft tissue region of the phantom and also better results than ETAR method in bone and lung tissues. PMID:22973081

  18. Production and installation of the LHC low-beta triplets

    SciTech Connect

    Feher, S.; Bossert, R.; DiMarco, J.; Karppinen, M.; Kerby, J.; Kimura, N.; Lamm, M.J.; Nakamoto, T.; Nicol, T.; Nobrega, A.; Ogitsu, T.; Ohuchi, N.; Ostojic, R.; Page, T.; Peterson, T.; Rabehl, R.; Schlabach, P.; Shintomi, T.; Strait, J.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab /CERN /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    The LHC performance depends critically on the low-{beta}, triplets, located on either side of the four interaction points. Each triplet consists of four superconducting quadrupole magnets, which must operate reliably at up to 215 T/m, sustain extremely high heat loads and have an excellent field quality. A collaboration of CERN, Fermilab and KEK was formed in 1996 to design and build the triplet systems, and after nine years of joint effort the production has been completed in 2005. We retrace the main events of the project and present the design features and performance of the low-{beta} quadrupoles, built by KEK and Fermilab, as well as of other vital elements of the triplet. The tunnel installation of the first triplet and plans for commissioning in the LHC are also presented. Apart from the excellent technical results, the construction of the LHC low-{beta} triplets has been a highly enriching experience combining harmoniously the different competences and approaches to engineering in a style reminiscent of high energy physics experiment collaborations, and rarely before achieved in construction of an accelerator.

  19. The versatile link, a common project for super-LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, Luis; Dris, Stefanos; Gerardin, Alexandre; Huffman, Todd; Issever, Cigdem; Pacheco, Alberto Jimenez; Jones, Mark; Kwan, Simon; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lian, Zhijun; Liu, Tiankuan; /CERN /Oxford U. /Fermilab /Taipei, Computing Ctr. /Southern Methodist U.

    2009-07-01

    Radiation tolerant, high speed optoelectronic data transmission links are fundamental building blocks in today's large scale High Energy Physics (HEP) detectors, as exemplified by the four experiments currently under commissioning at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), see for example. New experiments or upgrades will impose even more stringent demands on these systems from the point of view of performance and radiation tolerance. This can already be seen from the developments underway for the Super Large Hadron Collider (SLHC) project, a proposed upgrade to the LHC aiming at increasing the luminosity of the machine by factor of 10 to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, and thus providing a better chance to see rare processes and improving statistically marginal measurements. In the past, specific data transmission links have been independently developed by each LHC experiment for data acquisition (DAQ), detector control as well as trigger and timing distribution (TTC). This was justified by the different types of applications being targeted as well as by technological limitations preventing one single solution from fitting all requirements. However with today's maturity of optoelectronic and CMOS technologies it is possible to envisage the development of a general purpose optical link which can cover most transmission applications: a Versatile Link. Such an approach has the clear advantage of concentrating the development effort on one single project targeting an optical link whose final functionality will only result from the topology and configuration settings adopted.

  20. PHOBOS in the LHC era

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Peter

    2015-01-15

    The PHOBOS experiment ran at the RHIC collider from 2000 to 2005, under the leadership of Wit Busza. These proceedings summarize selected PHOBOS results, highlighting their continuing relevance amidst the wealth of new results from the lead–lead program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

  1. String Physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.

    2008-11-23

    The LHC program will include the identification of events with single high-k{sub T} photons as probes of new physics. We show that this channel is uniquely suited to search for experimental evidence of TeV-scale open string theory.

  2. Event generator for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleisberg, T.; Höche, S.; Krauss, F.; Schälicke, A.; Schumann, S.; Winter, J.

    2006-04-01

    In this contribution the new event generation framework S HERPA will be presented. It aims at the full simulation of events at current and future high-energy experiments, in particular the LHC. Some results related to the production of jets at the Tevatron will be discussed.

  3. Post-LHC accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Gourlay, Stephen A.

    2001-06-10

    The design and practicality of future accelerators, such as hadron colliders and neutrino factories being considered to supercede the LHC, will depend greatly on the choice of superconducting magnets. Various possibilities will be reviewed and discussed, taking into account recent progress and projected improvements in magnet design and conductor development along with the recommendations from the 2001 Snowmass workshop.

  4. NASA Construction of Facilities Validation Processes - Total Building Commissioning (TBCx)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Jay C.

    2004-01-01

    Key Atributes include: Total Quality Management (TQM) System that looks at all phases of a project. A team process that spans boundaries. A Commissioning Authority to lead the process. Commissioning requirements in contracts. Independent design review to verify compliance with Facility Project Requirements (FPR). Formal written Commissioning Plan with Documented Results. Functional performance testing (FPT) against the requirements document.

  5. Commissioning Experience of SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2007-07-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator complex consists of a 2.5 MeV H{sup -} front-end injector system, a 186 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, and associated beam transport lines. The linac was commissioned in five discrete runs, starting in 2002 and completed in 2005. The accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines were commissioned in two runs in January-February and April 2006. With the completed commissioning of the SNS accelerator, the facility has begun initial low-power operations. In the course of beam commissioning, most beam performance parameters and beam intensity goals have been achieved at low duty factor. A number of beam dynamics measurements have been performed, including emittance evolution, transverse coupling in the ring, beam instability thresholds, and beam distributions on the target. The commissioning results, achieved beam performance and initial operating experience of the SNS linac will be presented.

  6. Commission 42: Close Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez, Alvaro; Rucinski, Slavek; Szkody, P.; Gies, D.; Kang, Y.-W.; Linsky, J.; Livio, M.; Morrell, N.; Hilditch, R.; Nordström, B.; Ribas, I.; Sion, E.; Vrielman, S.

    2007-03-01

    The triennial report from Commission 42 covers various topics like massive binaries, contact systems, cataclysmic variables and low-mass binary stars. We try in a number of sections to provide an update on the current status of the main research areas in the field of close binaries. It is not a formal review, even complete or comprehensive, but an attempt to bring the main topics on recent research to astronomers working in other fields. References are also not comprehensive and simply added to the text to help the reader looking for deeper information on the subject. For this reason, we have chosen to include references (sometimes incomplete for ongoing work) not in a list at the end but integrated with the main text body. Complete references and additional sources can be easily obtained through web access of ADS or SIMBAD. Furthermore, the summary of papers on close-binary research contained in the Bibliography of Close Binaries (BCB) can be accessed from the web site of Commission 42. I would like to express the gratitude of the commission for the careful work of Colin Scarfe as Editor-in-Chief of BCB and Andras Holl and Attila Sragli for maintaining the web pages of the Commission within the structure of Division V. Finally, K. Olah and J. Jurcsik are gratefully acknowledged for their continued support as editors of the Information Bulletin on Variable Stars (IBVS), also accessible through the commission web page.

  7. An LHCb general-purpose acquisition board for beam and background monitoring at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, F.; Guzik, Z.; Jacobsson, R.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we will present an LHCb custom-made acquisition board which was developed for a continuous beam and background monitoring during LHC operations at CERN. The paper describes both the conceptual design and its performance, and concludes with results from the first period of beam operations at the LHC. The main purpose of the acquisition board is to process signals from a pair of beam pickups to continuously monitor the intensity of each bunch, and to monitor the phase of the arrival time of each proton bunch with respect to the LHC bunch clock. The extreme versatility of the board also allowed the LHCb experiment to build a high-speed and high-sensitivity readout system for a fast background monitor based on a pair of plastic scintillators. The board has demonstrated very good performance and proved to be conceptually valid during the first months of operations at the LHC. Connected to the beam pickups, it provides the LHCb experiment with a real-time measurement of the total intensity of each beam and of the arrival time of each beam at the LHCb Interaction Point. It also monitors the LHC filling scheme and the beam current per bunch at a continuous rate of 40 MHz, and assures a proper global timing of LHCb. The continuous readout of the scintillators at bunch clock speed provides the LHCb experiment with high-resolution information about the beam halo and fast losses during both injection and circulating beam. It has also provided valuable information to the LHC during machine commissioning with beam. Recent results also shows that it could contribute as a luminosity monitor independent from the LHCb experiment readout system. Beam, background and luminosity measurements are continuously fed back to the LHC in the data exchange framework between the experiments and the LHC machine aimed at improving efficiently the experimental conditions real-time.

  8. Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization: Report of the On-Site Inspection Workshop-5-Planning Examination of Inspection Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Krioutchenkov, V.; Shchukin, V.; Davies, A.; Sweeney, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    On-Site Inspection (OSI) Workshop-5 met 8-12 November, 1999 in Farnborough, UK and was hosted by the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency (DERA). The purpose of the workshop was to provide guidance on OSI Operational Manual (OM) development for Working Group B (WGB) of the CTBT Preparatory Commission (PrepCom). The two main topics of the workshop involved logistics/preparatory activities for the pre-inspection phase and in-depth examination of technology application during the initial and continuation phases of an OSI. Reports from the PTS-sponsored Kazakhstan OSI experiment set the tone for the discussions of logistics and preparatory activities. The most important recommendation coming out of the experiment and workshop discussions is a need for Working Group A to develop specific administrative and financial rules regarding OSIs and define the status of inspectors and inspector assistants with respect to the CTBTO. There was also extensive discussion of a need for Working Group B to develop and/or adapt safety standards. With respect to OSI preparations, the group agreed that the time line and quick response required by an OSI necessitate development of special procedures; standing arrangements and/or advanced parties are suggested as one possible approach and a list of relevant issues has been initiated. A chart was developed that outlines the various elements of logistics required for an OSI that can serve as a basis for development of checklists, databases, and other preparation activities. Technology presentations and discussion focused on three major areas: phenomenology, synergy, and specifications.

  9. Experimental Substantiation, Testing, and Commissioning of a Novel Separation System for Steam Generators of Nuclear Power Plants with VVER-1000 Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, B. I.; Ageev, A. G.; Blinkov, V. N.; Vasil'eva, R. V.; Korol'kov, B. M.; Dragunov, Yu. G.; Trunov, N. B.; Nekrasov, A. V.; Ilyushin, V. F.

    2003-03-15

    The separation system of a PGV-1000 steam generator is modernized on the basis of bench tests of model PGV-1000 steam generators, full-scale tests of steam generators, and computational analysis of the results of these tests. The changes concern the configuration of the submerged plate and replacement of the louver separator by a receiver baffle. These measures increase the marginal evaporative capacity and the permissible range of variation of the water level, decrease the moisture content at the outlet from the steam generator, and improve the conditions for control and repair of its internal surface.

  10. ``The Read-Out Driver'' ROD card for the Insertable B-layer (IBL) detector of the ATLAS experiment: commissioning and upgrade studies for the Pixel Layers 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbi, G.; Bindi, M.; Chen, S. P.; Falchieri, D.; Flick, T.; Gabrielli, A.; Hauck, S.; Hsu, S. C.; Kretz, M.; Kugel, A.; Lama, L.; Morettini, P.; Travaglini, R.; Wensing, M.

    2014-01-01

    The upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at LHC foresees the insertion of an innermost silicon layer, called the Insertable B-layer (IBL). The IBL read-out system will be equipped with new electronics. The Readout-Driver card (ROD) is a VME board devoted to data processing, configuration and control. A pre-production batch has been delivered for testing with instrumented slices of the overall acquisition chain, aiming to finalize strategies for system commissioning. In this paper system setups and results will be described, as well as preliminary studies on changes needed to adopt the ROD for the ATLAS Pixel Layers 1 and 2.

  11. On dilatons and the LHC diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megías, Eugenio; Pujolàs, Oriol; Quirós, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    We study soft wall models that can embed the Standard Model and a naturally light dilaton. Exploiting the full capabilities of these models we identify the parameter space that allows to pass Electroweak Precision Tests with a moderate Kaluza-Klein scale, around 2 TeV. We analyze the coupling of the dilaton with Standard Model (SM) fields in the bulk, and discuss two applications: i) Models with a light dilaton as the first particle beyond the SM pass quite easily all observational tests even with a dilaton lighter than the Higgs. However the possibility of a 125 GeV dilaton as a Higgs impostor is essentially disfavored; ii) We show how to extend the soft wall models to realize a 750 GeV dilaton that could explain the recently reported diphoton excess at the LHC.

  12. SPEAR 3 Commissioning Software

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, W.J.; Portmann, G.J.; Safranek, J.A.; Terebilo, A.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-05-09

    The short SPEAR 3 startup time required precommissioned software for machine setup, beam measurements and data analysis. To accomplish this goal, we used Matlab with the Accelerator Toolbox (AT), the Channel Access Toolbox (MCA) and Middle Layer software to integrate code and streamline production. This paper outlines the software architecture, describes the Middle Layer component and provides examples from SPEAR 3 commissioning.

  13. Conservation Commissions in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheffey, Andrew J. W.

    The Conservation Foundation reported on the experience of a resource development specialist in the state of Massachusetts on the public's growing concern for environmental quality. After tracing the origins of the Massachusetts movement, the report draws upon a variety of specific state experiences to illustrate the commission's growing pains and…

  14. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance.

  15. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance.

  16. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance.

  17. 77 FR 28420 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... the notice for such hearing, which was published in 77 FR 23319, April 18, 2012. Authority: Pub. L. 91... COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on June 7, 2012, in Binghamton,...

  18. 78 FR 52601 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... on August 15, 2013, and identified in the notice for such hearing, which was published in 78 FR 43961... COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on September 19, 2013, in...

  19. 78 FR 12412 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Commission on February 14, 2013, and identified in the notice for such hearing, which was published in 78 FR... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  20. 77 FR 70204 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... Commission on November 15, 2012, and identified in the notice for such hearing, which was published in 77 FR... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  1. Commissioning Instrument for the GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas, S.; Sánchez, B.; Bringas, V.; Espejo, C.; Flores, R.; Chapa, O.; Lara, G.; Chavolla, A.; Anguiano, G.; Arciniega, S.; Dorantes, A.; González, J. L.; Montoya, J. M.; Toral, R.; Hernández, H.; Nava, R.; Devaney, N.; Castro, J.; Cavaller-Marqués, L.

    2005-12-01

    During the GTC integration phase, the Commissioning Instrument (CI) will be a diagnostic tool for performance verification. The CI features four operation modes: imaging, pupil imaging, Curvature WFS, and high resolution Shack-Hartmann WFS. This instrument was built by the Instituto de Astronomía UNAM and the Centro de Ingeniería y Desarrollo Industrial (CIDESI) under GRANTECAN contract after a public bid. In this paper we made a general instrument overview and we show some of the performance final results obtained when the Factory Acceptance tests previous to its transport to La Palma.

  2. Modeling and Simulation of the Longitudinal Beam Dynamics - RF Station Interaction in the LHC Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Winkle, D.Van; Baudrenghien, P.; Tuckmantel, J.; /CERN

    2008-07-07

    A non-linear time-domain simulation has been developed to study the interaction between longitudinal beam dynamics and RF stations in the LHC rings. The motivation for this tool is to determine optimal LLRF configurations, to study system sensitivity on various parameters, and to define the operational and technology limits. It will be also used to study the effect of RF station noise, impedance, and perturbations on the beam life time and longitudinal emittance. It allows the study of alternative LLRF implementations and control algorithms. The insight and experience gained from our PEP-II simulation is important for this work. In this paper we discuss properties of the simulation tool that will be helpful in analyzing the LHC RF system and its initial results. Partial verification of the model with data taken during the LHC RF station commissioning is presented.

  3. Cryogenic safety aspect of the low -$\\beta$ magnest systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Darve, C.; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    The low-{beta} magnet systems are located in the LHC insertion regions around the four interaction points. They are the key elements in the beams focusing/defocusing process and will allow proton collisions at a luminosity of up to 10{sup 34}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Large radiation dose deposited at the proximity of the beam collisions dictate stringent requirements for the design and operation of the systems. The hardware commissioning phase of the LHC was completed in the winter of 2010 and permitted to validate this system safe operation. This paper presents the analysis used to qualify and quantify the safe operation of the low-{beta} magnet systems in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for the first years of operation.

  4. Simplified SIMPs and the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Lowette, S.; Tytgat, M. H. G.; Zaldivar, B.

    2015-11-01

    The existence of Dark Matter (DM) in the form of Strongly Interacting Massive Particles (SIMPs) may be motivated by astrophysical observations that challenge the classical Cold DM scenario. Other observations greatly constrain, but do not completely exclude, the SIMP alternative. The signature of SIMPs at the LHC may consist of neutral, hadron-like, trackless jets produced in pairs. We show that the absence of charged content can provide a very efficient tool to suppress dijet backgrounds at the LHC, thus enhancing the sensitivity to a potential SIMP signal. We illustrate this using a simplified SIMP model and present a detailed feasibility study based on simulations, including a dedicated detector response parametrization. We evaluate the expected sensitivity to various signal scenarios and tentatively consider the exclusion limits on the SIMP elastic cross section with nucleons.

  5. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2015-06-16

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  6. LHC magnet quench protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coull, L.; Hagedorn, D.; Remondino, V.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F.

    1994-07-01

    The quench protection system for the superconducting magnets of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The system is based on the so called 'cold diode' concept. In a group of series connected magnets if one magnet quenches then the magnetic energy of all the magnets will be dissipated in the quenched magnet so destroying it. This is avoided by by-passing the quenched magnet and then rapidly de-exciting the unquenched magnets. For the LHC machine it is foreseen to use silicon diodes situated inside the cryostat as by-pass elements - so called 'cold diodes'. The diodes are exposed to some 50 kGray of radiation during a 10 year operation life-time. The high energy density of the LHC magnets (500 kJ/m) coupled with the relatively slow propagation speed of a 'natural' quench (10 to 20 m/s) can lead to excessive heating of the zone where the quench started and to high internal voltages. It is therefore necessary to detect quickly the incipient quench and fire strip heaters which spread the quench out more quickly over a large volume of the magnet. After a quench the magnet chain must be de-excited rapidly to avoid spreading the quench to other magnets and over-heating the by-pass diode. This is done by switching high-power energy-dump resistors in series with the magnets. The LHC main ring magnet will be divided into 16 electrically separated units which has important advantages.

  7. hhjj production at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Englert, Christoph; Greiner, Nicolas; Nordstrom, Karl; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-08-25

    The search for di-Higgs production at the LHC in order to set limits on the Higgs trilinear coupling and constraints on new physics is one of the main motivations for the LHC high-luminosity phase. Recent experimental analyses suggest that such analyses will only be successful if information from a range of channels is included. We therefore investigate di-Higgs production in association with two hadronic jets and give a detailed discussion of both the gluon- and the weak boson-fusion (WBF) contributions, with a particular emphasis on the phenomenology with modified Higgs trilinear and quartic gauge couplings. We perform a detailed investigationmore » of the full hadronic final state and find that hhjj production should add sensitivity to a di-Higgs search combination at the HL-LHC with 3 ab-1. Since the WBF and GF contributions are sensitive to different sources of physics beyond the Standard Model, we devise search strategies to disentangle and isolate these production modes. In addition, while gluon fusion remains non-negligible in WBF-type selections, sizeable new physics contributions to the latter can still be constrained. As an example of the latter point we investigate the sensitivity that can be obtained for a measurement of the quartic Higgs–gauge boson couplings.« less

  8. Multicore job scheduling in the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forti, A.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Hartmann, T.; Alef, M.; Lahiff, A.; Templon, J.; Dal Pra, S.; Gila, M.; Skipsey, S.; Acosta-Silva, C.; Filipcic, A.; Walker, R.; Walker, C. J.; Traynor, D.; Gadrat, S.

    2015-12-01

    After the successful first run of the LHC, data taking is scheduled to restart in Summer 2015 with experimental conditions leading to increased data volumes and event complexity. In order to process the data generated in such scenario and exploit the multicore architectures of current CPUs, the LHC experiments have developed parallelized software for data reconstruction and simulation. However, a good fraction of their computing effort is still expected to be executed as single-core tasks. Therefore, jobs with diverse resources requirements will be distributed across the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), making workload scheduling a complex problem in itself. In response to this challenge, the WLCG Multicore Deployment Task Force has been created in order to coordinate the joint effort from experiments and WLCG sites. The main objective is to ensure the convergence of approaches from the different LHC Virtual Organizations (VOs) to make the best use of the shared resources in order to satisfy their new computing needs, minimizing any inefficiency originated from the scheduling mechanisms, and without imposing unnecessary complexities in the way sites manage their resources. This paper describes the activities and progress of the Task Force related to the aforementioned topics, including experiences from key sites on how to best use different batch system technologies, the evolution of workload submission tools by the experiments and the knowledge gained from scale tests of the different proposed job submission strategies.

  9. Commission 42: Close Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucinski, Slavek M.; Ribas, Ignasi; Giménez, Alvaro; Harmanec, Petr; Hilditch, Ronald W.; Kaluzny, Janusz; Niarchos, Panayiotis; Nordström, Birgitta; Oláh, Katalin; Richards, Mercedes T.; Scarfe, Colin D.; Sion, Edward M.; Torres, Guillermo; Vrielmann, Sonja

    2010-05-01

    During the commission business session, the past President presented the new Organizing Committee which was selected by the OC through a e-mail vote conducted during the months before the Rio de Janeiro General Assembly. The new OC will consist of Ignasi Ribas (President), Mercedes Richards (Vice President), and Slavek Rucinski (Past President) with the members: David Bradstreet, Petr Harmanec, Janusz Kaluzny, Joanna Mikolajewska, Ulisse Munari, Panos Niarchos, Katalin Olah, Theo Pribulla, Colin Scarfe and Guillermo Torres.

  10. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the April 1996 reporting period from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, the Administrative Law Judges, the Directors` Decisions, and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking. Included are issuances pertaining to: (1) Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (2) Georgia Tech Research Reactor, (3) River Bend Station, (4) Millstone Unit 1, (5) Thermo-Lag fire barrier material, and (6) Louisiana Energy Services.