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Sample records for lhc synchrotron light

  1. First Beam Measurements with the LHC Synchrotron Light Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Thibaut; Bravin, Enrico; Burtin, Gerard; Guerrero, Ana; Jeff, Adam; Rabiller, Aurelie; Roncarolo, Federico; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2012-07-13

    The continuous monitoring of the transverse sizes of the beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) relies on the use of synchrotron radiation and intensified video cameras. Depending on the beam energy, different synchrotron light sources must be used. A dedicated superconducting undulator has been built for low beam energies (450 GeV to 1.5 TeV), while edge and centre radiation from a beam-separation dipole magnet are used respectively for intermediate and high energies (up to 7 TeV). The emitted visible photons are collected using a retractable mirror, which sends the light into an optical system adapted for acquisition using intensified CCD cameras. This paper presents the design of the imaging system, and compares the expected light intensity with measurements and the calculated spatial resolution with a cross calibration performed with the wire scanners. Upgrades and future plans are also discussed.

  2. Spatial and temporal beam profiles for the LHC using synchrotron light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeff, A.; Bart Pedersen, S.; Boccardi, A.; Bravin, E.; Fisher, A. S.; Guerrero Ollacarizqueta, A.; Lefevre, T.; Rabiller, A.; Welsch, C. P.

    2010-04-01

    Synchrotron radiation is emitted whenever a beam of charged particles passes though a magnetic field. The power emitted is strongly dependent on the relativistic Lorentz factor of the particles, which itself is proportional to the beam energy and inversely proportional to the particle rest mass. Thus, synchrotron radiation is usually associated with electron accelerators, which are commonly used as light sources. However the largest proton machines reach sufficiently high energies to make synchrotron light useful for diagnostic purposes. The Large Hadron Collider at CERN will accelerate protons up to an energy of 7TeV. An optical arrangement has been made which focuses synchrotron light from two LHC magnets to image the cross-section of the beam. It is also planned to use this setup to produce a longitudinal profile of the beam by use of fast Single Photon Counting. This is complicated by the bunched nature of the beam which needs to be measured with a very large dynamic range. In this contribution we present early experimental data of the transverse LHC beam profile together with a scheme for measuring the longitudinal profile with a time resolution of 50 ps. It includes the use of a gating regime to increase the dynamic range of the photon counter and a three-stage correction algorithm to compensate for the detector's deadtime, afterpulsing and pile-up effects.

  3. Expected Performance of the LHC Synchrotron-Light Telescope (BSRT) and Abort-Gap Monitor (BSRA)

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2010-06-07

    This Report presents calculations of the synchrotron light from proton and lead-ion beams in the LHC at all energies from 0.45 to 7 TeV. It computes the emission from three sources: the uniform-field region of the D3 dipole, the dipole's edge field, and the short undulator just upstream. Light emitted at or near visible wavelengths is assessed for making optical measurements of transverse beam profiles and for monitoring the emptiness of the abort gap in the fill pattern. There is sufficient light for both applications, although both species pass through energy ranges in the ramp with small photon counts. Effects limiting image resolution are examined, including geometric optics, depth of field, and diffraction. The Report also considers recent suggestions that the undulator, intended to supplement the dipole for low energies, should not be ramped off at high energies and perhaps should not be used at all. We conclude that the undulator is essential at low energy for both species, but that it is possible to leave the undulator on at the cost of some blurring at intermediate energies.

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-01-08

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  5. National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-10

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  6. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2009-09-01

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  7. The DELTA Synchrotron Light Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.

    2004-05-12

    Synchrotron radiation sources like DELTA, the Dortmund Electron Accelerator, a third generation synchrotron light source, need an optical monitoring system to measure the beam size at different points of the ring with high resolution and accuracy. These measurements also allow an investigation of the emittance of the storage ring, an important working parameter for the efficiency of working beamlines with experiments using the synchrotron radiation. The resolution limits of the different types of optical synchrotron light monitors at DELTA are investigated. The minimum measurable beamsize with the normal synchrotron light monitor using visible light at DELTA is about 80 {mu}m. Due to this a synchrotron light interferometer was built up and tested at DELTA. The interferometer uses the same beamline in the visible range. The minimum measurable beamsize is with about 8 {mu}m one order of magnitude smaller. This resolution is sufficient for the expected small vertical beamsizes at DELTA. The electron beamsize and emittance were measured with both systems at different electron beam energies of the storage ring. The theoretical values of the present optics are smaller than the measured emittance. So possible reasons for beam movements are investigated.

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Dierker

    2008-03-12

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  9. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  10. Candle Synchrotron Light Source Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakanov, V. M.

    CANDLE - Center for the Advancement of Natural Discoveries using Light Emission - is a 3 GeV energy synchrotron light facility project in the Republic of Armenia. The main design features of the new facility are given. The results of the beam physics study in the future facility is overviewed including the machine impedance, single and multi-bunch instabilities, ion trapping and beam lifetime. The preliminary list of first group beamlines is discussed.

  11. The Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Brum, J. A.; Tavares, P. F.

    2007-01-19

    The Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory has been operating the only light source in the southern hemisphere since July 1997. During this period, approximately 28000 hours of beam time were delivered reaching more than 1000 users per year from all over Brazil as well as from 10 other countries. In this paper, we briefly recall the history of the project and describe the present configuration of the machine and associated instrumentation, focusing on improvements and upgrades of the various light source subsystems and beamlines implemented in recent years. Finally, we report on the use of the facility by the national and international scientific communities, its impact on the scientific and technological scene in Brazil and present perspectives for future improvements of the machine.

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

  13. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 20 years of synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-08-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is now operating as a fully dedicated light source with low emittance electron optics, delivering high brightness photon beams to 25 experimental stations six to seven months per year. On October 1, 1993 SSRL became a Division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, rather than an Independent Laboratory of Stanford University, so that high energy physics and synchrotron radiation now function under a single DOE contract. The SSRL division of SLAC has responsibility for operating, maintaining and improving the SPEAR accelerator complex, which includes the storage ring and a 3 GeV injector. SSRL has thirteen x-ray stations and twelve VUV/Soft x-ray stations serving its 600 users. Recently opened to users is a new spherical grating monochromator (SGM) and a multiundulator beam line. Circularly polarized capabilities are being exploited on a second SGM line. New YB{sub 66} crystals installed in a vacuum double-crystal monochromator line have sparked new interest for Al and Mg edge studies. One of the most heavily subscribed stations is the rotation camera, which has been recently enhanced with a MAR imaging plate detector system for protein crystallography on a multipole wiggler. Under construction is a new wiggler-based structural molecular biology beam line with experimental stations for crystallography, small angle scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plans for new developments include wiggler beam lines and associated facilities specialized for environmental research and materials processing.

  14. Status of the Synchrotron Light Source DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Sternemann, C.; Tolan, M.; Westphal, C.; Weis, T.; Wille, K.

    2007-01-19

    The Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA, a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source located at University of Dortmund, is operated for 3000 h per year including 2000 h beam time for synchrotron radiation use and 1000 h for machine physics, optimisation and maintenance. The status of the synchrotron light source is presented with emphasis on the operation, commissioning and installation of beamlines and insertion devices. The soft X-ray undulator beamlines provide photon energies between 5 to 400 eV (U250) and 55 and 1500 eV (U55), respectively. One dipole beamline covers soft X-rays between 6 to 200 eV, and a second dipole beamline is used without a monochromator at 2.2 keV critical energy of the dipole spectrum. For photons in the hard X-ray regime, a superconducting asymmetric wiggler (SAW) with a field of 5.3 T and 7.9 keV critical energy was installed, providing circularly polarized X-rays in the range of 2 to 30 keV. Due to its broad radiation fan, three beamlines are simultaneously served. The first SAW-beamline with an energy range between 4 to 30 keV is in full operation, the second is under commissioning, serving the energy range between 2 to 30 keV. The third SAW beamline is near completion, additional dipole beamlines are under construction.

  15. Synchrotron Light Interferometry at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Arne Freyberger; Pavel Chevtsov; Anthony Day; William Hicks

    2004-07-01

    The hyper-nuclear physics program at JLAB requires an upper limit on the RMS momentum spread of {delta}p/p < 3 x 10{sup -5}. The momentum spread is determined by measuring the beam width at a dispersive location (D {approx} 4m) in the transport line to the experimental halls. Ignoring the epsilon-beta contribution to the intrinsic beam size, this momentum spread corresponds to an upper bound on the beam width of {sigma}{sub beam} < 120 {micro}m. Typical techniques to measure and monitor the beam size are either invasive or do not have the resolution to measure such small beam sizes. Using interferometry of the synchrotron light produced in the dispersive bend, the resolution of the optical system can be made very small. The non-invasive nature of this measurement allows continuous monitoring of the momentum spread. Two synchrotron light interferometers have been built and installed at JLAB, one each in the Hall-A and Hall-C transport lines. The devices operate over a beam current range from 20 {micro}A to 120 {micro}A and have a spatial resolution of 10um. The structure of the interferometers, the experience gained during its installation, beam measurements and momentum spread stability are presented. The dependence of the measured momentum spread on beam current will be presented.

  16. Status Of The Synchrotron Light Source DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Friedl, J.; Hartmann, P.; Schirmer, D.; Schmidt, G.; Sternemann, C.; Tolan, M.; Weis, T.; Westphal, C.; Wille, K.

    2004-05-12

    The Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA, located at the University of Dortmund, changed its scope during the last years into a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source. DELTA is now operated for 3000 h per year including 2000 h dedicated beam time for synchrotron radiation use and 1000 h for machine physics, optimization and maintenance. The status of the accelerator complex is presented together with the beam operation, the installation and commissioning of beamlines and insertion devices. To serve user demands of photon energies up to more than 10 keV a 5.3 T superconducting asymmetric multipole wiggler (SAW) with a critical energy of 7.9 keV has been installed serving three beamlines in the hard X-ray regime with also circular polarization. Two undulator beamlines for photon energies between 5 and 400 eV (U250) and between 55 and 1500 eV (U55) and several dipole beamlines up to 200 eV are under operation. The construction and operation of the different beamlines is done by various universities and laboratories in Nordrhein-Westfalen.

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3

  19. Status of the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The status and performance of the NSLS 700 MeV ring and 2.5 GeV ring are described. Emphasis is placed on properties of the stored beam pertinent to synchrotron radiation production, the factors determining these properties, and efforts to improve performance of the rings.

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source safety-analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1982-07-01

    This document covers all of the safety issues relating to the design and operation of the storage rings and injection system of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The building systems for fire protection, access and egress are described together with air and other gaseous control or venting systems. Details of shielding against prompt bremstrahlung radiation and synchrotron radiation are described and the administrative requirements to be satisfied for operation of a beam line at the facility are given.

  1. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2004

    SciTech Connect

    MILLER,L.

    2005-05-01

    for the environmental science community, is also very important, as it will help to satisfy the large over subscription rate for this technique at the NSLS. Two other important upgrades that were initiated this past year are the replacement of the X25 wiggler with an undulator and the construction of the X9 undulator beamline for small-angle scattering, with an emphasis on nanoscience research. Another key activity that will benefit all users was the restoration of the x-ray ring lattice symmetry, which reduced the horizontal emittance and made the operational lattice more robust. Similarly, all users will benefit from the introduction of the PASS (Proposal Allocation Safety Scheduling) system this past year, which has greatly improved the process of proposal submission, review, allocation, and scheduling. This coming year we will work to add Rapid Access to the capabilities of PASS. Overall, the success of these and the many other projects that space does not permit listing is a testament to the dedication, hard work, and skill of the NSLS staff. Safety has always been an important issue at a large, complex scientific facility like the NSLS and in 2004 it received renewed attention. Safety is our highest priority and we spent a great deal of time reviewing and refining our safety practices and procedures. A new 'Safety Highlights' web page was created for safety news, and a large number of safety meetings and discussions were held. These reviews and meetings generated many ideas on how the NSLS might improve its safety practices, and we are committed to putting these in place and improving our already very good safety program. We had no lost-time accidents in 2004, which is a notable accomplishment. Our goal is to be best in class and I'm confident that by working together we can achieve that status. Several activities took place this past year to advance our proposal to replace the NSLS with a new National Synchrotron Light Source-II facility. These included a major

  2. Research by industry at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The world`s foremost facility for research using x-rays and ultraviolet and infrared radiation, is operated by the National Synchrotron Light Source dept. This pamphlet described the participating research teams that built most of the beam lines, various techniques for studying materials, treatment of materials, and various industrial research (catalysis, pharmaceuticals, etc.).

  3. DAFNE-Light INFN-LNF Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Balerna, A.; Cestelli-Guidi, M.; Cimino, R.; Commisso, M.; Grilli, A.; Pietropaoli, M.; Raco, A.; Sciarra, V.; Tullio, V.; Viviani, G.; De Sio, A.; Gambicorti, L.; Hampai, D.; Pace, E.

    2010-06-23

    DAFNE-Light is the Synchrotron Radiation Facility at the INFN-Frascati National Laboratory (Rome, Italy). Three beamlines are operational, using in parasitic and dedicated mode the intense photon emission of DAFNE, a 0.51 GeV storage ring with a routinely circulating electron current higher than 1 Ampere. Two of these beamlines--the soft x-ray (DXR1) and UV (DXR2)--use one of the DAFNE wiggler magnets as synchrotron radiation source, while the third beamline SINBAD (Synchrotron Infrared Beamline At DAFNE) collects the radiation from a bending magnet. New XUV bending magnet beamlines are nowadays under construction and the low energy one (35-200 eV) will be ready for commissioning by the end of 2009. A presentation of the facility will be given together with some recent scientific results achieved at SINBAD and DXR1 beamlines.

  4. Chemical Imaging of Biological Tissue with Synchrotron Infrared Light

    SciTech Connect

    Miller,L.; Dumas, P.

    2006-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (FTIRM) and imaging (FTIRI) have become valuable techniques for examining the chemical makeup of biological materials by probing their vibrational motions on a microscopic scale. Synchrotron infrared (S-IR) light is an ideal source for FTIRM and FTIRI due to the combination of its high brightness (i.e., flux density), also called brilliance, and broadband nature. Through a 10-{mu}m pinhole, the brightness of a synchrotron source is 100-1000 times higher than a conventional thermal (globar) source. Accordingly, the improvement in spatial resolution and in spectral quality to the diffraction limit has led to a plethora of applications that is just being realized. In this review, we describe the development of synchrotron-based FTIRM, illustrate its advantages in many applications to biological systems, and propose some potential future directions for the technique.

  5. CONTROL OF DYNAMIC APERTURE FOR SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    BENGTSSON, J.

    2005-05-15

    A summary of how modern analytical and numerical techniques enable one to construct a realistic model of state-of-the-art synchrotron light sources is provided. The effects of engineering tolerances and radiation are included in a self-consistent manner. An approach for utilizing these tools to develop an effective strategy for the design and control of the dynamic aperture for such dynamical systems is also outlined.

  6. Light nondegenerate squarks at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Mahbubani, Rakhi; Papucci, Michele; Perez, Gilad; Ruderman, Joshua T; Weiler, Andreas

    2013-04-12

    Experimental bounds on squarks of the first two generations assume their masses to be eightfold degenerate and consequently constrain them to be heavier than ∼1.4  TeV when the gluino is lighter than 2.5 TeV. The assumption of squark-mass universality is neither a direct consequence of minimal flavor violation (MFV), which allows for splittings within squark generations, nor a prediction of supersymmetric alignment models, which allow for splittings between generations. We reinterpret a recent CMS multijet plus missing energy search allowing for deviations from U(2) universality and find significantly weakened squark bounds: A 400 GeV second-generation squark singlet is allowed, even with exclusive decays to a massless neutralino, and, in an MFV scenario, the down-type squark singlets can be as light as 600 GeV, provided the up-type singlets are pushed up to 1.8 TeV, for a 1.5 TeV gluino and decoupled doublet squarks. PMID:25167251

  7. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    ROTHMAN,E.

    1999-05-01

    thereafter for half of the running time in FY 1998. In combination with the development of narrow gap undulators this mode opens the possibility of new undulators which could produce hard X-rays in the fundamental, perhaps up to 10 keV. On 27 September 1998, a low horizontal emittance lattice became operational at 2.584 GeV. This results in approximately a 50% decrease in the horizontal beam-size on dipole bending magnet beamlines, and somewhat less of a decrease on the insertion device lines. The beam lifetime is not degraded by the low emittance lattice. This represents an important achievement, enhancing for all users the x-ray ring brightness. The reduced horizontal emittance electron beam will produce brighter x-ray beams for all the beamlines, both bending magnets and insertion devices, adding to other recent increases in the X-Ray ring brightness. During FY 1999 users will gain experience of the new running mode and plans are in place to do the same at 2.8GeV during further studies sessions. Independent evidence of the reduced emittance is shown in Figure 2. This is a pinhole camera scan showing the X-ray beam profile, obtained on the diagnostic beamline X28. Finally, work has begun to update and refine the proposal of the Phase III upgrade endorsed by the Birgeneau panel and BESAC last year. With the whole NSLS facility in teenage years and with many demonstrated enhancements available, the time has come to herald in the next stage of life at the Light Source.

  8. Synchrotron light sources: A powerful tool for science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, F.; Robinson, A.

    1996-01-01

    A new generation of synchrotron light sources is producing extremely bright beams of vacuum-ultraviolet and x-ray radiation, powerful new tools for research in a wide variety of basic and applied sciences. Spectromicroscopy using high spectral and spatial resolution is a new way of seeing, offering many opportunities in the study of matter. Development of a new light source provides the country or region of the world in which the light source is located many new opportunities: a focal point for research in many scientific and technological areas, a means of upgrading the technology infrastructure of the country, a means of training students, and a potential service to industry. A light source for Southeast Asia would thus be a major resource for many years. Scientists and engineers from light sources around the world look forward to providing assistance to make this a reality in Southeast Asia.

  9. Producing terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation at the Hefei Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, De-Rong; Xu, Hong-Liang; Shao, Yan

    2015-07-01

    This paper theoretically proves that an electron storage ring can generate coherent radiation in the THz region using a quick kicker magnet and an AC sextupole magnet. When the vertical chromaticity is modulated by the AC sextupole magnet, the vertical beam collective motion excited by the kicker produces a wavy spatial structure after a number of longitudinal oscillation periods. The radiation spectral distribution was calculated from the wavy bunch parameters at the Hefei Light Source (HLS). When the electron energy is reduced to 400 MeV, extremely strong coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at 0.115 THz should be produced. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375176)

  10. Condenser for illuminating a ringfield camera with synchrotron emission light

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to the field of condensers for collecting light from a synchrotron radiation source and directing the light into a ringfield of a lithography camera. The present invention discloses a condenser comprising collecting, processing, and imaging optics. The collecting optics are comprised of concave and convex spherical mirrors that collect the light beams. The processing optics, which receive the light beams, are comprised of flat mirrors that converge and direct the light beams into a real entrance pupil of the camera in a symmetrical pattern. In the real entrance pupil are located flat mirrors, common to the beams emitted from the preceding mirrors, for generating substantially parallel light beams and for directing the beams toward the ringfield of a camera. Finally, the imaging optics are comprised of a spherical mirror, also common to the beams emitted from the preceding mirrors, images the real entrance pupil through the resistive mask and into the virtual entrance pupil of the camera. Thus, the condenser is comprised of a plurality of beams with four mirrors corresponding to a single beam plus two common mirrors.

  11. Condenser for illuminating a ringfield camera with synchrotron emission light

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, W.C.

    1996-04-30

    The present invention relates generally to the field of condensers for collecting light from a synchrotron radiation source and directing the light into a ringfield of a lithography camera. The present invention discloses a condenser comprising collecting, processing, and imaging optics. The collecting optics are comprised of concave and convex spherical mirrors that collect the light beams. The processing optics, which receive the light beams, are comprised of flat mirrors that converge and direct the light beams into a real entrance pupil of the camera in a symmetrical pattern. In the real entrance pupil are located flat mirrors, common to the beams emitted from the preceding mirrors, for generating substantially parallel light beams and for directing the beams toward the ringfield of a camera. Finally, the imaging optics are comprised of a spherical mirror, also common to the beams emitted from the preceding mirrors, images the real entrance pupil through the resistive mask and into the virtual entrance pupil of the camera. Thus, the condenser is comprised of a plurality of beams with four mirrors corresponding to a single beam plus two common mirrors. 9 figs.

  12. Light stops and observation of supersymmetry at LHC run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Bryan; Nath, Pran; Nelson, Brent D.; Spisak, Andrew B.

    2015-11-01

    Light stops consistent with the Higgs boson mass of ˜126 GeV are investigated within the framework of minimal supergravity. It is shown that models with light stops which are also consistent with the thermal relic density constraints require stop coannihilation with the neutralino LSP. The analysis shows that the residual set of parameter points with light stops satisfying both the Higgs mass and the relic density constraints lie within a series of thin strips in the m0-m1 /2 plane for different values of A0/m0. Consequently, this region of minimal supergravity parameter space makes a number of very precise predictions. It is found that light stops of mass down to 400 GeV or lower can exist consistent with all constraints. A signal analysis for this class of models at LHC run II is carried out and the dominant signals for their detection identified. Also computed is the minimum integrated luminosity for 5 σ discovery of the models analyzed. If supersymmetry is realized in this manner, the stop masses can be as low as 400 GeV or lower, and the mass gap between the lightest neutralino and lightest stop will be approximately 30-40 GeV. We have optimized the ATLAS signal regions specifically for stop searches in the parameter space and find that a stop with mass ˜375 GeV can be discovered with as little as ˜60 fb-1 of integrated luminosity at run II of the LHC; the integrated luminosity needed for discovery could be further reduced with more efficient signature analyses. The direct detection of dark matter in this class of models is also discussed. It is found that dark matter cross sections lie close to, but above, coherent neutrino scattering and would require multiton detectors such as LZ to see a signal of dark matter for this class of models.

  13. Ozone production at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Weilandics, C.; Rohrig, N.; Gmur, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    Ozone production by synchrotron radiation as a function of power density in air was investigated using a white beam at the BNL National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) x-ray ring. Power densities were calculated from the energy spectrum at 2.52 GeV. Ozone concentrations in small beam pipes were measured for power densities between I = 10/sup 12/ and 10/sup 15/ eV . cm/sup -3/ . sec/sup -1/. The measured ozone half-life was 37 +- 2 min. The measured G-value was 2.69 +- 0.14 mol/100 eV and the ozone destruction factor k was less than 7 x 10/sup -19/ cm/sup 3/ . eV/sup -1/. The random uncertainties stated are approximately one standard error. The large departure of the values for G and k from previous values suggest that some undiscovered systematic error may exist in the experiment. Ozone concentration in excess of the 0.1 ppM ACGIH TLV can be generated in the experimental hutches but can readily be controlled. Industrial hygiene aspects of operation and possible control measures will be discussed. 19 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. A compact high brightness laser synchrotron light source for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    1999-07-01

    The present high-brightness hard X-ray sources have been developed as third generation synchrotron light sources based on large high energy electron storage rings and magnetic undulators. Recently availability of compact terawatt lasers arouses a great interest in the use of lasers as undulators. The laser undulator concept makes it possible to construct an attractive compact synchrotron radiation source which has been proposed as a laser synchrotron light source. This paper proposes a compact laser synchrotron light source for mediacal applications, such as an intravenous coronary angiography and microbeam therapy.

  15. DEVELOPMENTS IN SYNCHROTRON X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY AT THE NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    DOWD,B.A.

    1999-07-23

    Last year, the X27A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) became dedicated solely to X-Ray Computed Microtomography (XCMT). This is a third-generation instrument capable of producing tomographic volumes of 1-2 micron resolution over a 2-3mm field of view. Recent enhancements will be discussed. These have focused on two issues: the desire for real-time data acquisition and processing and the need for highly monochromatic beam (.1 % energy bandpass). The latter will permit k-edge subtraction studies and will provide improved image contrast from below the Cr (6 keV) up to the Cs (36 keV) k-edge. A range of applications that benefit from these improvements will be discussed as well. These two goals are somewhat counterproductive, however; higher monochromaticity yields a lower flux forcing longer data acquisition times. To balance the two, a more efficient scintillator for X-ray conversion is being developed. Some testing of a prototype scintillator has been performed; preliminary results will be presented here. In the meantime, data reconstruction times have been reduced, and the entire tomographic acquisition, reconstruction and volume rendering process streamlined to make efficient use of synchrotron beam time. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program recently developed helped to reduce the time to reconstruct a volume of 150 x 150 x 250 pixels{sup 3} (over 5 million voxels) from the raw camera data to 1.5 minutes on a dual R10,000 CPU. With these improvements, one can now obtain a ''quick look'' of a small tomographic volume ({approximately}10{sup 6}voxels) in just over 15 minutes from the start of data acquisition.

  16. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D.; Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M.; Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y.; Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  17. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D. ); Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M. ); Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y. ); Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M. )

    1992-01-01

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  18. Commissioning and operation of the first brazilian synchrotron light source.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A R; Craievich, A F; Gonçalves Da Silva, C E

    1998-05-01

    The synchrotron light source designed and constructed at the LNLS is composed of a 1.37 GeV electron storage ring and a 120 MeV linac for low-energy injection. The storage ring has been commissioned and has already reached the designed electron-beam energy, current and emittance. The electron lifetime is now 6 h at 60 mA, and is steadily increasing. Seven beamlines (TGM, SGM, SXS, XAFS, XRD, SAXS, PCr) have been constructed in parallel with the electron accelerators and are at present in operation. Beam time was allocated to 129 approved research projects for the second semester of 1997. A number of them are currently under way. PMID:15263777

  19. Light flavour hadron production in the ALICE experiment at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalà, Angela

    2016-05-01

    Unique among the LHC experiments, ALICE has excellent particle identification capabilities for the measurement of light-flavour hadrons. A large number of hadron species from pions to multi-strange baryons and light nuclei have been measured over a large transverse momentum region. The measurement of the production of these particles is a valuable tool to study the properties of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. In particular they give information on the collective phenomena of the fireball, on the parton energy loss in the hot QCD medium and on the hadronization mechanisms such as recombination and statistical hadronization. The measurements in pp and in p-nucleus collisions provide the necessary baseline for heavy-ion data and help to investigate the effects of the ordinary nuclear matter. In this paper some of the main ALICE results on identified light-flavour hadron production in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV and p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV will be presented.

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source guidelines for the conduct of operations

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, M.

    1998-01-01

    To improve the quality and uniformity of operations at the Department of Energy`s facilities, the DOE issued Order 5480.19 ``Conduct of Operations Requirements at DOE facilities.`` This order recognizes that the success of a facilities mission critically depends upon a high level of performance by its personnel and equipment. This performance can be severely impaired if the facility`s Conduct of Operations pays inadequate attention to issues of organization, safety, health, and the environment. These guidelines are Brookhaven National Laboratory`s and the National Synchrotron Light Source`s acknowledgement of the principles of Conduct of Operations and the response to DOE Order 5480.19. These guidelines cover the following areas: (1) operations organization and administration; (2) shift routines and operating practices; (3) control area activities; (4) communications; (5) control of on-shift training; (6) investigation of abnormal events; (7) notifications; (8) control of equipment and system studies; (9) lockouts and tagouts; (10) independent verification; (11) log-keeping; (12) operations turnover; (13) operations aspects of facility process control (14) required reading; (15) timely orders to operators; (16) operations procedures; (17) operator aid posting; and (18) equipment sizing and labeling.

  1. Parametric Modeling of Electron Beam Loss in Synchrotron Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; Schweiger, C.; Hartman, E.; Corbett, J.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Paterson, E.; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    Synchrotron light is used for a wide variety of scientific disciplines ranging from physical chemistry to molecular biology and industrial applications. As the electron beam circulates, random single-particle collisional processes lead to decay of the beam current in time. We report a simulation study in which a combined neural network (NN) and first-principles (FP) model is used to capture the decay in beam current due to Touschek, Bremsstrahlung, and Coulomb effects. The FP block in the combined model is a parametric description of the beam current decay where model parameters vary as a function of beam operating conditions (e.g. vertical scraper position, RF voltage, number of the bunches, and total beam current). The NN block provides the parameters of the FP model and is trained (through constrained nonlinear optimization) to capture the variation in model parameters as operating condition of the beam changes. Simulation results will be presented to demonstrate that the proposed combined framework accurately models beam decay as well as variation to model parameters without direct access to parameter values in the model.

  2. PHOTOINJECTED ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC UPGRADE FOR THE NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.; BABZIEN,M.; BLUM,E.; CASEY,W.; CHANG,X.; GRAVES,W.; HASTINGS,J.; HULBERT,S.; JOHNSON,E.; KAO,C.C.; KRAMER,S.; KRINSKY,S.; MORTAZAVI,P.; MURPHY,J.; OZAKI,S.; PJEROV,S.; PODOBEDOV,B.; RAKOWSKY,G.; ROSE,J.; SHAFTAN,T.; SHEEHY,B.; SIDDONS,D.; SMEDLEY,J.; SRINIVASAN-RAO,T.; TOWNE,N.; WANG,J.M.; WANG,X.; WU,J.; YAKIMENKO,V.; YU,L.H.

    2001-06-18

    We describe a major paradigm shift in the approach to the production of synchrotron radiation This change will considerably improve the scientific capabilities of synchrotron light sources. We introduce plans for an upgrade of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This upgrade will be based on the Photoinjected Energy Recovering Linac (PERL). This machine emerges from the union of two technologies, the laser-photocathode RF gun (photoinjector) and superconducting linear accelerators with beam energy recovery (Energy Recovering Linac). The upgrade will bring the NSLS users many new insertion device beam lines, brightness greater than 3rd generation lightsource's and ultra-short pulse capabilities, not possible with storage ring light sources.

  3. Study of Laser Wakefield Accelerators as injectors for Synchrotron light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, Steffen; Assmann, Ralph; Müller, Anke-Susanne; Jansen, Oliver; Judin, Vitali; Pukhov, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Laser WakeField Accelerators (LWFA) feature short bunch lengths and high peak currents, combined with a small facility footprint. This makes them very interesting as injectors for Synchrotron light sources. Using the ANKA Synchrotron as an example, we investigate the possibility to inject a LWFA bunch into an electron storage ring. Particular emphasis is put on the longitudinal evolution of the bunch.

  4. National synchrotron light source. [Annual report], October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains brief discussions on the research being conducted at the National Synchrotron Light source. Some of the topics covered are: X-ray spectroscopy; nuclear physics; atomic and molecular science; meetings and workshops; operations; and facility improvements.

  5. Shedding Synchrotron Light on a Puzzle of Glasses

    ScienceCinema

    Chumakov, Aleksandr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France

    2010-01-08

    Vibrational dynamics of glasses remains a point of controversial discussions. In particular, the density of vibrational states (DOS) reveals an excess of states above the Debye model called "boson peak." Despite the fact that this universal feature for all glasses has been known for more than 35 years, the nature of the boson peak is still not understood. The application of nuclear inelastic scattering via synchrotron radiation perhaps provides a clearer, more consistent picture of the subject. The distinguishing features of nuclear inelastic scattering relative to, e.g., neutron inelastic scattering, are ideal momentum integration and exact scaling of the DOS in absolute units. This allows for reliable comparison to data from other techniques such as Brillouin light scattering. Another strong point is ideal isotope selectivity: the DOS is measured for a single isotope with a specific low-energy nuclear transition. This allows for special "design" of an experiment to study, for instance, the dynamics of only center-of-mass motions. Recently, we have investigated the transformation of the DOS as a function of several key parameters such as temperature, cooling rate, and density. In all cases the transformation of the DOS is sufficiently well described by a transformation of the continuous medium, in particular, by changes of the macroscopic density and the sound velocity. These results suggest a collective sound-like nature of vibrational dynamics in glasses and cast doubts on microscopic models of glass dynamics. Further insight can be obtained in combined studies of glass with nuclear inelastic and inelastic neutron scattering. Applying two techniques, we have measured the energy dependence of the characteristic correlation length of atomic motions. The data do not reveal localization of atomic vibrations at the energy of the boson peak. Once again, the results suggest that special features of glass dynamics are related to extended motions and not to local models.

  6. Synchrotron light source data book: Version 4, Revision 05/96

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.B.

    1996-05-01

    This book is as its name implies a collection of data on existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The intention was to provide a compendium of tools for the design of electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation sources. The slant is toward the accelerator physicist as other booklets such as the X-Ray Data Booklet address the use of synchrotron radiation. It is hoped that the booklet serves as a pocket sized reference to facilitate back of the envelope type calculations. It contains some useful formulae in practical units and a brief description of many of the existing and planned light source lattices.

  7. Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2012-04-09

    The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring design. The talk will start with an overview of the latest developments and advances in the design of synchrotron light sources based on the concept of an 'ultimate' storage ring. The review will establish how bright a ring based light source might be, where the frontier of technological challenges are, and what the limits of accelerator physics are. Emphasis will be given to possible improvements in accelerator design and developments in technology toward the goal of achieving an ultimate storage ring. An ultimate storage ring (USR), defined as an electron ring-based light source having an emittance in both transverse planes at the diffraction limit for the range of X-ray wavelengths of interest for a scientific community, would provide very high brightness photons having high transverse coherence that would extend the capabilities of X-ray imaging and probe techniques beyond today's performance. It would be a cost-effective, high-coherence 4th generation light source, competitive with one based on energy recovery linac (ERL) technology, serving a large number of users studying material, chemical, and biological sciences. Furthermore, because of the experience accumulated over many decades of ring operation, it would have the great advantage of stability and reliability. In this paper we consider the design of an USR having 10-pm-rad emittance. It is a tremendous challenge to design a storage ring having such an extremely low emittance, a factor of 100 smaller than those in existing light sources, especially such that it has adequate dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. In many ultra-low emittance designs, the injection acceptances are not large enough for accumulation of the electron beam, necessitating on-axis injection where stored electron bunches are completely replaced with newly injected ones. Recently, starting with the MAX-IV 7-bend achromatic cell, we

  8. Testing the light dark matter scenario of the MSSM at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Junjie; He, Yangle; Shang, Liangliang; Su, Wei; Zhang, Yang

    2016-03-01

    In the light dark matter (DM) scenario of the MSSM, the DM relic density puts non-trivial requirements on the spectrum of supersymmetric particles. As a result, the direct search for multi-lepton signals at the LHC has great impact on the scenario. In this work, we concentrate on the searches for sleptons and electroweak-inos at the LHC, investigate their constraints on the light DM scenario with the 8 TeV LHC data, and also study their capability to test the scenario at the 14 TeV LHC. For this purpose, we first get the samples of the scenario by scanning the vast parameter space of the MSSM with various available constraints considered. Then for the surviving samples, we simulate the 2 l + E T miss signal from slepton pair production process and the 2 l + E T miss and 3 l + E T miss signals from chargino and neutralino associated production processes at both the 8 TeV LHC and the 14 TeV LHC. Our simulations indicate that the 8 TeV LHC data have excluded a sizable portion of the samples, and the capability of the 14 TeV LHC will be much more powerful in testing the scenario. For example, in case that no excess of the multi-lepton signals is observed at the 14 TeV LHC, most samples of the light DM scenario will be excluded, especially a lower limit on the lightest neutralino mass will be set at 42 GeV and 44 GeV with 30 fb-1 and 100 fb-1 data respectively, and this limit can be further pushed up to 55 GeV with 300 fb-1 data.

  9. Synchrotron light sources: The search for quantum chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, Fred

    2001-02-01

    A storage ring is a specialized synchrotron in which a stored beam of relativistic electrons produces radiation in the vuv and x-ray regions of the spectrum. High-brightness radiation is used at the ALS to study doubly excited autoionizing states of the helium atom in the search for quantum chaos.

  10. Diffraction and Transmission Synchrotron Imaging at the German Light Source ANKA--Potential Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, Alexander; Weitkamp, Timm; Helfen, Lukas; Simon, Rolf; Luebbert, Daniel; Baumbach, Tilo

    2009-03-10

    Diffraction and transmission synchrotron imaging methods have proven to be highly suitable for investigations in materials research and non-destructive evaluation. The high flux and spatial coherence of X-rays from modern synchrotron light sources allows one to work using high resolution and different contrast modalities. This article gives a short overview of different transmission and diffraction imaging methods with high potential for industrial applications, now available for commercial access via the German light source ANKA (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe) and its new department ANKA Commercial Service (ANKA COS, http://www.anka-cos.de)

  11. Light Higgs bosons in NMSSM at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guchait, Monoranjan; Kumar, Jacky

    2016-04-01

    The next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) with an extended Higgs sector offers at least one Higgs boson as the Standard Model (SM)-like Higgs with a mass around 125 GeV. In this work, we revisit the mass spectrum and couplings of non-SM-like Higgs bosons taking into consideration most relevant constraints and identify the relevant parameter space. The discovery potential of these non-SM-like Higgs bosons, apart from their masses, is guided by their couplings with gauge bosons and fermions which are very much parameter space sensitive. We evaluate the rates of productions of these non-SM-like Higgs bosons at the LHC for a variety of decay channels in the allowed region of the parameter space. Although bb¯, ττ modes appear to be the most promising decay channels, but for a substantial region of parameter space the two-photon decay mode has a remarkably large rate. In this study we emphasize that this diphoton mode can be exploited to find the non-SM-like Higgs bosons of the NMSSM and can also be a potential avenue to distinguish the NMSSM from the MSSM. In addition, we discuss briefly the various detectable signals of these non-SM Higgs bosons at the LHC.

  12. Mechanical Design of the HER Synchrotron Light Monitor Primary Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Edward F.; Fisher, Alan S.; Kurita, Nadine R.; Langton, J.; /SLAC

    2011-09-14

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the primary mirror that images the visible portion of the synchrotron radiation (SR) extracted from the High Energy Ring (HER) of the PEP-II B-Factory. During off-axis operation, the water-cooled GlidCop mirror is subjected to a heat flux in excess of 2000 W/cm2. When on-axis imaging occurs, the heat flux due to scattered SR, resistive wall losses and Higher-Order-Mode (HOM) heating is estimated at 1 W/cm2. The imaging surface is plated with Electroless Nickel to improve its optical characteristics. The design requirements for the primary mirror are listed and discussed. Calculated mechanical distortions and stresses experienced by the mirror during on-axis and off-axis operation will be presented.

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source angiography personnel protection interlock

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.; Larson, R.; Thomlinson, W.

    1992-06-01

    This document has been written to describe the safety system operation at the NSLS X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF). The angiography exposure process involves scanning a patient up and down through dual fixed-position x-ray beams; exposure is controlled by opening and closing a fast-acting Safety Shutter mechanism at precise times in relation to the up and down motion of the scan chair. The fast-acting Safety Shutter mechanism is the primary radiation-stopping element protecting the patient while the chair is at rest and while it is reversing directions during the scan. Its fail-safe and fast operation is essential for the safety of the patient. Operation of X17B2 as a human subject angiography station necessitates the implementation of a personnel protection interlock system that, in conjunction with the Safety Shutters: permits safe access to the patient exposure area while the synchrotron radiation beam is illuminating the upstream dual energy monochromator; allows a patient to be imaged by the monochromatized beam under the supervision of a Responsible Physician, with scan chair motion and precision shutter actuation regulated by an angiography control computer, while providing a suitable number of safeguards against accidental radiation exposure; has different modes of operation to accommodate equipment set-up, test, and calibration; and patient exposure; and ensures the quick extinction of the beam if a potentially unsafe condition is detected. The interlock system which performs these safety functions is called the Angiography Personnel Protection Interlock (APPI). The APPI Document is organized such that the level of detail changes from a general overview to detailed engineering drawings of the hardware system.

  14. Proton opacity in the light of LHC diffractive data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryskin, M. G.; Martin, A. D.; Khoze, V. A.

    2012-04-01

    We show that collider data on elastic pp (and pbar{p}) scattering, including the LHC TOTEM data at 7 TeV, can be well described by a 3-channel eikonal model with only one Pomeron, with parameters that are naturally linked to the perturbative QCD (BFKL) framework. The proton opacity, determined in this way, is then used to account for sizeable absorptive effects. We study the recent measurements of dσ/ dΔ η made by the ATLAS collaboration, where they select events with large rapidity gaps Δ η. We demonstrate that the absorptive corrections noticeably change both the value and the Δ η dependence of the cross section. We find that our parameter-free calculation is in agreement with these ATLAS data.

  15. 1994 Activity Report, National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report, October 1, 1993-September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, E.Z.

    1995-05-01

    This report is a summary of activities carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source during 1994. It consists of sections which summarize the work carried out in differing scientific disciplines, meetings and workshops, operations experience of the facility, projects undertaken for upgrades, administrative reports, and collections of abstracts and publications generated from work done at the facility.

  16. Application of electron linacs in medicine, food sterilization and synchrotron light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Duc-Tien

    1989-04-01

    A review of the state of the art and new trends in electron linac technology is given with emphasis on three particular applications: radiotherapy, food sterilization and synchrotron light sources. The requirements on linac performances that these applications call for, namely energy variation flexibility, high power, high energy and low cost, will open linacs to new applications to come.

  17. Neutron field measurements at the Aladdin Synchrotron Light Source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Li, Y; DeLuca, P M; Otte, R; Rowe, E M

    1986-01-01

    The neutron field near the inflector of the 800-MeV electron storage ring was studied. Photon-induced neutrons are produced by 100-MeV electrons bombarding the inflector during injection into the synchrotron ring. Neutrons were measured with moderating detectors made of 15 X 15 X 20 cm Lucite blocks and Au activation foils. Detector response was established with a Pu-Be neutron source and a 25.4-cm polyethylene sphere and Au foil detector. The neutron yield was 0.97 +/- 0.14 X 10(12) kJ-1. For 1.38 W of electron pulse power, the dose equivalent rate 1 m aside and 1 m above the inflector was 4.35 +/- 0.47 mu Sv s-1 and 3.13 +/- 0.23 mu Sv s-1, respectively. A measured dose equivalent transmission curve for polyethylene yielded an attenuation coefficient of 15.7 m-1. PMID:3943962

  18. SUNY beamline facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Coppens, Philip

    2003-06-22

    The DOE sponsored SUNY synchrotron project has involved close cooperation among faculty at several SUNY campuses. A large number of students and postdoctoral associates have participated in its operation which was centered at the X3 beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Four stations with capabilities for Small Angle Scattering, Single Crystal and Powder and Surface diffraction and EXAFS were designed and operated with capability to perform experiments at very low as well as elevated temperatures and under high vacuum. A large amount of cutting-edge science was performed at the facility, which in addition provided excellent training for students and postdoctoral scientists in the field.

  19. ZAP and its application to the optimization of synchrotron light source parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    1987-03-01

    The design of electron storage rings for the production of synchrotron radiation has become increasingly sophisticated in recent years. To assist in the optimization of such storage rings, a new, user-friendly code to treat the relevant collective phenomena, called ZAP, has been written at LBL. The code is designed primarily to carry out parameter studies of electron storage rings, although options for protons or heavy ions are included where appropriate. In this paper, we first describe the contents of the code itself, and then illustrate, via selected examples, how the collective effects treated by ZAP manifest themselves in the new generation of synchrotron light sources.

  20. Synchrotron radiation as a light source in confocal microscopy of biological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; van der Oord, C. J. R.; Levine, Yehudi K.; Munro, Ian H.; Myring, Wendy J.; Shaw, D. A.; Rommerts, Fokko F.

    1992-04-01

    A novel confocal microscope is presented using the Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation source as its light source. The broad spectrum of synchrotron radiation in combination with the UV compatible microscope allows the extension of confocal microscopy from the visible to the UV region down to about 200 nm. It is envisaged that structures separated by about 70 nm can be resolved at a wavelength of 200 nm. In addition, the tunability of synchrotron radiation affords the selective excitation of any specific fluorescent molecule at the maximum of the absorption band. This avoids the restriction of working at fixed laser lines. A further advantage of using synchrotron radiation is the realization of multiwavelength excitation. Test results using laser systems in the visible and in the UV are presented. Fluorescence images of test targets using UV excitation reveal the superior resolution of the microscope. Furthermore, images of Leydig cells incubated with a fluorescent cholesterol derivative whose maximum of absorption is at 325 nm are shown. These images cannot be produced by conventional confocal laser microscopes. Finally, promising preliminary results obtained with synchrotron radiation are presented.

  1. Measurements of a prototype synchrotron radiation pumped absorber for future light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.S.; Foerster, C.L.; Halama, H.; Lanni, C.

    1988-01-01

    In the new generation of advanced synchrotron light sources, the conventional concept of distributed pumping is no longer suitable for removing the gas load caused by photon stimulated desorption (PSD). A new concept using a combination of photon absorber and pumping station has been designed, constructed, and installed in the U1OB beam line at the VUV ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The system consists of an electrically insulated water cooled copper block, a titanium sublimation pump, calibrated BA gauges, a calibrated RGA, and a known conductance. A photon beam 10 milliradian wide and 3.26 milliradian high, having critical energy of 500 eV, is directed on the absorber. PSD yield is studied as a function of total beam dose and absorber surface preparation. The results from this experiment, pump characteristics, design of an absorber pump for future light sources, and the pressure improvement factors will be presented. 5 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Measurements of a prototype synchrotron radiation pumped absorber for future light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, T. S.; Foerster, C. L.; Halama, H.; Lanni, C.

    1988-09-01

    In the new generation of advanced synchrotron light sources, the conventional concept of distributed pumping is no longer suitable for removing the gas load caused by photon stimulated desorption (PSD). A new concept using a combination of photon absorber and pumping station has been designed, constructed, and installed in the U10B beam line at the VUV ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The system consists of an electrically insulated water cooled copper block, a titanium sublimation pump, calibrated BA gauges, a calibrated RGA, and a known conductance. A photon beam 10 milliradian wide and 3.26 milliradian high, having critical energy of 500 eV, is directed on the absorber. PSD yield is studied as a function of total beam dose and absorber surface preparation. The results from this experiment, pump characteristics, design of an absorber pump for future light sources, and the pressure improvement factors will be presented.

  3. Closing up a light stop window in natural SUSY at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Liu, Ning; Wu, Lei; Yang, Jin Min; Zhang, Mengchao

    2016-04-01

    Top squark (stop) plays a key role in the radiative stability of the Higgs boson mass in supersymmetry (SUSY). In this work, we use the LHC Run-1 data to determine the lower mass limit of the right-handed stop in a natural SUSY scenario, where the higgsinos χ˜1,20 and χ˜1± are light and nearly degenerate. We find that the stop mass has been excluded up to 430 GeV for mχ˜10 ≲ 250 GeV and to 540 GeV for mχ˜10 ≃ 100 GeV by the Run-1 SUSY searches for 2 b + ETmiss and 1 ℓ +jets + ETmiss, respectively. In a small strip of parameter space with mχ˜10 ≳ 190 GeV, the stop mass can still be as light as 210 GeV and compatible with the Higgs mass measurement and the monojet bound. The 14 TeV LHC with a luminosity of 20 fb-1 can further cover such a light stop window by monojet and 2 b + ETmiss searches and push the lower bound of the stop mass to 710 GeV. We also explore the potential to use the Higgs golden ratio, Dγγ = σ (pp → h → γγ) / σ (pp → h → ZZ* → 4ℓ±), as a complementary probe for the light and compressed stop. If this golden ratio can be measured at percent level at the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) or future e+e- colliders, the light stop can be excluded for most of the currently allowed parameter region.

  4. Light stop searches at the LHC in events with two b jets and missing energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bornhauser, S.; Drees, M.; Grab, S.; Kim, J. S.

    2011-02-01

    We propose a new method to discover light top squarks (stops) in the co-annihilation region at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The bino-like neutralino is the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) and the lighter stop is the next-to-LSP. Such scenarios can be consistent with electroweak baryogenesis and also with dark matter constraints. We consider the production of two stops in association with two b-quarks, including pure QCD as well as mixed electroweak-QCD contributions. The stops decay into a charm quark and the LSP. For a higgsino-like light chargino, the electroweak contributions can exceed the pure QCD prediction. We show the size of the electroweak contributions as a function of the stop mass and present the LHC discovery reach in the stop-neutralino mass plane.

  5. An Upgrade for the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source: Are you Sirius?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roque da Silva, Antonio José

    2015-03-01

    The application of synchrotron radiation in a great variety of fields in general, and condensed matter in particular, has increased steadily worldwide. This, to a large extent, is a result of the availability of the much brighter third-generation light sources, which opened up new experimental techniques. Recently, new developments in accelerator technology are paving the way for even brighter sources, which are being named fourth-generation light sources. Sirius, the future new Brazilian synchrotron, is one of the first two such machines being currently constructed in the world. Its first light is expected by 2018. It is being planned to be a state of the art machine, providing tools for cutting edge research that are non existent today in Brazil. It is a project designed and executed by the Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron - LNLS, which was also responsible for the construction of the current second generation Brazilian light source, the first synchrotron in the southern hemisphere, still the only one in Latin America. In this talk an overview of the status of Sirius will be provided.

  6. Design of Grazing Incident Monochromator for Saga Synchrotron Light

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Yuzi; Azuma, Junpei; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Kamada, Masao

    2004-05-12

    The Varied Line Spacing Plane Grating Monochromator (VLSPGM) was adopted for industry application beamline at Saga-ring. The VLSPGM is consisted of three focusing mirrors and one grating to suppress the higher order and stray light in the wide energy range by changing the deflection angle. The parameters of varied line spacing grating were determined so as to satisfy the condition that the terms expressing defocus, coma and spherical aberrations in the optical path function are equal to zero. The overall performance of the VLSPGM was estimated using ray-tracing calculations. The calculated resolving power with the slit widths of 10 and 20 {mu}m was more than 5,000 and 2,000 with the photon flux of more than 1x1010 and 6x1010 photons/sec/300mA, respectively.

  7. Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,H.; Rose, J.

    2009-05-04

    The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source users manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beam lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.; White-DePace, S.M.

    1987-08-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source in the years to come will be based, in large part, on the size of the users community and the diversity of the scientific disciplines represented by these users. In order to promote this philosophy, this National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Users Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beam Lines, has been published. This manual serves a number of purposes. In an effort to attract new research, it will present to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture and capabilities of the various VUV and x-ray beam lines and storage rings. We anticipate that this publication will be updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes at the NSLS.

  9. Fringe Pattern of the PEP-II Synchrotron-Light Interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2005-09-19

    Synchrotron-light interferometry is used to measure the vertical beam sizes in the high-energy and low-energy rings (HER and LER) of the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC. Light from a point in a dipole magnet is diffracted by two slits and then imaged onto a CCD camera. A curve fitting algorithm matches the measured interference fringes to a calculated pattern that includes the effect on the modulation depth of the fringes due to both the small but nonzero source size and the narrow bandpass of the optical filter. These formulas are derived here. Next, an additional focusing term from the primary mirror in the vacuum chamber is considered. The mirror needs extensive cooling due to the intense fan of synchrotron x-rays and is likely to have a slight stress-induced curvature, which must be considered to determine the true source size.

  10. Time-resolved far-infrared experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, D.B.; Reitze, D.H.; Carr, G.L.

    1999-10-12

    A facility for time-resolved infrared and far-infrared spectroscopy has been built and commissioned at the National Synchrotron Light Source. This facility permits the study of time dependent phenomena over a frequency range from 2-8000cm{sup {minus}1} (0.25 meV-1 eV). Temporal resolution is approximately 200 psec and time dependent phenomena in the time range out to 100 nsec can be investigated.

  11. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-08-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  12. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits). PMID:27140147

  13. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits). PMID:27140147

  14. Neutralinos and sleptons at the LHC in light of muon (g -2 )μ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajaib, M. Adeel; Dutta, Bhaskar; Ghosh, Tathagata; Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar

    2015-10-01

    We study the neutralinos and sleptons in multilepton final states at the LHC in light of (g -2 )μ anomaly. We scan the minimal supersymmetric standard model parameters relevant to (g -2 )μ and focus on three distinct cases with different neutralino compositions. The explanation of (g -2 )μ excess at 2 σ range requires the smuon (μ˜ 1 ) to be lighter than ˜500 (1000 ) GeV for tan β =10 (50 ) . Correspondingly the two lightest neutralinos, χ˜1 0 , χ˜2 0 , have to be lighter than ˜300 (650 ) GeV and 900 (1500) GeV, respectively. We explore the prospects of searching these light neutralinos and smuons at the LHC. The upcoming run of the LHC will be able to set 95% CL exclusion limit on Mχ˜2 0 (˜650 -1300 GeV ) and ml ˜ (˜670 -775 GeV ) with Mχ˜1 0˜100 -250 GeV at 3000 fb-1 integrated luminosity in multilepton+E T channel.

  15. Operating synchrotron light sources with a high gain free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mitri, S.; Cornacchia, M.

    2015-11-01

    Since the 1980s synchrotron light sources have been considered as drivers of a high repetition rate (RR), high gain free electron laser (FEL) inserted in a by-pass line or in the ring itself. As of today, the high peak current required by the laser is not deemed to be compatible with the standard multi-bunch filling pattern of synchrotrons, and in particular with the operation of insertion device (ID) beamlines. We show that this problem can be overcome by virtue of magnetic bunch length compression in a ring section, and that, after lasing, the beam returns to equilibrium conditions without beam quality disruption. Bunch length compression brings a double advantage: the high peak current stimulates a high gain FEL emission, while the large energy spread makes the beam less sensitive to the FEL heating and to the microwave instability in the ring. The beam’s large energy spread at the undulator is matched to the FEL energy bandwidth through a transverse gradient undulator. Feasibility of lasing at 25 nm is shown for the Elettra synchrotron light source at 1 GeV, and scaling to shorter wavelengths as a function of momentum compaction, beam energy and transverse emittance in higher energy, larger rings is discussed. For the Elettra case study, a low (100 Hz) and a high (463 kHz) FEL RR are considered, corresponding to an average FEL output power at the level of ∼1 W (∼1013 photons per pulse) and ∼300 W (∼1011 photons per pulse), respectively. We also find that, as a by-product of compression, the ∼5 W Renieri’s limit on the average FEL power can be overcome. Our conclusion is that existing and planned synchrotron light sources may be made compatible with this new hybrid IDs-plus-FEL operational mode, with little impact on the standard beamlines functionality.

  16. Status and Highlights of CANDLE Synchrotron Light Source Project in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakanov, V. M.

    2007-01-01

    CANDLE — Center for the Advancement of Natural Discoveries using Light Emission — is a 3 GeV energy synchrotron light facility project in the Republic of Armenia. The facility has the potential to provide more than 40 beamlines from bends, undulators and wigglers in wide spectral range from ultraviolet to hard X-Rays. The project is supposed to be an international facility for advanced studies in life and material sciences. The main features and the status of the project are presented. The preliminary list of first group beamlines is discussed.

  17. Status and Highlights of CANDLE Synchrotron Light Source Project in Armenia

    SciTech Connect

    Tsakanov, V. M.

    2007-01-19

    CANDLE - Center for the Advancement of Natural Discoveries using Light Emission - is a 3 GeV energy synchrotron light facility project in the Republic of Armenia. The facility has the potential to provide more than 40 beamlines from bends, undulators and wigglers in wide spectral range from ultraviolet to hard X-Rays. The project is supposed to be an international facility for advanced studies in life and material sciences. The main features and the status of the project are presented. The preliminary list of first group beamlines is discussed.

  18. Beam dynamics of a new low emittance third generation synchrotron light source facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasem, H.; Ahmadi, E.; Saeidi, F.; Sarhadi, K.

    2015-03-01

    The Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF) is a new 3 GeV third generation synchrotron light source facility which is in the design stage. As the main radiation source, design of the ILSF storage ring emphasizes an ultralow electron beam emittance, great brightness, stability and reliability. The storage ring is based on a five-bend achromat lattice providing an ultralow horizontal beam emittance of 0.48 nm rad. In this paper, we present the design feature of the ILSF storage ring, give the linear and nonlinear dynamic properties of the lattice and discuss the related beam dynamic specifications.

  19. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: Study on the characteristics of linac based THz light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiong-Wei; Wang, Shu-Hong; Chen, Sen-Yu

    2009-10-01

    There are many methods based on linac for THz radiation production. As one of the options for the Beijing Advanced Light, an ERL test facility is proposed for THz radiation. In this test facility, there are 4 kinds of methods to produce THz radiation: coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), synchrotron radiation (SR), low gain FEL oscillator, and high gain SASE FEL. In this paper, we study the characteristics of the 4 kinds of THz light sources.

  20. Vacuum and magnetic field constraints in a H -/light ion synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arduini, G.; Martin, R. L.; Rossi, S.; Silari, M.

    1994-08-01

    Acceleration of H - ions in a synchrotron imposes severe restrictions on the level of residual pressure in the vacuum chamber and the maximum magnetic field in the magnets of the ring. Significant vacuum requirements are also imposed by the acceleration of ions. This paper discusses these two aspects of the design of a combined H -/light ion synchrotron for radiation therapy. The fractional loss of the accelerated beam induced by the two processes is evaluated on the basis of a general treatment of the physics of these phenomena. The values of the vacuum and magnetic field necessary for normal operation of the machine are specified and a discussion is given of the behaviour of the above quantities as a function of several parameters such as beam energy, composition and pressure of the residual gas in the vacuum chamber and beam extraction time.

  1. Chacterization and application of a GE amorphous silicon flat panel detector in a synchrotron light source.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Miceli, A.; Almer, J.; Bernier, J.; Chapman, K.; Chupas, P.; Haeffner, D.; Lee, P. L.; Lienert, U.; Aydiner, C.; Vera, G.; Kump, K.; LANL; GE Healthcare

    2007-01-01

    Characterization, in the language of synchrotron radiation, was performed on a GE Revolution 41RT flat panel detector using the X-ray light source at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The detector has an active area of 41 x 41 cm{sup 2} with 200 x 200 {micro}m{sup 2} pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured in terms of line spread function (LSF) using a 25 {micro}m x 1 cm tungsten slit. Memory effects of the detector elements, called lag, were also measured. The large area and fast data capturing rate - 8 fps in unbinned mode, 30 fps in binned or region of interest (ROI) mode - make the GE flat panel detector a unique and very versatile detector for synchrotron experiments. In particular, we present data from pair distribution function (PDF) measurements to demonstrate the special features of this detector.

  2. Magnetic properties of the ALS (Advanced Light Source) booster synchrotron engineering model magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, R.; Green, M.I.; Hoyer, E.; Koo, Y.M.; Luchini, K.; Marks, S.; Milburn, J.; Nelson, D.H.

    1989-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is designed to be a third-generation electron storage ring producing high-brightness VUV and X-ray radiation from wiggler and undulator insertion devices. Engineering models of all lattice magnets that are to be installed in the storage ring and its booster synchrotron have been built and are being tested to verify their performance. This paper is concerned with the magnets that form the booster lattice: dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles, and corrector dipoles (steerers). After a brief outline of measurement techniques and equipment, the major design parameters of these magnets are listed. Measured effective lengths and multipole field errors are then given for each type. All engineering models meet the specifications, and tracking studies including the measured systematic field errors show acceptable performance of the booster synchrotron; hence the designs are qualified for production. 3 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Synchrotron Vacuum Ultraviolet Light and Soft X-Ray Radiation Effects on Aluminized Teflon FEP Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Gaier, James R.; Jalics, Alice I.

    1999-01-01

    Since the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was deployed in low Earth orbit in April 1990, two servicing missions have been conducted to upgrade its scientific capabilities. Minor cracking of second-surface metalized Teflon FEP (DuPont; fluorinated ethylene propylene) surfaces from multilayer insulation (MLI) was first observed upon close examination of samples with high solar exposure retrieved during the first servicing mission, which was conducted 3.6 years after deployment. During the second HST servicing mission, 6.8 years after deployment, astronaut observations and photographic documentation revealed significant cracks in the Teflon FEP layer of the MLI on both the solar- and anti-solar-facing surfaces of the telescope. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center directed the efforts of the Hubble Space Telescope MLI Failure Review Board, whose goals included identifying the low-Earth-orbit environmental constituent(s) responsible for the cracking and embrittling of Teflon FEP which was observed during the second servicing mission. The NASA Lewis Research Center provided significant support to this effort. Because soft x-ray radiation from solar flares had been considered as a possible cause for the degradation of the mechanical properties of Teflon FEP (ref. 1), the effects of soft xray radiation and vacuum ultraviolet light on Teflon FEP were investigated. In this Lewisled effort, samples of Teflon FEP with a 100-nm layer of vapor-deposited aluminum (VDA) on the backside were exposed to synchrotron radiation of various vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelengths between 18 nm (69 eV) and 0.65 nm (1900 eV). Synchrotron radiation exposures were conducted using the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Samples of FEP/VDA were exposed with the FEP surface facing the synchrotron beam. Doses and fluences were compared with those estimated for the 20-yr Hubble Space Telescope mission.

  4. SESAME-A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Herman

    2010-02-01

    Developed under the auspices of UNESCO and modeled on CERN, SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) is an international research center in construction in Jordan. It will enable world class research by scientists from the region, reversing the brain drain. It will also build bridges between diverse societies, contributing to a culture of peace through international cooperation in science. The centerpiece is a synchrotron light source originating from BESSY I, a gift by Germany. The upgraded machine, a 2.5 GeV 3rd Generation Light Source (133m circumference, 26nm-rad emittance and 12 places for insertion devices), will provide light from infra-red to hard X-rays, offering excellent opportunities to train local scientists and attract those working abroad to return. The SESAME Council meets twice each year and presently has nine Members (Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestinian Authority, Turkey). Members have responsibility for the project and provide the annual operations budget (1.5M US dollars in 2009, expected to rise to about 5M when operation starts in 2012-13). Jordan provided the site, building, and infrastructure. A staff of 20 is installing the 0.8 GeV BESSY I injection system. The facility will have the capacity to serve 30 or more experiments operating simultaneously. See www.sesame.org.jo )

  5. Probing a light CP-odd scalar in di-top-associated production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Farooque, Trisha; Juste, Aurelio; Liu, Tao; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-10-01

    CP-odd scalars are an integral part of many extensions of the Standard Model. Recently, electroweak-scale pseudoscalars have received increased attention in explaining the diffuse gamma-ray excess from the Galactic Centre. Elusive due to absence of direct couplings to gauge bosons, these particles receive only weak constraints from direct searches at LEP or searches performed during the first LHC runs. We investigate the LHC's sensitivity in probing a CP-odd scalar in the mass range 20 ≤ m_A ≤ 100 GeV via di-top-associated production using jet-substructure-based reconstruction techniques. We parameterise the scalar's interactions using a simplified model approach and relate the obtained upper limits to couplings within type-I and type-II 2HDMs as well as the NMSSM. We find that in di-top-associated production, experiments at the LHC can set tight limits on CP-odd scalars that fit the Galactic Centre excess. However, direct sensitivity to light CP-odd scalars from the NMSSM remains challenging.

  6. Extending LHC coverage to light pseudoscalar mediators and coy dark sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Martin, Travis A. W.

    2015-04-01

    Many dark matter models involving weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) feature new, relatively light pseudoscalars that mediate dark matter pair annihilation into Standard Model fermions. In particular, simple models of this type can explain the gamma ray excess originating in the Galactic Center as observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. In many cases the pseudoscalar's branching ratio into WIMPs is suppressed, making these states challenging to detect at colliders through standard dark matter searches. Here, we study the prospects for observing these light mediator states at the LHC without exploiting missing energy techniques. While existing searches effectively probe pseudoscalars with masses between 5-14 GeV and above 90 GeV, the LHC reach can be extended to cover much of the interesting parameter space in the intermediate 20-80 GeV mass range in which the mediator can have appreciable Yukawa-like couplings to Standard Model fermions but would have escaped detection by LEP and other experiments. Models explaining the Galactic Center excess via a light pseudoscalar mediator can give rise to a promising signal in this regime through the associated production of the mediator with bottom quarks while satisfying all other existing constraints. We perform an analysis of the backgrounds and trigger efficiencies, detailing the cuts that can be used to extract the signal. A significant portion of the otherwise unconstrained parameter space of these models can be conclusively tested at the 13 TeV LHC with 100 fb-1, and we encourage the ATLAS and CMS collaborations to extend their existing searches to this mass range.

  7. SESAME — A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Å°lkü, Dinçer; Rahighi, Javad; Winick, Herman

    2007-01-01

    SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) will be the Middle East's first international research center. It is a cooperative venture by the scientists and governments of the region with founding members Bahrain, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestine Authority, and Turkey. Iran is in the process of finalizing its formal membership. Other countries (Cyprus, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates) are also expected to join. The permanent Council of member states has full responsibility for the project. Members provide the annual operating budget. Observer countries are Germany, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Portugal, Russian Federation, Sweden, the UK, and the US. SESAME is being developed under the umbrella of UNESCO. Jordan was selected as the building site. SESAME will offer excellent opportunities for training of Middle East scientists and attract those working abroad to consider returning. SESAME will be a 2.5GeV 3rd Generation light source (emittance 26nm-rad, circumference ˜133m), providing excellent performance for structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, surface and interface science, microelectromechanical devices, x-ray imaging, archaeological microanalysis, and materials characterization. It will cover a broad spectral range from the infrared to hard x-rays and will have 12 straight sections for insertion devices (average length 2.75m). The injector will be the BESSY I 0.8 GeV booster synchrotron which has been given as a gift from Germany. Four committees advise the Council and assist in developing the technical design, beam lines, user community, and scientific Program. The SESAME building, now in construction with funds and a site provided by Jordan, is scheduled for completion in late 2006 after which the BESSY I injector will be installed. First stored beam in the new 2.5 GeV ring is planned for 2009 with six initial beamlines planned. Some beamlines will be built by member countries

  8. SESAME - A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U˝Lkü, Dinçer; Rahighi, Javad; Winick, Herman

    2007-01-01

    SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) will be the Middle East's first international research center. It is a cooperative venture by the scientists and governments of the region with founding members Bahrain, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestine Authority, and Turkey. Iran is in the process of finalizing its formal membership. Other countries (Cyprus, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates) are also expected to join. The permanent Council of member states has full responsibility for the project. Members provide the annual operating budget. Observer countries are Germany, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Portugal, Russian Federation, Sweden, the UK, and the US. SESAME is being developed under the umbrella of UNESCO. Jordan was selected as the building site. SESAME will offer excellent opportunities for training of Middle East scientists and attract those working abroad to consider returning. SESAME will be a 2.5GeV 3rd Generation light source (emittance 26nm-rad, circumference ~133m), providing excellent performance for structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, surface and interface science, microelectromechanical devices, x-ray imaging, archaeological microanalysis, and materials characterization. It will cover a broad spectral range from the infrared to hard x-rays and will have 12 straight sections for insertion devices (average length 2.75m). The injector will be the BESSY I 0.8 GeV booster synchrotron which has been given as a gift from Germany. Four committees advise the Council and assist in developing the technical design, beam lines, user community, and scientific Program. The SESAME building, now in construction with funds and a site provided by Jordan, is scheduled for completion in late 2006 after which the BESSY I injector will be installed. First stored beam in the new 2.5 GeV ring is planned for 2009 with six initial beamlines planned. Some beamlines will be built by member countries

  9. SESAME - A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Ulkue, Dincer; Rahighi, Javad; Winick, Herman

    2007-01-19

    SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) will be the Middle East's first international research center. It is a cooperative venture by the scientists and governments of the region with founding members Bahrain, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestine Authority, and Turkey. Iran is in the process of finalizing its formal membership. Other countries (Cyprus, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates) are also expected to join. The permanent Council of member states has full responsibility for the project. Members provide the annual operating budget. Observer countries are Germany, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Portugal, Russian Federation, Sweden, the UK, and the US. SESAME is being developed under the umbrella of UNESCO. Jordan was selected as the building site. SESAME will offer excellent opportunities for training of Middle East scientists and attract those working abroad to consider returning. SESAME will be a 2.5GeV 3rd Generation light source (emittance 26nm-rad, circumference {approx}133m), providing excellent performance for structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, surface and interface science, microelectromechanical devices, x-ray imaging, archaeological microanalysis, and materials characterization. It will cover a broad spectral range from the infrared to hard x-rays and will have 12 straight sections for insertion devices (average length 2.75m). The injector will be the BESSY I 0.8 GeV booster synchrotron which has been given as a gift from Germany. Four committees advise the Council and assist in developing the technical design, beam lines, user community, and scientific Program. The SESAME building, now in construction with funds and a site provided by Jordan, is scheduled for completion in late 2006 after which the BESSY I injector will be installed. First stored beam in the new 2.5 GeV ring is planned for 2009 with six initial beamlines planned. Some beamlines will be built by member

  10. Mixed sneutrino dark matter in light of the 2011 XENON and LHC results

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, Béranger; Kraml, Sabine; Fichet, Sylvain; Schwetz, Thomas E-mail: belanger@lapp.in2p3.fr E-mail: sabine.kraml@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2012-09-01

    In the context of supersymmetric models in which small Dirac neutrino masses are generated by supersymmetry breaking, a mainly right-handed (RH) mixed sneutrino can be an excellent cold dark matter (DM) candidate. We perform a global analysis of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM)+RH neutrino parameter space by means of Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling. We include all relevant constraints from collider and dark matter searches, paying particular attention to nuclear and astrophysical uncertainties. Two distinct cases can satisfy all constraints: heavy sneutrino DM with mass of order 100 GeV, as well as light sneutrino DM with mass of about 3–6 GeV. We discuss the implications for direct and indirect dark matter searches, as well as for SUSY and Higgs searches at the LHC for both, the light and the heavy sneutrino dark matter case. The light sneutrino case is excluded by the 125–126 GeV Higgs signal.

  11. A Bragg Magnifier with Sub-μm Resolution Using High Energy Synchrotron Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampanoni, Marco; Borchert, G. L.; Abela, R.; Rüegsegger, P.

    2003-01-01

    X-ray computer microtomography using synchrotron light (SRμCT) has proven to be a highly powerful method in many fields of modern research as medicine, biology and material science. Presently used instruments, however, are limited to about 1μm resolution at a total efficiency of a few percent, due to the properties of the scintillator, the optical light transfer, and the CCD granularity. To overcome these limitations we have realized a novel approach based on extremely asymmetrical Bragg reflection. Our instrument, the "Bragg Magnifier" combines two asymmetrically cut Si crystals, mounted close to each other on two rotation and adjustment units. It is installed at the Materials Science Beamline of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). It operates at favorably high energies between 21 keV and 23 keV. In a first experiment using a human bone trabecula a two-dimensional magnification factor of 100×100 was achieved yielding a spatial resolution of 140nm.

  12. A high-average power femtosecond laser for synchrotron light source applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, R. B.; Schoenlein, R. W.

    2007-02-01

    We describe a 60W, 70fs, 20kHz Ti:sapphire CPA laser system using cryogenically-cooled amplifiers, currently operating at the Advanced Light Source at LBNL. The system consists of an oscillator, a 20 kHz regenerative preamplifier, and two power amplifiers to produce two output beams, each at 30W. Each power amp can be pumped by two 90 Watt, 10 kHz, diode-pumped, doubled YLF lasers simultaneously (for 10 kHz) or interleaved in time (for 20 kHz). The regen is pumped at 20 kHz and 60W, producing 8W output which is split between the power amps. To maintain the crystals near the thermal conductivity peak at ~50°K, we used 300 Watt cryorefrigerators mechanically decoupled from the optical table. Pulses are compressed in a quartz transmission grating compressor, to minimize thermal distortions of the phase front typical of gold coated gratings at high power density. Transmission through the compressor is >80%, using a single 100 x 100mm grating. One of the 30W output beams is used to produce 70fs electron bunches in the synchrotron light source. The other is delayed by 300ns in a 12-pass Herriot cell before amplification, to be synchronized with the short light pulse from the synchrotron.

  13. Omega Dante Soft X-Ray Power Diagnostic Component Calibration at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K; Weber, F; Dewald, E; Glenzer, S; Landen, O; Turner, R; Waide, P

    2004-04-15

    The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer installed on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester is a twelve-channel filter-edge defined x-ray power diagnostic. It is used to measure the absolute flux from direct drive, indirect drive (hohlraums) and other plasma sources. Calibration efforts using two beam lines, U3C (50eV-1keV) and X8A (1keV-6keV) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) have been implemented to insure the accuracy of these measurements. We have calibrated vacuum x-ray diodes, mirrors and filters.

  14. Omega Dante soft x-ray power diagnostic component calibration at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.M.; Weber, F.A.; Dewald, E.L.; Glenzer, S.H.; Landen, O.L.; Turner, R.E.; Waide, P.A.

    2004-10-01

    The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer, installed on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, is a 12-channel filter-edge defined soft x-ray power diagnostic. It is used to measure the spectrally resolved, absolute flux from direct drive, indirect drive (hohlraums) and other plasma sources. Dante component calibration efforts using two beam lines, U3C (50 eV-1 keV) and X8A (1-6 keV) at the National Synchrotron Light Source have been implemented to improve the accuracy of these measurements. We have calibrated metallic vacuum x-ray diodes, mirrors and filters.

  15. The role of iron in neurodegenerative disorders: insights and opportunities with synchrotron light

    PubMed Central

    Collingwood, Joanna F.; Davidson, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence for iron dysregulation in many forms of disease, including a broad spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. In order to advance our understanding of the pathophysiological role of iron, it is helpful to be able to determine in detail the distribution of iron as it relates to metabolites, proteins, cells, and tissues, the chemical state and local environment of iron, and its relationship with other metal elements. Synchrotron light sources, providing primarily X-ray beams accompanied by access to longer wavelengths such as infra-red, are an outstanding tool for multi-modal non-destructive analysis of iron in these systems. The micro- and nano-focused X-ray beams that are generated at synchrotron facilities enable measurement of iron and other transition metal elements to be performed with outstanding analytic sensitivity and specificity. Recent developments have increased the scope for methods such as X-ray fluorescence mapping to be used quantitatively rather than semi-quantitatively. Burgeoning interest, coupled with technical advances and beamline development at synchrotron facilities, has led to substantial improvements in resources and methodologies in the field over the past decade. In this paper we will consider how the field has evolved with regard to the study of iron in proteins, cells, and brain tissue, and identify challenges in sample preparation and analysis. Selected examples will be used to illustrate the contribution, and future potential, of synchrotron X-ray analysis for the characterization of iron in model systems exhibiting iron dysregulation, and for human cases of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Friedreich’s ataxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:25191270

  16. Higgs singlet extension parameter space in the light of the LHC discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruna, Giovanni Marco; Robens, Tania

    2013-12-01

    In this article we propose an overview on the current theoretical and experimental limits on a Higgs singlet extension of the Standard Model (SM). We assume that the boson which has recently been observed by the LHC experiments is the lightest Higgs boson of such a model, while for the second Higgs boson we consider a mass range of 600GeV≤mH≤1TeV, where our model directly corresponds to a benchmark scenario of the heavy Higgs working group. In this light, we study the impact of perturbative unitarity limits, renormalization group equations analysis, and experimental constraints (electroweak precision tests, measurements of the observed light Higgs coupling strength at the Large Hadron Collider). We show that, in the case of no additional hidden sector contributions, the largest constraints for higher Higgs masses stem from the assumption of perturbativity as well as vacuum stability for scales of the order of the SM metastability scale, and that the allowed mixing range is severely restricted. We discuss implications for current LHC searches in the singlet extension, especially the expected suppression factors for SM-like decays of the heavy Higgs. We present these results in terms of a global scaling factor κ as well as the total width Γ of the new scalar.

  17. (Multi-)strange hadron and light (anti-)nuclei production with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to its excellent tracking performance and particle identification capabilities, the ALICE detector allows for the identification of light (anti-)(hyper)nuclei and for the measurement of (multi-)strange particles over a wide range of transverse momentum. Deuterons, 3He and 4He and their corresponding anti-nuclei are identified via their specific energy loss in the Time Projection Chamber and the velocity measurement provided by the Time-Of-Flight detector. Strange and multi-strange baryons and mesons as well as (anti-)hypertritons are reconstructed via their topological decays. Detailed measurements of (multi-)strange hadron production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collision and of light (anti-)nuclei and (anti-)hypertritons in Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC are presented. The experimental results will be compared with the predictions of both statistical hadronization and coalescence models.

  18. The scanning transmission microscope at the NSLS (National Synchrotron Light Source)

    SciTech Connect

    Rarback, H.; Buckley, C.; Goncz, K.; Ade, H.; Anderson, E.; Attwood, D.; Batson, P.; Hellman, S.; Jacobsen, C.; Kern, D.; Kirz, J.; Lindaas, S.; McNulty,I.; Oversluizen, M.; Rivers, M.; Rothman, S.; Shu, D.; Tang, Eshang; State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY . Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA; State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY . Dep

    1989-01-01

    The scanning transmission soft x-ray microscope (STXM), that has been under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source has been substantially upgraded for operation with the X1 undulator. The principal new features are: optical prefocusing, using a visible light interferometer, a dedicated VAXstation 3200 with a more user friendly and flexible software system for image acquisition and analysis, a flow cell that makes it possible not only to keep the specimen wet during exposure, but to change the fluid around the specimen as well, and a more compact proportional counter that is capable of counting rates of several MHz. In conjunction with new zone plates of better resolution and higher efficiency, the microscope is ready for a period of extended use in biological imaging. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Using synchrotron light to accelerate EUV resist and mask materials learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher N.; Baclea-an, Lorie-Mae; Denham, Paul; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Jones, Gideon; McClinton, Brittany; Miyakawa, Ryan; Mochi, Iacopo; Montgomery, Warren; Rekawa, Seno; Wallow, Tom

    2011-03-01

    As commercialization of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) progresses, direct industry activities are being focused on near term concerns. The question of long term extendibility of EUVL, however, remains crucial given the magnitude of the investments yet required to make EUVL a reality. Extendibility questions are best addressed using advanced research tools such as the SEMATECH Berkeley microfield exposure tool (MET) and actinic inspection tool (AIT). Utilizing Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source facility as the light source, these tools benefit from the unique properties of synchrotron light enabling research at nodes generations ahead of what is possible with commercial tools. The MET for example uses extremely bright undulator radiation to enable a lossless fully programmable coherence illuminator. Using such a system, resolution enhancing illuminations achieving k1 factors of 0.25 can readily be attained. Given the MET numerical aperture of 0.3, this translates to an ultimate resolution capability of 12 nm. Using such methods, the SEMATECH Berkeley MET has demonstrated resolution in resist to 16-nm half pitch and below in an imageable spin-on hard mask. At a half pitch of 16 nm, this material achieves a line-edge roughness of 2 nm with a correlation length of 6 nm. These new results demonstrate that the observed stall in ultimate resolution progress in chemically amplified resists is a materials issue rather than a tool limitation. With a resolution limit of 20-22 nm, the CAR champion from 2008 remains as the highest performing CAR tested to date. To enable continued advanced learning in EUV resists, SEMATECH has initiated a plan to implement a 0.5 NA microfield tool at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron facility. This tool will be capable of printing down to 8-nm half pitch.

  20. Hidden Higgs boson at the LHC and light dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect

    He Xiaogang; Tandean, Jusak

    2011-10-01

    Recent LHC searches have not found a clear signal of the Higgs boson h of the standard model (SM) with three or four families in the mass range m{sub h}=120-600 GeV. If the Higgs had an unexpectedly large invisible branching ratio, the excluded m{sub h} regions would shrink. This can be realized in the simplest weakly interacting massive particle dark matter (DM) model, which is the SM plus a real gauge-singlet scalar field D as the DM, via the invisible mode h{yields}DD. Current data allow this decay to occur for D-mass values near, but below, m{sub h}/2 and those compatible with the light DM hypothesis. For such D masses, h{yields}DD can dominate the Higgs width depending on m{sub h}, and thus sizable portions of the m{sub h} exclusion zones in the SM with three or four families may be recovered. Increased luminosity at the LHC may even reveal a Higgs having SM-like visible decays still hiding in the presently disallowed regions. The model also accommodates well the new possible DM hints from CRESST-II and will be further tested by improved data from future DM direct searches.

  1. Analysis of Old Copper Synchrotron Light Absorbers from the Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, S.R.; Scott, B.; /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    Synchrotron light absorbers intercept synchrotron radiation to protect chamber walls from excessive heat. When subjected to the high temperature of the beam, these absorbers undergo thermal stress. If the stress is too great or fatigues the material, the absorbers may fail. These absorbers are designed to last the lifetime of the machine. Any premature cracking could result in a leak and, consequently, loss of the ultra high vacuum environment. Using secondary and backscattered electron techniques, several sections of a used copper absorber were analyzed for material damage. Chemical analyses were performed on these samples as well. Comparing the unexposed sections to the sections exposed to the electron beam, few cracks were seen in the copper. However, the exposed samples showed heavy surface damage, in addition to crevices that could eventually result in material failure. Significant corrosion was also evident along the water cooling passage of the samples. These findings suggest that further investigation and periodic inspection of absorbers in SPEAR3 are necessary to control corrosion of the copper.

  2. Pseudo-Single-Bunch with Adjustable Frequency: A New Operation Mode for Synchrotron Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C.; Portmann, G.; Hertlein, M.; Kirz, J.; Robin, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    We present the concept and results of pseudo-single-bunch (PSB) operation—a new operational mode at the advanced light source—that can greatly expand the capabilities of synchrotron light sources to carry out dynamics and time-of-flight experiments. In PSB operation, a single electron bunch is displaced transversely from the other electron bunches using a short-pulse, high-repetition-rate kicker magnet. Experiments that require light emitted only from a single bunch can stop the light emitted from the other bunches using a collimator. Other beam lines will only see a small reduction in flux due to the displaced bunch. As a result, PSB eliminates the need to schedule multibunch and timing experiments during different running periods. Furthermore, the time spacing of PSB pulses can be adjusted from milliseconds to microseconds with a novel “kick-and-cancel” scheme, which can significantly alleviate complications of using high-power choppers and substantially reduce the rate of sample damage.

  3. Synchrotron radiation shielding design for the Brockhouse sector at the Canadian light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassey, Bassey; Moreno, Beatriz; Gomez, Ariel; Ahmed, Asm Sabbir; Ullrich, Doug; Chapman, Dean

    2014-05-01

    At the Canadian Light Source (CLS), the plans for the construction of three beamlines under the Brockhouse Project are underway. The beamlines, to be classified under the CLS Phase III beamlines, will comprise of a wiggler and an undulator, and will be dedicated to x-ray diffraction and scattering experiments. The energy range of these beamlines will be 7-22 keV (low energy wiggler beamline), 20-94 keV (high energy wiggler beamline), and 5-21 keV (undulator beamline). The beamlines will have a total of five hutches. Presented is the shielding design against target scattered white and monochromatic synchrotron radiations for these beamlines. The shielding design is based on: scatter target material-water, dose object-anthropomorphic phantom of the adult human (anteroposterior-AP geometry), and shielding thicknesses of steel and lead that will drop the radiation leakage from the hutches to below 0.5 μSv/h.

  4. Photon stimulated desorption from a vacuum chamber at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kobari, T.; Halama, H.J.

    1987-07-01

    In our search for surfaces exhibiting the lowest photon stimulated desorption, we have exposed a 3-m-long beam tube to photons from the vacuum ultraviolet ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source having critical energy of --500 eV. Desorption of H/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, CO, and CO/sub 2/, which are the main gas species, was studied as a function of the beam dose for the following surface treatments: standard chemical cleaning, Ar 10% O/sub 2/ glow discharge, N/sub 2/ glow discharge, and radio frequency glow discharge using O/sub 2/ disassociation. In addition, we measured the desorption as a function of vertical collimator position. N/sub 2/ glow discharge treatment yielded the lowest desorption.

  5. Storage Rings for Science with: Electron-Positron Collisions, Hadron Collisions and Synchrotron Light

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki,S.

    2009-05-04

    The author is honored to receive the 2009 Robert Wilson Prize and the recognition that comes with it. The citation for the prize reads, 'For his outstanding contribution to the design and construction of accelerators that has led to the realization of major machines for fundamental science on two continents and his promotion of international collaboration.' In this article, he will discuss the two construction projects, which he led, one (TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} Collider at KEK) in Japan and the other (RHIC at BNL) in the USA, covering project issues and lessons learned from these projects. Although both of them were built on separate continents, it is interesting to note that they are both built on long off-shore islands. He will also add comments on his recent engagement in the development of the Conceptual Design for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II).

  6. Environmental Remediation Science at Beamline X26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, Paul

    2013-11-07

    The goal of this project was to provide support for an advanced X-ray microspectroscopy facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. This facility is operated by the University of Chicago and the University of Kentucky. The facility is available to researchers at both institutions as well as researchers around the globe through the general user program. This facility was successfully supported during the project period. It provided access to advanced X-ray microanalysis techniques which lead to fundamental advances in understanding the behavior of contaminants and geochemistry that is applicable to environmental remediation of DOE legacy sites as well as contaminated sites around the United States and beyond.

  7. Optical design and performance of the inelastic scattering beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, C.C.; Siddons, D.P.; Oversluizen, T.; Hastings, J.B.; Hamalainen, K.; Krisch, M.

    1994-12-31

    Phase I of the X21 beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source was commissioned during 1993. The research program at the X21 beamline is focused on the study of electronic excitations in condensed matter with total energy resolution of 0.1 eV to 1.0 eV. The source is a 27 pole hybrid wiggler. A water-cooled horizontal focusing Si(220) monochromator and a spherically bent Si(444) analyzer were installed and commissioned. At 8 keV the energy resolution of the monochromator is about 0.7 eV, and the energy resolution of the analyzer is about 0.1 eV. Results from several selected experiments are also discussed.

  8. X-Ray Irradiation of H2O + CO Ice Mixtures with Synchrotron Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Chen, Y.-J.; Ciaravella, A.; Huang, C.-H.; Micela, G.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.

    2016-03-01

    We irradiated a (4:1) mixture of water and carbon monoxide with soft X-rays of energies up to 1.2 keV. The experiments were performed using the spherical grating monochromator beamline at National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. Both monochromatic (300 and 900 eV) and broader energy fluxes (250-1200 eV) were employed. During the irradiation, the H2O + CO mixture was ionized, excited, and fragmented, producing a number of reactive species. The composition of the ice has been monitored throughout both the irradiation and warm-up phases. We identified several products, which can be related through a plausible chemical reaction scheme. Such chemistry is initiated by the injection of energetic photoelectrons that produce multiple ionization events generating a secondary electron cascade. The results have been discussed in light of a model for protoplanetary disks around young solar-type stars.

  9. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J.

    1996-05-01

    This report discusses research conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in the following areas: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy, and tomography; nuclear physics; scattering and crystallography studies of biological materials; time resolved spectroscopy; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; the 1995 NSLS annual users` meeting; 17th international free electron laser conference; micro bunches workshop; VUV machine; VUV storage ring parameters; beamline technical improvements; x-ray beamlines; x-ray storage ring parameters; the NSLS source development laboratory; the accelerator test facility (ATF); NSLS facility improvements; NSLS advisory committees; NSLS staff; VUV beamline guide; and x-ray beamline guide.

  10. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings is the observation of electromigration-induced plasticity in the metal lines that appear during the very early stages of electromigration. In some of the lines, high density of geometrically necessary dislocation are formed leading to additional diffusion paths causing an enhancement of electromigration effect at test temperature.

  11. Synchrotrons: Taiwan unveils new synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Noriaki

    2015-05-01

    Competitive activities around the globe to develop the world's brightest synchrotron light source have accelerated in recent years. Taiwanese scientists now aspire to be at the top of the list with the recently constructed Taiwan Photon Source.

  12. A Bragg Magnifier with Sub-{mu}m Resolution Using High Energy Synchrotron Light

    SciTech Connect

    Stampanoni, Marco; Borchert, G. L.; Abela, R.; Rueegsegger, P.

    2003-01-24

    X-ray computer microtomography using synchrotron light (SR{mu}CT) has proven to be a highly powerful method in many fields of modern research as medicine, biology and material science. Presently used instruments, however, are limited to about 1{mu}m resolution at a total efficiency of a few percent, due to the properties of the scintillator, the optical light transfer, and the CCD granularity. To overcome these limitations we have realized a novel approach based on extremely asymmetrical Bragg reflection. Our instrument, the 'Bragg Magnifier' combines two asymmetrically cut Si crystals, mounted close to each other on two rotation and adjustment units. It is installed at the Materials Science Beamline of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). It operates at favorably high energies between 21 keV and 23 keV. In a first experiment using a human bone trabecula a two-dimensional magnification factor of 100x100 was achieved yielding a spatial resolution of 140nm.

  13. A MODEL STUDY OF TRANSVERSE MODE COUPLING INSTABILITY AT NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II (NSLS-II).

    SciTech Connect

    BLEDNYKH, A.; WANG, J.M.

    2005-05-15

    The vertical impedances of the preliminary designs of National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Mini Gap Undulators (MGU) are calculated by means of GdfidL code. The Transverse Mode Coupling Instability (TMCI) thresholds corresponding to these impedances are estimated using an analytically solvable model.

  14. Gravitino decays and the cosmological lithium problem in light of the LHC Higgs and supersymmetry searches

    SciTech Connect

    Cyburt, Richard H.; Ellis, John; Luo, Feng; Fields, Brian D.; Olive, Keith A.; Spanos, Vassilis C. E-mail: John.Ellis@cern.ch E-mail: fluo@physics.umn.edu E-mail: spanos@inp.demokritos.gr

    2013-05-01

    We studied previously the impact on light-element abundances of gravitinos decaying during or after Big-Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). We found regions of the gravitino mass m{sub 3/2} and abundance ζ{sub 3/2} plane where its decays could reconcile the calculated abundance of {sup 7}Li with observation without perturbing the other light-element abundances unacceptably. Here we revisit this issue in light of LHC measurements of the Higgs mass and constraints on supersymmetric model parameters, as well as updates in the astrophysical measurements of light-element abundances. In addition to the constrained minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model with universal soft supersymmetry-breaking masses at the GUT scale (the CMSSM) studied previously, we also study models with universality imposed below the GUT scale and models with non-universal Higgs masses (NUHM1). We calculate the total likelihood function for the light-element abundances, taking into account the observational uncertainties. We find that gravitino decays provide a robust solution to the cosmological {sup 7}Li problem along strips in the (m{sub 3/2},ζ{sub 3/2}) plane along which the abundances of deuterium, {sup 4}He and {sup 7}Li may be fit with χ{sup 2}{sub min}∼<3, compared with χ{sup 2} ∼ 34 if the effects of gravitino decays are unimportant. The minimum of the likelihood function is reduced to χ{sup 2} < 2 when the uncertainty on D/H is relaxed and < 1 when the lithium abundance is taken from globular cluster data.

  15. Vibrational dynamics of plant light-harvesting complex LHC II investigated by quasi- and inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, Maksym; Irrgang, Klaus-Dieter; Rusevich, Leonid; Pieper, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Vibrational dynamics of the light-harvesting complex II (LHC II) from spinach was investigated by quasi- and inelastic neutron scattering (QENS and INS) at three different temperatures of 80, 160, and 285 K. QENS/INS spectra of solubilised LHC II and of the corresponding buffer solution were obtained separately and exhibit characteristic inelastic features. After subtraction of the buffer contribution, the INS spectrum of LHC II reveals a distinct Boson peak at ˜ 2.5 meV at 80 K that shifts towards lower energies if the temperature is increased to 285 K. This effect is interpreted in terms of a "softening" of the protein matrix along with the dynamical transition at ˜ 240 K. Our findings indicate that INS is a valuable method to obtain the density of vibrational states not only at cryogenic, but also at physiological temperatures.

  16. Measurement of the intensity of the beam in the abort gap at the Tevatron utilizing synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Lorman, E.; Meyer, T.; Pordes, S.; De Santis, S.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2005-05-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of abort gap beam intensity monitoring at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. There are two somewhat independent monitors which measure the intensity of the synchrotron light emitted by particles in the abort gaps. One system uses a gated Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) to measure the light intensity, and the other system uses a single lens telescope, gated image intensifier, and Charge Injection Device (CID) camera to image the beam.

  17. Multi-anvil High Pressure Facility at National Synchrotron Light Source: Then, Now, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Weidner, D. J.; Vaughan, M. T.; Chen, J.; Li, B.; Liebermann, R. C.

    2007-12-01

    Multi-anvil high pressure facility (Beamline X17B2) at National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) was the first of its kind established in the United States with the support from NSF through the Center for High Pressure Research (CHiPR, 1990 - 2002). During this period, the facility provided a fertile ground for steep growth of research on earth materials at simultaneously high pressures and temperatures. Main areas of study included the thermoelastic and structural properties of minerals, phase equilibria, rheology, acoustic velocities, kinetics of phase transformations, and physical properties of melts. The rheological and acoustic measurements at high pressures in conjunction with synchrotron were first developed at this facility, and both techniques are being adapted today by other laboratories around the world. Last five years has witnessed great increases in efficiency and productivity of this facility, a beneficiary of the construction of a permanent hutch and time-sharing mechanism made possible by NSLS, and the establishment of the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES). While other above- mentioned areas of research continued to grow, the rheological studies of minerals experienced fast expansion through the use of two new high pressure deformation apparatus, the Deformation DIA (D-DIA) and the Rotational Drickamer apparatus (RDA, led by S. Karato from Yale Univ.) Experiments are currently being performed on various mantle minerals to derive their rheological properties. Performance of the facility will receive another boost through the addition of a monochromatic side station jointly supported by DoD, COMPRES and NSLS, and construction of the station is well underway. With continued operation of COMPRES in next five years, we will see several significant additions to the large- volume facility at NSLS: a new system for precise measurements of stress at high pressure; a 2000-ton press; D- TCup apparatus for deformation

  18. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J.B.

    1997-05-01

    The hard work done by the synchrotron radiation community, in collaboration with all those using large-scale central facilities during 1995, paid off in FY 1996 through the DOE`s Presidential Scientific Facilities Initiative. In comparison with the other DOE synchrotron radiation facilities, the National Synchrotron Light Source benefited least in operating budgets because it was unable to increase running time beyond 100%-nevertheless, the number of station hours was maintained. The major thrust at Brookhaven came from a 15% increase in budget which allowed the recruitment of seven staff in the beamlines support group and permitted a step increment in the funding of the extremely long list of upgrades; both to the sources and to the beamlines. During the December 1995 shutdown, the VUV Ring quadrant around U10-U12 was totally reconstructed. New front ends, enabling apertures up to 90 mrad on U10 and U12, were installed. During the year new PRTs were in formation for the infrared beamlines, encouraged by the investment the lab was able to commit from the initiative funds and by awards from the Scientific Facilities Initiative. A new PRT, specifically for small and wide angle x-ray scattering from polymers, will start work on X27C in FY 1997 and existing PRTs on X26C and X9B working on macromolecular crystallography will be joined by new members. Plans to replace aging radio frequency cavities by an improved design, originally a painfully slow six or eight year project, were brought forward so that the first pair of cavities (half of the project for the X-Ray Ring) will now be installed in FY 1997. Current upgrades to 350 mA initially and to 438 mA later in the X-Ray Ring were set aside due to lack of funds for the necessary thermally robust beryllium windows. The Scientific Facilities Initiative allowed purchase of all 34 windows in FY 1996 so that the power upgrade will be achieved in FY 1997.

  19. Ultra-high vacuum system of the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    The rings of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) have been supplying light to numerous users for approximately a decade and we recently enjoyed a fully conditioned machine vacuum at design currents. A brief description of the X-Ray storage ring, the VUV storage ring and their current supply is given along with some of their features. The ultra-high vacuum system employed for the storage rings and their advantages for the necessary stored beam environments are discussed including, a brief history of time. After several hundred amp hours of stored beam current operation, very little improvement in machine performance was seen due to conditioning. Sections of the rings were vented, to dry nitrogen and replacement components were pre-baked and pre-argon glow conditioned prior to installation. Very little machine conditioning was needed to return to operation after recovering vacuum due to well established conditioning procedures. All straight sections in the X-Ray ring and the VUV ring have been filled with various insertion devices and most are fully operational. Each storage ring has a computer controlled total pressure and partial pressure monitoring system for the ring and its beam ports, to insure good vacuum.

  20. Design of a multi-bend achromat lattice for 3 GeV synchrotron light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-San

    2016-03-01

    We present a lattice design for a low-emittance and high-brilliance 3 GeV synchrotron light source that has been widely investigated in the world. We show the design results for a MBA (Multi-Bend Achromat) lattice with an emittance of 1.3 nm and 282.4 m circumference. Each cell has 5 bending magnets that consist of outer two with bending angle of 4.5° and inner three with bending angle of 7°. The lattice is designed to be flexible and consists of 12 straight sections in which one straight section has a length of 5.9 m. We have studied the dynamic aperture in the lattice with machine errors. It is shown that the designed low-emittance lattice provides sufficient dynamic aperture after COD correction. We present the results of variations of emittance, energy spread and dynamic aperture due to in-vacuum undulators in the straight sections. We performed particle tracking after the beam injection to investigate the efficiency of the injection scheme. We show the designed results of an injection scheme that shows the space allocation in injection section and the particle motions of injected beam. Our designed lattice provides a good optimization in terms of the emittance and brilliance as a light source for 3 GeV energy and circumference of 28 m.

  1. SESAME, A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Einfeld, D.; Hasnain, S.S.; Sayers, Z.; Schopper, H.; Winick, H.; Al-Dmour, E.

    2004-05-12

    Developed under the auspices of UNESCO, SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) will be a major international research centre in the Middle East and Mediterranean region. On 6th of January 2003, the official foundation of SESAME took place. The facility is located in Allan, Jordan, 30 km North-West of Amman. As of August 2003 the Founding Members are Bahrain, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestine, Turkey and United Arabic Emirates, representing a population of over 300 million. SESAME will be a 2.5 GeV 3rd Generation light source (emittance 24.6 nm.rad, circumference {approx}125m). About 40% of the circumference is available for insertion devices (average length 2.75m) in 13 straight sections. Beam lines are up to 36m. The site and a building are provided by Jordan. Construction started in August 2003. The scientific program will start with up to 6 beam lines: MAD Protein Crystallography, SAXS and WAXS for polymers and proteins, Powder Diffraction for material science, UV/VUV/SXR Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Photoabsorption Spectroscopy, IR Spectroscopy, and EXAFS.

  2. Aluminium ultrahigh vacuum system for the 3 GeV TPS synchrotron light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiung, G. Y.; Chang, C. C.; Chen, C. L.; Wu, L. H.; Cheng, C. M.; Chan, C. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Hsueh, H. P.; Hsu, S. N.; Chen, J. R.

    2013-06-01

    The 3-GeV Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) is a large accelerator and synchrotron light source of circumference 518.4 m. The electron storage ring of TPS requires an ultrahigh-vacuum pressure per beam current less than 2×10-10 Pa/mA in the beam duct to maintain a long life of the circulating beam without scattering of ions by residual gases. Aluminium alloys used for the beam ducts have a benefit of greater thermal conductivity that simplifies the structure of vacuum vessels built with the cooling components. Machining completely free of oil applied to the aluminium chambers followed by cleaning with ozonized water and welding in house provide a precise dimensional control within 0.3 mm and a clean surface with a small rate ~ 6.4×10-12 Pa m/s of thermal outgassing after baking at 150 °C for 24 h. The assembled ion pump with non-evaporable getter pump is capable of evacuating the chamber to a pressure < 1×10-9 Pa. The average pressure inside the duct is expected to be sufficiently small. The clean process to manufacture the aluminium ultrahigh vacuum system is described.

  3. Operation of general purpose stepping motor controllers at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1986-10-01

    A prototype and four copies of a general purpose subsystem for mechanical positioning of detectors, samples, and beam line optical elements which constitute experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory have been constructed and placed into operation. Construction of a sixth subsystem is nearing completion. The subsystems effect mechanical positioning by controlling a set of stepping motors and their associated position encoders. The units are general purpose in the sense that they receive commands over a standard 9600 baud asynchronous serial line compatible with the RS-232-C electrical signal standard, generate TTL-compatible streams of stepping pulses which can be used with a wide variety of stepping motors, and read back position values from a number of different types and models of position encoder. The basic structure of the motor controller subsystem will be briefly reviewed. Short descriptions of the positioning apparatus actuated at each of the test and experiment stations employing a motor control unit are given. Additions and enhancements to the subsystem made in response to problems indicated by actual operation of the four installed units are described in more detail.

  4. Operation of general purpose stepping motor controllers at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1987-02-01

    A prototype and four copies of a general purpose subsystem for mechanical positioning of detectors, samples, and beam line optical elements which constitute experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory have been constructed and placed into operation. Construction of a sixth subsystem is nearing completion. The subsystems effect mechanical positioning by controlling a set of stepping motors and their associated position encoders. The units are general purpose in the sense that they receive commands over a standard 9600 baud asynchronous serial line compatible with the RS-232-C electrical signal standard, generate TTL-compatible streams of stepping pulses which can be used with a wide variety of stepping motors, and read back position values from a number of different types and models of position encoder. The basic structure of the motor controller subsystem is briefly reviewed. Short descriptions of the positioning apparatus actuated at each of the test and experiment stations employing a motor control unit are given. Additions and enhancements to the sub-system made in response to problems indicated by actual operation of the four installed units are described in more detail.

  5. National Synchrotron Light Source Facility Manual Maintenance Management Program. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fewell, N.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this program s to meet the policy and objectives for the management and performance of cost-effective maintenance and repair of the National Synchrotron Light Source, as required by the US Department of Energy order DOE 433O.4A. It is the DOE`s policy that: The maintenance management program for the NSLS be consistent with this Order and that NSLS property is maintained in a manner which promotes operational safety, worker health, environmental protection and compliance, property preservation, and cost-effectiveness while meeting the NSLS`s programmatic mission. Structures, components and systems (active and passive) that are imporant to safe operation of the NSLS shall be subject to a maintenance program to ensure that they meet or exceed their design requirements throughout the life of the NSLS. Periodic examination of structures, systems components and equipment be performed to determine deterioration or technical obsolescence which may threaten performance and/or safety. Primary responsibility, authority, and accountability for the direction and management of the maintenance program at the NSLS reside with the line management assigned direct programmatic responsibility. Budgeting and accounting for maintenance programs are consistent with DOE Orders guidance.

  6. New Perspectives for Advanced Science at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tolentino, Helio C.N.

    2003-01-24

    The LNLS (Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron) is a national laboratory in Brazil that operates a 1.37 GeV storage ring for synchrotron light users since July 1997. Eleven bending magnet beamlines are open to a wide range of possibilities for research in ultra-violet and X-ray spectroscopy, single crystal and powder diffraction, magnetic and anomalous scattering, protein crystallography, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray lithography and small angle X-ray scattering. The recent conclusion of the booster injector opened the way for insertion devices to be accommodated in the four straight sections available. A multipolar wiggler, for protein crystallography using the MAD technique, is the first planned to be installed during 2003. The construction of the first LNLS undulator, for the vaccum ultra-violet and soft X-ray domain, has already started and will expand the possibilities in atomic, molecular and surface physics, as well as in catalysis and magnetism. LNLS has expanded its infra-structure as an open multidisciplinary research laboratory into complementary areas, such as electron and scanning probe microscopy, nanostructure synthesis and molecular biology. Many technological and scientific achievements have been attained in these last five years. Some of them will be highlighted here, with emphasis in the area of nanostructured and magnetic materials.

  7. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings is the observation of electromigration-induced plasticity in the metal lines that appear during the very early stages of electromigration. In some of the lines, high density of geometrically necessary dislocation are formed leading to additional diffusion paths causing an enhancement of electromigration effect at test temperature. This paper presents an overview of the principal results obtained from X-ray microdiffraction studies of electromigration effects on aluminum and copper interconnects at the ALS throughout continuous efforts that spanned over a decade (1998-2008) from approximately 40 weeks of combined beamtime.

  8. A superconducting bending magnet system for a compact synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Garren, A.A.; Leung, E.M.; Madura, D.D.; Cline, D.B.; Kolonko, J.J.; Schachinger, L.C.

    1995-07-01

    High intensity, high energy X-rays for use in protein crystallography, nano-machining and medical applications, such as non invasive coronary angiography, can be produced by a 1.2 to 1.5 GeV electron storage ring compact light source with 6 to 8 tesla superconducting bending magnets. Because the bending magnets are to be superconducting, the storage ring energy can be over factor of two lower than a conventional storage ring that delivers same photon energy. The ring, which has superconducting bending magnets, is smaller in circumference and has the advantage of having fewer particles in the ring for a given x ray source intensity. The proposed storage ring is a separated function accelerator ring with six superconducting bending magnet units. Conventional quadruples and correction elements would be located between the bending magnets. Because the synchrotron radiation is generated in the bend, the superconducting bending magnets must have a warm vacuum chamber for the electron beam. Variations of a superferric magnet design have been studied for this application. This report presents a superferric H magnet design that can produce good quality magnetic field in a region that is 50 mm high by 100 mm wide. This modified superferric H magnet design has saturated iron poles but the magnetic flux is returned from one pole to the other through an unsaturated iron return path. The dipole magnet required for a compact storage ring must be physically short (380 mm long), and the field must fall off rapidly at the ends of the magnet. This report describes a preliminary design for a pair of 6.894 tesia, thirty degree bending magnets in a common vacuum vessel for use in a 1.5 GeV compact storage ring light source.

  9. XUV synchrotron optical components for the Advanced Light Source: Summary of the requirements and the developmental program

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, W.; Irick, S.; Lunt, D.

    1992-07-01

    We give a brief summary of the requirements for water cooled optical components for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third generation synchrotron radiation source under construction at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Materials choices, surface figure and smoothness specifications, and metrology systems for measuring the plated metal surfaces are discussed. Results from a finished water cooled copper alloy mirror will be used to demonstrate the state of the art in optical metrology with the Takacs Long Trace Profiler (LTP II).

  10. NSLS 2007 Activity Report (National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller ,L.; Nasta, K.

    2008-05-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is one of the world's most productive and cost-effective user facilities. With 2,219 individual users, about 100 more than last year, and a record-high 985 publications, 2007 was no exception. In addition to producing an impressive array of science highlights, which are included in this Activity Report, many NSLS users were honored this year for their scientific accomplishments. Throughout the year, there were major strides in the development of the scientific programs by strengthening strategic partnerships with major research resources and with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). Of particular note, the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) received renewed funding for the next five years through the National Science Foundation. COMPRES operates four high-pressure NSLS beamlines--X17B2, X17B3, X17C, and U2A--and serves the earth science community as well as the rapidly expanding segment of researchers using high-pressure techniques in materials, chemical, and energy-related sciences. A joint appointment was made between the NSLS and Stony Brook University to further enhance interactions with COMPRES. There was major progress on two key beamline projects outlined in the Five-Year Strategic Plan: the X25 beamline upgrade and the construction of the X9 small angle scattering (SAXS) beamline. The X25 overhaul, which began with the installation of the in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU) in January 2006, is now complete. X25 is once again the brightest beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the NSLS, and in tandem with the X29 undulator beamline, it will keep the NSLS at the cutting edge in this important area of research. Upgrade work associated with the new MGU and the front end for the X9 SAXS beamline--jointly developed by the NSLS and the CFN--also was completed. Beamline X9 will host the SAXS program that currently exists at beamline X21 and will provide new microbeam SAXS

  11. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms.

  12. Bringing Physics, Synchrotron Light and Probing Neutrons to the Public: A Collaborative Outreach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micklavzina, Stanley; Almqvist, Monica; Sörensen, Stacey L.

    2014-01-01

    Stanley Micklavzina, a US physics educator on sabbatical, teams up with a Swedish national research laboratory, a synchrotron radiation experimental group and a university science centre to develop and create educational and public outreach projects. Descriptions of the physics, science centre displays and public demonstrations covering the…

  13. Support for the Advanced Polymers Beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Benjamin S

    2008-10-01

    The primary focus of the X27C beamline is to investigate frontier polymer science and engineering problems with emphasis on real-time studies of structures, morphologies and dynamics from atomic, nanoscopic, microscopic to mesoscopic scales using simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques. The scientific merit of this project is as follows. Currently, many unique sample chambers for in-situ synchrotron studies, developed by the PI (B. Hsiao) and Co-PI (B. Chu), are available for general users of X27C at NSLS. These instruments include a gel/melt spinning apparatus, a continuous fiber drawing apparatus, a tensile stretching apparatus, a high pressure X-ray cell using supercritical carbon dioxide, a parallel plate strain-controlled shear stage and a dynamic rheometer for small-strain oscillatory deformation study. Based on the use of these instruments in combination with synchrotron X-rays, many new insights into the relationships between processing and structure have been obtained in recent years. The broader impact of this project is as follows. The X27C beamline is the first synchrotron facility in the United States dedicated to chemistry/materials research (with emphasis on polymers). The major benefit of this facility to the materials community is that no extensive synchrotron experience and equipment preparation are required from general users to carry out cutting-edge experiments.

  14. NSLS 2005 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2005).

    SciTech Connect

    MILLER, L.

    2006-05-01

    efforts on NSLS-II, the world-leading third-generation synchrotron planned for construction at BNL. NSLS-II passed a critical milestone in 2005 with the approval by the Department of Energy of CD-0. BNL has established the NSLS-II Project Organization within the Light Sources Directorate to put in place the management systems and infrastructure necessary to execute this complex undertaking. I will serve as NSLS-II Project Director and also retain my position as Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, with the NSLS reporting to me. Another exciting development is the planned establishment of the Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI). JPSI will be devoted to cultivating and fostering collaborative, interdisciplinary R&D in areas of the physical sciences, engineering, and the life sciences that are united in employing synchrotron-based methods. JPSI will also develop new methods and applications that exploit the unique capabilities of NSLS-II and will serve as a gateway for NSLS-II users. JPSI will be a partnership between the Department of Energy and New York State, and I am delighted that New York State Governor George Pataki has pledged $30 million for the construction of the JPSI building. The building will be located adjacent to NSLS-II and will contain offices, meeting rooms, and specialized laboratories. The operating expenses of JPSI and funding for its research programs will be provided by the federal government. Until a permanent NSLS Director is selected, NSLS User Science Division Associate Chair Chi-Chang Kao will serve as the Interim NSLS Director. I couldn't be leaving the facility in more capable hands. Chi-Chang will lead NSLS staff and users this year in the development of a five-year strategic plan for the NSLS, scheduled for completion by the end of summer 2006. The plan will outline the course for the future operation and development of the NSLS, and will help ensure that the future of the NSLS remains as bright as its past.

  15. Diffraction-Enhanced Computed Tomographic Imaging of Growing Piglet Joints by Using a Synchrotron Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Glendon W; Belev, George S; Chapman, L Dean; Wiebe, Sheldon P; Cooper, David M; Wong, Adelaine TF; Rosenberg, Alan M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and test a new technology for imaging growing joints by means of diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) combined with CT and using a synchrotron radiation source. DEI–CT images of an explanted 4-wk-old piglet stifle joint were acquired by using a 40-keV beam. The series of scanned slices was later ‘stitched’ together, forming a 3D dataset. High-resolution DEI-CT images demonstrated fine detail within all joint structures and tissues. Striking detail of vasculature traversing between bone and cartilage, a characteristic of growing but not mature joints, was demonstrated. This report documents for the first time that DEI combined with CT and a synchrotron radiation source can generate more detailed images of intact, growing joints than can currently available conventional imaging modalities. PMID:26310464

  16. ZAP AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE OPTIMIZATION OF SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    1987-10-01

    A new computer code, ZAP, has been written to study the influence of various collective effects on the performance of electron storage rings. In particular, the code can evaluate the equilibrium emittance of a ring including the effects of intrabeam scattering. Examples are presented of utilizing the code to optimize the design of storage rings for the purposes of a third-generation synchrotron radiation source and a high-gain free-electron laser. In addition, the importance of the intrabeam scattering emittance blowup to the issue of low energy injection is discussed. Such considerations will be necessary to optimize the design of compact synchrotrons now being studied for use in x-ray lithography. To verify predictions of the code, comparisons are made with experimental measurements of low energy beam emittance taken from the Aladdin storage ring; reasonable agreement is obtained.

  17. Realizing dark matter and Higgs inflation in light of LHC diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shao-Feng; He, Hong-Jian; Ren, Jing; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi

    2016-06-01

    LHC Run-2 has provided intriguing di-photon signals of a new resonance around 750GeV, which, if not due to statistical fluctuations, must call for new physics beyond the standard model (SM) at TeV scale. We propose a minimal extension of the SM with a complex singlet scalar S and a doublet of vector-like quarks. The scalar sector respects CP symmetry, with its CP-odd imaginary component χ providing a natural dark matter (DM) candidate. The real component of S serves as the new resonance (750GeV) and explains the diphoton excess of the LHC Run-2. The new scalar degrees of freedom of S help to stabilize the Higgs vacuum, and can realize the Higgs inflation around GUT scale, consistent with the current cosmological observations. We construct two representative samples A and B of our model for demonstration. We study the mono-jet signals of DM production from invisible decays Re (S) → χχ at the LHC Run-2. We further derive the DM relic density bound, and analyze constraints from the direct and indirect DM detections.

  18. Excitonic coupling of chlorophylls in the plant light-harvesting complex LHC-II.

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Axel; Beenken, Wichard J D; Stiel, Holger; Voigt, Bernd; Leupold, Dieter; Lokstein, Heiko

    2002-01-01

    Manifestation and extent of excitonic interactions in the red Chl-absorption region (Q(y) band) of trimeric LHC-II were investigated using two complementary nonlinear laser-spectroscopic techniques. Nonlinear absorption of 120-fs pulses indicates an increased absorption cross section in the red wing of the Q(y) band as compared to monomeric Chl a in organic solution. Additionally, the dependence of a nonlinear polarization response on the pump-field intensity was investigated. This approach reveals that one emitting spectral form, characterized by a 2.3(+/-0.8)-fold larger dipole strength than monomeric Chl a, dominates the fluorescence spectrum of LHC-II. Considering available structural and spectroscopic data, these results can be consistently explained assuming the existence of an excitonically coupled dimer located at Chl-bindings sites a2 and b2 (referring to the original notation of W. Nühlbrandt, D.N. Wang, and Y. Fujiyoshi, Nature, 1994, 367:614-621), which must not necessarily correspond to Chls a and b). This fluorescent dimer, terminating the excitation energy-transfer chain of the LHC-II monomeric subunit, is discussed with respect to its relevance for intra- and inter-antenna excitation energy transfer. PMID:11806942

  19. THE WISE LIGHT CURVES OF Z CAMELOPARDALIS DURING OUTBURST: EVIDENCE FOR SYNCHROTRON EMISSION?

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas E.

    2014-08-10

    The WISE mission happened to observe the cataclysmic variable Z Cam at the peak of an outburst. The WISE single exposure data shows that Z Cam was highly variable at 12 μm, but only marginally so at shorter wavelengths. The rapid variability at 12 μm, and the fact that these observations occurred close to visual maximum suggests that, like SS Cyg, Z Cam is a synchrotron source.

  20. Light top squarks in a U (1 )R lepton number model with a right handed neutrino and the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sabyasachi; Datta, AseshKrishna; Huitu, Katri; Roy, Sourov; Waltari, Harri

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the phenomenology of top squarks at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in a supersymmetric model where lepton number is identified with an approximate U (1 )R symmetry in such a way that one of the left-chiral sneutrinos can acquire a large vacuum expectation value and can play the role of the down-type Higgs. This R symmetry allows a subset of trilinear R -parity violating interactions, which determine the collider phenomenology of this model in a significant way. The gauginos are Dirac particles and gluinos are relatively heavy in this class of models. The model contains a right handed neutrino superfield, which gives a tree level mass to one of the active neutrinos. An order one neutrino Yukawa coupling also helps enhance the Higgs boson mass at the tree level and results in a very light bino-like neutralino (χ˜2 0 ) with mass around a few hundred MeV, which is a carrier of missing (transverse) energy (ET ). The model can accommodate two rather light top squarks, compatible with the observed mass of the Higgs boson. The lighter top squark (t˜1) can decay into t χ˜20, and thus the signal would be similar to the signal of top quark pair production at the LHC. In addition, fully visible decays such as t˜2→b e+ can give rise to interesting final states. Such signals at the LHC combined with other features like a heavy gluino could provide strong evidence for this kind of a model. Our analysis shows that mt˜1≲575 (750 ) GeV and mt˜2≲1.2 (1.4 ) TeV can be probed with 5 σ statistical significance at the 13 TeV LHC with 300 (3000 ) fb-1 of integrated luminosity. Finally, we observe that in the presence of superlight carriers of ET, the so-called "stealth" top squark scenario may naturally appear in our model.

  1. First results of the LHC longitudinal density monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeff, A.; Boccardi, A.; Bravin, E.; Fisher, A. S.; Lefevre, T.; Rabiller, A.; Roncarolo, F.; Welsch, C. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is the world's largest particle accelerator. It is designed to accelerate and collide protons or heavy ions up to the center-of-mass energies of 14 TeV. Knowledge of the longitudinal distribution of particles is important for various aspects of accelerator operation, in particular to check the injection quality and to measure the proportion of charge outside the nominally filled bunches during the physics periods. In order to study this so-called ghost charge at levels very much smaller than the main bunches, a longitudinal profile measurement with a very high dynamic range is needed. A new detector, the LHC Longitudinal Density Monitor (LDM) is a single-photon counting system measuring synchrotron light by means of an avalanche photodiode detector. The unprecedented energies reached in the LHC allow synchrotron light diagnostics to be used with both protons and heavy ions. A prototype was installed during the 2010 LHC run and was able to longitudinally profile the whole ring with a resolution close to the target of 50 ps. On-line correction for the effects of the detector deadtime, pile-up and afterpulsing allow a dynamic range of 105 to be achieved. First measurements with the LDM are presented here along with an analysis of its performance and an outlook for future upgrades.

  2. R -parity violation and light neutralinos at SHiP and the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Jordy; Dreiner, Herbi K.; Schmeier, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    We study the sensitivity of the proposed SHiP experiment to the L Q D operator in R -parity violating supersymmetric theories. We focus on single neutralino production via rare meson decays and the observation of downstream neutralino decays into charged mesons inside the SHiP decay chamber. We provide a generic list of effective operators and decay width formulas for any λ' coupling and show the resulting expected SHiP sensitivity for a widespread list of benchmark scenarios via numerical simulations. We compare this sensitivity to expected limits from testing the same decay topology at the LHC with ATLAS.

  3. The MoEDAL experiment - a new light on LHC physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinfold, James L.

    2015-05-01

    In 2010 the MoEDAL experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was unanimously approved by CERN's Research Board to start data taking in 2015. MoEDAL is a pioneering experiment designed to search for highly ionizing messengers of new physics such as magnetic monopoles or massive (pseudo-)stable charged particles. Its groundbreaking physics program defines a number of scenarios that yield potentially revolutionary insights into foundational questions. MoEDAL's purpose is to meet such far-reaching challenges at the frontier of the field. The innovative MoEDAL detector is tuned to the prospect of discovery physics. The largely passive MoEDAL detector, deployed at Point 8 on the LHC ring, has a dual nature. First, it acts like a giant camera, comprised of nuclear track detectors - analyzed offline by ultra fast scanning microscopes - sensitive only to new physics. Second, it is uniquely able to trap the particle harbingers of new physics beyond the Standard Model for further study. MoEDAL's radiation environment is monitored by a state-of-the-art real-time TimePix pixel detector array.

  4. Singlets in composite Higgs models in light of the LHC 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Alexander; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Cai, Haiying; Flacke, Thomas; Parolini, Alberto; Serôdio, Hugo

    2016-07-01

    Models of compositeness can successfully address the origin of the Higgs boson, as a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (pNGB) of a spontaneously broken global symmetry, and flavor physics via the partial compositeness mechanism. If the dynamics is generated by a confining gauge group with fermionic matter content, there exists only a finite set of models that have the correct properties to account for the Higgs and top partners at the same time. In this paper, we explore the theory space of this class of models; remarkably, all of them contain—beyond the pNGB Higgs—a pNGB singlet, a , which couples to Standard Model gauge bosons via Wess-Zumino-Witten interactions, thus providing naturally a resonance in the diboson at the LHC. With the assumption that the recently reported diphoton excess at 750 GeV at the LHC arises from the a resonance, we propose a generic approach on how to delineate the best candidate for composite Higgs models with top partners. We find that constraints from other diboson searches severely reduce the theory space of the models under consideration. For the models which can explain the diphoton excess, we make precise and testable predictions for the width and other diboson resonance searches.

  5. Study for a proposed Phase I Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) Synchrotron Light Source at Cornell University

    SciTech Connect

    Sol M. Gruner and Maury Tigner, eds.; Ivan Bazarov; Sergey Belomestnykh; Don Bilderback; Ken Finkelstein; Ernie Fontes; Steve Gray; Sol M. Gruner; Geoff Krafft; Lia Merminga; Hasan Padamsee; Ray Helmke; Qun Shen; Joe Rogers; Charles Sinclair; Richard Talman; Maury Tigner

    2001-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) has become an essential and rapidly growing tool across the sciences and engineering. World-wide, about 70 SR sources are in various stages of operation, construction, or planning, representing a cumulative investment on many billions of dollars and serving a growing research community well in excess of 10,000 scientists. To date, all major SR x-ray facilities are based on electron (or positron) storage rings. Given the expected continued growth, importance and expense of SR sources, it is important to ask if there are alternatives to the storage ring SR source which offer advantages of capability or cost. A step in this direction is being taken by the SR community with the proposed developments of linac-based x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) utilizing the self-amplified spontaneous emission process (SASE). However, the versatility of modern developments in accelerator physics, as applied to synchrotron radiation, is not limited to storage rings or XFELs. New developments in laser driven photoinjectors and superconducting linac technology open new and exciting possibilities for novel SR-generating machines which offer extraordinary capabilities and promise to catalyze whole new areas of SR-based science.

  6. Functional micro-imaging of soft and hard tissue using synchrotron light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurner, Philipp J.; Wyss, Peter; Voide, Romain; Stauber, Martin; Muller, Bert; Stampanoni, Marco; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Muller, Ralph; Sennhauser, Urs

    2004-10-01

    In current biological and biomedical research, quantitative endpoints have become an important factor of success. Classically, such endpoints were investigated with 2D imaging, which is usually destructive and the 3D character of tissue gets lost. 3D imaging has gained in importance as a tool for both, qualitative and quantitative assessment of biological systems. In this context synchrotron radiation based tomography has become a very effective tool for opaque 3D tissue systems. Cell cultures and adherent scaffolds are visualized in 3D in a hydrated environment, even uncovering the shape of individual cells. Advanced morphometry allows to characterize the differences between the cell cultures of two distinct phenotypes. Moreover, a new device is presented enabling the 3D investigation of trabecular bone under mechanical load in a time-lapsed fashion. Using the highly brilliant X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source, bone microcracks and an indication for un-cracked ligament bridging are uncovered. 3D microcrack analysis proves that the classification of microcracks from 2D images is ambiguous. Fatigued bone was found to fail in burst-like fashion, whereas non-fatigued bone exhibited a distinct failure band. Additionally, a higher increase in microcrack volume was detected in fatigued in comparison to non-fatigued bone. The developed technologies prove to be very effective tools for advanced 3D imaging of both hard and soft tissue.

  7. Shedding new light on historical metal samples using micro-focused synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grolimund, D.; Senn, M.; Trottmann, M.; Janousch, M.; Bonhoure, I.; Scheidegger, A. M.; Marcus, M.

    2004-10-01

    insights concerning the nature and origin of used raw materials as well as regarding employed processing techniques during historic iron fabrication and weapon manufacturing.The study demonstrates the potential of oxidation state and mineral phase mapping based on energy selective micro-XRF maps and spectroscopic phase identification. Such a spatially resolved recording of the chemical speciation is based on X-ray absorption spectroscopy. This analytical technique is exclusive to synchrotron light sources. However, the steadily increasing number of available synchrotron-based X-ray microprobes allows nowadays for more routine utilization of such micro-XAS techniques.

  8. Procurement history of the hybrid undulator for the U-5 Beam Line at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    James, D.C.; Bader, S.D.; Viccaro, P.J.

    1989-05-01

    As part of a national multi-institutional Materials Research Group (MRG), Argonne National Laboratory had the responsibility, under a prime contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, of obtaining a Permanent Magnet Hybrid undulator to be used on the U5 Beam Line on the VUV Ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The procurement involved determining the technical specifications of the device as well as developing an effective procedure for evaluation of the proposals. The conceptual design of the magnetic structure including all pertinent magnetic field properties was developed before the actual procurement process was initiated. In addition, complete calculations of the expected spectral properties of the undulator were performed which included the emittance properties of the VUV ring. The results from both analysis were essential in determining the expected performance of the device and the final choice of operating parameters.

  9. Emphysema diagnosis using X-ray dark-field imaging at a laser-driven compact synchrotron light source

    PubMed Central

    Schleede, Simone; Meinel, Felix G.; Bech, Martin; Herzen, Julia; Achterhold, Klaus; Potdevin, Guillaume; Malecki, Andreas; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Thieme, Sven F.; Bamberg, Fabian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bohla, Alexander; Yildirim, Ali Ö.; Loewen, Roderick; Gifford, Martin; Ruth, Ronald; Eickelberg, Oliver; Reiser, Maximilian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-01-01

    In early stages of various pulmonary diseases, such as emphysema and fibrosis, the change in X-ray attenuation is not detectable with absorption-based radiography. To monitor the morphological changes that the alveoli network undergoes in the progression of these diseases, we propose using the dark-field signal, which is related to small-angle scattering in the sample. Combined with the absorption-based image, the dark-field signal enables better discrimination between healthy and emphysematous lung tissue in a mouse model. All measurements have been performed at 36 keV using a monochromatic laser-driven miniature synchrotron X-ray source (Compact Light Source). In this paper we present grating-based dark-field images of emphysematous vs. healthy lung tissue, where the strong dependence of the dark-field signal on mean alveolar size leads to improved diagnosis of emphysema in lung radiographs. PMID:23074250

  10. Operation of a general purpose stepping motor-encoder positioning subsystem at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1985-11-01

    Four copies of a general purpose subsystem for mechanical positioning of detectors, samples, and beam line optical elements which constitute experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory have been constructed and placed into operation. Construction of a fifth subsystem unit is nearing completion. The subsystems affect mechanical positioning by controlling a set of stepping motor-encoder pairs. The units are general purpose in the sense that they receive commands over a 9600 baud asynchronous serial line compatible with the RS-232-C electrical signal standard, generate TTL-compatible streams of stepping pulses which can be used with a wide variety of stepping motors, and read back position values from a number of different types and models of position encoder. The basic structure of the motor controller subsystem is briefly reviewed. Additions to the subsystem made in response to problems indicated by actual operation of the four installed units are described in more detail.

  11. LPE grown LSO:Tb scintillator films for high-resolution X-ray imaging applications at synchrotron light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecilia, A.; Rack, A.; Douissard, P.-A.; Martin, T.; Dos Santos Rolo, T.; Vagovič, P.; Hamann, E.; van de Kamp, T.; Riedel, A.; Fiederle, M.; Baumbach, T.

    2011-08-01

    Within the project ScinTAX of the 6th framework program (FP6) of the European Commission (SCINTAX—STRP 033 427) we have developed a new thin single crystal scintillator for high-resolution X-ray imaging. The scintillator is based on a Tb-doped Lu2SiO5 (LSO) film epitaxially grown on an adapted substrate. The high density, effective atomic number and light yield of the scintillating LSO significantly improves the efficiency of the X-ray imaging detectors currently used in synchrotron micro-imaging applications. In this work we present the characterization of the scintillating LSO films in terms of their spatial resolution performance and we provide two examples of high spatial and high temporal resolution applications.

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source user`s manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines. Fifth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.

    1993-04-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source is based, in large part, on the size of the user community and the diversity of the scientific and technical disciplines represented by these users. As evidence of this success, the VUV Ring has just celebrated its 10th anniversary and the X-ray Ring will do the same in 1995. In order to enhance this success, the NSLS User`s Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beamlines - Fifth Edition, is being published. This Manual presents to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture, capabilities and research programs of the various VUV and X-ray beamlines. Also detailed is the research and computer equipment a General User can expect to find and use at each beamline when working at the NSLS. The Manual is updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes on these beamlines.

  13. Emphysema diagnosis using X-ray dark-field imaging at a laser-driven compact synchrotron light source.

    PubMed

    Schleede, Simone; Meinel, Felix G; Bech, Martin; Herzen, Julia; Achterhold, Klaus; Potdevin, Guillaume; Malecki, Andreas; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Thieme, Sven F; Bamberg, Fabian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bohla, Alexander; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Loewen, Roderick; Gifford, Martin; Ruth, Ronald; Eickelberg, Oliver; Reiser, Maximilian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-10-30

    In early stages of various pulmonary diseases, such as emphysema and fibrosis, the change in X-ray attenuation is not detectable with absorption-based radiography. To monitor the morphological changes that the alveoli network undergoes in the progression of these diseases, we propose using the dark-field signal, which is related to small-angle scattering in the sample. Combined with the absorption-based image, the dark-field signal enables better discrimination between healthy and emphysematous lung tissue in a mouse model. All measurements have been performed at 36 keV using a monochromatic laser-driven miniature synchrotron X-ray source (Compact Light Source). In this paper we present grating-based dark-field images of emphysematous vs. healthy lung tissue, where the strong dependence of the dark-field signal on mean alveolar size leads to improved diagnosis of emphysema in lung radiographs. PMID:23074250

  14. Initial feasibility study of a dedicated synchrotron radiation light source for ultrafast X-ray science

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, John N.; DeSantis, S.; Hartman, N.; Heimann, P.; LaFever, R.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.; Rimmer, R.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Tanabe, J.; Wang, S.; Zholents, A.; Kairan, D.

    2001-10-26

    We present an initial feasibility summary of a femtosecond synchrotron radiation x-ray source based on a flat-beam rf gun and a recirculating superconducting linac that provides beam to an array of undulators and bend magnets. Optical pulse durations of < 100 fs are obtained by a combination of electron pulse compression, transverse temporal correlation of the electrons, and x-ray pulse compression. After an introduction and initial scientific motivation, we cover the following aspects of the design: layout and lattice, ultra-fast x-ray pulse production, flat electron-beam production, the rf gun, rf systems, cryogenic systems, collective effects, photon production, and synchronization of x-ray and laser pulses. We conclude with a summary of issues and areas of development that remain to be addressed.

  15. Development of soft X-ray polarized light beamline on Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Phase, D. M. Gupta, Mukul Potdar, S. Behera, L. Sah, R. Gupta, Ajay

    2014-04-24

    This article describes the development of a soft x-ray beamline on a bending magnet source of Indus-2 storage ring (2.5 GeV) and some preliminary results of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements using the same. The beamline layout is based on a spherical grating monochromator. The beamline is able to accept synchrotron radiation from the bending magnet port BL-1 of the Indus-2 ring with a wide solid angle. The large horizontal and vertical angular acceptance contributes to high photon flux and selective polarization respectively. The complete beamline is tested for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) ∼ 10{sup −10} mbar. First absorption spectrum was obtained on HOPG graphite foil. Our performance test indicates that modest resolving power has been achieved with adequate photon flux to carry out various absorption experiments.

  16. Dynamical Electroweak Symmetry Breaking with a Heavy Fermion in Light of Recent LHC Results

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hung, Pham Q.

    2013-01-01

    The recent announcement of a discovery of a possible Higgs-like particle—its spin and parity are yet to be determined—at the LHC with a mass of 126 GeV necessitates a fresh look at the nature of the electroweak symmetry breaking, in particular if this newly-discovered particle will turn out to have the quantum numbers of a Standard Model Higgs boson. Even if it were a 0 + scalar with the properties expected for a SM Higgs boson, there is still the quintessential hierarchy problem that one has to deal with and which, by itself, suggests a new physics energy scale aroundmore » 1 TeV. This paper presents a minireview of one possible scenario: the formation of a fermion-antifermion condensate coming from a very heavy fourth generation, carrying the quantum number of the SM Higgs field, and thus breaking the electroweak symmetry.« less

  17. SO(10) grand unification in light of recent LHC searches and colored scalars at the TeV-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, Ufuk

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the compatibility of the recent LHC signals and the TeV-scale left-right model(s) in the minimal nonsupersymmetric SO(10) framework. We show that the models in which the Higgs content is selected based on the extended survival hypothesis do not allow the WR boson to be at the TeV-scale. By relaxing this conjecture, we investigate various scenarios where a number of colored-scalars, originated from various Pati-Salam multiplets, are light and whence they survive down to the low energies. Performing a detailed renormalization group analysis with various low-energy Higgs configurations and symmetry breaking chains, while keeping the high energy Higgs content unmodified; we find that, among a number of possibilities, the models which have a light color-triplet scalar, and its combination with a light color-sextet, particularly stand out. Although these models do allow a TeV-scale WR boson, generating the required value of the gauge coupling gR at this scale is nontrivial.

  18. Nuclear waste viewed in a new light; a synchrotron study of uranium encapsulated in grout.

    PubMed

    Stitt, C A; Hart, M; Harker, N J; Hallam, K R; MacFarlane, J; Banos, A; Paraskevoulakos, C; Butcher, E; Padovani, C; Scott, T B

    2015-03-21

    How do you characterise the contents of a sealed nuclear waste package without breaking it open? This question is important when the contained corrosion products are potentially reactive with air and radioactive. Synchrotron X-rays have been used to perform micro-scale in-situ observation and characterisation of uranium encapsulated in grout; a simulation for a typical intermediate level waste storage packet. X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction generated both qualitative and quantitative data from a grout-encapsulated uranium sample before, and after, deliberately constrained H2 corrosion. Tomographic reconstructions provided a means of assessing the extent, rates and character of the corrosion reactions by comparing the relative densities between the materials and the volume of reaction products. The oxidation of uranium in grout was found to follow the anoxic U+H2O oxidation regime, and the pore network within the grout was observed to influence the growth of uranium hydride sites across the metal surface. Powder diffraction analysis identified the corrosion products as UO2 and UH3, and permitted measurement of corrosion-induced strain. Together, X-ray tomography and diffraction provide means of accurately determining the types and extent of uranium corrosion occurring, thereby offering a future tool for isolating and studying the reactions occurring in real full-scale waste package systems. PMID:25497037

  19. ESC FY2002 Annual Report: Synchrotron-Radiation-Based Photoelectron Spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Chung, B W; Schulze, R K; Shuh, D K

    2002-10-04

    Despite recent intensive experimental effort, the electronic structure of Pu, particularly {delta}-Pu, remains ill defined. An evaluation of our previous synchrotron-radiation-based investigation of {alpha}-Pu and {delta}-Pu has lead to a new paradigm for the interpretation of photoemission spectra of U, Np, {alpha}-Pu, {delta}-Pu and Am. This approach is founded upon a model in which spin and spin-orbit splittings are included in the picture of the 5f states and upon the observation of chiral/spin-dependent effects in non-magnetic systems. By extending a quantitative model developed for the interpretation of core level spectroscopy in magnetic systems, it is possible to predict the contributions of the individual component states within the 5-f manifold. This has lead to a remarkable agreement between the results of the model and the previously collected spectra of U, Np, Pu and Am, particularly {delta}-Pu, and to a prediction of what we might expect to see in future spin-resolving experiments.

  20. Developing EnviroSuite Resources at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Northrup; Jeffrey Fitts; Mark Fuhrmann; Paul Kalb

    2006-06-01

    The objective of Brookhaven National Laboratory's EnviroSuite Initiative is to develop the facilities, user support infrastructure, and techniques necessary to conduct world-class molecular environmental science research at the NSLS. This is intended to benefit the research of ERSD-supported scientists, both through direct access and assistance and through the indirect benefits of a broader network of environmental scientists as collaborators and users. Much of the EnviroSuite research involves close collaboration with members of the Center for Environmental Molecular Science (CEMS), an EMSI based at BNL and nearby Stony Brook University and jointly supported by ERSD (Project 1023761, P. Kalb) and NSF. This offers unique opportunities to benefit from both national laboratory facilities and university resources. Other collaborators, from around the US and the world, investigate various aspects of the underlying molecular-scale processes in complex natural systems. In general, synchrotron techniques are ideal for studying the molecular-scale structures, chemical/physical interactions, and transformations that govern the macroscopic properties and processes (e.g. transport, bioavailability) of contaminants in the environment. These techniques are element-specific, non-destructive, and sensitive to the very low concentrations found in real-world samples.

  1. Assessment of murine bone ultrastructure using synchrotron light: towards nano-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; Voide, Romain; Stauber, Martin; Stampanoni, Marco; Donahue, Leah Rae; Wyss, Peter; Sennhauser, Urs; Müller, Ralph

    2006-08-01

    To describe the different aspects of bone quality, we follow a hierarchical approach and assess bone tissue properties in different regimes of spatial resolution, beginning at the organ level and going down to cellular dimensions. For these purposes we developed different synchrotron radiation (SR) based computed-tomography (CT) methods to assess murine bone ultrastructure. In a first step, a tubular system and the osteocyte lacunar system within murine cortical bone have been established as novel ultrastructural quantitative traits. Results in two mouse strains showed that morphometry of these quantitative traits was dependent on strain and partially on gender, and that their scaling behavior with bone size was fundamentally different. In a second step, we explored bone competence on an ultrastructural level and related our findings to the two ultrastructural quantitative traits introduced before. We showed that SR CT imaging is a powerful tool to investigate the initiation and propagation of microcracks, which may alter bone quality and may lead to increased fracture risk by means of microdamage accumulation. In summary, investigation of ultrastructural bone tissue properties will eventually lead to a better understanding of bone quality and its relative contribution to bone competence.

  2. X-ray photonic microsystems for the manipulation of synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.; Walko, D. A.; Jung, I. W.; Schwartz, C. P.; Wang, Jin; López, D.; Shenoy, G. K.

    2015-05-05

    In this study, photonic microsystems played an essential role in the development of integrated photonic devices, thanks to their unique spatiotemporal control and spectral shaping capabilities. Similar capabilities to markedly control and manipulate X-ray radiation are highly desirable but practically impossible due to the massive size of the silicon single-crystal optics currently used. Here we show that micromechanical systems can be used as X-ray optics to create and preserve the spatial, temporal and spectral correlation of the X-rays. We demonstrate that, as X-ray reflective optics they can maintain the wavefront properties with nearly 100% reflectivity, and as a dynamic diffractive optics they can generate nanosecond time windows with over 100-kHz repetition rates. Since X-ray photonic microsystems can be easily incorporated into lab-based and next-generation synchrotron X-ray sources, they bring unprecedented design flexibility for future dynamic and miniature X-ray optics for focusing, wavefront manipulation, multicolour dispersion, and pulse slicing.

  3. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  4. X-ray photonic microsystems for the manipulation of synchrotron light

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mukhopadhyay, D.; Walko, D. A.; Jung, I. W.; Schwartz, C. P.; Wang, Jin; López, D.; Shenoy, G. K.

    2015-05-05

    In this study, photonic microsystems played an essential role in the development of integrated photonic devices, thanks to their unique spatiotemporal control and spectral shaping capabilities. Similar capabilities to markedly control and manipulate X-ray radiation are highly desirable but practically impossible due to the massive size of the silicon single-crystal optics currently used. Here we show that micromechanical systems can be used as X-ray optics to create and preserve the spatial, temporal and spectral correlation of the X-rays. We demonstrate that, as X-ray reflective optics they can maintain the wavefront properties with nearly 100% reflectivity, and as a dynamic diffractivemore » optics they can generate nanosecond time windows with over 100-kHz repetition rates. Since X-ray photonic microsystems can be easily incorporated into lab-based and next-generation synchrotron X-ray sources, they bring unprecedented design flexibility for future dynamic and miniature X-ray optics for focusing, wavefront manipulation, multicolour dispersion, and pulse slicing.« less

  5. Conceptual Design Report for a Phase 3 upgrade of the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Foyt, W.; Krinsky, S.; Hastings, J.; Finlay, L.

    1994-03-01

    Considerable investment by both the Department of Energy and the facility`s Participating Research teams has permitted the NSLS to offer a national facility to a wide range of scientific pursuits. The purpose of the NSLS Phase III project is to maximize the scientific output of this premier 2nd generation synchrotron radiation facility through a number of distinct projects. Over the years the NSLS has made significant improvements in the area of beam reliability which has resulted in deliverable, reproducible beam during 98% and 97% of scheduled operations on the VUV and X-ray rings respectively. This project will focus on improving beam intensity and stability by upgrading the optics and detector systems on a number of beamlines as well as upgrading radio frequency (rf) and beam position monitoring systems in the storage rings. In addition, the project includes plans for the design and procurement of a utility isolation system that would guard against voltage transients that disrupt the facility`s electrical system. Also a new insertion device will be installed at beamline X25 and a 2nd floor will be constructed over the X6 -- X16 region which will provide sorely needed laboratory and office space for the user community. This project requests funding of 22.5 million dollars over a three year period: FY 1996 ($6.3M), FY 1997 ($13.4M) and FY 1998 ($2.8M).

  6. X-ray photonic microsystems for the manipulation of synchrotron light

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, D.; Walko, D. A.; Jung, I. W.; Schwartz, C. P.; Wang, Jin; López, D.; Shenoy, G. K.

    2015-01-01

    Photonic microsystems played an essential role in the development of integrated photonic devices, thanks to their unique spatiotemporal control and spectral shaping capabilities. Similar capabilities to markedly control and manipulate X-ray radiation are highly desirable but practically impossible due to the massive size of the silicon single-crystal optics currently used. Here we show that micromechanical systems can be used as X-ray optics to create and preserve the spatial, temporal and spectral correlation of the X-rays. We demonstrate that, as X-ray reflective optics they can maintain the wavefront properties with nearly 100% reflectivity, and as a dynamic diffractive optics they can generate nanosecond time windows with over 100-kHz repetition rates. Since X-ray photonic microsystems can be easily incorporated into lab-based and next-generation synchrotron X-ray sources, they bring unprecedented design flexibility for future dynamic and miniature X-ray optics for focusing, wavefront manipulation, multicolour dispersion, and pulse slicing. PMID:25940542

  7. Preliminary studies of enhanced contrast radiography in anatomy and embryology of insects with Elettra synchrotron light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönnicke, M. G.; Foerster, L. A.; Navarro-Silva, M. A.; Menk, R.-H.; Rigon, L.; Cusatis, C.

    2005-08-01

    Enhanced contrast X-ray imaging is achieved by exploiting the real part of the refraction index, which is responsible for the phase shifts, in addition to the imaginary part, which is responsible for the absorption. Such techniques are called X-ray phase contrast imaging. An analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging set-up with Diffraction Enhanced Imaging processing (DEI) were used for preliminary studies in anatomy and embryology of insects. Parasitized stinkbug and moth eggs used as control agents of pests in vegetables and adult stinkbugs and mosquitoes ( Aedes aegypti) were used as samples. The experimental setup was mounted in the SYRMEP beamline at ELETTRA. Images were obtained using a high spatial resolution CCD detector (pixel size 14×14 μm 2) coupled with magnifying optics. Analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast images (PCI) and edge detection images show contrast and details not observed with conventional synchrotron radiography and open the possibility for future study in the embryonic development of insects.

  8. The MoEDAL Experiment at the LHC - a New Light on the Terascale Frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinfold, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    MoEDAL is a pioneering experiment designed to search for highly ionizing avatars of new physics such as magnetic monopoles or massive (pseudo-)stable charged particles. Its groundbreaking physics program defines a number of scenarios that yield potentially revolutionary insights into such foundational questions as: are there extra dimensions or new symmetries; what is the mechanism for the generation of mass; does magnetic charge exist; what is the nature of dark matter; and, how did the big-bang develop. MoEDAL's purpose is to meet such far-reaching challenges at the frontier of the field. The innovative MoEDAL detector employs unconventional methodologies tuned to the prospect of discovery physics. The largely passive MoEDAL detector, deployed at Point 8 on the LHC ring, has a dual nature. First, it acts like a giant camera, comprised of nuclear track detectors - analyzed offline by ultra fast scanning microscopes - sensitive only to new physics. Second, it is uniquely able to trap the particle messengers of physics beyond the Standard Model for further study. MoEDAL's radiation environment is monitored by a state-of-the-art real-time TimePix pixel detector array. A new MoEDAL sub-detector to extend MoEDAL's reach to millicharged, minimally ionizing, particles (MMIPs) is under study.

  9. Inert doublet model in light of LHC Run I and astrophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilnicka, Agnieszka; Krawczyk, Maria; Robens, Tania

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the parameter space of the inert doublet model, a two Higgs doublet model with a dark matter candidate. An extensive set of theoretical and experimental constraints on this model is considered, where both collider as well as astroparticle data limits, the latter in the form of dark matter relic density as well as direct detection, are taken into account. We discuss the effects of these constraints on the parameter space of the model. In particular, we do not require the inert doublet model to provide the full dark matter content of the Universe, which opens up additional regions in the parameter space accessible at collider experiments. The combination of all constraints leads to a relatively strong mass degeneracy in the dark scalar sector for masses ≳200 GeV , and to a minimal scale ˜45 GeV for the dark scalar masses. We also observe a stringent mass hierarchy MH±>MA. We propose benchmark points and benchmark planes for dark scalar pair production for the current LHC run being in compliance with all theoretical as well as experimental bounds.

  10. Performance of the far-IR beamline of the 6 MeV tabletop synchrotron light source.

    PubMed

    Monirul Haque, Md; Yamada, Hironari; Moon, Ahsa; Yamada, Mami

    2009-03-01

    The performance of the far-infrared (FIR) beamline of the 6 MeV tabletop synchrotron light source MIRRORCLE-6FIR dedicated to far-infrared spectroscopy is presented. MIRRORCLE-6FIR is equipped with a perfectly circular optical system (PhSR) placed around the 1 m-long circumference electron orbit. To illustrate the facility of this light source, the FIR output as well as its spectra were measured. The optimum optical system was designed by using the ray-tracing simulation code ZEMAX. The measured FIR intensity with the PhSR in place is about five times higher than that without the PhSR, which is in good agreement with the simulation results. The MIRRORCLE-6FIR spectral flux is compared with a standard thermal source and is found to be 1000 times greater than that from a typical thermal source at approximately 15 cm(-1). It is also observed that the MIRRORCLE-6FIR radiation has a highly coherent nature. The broadband infrared allows the facility to reach the spectral range from 10 cm(-1) to 100 cm(-1). MIRRORCLE-6FIR, owing to a large beam current, the PhSR mirror system, a large dynamic aperture and small ring energy, can deliver a bright flux of photons in the FIR/THz region useful for broadband spectroscopy. PMID:19240343

  11. THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

  12. NSLS 2006 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2006)

    SciTech Connect

    MILLER, L.

    2006-12-31

    This past year has seen both challenges and fantastic new opportunities for the user community at the NSLS. The fantastic new opportunities are clear and abundant. We now have a five-year strategic plan for new development and continued operation of the NSLS. The NSLS continues to be an extremely productive facility, and the UEC is delighted at how NSLS Chair Chi-Chang Kao has consulted widely within the user community to develop a five-year plan for strategic upgrades and continued operation of the facility. The NSLS-II project, led by Associate Lab Director Steve Dierker, has done very well in its Department of Energy (DOE) reviews and will hopefully soon receive Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) approval, which in DOE lingo gives a go-ahead to launch the detailed design of the facility. We also held the first joint user meeting between the NSLS and Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), for which the building is near completion. The joint user meeting is an important step toward the close collaboration of the two facilities. The CFN, led by Emilio Mendez, promises to provide capabilities and research foci that are complementary to those at the NSLS. Together, all of these developments give a clear path to an exciting future of synchrotron radiation research at Brookhaven! However, with opportunities come challenges! One of the largest of these faced in the past year involved congressional support for scientific research in general, and DOE user facilities in particular. As you likely know, Congress did not complete its usual budget process in 2006, with the exceptions of the departments of Defense and Homeland Security. This left science funding at the budget levels enacted in late 2005 for FY2006, and unfortunately, FY2006 was not a particularly memorable vintage for science support. The good news is that you, the user community, have spoken up with unprecedented vigor about this, and Congress appears to be listening. As we look at the FY2007 budget

  13. Energy Spread Monitoring for the JLAB Experimental Program: Synchrotron Light Interferometers, Optical Transition Radiation Monitors, and Wire Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.-C.; Chevtsov, P.; Day, A.; Freyberger, A. P.; Hicks, R.; Joyce, M.; Denard, J.-C.

    2004-11-10

    The hypernuclear physics program at JLAB requires an electron beam with small transverse size ({sigma} {approx} 100 {mu}m) and an upper limit on the RMS energy spread of ({delta}E/E) < 3 x 10{sup -5}. To measure and monitor these parameters, a beam size and energy spread measurement system has been created. The system consists of a set of wire scanners, Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) detectors, and Synchrotron Light Interferometers (SLI). The energy spread is measured via a set of wire scans performed at specific locations in the transport line, which is an invasive process. During physics operation the energy spread is monitored continuously with the OTR and/or the SLI. These devices are non-invasive [or nearly non-invasive in the case of OTR] and operate over a very wide range of beam energies (1-6 GeV) and currents ({approx}100 {mu}A down to few {mu}A). All components of this system are automated in an EPICS accelerator control environment. The paper presents our operational experience with the beam size and energy spread measurement system and its maintenance.

  14. Energy Spread Monitoring for the JLAB Experimental Program: Synchrotron Light Interferometers, Optical Transition Radiation Monitors and Wire Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Arne Freyberger; Yu-Chiu Chao; Pavel Chevtsov; Anthony Day; William Hicks; Michele Joyce; Jean-Claude Denard

    2004-05-01

    The hypernuclear physics program at JLAB requires an electron beam with small transverse size (sigma {approx} 100 {micro}m) and an upper limit on the RMS energy spread of delta E / E < 3 x 10{sup -}5. To measure and monitor these parameters, a beam size and energy spread measurement system has been created. The system consists of a set of wire scanners, Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) detectors, and Synchrotron Light Interferometers (SLI). The energy spread is measured via a set of wire scans performed at specific locations in the transport line, which is an invasive process. During physics operation the energy spread is monitored continuously with the OTR and/or the SLI. These devices are noninvasive [or nearly non-invasive in the case of OTR] and operate over a very wide range of beam energies (1.6 GeV) and currents ({approx}100 {micro}A down to few {micro}A). All components of this system are automated in an EPICS accelerator control environment. The paper presents our operational experience with the beam size and energy spread measurement system and its maintenance.

  15. Development of an in-vacuum minipole undulator array for National Synchrotron Light Source In-Vacuum UNdulator

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, T.; Marechal, X.; Tanaka, T.; Kitamura, H.; Stefan, P.; Krinsky, S.; Rakowsky, G.; Solomon, L.

    1998-01-01

    An in-vacuum minipole (short period) insertion device has been developed in a collaboration between SPring-8 and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The magnetic arrays were assembled, field measured, corrected, and vacuum tested by SPring-8 and were installed in an NSLS-developed chamber with mechanical parts in the NSLS X-Ray Ring (E=2.584GeV) in May 1997 and a successful commissioning of the device was carried out in June 1997. The device is made of permanent magnets with 30.5 periods and a period length of 11 mm. It is designed to produce fundamental radiation at 4.6 keV, and with a modest value of deflection parameter (K=0.7at3.3mm gap) enables higher harmonics to be used as well, for a variety of experiments. A detailed description of the mechanical support and vacuum chamber will be reported elsewhere. We describe technical challenges encountered in constructing this type of device, and present an outline of our collaboration. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Magnetic measurements of permanent magnet insertion devices at the BNL-NSLS (Brookhaven National Laboratory--National Synchrotron Light Source)

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, L.; Decker, G.; Galayda, J.; Kitamura, M.

    1989-01-01

    Since June 1988, three permanent magnet insertion devices of the hybrid type have been installed into the x-ray ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Lab. as part of the Phase II facility upgrade. The three magnets consist of a soft x-ray undulator (SXU) and two hybrid wigglers, with peak fields of 0.35 and 1.2 Tesla respectively. The SXU magnet has iron poles, samarium cobalt permanent magnets, 80mm period length, 77 poles, and a gap range of 31--100 mm. For this gap range the undulator parameter K, where K = 0.934 B(Tesla)/lambda/(cm), ranges from 2.6 to 0.15. The hybrid wigglers have vanadium pomander poles, samarium cobalt magnets, 120MM periods, 31 poles, and a gap range of 22--122mm. For this gap range K ranges from 13.0 to 0.5. All three of these magnets have electromagnetic coils which can be powered to adjust the value of the magnet field integral. Both point and integral magnetic measurements were performed on these magnets; some of the measurement results will be presented in this paper.

  17. An updated analysis of Inert Higgs Doublet Model in light of the recent results from LUX, PLANCK, AMS-02 and LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang; Yuan, Qiang E-mail: yue-lin.tsai@ipmu.jp E-mail: tcyuan@phys.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-06-01

    In light of the recent discovery by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of a Higgs-like particle with a narrow mass range of 125–126 GeV, we perform an updated analysis on one of the popular scalar dark matter models, the Inert Higgs Doublet Model (IHDM). We take into account in our likelihood analysis of various experimental constraints, including recent relic density measurement, dark matter direct and indirect detection constraints as well as the latest collider constraints on the invisible decay width of the Higgs boson and monojet search at the LHC. It is shown that if the invisible decay of the standard model Higgs boson is open, LHC as well as direct detection experiments like LUX and XENON100 could put stringent limits on the Higgs boson couplings to dark matter. We find that the most favoured parameter space for IHDM corresponds to dark matter with a mass less than 100 GeV or so. In particular, the best-fit points are at the dark matter mass around 70 GeV where the invisible Higgs decay to dark matter is closed. Scalar dark matter in the higher mass range of 0.5–4 TeV is also explored in our study. Projected sensitivities for the future experiments of monojet at LHC-14, XENON1T and AMS-02 one year antiproton flux are shown to put further constraints on the existing parameter space of IHDM.

  18. Design of a diagnostic area-type beam position monitor for x-ray beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Corridon, D.

    1996-10-01

    We have built a area-type beam position monitor for use as a diagnostic tool at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The device is compact and fits into a vacuum cross. We completed range and resolution tests of the device at beamline X-19A at the NSLS and concluded that such a monitor can be placed in the confines of the vacuum cross.

  19. Soft-x-ray and vacuum-ultraviolet beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source 700-MeV storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.P.; Howells, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    We summarize the characteristics of the first beamlines which are being installed and commissioned at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) 700 MeV storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We also give a progress report as of July 1982 on the early stages of beamline alignment and operation in which particular attention is paid to the 5 beamlines which NSLS has developed. The report describes in detail a novel method for beamline alignment which is of general application.

  20. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    SciTech Connect

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature.

  1. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.; Robinson, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 ..mu..m and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80.

  3. Testing the color charge and mass dependence of parton energy loss with heavy-to-light ratios at BNL RHIC and CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Armesto, Nestor; Dainese, Andrea; Salgado, Carlos A.; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2005-03-01

    The ratio of nuclear modification factors of high-p{sub T} heavy-flavored mesons to light-flavored hadrons ('heavy-to-light ratio') in nucleus-nucleus collisions tests the partonic mechanism expected to underlie jet quenching. Heavy-to-light ratios are mainly sensitive to the mass and color-charge dependences of medium-induced parton energy loss. Here, we assess the potential for identifying these two effects in D and B meson production at RHIC and at the LHC. To this end, we supplement the perturbative QCD factorized formalism for leading hadron production with radiative parton energy loss. For D meson spectra at high but experimentally accessible transverse momentum (10 < or approx. p{sub T} < or approx. 20 GeV) in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC, we find that charm quarks behave essentially like light quarks. However, since light-flavored hadron yields are dominated by gluon parents, the heavy-to-light ratio of D mesons is a sensitive probe of the color-charge dependence of parton energy loss. In contrast, due to the larger b quark mass, the medium modification of B mesons in the same kinematical regime provides a sensitive test of the mass dependence of parton energy loss. At RHIC energies, the strategies for identifying and disentangling the color charge and mass dependence of parton energy loss are more involved because of the smaller kinematical range accessible. We argue that at RHIC, the kinematical regime best suited for such an analysis of D mesons is 7 < or approx. p{sub T} < or approx. 12 GeV, whereas the study of lower transverse momenta is further complicated due to the known dominant contribution of additional, particle species dependent, nonperturbative effects.

  4. Synchrotron polarization in blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haocheng; Böttcher, Markus; Chen, Xuhui

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of time- and energy-dependent synchrotron polarization signatures in a shock-in-jet model for γ-ray blazars. Our calculations employ a full three-dimensional radiation transfer code, assuming a helical magnetic field throughout the jet. The code considers synchrotron emission from an ordered magnetic field, and takes into account all light-travel-time and other relevant geometric effects, while the relevant synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton effects are handled with the two-dimensional Monte-Carlo/Fokker-Planck (MCFP) code. We consider several possible mechanisms through which a relativistic shock propagating through the jet may affect the jet plasma to produce a synchrotron and high-energy flare. Most plausibly, the shock is expected to lead to a compression of the magnetic field, increasing the toroidal field component and thereby changing the direction of the magnetic field in the region affected by the shock. We find that such a scenario leads to correlated synchrotron + synchrotron-self-Compton flaring, associated with substantial variability in the synchrotron polarization percentage and position angle. Most importantly, this scenario naturally explains large polarization angle rotations by ≳ 180°, as observed in connection with γ-ray flares in several blazars, without the need for bent or helical jet trajectories or other nonaxisymmetric jet features.

  5. Synchrotron Polarization in Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Chen, Xuhui; Böttcher, Markus

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of time- and energy-dependent synchrotron polarization signatures in a shock-in-jet model for γ-ray blazars. Our calculations employ a full three-dimensional radiation transfer code, assuming a helical magnetic field throughout the jet. The code considers synchrotron emission from an ordered magnetic field, and takes into account all light-travel-time and other relevant geometric effects, while the relevant synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton effects are handled with the two-dimensional Monte-Carlo/Fokker-Planck (MCFP) code. We consider several possible mechanisms through which a relativistic shock propagating through the jet may affect the jet plasma to produce a synchrotron and high-energy flare. Most plausibly, the shock is expected to lead to a compression of the magnetic field, increasing the toroidal field component and thereby changing the direction of the magnetic field in the region affected by the shock. We find that such a scenario leads to correlated synchrotron + synchrotron-self-Compton flaring, associated with substantial variability in the synchrotron polarization percentage and position angle. Most importantly, this scenario naturally explains large polarization angle rotations by >~ 180°, as observed in connection with γ-ray flares in several blazars, without the need for bent or helical jet trajectories or other nonaxisymmetric jet features.

  6. Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-07-22

    Brookhaven's Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom (InSynC) program gives teachers and their students access to the National Synchrotron Light Source through a competitive proposal process. The first batch of InSynC participants included a group of students from Islip Middle School, who used the massive machine to study the effectiveness of different what filters.

  7. Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom

    SciTech Connect

    2011-05-20

    Brookhaven's Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom (InSynC) program gives teachers and their students access to the National Synchrotron Light Source through a competitive proposal process. The first batch of InSynC participants included a group of students from Islip Middle School, who used the massive machine to study the effectiveness of different what filters.

  8. Ultrafast excitation energy transfer and exciton-exciton annihilation processes in isolated light harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHC II) from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Bittner, T.; Wasielewski, M.R. ); Irrgang, K.D.; Renger, G. )

    1994-11-17

    Excitation energy transfer and exciton-exciton annihilation in the isolated light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complex of spinach photosystem II (LHC II) has been studied by two-color absorption difference spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution. After selectively exciting Chl b at 645 nm, the transient absorption changes were monitored at wavelengths where either Chl b (655 nm) or Chl a (680 nm) dominates the absorption of LHC II. From the good correspondence of the lifetimes obtained from a numerical analysis of the very fast relaxation in the Chl b absorption band (160 [+-] 20 fs) and the rise kinetics in the Chl a absorption band (145 [+-] 20 fs), it is suggested that the Chl b [yields] Chl a excitation energy transfer occurs on a time scale of about 150 fs. In addition, at both probe wavelengths (655 and 680 nm) lifetimes of 3-7 ps were observed which likely arise from excitation energy transfer processes connected with spectral shifting. The kinetic curves of the transient absorption changes at 680 nm show a remarkable intensity dependence which is ascribed to exciton-exciton annihilation. Since at a probe wavelength of 655 nm no intensity effect on the kinetics was observed, it is concluded that annihilation processes preferably occur among excited singlet states of Chl a molecules. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Design for a Longitudinal Density Monitor for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff, Adam; Bart Pedersen, Stephane; Boccardi, Andrea; Bravin, Enrico; Lefevre, Thibaut; Rabiller, Aurelie; Roncarolo, Federico; Fisher, Alan; Welsch, Carsten; /Liverpool U.

    2012-07-13

    Synchrotron radiation is currently used on the LHC for beam imaging and for monitoring the proton population in the 3 microsecond abort gap. In addition to these existing detectors, a study has been initiated to provide longitudinal density profiles of the LHC beams with a high dynamic range and a 50ps time resolution. This would allow for the precise measurement both of the bunch shape and the number of particles in the bunch tail or drifting into ghost bunches. A solution is proposed based on counting synchrotron light photons with two fast avalanche photo-diodes (APD) operated in Geiger mode. One is free-running but heavily attenuated and can be used to measure the core of the bunch. The other is much more sensitive, for measurement of the bunch tails, but must be gated off during the passage of the bunch to prevent the detector from being swamped. An algorithm is then applied to combine the two measurements and correct for the detector dead-time, afterpulsing and pile-up effects. Initial results from laboratory testing of this system are described here.

  10. Excluding the light dark matter window of a 331 model using LHC and direct dark matter detection data

    SciTech Connect

    Cogollo, D.; Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Teles, P. Rebello E-mail: alxogonz@ucsc.edu E-mail: patricia.rebello.teles@cern.ch

    2014-11-01

    We sift the impact of the recent Higgs precise measurements, and recent dark matter direct detection results, on the dark sector of an electroweak extension of the Standard Model that has a complex scalar as dark matter. We find that in this model the Higgs decays with a large branching ratio into dark matter particles, and charged scalars when these are kinematically available, for any coupling strength differently from the so called Higgs portal. Moreover, we compute the abundance and spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section, which are driven by the Higgs and Z{sup '} boson processes. We decisively exclude the 1–500 GeV dark matter window and find the most stringent lower bound in the literature on the scale of symmetry breaking of the model namely 10 TeV, after applying the LUX-2013 limit. Interestingly, the projected XENON1T constraint will be able to rule out the entire 1 GeV–1000 GeV dark matter mass range. Lastly, for completeness, we compute the charged scalar production cross section at the LHC and comment on the possibility of detection at current and future LHC runnings.

  11. Extracting constraints from direct detection searches of supersymmetric dark matter in the light of null results from the LHC in the squark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffard, Q.; Mayet, F.; Bélanger, G.; Genest, M.-H.; Santos, D.

    2016-02-01

    The comparison of the results of direct detection of dark matter, obtained with various target nuclei, requires model-dependent, or even arbitrary, assumptions. Indeed, to draw conclusions either the spin-dependent (SD) or the spin-independent (SI) interaction has to be neglected. In the light of the null results from supersymmetry searches at the LHC, the squark sector is pushed to high masses. We show that for a squark sector at the TeV scale, the framework used to extract constraints from direct detection searches can be redefined as the number of free parameters is reduced. Moreover, the correlation observed between SI and SD proton cross sections constitutes a key issue for the development of the next generation of dark matter detectors.

  12. Calibrating the light pulse shape of a hydrogen flashlamp using synchrotron radiation as a standard of excitation.

    PubMed

    Andre, J C; Lopez-Delgado, R; Lyke, R L; Ware, W R

    1979-05-01

    Advantage has been taken of the measured pulse width of synchrotron radiation and its independence of wavelength to determine the delta-pulse response of a vacuum uv photomultiplier. This photomultiplier was then used to establish the true time profile of a nanosecond H(2) flashlamp. Two numerical techniques (the exponential series method and the fast Fourier transform method) were used to deconvolute the data arising from these experiments. The results indicate that the H(2) flashlamp probably has the same profile in the many-line region, lambda < 1800 A, and in the continuum region, lambda > 2100 A, and the delta-pulse response of the PMT appears consistent with known properties of the Cs-Te photocathode. PMID:20212849

  13. Photon reflectivity distributions from the LHC beam screen and their implications on the arc beam vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahne, N.; Baglin, V.; Collins, I. R.; Giglia, A.; Pasquali, L.; Pedio, M.; Nannarone, S.; Cimino, R.

    2004-07-01

    In particle accelerators with intense positively charged bunched beams, an electron cloud may induce beam instabilities and the related beam induced electron multipacting (BIEM) can result in an undesired pressure rise. In a cryogenic machine such as the large hadron collider (LHC), the BIEM will introduce additional heat load. When present, synchrotron radiation (SR) may generate a significant number of photoelectrons, that may play a role in determining the onset and the detailed properties of the electron cloud related instability. Since electrons are constrained to move along field lines, those created on the accelerator equator in a strong vertical (dipole) field cannot participate in the e-cloud build-up. Therefore, for the LHC there has been a continuous effort to find solutions to absorb the photons on the equator. The solution adopted for the LHC dipole beam screens is a saw-tooth structure on the illuminated equator. SR from a bending magnet beamline at ELETTRA, Italy (BEAR) has been used to measure the reflectivities (forward, back-scattered and diffuse), for a flat and a saw-tooth structured Cu co-laminated surface using both white light SR, similar to the one emitted by LHC, and monochromatic light. Our data show that the saw-tooth structure does reduce the total reflectivity and modifies the photon energy distribution of the reflected photons. The implications of these results on the LHC arc vacuum system are discussed.

  14. Transverse damping systems in modern synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhabitsky, V. M.

    2006-12-01

    Transverse feedback systems for suppression of transverse coherent beam oscillations are used in modern synchrotrons for preventing the development of transverse instabilities and damping residual beam oscillations after injection. Information on damper systems for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC; CERN, Geneva) and the accelerator complex FAIR (GSI, Darmstadt) is presented. The project for the LHC is being performed at the Laboratory of Particle Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in collaboration with CERN. The information concerning the state of the project and the plans of its completion at the LHC is given. The results of the first design activity on transverse damping systems at the SIS100 and SIS300 synchrotrons, to be created in the framework of the new international project FAIR, are presented.

  15. Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Lee C.

    2004-02-01

    As early as 1900, immediately after the pioneer formulation by Liénard and Wiechert of the retarded potentials of a point charge (electron), calculations of the characteristics of the radiation from an accelerated electron or electron beam have been performed. But it was not until 1947 when John Blewett actually observed the synchrotron radiation from the beam in the 70-MeV General Electric electron synchrotron, the phenomenon was accepted as physical reality instead of some interesting mathematical deduction. It was soon recognized that the synchrotron radiation provides an extremely brilliant photon beam over a very broad frequency range from infrared to hard x-ray, and hence makes an ideal tool for use in extranuclear research. By the end of the twentieth century there were dozens of electron storage rings operated around the world at energies from a few hundred MeV to 8 GeV for experiments. Here we will study first the properties of the synchrotron radiation and then the effects of the emission of synchrotron radiation on the electron beam.

  16. Extragalactic Synchrotron Transients in the Era of Wide-field Radio Surveys. I. Detection Rates and Light Curve Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Williams, P. K. G.; Berger, Edo

    2015-06-01

    The impending era of wide-field radio surveys has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of astrophysical transients. Here we evaluate the prospects of a wide range of planned and hypothetical radio surveys using the properties and volumetric rates of known and hypothetical classes of extragalactic synchrotron radio transients (e.g., on-axis and off-axis gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), supernovae, tidal disruption events, compact object mergers). Utilizing these sources and physically motivated considerations we assess the allowed phase space of radio luminosity and peak timescale for extragalactic transients. We also include for the first time effects such as redshift evolution of the rates, K-corrections, and non-Euclidean luminosity distance, which affect the detection rates of the most sensitive surveys. The number of detected events is calculated by means of a Monte Carlo method, using the various survey properties (depth, cadence, area) and realistic detection criteria that include a cut on the minimum variability of the transients during the survey and an assessment of host galaxy contamination. We find that near-term GHz frequency surveys (ASKAP/VAST, Very Large Array Sky Survey) will detect few events: ≲ 30-50 on- and off-axis long GRBs (LGRBs) and off-axis tidal disruption events, and ∼ 50-100 neutron star binary mergers if ∼ 0.5% of the mergers result in a stable millisecond magnetar. Low-frequency surveys (e.g., LOFAR) are unlikely to detect any transients, while a hypothetical large-scale mm survey may detect ∼40 on-axis LGRBs. On the other hand, we find that SKA1 surveys at ∼ 0.1-1 GHz have the potential to uncover thousands of transients, mainly on-axis and off-axis LGRBs, on-axis short GRBs, off-axis TDEs, and neutron star binary mergers with magnetar remnants.

  17. The LHC Vacuum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröbner, O.

    1997-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, involves two proton storage rings with colliding beams of 7 TeV. The machine will be housed in the existing LEP tunnel and requires 16 m long superconducting bending magnets. The vacuum chamber will be the inner wall of the cryostat and hence at the temperature of the magnet cold bore, i.e. at 1.9 K and therefore a very good cryo-pump. To reduce the cryogenic power consumption, the heat load from synchrotron radiation and from the image currents in the vacuum chamber will be absorbed on a 'beam screen', which operates between 5 and 20 K, inserted in the magnet cold bore. The design pressure necessary for operation must provide a lifetime of many days and a stringent requirement comes from the power deposition in the superconducting magnet coils due to protons scattered on the residual gas which could lead to a magnet quench. Cryo-pumping of gas on the cold surfaces provides the necessary low gas densities but it must be ensured that the vapour pressure of cryo-sorbed molecules, of which H2 and He would be the most critical species, remains within acceptable limits. The room temperature sections of the LHC, specifically in the experiments, the vacuum must be stable against ion induced desorption and ISR-type 'pressure bumps'.

  18. Proton synchrotron radiation at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, Randy; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    While protons are not generally associated with synchrotron radiation, they do emit visible light at high enough energies. This paper presents an overview of the use of synchrotron radiation in the Tevatron to measure transverse emittances and to monitor the amount of beam in the abort gap. The latter is necessary to ensure a clean abort and prevent quenches of the superconducting magnets and damage to the silicon detectors of the collider experiments.

  19. Synchrotron radiation in biosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.; Gupta, Sayan; Zhan, Chenyang; Chance, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    The Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB) operates five beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Infrared (IR) micro-spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, structural proteomics and macromolecular footprinting are among the major technologies available through the Center. IR micro-spectroscopy is used to examine protein-folding in the microsecond time regime, image bone, neurons, seeds and other biological tissues, as well as image samples of interest in the chemical and environmental sciences. Structural proteomics research of New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium (NYSGRC) is steadily increasing the number of solved protein structures, with a goal to solve 100-200 structures per year. To speed up the research, a high-throughput method called 'metallomics' was implemented for NYSGRC crystallographers to detect intrinsic anomalous scatterers using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Hydroxyl radical mediated X-ray footprinting is capable of resolving folding events of RNA, at single base resolution on millisecond timescales using a synchrotron white beam. The high brightness of synchrotron source is essential for CSB projects as it permits the use of smaller sample sizes and/or concentration, and allows studies of more complicated biological systems than with conventional sources.

  20. Global analysis of the pMSSM in light of the Fermi GeV excess: prospects for the LHC Run-II and astroparticle experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Calore, Francesca; Caron, Sascha; Ruiz, Roberto; Kim, Jong Soo; Trotta, Roberto; Weniger, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    We present a new global fit of the 19-dimensional phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (pMSSM-19) that complies with all the latest experimental results from dark matter indirect, direct and accelerator dark matter searches. We show that the model provides a satisfactory explanation of the excess of gamma rays from the Galactic centre observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, assuming that it is produced by the annihilation of neutralinos in the Milky Way halo. We identify two regions that pass all the constraints: the first corresponds to neutralinos with a mass 0~ 80‑10 GeV annihilating into WW with a branching ratio of 95%; the second to heavier neutralinos, with mass 0~ 180‑20 GeV annihilating into bar tt with a branching ratio of 87%. We show that neutralinos compatible with the Galactic centre GeV excess will soon be within the reach of LHC run-II—notably through searches for charginos and neutralinos, squarks and light smuons—and of Xenon1T, thanks to its unprecedented sensitivity to spin-dependent cross-section off neutrons.

  1. Complexation of copper and zinc ions with proteins of a light-harvesting complex (LHC-II) of chloroplast thylakoid membranes studied by FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.; Ahmed, A.

    1993-08-01

    The interaction of Zn(II) and Cu(II) ions with the light-harvesting proteins (LHC-II) of chloroplast thylakoid membranes was studied in aqueous solution with metal ion concentrations of 0.01 to 20mM, using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Analyses of the metal ion binding mode and protein conformational variations were carried out and correlations between spectral changes and metal—protein complexation were established. Infrared difference spectroscopic results revealed the presence of a strong metal—protein interaction at high metal ion concentrations, while at low concentrations complexation was negligible. The binding of Zn and Cu ions was found to be with the protein carbonyl groups at low metal ion concentrations, whereas CO and CN groups were the main coordination sites at higher concentrations. A major conformational variation from α-helix to β-sheet and turn structures was observed in the presence of a concentrated metal ion solution.

  2. Kinetic freeze-out temperature and flow velocity extracted from transverse momentum spectra of final-state light flavor particles produced in collisions at RHIC and LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hua-Rong; Liu, Fu-Hu; Lacey, Roy A.

    2016-04-01

    The transverse momentum spectra of final-state light flavor particles produced in proton-proton ( p - p , copper-copper (Cu-Cu), gold-gold (Au-Au), lead-lead (Pb-Pb), and proton-lead ( p -Pb) collisions for different centralities at relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and large hadron collider (LHC) energies are studied in the framework of a multisource thermal model. The experimental data measured by the STAR, CMS, and ALICE Collaborations are consistent with the results calculated by the multi-component Erlang distribution and Tsallis Statistics. The effective temperature and real temperature (kinetic freeze-out temperature) of the interacting system at the stage of kinetic freeze-out, the mean transverse flow velocity and mean flow velocity of particles, and the relationships between them are extracted. The dependences of effective temperature and mean (transverse) momentum on rest mass, moving mass, centrality, and center-of-mass energy, and the dependences of kinetic freeze-out temperature and mean (transverse) flow velocity on centrality, center-of-mass energy, and system size are obtained.

  3. Low-temperature energy transfer in LHC-II trimers from the Chl a/b light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II.

    PubMed Central

    Savikhin, S; van Amerongen, H; Kwa, S L; van Grondelle, R; Struve, W S

    1994-01-01

    Temperature dependence in electronic energy transfer steps within light-harvesting antenna trimers from photosystem II was investigated by studying Chl a pump-probe anisotropy decays at several wavelengths from 675 to 682 nm. The anisotropy lifetime is markedly sensitive to temperature at the longest wavelengths (680-682 nm), increasing by factors of 5 to 6 as the trimers are cooled from room temperature to 13 K. The temperature dependence is muted at 677 and 675 nm. This behavior is modeled using simulations of temperature-broadened Chl a absorption and fluorescence spectra in spectral overlap calculations of Förster energy transfer rates. In this model, the 680 nm anisotropy decays are dominated by uphill energy transfers from 680 nm Chl a pigments at the red edge of the LHC-II spectrum; the 675 nm anisotropy decays reflect a statistical average of uphill and downhill energy transfers from 676-nm pigments. The measured temperature dependence is consistent with essentially uncorrelated inhomogeneous broadening of donor and acceptor Chl a pigments. PMID:8061208

  4. LHC Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-07-28

    The LHC is the world’s highest energy particle accelerator and scientists use it to record an unprecedented amount of data. This data is recorded in electronic format and it requires an enormous computational infrastructure to convert the raw data into conclusions about the fundamental rules that govern matter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln gives us a sense of just how much data is involved and the incredible computer resources that makes it all possible.

  5. Design and project status of the National Synchrotron Light Source; storage rings (2. 5 GeV, 0. 7 GeV) for the generation of bright synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    van Steenbergen, A

    1980-01-01

    Two high intensity storage rings are being constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the generation of intense fluxes of synchrotron radiation in the vuv wavelength region (700 MeV ring, lambda/sub c/ = 31.5 A) and in the x-ray wavelength region (2.5 GeV ring, lambda/sub c/ = 2.5 A). A description is given of the facility, the main features of the storage rings are presented and the basic parameters are enumerated. High field superconducting wigglers, to lower the short wavelength cutoff in the x-ray ring, and undulators, for flux enhancement or a free electron laser experiment will be incorporated and parameters are given here. Special design aspects to optimize the electron storage rings as dedicated synchrotron radiation sources will be emphasized and the status of the project will be given.

  6. Molecular Chemical Structure of Barley Proteins Revealed by Ultra-Spatially Resolved Synchrotron Light Sourced FTIR Microspectroscopy: Comparison of Barley Varieties

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    Barley protein structure affects the barley quality, fermentation, and degradation behavior in both humans and animals among other factors such as protein matrix. Publications show various biological differences among barley varieties such as Valier and Harrington, which have significantly different degradation behaviors. The objectives of this study were to reveal the molecular structure of barley protein, comparing various varieties (Dolly, Valier, Harrington, LP955, AC Metcalfe, and Sisler), and quantify protein structure profiles using Gaussian and Lorentzian methods of multi-component peak modeling by using the ultra-spatially resolved synchrotron light sourced Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (SFTIRM). The items of the protein molecular structure revealed included protein structure {alpha}-helices, {beta}-sheets, and others such as {beta}-turns and random coils. The experiment was performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, US Department of Energy, NY). The results showed that with the SFTIRM, the molecular structure of barley protein could be revealed. Barley protein structures exhibited significant differences among the varieties in terms of proportion and ratio of model-fitted {alpha}-helices, {beta}-sheets, and others. By using multi-component peaks modeling at protein amide I region of 1710-1576 cm{sup -1}, the results show that barley protein consisted of approximately 18-34% of {alpha}-helices, 14-25% of {beta}-sheets, and 44-69% others. AC Metcalfe, Sisler, and LP955 consisted of higher (P < 0.05) proportions of {alpha}-helices (30-34%) than Dolly and Valier ({alpha}-helices 18-23%). Harrington was in between which was 25%. For protein {beta}-sheets, AC Metcalfe, and LP955 consisted of higher proportions (22-25%) than Dolly and Valier (13-17%). Different barley varieties contained different {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheet ratios, ranging from 1.4 to 2.0, although the difference were

  7. Synchrotron radiation and biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.

    1986-08-01

    In this lecture we describe the characteristics of Synchrotron radiation as a source of X rays. We discuss the properties of SR arc sources, wigglers, undulators and the use of backscattering of laser light. Applications to angiography, X ray microscopy and tomography are reviewed. 16 refs., 23 figs.

  8. Design and prototyping of HL-LHC double quarter wave crab cavities for SPS test

    SciTech Connect

    Verdu-Andres, S.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Alberty, L.; Artoos, K.; Calaga, R.; Capatina, O.; Capelli, T.; Carra, F.; Leuxe, R.; Kuder, N.; Zanoni, C.; Li, Z.; Ratti, A.

    2015-05-03

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  9. LHC detector upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Green

    2003-09-15

    The LHC detectors are well into their construction phase. The LHC schedule shows first beam to ATLAS and CMS in 2007. Because the LHC accelerator has begun to plan for a ten fold increase in LHC design luminosity (the SLHC or super LHC) it is none too soon to begin to think about the upgrades which will be required of the present LHC detectors. In particular, the tracking systems of ATLAS and CMS will need to be completely rebuilt. Given the time needed to do the R & D, make prototypes, and construct the new detectors and given the accelerator schedule for the SLHC, work needs to begin rather soon.

  10. COMPRES X-ray beamlines (X17B3 and X17C) for the diamond anvil cell at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, X.; Chen, Z.; Sengupta, A.; Goncharov, A. F.; Ehm, L.; Duffy, T. S.; Weidner, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    The laser heated diamond anvil cell technique can readily achieve the pressure and temperature domain of Earth from upper mantle to outer core. The laser heating diamond anvil cell X-ray facilities (X17-DAC), consists of X17B3 and X17C stations on a superconducting wiggler beamline and a sample preparation/spectroscopy laboratory at the National Synchrotron Light Source). As the first dedicated high-pressure (HP) beamline in the world, X17-DAC has been a workhorse for HP research for two decades, and has led the way in many developments, Here we report current capabilities and recent developments at X17-DAC beamlines including a new double-side laser heating system . At the X17B3 station, high-temperature high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments can be carried out either with monochromatic beam (~30 keV or ~80 keV), or with white beam for energy dispersive x-ray diffraction. In-situ laser heating system will be available for users in Geosciences starting from September, 2011. With a monochromatic beam at 30 keV, the X-ray beam can be focused to a beam size of ~10 μm. By combing with the laser heating technique, we can support in-situ X-ray diffraction experiments at the domain of temperature and pressure up to Earth's outer core. With high energy at 80 keV, total scattering pair distribution function (PDF) measurements are performed. Originally, this method was used to study amorphous and highly disordered materials, but more recently, it has been used for the analysis of crystalline and nanostructured materials. This novel technique provides useful information about the long- and short-range ordering of the atoms in the materials. It is promising to combine laser heating and total scattering PDF measurements so as to probe phase transitions and phase relations for geophysical important materials at X17B3 station. At X17C, we conduct angle and energy dispersive x-ray diffraction on polycrystalline samples in either axial or radial geometry. Energy dispersive

  11. Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.T.

    1984-06-01

    The Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop was held to consider two vacuum-related problems that bear on the design of storage rings and beam lines for synchrotron radiation facilities. These problems are gas desorption from the vacuum chamber walls and carbon deposition on optical components. Participants surveyed existing knowledge on these topics and recommended studies that should be performed as soon as possible to provide more definitive experimental data on these topics. This data will permit optimization of the final design of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its associated beam lines. It also should prove useful for other synchrotron radiation facilities as well.

  12. Special issue on Spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, A.; McKellar, A. R. W.

    2015-09-01

    Synchrotron light sources have emerged as a valuable tool for high resolution spectroscopy, particularly in the far infrared and vacuum ultraviolet regions. There are well over fifty facilities in the world using electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation (SR) sources, plus an increasing number using linear accelerators. The brightness and broad band nature of SR make it especially suitable as a source for absorption studies in combination with Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS).

  13. The LHC Confronts the pMSSM

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cahill-Rowley, Matthew

    2016-05-31

    Here we explore the impact of current (7+8 TeV) and future (14 TeV) LHC searches on the range of viable sparticle spectra within the 19/20 – dimensional phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM). Considering both neutralino and gravitino LSPs, we compare our results with simplified model exclusion limits and describe important cases where the pMSSM results differ significantly from the simplified model descriptions. We also consider models that are poorly constrained by LHC data because of unusual decay topologies and/or displaced decays, and discuss ways to improve the LHC sensitivity in these scenarios. Finally, motivated by naturalness, we examine the sensitivity of currentmore » searches to models with light stops and to a specialized set of models with fine-tuning better than 1%. We show that the 14 TeV LHC will be a very powerful probe of natural pMSSM models.« less

  14. R-axion detection at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Goh, Hock-Seng; Ibe, Masahiro; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    Supersymmetric models with spontaneously broken approximate R-symmetry contains a light spin 0 particle, the R-axion. The properties of the particle can be a powerful probe of the structure of the new physics. In this paper, we discuss the possibilities of the R-axion detection at the LHC experiments. It is challenge to observe this light particle in the LHC environment. However, for typical values in which the mass of the R-axion is a few hundred MeV, we show that those particles can be detected by searching for displaced vertices from R-axion decay.

  15. Symmetry and light stuffing of H o2T i2O7 , E r2T i2O7 , and Y b2T i2O7 characterized by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroudi, Kristen; Gaulin, Bruce D.; Lapidus, Saul H.; Gaudet, Jonathan; Cava, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    The H o2T i2O7 , E r2T i2O7 , and Y b2T i2O7 pyrochlores were studied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction to determine whether the (002) peak, forbidden in the pyrochlore space group F d -3 m but observed in single crystal neutron scattering measurements, is present due to a deviation of their pyrochlore structure from F d -3 m symmetry. Synchrotron diffraction measurements on precisely synthesized stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric powders and a crushed floating zone crystal of H o2T i2O7 revealed that the (002) reflection is absent in all cases to a sensitivity of approximately one part in 30 000 of the strongest x-ray diffraction peak. This indicates to high sensitivity that the space group of the crystal structure of these rare earth titanate pyrochlores is F d -3 m , and that, thus, the (002) peak observed in the neutron scattering experiments has a nonstructural origin. The cell parameters and internal strain for lightly stuffed H o2 +xT i2 -xO7 are also presented.

  16. Infrared microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, G.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1997-09-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy with a high brightness synchrotron source can achieve a spatial resolution approaching the diffraction limit. However, in order to realize this intrinsic source brightness at the specimen location, some care must be taken in designing the optical system. Also, when operating in diffraction limited conditions, the effective spatial resolution is no longer controlled by the apertures typically used for a conventional (geometrically defined) measurement. Instead, the spatial resolution depends on the wavelength of light and the effective apertures of the microscope`s Schwarzchild objectives. The authors have modeled the optical system from the synchrotron source up to the sample location and determined the diffraction-limited spatial distribution of light. Effects due to the dependence of the synchrotron source`s numerical aperture on wavelength, as well as the difference between transmission and reflection measurement modes, are also addressed. Lastly, they examine the benefits (when using a high brightness source) of an extrinsic germanium photoconductive detector with cone optics as a replacement for the standard MCT detector.

  17. Synchrotrons in cyclotron territory

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.; Gough, R.A.

    1986-10-01

    Synchrotrons and cyclotrons have an overlap in their particle and energy ranges. In proton radiotherapy, synchrotrons are proposed at 250 MeV, an energy usually served by cyclotrons. Heavy ion therapy has been synchrotron territory, but cyclotrons may be competitive. In nuclear science, heavy ion synchrotrons can be used in the cyclotron energy range of 10-200 MeV/u. Storage rings are planned to increase the flexibility of several cyclotrons. For atomic physics research, several storage rings are under construction for the energy range of 10 MeV/u and below.

  18. Review of the safety of LHC collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Giudice, Gian; Mangano, Michelangelo; Tkachev, Igor; Wiedemann, Urs; LHC Safety Assessment Group

    2008-11-01

    The safety of collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was studied in 2003 by the LHC Safety Study Group, who concluded that they presented no danger. Here we review their 2003 analysis in light of additional experimental results and theoretical understanding, which enable us to confirm, update and extend the conclusions of the LHC Safety Study Group. The LHC reproduces in the laboratory, under controlled conditions, collisions at centre-of-mass energies, less than those reached in the atmosphere by some of the cosmic rays that have been bombarding the Earth for billions of years. We recall the rates for the collisions of cosmic rays with the Earth, Sun, neutron stars, white dwarfs and other astronomical bodies at energies higher than the LHC. The stability of astronomical bodies indicates that such collisions cannot be dangerous. Specifically, we study the possible production at the LHC of hypothetical objects such as vacuum bubbles, magnetic monopoles, microscopic black holes and strangelets, and find no associated risks. Any microscopic black holes produced at the LHC are expected to decay by Hawking radiation before they reach the detector walls. If some microscopic black holes were stable, those produced by cosmic rays would be stopped inside the Earth or other astronomical bodies. The stability of astronomical bodies strongly constrains the possible rate of accretion by any such microscopic black holes, so that they present no conceivable danger. In the case of strangelets, the good agreement of measurements of particle production at RHIC with simple thermodynamic models severely constrains the production of strangelets in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC, which also present no danger.

  19. 3 GeV Booster Synchrotron Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2009-06-02

    Synchrotron light cna be produced from a relativistic particle beam circulating in a storage ring at extremely high intensity and brilliance over a large spectral region reaching from the far infrared regime to hard x-rays. The particles, either electrons or positrons, radiate as they are deflected in the fields of the storage ring bending magnets or of magnets specially optimized for the production of synchrotron light. The synchrotron light being very intense and well collimated in the forward direction has become a major tool in a large variety of research fields in physics, chemistry, material science, biology, and medicine.

  20. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  1. Probing Metastability at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Clavelli, L.

    2010-02-10

    Current attempts to understand supersymmetry (susy) breaking are focused on the idea that we are not in the ground state of the universe but, instead, in a metastable state that will ultimately decay to an exactly susy ground state. It is interesting to ask how experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will shed light on the properties of this future supersymmetric universe. In particular we ask how we can determine whether this final state has the possibility of supporting atoms and molecules in a susy background.

  2. Measurement methods for surface oxides on SUS 316L in simulated light water reactor coolant environments using synchrotron XRD and XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masashi; Yonezawa, Toshio; Shobu, Takahisa; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2013-03-01

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescent (XRF) measurement techniques have been used for non-destructive characterization of surface oxide films on Type 316L austenitic stainless steels that were exposed to simulated primary water environments of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR). The layer structures of the surface spinel oxides were revealed ex situ after oxidation by measurements made as a function of depth. The layer structure of spinel oxides formed in simulated PWR primary water should normally be different from that formed in simulated BWR water. After oxidation in the simulated BWR environment, the spinel oxide was observed to contain NiFe2O4 at shallow depths, and FeCr2O4 and Fe3O4 at deeper depths. By contrast, after oxidation in the simulated PWR primary water environment, a Fe3O4 type spinel was observed near the surface and FeCr2O4 type spinel near the interface with the metal substrate. Furthermore, by in situ measurements during oxidation in the simulated BWR environment, it was also demonstrated that the ratio between spinel and hematite Fe2O3 can be changed depending on the water condition such as BWR normal water chemistry or BWR hydrogen water chemistry.

  3. Synchrotron beamlines for x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippe, Anthony P.; Pearce, W. J.

    1994-02-01

    Louisiana State University established the J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD). Designed and constructed by the Brobeck Division of Maxwell Laboratories, the CAMD synchrotron light source is the first electron storage ring to be built by a commercial company in the United States. The synchrotron x-ray radiation generated at CAMD is an extremely useful exposure source for both thin and thick film lithography. Passing through a beamline containing two plane mirrors, the synchrotron light is used to expose thin resists for lithography of patterns with feature sizes of 0.25 micron and smaller. Two thick-resist beamlines, one using a single aspheric (collimating) mirror and one using a plane mirror, provide the higher flux photons required for miniaturization in silicon to produce microscopic mechanical devices including gears, motors, filters, and valves.

  4. LHC II system sensitivity to magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotae, Vlad; Creanga, Ioan

    2005-03-01

    Experiments have been designed to reveal the influences of ferrofluid treatment and static magnetic field exposure on the photosynthetic system II, where the light harvesting complex (LHC II) controls the ratio chlorophyll a/ chlorophyll b (revealing, indirectly, the photosynthesis rate). Spectrophotometric measurement of chlorophyll content revealed different influences for relatively low ferrofluid concentrations (10-30 μl/l) in comparison to higher concentrations (70-100 μl/l). The overlapped effect of the static magnetic field shaped better the stimulatory ferrofluid action on LHC II system in young poppy plantlets.

  5. Lessons from LHC elastic and diffractive data

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.D.; Khoze, V.A.; Ryskin, M.G.

    2015-04-10

    In the light of LHC data, we discuss the global description of all high-energy elastic and diffractive data, using a one-pomeron model, but including multi-pomeron interactions. The LHC data indicate the need of a k{sub t}(s) behaviour, where k{sub t} is the gluon transverse momentum along the partonic ladder structure which describes the pomeron. We also discuss tensions in the data, as well as the t dependence of the slope of dσ{sub el}/dt in the small t domain.

  6. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION MONITOR FOR NSLS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    PINAYEV, I.; SHAFTAN, T.

    2005-11-04

    NSLS booster diagnostics consisted of tune measurement system, system for turn-by-turn measurement on the electron beam, and beam intensity monitor, which is not absolutely calibrated. We present design and implementation of synchrotron light monitor for the booster, which expands diagnostics capabilities. The system allows to measure an orbit, beam sizes and coupling of the electron beam along the ramp.

  7. Overview of United States synchrotron radiation facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    There has been considerable activity within the past year involving the creation of new and the improvement of existing capabilities for research with synchrotron light. The purpose of this review is to summarize what has happened within the United States. Being a status report, some of the information necessarily has a date attached to it - the date, in this case, being early September 1983.

  8. Supersymmetry At LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Shaaban

    2008-04-21

    One of the main motivation of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), scheduled to start around 2006, is to search for supersymmetric particles. The region of the parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, where supersymmetry can be discovered is investigated. We show that if supersymmetry exists at electroweak scale, it would be easy to find signals for it at the LHC. If the LHC does find supersymmetry, this would be one of the greatest achievements in the history of theoretical physics.

  9. LHC Beam Diffusion Dependence on RF Noise: Models And Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Van Winkle, D.; Baudrenghien, P.; Butterworth, A.; Molendijk, J.; /CERN

    2010-09-14

    Radio Frequency (RF) accelerating system noise and non-idealities can have detrimental impact on the LHC performance through longitudinal motion and longitudinal emittance growth. A theoretical formalism has been developed to relate the beam and RF loop dynamics with the bunch length growth [1]. Measurements were conducted at LHC to validate the formalism, determine the performance limiting RF components, and provide the foundation for beam diffusion estimates for higher energies and intensities. A brief summary of these results is presented in this work. During a long store, the relation between the energy lost to synchrotron radiation and the noise injected to the beam by the RF accelerating voltage determines the growth of the bunch energy spread and longitudinal emittance. Since the proton synchrotron radiation in the LHC is very low, the beam diffusion is extremely sensitive to RF perturbations. The theoretical formalism presented in [1], suggests that the noise experienced by the beam depends on the cavity phase noise power spectrum, filtered by the beam transfer function, and aliased due to the periodic sampling of the accelerating voltage signal V{sub c}. Additionally, the dependence of the RF accelerating cavity noise spectrum on the Low Level RF (LLRF) configurations has been predicted using time-domain simulations and models [2]. In this work, initial measurements at the LHC supporting the above theoretical formalism and simulation predictions are presented.

  10. The LHC Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-11

    The Large Hadron Collider or LHC is the world’s biggest particle accelerator, but it can only get particles moving very quickly. To make measurements, scientists must employ particle detectors. There are four big detectors at the LHC: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln introduces us to these detectors and gives us an idea of each one’s capabilities.

  11. ALS synchrotron radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    This note discusses the assumptions and results of synchrotron radiation shielding estimates for ALS bend magnet and wiggler beamlines. Estimates of gas bremsstrahlung production are not included and are dealt with elsewhere.

  12. Synchrotron Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Investigation on Integral Membrane Protein Light-Harvesting Complex LH2 from Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas Acidophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lu-Chao; Weng, Yu-Xiang; Hong, Xin-Guo; Xian, Ding-Chang; Kobayashi, Katsumi

    2006-07-01

    Structures of membrane protein in solution are different from that in crystal phase. We present the primary results of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) resolved topological structures of a light harvesting antenna membrane protein complex LH2 from photosynthetic bacteria Rhodopseudomonas acidophila in detergent solution for the first time. Our results show that the elliptical shape of the LH2 complex in solution clearly deviates from its circular structure in crystal phase determined by x-ray diffraction. This result provides an insight into the structure and function interplay in LH2.

  13. The ISAS Synchrotron Microprobe at DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlen, Alex von; Kraemer, Markus; Hergenroeder, Roland; Berges, Ulf

    2007-01-19

    Since 2004 ISAS operates a dipole beamline at the synchrotron radiation facility DELTA at University of Dortmund. Synchrotron radiation is used at this beamline as an excellent excitation source for X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). Among others, the high brilliance of the synchrotron radiation in contrast to conventional X-ray tubes, the strong polarization of the synchrotron radiation and the low divergence of the electron beam can be applied to XRF offering several advantages for spectroscopy. These outstanding features encouraged us to develop and operate a synchrotron radiation induced X-ray micro fluorescence probe connected to a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (SR-WDXRF). A relevant characteristic of such a device, namely, good lateral resolution at high spectral resolution can be applied for single spot-, line-scan and area map analyses of a variety of objects. The instrumentation of the SR-WDXRF and the performed experiments will be presented. Main task is the detection of light elements by their fluorescence K-lines and the specification of element compounds.

  14. Sbottoms of natural NMSSM at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuria, Jyotiranjan; Chatterjee, Arindam; Datta, AseshKrishna

    2016-08-01

    Search for the bottom squarks (sbottoms) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has recently assumed a heightened focus in the hunt for Supersymmetry (SUSY). The popular framework of the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) could conceive a naturally light sbottom which can easily be consistent with available constraints from the experiments at the LHC. Phenomenology of such sbottoms could in principle be as striking as that for a light top squark (stop) thanks to a rather nontrivial neutralino sector (with appreciable mixing among the neutral higgsinos and the singlino) that the scenario gives rise to. Nonetheless, finding such sbottoms would require a moderately large volume of data (˜300 fb-1) at the 13 TeV run of the LHC. A multi-channel analysis establishing a generic depletion of events in the usual 2 b- jets + [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] T final state while registering, in conjunction, characteristically significant rates in various multi-lepton final states accompanied by b- jets might point not only to the presence of light sbottom(s) but could also shed crucial light on their compositions and the (singlino) nature of the lightest SUSY particle (LSP).

  15. String photini at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Craig, Nathaniel; Dimopoulos, Savas; Dubovsky, Sergei; March-Russell, John

    2010-04-01

    String theories with topologically complex compactification manifolds suggest the simultaneous presence of many unbroken U(1)'s without any light matter charged under them. The gauge bosons associated with these U(1)'s do not have direct observational consequences. However, in the presence of low energy supersymmetry the gauge fermions associated with these U(1)'s, the ''photini,'' mix with the bino and extend the minimal supersymmetric standard model neutralino sector. This leads to novel signatures at the LHC. The lightest ordinary supersymmetric particle (LOSP) can decay to any one of these photini. In turn, photini may transition into each other, leading to high lepton and jet multiplicities. Both the LOSP decays and interphotini transitions can lead to displaced vertices. When the interphotini decays happen outside the detector, the cascades can result in different photini escaping the detector, leading to multiple reconstructed masses for the invisible particle. If the LOSP is charged, it stops in the detector and decays out of time to photini, with the possibility that the produced final photini vary from event to event. Observation of a plenitude of photini at the LHC would be evidence that we live in a string vacuum with a topologically rich compactification manifold.

  16. Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ajemian, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions.

  17. SPS Beam Steering for LHC Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana; Bartosik, Hannes; Cornelis, Karel; Norderhaug Drøsdal, Lene; Goddard, Brennan; Kain, Verena; Meddahi, Malika; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Wenninger, Jorg

    2014-07-01

    The CERN Super Proton Synchrotron accelerates beams for the Large Hadron Collider to 450 GeV. In addition it produces beams for fixed target facilities which adds complexity to the SPS operation. During the run 2012-2013 drifts of the extracted beam trajectories have been observed and lengthy optimizations in the transfer lines were performed to reduce particle losses in the LHC. The observed trajectory drifts are consistent with the measured SPS orbit drifts at extraction. While extensive studies are going on to understand, and possibly suppress, the source of such SPS orbit drifts the feasibility of an automatic beam steering towards a “golden” orbit at the extraction septa, by means of the interlocked correctors, is also being investigated. The challenges and constraints related to the implementation of such a correction in the SPS are described. Simulation results are presented and a possible operational steering strategy is proposed.

  18. Precision synchrotron radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, M.; Rouse, F.; Butler, J.; Jung, C.K.; Lateur, M.; Nash, J.; Tinsman, J.; Wormser, G.; Gomez, J.J.; Kent, J.

    1989-03-01

    Precision detectors to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions have been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 /mu/m on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely-aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. Also, detectors of synchrotron radiation using the charge developed by the ejection of Compton-recoil electrons from an array of fine wires are being developed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Phenomenology of flavon fields at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsumura, Koji; Velasco-Sevilla, Liliana

    2010-02-01

    We study low energy constraints from flavor violating processes, production, and decay at the LHC of a scalar field {phi} (flavon) associated to the breaking of a nonsupersymmetric Abelian family symmetry at the TeV scale. This symmetry is constrained to reproduce fermion masses and mixing, up to O(1) coefficients. The nonsupersymmetric gauged U(1) models considered are severely restricted by cancellation of anomalies and LEP bounds on contact interactions; consequently its phenomenology is out of the LHC reach. We therefore introduce an effective U(1) which is not gauged and is broken explicitly by a CP-odd term at the TeV scale. This helps us to explore flavor violating processes, production, and decay at the LHC for these kind of light scalars. In this context we first study the constraints on the flavon mass and its vacuum expectation value from low energy flavor changing processes such as {mu}{yields}e{gamma}. We find that a flavon of about m{sub {phi}}< or approx. 150 GeV could be experimentally allowed. These kinds of flavons could be significantly generated at the LHC via the gluon fusion mechanism and the single top production channel gu{yields}t{phi}. The produced flavons can have characteristic decay modes such as tc for m{sub {phi}}> or approx. m{sub t}, and {tau}{mu} for m{sub {phi}}< or approx. m{sub t}, which could be effectively useful to detect flavons.

  20. Soft QCD and Diffractive Physics at Lhc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scapparone, Eugenio

    2012-12-01

    After a short introduction on the importance of the soft and of the diffractive studies in the understanding of minimum bias events, the main results obtained at LHC are discussed. This overview includes identified particle and inclusive measurements, minimum bias and underlying events, all of them shedding light on the soft process production mechanisms. The results of the inelastic cross-section measurements obtained by the LHC experiments and their compatibility are discussed together with the models used to extrapolate the data at low diffractive masses. A review of the most recent diffraction results is presented, showing the different approaches used by the LHC experiments, relying on different experimental techniques. The combination of the results obtained by ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and TOTEM provides a wide sample of informations, covering an unprecedented pseudorapidity range. A detailed comparison between the obtained results is shown, followed by a critical discussion on the still existing discrepancies between the experimental data and the Monte Carlo used at LHC to simulate soft and diffractive physics.

  1. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2012-03-29

    achievable emittance in the synchrotron light sources for short bunches.

  2. Post-LHC8 supersymmetry benchmark points for ILC physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard; List, Jenny

    2013-09-01

    We reevaluate prospects for supersymmetry (SUSY) at the proposed International Linear e+e- Collider (ILC) in light of the first two years of serious data taking at LHC: LHC7 with ˜5fb-1 of pp collisions at s=7TeV and LHC8 with ˜20fb-1 at s=8TeV. Strong new limits from LHC8 SUSY searches, along with the discovery of a Higgs boson with mh≃125GeV, suggest a paradigm shift from previously popular models to ones with new and compelling signatures. After a review of the current status of supersymmetry, we present a variety of new ILC benchmark models, including natural SUSY, radiatively driven natural SUSY, NUHM2 with low mA, a focus point case from mSUGRA/CMSSM, nonuniversal gaugino mass model, τ˜ coannihilation, Kallosh-Linde/spread SUSY model, mixed gauge-gravity mediation, normal scalar mass hierarchy, and one example with the recently discovered Higgs boson being the heavy CP-even state H. While all these models at present elude the latest LHC8 limits, they do offer intriguing case study possibilities for ILC operating at s≃0.25-1TeV. The benchmark points also present a view of the widely diverse SUSY phenomena which might still be expected in the post-LHC8 era at both LHC and ILC.

  3. Synchrotron Radiation II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a unique form of radiation that spans the electro-magnetic spectrum from X-rays through the ultraviolet and visible into the infrared. Tunable monochromators enable scientists to select a narrow band of wavelengths at any point in the spectrum. (Author/BB)

  4. X-ray fluorescence imaging with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The micro-distribution of trace elements is of great interest in fields such as geochemistry, biology and material science. The synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe provides a technique to quantitatively measure trace element compositions at individual points and to construct semiquantitative two dimensional maps of trace element compositions. This paper describes an x-ray fluorescence system used at the National Synchrotron Light Source.

  5. A Proposal to the Department of Energy for The Fabrication of a Very High Energy Polarized Gama Ray Beam Facility and A Program of Medium Energy Physics Research at The National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sandorfi, A.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Giordano, G.; Matone, G.

    1982-09-01

    This proposal requests support for the fabrication and operation of a modest facility that would provide relatively intense beams of monochromatic and polarized photons with energies in the range of several hundreds of MeV. These {gamma} rays would be produced by Compton backscattering laser light from the electrons circulating in the 2.5-3.0 GeV 'X-RAY' storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The excellent emittance, phase space, and high current of this state-of-the-art storage ring will allow the production of 2 x 10{sup 7} {gamma} rays per second. These photons would be tagged by detecting the scattered electrons, thereby determining the energy to 2.7 MeV for all {gamma}-ray energies. The efficiency of this tagging procedure is 100% and the {gamma}-ray beam would be essentially background free. Tagging will also allow the flexibility of operating with a dynamic range as large as 200 MeV in photon energy while still preserving high resolution and polarization. These beams will permit a fruitful study of important questions in medium-energy nuclear physics. The initial goals of this program are to reach reliable operation with photon energies up to 300 MeV and to develop {gamma}-ray beams with energies up to about 500 MeV. To demonstrate reliable operation, a modest physics program is planned that, for the most part, utilizes existing magnets and detector systems but nonetheless addresses several important outstanding problems. Gamma ray beams of the versatility, intensity, energy, and resolution that can be achieved at this facility are not currently available at any other world facility either existing or under construction. Furthermore, the proposed program would produce the first intense source of medium-energy {gamma} rays that are polarized. Because of the difficulties in producing such polarized beams, it is very unlikely that viable alternate sources can be developed in the near future; at present

  6. Synchrotron radiation sources and research

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1995-12-31

    This is an introduction and a review of Synchrotron Radiation sources and the research performed using synchrotron radiation. I will begin with a brief discussion of the two principal uses of particle storage rings: for colliding beams (Collider) and for synchrotron radiation (Radiator). Then I will concentrate on discussions of synchrotron radiation topics, starting with a historical account, followed by descriptions of the features of the storage ring and the features of the radiation from the simplest source -- the bending magnet. I will then discuss the special insertion device sources -- wigglers and undulators -- and their radiations, and end with a brief general account of the research and other applications of synchrotron radiation.

  7. Single crystal diffraction by synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kvick, A.

    1988-01-01

    The tunability and access to short wavelengths in combination with high intensity and the low divergence of the x-ray radiation produced by synchrotron storage rings opens up new and challenging fields for single crystal diffraction. These areas include microcrystal diffraction, studies of time-dependent phenomena, element selective diffraction, studies of materials under extreme conditions, solution of the crystallographic phase problem either by the use of the wavelength dependency of the anomalous scattering or by direct experimental determination of the phases. Single crystal diffraction from proteins and macromolecules using photographic film as a detection medium has already reached considerable maturity, but high-precision data collections using diffractometers at storage rings are still not routine because of the severe requirements for beam stability over extended periods of time. Development work at institutions such as the National Synchrotron Light Source, The Photon Factory, SSRL, CHESS, Hasylab and Daresbury, however, suggest that synchrotron single-crystal diffraction will become an essential part of the research at the synchrotron storage rings in the near future. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Assessing noise sources at synchrotron infrared ports

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Ph.; Dumas, P.; Schilcher, T.; Nadji, A.; Luedeke, A.; Hubert, N.; Cassinari, L.; Boege, M.; Denard, J.-C.; Stingelin, L.; Nadolski, L.; Garvey, T.; Albert, S.; Gough, Ch.; Quack, M.; Wambach, J.; Dehler, M.; Filhol, J.-M.

    2012-01-01

    Today, the vast majority of electron storage rings delivering synchrotron radiation for general user operation offer a dedicated infrared port. There is growing interest expressed by various scientific communities to exploit the mid-IR emission in microspectroscopy, as well as the far infrared (also called THz) range for spectroscopy. Compared with a thermal (laboratory-based source), IR synchrotron radiation sources offer enhanced brilliance of about two to three orders of magnitude in the mid-IR energy range, and enhanced flux and brilliance in the far-IR energy range. Synchrotron radiation also has a unique combination of a broad wavelength band together with a well defined time structure. Thermal sources (globar, mercury filament) have excellent stability. Because the sampling rate of a typical IR Fourier-transform spectroscopy experiment is in the kHz range (depending on the bandwidth of the detector), instabilities of various origins present in synchrotron radiation sources play a crucial role. Noise recordings at two different IR ports located at the Swiss Light Source and SOLEIL (France), under conditions relevant to real experiments, are discussed. The lowest electron beam fluctuations detectable in IR spectra have been quantified and are shown to be much smaller than what is routinely recorded by beam-position monitors. PMID:22186638

  9. Synchrotron X-ray footprinting on tour

    PubMed Central

    Bohon, Jen; D’Mello, Rhijuta; Ralston, Corie; Gupta, Sayan; Chance, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron footprinting is a valuable technique in structural biology for understanding macromolecular solution-state structure and dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids. Although an extremely powerful tool, there is currently only a single facility in the USA, the X28C beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), dedicated to providing infrastructure, technology development and support for these studies. The high flux density of the focused white beam and variety of specialized exposure environments available at X28C enables footprinting of highly complex biological systems; however, it is likely that a significant fraction of interesting experiments could be performed at unspecialized facilities. In an effort to investigate the viability of a beamline-flexible footprinting program, a standard sample was taken on tour around the nation to be exposed at several US synchrotrons. This work describes how a relatively simple and transportable apparatus can allow beamlines at the NSLS, CHESS, APS and ALS to be used for synchrotron footprinting in a general user mode that can provide useful results. PMID:24365913

  10. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.