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Sample records for lidocaine

  1. Lidocaine Viscous

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain of a sore or irritated mouth and throat often associated with cancer chemotherapy and certain medical ... Lidocaine viscous is not normally used for sore throats due to cold, flu, or infections such as ...

  2. Tumescent Liposuction without Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Joshua J.; Fang, Xin-Hua; Williams, Shelley J.; Baynosa, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our previous study demonstrated that lidocaine has a negative impact on adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) survival. Currently for large-volume liposuction, patients often undergo general anesthesia; therefore, lidocaine subcutaneous anesthesia is nonessential. We hypothesized that removing lidocaine from tumescent might improve stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and ASC survival from the standard tumescent with lidocaine. Ropivacaine is also a commonly used local anesthetic. The effect of ropivacaine on ASC survival was examined. Methods: Adults who underwent liposuction on bilateral body areas were included (n = 10). Under general anesthesia, liposuction on 1 area was conducted under standard tumescent with lidocaine. On the contralateral side, liposuction was conducted under the modified tumescent without lidocaine. Five milliliters of lipoaspirate were processed for the isolation of SVF. The adherent ASCs were counted after 24 hours of SVF culture. Apoptosis and necrosis of SVF cells were examined by Annexin/propidium iodide staining and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: Average percentage of live SVF cells was 68.0% ± 4.0% (28.5% ± 3.8% of apoptosis and 3.4% ± 1.0% of necrosis) in lidocaine group compared with 86.7% ± 3.7% (11.5% ± 3.1% of apoptosis and 1.8% ± 0.7% of necrosis) in no-lidocaine group (P = 0.002). Average number of viable ASC was also significantly lower (367,000 ± 107) in lidocaine group compared with that (500,000 ± 152) in no-lidocaine group (P = 0.04). No significant difference was found between lidocaine and ropivacaine on ASC cytotoxicity. Conclusions: Removing lidocaine from tumescent significantly reduced SVF and ASC apoptosis in the lipoaspirate. We recommend tumescent liposuction without lidocaine, particularly if patient’s lipoaspirate will be used for fat grafting. PMID:27622097

  3. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion.

    PubMed

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20-25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure. PMID:25709968

  4. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20–25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure. PMID:25709968

  5. Benzocaine/Lidocaine/Tetracaine Cream

    PubMed Central

    Boonsiri, Metavee; Marks, Katherine C.

    2016-01-01

    Practitioners are increasingly using topical anesthetics in the field of dermatology. Application of topical anesthetics prior to performing dermatologic procedures has proven to decrease pain and discomfort associated with these procedures. Despite the prevalent use of topical anesthetics, there are few standard guidelines for about which products provide optimal and safest use. Adverse events are often correlated with improper application of topical anesthetics. A few case reports have cited adverse events related to the use of compounded products that the United States Food and Drug Administration has not approved, such as benzocaine, lidocaine, tetracaine. In this article, the authors report the possible ocular side effects due to the use of benzocaine, lidocaine, tetracaine. Careful attention must be paid to this compounded product, and better formulations are needed in order to prevent adverse events. PMID:27354889

  6. Estimated Maximal Safe Dosages of Tumescent Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumescent lidocaine anesthesia consists of subcutaneous injection of relatively large volumes (up to 4 L or more) of dilute lidocaine (≤1 g/L) and epinephrine (≤1 mg/L). Although tumescent lidocaine anesthesia is used for an increasing variety of surgical procedures, the maximum safe dosage is unknown. Our primary aim in this study was to measure serum lidocaine concentrations after subcutaneous administration of tumescent lidocaine with and without liposuction. Our hypotheses were that even with large doses (i.e., >30 mg/kg), serum lidocaine concentrations would be below levels associated with mild toxicity and that the concentration-time profile would be lower after liposuction than without liposuction. METHODS: Volunteers participated in 1 to 2 infiltration studies without liposuction and then one study with tumescent liposuction totally by local anesthesia. Serum lidocaine concentrations were measured at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, and 24 hours after each tumescent lidocaine infiltration. Area under the curve (AUC∞) of the serum lidocaine concentration-time profiles and peak serum lidocaine concentrations (Cmax) were determined with and without liposuction. For any given milligram per kilogram dosage, the probability that Cmax >6 μg/mL, the threshold for mild lidocaine toxicity was estimated using tolerance interval analysis. RESULTS: In 41 tumescent infiltration procedures among 14 volunteer subjects, tumescent lidocaine dosages ranged from 19.2 to 52 mg/kg. Measured serum lidocaine concentrations were all <6 μg/mL over the 24-hour study period. AUC∞s with liposuction were significantly less than those without liposuction (P = 0.001). The estimated risk of lidocaine toxicity without liposuction at a dose of 28 mg/kg and with liposuction at a dose of 45 mg/kg was ≤1 per 2000. CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary estimates for maximum safe dosages of tumescent lidocaine are 28 mg/kg without liposuction and 45 mg/kg with liposuction. As a

  7. Prophylactic lidocaine in suspected acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Goodman, S L; Geiderman, J M; Bernstein, I J

    1979-06-01

    The incidence of serious ventricular arrhythmias following acute myocardial infarction is highest during the first few hours after injury, and thereafter declines. Several investigations into the prophylactic use of lidocaine to prevent the development of arrhythmias have shown that lidocaine, given in therapeutic doses, is effective in preventing ventricular fibrillation and in reducing early mortality. Lidocaine was found to be effective when given either by the intravenous or by the intramuscular routes. The recommended dosage is 100 mg given as an intravenous bolus followed by 2 to 4 mg/min as an infusion, which should be given by infusion pump. Another recommendation is to use two 100 mg boluses 20 minutes apart, along with the same infusion. We recommend that lidocaine be started as soon as possible in all patients suspected of having suffered acute myocardial infarction. PMID:449144

  8. Systemic lidocaine therapy for poststroke pain.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, E A; Simpson, R K; Stubler, D K; Beric, A

    1993-10-01

    Poststroke pain syndrome is commonly regarded as an intractable disease. We describe four patients who responded to an intravenous lidocaine infusion for relief of central pain after a stroke. The infusion was administered over a 48-hour period after an initial bolus of 50 to 100 mg intravenously over 40 to 120 seconds. Pain intensity and pain relief were measured by visual analog and numeric scales. All patients reported some relief within the first 12 hours of infusion. All patients were subsequently given a trial of mexiletine, an oral congener of lidocaine. Two have continued taking the drug and report excellent relief at 12 months' follow-up; the other two had side effects that precluded further use of the drug. We conclude that lidocaine can reduce poststroke pain, and we propose a treatment algorithm based on our experience with 40 additional patients treated for other neuropathic pain states. PMID:8211322

  9. Nanoethosomes for Dermal Delivery of Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Babaie, Soraya; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Davaran, Soodabeh; Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: It is necessary for local anesthetics to pass through the stratum corneum to provide rapid pain relief. Many techniques have been reported to enhance intradermal penetration of local anesthetics such as vesicular lipid carriers. Ethosomes are lipid vesicles containing phospholipids, ethanol at relatively high concentration. We hypothesized that synergistic effects of phospholipids and high concentration of ethanol in formulation could accelerate penetration of nanoethosomes in deep layers of skin. Methods: Lidocaine-loaded nanoethosomes were prepared and characterized by size and zeta analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Furthermore, encapsulation efficiency (EE), loading capacity (LC), and skin penetration capability were evaluated by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Results: results showed that the particle size, zeta potential, EE and LC of optimum formulation were 105.4 ± 7.9 nm, -33.6 ± 2.4 mV, 40.14 ± 2.5 %, and 8.02 ± 0.71 respectively. SEM results confirmed the non-aggregated nano-scale size of prepared nanoethosomes. Particle size of ethosomes and EE of Lidocaine were depended on the phospholipid and ethanol concentrations. XRD results demonstrated the drug encapsulation in amorphous status interpreting the achieved high drug EE and LC values. In vitro and in vivo assays confirmed the appropriate skin penetration of Lidocaine with the aid of nanoethosomes and existence of deposition of nanoethosomes in deep skin layers, respectively. Conclusion: The developed nanoethosomes are proposed as a suitable carrier for topical delivery of anesthetics such as Lidocaine. PMID:26819928

  10. Lidocaine Inhibits HCN Currents in Rat Spinal Substantia Gelatinosa Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Liu, Nana; Lv, Minhua; Ma, Longxian; Peng, Huizhen; Peng, Sicong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lidocaine, which blocks voltage-gated sodium channels, is widely used in surgical anesthesia and pain management. Recently, it has been proposed that the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide (HCN) channel is one of the other novel targets of lidocaine. Substantia gelatinosa in the spinal dorsal horn, which plays key roles in modulating nociceptive information from primary afferents, comprises heterogeneous interneurons that can be electrophysiologically categorized by firing pattern. Our previous study demonstrated that a substantial proportion of substantia gelatinosa neurons reveal the presence of HCN current (Ih); however, the roles of lidocaine and HCN channel expression in different types of substantia gelatinosa neurons remain unclear. METHODS: By using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated the effect of lidocaine on Ih in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons of acute dissociated spinal cord slices. RESULTS: We found that lidocaine rapidly decreased the peak Ih amplitude with an IC50 of 80 μM. The inhibition rate on Ih was not significantly different with a second application of lidocaine in the same neuron. Tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, did not affect lidocaine’s effect on Ih. In addition, lidocaine shifted the half-activation potential of Ih from −109.7 to −114.9 mV and slowed activation. Moreover, the reversal potential of Ih was shifted by −7.5 mV by lidocaine. In the current clamp, lidocaine decreased the resting membrane potential, increased membrane resistance, delayed rebound depolarization latency, and reduced the rebound spike frequency. We further found that approximately 58% of substantia gelatinosa neurons examined expressed Ih, in which most of them were tonically firing. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies demonstrate that lidocaine strongly inhibits Ih in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner in substantia gelatinosa neurons, independent of tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels. Thus, our

  11. Neuroprotective effect of lidocaine: is there clinical potential?

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Tiandong; Gao, Xiuren; Dilger, James P; Lin, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetic lidocaine has been shown to be protective in animal models of focal and global ischemia as well as in in vitro hypoxic models. Lidocaine has been tested in patients for its potential protective effect on postoperative cognitive dysfunction. This mini-review summarizes the laboratory and clinical evidences and discusses its clinical applications as neuroprotective agent. PMID:27186318

  12. Intravenous lidocaine as a suppressant of coughing during tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Yukioka, H; Yoshimoto, N; Nishimura, K; Fujimori, M

    1985-12-01

    Effects of intravenously administered lidocaine on cough suppression during tracheal intubation under general anesthesia were evaluated in two studies. In study 1, 100 patients received either a placebo or 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously 1 min before tracheal intubation. All visible coughs were classified as coughing. The incidence of coughing decreased as the dose of lidocaine increased. A dose of 1 mg/kg or more of intravenous lidocaine suppressed the cough reflex significantly (P less than 0.01). Coughing was suppressed completely by 2 mg/kg of intravenous lidocaine. In study 2, 108 patients received 2 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously or a placebo 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 15 min before intubation. The same criteria for determining whether a patient did or did not cough during tracheal intubation were used as in study 1. The incidence of coughing decreased significantly (P less than 0.01) when 2 mg/kg of lidocaine was injected intravenously between 1 and 5 min before our attempting intubation. Cough reflex was suppressed completely by plasma concentrations of lidocaine in excess of 3 micrograms/ml. PMID:4061901

  13. 21 CFR 862.3555 - Lidocaine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lidocaine test system. 862.3555 Section 862.3555 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3555 Lidocaine test system. (a)...

  14. Lidocaine Metabolism and Toxicity: A Laboratory Experiment for Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusek, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory exercise for dental students is presented using a toxic dose of lidocaine in place of an anesthetic dose of pentobarbital. The use of lidocaine demonstrates its toxic and lethal actions and increases the relevance of the experience for dental students. (Author/MLW)

  15. Pharmacokinetics of lidocaine delivered from a transmucosal patch in children.

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Andrea; Wilson, Stephen; Weaver, Joel S.; Moursi, Amr M.

    2002-01-01

    The DentiPatch lidocaine transoral delivery system (Noven Pharmaceuticals) is indicated for mild topical anesthesia of mucosal membranes in the mouth. The DentiPatch is a mucoadhesive patch containing 46.1 mg of lidocaine (20% concentration). Current studies in adults report that DentiPatch application produces very low plasma concentrations of lidocaine. However, it is not known what plasma levels are obtained when the same dosage is used in children. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the plasma lidocaine concentrations generated by the DentiPatch are within a safe range for children. The sample in this study was 11 children aged 2-7 years requiring general anesthesia for comprehensive dental care. A lidocaine DentiPatch was placed on the buccal mucosa above the maxillary incisors for 5 minutes. Blood samples were drawn before placing the DentiPatch and at various time intervals after removing it. Blood samples were analyzed by fluorescence polarization immunoassay to determine the plasma concentrations of lidocaine and its major metabolite, monoethylglycinexylidide. The lidocaine and monoethylglycinexylidide absorbed from the DentiPatch did not reach toxic plasma levels in children. However, plasma concentrations were much higher than in adults and were high enough to require inclusion in the calculation of total lidocaine administered to a pediatric patient. Images Figure 1 PMID:15384296

  16. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.810 Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter (mL) of solution contains 135 milligrams (mg) embutramide; 45 mg chloroquine phosphate,...

  17. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.810 Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter (mL) of solution contains 135 milligrams (mg) embutramide; 45 mg chloroquine phosphate,...

  18. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.810 Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter (mL) of solution contains 135 milligrams (mg) embutramide; 45 mg chloroquine phosphate,...

  19. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.810 Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter (mL) of solution contains 135 milligrams (mg) embutramide; 45 mg chloroquine phosphate,...

  20. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.810 Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter (mL) of solution contains 135 milligrams (mg) embutramide; 45 mg chloroquine phosphate,...

  1. Preparation and characterization of lidocaine rice gel for oral application.

    PubMed

    Okonogi, Siriporn; Kaewpinta, Adchareeya; Yotsawimonwat, Songwut; Khongkhunthian, Sakornrat

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to prepare buccal anesthetic gels using rice as gelling agent. Rice grains of four rice varieties, Jasmine (JM), Saohai (SH), Homnil (HN), and Doisket (DS) were chemically modified. Buccal rice gels, containing lidocaine hydrochloride as local anesthetic drug were formulated using the respective modified rice varieties. The gels were evaluated for outer appearance, pH, color, gel strength, foaming property, adhesion, in vitro drug release and in vivo efficacy. It was found that the developed rice gels possessed good texture. Rice varieties showed influence on gel strength, color, turbidity, adhesive property, release property, and anesthetic efficacy. JM gel showed the lowest turbidity with light transmission of 86.76 ± 1.18% whereas SH gel showed the highest gel strength of 208.78 ± 10.42 g/cm(2). Lidocaine hydrochloride can cause a decrease in pH and adhesive property but an increase in turbidity of the gels. In vitro drug release profile within 60 min of lidocaine SH gel and lidocaine HN gel showed that lidocaine could be better released from SH gel. Evaluation of in vivo anesthetic efficacy in 100 normal volunteers indicates that both lidocaine rice gels have high efficacy but different levels. Lidocaine SH gel possesses faster onset of duration and longer duration of action than lidocaine HN gel. PMID:26781924

  2. [Effect of intravenous lidocaine infusion on arterial baroreflex].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, I

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of the first study was to identify the relationship between reflex sympathetic nerve activity and plasma concentration of lidocaine. Lidocaine was infused in 4 different doses: 2 mg.kg-1 bolus + 100 micrograms.kg-1 x min-1, 3 mg.kg-1 bolus + 200 micrograms.kg-1 x min-1, 6 mg.kg-1 bolus + 400 micrograms.kg-1 x min-1 and 12 mg.kg-1 bolus + 800 micrograms.kg-1 x min-1. Baroreflex depressor and pressor tests using sodium nitroprusside (5-10 micrograms.kg-1) and phenylephrine (2-4 micrograms.kg-1) were performed before and at 10 min after the start of lidocaine infusion. Plasma lidocaine concentrations determined by HPLC revealed that its steady-state levels were maintained during the baroreflex tests. Baroreflex sensitivity was preserved at clinical concentrations of lidocaine (< 5 micrograms.ml-1). However, baroreflex was significantly attenuated when plasma lidocaine concentrations were above seizure levels (> 10 micrograms.ml-1). This result indicates that hemodynamic derangement observed in the lidocaine-induced CNS toxicity is, at least in part, due to the attenuated arterial baroreflex. In the second study, the author evaluated the effect of respiratory acidosis and alkalosis on the baroreflex with or without lidocaine infusion (2 mg.kg-1 + 100 micrograms.kg-1 x min-1). Respiratory acidosis (PaCO2: 65.6 +/- 3.4) enhanced the baroreflex significantly, but lidocaine infusion abolished this acidosis-induced enhancement. The author concludes that hypercarbia should be avoided in patients receiving intravenous lidocaine infusion. PMID:8515540

  3. Evaluation of Analgesic Effect of Caudal Epidural Tramadol, Tramadol-Lidocaine, and Lidocaine in Water Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Atiba, Ayman; Ghazy, Alaa; Gomaa, Naglaa; Kamal, Tarek; Shukry, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol and a combination of tramadol-lidocaine with that produced by lidocaine administration in the epidural space in buffalo calves. In a prospective randomized crossover study, ten male buffalo calves were used to compare the epidural analgesic effect of tramadol (1 mg/kg) and tramadol-lidocaine combination (0.5 mg/kg and 0.11 mg/kg, resp.) with that produced by 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg). Loss of sensation was examined by pin-prick test. Onset time, duration, and degree of analgesia and ataxia were recorded after each treatment. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal temperature, and haematobiochemical parameters were recorded after all treatments. Time to onset and duration of analgesia, respectively, were as follows: tramadol 11 ± 2 min and 208 ± 15 min; tramadol-lidocaine 6 ± 2 min and 168 ± 9 min; lidocaine 4 ± 1 min and 67 ± 13 min. Onset time and duration were significantly longer with tramadol than the other treatments. Duration was significantly longer with tramadol-lidocaine than lidocaine. Ataxia was mildly observed in tramadol-lidocaine and was moderate in lidocaine. HR, RR, and rectal temperature did not differ significantly from baseline after any treatment. Haematobiochemical parameters returned to basal levels by 24 h after all treatments. This combination might be clinically useful to provide analgesia in buffalo for long-duration surgical procedures. PMID:26770870

  4. Comparison of topical lidocaine/prilocaine anesthetic cream and local infiltration of 2% lidocaine for episioplasty in mares.

    PubMed

    Erkert, R S; Macallister, C G; Campbell, G; Payton, M E; Shawley, R; Clarke, C R

    2005-06-01

    Local anesthesia and tissue inflammation associated with lidocaine infiltration and lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic cream for episioplasty in mares were compared. Twenty-two mares were randomly assigned to lidocaine or lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic cream treatment groups. Perineum and vulva were cleaned, 8-12 g (approximately 1 g/cm per side of vulva) of topical anesthetic cream was applied, and the area was covered by plastic wrap 30 min prior to beginning procedure. Alternately, lidocaine was injected (1 mL) every centimeter just prior to the procedure. Episioplasty was conducted using standard methods, but employing simple interrupted sutures. Horses were not sedated and use of a twitch was recorded. Four millimeter punch biopsies were harvested 1, 3, and 10 days following episioplasty and scored for degree of inflammation by a blinded pathologist. Clinical inflammation scores were assigned when biopsies were obtained. Seven of 11 horses receiving lidocaine infiltration required twitching, but none of the horses that received the anesthetic cream required twitching. Six of 11 and seven of 11 of the lidocaine and anesthetic cream groups, respectively, required twitching for episioplasty. Except for the clinical scores on day 3, no statistical differences for clinical and histopathologic scores between samples from the two treatment groups for a given day were identified. Use of lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic cream was as effective as lidocaine infiltration in providing local anesthesia when performing episioplasty in mares. Its use decreased the need for twitching horses as well as the risk of deformation of the labia caused by lidocaine infiltration. PMID:15953204

  5. Evaluation of Analgesic Effect of Caudal Epidural Tramadol, Tramadol-Lidocaine, and Lidocaine in Water Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Atiba, Ayman; Ghazy, Alaa; Gomaa, Naglaa; Kamal, Tarek; Shukry, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol and a combination of tramadol-lidocaine with that produced by lidocaine administration in the epidural space in buffalo calves. In a prospective randomized crossover study, ten male buffalo calves were used to compare the epidural analgesic effect of tramadol (1 mg/kg) and tramadol-lidocaine combination (0.5 mg/kg and 0.11 mg/kg, resp.) with that produced by 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg). Loss of sensation was examined by pin-prick test. Onset time, duration, and degree of analgesia and ataxia were recorded after each treatment. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal temperature, and haematobiochemical parameters were recorded after all treatments. Time to onset and duration of analgesia, respectively, were as follows: tramadol 11 ± 2 min and 208 ± 15 min; tramadol-lidocaine 6 ± 2 min and 168 ± 9 min; lidocaine 4 ± 1 min and 67 ± 13 min. Onset time and duration were significantly longer with tramadol than the other treatments. Duration was significantly longer with tramadol-lidocaine than lidocaine. Ataxia was mildly observed in tramadol-lidocaine and was moderate in lidocaine. HR, RR, and rectal temperature did not differ significantly from baseline after any treatment. Haematobiochemical parameters returned to basal levels by 24 h after all treatments. This combination might be clinically useful to provide analgesia in buffalo for long-duration surgical procedures. PMID:26770870

  6. Lidocaine decreases the xylazine-evoked contractility in pregnant cows.

    PubMed

    Piccinno, M; Rizzo, A; Mutinati, M; D'Onghia, G; Sciorsci, R L

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of xylazine on basal uterine contractility of bovine pregnant uterine strips and that of lidocaine on xylazine-sensitized bovine pregnant uterine strips, at different stages of pregnancy. Basal contractility was evaluated in an isolated organ bath and the functionality of the strips throughout the experiment was evaluated using a dose of carbachol (10(-5)M). Uterine motility, expressed with amplitude, frequency of contractions as well as the area under the curve, was recorded in different stages of pregnancy and data were collected at 15-min intervals (5-min before and 5-min after xylazine administration and 5-min after lidocaine addition on the plateau contraction induced by xylazine). Uterine motility increased in all the stages of pregnancy after xylazine addition and gradually decreased after treatment with lidocaine. These data suggest that lidocaine might decrease the tonic effect induced by xylazine on bovine pregnant uteri. PMID:27474006

  7. Effects of epidural lidocaine anesthesia on bulls during electroejaculation.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, A J; Waldner, C L; Cotter, B S; Gudmundson, J; Barth, A D

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine whether caudal epidural lidocaine anesthesia reduces a stress response to electroejaculation. In the 1st experiment, changes in cortisol and progesterone concentrations in serial blood samples were used to assess the stress response to restraint (control), transrectal massage, caudal epidural injection of saline, electroejaculation after caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, and electroejaculation without epidural lidocaine. In the 2nd experiment, behavioral responses were subjectively scored in bulls that were electroejaculated with or without caudal epidural lidocaine anesthesia. Cortisol and progesterone concentrations were significantly elevated after electroejaculation, whether or not bulls received caudal epidural anesthesia. Elevations in cortisol and progesterone were lower and fewer bulls vocalized during electroejaculation when given caudal epidural anesthesia; however, the differences were not significant. PMID:11272454

  8. The Use of Topical Lidocaine Gel During Intermaxillary Fixation Procedure.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yeon Jin; Kim, Ho Jun; Kwon, Ho; Shim, Hyung-Sup; Seo, Bommie Florence; Jung, Sung-No

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to validate the usefulness of lidocaine gel during intermaxillary fixation using arch bars in patients with mandible fracture by comparing 2 patient groups: one group using lidocaine gel in intermaxillary fixation and the other group undergoing traditional local infiltration.Subjects were patients with mandible fracture undergoing intermaxillary fixation using arch bars from March 2003 to February 2007. Twenty-three patients were anesthetized in the upper and lower gingiva by 2% local lidocaine solution injection; another 23 underwent topical anesthesia with 2% lidocaine hydrochloride gel applied to the upper and lower gingiva. The convenience of fixation was measured in terms of operation time and degree of pain according to the visual analog scale; arch bar loosening rate was assessed postoperatively.The mean operation times were 63 and 47 minutes in the groups undergoing local infiltration and using topical lidocaine gel, respectively. For pain degree according to the visual analog scale, the mean scores were 6.4 and 3.2 in the groups using local infiltration and topical lidocaine gel, respectively. When the arch bar loosening rate was measured postoperatively, the 2 groups differed significantly, with a rate of 26% in the group using local infiltration and 13% in the group using topical lidocaine gel.Application of topical lidocaine gel during intermaxillary fixation using arch bars in patients with mandible fracture relieves pain and offers convenience in performing the procedure. It can be a useful alternative method for patients who are sensitive to pain or have needle phobia. PMID:27391518

  9. Cervical Lidocaine for IUD Insertional Pain: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    McNicholas, Colleen P.; Madden, Tessa; Zhao, Qiuhong; Secura, Gina; Allsworth, Jenifer E.; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Anticipated pain with intrauterine device (IUD) insertion may be a barrier to widespread use. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of intracervical 2% lidocaine gel for pain relief with IUD insertion. Study Design We performed a double-blind, randomized controlled trial of women undergoing IUD insertion. Participants were randomly assigned to 2% lidocaine or placebo gel. Study gel (3ccs) wase placed 3 minutes prior to IUD insertion. Pain scores were measured at various time points using a 10-point visual analog scale. Results Of the 200 participants randomized, 199 completed the study. Pain scores among lidocaine and placebo arms were similar at tenaculum placement (lidocaine and placebo; median 4, range 0–10 p=0.15) as well as with insertion (lidocaine: median 5 range 1–10, placebo: median 6 range 0–10 p=0.16). These results did not differ by parity. Conclusions Topical or intracervical 2% lidocaine gel prior to IUD insertion does not decrease pain scores. PMID:23107081

  10. Lidocaine Concentration in Oral Tissue by the Addition of Epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eri; Yoshida, Kenji; Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    The vasoconstrictive effect due to the addition of epinephrine to local anesthetic has been clearly shown by measuring blood-flow volume or blood anesthetic concentration in oral mucosal tissue. However, there are no reports on the measurement of anesthetic concentration using samples directly taken from the jawbone and oral mucosal tissue. Consequently, in this study, the effect of lidocaine concentration in the jawbone and oral mucosal tissue by the addition of epinephrine to the local anesthetic lidocaine was considered by quantitatively measuring lidocaine concentration within the tissue. Japanese white male rabbits (n = 96) were used as test animals. General anesthesia was induced by sevoflurane and oxygen, and then cannulation to the femoral artery was performed while arterial pressure was constantly recorded. Infiltration anesthesia was achieved by 0.5 mL of 2% lidocaine containing 1 : 80,000 epinephrine in the upper jawbone (E(+)) and 0.5 mL of 2% of epinephrine additive-free lidocaine (E(0)) under the periosteum. At specified time increments (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 minutes), samples from the jawbone, oral mucosa, and blood were collected, and lidocaine concentration was directly measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. No significant differences in the change in blood pressure were observed either in E(+) or E(0). In both E(+) and E(0) groups, the serum lidocaine concentration peaked 10 minutes after local anesthesia and decreased thereafter. At all time increments, serum lidocaine concentration in E(+) was significantly lower than that in E(0). There were no significant differences in measured lidocaine concentration between jawbone and mucosa within either the E(+) or the E(0) groups at all time points, although the E(0) group had significantly lower jawbone and mucosa concentrations than the E(+) group at all time points when comparing the 2 groups to each other. Addition of epinephrine to the local anesthetic inhibited systemic

  11. Oral mexiletine for lidocaine-responsive neonatal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Mika; Okumura, Akihisa; Niijima, Shinichi; Yamashita, Shintaro; Shimono, Kuriko; Hirose, Shinichi; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2013-08-01

    We report a patient with lidocaine-responsive neonatal epilepsy treated successfully with oral mexiletine. The patient was a male neonate who had seizures since 2days of age. While his seizures were refractory to phenobarbital, lamotrigine, vitamin B6, and midazolam, they were controlled by continuous lidocaine infusion. Oral mexiletine at serum levels of 0.2-0.4μg/ml was used successfully for long-term treatment of his seizures. No delay in psychomotor development was observed at the last follow-up at 20months of age. No mutation was identified in any of four genes: SCN1A, SCN1B, KCNQ2, and KCNQ3. Our patient demonstrates that oral mexiletine can be useful for long-term treatment of patients with lidocaine-responsive epilepsy. PMID:23182886

  12. Nebulized lidocaine in the treatment of intractable cough.

    PubMed

    Truesdale, Kelly; Jurdi, Adham

    2013-09-01

    Cough is one of the most common symptoms prompting patients to be seen by health care providers in the United States. Persistent cough can disrupt daily activities such as conversation, eating, breathing, and sleeping, and it can become extremely debilitating both physically and mentally. Pharmacological treatments include dextramethorphan, opioid cough suppressants, benzonatate, inhaled ipratropium, and guaifenesin. Successful cough suppression has also been demonstrated in several studies with the use of nebulized lidocaine. Nebulized lidocaine also appears to be well tolerated by patients with minimal side effects including dysphonia, oropharyngeal numbness, and bitter taste. Studies conducted thus far have been small, so larger randomized control trials comparing nebulized lidocaine to placebo need to be conducted in the future. PMID:22964341

  13. Lidocaine 5% Medicated Plaster for Spinal Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Freo, Ulderico; Ambrosio, Francesco; Furnari, Maurizio; Ori, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Spinal cord injuries frequently determine central pain symptoms that are difficult to control. The authors present the case of a 67-year-old suffering from a pleural mesothelioma. During the disease course, he developed a paraplegia syndrome from mesothelioma compression of the spinal cord at T4-T5 level. Following spinal decompression surgery, the patient presented an intense at-level, superficial neuropathic pain syndrome with allodynia and hyperalgesia. After systemic pharmacological therapies had failed, treatment with lidocaine 5% plaster was initiated. The superficial neuropathic symptoms almost completely disappeared within a few days. The lidocaine topical treatment was continued for months with durable analgesic effect. PMID:27018847

  14. Characterization and comparison of lidocaine-tetracaine and lidocaine-camphor eutectic mixtures based on their crystallization and hydrogen-bonding abilities.

    PubMed

    Gala, Urvi; Chuong, Monica C; Varanasi, Ravi; Chauhan, Harsh

    2015-06-01

    Eutectic mixtures formed between active pharmaceutical ingredients and/or excipients provide vast scope for pharmaceutical applications. This study aimed at the exploration of the crystallization abilities of two eutectic mixtures (EM) i.e., lidocaine-tetracaine and lidocaine-camphor (1:1 w/w). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for degradation behavior whereas modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MTDSC) set in first heating, cooling, and second heating cycles, was used to qualitatively analyze the complex exothermic and endothermic thermal transitions. Raman microspectroscopy characterized vibrational information specific to chemical bonds. Prepared EMs were left at room temperature for 24 h to visually examine their crystallization potentials. The degradation of lidocaine, tetracaine, camphor, lidocaine-tetracaine EM, and lidocaine-camphor EM began at 196.56, 163.82, 76.86, 146.01, and 42.72°C, respectively, which indicated that eutectic mixtures are less thermostable compared to their individual components. The MTDSC showed crystallization peaks for lidocaine, tetracaine, and camphor at 31.86, 29.36, and 174.02°C, respectively (n = 3). When studying the eutectic mixture, no crystallization peak was observed in the lidocaine-tetracaine EM, but a lidocaine-camphor EM crystallization peak was present at 18.81°C. Crystallization occurred in lidocaine-camphor EM after being kept at room temperature for 24 h, but not in lidocaine-tetracaine EM. Certain peak shifts were observed in Raman spectra which indicated possible interactions of eutectic mixture components, when a eutectic mixture was formed. We found that if the components forming a eutectic mixture have crystallization peaks close to each other and have sufficient hydrogen-bonding capability, then their eutectic mixture is least likely to crystallize out (as seen in lidocaine-tetracaine EM) or vice versa (lidocaine-camphor EM). PMID:25370024

  15. The effects of lidocaine or a lidocaine-bupivacaine mixture administered into the infraorbital canal in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the onset, duration, and extent of regional nerve blocks performed by administration of lidocaine or lidocaine-bupivacaine into the infraorbital canal in dogs. ANIMALS 6 healthy hound-type dogs. PROCEDURES Under general anesthesia, stimulating needles were inserted into the gingiva dorsolateral to both maxillary canine (MC) teeth and the maxillary fourth premolar (MPM4) and second molar (MM2) teeth on the treatment side. A reflex-evoked muscle potential (REMP) was recorded from the digastricus muscle after noxious electrical stimulation at each site. After baseline measurements, 1 mL of 2% lidocaine solution or a 2% lidocaine-0.5% bupivacaine mixture (0.5 mL each) was injected into the infraorbital canal (at approx two-thirds of the canal length measured rostrocaudally). The REMPs were recorded for up to 7 hours. The REMP data for the contralateral (untreated control) canine tooth were used to normalize results for all stimulation sites. RESULTS With both treatments, nerve block for MC teeth on the treated side was achieved by 5 (n = 5 dogs) or 10 (1) minutes after injection, but nerve block for ipsilateral MPM4 and MM2 teeth was successful for only 3 dogs and 1 dog, respectively. Mean duration of nerve blocks for MC teeth was 120 and 277 minutes following injection of lidocaine and lidocaine-bupivacaine, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Local anesthesia, as performed in this study, successfully blocked innervation of MC teeth, but results for MPM4 and MM2 teeth were inconsistent. This specific technique should not be used during tooth extractions caudal to the MC teeth. PMID:27347819

  16. 21 CFR 862.3555 - Lidocaine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lidocaine test system. 862.3555 Section 862.3555 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  17. 21 CFR 862.3555 - Lidocaine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lidocaine test system. 862.3555 Section 862.3555 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3555 - Lidocaine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lidocaine test system. 862.3555 Section 862.3555 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  19. 21 CFR 862.3555 - Lidocaine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lidocaine test system. 862.3555 Section 862.3555 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  20. Immediate reaction to lidocaine with periorbital edema during upper blepharoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Presman, Benjamin; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Tocco-Tussardi, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Blepharoplasty is the fourth most commonly performed cosmetic surgery in the US, with 207,000 operations in 2014. Lidocaine is the preferred anesthetic agent for blepharoplasty. Presentation of case We describe the unusual case of acute periorbital edema following local anesthesia with lidocaine for upper blepharoplasty. At present, only two other reports of periorbital reactions to lidocaine are present in the literature. The reactions observed are significant palpebral swelling and erythema with scaling of the cheek. Fortunately the swelling, although marked, is transient in nature and resolves almost spontaneously without affecting the visual acuity. Discussion Patients reporting adverse reactions should be screened for allergy according to the standard protocols, but skin testing has only been reported to be positive in less than 10% of all cases and allergy confirmation with IgE is even more rare. Conclusion In clinical practice, we recommend that patient should be informed about the possibility of recurrence of an adverse reaction in case of re-exposure to lidocaine, even in the vast majority of cases where true allergy could not be proven. In case of further need for local anesthesia with history of an adverse event, a different agent may be chosen even from the same class (another amide) as cross-reactions in the amide group are rare. Otherwise, an anesthetic from the ester group can also be safely used. PMID:26785079

  1. Effect of lidocaine on left ventricular pressure-volume curves during demand ischemia in pigs.

    PubMed

    Tayama, M; Solomon, S B; Glantz, S A

    1998-06-01

    The diastolic pressure-volume curve shifts upward during demand ischemia, most likely because of changes in Ca2+ dynamics within the sarcomere. It is possible that agents that affect Na+/Ca2+ exchange, such as lidocaine, a class 1b-type Na+-channel blocker that decreases intracellular Na+, could affect the diastolic pressure-volume relationship because of indirect effects on intracellular Ca2+. Lidocaine is a drug widely used to treat arrhythmias in patients with myocardial ischemia. We studied the effects of lidocaine on diastolic dysfunction associated with demand ischemia. We compared diastolic (as represented by the shift in the diastolic pressure-volume relationship) and systolic function during demand ischemia before and after lidocaine injection. We created demand ischemia in pigs before and after administering lidocaine (5 mg/kg) in eight open-pericardium anesthetized pigs. Demand ischemia was induced by constricting the left anterior descending coronary artery and then pacing at 1.5-1.8 times the baseline heart rate for 1.5-3 min. Hemodynamics were recorded during baseline, demand ischemia, baseline after lidocaine injection, and demand ischemia after lidocaine. Lidocaine did not affect systolic function or the time constant of isovolumic relaxation, but it increased the upward shift of the diastolic pressure-volume curve during demand ischemia compared with the increase that occurred before lidocaine was administered. This result suggests that lidocaine could aggravate diastolic dysfunction in patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:9841537

  2. Intravenous Lidocaine as an Adjuvant for Pain Associated with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Natalie L; Kome, Anne M; Lowe, Denise K; Coyne, Patrick; Hawks, Kelly G

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adjuvant intravenous (IV) lidocaine in adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). This was a retrospective review. Adults with SCD receiving at least one IV lidocaine infusion from 2004 to 2014 were included. Patient demographics, lidocaine treatment parameters, pain scores, pain medications, and adverse effects were recorded. Eleven patients were identified, yielding 15 IV lidocaine trials. Clinical improvement in pain scores from pre-lidocaine challenge to 24 hours post-lidocaine challenge, defined by ≥ 20% reduction in pain scores, was achieved in 53.3% (8 of 15) of IV lidocaine challenges. Of the 8 clinically successful trials, the mean reduction in morphine dose equivalents (MDE) from 24 hours pre-lidocaine challenge to 24 hours post-lidocaine challenge was 32.2%. Additionally, clinically successful trials had a mean initial and a maximum dose of 1 mg/kg/h (range: 0.5-2.7 mg/kg/h) and 1.3 mg/kg/h (range: 0.5-1.9 mg/kg/h), respectively. On average, these patients underwent 3 dose titrations (range: 1-8) and received lidocaine infusions for 4.4 days (range: 2-8 days). Two patients experienced disorientation and dizziness. The authors conclude that adjuvant IV lidocaine provided pain relief and a mean reduction in MDE during sickle cell pain crisis. These results provide preliminary insight into the use of IV lidocaine for treating pain in patients with SCD, although prospective studies are needed to determine efficacy, dosing, and tolerability of IV lidocaine in this patient population. PMID:26654408

  3. The immediate effects of lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current on pressure sense threshold and tactile sensation.

    PubMed

    Yoosefinejad, Amin Kordi; Motealleh, Alireza; Abbasnia, Keramatollah

    2016-03-01

    Iontophoresis is the noninvasive delivery of ions using direct current. The direct current has some disadvantages such as skin burning. Interferential current is a kind of alternating current without limitations of direct current; so the purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the effects of lidocaine, interferential current and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current. 30 healthy women aged 20-24 years participated in this randomized clinical trial study. Pressure, tactile and pain thresholds were evaluated before and after the application of treatment methods. Pressure, tactile and pain sensitivity increased significantly after the application of lidocaine alone (p < 0.005) and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current (p < 0.0001). Lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current can increase perception threshold of pain, tactile stimulus and pressure sense more significantly than lidocaine and interferential current alone. PMID:26893248

  4. Carpal ligament decompression under local anaesthesia: the effect of lidocaine warming and alkalinisation on infiltration pain.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulos, C K

    2004-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of alkalinization and warming of lidocaine 1% on injection pain in patients undergoing carpal tunnel decompression. Sixty-four adult patients were randomly allocated into one of three groups: Group A (n=20) received plain lidocaine 1%, Group B (n=22) alkalinized lidocaine and Group C (n=22) warmed and alkalinized lidocaine. Pain on needle insertion and on infiltration was assessed using a 100mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). There was no significant difference regarding pain on needle insertion whereas significant differences were noted in reference to infiltration pain. In Groups B and C (alkalinized lidocaine) the VAS scores on skin infiltration were significantly lower than in Group A, while the pain score in Group C (alkalinized and warmed lidocaine) was significantly lower than in Group B. PMID:14734067

  5. Intravenous lidocaine as a suppressant of coughing during tracheal intubation in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Yukioka, H; Hayashi, M; Terai, T; Fujimori, M

    1993-08-01

    The effects of intravenously administered lidocaine on cough suppression in elderly patients over the age of 60 yr during tracheal intubation under general anesthesia were evaluated in two studies. In the first study, 100 patients received a placebo of either 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously 1 min before tracheal intubation. All visible coughs were classified as coughing. The incidence of coughing decreased as the dose of lidocaine increased. A dose of 1.5 mg/kg or more of intravenous lidocaine suppressed the cough reflex significantly (P < 0.01). In the second study, 108 patients received 2 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously or a placebo 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 15 min before intubation. The same criteria for determining whether a patient did or did not cough during tracheal intubation were used as in Study 1. The incidence of coughing decreased significantly (P < 0.01) when 2 mg/kg lidocaine was injected intravenously between 1 min and 3 min before attempting intubation. The cough reflex was almost entirely suppressed by plasma concentrations of lidocaine in excess of 4 micrograms/mL. The results suggest that intravenous administration of lidocaine is effective in suppressing the cough reflex during tracheal intubation in elderly patients under general anesthesia, but that relatively high plasma concentrations of lidocaine may be required for suppression of coughing. PMID:8346830

  6. Efficacy of lidocaine hydrochloride for laryngeal desensitization: a clinical comparison of techniques in the cat.

    PubMed

    Dyson, D H

    1988-05-01

    Assessment of laryngeal relaxation and ease of intubation in cats was made after preanesthetic medication with acepromazine/meperidine/atropine (IM) and induction of anesthesia 20 minutes later by thiopental administration (IV). Healthy cats (n = 32) scheduled for elective surgery were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups to be provided with laryngeal desensitization: group 1, 2% lidocaine HCl (2 mg/kg of body weight) given IV 30 seconds before thiopental induction; group 2, 2% lidocaine HCl (2 mg/kg) topically applied to the larynx; group 3, 10% lidocaine HCl (10 mg) as a topical aerosol; and group 4, no treatment before intubation. A significant (P less than 0.05; ANOVA) difference between groups in the reaction to intubation attempts was apparent. Cats receiving 2% lidocaine IV or no treatment for desensitization had a greater response to intubation than did those receiving 2% or 10% lidocaine topically. The number of attempts required to intubate cats was significantly (P less than 0.05) greater in cats with no treatment than in cats treated topically with 2% or 10% lidocaine. Response to IV administration of 2% lidocaine HCl was not significantly different from the response to other treatments, indicating little advantage over no laryngeal desensitization. It was concluded that topical application of 2% lidocaine (2 mg/kg) or 10% lidocaine aerosol 1 1/2 minutes before intubation provides effective laryngeal desensitization in the cat. PMID:3391852

  7. Effects of fentanyl-lidocaine-propofol and dexmedetomidine-lidocaine-propofol on tracheal intubation without use of muscle relaxants.

    PubMed

    Hanci, Volkan; Erdoğan, Gülay; Okyay, Rahşan Dilek; Yurtlu, Bülent Serhan; Ayoğlu, Hilal; Baydilek, Yunus; Turan, Işil Ozkoçak

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of fentanyl or dexmedetomidine when used in combination with propofol and lidocaine for tracheal intubation without using muscle relaxants. Sixty patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists stage I risk were randomized to receive 1 mg/kg dexmedetomidine (Group D, n = 30) or 2 mg/kg fentanyl (Group F, n = 30), both in combination with 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine and 3 mg/kg propofol. The requirement for intubation was determined based on mask ventilation capability, jaw motility, position of the vocal cords and the patient's response to intubation and inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff. Systolic arterial pressure, mean arterial pressure, heart rate and peripheral oxygen saturation values were also recorded. Rate pressure products were calculated. Jaw relaxation, position of the vocal cords and patient's response to intubation and inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff were significantly better in Group D than in Group F (p < 0.05). The intubation conditions were significantly more satisfactory in Group D than in Group F (p = 0.01). Heart rate was significantly lower in Group D than in Group F after the administration of the study drugs and intubation (p < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure was significantly lower in Group F than in Group D after propofol injection and at 3 and 5 minutes after intubation (p < 0.05). After intubation, the rate pressure product values were significantly lower in Group D than in Group F (p < 0.05). We conclude that endotracheal intubation was better with the dexmedetomidine-lidocaine-propofol combination than with the fentanyl-lidocaine-propofol combination. However, side effects such as bradycardia should be considered when using dexmedetomidine. PMID:20466334

  8. Rocuronium-induced withdrawal movement: influence of ketorolac or a combination of lidocaine and ketorolac pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Younghoon; Ha, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Hyung-Chul; Ryu, Taeha

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain on injection of rocuronium is a common clinical problem. We compared the efficacy of lidocaine, ketorolac, and the 2 in combination as pretreatment for the prevention of rocuronium-induced withdrawal movement. Methods For this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study a total of 140 patients were randomly allocated to one of 4 treatment groups to receive intravenously placebo (saline), lidocaine (20 mg), ketorolac (10 mg), or both (n = 35 for each group), with venous occlusion. The tourniquet was released after 2 min and anesthesia was performed using 5 mg/kg thiopental sodium followed by 0.6 mg/kg rocuronium. The withdrawal response was graded on a 4-point scale in a double-blind manner. Results The overall incidence of withdrawal movements after rocuronium was 34.3% with lidocaine (P = 0.001), 40% with ketorolac (P = 0.004), and 8.6% with both (P < 0.001), compared with 74.3% with placebo. There was a significantly lower incidence of withdrawal movements in patients receiving the lidocaine/ketorolac combination than in those receiving lidocaine or ketorolac alone (P = 0.009 and 0.002, respectively). The incidence of moderate to severe withdrawal movements was 14.3% with lidocaine, 17.2% with ketorolac, and 2.9% with lidocaine/ketorolac combination, as compared to 45.7% with the placebo. There was no significant difference in withdrawal movement between the lidocaine group and the ketorolac group. Conclusions Ketorolac pretreatment had an effect comparable to that of lidocaine in attenuating rocuronium-induced withdrawal movements and the lidocaine/ketorolac combination pretreatment, compared with lidocaine or ketorolac alone, effectively reduced withdrawal movements during rocuronium injection. PMID:23372882

  9. Interaction between lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and various irrigants: A nuclear magnetic resonance analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vidhya, Nirmal; Karthikeyan, Balasubramanian Saravana; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy; Abarajithan, Mohan; Nithyanandan, Sivasankaran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Interaction between local anesthetic solution, lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline), and root canal irrigants such as sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA), and chlorhexidine (CHX) has not been studied earlier. Hence, the purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the chemical interaction between 2% lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and commonly used root canal irrigants, NaOCl, EDTA, and CHX. Materials and Methods: Samples were divided into eight experimental groups: Group I-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/3% NaOCl, Group II-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/17% EDTA, Group III- Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/2% CHX, Group IV-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/3% NaOCl, Group V-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/17% EDTA, Group VI-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/2% CHX, and two control groups: Group VII-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/deionized water and Group VIII-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/deionized water. The respective solutions of various groups were mixed in equal proportions (1 ml each) and observed for precipitate formation. Chemical composition of the formed precipitate was then analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and confirmed with diazotation test. Results: In groups I and IV, a white precipitate was observed in all the samples on mixing the respective solutions, which showed a color change to reddish brown after 15 minutes. This precipitate was then analysed by NMR spectroscopy and was observed to be 2,6-xylidine, a reported toxic compound. The experimental groups II, III, V, and VI and control groups VII and VIII showed no precipitate formation in any of the respective samples, until 2 hours. Conclusion: Interaction between lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and NaOCl showed precipitate formation containing 2,6-xylidine, a toxic compound

  10. Effects of glucose administered with lidocaine solution on spinal neurotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hanxiang; Xu, Tingting; Xiong, Xiangsheng; Mao, Jingjing; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yonghai; Bai, Zhixia; Chen, Xuexin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether intrathecal administration of 10% glucose increases functional impairment and histologic damage in rats when mixed with 5% lidocaine. After implanted intrathecal catheter, 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups: lidocaine group (Group L, n=8) received 5% lidocaine 20 µL, lidocaine with glucose group (Group LG, n=8) received 5% lidocaine with 10% glucose 20 µL, glucose group (Group G, n=8) received 10% glucose 20 µL and normal saline group received normal saline 20 µL (Group NS, n=8). Four days after intrathecal injection, sensory impairments of rats in the four groups were evaluated by using the tail-flick test. The histologic changes of spinal cord and nerve roots were observed by electron microscopy and light microscopy. There was no significant difference in baseline tail-flick latencies between the four groups (P=0.284). On the 4th day after intrathecal injection, the assessment result of sensory function was similar to baseline (P=0.217) in saline-treated animals. Sensory impairment occurred after intrathecal administration of 5% lidocaine, and 10% glucose with 5% lidocaine worsen this satiation (P=0.0001); histologic changes in 10% glucose with 5% lidocaine-treated group has differ significantly from lidocaine-treated group (P=0.001). Sensory function after intrathecal administration of 10% glucose was similar to baseline and did not differ from the saline group (P=0.995); histologic changes in 10% glucose-treated rats did not differ significantly from saline controls (P=0.535). These results suggest that 5% lidocaine can induce spinal neurotoxicity and 10% glucose with 5% lidocaine could worsen spinal neurotoxicity. PMID:26884984

  11. Cardiopulmonary Effects of Constant-Rate Infusion of Lidocaine for Anesthesia during Abdominal Surgery in Goats.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Lais M; Greene, Stephen A; Gay, John M; Grubb, Tammy L

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine is commonly used in ruminants but has an anecdotal history of being toxic to goats. To evaluate lidocaine's effects on selected cardiopulmonary parameters. Isoflurane-anesthetized adult goats (n = 24) undergoing abdominal surgery received a loading dose of lidocaine (2.5 mg/kg) over 20 min followed by constant-rate infusion of lidocaine (100 μg/kg/min); control animals received saline instead of lidocaine. Data collected at predetermined time points during the 60-min surgery included heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, pO2, and pCO2. According to Welch 2-sample t tests, cardiopulmonary variables did not differ between groups. For example, after administration of the loading dose, goats in the lidocaine group had a mean heart rate of 88 ± 28 bpm, mean arterial blood pressure of 70 ± 19 mm Hg, pCO2 of 65 ± 13 mm Hg, and pO2 of 212 ± 99 mm Hg; in the saline group, these values were 90 ± 16 bpm, 76 ± 12 mm Hg, 61 ± 9 mm Hg, and 209 ± 83 mm Hg, respectively. One goat in the saline group required an additional dose of butorphanol. Overall our findings indicate that, at the dose provided, intravenous lidocaine did not cause adverse cardiopulmonary effects in adult goats undergoing abdominal surgery. Adding lidocaine infusion during general anesthesia is an option for enhancing transoperative analgesia in goats. PMID:27423150

  12. Hepatic Chemoembolization: Effect of Intraarterial Lidocaine on Pain and Postprocedure Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnell, George G.; Gates, Julia; Stuart, Keith; Underhill, Jonathan; Brophy, David P.

    1999-07-15

    Purpose: To determine if intraarterial lidocaine reduces pain during and after chemoembolization, and whether it influences postprocedure recovery. Methods: Two patient cohorts undergoing selective hepatic chemoembolization were compared. Chemoembolization was performed without lidocaine (control group) in 27 patients and intraarterial lidocaine was used (lidocaine group) in 29 similar patients. Objective changes in patient management were assessed. Pain reduction in 31 more procedures with lidocaine (total 60) was assessed and related to tumor type. Results: During chemoembolization, intraarterial lidocaine reduced the need for additional intravenous analgesics from 69% to 19%. After chemoembolization the mean Dilaudid dose in the first 24 hr was reduced from 9.5 mg to 4.15 mg; accordingly, the mean length of hospital stay was reduced from 67.5 to 53.5 hr. During the day of chemoembolization, the mean oral fluid intake increased from 420 ml (control group) to 487 ml (lidocaine group); the percentage of patients taking solid food on the day of chemoembolization increased from 3% to 43%. Conclusion: Intraarterial lidocaine during chemoembolization reduces the severity and duration of pain after chemoembolization resulting in faster recovery thus reducing the length of hospitalization.

  13. Lidocaine Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Apoptosis in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Dae Young; Kwon, Kisang; Lee, Kyeong Ryong; Choi, Young Jin; Goo, Tae-Won; Yu, Kweon; Kim, Seung-Whan; Kwon, O-Yu

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated that upregulation of both gene expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress chaperones (BiP, calnexin, calreticulin, and PDI) and ER stress sensors (ATF6, IRE1 and PERK) was induced by lidocaine, a local anesthetic, in PC12 cells. In addition to gene regulation, lidocaine also induced typical ER stress phenomena such as ART6 proteolytic cleavage, eIF2 alpha phosphorylation, and XBP1 mRNA splicing. In in vivo experiments, while lidocaine downregulated gene expression of antiapoptotic factors (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl), pro-apoptotic factor (Bak and Bax) gene expression was upregulated. Furthermore, lidocaine induced apoptosis, as measured histochemically, and upregulated PARP1, a DNA damage repair enzyme. These results are the first to show that lidocaine induces apoptosis through ER stress in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22174623

  14. Neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of lidocaine in kainic acid-injected rats.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuan Ming; Lu, Cheng Wei; Lee, Ming Yi; Wang, Ming Jiuh; Lin, Tzu Yu; Wang, Su Jane

    2016-05-01

    Lidocaine, the most commonly used local anesthetic, inhibits glutamate release from nerve terminals. Given the involvement of glutamate neurotoxicity in the pathogenesis of various neurological disorders, this study investigated the role of lidocaine in hippocampal neuronal death and inflammatory events induced by an i.p. injection of kainic acid (KA) (15 mg/kg), a glutamate analog. The results showed that KA significantly led to neuronal death in the CA3 pyramidal layers of the hippocampus and this effect was attenuated by the systemic administration of lidocaine (0.8 or 4 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before KA injection. Moreover, KA-induced microglia activation and gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, namely, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the hippocampus were reduced by the lidocaine pretreatment. Altogether, the results suggest that lidocaine can effectively treat glutamate excitotoxicity-related brain disorders. PMID:26999361

  15. TRPA1 activation by lidocaine in nerve terminals results in glutamate release increase

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, L.-H.; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, C.-Y.; Liu Tao; Yue, H.-Y.; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2009-02-20

    We examined the effects of local anesthetics lidocaine and procaine on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in adult rat spinal cord slices with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Bath-applied lidocaine (1-5 mM) dose-dependently and reversibly increased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) in SG neurons. Lidocaine activity was unaffected by the Na{sup +}-channel blocker, tetrodotoxin, and the TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, but was inhibited by the TRP antagonist, ruthenium red. In the same neuron, the TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate, and lidocaine both increased sEPSC frequency. In contrast, procaine did not produce presynaptic enhancement. These results indicate that lidocaine activates TRPA1 in nerve terminals presynaptic to SG neurons to increase the spontaneous release of L-glutamate.

  16. The effect of topical lidocaine on muscle artefacts in awake canine electroencephalogram recordings.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jordan; James, Fiona; Monteith, Gabrielle

    2016-07-01

    Muscle artefacts in electroencephalogram recording data interfere with diagnostic accuracy. Lidocaine may reduce these artefacts. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of topical lidocaine on muscle artefacts in unanesthetized canine electroencephalogram (EEG) recording data. Topical 4% lidocaine was applied to each electrode site for six treated dogs prior to subdermal wire electrode placement and compared against historical untreated controls. Twenty-minute recordings began 30 min after lidocaine application. Three epochs (early, middle, and end) were sampled from each recording and scored for muscle artefact incidence and severity by two blinded reviewers. No significant treatment effects on incidence and severity were found. Application of topical lidocaine does not appear to reduce the occurrence of muscle artefacts in canine EEG recordings. PMID:27240906

  17. Can repeated exposure to morphine change the spinal analgesic effects of lidocaine in rats?*

    PubMed Central

    Dabbagh, Ali; Moghadam, Shervin Farkhondehkish; Rajaei, Samira; Mansouri, Zahra; Manaheji, Homa Shardi

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic opium exposure leads to altered response to opioid compounds. The aim of this study was to assess the behavioral effects of opium tolerance on the analgesic effects of intrathecal lidocaine in rats. METHODS: Twenty-four adult male Sprague Dawley rats with intrathecal (IT) catheters were divided into 3 groups of 8. The first group was morphine tolerant and received IT lidocaine (ML). Rats in the second group were not morphine tolerant and received IT lidocaine (L), while the third group consisted of not morphine tolerant rats that received IT placebo. Tail flick test was done and maximal possible antinociceptive effects (MPAE) were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS: While percent of MPAE significantly increased in the L group, it had a significant reduction in the ML group (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: After intrathecal lidocaine administration, a hyperalgesic response was seen in morphine tolerant rats and an analgesic response was seen in the lidocaine group. PMID:22973332

  18. Concentrations of dimethylaniline and other metabolites in milk and tissues of dairy cows treated with lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Hoogenboom, Ron L A P; Zuidema, Tina; Essers, Martien; van Vuuren, Ad M; van Wikselaar, Piet G; van Eijkeren, Jan C H; Mengelers, Marcel J B; Zeilmaker, Marco J; Bulder, Astrid S

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine is a topical anaesthetic drug used in dairy cows for laparotomy (caesarean section, abomasal displacement). Because there are no registered drugs for this indication, it can be applied under the so-called Cascade rules (off-label use), with the restriction that the off-label withdrawal periods of 7 days for milk and 28 days for meat are taken into account. In animals, lidocaine is rapidly metabolised into various metabolites, one being 2,6-dimethylaniline (DMA) which is reported to possess carcinogenic and mutagenic properties and detected also in milk. To investigate whether the off-label withdrawal periods are long enough to exclude the presence of lidocaine and DMA, and potential other metabolites, in edible products, a study was performed with eight dairy cows treated with lidocaine by injection in the abdominal muscles. At various time points blood samples, milk and urine were collected. Four animals were slaughtered 3.5 h after treatment, the other four after 48.5 h. The injection site, meat, liver and kidney were analysed for levels of lidocaine, DMA, monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX) and 3-OH-lidocaine. It was shown that DMA is an important metabolite in dairy cows and can be detected in both meat and milk. In addition, also MEGX, 3-OH-lidocaine and three other metabolites were identified and to some extent quantified. These metabolites were 4-OH-lidocaine, lidocaine-N-oxide and 4-hydroxy-DMA. The latter compound was the most important metabolite in urine. However, levels in milk and meat decreased rapidly after the application. Overall, it can be concluded that the off-label withdrawal times of 7 and 28 days for milk and meat, respectively, guarantee the absence of detectable levels of lidocaine and metabolites. PMID:26118443

  19. Lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and subsequent cell death in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tsutomu; Toyoda, Futoshi; Imai, Shinji; Tanigawa, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Kousuke; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2016-05-01

    Local anesthetics are administered intraarticularly for pain control in orthopedic clinics and surgeries. Although previous studies have shown that local anesthetics can be toxic to chondrocytes, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study investigates acute cellular responses associated with lidocaine-induced toxicity to articular chondrocytes. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were exposed to lidocaine and their morphological changes were monitored with live cell microscopy. The viability of chondrocytes was evaluated using a fluorescence based LIVE/DEAD assay. Acute treatment of chondrocytes with lidocaine (3-30 mM) induced spherical protrusions on the cell surface (so called "membrane blebbing") in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The concentration-response relationship for the lidocaine effect was shifted leftward by elevating extracellular pH, as expected for the non-ionized lidocaine being involved in the bleb formation. ROCK (Rho-kinase) inhibitors Y-27632 and fasudil completely prevented the lidocaine-induced membrane blebbing, suggesting that ROCK activation is required for bleb formation. Caspase-3 levels were unchanged by 10 mM lidocaine (p = 0.325) and a caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not affect the lidocaine-induced blebbing (p = 0.964). GTP-RhoA levels were significantly increased (p < 0.001), but Rho inhibitor-1 failed to suppress the membrane blebbing (p = 0.875). Lidocaine (30 mM) reduced the cell viability of isolated chondrocytes (p < 0.001) and in situ chondrocytes (p < 0.001). The chondrotoxicity was attenuated by pretreatment of cells with ROCK inhibitors or a myosin-II inhibitor blebbistatin (p < 0.001). These findings suggest that lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and thereby produces a cytotoxic effect on chondrocytes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:754-762, 2016. PMID:26519731

  20. Intrarectal Lidocaine-Diltiazem-Meperidine Gel for Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farsad; Moghaddam, Yasaman; Shariat Moharari, Reza; Etezadi, Farhad; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: TRUS-guided needle biopsy of the prostate gland is the current standard method used for diagnosis of prostate cancer. Pain control during this procedure is through the use of i.v. sedation or local anaesthetic (LA), depending on clinician preference. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intrarectal lidocaine, lidocaine-diltiazem and lidocaine-meperidine-diltiazem gel for anesthetizing transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Patients and Methods: In a randomized double-blind clinical trial, 100 consecutive patients were divided into three groups. The patients received one of the gels before transrectal ultrasound guided prostate needle biopsy: group A, intrarectal and perianal lidocaine, gel 1 g; group B, intrarectal lidocaine gel, 1 g, + perianal diltiazem, 1 g; group C, intrarectal lidocaine gel, 1 g, + meperidine, 25 mg, and perianal diltiazem, 1 g. Visual analog pain scale was used to estimate pain during probe insertion and biopsy. Heart rate and blood pressure during probe insertion and biopsy were recorded too. Results: The mean of visual analog pain scale was 4.5 in group A, 3.5 in group B, and 2.0 in group C during probe insertion (P value = 0.01). The mean of visual analog pain scale was 5.1 in group A, 3.5 group B, and 2.5 in group C during biopsy (P value = 0.001). The groups were comparable for patients' age, weight, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate size (P > 0.05). No side effects of meperidine and lidocaine including drowsiness, dizziness, tinnitus and light-headedness or requiring assistance for activity were noted. Conclusions: Lidocaine-meperidine-diltiazem gel provides significantly better pain control than lidocaine-diltiazem gel and lidocaine gel alone during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy and probe insertion. This mixture gel is safe, easy to administer and well accepted by patients. PMID:26161317

  1. Use of Lidocaine Patch for Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lidocaine patch (L5P) has demonstrated short-term efficacy in treating both acute surgical pain and chronic neuropathic pain with tolerable side effects. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) is the mainstay of minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS). Sufficient analgesia during PELD surgery makes the patient consider it real MISS. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of lidocaine patch in patients who underwent PELD under local anesthesia. Methods L5P (L group) or placebo (P group) was randomly applied on the skin of the back covering the anticipated path of the working channel before 1 hour of surgery in 100 patients who underwent a single level PELD at L4-L5. Efficacy of the lidocaine patch was assessed by patient's numeric rating scale (NRS) of pain at each stage during the surgery and by a 5-scale grading of the satisfaction with the anesthesia of the operator and patients after surgery. Results Mean NRS scores at the stages of needle insertion, skin incision, serial dilation and insertion of working channel, and subcutaneous suture were significantly lower in the L group than the P group. Postoperative operator's and patients' satisfaction scores were also significantly higher in L group than in the P group. There were subtle adverse effects in both groups. Conclusions L5P provided better pain relief during PELD, especially at the stage of needle insertion, skin incision, serial dilation and insertion of working channel, and subcutaneous suture. It also provided higher patient and operator postoperative satisfaction, with only subtle adverse effects. PMID:21716614

  2. Effects of eight vehicles on transdermal lidocaine penetration in sheep skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bayldon, W; Narishetty, S; De Rose, G; Rothwell, J; Mills, P C

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of vehicles on penetration and retention of lidocaine applied to sheep skin in vitro. Thoracic skin from two sheep was clipped of wool and stored at -20 °C, until used. Skin samples were defrosted and mounted in Franz-type diffusion cells, and then one of the following formulations, each saturated with lidocaine, was added: sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) 0.5% in water, SLS 1% in water, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) 50% in water (wt/wt), DMSO 100%, isopropyl myristate 100% (IPM), water alone, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DGME) 50% in water (wt/wt) and DGME 100%. The penetration of lidocaine in each skin sample was measured over 8 h. Significantly greater lidocaine skin concentrations and flux (J(SS)) were achieved with the nonaqueous vehicles, DMSO 100% (P < 0.00001 and P < 0.01, respectively), followed by DGME 100% and IPM (P < 0.00001 and P < 0.01, respectively). The lag time (t(lag)) for lidocaine penetration in the DMSO 100% vehicle was significantly shorter (P < 0.01) compared with all other vehicles except water. Improved transdermal penetration of lidocaine in the DMSO 100% vehicle was likely due to skin barrier disruption, as determined by differences in pre- and post-treatment transepidermal water loss (TEWL). This study has shown that nonaqueous vehicles enhanced penetration of lidocaine in sheep skin to a greater extent than aqueous vehicles, which has implications for topically applied local anaesthesia in sheep. PMID:23980624

  3. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lidocaine-Loaded Biodegradable Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianming; Lv, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel lidocaine microspheres. Microspheres were prepared by the oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion technique using poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) for the controlled delivery of lidocaine. The average diameter of lidocaine PLGA microspheres was 2.34 ± 0.3 μm. The poly disperse index was 0.21 ± 0.03, and the zeta potential was +0.34 ± 0.02 mV. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading of the prepared microspheres were 90.5% ± 4.3% and 11.2% ± 1.4%. In vitro release indicated that the lidocaine microspheres had a well-sustained release efficacy, and in vivo studies showed that the area under the curve of lidocaine in microspheres was 2.02–2.06-fold that of lidocaine injection (p < 0.05). The pharmacodynamics results showed that lidocaine microspheres showed a significant release effect in rats, that the process to achieve efficacy was calm and lasting and that the analgesic effect had a significant dose-dependency. PMID:25268618

  4. Radioprotective Effect of Lidocaine on Function and Ultrastructure of Salivary Glands Receiving Fractionated Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim, Samer George; Benedek, Geza Attila; Su Yuxiong; Jacobsen, Hans Christian; Klinger, Matthias; Dendorfer, Andreas; Hemmelmann, Claudia; Meller, Birgit; Nadrowitz, Roger; Rades, Dirk; Sieg, Peter

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced xerostomia still represents a common side effect after radiotherapy for head-and-neck malignancies. The aim of the present study was to examine the radioprotective effect of lidocaine hydrochloride during fractionated radiation in an experimental animal model. Methods and Materials: To evaluate the influence of different radiation doses on salivary gland function and the radioprotective effect of lidocaine, rabbits were irradiated with 15, 25, 30, and 35 Gy (equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions equivalent to 24, 40, 48, and 56 Gy, respectively). Lidocaine hydrochloride (10 and 12 mg/kg) was administered before every radiation fraction in the treatment groups. Salivary gland function was assessed by flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy, and the morphologic changes were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Results: Functional impairment was first observed after 35 Gy and pretreatment with lidocaine improved radiation tolerance of both parotid and submandibular glands. The use of 12 mg/kg lidocaine was superior and displayed significant radioprotection with regard to flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy. The ultrastructure was largely preserved after pretreatment with both lidocaine doses. Conclusions: Lidocaine represents an effective radioprotective agent and a promising approach for clinical application to avoid radiation-induced functional impairment of salivary glands.

  5. Anesthetic Efficacy of Lidocaine/Meperidine for Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Amanda; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered, in a single-blind manner, inferior alveolar nerve blocks using 36 mg of lidocaine with 18 μg of epinephrine or a combination of 36 mg of lidocaine with 18 μg epinephrine plus 36 mg meperidine with 18 μg of epinephrine, at 2 separate appointments, to 52 subjects. An electric pulp tester was used to test for anesthesia, in 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes, of the molars, premolars, and central and lateral incisors. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive 80 readings were obtained within 15 minutes and the 80 reading was continuously sustained for 60 minutes. Using the lidocaine solution, successful pulpal anesthesia ranged from 8 to 58% from the central incisor to the second molar. Using the lidocaine/meperidine solution, successful pulpal anesthesia ranged from 0 to 17%. There was a significant difference (P < .05) between the lidocaine and lidocaine/meperidine solutions for the lateral incisors through the second molars. We conclude that the addition of meperidine to a standard lidocaine solution does not increase the success of the inferior alveolar nerve block. PMID:17177592

  6. The topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in localized neuropathic pain: a reappraisal of the clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    de León-Casasola, Oscar A; Mayoral, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Topical 5% lidocaine medicated plasters represent a well-established first-line option for the treatment of peripheral localized neuropathic pain (LNP). This review provides an updated overview of the clinical evidence (randomized, controlled, and open-label clinical studies, real-life daily clinical practice, and case series). The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster effectively provides pain relief in postherpetic neuralgia, and data from a large open-label controlled study indicate that the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is as effective as systemic pregabalin in postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic polyneuropathy but with an improved tolerability profile. Additionally, improved analgesia and fewer side effects were experienced by patients treated synchronously with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, further demonstrating the value of multimodal analgesia in LNP. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster provides continued benefit after long-term (≤7 years) use and is also effective in various other LNP conditions. Minor application-site reactions are the most common adverse events associated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster; there is minimal risk of systemic adverse events and drug–drug interactions. Although further well-controlled studies are warranted, the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is efficacious and safe in LNP and may have particular clinical benefit in elderly and/or medically compromised patients because of the low incidence of adverse events. PMID:26929664

  7. Comparison of etidocaine and lidocaine for control of intra- and post-operative bleeding and pain.

    PubMed

    Sisk, A L

    1986-01-01

    Etidocaine hydrochloride, an amide-type of local anesthetic with prolonged duration of action, was evaluated and compared with the standard local anesthetic lidocaine to determine its efficacy of action and its effect on bleeding during and following the removal of impacted mandibular third molar teeth. The findings indicate that 1.5% etidocaine hydrochloride with 1:200,000 epinephrine, in comparison with 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, produces anesthesia comparable to that obtained with lidocaine but results in greater measured intraoperative blood loss. PMID:3484524

  8. Efficacy of Intravenous Lidocaine During Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Gastric Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Eun; Choi, Jong Bum; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Jeong, Hae Won; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, So Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an advanced therapy for early gastric neoplasm and requires sedation with adequate analgesia. Lidocaine is a short-acting local anesthetic, and intravenous lidocaine has been shown to have analgesic efficacy in surgical settings. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of intravenous lidocaine on analgesic and sedative requirements for ESD and pain after ESD. Sixty-six patients scheduled for ESD randomly received either intravenous lidocaine as a bolus of 1.5 mg/kg before sedation, followed by continuous infusion at a rate of 2 mg/kg/h during sedation (lidocaine group; n = 33) or the same bolus and infusion volumes of normal saline (control group; n = 33). Sedation was achieved with propofol and fentanyl. The primary outcome was fentanyl requirement during ESD. We recorded hemodynamics and any events during ESD and evaluated post-ESD epigastric and throat pain. Fentanyl requirement during ESD reduced by 24% in the lidocaine group compared with the control group (105 ± 28 vs. 138 ± 37 μg, mean ± SD; P < 0.001). The lidocaine group reached sedation faster [40 (20–100) vs. 55 (30–120) s, median (range); P = 0.001], and incidence of patient movement during ESD decreased in the lidocaine group (3% vs. 26%, P = 0.026). Numerical rating scale for epigastric pain was significantly lower at 6 hours after ESD [2 (0–6) vs. 3 (0–8), median (range); P = 0.023] and incidence of throat pain was significantly lower in the lidocaine group (27% vs. 65%, P = 0.003). No adverse events associated with lidocaine were discovered. Administration of intravenous lidocaine reduced fentanyl requirement and decreased patient movement during ESD. Moreover, it alleviated epigastric and throat pain after ESD. Thus, we conclude that the use of intravenous adjuvant lidocaine is a new and safe sedative method during ESD. PMID:27149489

  9. Lidocaine as an Induction Agent for Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zahid Hussain; Samadi, Shahram; Ameli, Sanaz; Emir Alavi, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Induction of anaesthesia and its associated spikes in blood pressure can cause rupture of an aneurysm during intracranial surgery. Lidocaine can reportedly provide hemodynamic stability when applied before endotracheal intubation. Rapid injection of large doses of lidocaine can cause unconsciousness. Case Presentation: Lidocaine was applied as the sole anaesthetic for induction and maintenance during aneurysm surgery in four patients undergoing intracranial aneurysm surgery. Blood pressure alteration after induction and during surgery, bleeding, brain laxity, intracranial pressure and extubation time were acceptable. Conclusions: Although propofol remains a standard agent for such types of surgeries, lidocaine proved equally effective and coupled with its low cost, minimal side effects and omission of other hypnotic agents was a plausible induction agent and a maintenance drug in the selected cases. PMID:27047794

  10. Effects of intravenously administered lidocaine on pulmonary vagal afferents and phrenic nerve activity in cats.

    PubMed

    Aoki, M; Harada, Y; Namiki, A; Ikeda, M; Shimizu, H

    1992-10-01

    The ability of lidocaine to suppress activity of single vagal afferent fiber and that of phrenic nerve was studied in 20 cats anesthetized with pentobarbital. Slowly adapting stretch receptors (SAR, n = 16) and rapidly adapting stretch receptors (RAR, n = 7) were identified by their discharge pattern to pulmonary inflation. Intravenous lidocaine (1 mg.kg(-1) or 2 mg.kg(-1)) produced a suppression of SAR activity but not of RAR activity. Suppression of phrenic nerve activity lasted much longer than that of SAR. These findings indicate that iv lidocaine acts more dominantly on CNS than on peripherals. We conclude that iv lidocaine prevents cough and hemodynamic changes caused by airway manipulation mainly through its action on CNS and not on peripherals (peripheral nerves or their receptor). PMID:15278511

  11. Benzocaine and lidocaine induced methemoglobinemia after bronchoscopy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Sophie; Fischer, Jacqueline L; Rogers, John D

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Methemoglobinemia is a rare cause of hypoxemia, characterized by abnormal levels of oxidized hemoglobin that cannot bind to and transport oxygen. Case presentation A 62-year-old male underwent bronchoscopy where lidocaine oral solution and Hurricaine spray (20% benzocaine) were used. He developed central cyanosis and his oxygen saturation was 85% via pulse oximetry. An arterial blood gas revealed pH 7.45, PCO2 42, PO2 282, oxygen saturation 85%. Co-oximetry performed revealed a methemoglobin level of 17.5% (normal 0.6–2.5%). The patient was continued on 15 L/minute nonrebreathing face mask and subsequent oxygen saturation improved to 92% within two hours. With hemodynamic stability and improved SpO2, treatment with methylene blue was withheld. Conclusion Methemoglobinemia is a potentially lethal condition after exposure to routinely used drugs. Physicians should be aware of this complication for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:18215265

  12. Skin permeation of lidocaine from crystal suspended oily formulations.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Rakan; Hasegawa, Masaaki; Ishida, Masami; Ebata, Toshiya; Namiki, Noriyuki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2005-09-01

    In vitro permeation of lidocaine (lidocaine base, LID) through excised rat skin was investigated using several LID-suspended oily formulations. The first skin permeation of LID from an LID-suspended oily solution such as liquid paraffin (LP), isopropyl myristate (IPM), polyoxyethylene (2) oleylether (BO-2), and diethyl sebacate (DES) was evaluated and compared with that from polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400) solution, a hydrophilic base. The obtained permeation rate of LID, Japp, from PEG400, LP, IPM, BO-2, and DES was in the order of DES>BO-2=IPM>LP>PEG400, and increased with LID solubility in the oily solvents, although LID crystals were dispersed in all solvents. Subsequently, oily formulations that consisted of different ratios of the first oily solvent (IPM, BO-2, or DES) (each 0-20%), the second oily solvent (LP) and an oily mixture of microcrystalline wax/white petrolatum/paraffin (1/5/4) were evaluated. BO-2 groups at a concentration of 5% and 10% had the highest Japp among the oily formulations, although a higher BO-2 resulted in lower skin permeation. In addition, pretreatment with BO-2 increased the skin permeation of LID. These results suggest that the penetration enhancing effect by the system may be related to the skin penetration of BO-2 itself. Finally, mathematical analysis was done to evaluate the effect of BO-2, and it was shown that BO-2 improved the LID solubility in stratum corneum lipids to efficiently enhance the LID permeation through skin. PMID:16221607

  13. The Efficacy of Lidocaine in Laryngospasm Prevention in Pediatric Surgery: a Network Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaojing; Lai, Zhoupeng; Li, Si; Liu, Xiaochen; Wang, Zhongxing; Tan, Wulin

    2016-01-01

    Higher incidence and worse outcomes of laryngospasm during general anesthesia in children than adults have been reported for many years, but few prevention measures are put forward. Efficacy of lidocaine in laryngospasm prevention has been argued for many years and we decided to design this network meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of lidocaine. We conducted an electronic search of six sources and finally included 12 Randomized Controlled Trials including 1416 patients. A direct comparison between lidocaine and placebo revealed lidocaine had the effect on preventing laryngospasm in pediatric surgery (RR = 0.46, 95% CI = [0.30, 0.70], P = 0.0002, I(2) = 0%). Both subgroup analysis and network analysis demonstrated that both intravenous lidocaine (subgroup: RR = 0.39, 95% CI = [0.18, 0.86], P = 0.02, I(2) = 38%; network: RR = 0.25, 95% CI = [0.04, 0.86]) and topical lidocaine (subgroup: RR = 0.37, 95% CI = [0.19, 0.72], P = 0.003, I(2) = 0%; network: RR = 0.14, 95% CI = [0.02, 0.55]) was effective in laryngospasm prevention, while no statistical difference was found in a comparison between intravenous and topical lidocaine. In conclusion, both intravenous and topical lidocaine are effective in laryngospasm prevention in pediatric surgery, while a comparison between them needs more evidences. PMID:27586012

  14. Lidocaine for systemic sclerosis: a double-blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma; SSc) is an orphan disease with the highest case-specific mortality of any connective-tissue disease. Excessive collagen deposit in affected tissues is a key for the disease's pathogenesis and comprises most of the clinical manifestations. Lidocaine seems to be an alternative treatment for scleroderma considering that: a) the patient's having excessive collagen deposits in tissues affected by scleroderma; b) the patient's demonstrating increased activity of the enzyme prolyl hydroxylase, an essential enzyme for the biosynthesis of collagen; and c) lidocaine's reducing the activity of prolyl hydroxylase. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of lidocaine in treating scleroderma. Methods A randomized double-blind clinical trial included 24 patients with scleroderma randomized to receive lidocaine or placebo intravenously in three cycles of ten days each, with a one-month interval between them. Outcomes: cutaneous (modified Rodnan skin score), oesophageal (manometry) and microvascular improvement (nailfold capillaroscopy); improvement in subjective self-assessment and in quality of life (HAQ). Results There was no statistically significant difference between the groups for any outcome after the treatment and after 6-months follow-up. Improvement in modified Rodnan skin score occurred in 66.7% and 50% of placebo and lidocaine group, respectively (p = 0.408). Both groups showed an improvement in subjective self-assessment, with no difference between them. Conclusions Despite the findings of a previous cohort study favouring the use of lidocaine, this study demonstrated that lidocaine at this dosage and means of administration showed a lack of efficacy for treating scleroderma despite the absence of significant adverse effects. However, further similar clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy of lidocaine when administered in different dosages and by other means. PMID:21299861

  15. The Efficacy of Lidocaine in Laryngospasm Prevention in Pediatric Surgery: a Network Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaojing; Lai, Zhoupeng; Li, Si; Liu, Xiaochen; Wang, Zhongxing; Tan, Wulin

    2016-01-01

    Higher incidence and worse outcomes of laryngospasm during general anesthesia in children than adults have been reported for many years, but few prevention measures are put forward. Efficacy of lidocaine in laryngospasm prevention has been argued for many years and we decided to design this network meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of lidocaine. We conducted an electronic search of six sources and finally included 12 Randomized Controlled Trials including 1416 patients. A direct comparison between lidocaine and placebo revealed lidocaine had the effect on preventing laryngospasm in pediatric surgery (RR = 0.46, 95% CI = [0.30, 0.70], P = 0.0002, I2 = 0%). Both subgroup analysis and network analysis demonstrated that both intravenous lidocaine (subgroup: RR = 0.39, 95% CI = [0.18, 0.86], P = 0.02, I2 = 38%; network: RR = 0.25, 95% CI = [0.04, 0.86]) and topical lidocaine (subgroup: RR = 0.37, 95% CI = [0.19, 0.72], P = 0.003, I2 = 0%; network: RR = 0.14, 95% CI = [0.02, 0.55]) was effective in laryngospasm prevention, while no statistical difference was found in a comparison between intravenous and topical lidocaine. In conclusion, both intravenous and topical lidocaine are effective in laryngospasm prevention in pediatric surgery, while a comparison between them needs more evidences. PMID:27586012

  16. Comparison of intravenous and topical lidocaine as a suppressant of coughing after bronchoscopy during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, C J; Ahlburg, P; Holdgård, H O; Olsen, K H; Thomsen, A

    1991-04-01

    Twenty-four consecutive patients scheduled for fiberbronchoscopy were randomized to receive double-blind either intravenous (1.5 mg/kg) or laryngotracheal (3 mg/kg) lidocaine to evaluate the influence on post-bronchoscopic laryngospasm, pain in the throat and coughing. Plasma lidocaine concentrations were analyzed 5, 15, 30 and 60 min after administration. None of the patients demonstrated laryngospasm or pain in the throat during the first hour after bronchoscopy. Patients receiving topical lidocaine coughed significantly more than patients receiving intravenous lidocaine, with a median number of coughs of 20 compared to 4, during the first hour (P less than 0.01). The plasma lidocaine concentrations were significantly higher after intravenous than after topical administration (P less than 0.001). After intravenous administration the plasma lidocaine concentrations exceeded the accepted level for potential toxicity in five out of 11 patients, but none of the patients developed toxic symptoms and no side-effects were observed. PMID:2038931

  17. Lidocaine Enhances Contractile Function of Ischemic Myocardial Regions in Mouse Model of Sustained Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kania, Gabriela; Osto, Elena; Jakob, Philipp; Krasniqi, Nazmi; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Eriksson, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Perioperative myocardial ischemia is common in high-risk patients. The use of interventional revascularisation or even thrombolysis is limited in this patient subset due to exceedingly high bleeding risks. Blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) with lidocaine had been suggested to reduce infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death in ischemia/reperfusion models. However, the impact of lidocaine on cardiac function during sustained ischemia still remains unclear. Methods Sustained myocardial ischemia was induced by ligation of the left anterior descending artery in 12–16 weeks old male BALB/c mice. Subcutaneous lidocaine (30 mg/kg) was used to block VGSC. Cardiac function was quantified at baseline and at 72h by conventional and speckle-tracking based echocardiography to allow high-sensitivity in vivo phenotyping. Infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death were assessed post mortem histologically and indirectly using troponin measurements. Results Ischemia strongly impaired both, global systolic and diastolic function, which were partially rescued in lidocaine treated in mice. No differences regarding infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death were observed. Mechanistically, and as shown with speckle-tracking analysis, lidocaine specifically improves residual contractility in the ischemic but not in the remote, non-ischemic myocardium. Conclusion VGSC blockade with lidocaine rescues function of ischemic myocardium as a potential bridging to revascularisation in the setting of perioperative myocardial ischemia. PMID:27140425

  18. Effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Queiroz-Williams, Patricia; Doherty, Thomas J; da Cunha, Anderson F; Leonardi, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane (MACSEVO) in alpacas. Eight healthy, intact male, adult alpacas were studied on 2 separate occasions. Anesthesia was induced with SEVO, and baseline MAC (MACB) determination began 45 min after induction. After MACB determination, alpacas were randomly given either an intravenous (IV) loading dose (LD) and infusion of saline or a loading dose [ketamine = 0.5 mg/kg body weight (BW); lidocaine = 2 mg/kg BW] and an infusion of ketamine (25 μg/kg BW per minute) in combination with lidocaine (50 μg/kg BW per minute), and MACSEVO was re-determined (MACT). Quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were also evaluated. Mean MACB was 1.88% ± 0.13% and 1.89% ± 0.14% for the saline and ketamine + lidocaine groups, respectively. Ketamine and lidocaine administration decreased (P < 0.05) MACB by 57% and mean MACT was 0.83% ± 0.10%. Saline administration did not change MACB. Time to determine MACB and MACT was not significantly different between the treatments. The quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were not different between groups. The infusion of ketamine combined with lidocaine significantly decreased MACSEVO by 57% and did not adversely affect time-to-standing or quality of recovery. PMID:27127341

  19. The use of 0.25% lidocaine with fentanyl and pancuronium for intravenous regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Sztark, F; Thicoipé, M; Favarel-Garrigues, J F; Lassié, P; Petitjean, M E; Dabadie, P

    1997-04-01

    The present study was designed to assess the efficacy of fentanyl and pancuronium combined with dilute lidocaine solution for intravenous regional anesthesia of the arm. Forty adult patients undergoing upper limb surgery were randomly allocated to receive either 0.6 mL/kg of 0.5% lidocaine (3 mg/kg) or 0.6 mL/kg of 0.25% lidocaine (1.5 mg/kg) with 1 microg/kg of fentanyl and 0.5 mg of pancuronium. The onset of sensory and motor blocks was significantly shorter in the 0.5% lidocaine group (P < 0.05). However, no differences in analgesia or motor blockade were found between the two groups at 20 min tourniquet time. Regional anesthesia was considered successful in more than 85% of patients. One patient in the 0.25% lidocaine group experienced a transient diplopia after tourniquet release. Postoperative analgesia time was similar in the two groups. We conclude that the addition of fentanyl plus pancuronium to the lidocaine solution reduces the dose of the local anesthetic and possibly systemic toxicity. PMID:9085956

  20. Efficacy of lidocaine lontophoresis using either alternating or direct current in hairless rats.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Wakita, Ryo; Haida, Haruka; Fukayama, Haruhisa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine transport of lidocaine ions through a hairless rat skin in vivo and to compare the efficacy of alternating current (AC) with that of direct current (DC) iontophoresis (IOP). We measured the concentration of lidocaine transported through a cellophane membrane or a hairless rat dorsal skin applying either AC-IOP or DC-IOP. The results revealed that lidocaine concentration increased in a time-dependent manner in vitro in both DC-IOP and AC-IOP. However, the in vivo study showed different tendencies in lidocaine concentration. In the DCIOP group, lidocaine concentration reached its maximum 20 min after current application and then decreased rapidly; the AC-IOP group showed an increase in lidocaine concentration in a time-dependent manner. There were no side effects such as electrical burns in the rats. In conclusion, AC can be applied for long periods and DC for short periods, or their application time can be appropriately scheduled. Our study also suggests the mechanism by which voltage waveforms affect the skin when applied by IOP. In the future, these findings will be a solid foundation for developing various kinds of medical equipment such as scheduled drug delivery system that can easily deliver various types of drug. PMID:24146168

  1. Understanding the large solubility of lidocaine in 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium based ionic liquids using molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Ryan T.; Paluch, Andrew S.

    2016-02-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids have been proposed as replacement solvents in a wide range of industrial separation processes. Here, we focus on the use of ionic liquids as solvents for the pharmaceutical compound lidocaine. We show that the solubility of lidocaine in seven common 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium based ionic liquids is greatly enhanced relative to water. The predicted solubility is greatest in [BMIM]+[CH3CO2]-, which we find results from favorable hydrogen bonding between the lidocaine amine hydrogen and the [CH3CO2]- oxygen, favorable electrostatic interactions between the lidocaine amide oxygen with the [BMIM]+ aromatic ring hydrogens, while lidocaine does not interfere with the association of [BMIM]+ with [CH3CO2]-. Additionally, by removing functional groups from the lidocaine scaffold while maintaining the important amide group, we found that as the van der Waals volume increases, solubility in [BMIM]+[CH3CO2]- relative to water increases.

  2. Muscle-Type Nicotinic Receptor Blockade by Diethylamine, the Hydrophilic Moiety of Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Alberola-Die, Armando; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; González-Ros, José M.; Ivorra, Isabel; Morales, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine bears in its structure both an aromatic ring and a terminal amine, which can be protonated at physiological pH, linked by an amide group. Since lidocaine causes multiple inhibitory actions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), this work was aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of diethylamine (DEA), a small molecule resembling the hydrophilic moiety of lidocaine, on Torpedo marmorata nAChRs microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes. Similarly to lidocaine, DEA reversibly blocked acetylcholine-elicited currents (IACh) in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 close to 70 μM), but unlike lidocaine, DEA did not affect IACh desensitization. IACh inhibition by DEA was more pronounced at negative potentials, suggesting an open-channel blockade of nAChRs, although roughly 30% inhibition persisted at positive potentials, indicating additional binding sites outside the pore. DEA block of nAChRs in the resting state (closed channel) was confirmed by the enhanced IACh inhibition when pre-applying DEA before its co-application with ACh, as compared with solely DEA and ACh co-application. Virtual docking assays provide a plausible explanation to the experimental observations in terms of the involvement of different sets of drug binding sites. So, at the nAChR transmembrane (TM) domain, DEA and lidocaine shared binding sites within the channel pore, giving support to their open-channel blockade; besides, lidocaine, but not DEA, interacted with residues at cavities among the M1, M2, M3, and M4 segments of each subunit and also at intersubunit crevices. At the extracellular (EC) domain, DEA and lidocaine binding sites were broadly distributed, which aids to explain the closed channel blockade observed. Interestingly, some DEA clusters were located at the α-γ interphase of the EC domain, in a cavity near the orthosteric binding site pocket; by contrast, lidocaine contacted with all α-subunit loops conforming the ACh binding site, both in α-γ and α-δ and

  3. Muscle-Type Nicotinic Receptor Blockade by Diethylamine, the Hydrophilic Moiety of Lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Alberola-Die, Armando; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; González-Ros, José M; Ivorra, Isabel; Morales, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine bears in its structure both an aromatic ring and a terminal amine, which can be protonated at physiological pH, linked by an amide group. Since lidocaine causes multiple inhibitory actions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), this work was aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of diethylamine (DEA), a small molecule resembling the hydrophilic moiety of lidocaine, on Torpedo marmorata nAChRs microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes. Similarly to lidocaine, DEA reversibly blocked acetylcholine-elicited currents (I ACh ) in a dose-dependent manner (IC 50 close to 70 μM), but unlike lidocaine, DEA did not affect I ACh desensitization. I ACh inhibition by DEA was more pronounced at negative potentials, suggesting an open-channel blockade of nAChRs, although roughly 30% inhibition persisted at positive potentials, indicating additional binding sites outside the pore. DEA block of nAChRs in the resting state (closed channel) was confirmed by the enhanced I ACh inhibition when pre-applying DEA before its co-application with ACh, as compared with solely DEA and ACh co-application. Virtual docking assays provide a plausible explanation to the experimental observations in terms of the involvement of different sets of drug binding sites. So, at the nAChR transmembrane (TM) domain, DEA and lidocaine shared binding sites within the channel pore, giving support to their open-channel blockade; besides, lidocaine, but not DEA, interacted with residues at cavities among the M1, M2, M3, and M4 segments of each subunit and also at intersubunit crevices. At the extracellular (EC) domain, DEA and lidocaine binding sites were broadly distributed, which aids to explain the closed channel blockade observed. Interestingly, some DEA clusters were located at the α-γ interphase of the EC domain, in a cavity near the orthosteric binding site pocket; by contrast, lidocaine contacted with all α-subunit loops conforming the ACh binding site, both in α-γ and α-δ and

  4. Comparison of the Effects of Lidocaine Prilocaine Cream (EMLA) and Lidocaine Injection on Reduction of Perineal Pain During Perineum Repair in Normal Vaginal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kargar, Roxana; Aghazadeh-Nainie, Afsaneh; Khoddami-Vishteh, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of EMLA cream and lidocaine injection to reduce pain during episiotomy repair. Materials and methods: A total of 46 primiparous women with normal pregnancy who referred for normal vaginal delivery and needed episiotomy repair were selected and randomly divided into two groups. For EMLA group, one hour before the estimated time of delivery, 5g of EMLA cream was applied to perinealmediolateral incision, and after the delivery of the fetus and placenta, again 5g of EMLA cream was applied to healthy skin around the episiotomy for repair. In the other group, lidocaine 2% was used before episiotomy and for its repair, too. Results: Only 8 people (19%) were in need of further analgesia. The mean ± SD of pain during repair of episiotomy on the VAS scale in all cases was 4.2 ± 2.3 cm. Most people (97%) were satisfied with their episiotomy repair. Comparing the two groups of EMLA and lidocaine, there was no difference between the two groups in terms of the duration of episiotomy repair, need for further analgesia, pain on the VAS scale, and satisfaction with the repair method. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that the use of EMLA cream in the site of episiotomy incision in primiparous women can induce a level of analgesia equal to that of lidocaine, and cause a similar level of satisfaction. PMID:27385970

  5. Paraspinous Lidocaine Injection for Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Marta; Imamura, Satiko Tomikawa; Targino, Rosa Alves; Morales-Quezada, León; Onoda Tomikawa, Luis C.; Onoda Tomikawa, Luis G.; Alfieri, Fabio M.; Filippo, Thais R.; da Rocha, Ivan D.; Neto, Raul Bolliger; Fregni, Felipe; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo

    2016-01-01

    In this large, sham-controlled, randomized trial, we examined the efficacy of the combination of standard treatment and paraspinous lidocaine injection compared with standard therapy alone in subjects with chronic low back pain. There is little research-based evidence for the routine clinical use of paraspinous lidocaine injection for low back pain. A total of 378 subjects with nonspecific chronic low back pain were randomized to 3 groups: paraspinous lidocaine injection, analgesics, and exercises (group 1, LID-INJ); sham paraspinous lidocaine injection, analgesics, and exercises (group 2, SH-INJ); and analgesics and exercises (group 3, STD-TTR). A blinded rater assessed the study outcomes at 3 time points: baseline, after treatment, and after 3 months of follow-up. There were increased frequency of pain responses and better low back functional scores in the LID-INJ group compared with the SH-INJ and STD-TTR groups. These effects remained at the 3-month follow-up but differed between all 3 groups. There were significant changes in pain threshold immediately after treatment, supporting the effects of this intervention in reducing central sensitization. Paraspinous lidocaine injection therapy is not associated with a higher risk of adverse effects compared with conventional treatment and sham injection. Its effects on hyperalgesia might correlate with changes in central sensitization. PMID:26828801

  6. [Topical pharmacologic approach with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in the treatment of localized neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Provinciali, L; Lattanzi, S; Chiarlone, R; Fogliardi, A; Intelligente, F; Irace, C; Lanzilotta, M; Palomba, R; Storelli, E; Zampi, M

    2014-12-01

    The treatment of neuropathic pain is a medical challenge. The responsiveness to the different classes of drugs is often unsatisfactory and frequently associated to a wide range of side effects. International guidelines suggest for the "localized" neuropathic pain the topical treatment with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, alone or associated to systemic drugs, as the first choice since its favorable efficacy and tolerability profile. Many clinical experiences support the rationale for using 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in different kinds of localized neuropathic pain, such as postherpetic and trigeminal neuralgia, compressive syndromes, painful diabetic polyneuropathy and pain secondary to trauma or surgical interventions. This paper reports a series of clinical cases whose heterogeneity suggests the wide burden of applicability of the topical 5% lidocaine, either alone and associated to systemic drugs. All the described conditions were characterized by a highly intense pain, not adequately controlled by actual medications, which improved after the use of topical lidocaine. The good response to lidocaine allowed the reduction, of even the withdrawal, of concurrent drugs and improved the patients' quality of life. PMID:25392960

  7. The Effect of Intravenous Lidocaine on Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Randomized Double Blind Placebo Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Argyra, Erifili

    2014-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is the most common neuralgia. Its therapeutic approach is challenging as the first line treatment often does not help, or even causes intolerable side effects. The aim of our randomized double blind, placebo controlled, crossover study was to investigate in a prospective way the effect of lidocaine in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. Twenty patients met our inclusion criteria and completed the study. Each patient underwent four weekly sessions, two of which were with lidocaine (5 mgs/kg) and two with placebo infusions administered over 60 minutes. Intravenous lidocaine was superior regarding the reduction of the intensity of pain, the allodynia, and the hyperalgesia compared to placebo. Moreover, contrary to placebo, lidocaine managed to maintain its therapeutic results for the first 24 hours after intravenous infusion. Although, intravenous lidocaine is not a first line treatment, when first line medications fail to help, pain specialists may try it as an add-on treatment. This trial is registered with NCT01955967. PMID:27335883

  8. Transient radiculopathy after 5% lidocaine or 0.75% bupivacaine spinal anesthesia in 3 surgical positions.

    PubMed

    Canady, J; Hargrove, M; Ganz, A

    2001-10-01

    The present study was conducted to compare the incidence of transient radicular irritation (TRI) after spinal anesthesia with 5% lidocaine or 0.75% bupivacaine in the supine, prone, and lithotomy surgical positions. A non-rAndomized survey approach was used. The convenience sample consisted of 243 adults receiving spinal anesthesia for elective surgery at 1 of 3 hospitals. Patients were questioned by telephone postoperatively to determine whether they had experienced TRI. Statistical analysis using the Fisher exact test revealed no significant difference in TRI incidence between local anesthetics in the supine or prone position groups. In the lithotomy position group, the incidence of TRI was significantly higher in patients receiving 5% lidocaine. Further, chi 2 testing revealed no significant difference in TRI incidence between surgical position groups when position alone was considered. The findings suggest that TRI after spinal anesthesia occurs more frequently with 5% lidocaine than with 0.75% bupivacaine only when patients undergo surgery in the lithotomy position. Providers need to consider the risks and benefits of 5% lidocaine when selecting an agent for spinal anesthesia, especially with patients undergoing surgery in the lithotomy position. When lidocaine is used, providers should discuss TRI as a risk of spinal anesthesia with patients during preanesthetic counseling. PMID:11899459

  9. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Activation and Subsequent Th1 Cell Polarization by Lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young-Tae; Na, Hyeongjin; Ryu, Heeju; Chung, Yeonseok

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play an essential role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing cellular stress including pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns and by shaping the types of antigen-specific T cell immunity. Although lidocaine is widely used in clinical settings that trigger cellular stress, it remains unclear whether such treatment impacts the activation of innate immune cells and subsequent differentiation of T cells. Here we showed that lidocaine inhibited the production of IL-6, TNFα and IL-12 from dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor ligands including lipopolysaccharide, poly(I:C) and R837 in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, the differentiation of Th1 cells was significantly suppressed by the addition of lidocaine while the same treatment had little effect on the differentiation of Th17, Th2 and regulatory T cells in vitro. Moreover, lidocaine suppressed the ovalbumin-specific Th1 cell responses in vivo induced by the adoptive transfer of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. These results demonstrate that lidocaine inhibits the activation of dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor signals and subsequently suppresses the differentiation of Th1 cell responses. PMID:26445366

  10. Analysis of Lidocaine Interactions with Serum Proteins Using High-Performance Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Sony; Yoo, Michelle J.; Jang, Yoon Jeong; Hage, David S.

    2010-01-01

    High-performance affinity chromatography was used to study binding by the drug lidocaine to human serum albumin (HSA) and α1–acid glycoprotein (AGP). AGP had strong binding to lidocaine, with an association equilibrium constant (Ka) of 1.1-1.7 × 105 M-1 at 37 °C and pH 7.4. Lidocaine had weak-to-moderate binding to HSA, with a Ka in the range of 103 to 104 M-1. Competitive experiments with site selective probes showed that lidocaine was interacting with Sudlow site II of HSA and the propranolol site of AGP. These results agree with previous observations in the literature and provide a better quantitative understanding of how lidocaine binds to these serum proteins and is transported in the circulation. This study also demonstrates how HPAC can be used to examine the binding of a drug with multiple serum proteins and provide detailed information on the interaction sites and equilibrium constants that are involved in such processes. PMID:20138813

  11. Selective metabolic activation of the hippocampus during lidocaine-induced pre-seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Ingvar, M; Shapiro, H M

    1981-01-01

    Neurophysiologic studies indicate that local anesthetic-induced seizures are generated in subcortical brain structures. The authors utilized a quantitative autoradiographic technique to measure cerebral metabolism during lidocaine-induced seizure activity in rats anesthetized with nitrous oxide. Local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (l-CMRg) was determined when lidocaine infusion resulted in sustained electroencephalographic patterns consisting of approximately 100--125-mu volt discharges with a frequency of about 9 Hz, lasting 1-2 sec, and superimposed upon almost isoelectric periods lasting 1-3 sec. Significant reductions in 1-CMRg (30-70 per cent decreases) occurred in 19 of 26 regions surveyed. All areas of cerebral cortex had decreased glucose uptake following lidocaine administration. The hippocampus developed a striking increase in 1-CMRg of 237 per cent, while the amygdala and other related nuclei sustained metabolic rates similar to those present before lidocaine was given. This study demonstrates a coupling of metabolic activity with functional activity in subcortical structures recognized to be involved in the generation of local anesthetic seizure activity. Additionally, it reveals a heterogeneous response of cerebral metabolism to lidocaine infusion in the presence of subcortically localized seizures. PMID:7457980

  12. Effects of lumbosacral epidural ketamine and lidocaine in xylazine-sedated cats.

    PubMed

    DeRossi, R; Benites, A P; Ferreira, J Z; Neto, J M N; Hermeto, L C

    2009-06-01

    In order to determine the analgesic and cardiovascular effects of the combination of epidural ketamine and lidocaine, 6 sedated cats were studied. Six healthy, young cats were used in a prospective randomised study. Each cat underwent 3 treatments, at least 1 week apart, via epidural injection: (1) ketamine (2.5 mg/kg), (2) lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg), and (3) ketamine (2.5 mg/kg) plus lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg). Epidural injections were administered through the lumbosacral space. Analgesia, motor block, sedation, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate and arterial oxygen saturation were measured. Rectal temperature was compared before and after sedation as well as after epidural administration of the drugs. Epidural administration of the ketamine/lidocaine combination induced prolonged analgesia extending from the coccygeal to the T13-L1 dermatomes, leading to severe ataxia. Cardiovascular effects were significant in all treatments: heart rate decreased, but there was a minimal reduction in arterial pressure. It was concluded that adding a dose of ketamine to epidural lidocaine in cats is feasible and effective. PMID:19831267

  13. Analgesic efficacy of lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal: A randomized trial study1

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Valdecy Ferreira de Oliveira; da Costa, José Madson Vidal; Cascudo, Marcelo Matos; Pinheiro, Ênio de Oliveira; Fernandes, Maria Angela Ferreira; de Araujo, Ivonete Batista

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to assess the analgesic efficacy of subcutaneous lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal following heart surgery. Methods: sixty volunteers were randomly allocated in two groups; 30 participants in the experimental group were given 1% subcutaneous lidocaine, and 30 controls were given a multimodal analgesia regime comprising systemic anti-inflammatory agents and opioids. The intensity and quality of pain and trait and state anxiety were assessed. The association between independent variables and final outcome was assessed by means of the Chi-squared test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test. Results: the groups did not exhibit significant difference with respect to the intensity of pain upon chest tube removal (p= 0.47). The most frequent descriptors of pain reported by the participants were pressing, sharp, pricking, burning and unbearable. Conclusion: the present study suggests that the analgesic effect of the subcutaneous administration of 1% lidocaine combined with multimodal analgesia is most efficacious. PMID:26625989

  14. Continuous subcutaneous infusion of lidocaine for persistent hiccup in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaneishi, Keisuke; Kawabata, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Persistent hiccup can cause anorexia, weight loss, disabling sleep deprivation, anxiety, and depression. Therefore, relief of persistent hiccup is important for advanced cancer patients and their family. Most reports on this condition are case series reports advocating the use of baclofen, haloperidol, gabapentin, and midazolam. However, these medications are occasionally ineffective or accompanied by intolerable side effects. The sodium channel blocker lidocaine has been shown to be effective in treating a variety of disorders thought to involve neuropathic mechanisms. Intravenous administration of lidocaine is common but efficacy has also been reported for subcutaneous infusion. In advanced cancer patients, subcutaneous infusion is easy, advantageous, and accompanied by less discomfort. We report a case of severe and sustained hiccup caused by gastric cancer that was successfully treated with a continuous subcutaneous infusion of lidocaine (480 mg (24 ml)/day) without severe side effects. PMID:22661318

  15. I.v. lidocaine worsens histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hirota, K; Hashimoto, Y; Sato, T; Yoshioka, H; Kudo, T; Ishihara, H; Matsuki, A

    1999-01-01

    We have assessed the effect of lidocaine (lignocaine) on histamine-induced bronchoconstriction by direct visualization with a superfine fibreoptic bronchoscope. Seven mongrel dogs were anaesthetized with pentobarbital (pentobarbitone) 30 mg kg-1 followed by 2 mg kg-1 h-1 and pancuronium 200 micrograms kg-1 h-1. The trachea was intubated with a tracheal tube containing a second lumen for insertion of a 2.2-mm fibreoptic bronchoscope. This allowed estimation of the bronchial cross-sectional area (BCA) of the third bronchial bifurcation of the right lung. We used NIH image, a public domain image processing and analysis program. Bronchoconstriction was produced with a bolus dose of histamine 10 micrograms kg-1 i.v. followed by continuous infusion of 500 micrograms kg-1 h-1. After 30 min the following i.v. doses of lidocaine were given: lidocaine 0 (saline), 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10 mg kg-1 at 10-min intervals. BCA was assessed 90 s after each dose. Arterial blood sampling was performed for measurement of plasma catecholamines. Lidocaine 1.0 and 10 mg kg-1 significantly reduced histamine-decreased BCA from 69.7 (SEM 4.1)% to 59.8 (7.3)% and 34.3 (6.8)%, respectively. Plasma concentrations of catecholamines decreased significantly after lidocaine 10 mg kg-1 i.v. In addition, there was a significant correlation between percentage decreases in plasma concentrations of epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) and reduction in %BCA (epinephrine-BCA, P < 0.01, r = 0.674; norepinephrine-BCA, P < 0.01, r = 0.510). This study suggests that i.v. lidocaine may exacerbate histamine-induced bronchoconstriction by a sympatholytic effect. This may have therapeutic implications for patients with acute asthma or anaphylactic shock who may become dependent on circulating catecholamines. PMID:10325842

  16. Juvéderm Volbella with Lidocaine for Lip and Perioral Enhancement: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chantrey, Jonquille; Belhaouari, Lakdhar; Saleh, Roy; Murphy, Diane K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Juvéderm Volbella with Lidocaine is a new hyaluronic acid dermal filler. Methods: In this prospective, randomized, multicenter study, 280 subjects desiring lip volume enhancement were treated with Juvéderm Volbella with Lidocaine or Restylane-L. Investigators rated treatment outcomes on Allergan’s Lip Fullness Scale, Perioral Lines Scale, and Oral Commissures Severity Scale. A blinded independent central reviewer (ICR) assessed 3-dimensional digital photographs using these scales. Subjects evaluated outcomes using the FACE-Q Recovery Early Life Impact and Recovery Early Symptoms modules. The primary endpoint was noninferiority of Juvéderm Volbella with Lidocaine to Restylane-L based on responder rate (percentage of subjects with ≥1-point Lip Fullness Scale improvement at month 3 ICR assessment vs baseline). Results: Juvéderm Volbella with Lidocaine was noninferior to Restylane-L. Although responder rates based on ICR assessments of lip fullness, perioral lines, and oral commissures did not differ between treatments, investigator assessments showed significant improvements in perioral lines and oral commissures with Juvéderm Volbella with Lidocaine vs Restylane-L (P ≤ 0.029). Subjects treated with Juvéderm Volbella with Lidocaine had higher mean FACE-Q scores on day 1 (P ≤ 0.001), indicating less disruption of daily activities. Mean change in lip volume from baseline to day 1 was smaller in the Juvéderm Volbella with Lidocaine group (but similar between treatments on day 14), indicating less acute swelling. Severe injection site responses occurred less frequently with Juvéderm Volbella with Lidocaine. Conclusions: Juvéderm Volbella with Lidocaine is effective for lip enhancement, improves perioral lines and oral commissures, and results in less short-term swelling and disruption in daily activities than Restylane-L. PMID:25878932

  17. Intracuff alkalized lidocaine reduces sedative/analgesic requirements for mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Basuni, Ahmed Sobhy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of intracuff alkalized lidocaine on sedative/analgesic requirements for mechanically ventilated patients and its consequence on patient-ventilator interaction. Materials and Methods: A total of 64 patients who expected to require ventilatory support for a period of more than 48 h were randomly assigned to groups S and L. In group S, the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuffs were inflated with normal saline. In group L, the ETT cuffs were inflated with lidocaine 2% and sodium bicarbonate 8.4%. The investigator and the surgical intensive care unit staff were blinded to the nature of cuff-filled solutions. Sedation was maintained with propofol and fentanyl infusions. The total requirements for propofol and fentanyl, frequency and severity of cough and number of ineffective triggering during the first 24 h of mechanical ventilation were recorded. Results: There was a significant reduction (about 30%) in the requirements for propofol and fentanyl in patients who received intracuff alkalinized lidocaine; P < 0.001. The frequency and severity of cough were significantly lower in group L compared with group S and the frequency of ineffective triggering was significantly lower in group L; P < 0.001 for both comparisons. Conclusion: Intracuff alkalized lidocaine increases ETT tolerance and hence, decreases sedatives/analgesics requirements for mechanically ventilated patients. This results in improved patient-ventilator synchronization. PMID:25422600

  18. Regional lidocaine anesthesia without exsanguination for outpatient management of upper extremity fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, G. A.; Hayes, W. M.; Cornwal, R.

    1995-01-01

    The use of small dose intravenous lidocaine without exsanguination for upper extremity fractures in children and adults is described. A twenty-plus year experience with this technique in the outpatient setting has shown it to be effective and safe. Attention to detail is essential and inadvertent tourniquet release must be avoided. Images Figure 1 PMID:7634037

  19. Enhanced skin penetration of lidocaine through encapsulation into nanoethosomes and nanostructured lipid carriers: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Babaei, S; Ghanbarzadeh, S; Adib, Z M; Kouhsoltani, M; Davaran, S; Hamishehkar, H

    2016-05-01

    Lipid based nanoparticles have become a major research object in topical drug delivery to enable drugs to pass the stratum corneum and reach the desired skin layer. The present investigation deals with the encapsulation of lidoacine into nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) and nanoethosomes for improving its dermal delivery and consequently local anesthetic efficacy. Concurrently these two topical delivery systems were compared. Lidocaine-loaded NLCs and nanoethosomes were characterized by various techniques and used for an in vitro skin penetration study using excised rat skin and Franz diffusion cells. The nanoparticles were tracked in the skin by following the Rhodamine-labled nanocarriers under fluorescent microscopy. Optimized lidocaine-loaded NLCs (size 96 nm, zeta potential -13.7 mV, encapsulation efficiency (EE) % 69.86% and loading capacity (LC) % 10.47%) and nanoethosomes (size 105.4 nm, zeta potential -33.6 mV, EE 40.14% and LC 8.02%) were chosen for a skin drug delivery study. Higher skin drug deposition of NLCs and nanoethosomal formulations compared to lidocaine hydroalcoholic solution represented a better localization of the drug in the skin. NLC formulation showed the lowest entered drug in the receptor phase of Franz diffusion cell in comparison with nanoethosomes and hydroalcoholic solution confirming the highest skin accumulation of drug. Both colloidal systems showed superiority over the drug solution for dermal delivery of lidocaine, however, NLC exhibited more promising characteristics than nanoethosomes regarding drug loading and skin targeted delivery. PMID:27348967

  20. A New Anaesthetic Protocol for Adult Zebrafish (Danio rerio): Propofol Combined with Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Valentim, Ana M.; Félix, Luís M.; Carvalho, Leonor; Diniz, Enoque; Antunes, Luís M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The increasing use of zebrafish model has not been accompanied by the evolution of proper anaesthesia for this species in research. The most used anaesthetic in fishes, MS222, may induce aversion, reduction of heart rate, and consequently high mortality, especially during long exposures. Therefore, we aim to explore new anaesthetic protocols to be used in zebrafish by studying the quality of anaesthesia and recovery induced by different concentrations of propofol alone and in combination with different concentrations of lidocaine. Material and Methods In experiment A, eighty-three AB zebrafish were randomly assigned to 7 different groups: control, 2.5 (2.5P), 5 (5P) or 7.5 μg/ml (7.5P) of propofol; and 2.5 μg/ml of propofol combined with 50, (P/50L), 100 (P/100L) or 150 μg/ml (P/150L) of lidocaine. Zebrafish were placed in an anaesthetic water bath and time to lose the equilibrium, reflex to touch, reflex to a tail pinch, and respiratory rate were measured. Time to gain equilibrium was also assessed in a clean tank. Five and 24 hours after anaesthesia recovery, zebrafish were evaluated concerning activity and reactivity. Afterwards, in a second phase of experiments (experiment B), the best protocol of the experiment A was compared with a new group of 8 fishes treated with 100 mg/L of MS222 (100M). Results In experiment A, only different concentrations of propofol/lidocaine combination induced full anaesthesia in all animals. Thus only these groups were compared with a standard dose of MS222 in experiment B. Propofol/lidocaine induced a quicker loss of equilibrium, and loss of response to light and painful stimuli compared with MS222. However zebrafish treated with MS222 recovered quickly than the ones treated with propofol/lidocaine. Conclusion In conclusion, propofol/lidocaine combination and MS222 have advantages in different situations. MS222 is ideal for minor procedures when a quick recovery is important, while propofol/lidocaine is best to

  1. Plasma Levels of 2% Lidocaine with 1:100,000 Epinephrine with Young Children Undergoing Dental Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Jurevic, Richard; Milgrom, Peter; Karl, Helen W.; Weinstein, Philip; Coldwell, Susan E.; Kharasch, Evan D.; Mautz, Douglas; Domoto, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Lidocaine levels were determined for 12 children, aged 55 to 150 mo, who received routine dental treatment, including multiple intraoral injections of 2% lidocaine (2.6 to 6.4 mg/kg) with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Peak plasma concentrations of lidocaine ranged from 0.7 to 3.8 μg/ml at 5 to 15 min postinjection. Generally accepted threshold concentrations for the onset of central nervous system toxicity are 5 to 10 μg/ml. In this study, no child approached these levels when given local anesthesia for dental procedures. PMID:19598719

  2. Efficacy of Intravenous Lidocaine During Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Gastric Neoplasm: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Choi, Jong Bum; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Jeong, Hae Won; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, So Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an advanced therapy for early gastric neoplasm and requires sedation with adequate analgesia. Lidocaine is a short-acting local anesthetic, and intravenous lidocaine has been shown to have analgesic efficacy in surgical settings. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of intravenous lidocaine on analgesic and sedative requirements for ESD and pain after ESD.Sixty-six patients scheduled for ESD randomly received either intravenous lidocaine as a bolus of 1.5 mg/kg before sedation, followed by continuous infusion at a rate of 2 mg/kg/h during sedation (lidocaine group; n = 33) or the same bolus and infusion volumes of normal saline (control group; n = 33). Sedation was achieved with propofol and fentanyl. The primary outcome was fentanyl requirement during ESD. We recorded hemodynamics and any events during ESD and evaluated post-ESD epigastric and throat pain.Fentanyl requirement during ESD reduced by 24% in the lidocaine group compared with the control group (105 ± 28 vs. 138 ± 37 μg, mean ± SD; P < 0.001). The lidocaine group reached sedation faster [40 (20-100) vs. 55 (30-120) s, median (range); P = 0.001], and incidence of patient movement during ESD decreased in the lidocaine group (3% vs. 26%, P = 0.026). Numerical rating scale for epigastric pain was significantly lower at 6 hours after ESD [2 (0-6) vs. 3 (0-8), median (range); P = 0.023] and incidence of throat pain was significantly lower in the lidocaine group (27% vs. 65%, P = 0.003). No adverse events associated with lidocaine were discovered.Administration of intravenous lidocaine reduced fentanyl requirement and decreased patient movement during ESD. Moreover, it alleviated epigastric and throat pain after ESD. Thus, we conclude that the use of intravenous adjuvant lidocaine is a new and safe sedative method during ESD. PMID:27149489

  3. Assessment of membrane protection by /sup 31/P-NMR effects of lidocaine on calcium-paradox in myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Hirosumi; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Teragaki, Masakazu; Takeuchi, Kazuhide; Takeda, Takeda; Ikata, Mari; Ishikawa, Makoto; Miura, Iwao

    1989-01-01

    In studying calcium paradox, perfused rat hearts were used to investigate the myocardial protective effects of lidocaine. Intracellular contents of phosphates were measured using the /sup 31/P-NMR method. In hearts reexposed to calcium, following 3 minute calcium-free perfusion, a rapid contracture occurred, followed by rapid and complete disappearance of intracellular phosphates with no resumption of cardiac function. In hearts where lidocaine was administered from the onset of the calcium-free perfusion until 2 minutes following the onset of reexposure to calcium, both intracellular phosphates and cardiac contractility were maintained. Therefore, it can be said that cell membranes were protected by lidocaine.

  4. Case studies illustrating the management of trigeminal neuropathic pain using topical 5% lidocaine plasters

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Zehra; Renton, Tara

    2013-01-01

    Chronic trigeminal pain, with its severe related functional problems, is difficult to treat. Treatment is often empirically based on medications used for other chronic pain conditions. Systemic sodium channel and calcium channel blocking agents may cause a multitude of complications that are often poorly tolerated by the patient. Aim: The aim of this case report was to assess the efficacy of topical 5% lidocaine plasters in reducing pain and reducing adjuvant medication in patients with orofacial neuropathic pain. Method: Fourteen patients with chronic orofacial pain conditions referred to the oral surgery department were instructed to wear 5% lidocaine plasters for 12 hours each day over the painful area. The conditions included post-surgical neuropathy (n = 10), multiple sclerosis-related pain (n = 1), persistent idiopathic facial pain (n = 1), Ramsay Hunt syndrome (post-herpetic neuralgia, n = 1) and trigeminal neuralgia (n = 1). Data were collected on patient demographics, pain levels and medication. Results: Pain levels improved in 12 out of 14 patients. Nine patients had a reduction in adjuvant medication, two of whom completely stopped adjuvant treatment. Conclusion: This case series demonstrates that of the use of 5% lidocaine plasters may play a useful role in the management of chronic trigeminal pain. A suggested novel approach for the management of orofacial pain, for clinicians, is presented. Summary points Management of chronic orofacial pain continues to be a major challenge to the clinician. Patients are often placed on a multitude of medications in an attempt to alleviate pain without success. Topical 5% lidocaine plasters, currently used for the management of post-herpetic neuralgia, offer the option of locally targeting trigeminal pain without the multiple side-effects of systemic medication. This case series demonstrates that lidocaine plasters decrease verbal pain scores in extraoral, trigeminal and neuropathic pain, and reduce the use of other

  5. Addition of Lidocaine Injection Immediately before Physiotherapy for Frozen Shoulder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Wang, Tao-Liang; Lin, Yi-Jia; Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Tsai, Chun-Mei; Huang, Kuang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The intraarticular injection of lidocaine immediately before a physiotherapy session may relieve pain during the stretching and mobilization of the affected joint in patients with a frozen shoulder, thus enhancing the treatment effect. To compare the effects of intraarticular injection of lidocaine plus physiotherapy to that of physiotherapy alone in the treatment of a frozen shoulder, a prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted in the rehabilitation department of a private teaching hospital. Patients with a frozen shoulder were randomized into the physiotherapy group or the lidocaine injection plus physiotherapy (INJPT) group. The subjects in the INJPT group underwent injection of 3 ml of 1% lidocaine into the affected shoulder 10 to 20 minutes before each physiotherapy session. In each group, the treatment lasted 3 months. The primary outcome measures were the active and passive range of motion of the affected shoulder. The secondary outcome measures were the results of the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). The outcome measures were evaluated before treatment and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 months after the start of treatment. The group comparisons showed significantly greater improvement in the INJPT group, mainly in active and passive shoulder range of motion in flexion and external rotation and improvements in pain and disability (P < 0.05); however, no significant group difference was seen in the SF-36 results. The intraarticular injection of lidocaine immediately before a physiotherapy session might be superior to physiotherapy alone in the treatment of a frozen shoulder. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01817348 PMID:25714415

  6. Effects of Lidocaine, Dexmedetomidine or Their Combination on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Sevoflurane in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    MORAN-MUÑOZ, Rafael; IBANCOVICHI, J. A.; Gutierrez-BLANCO, Eduardo; ACEVEDO-ARCIQUE, Carlos M.; Victoria MORA, J. Mauro; TENDILLO, Francisco J.; SANTOS-GONZALEZ, Martin; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to determine the effects of lidocaine (LIDO) and dexmedetomidine (DEX) or their combination (LIDO–DEX), administered by constant-rate infusion (CRI), on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in dogs. Seven healthy mongrel dogs were used with a 2-week washout interval between treatments in this study. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen, and MAC of sevoflurane was determined after 90 min equilibration period in the dogs (SEV-MACBASAL). Then, sevoflurane MAC was determined again in the dogs after 45 min equilibration period of one of the following treatments: an intravenous loading dose of lidocaine 2 mg/kg followed by 6 mg/kg/hr CRI (SEV-MACLIDO); an intravenous loading dose of dexmedetomidine 2 µg/kg followed by 2 µg/kg/hr CRI (SEV-MACDEX); or their combination (SEV-MACLIDO-DEX). These SEV-MACs were determined in duplicate. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc Tuckey test when appropriate. The SEV-MACBASAL was 1.82 ± 0.06%, SEV-MACLIDO was 1.38 ± 0.08%, SEV-MACDEX was 1.22 ± 0.10%, and SEV-MACLIDO-DEX was 0.78 ± 0.06%. The CRI administration of lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination produced a significant reduction in the MAC of sevoflurane by 26.1 ± 9.0% (P<0.0001), 43.7 ± 11.8% (P<0.0002) and 54.4 ± 9.8% (P<0.0001), respectively. The MAC reduction was significantly greater after the CRI combination of lidocaine and dexmedetomidine when compared with lidocaine CRI (P<0.0001) or dexmedetomidine CRI treatments (P<0.025). PMID:24572631

  7. Comparison of the Effect of Lidocaine Adding Dexketoprofen and Paracetamol in Intravenous Regional Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Akdogan, Ali; Eroglu, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Comparison of dexketoprofen and paracetamol added to the lidocaine in Regional Intravenous Anesthesia in terms of hemodynamic effects, motor and sensorial block onset times, intraoperative VAS values, and analgesia requirements. Method. The files of 73 patients between 18 and 65 years old in the ASA I-II risk group who underwent hand and forearm surgery were analyzed and 60 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into 3 groups: Group D (n = 20), 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine and 50 mg/2 mL dexketoprofen trometamol; Group P (n = 20), 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine and 3 mg/kg paracetamol; Group K (n = 20), 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine. Demographic data, motor and sensorial block times, heart rate, mean blood pressure, VAS values, and intraoperative and postoperative analgesia requirements were recorded. Results. Sensorial and motor block onset durations of Group K were significantly longer than other groups. Motor block termination duration was found to be significantly longer in Group D than in Group K. VAS values of Group K were found higher than other groups. There was no significant difference in VAS values between Group D and Group P. Analgesia requirement was found to be significantly more in Group K than in Group P. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of heart rates and mean arterial pressures. Conclusion. We concluded that the addition of 3 mg/kg paracetamol and 50 mg dexketoprofen to lidocaine as adjuvant in Regional Intravenous Anesthesia applied for hand and/or forearm surgery created a significant difference clinically. PMID:24800256

  8. Comparison of the effects of acetaminophen to ketorolac when added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Myoung Jin; Cheong, Soon Ho; Shin, Chee Mahn; Kim, Young Jae; Choe, Young Kyun; Lee, Kun Moo; Lim, Se Hun; Kim, Young Hwan; Cho, Kwang Rae; Lee, Sang Eun

    2010-01-01

    Background This study was done to evaluate the effect on pain relief when acetaminophen was added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA). Methods Sixty patients undergoing hand or forearm surgery received IVRA were assigned to three groups: Group C received 0.5% lidocaine diluted with 0.9% normal saline to a total volume of 40 ml (n = 20), Group P received 0.5% lidocaine diluted with intravenous acetaminophen 300 mg to a total volume of 40 ml (n = 20) and Group K received 0.5% lidocaine diluted with 0.9% normal saline plus ketorolac 10 mg made up to a total volume of 40 ml (n = 20). Sensory block onset time, tourniquet pain onset time, which was defined as the time from tourniquet application to fentanyl administration for relieving tourniquet pain and amount of analgesic consumption during surgery were recorded. Following deflation of tourniquet sensory recovery time, postoperative pain and quantity of analgesic uses in post-anesthesia care unit were assessed. Results Sensory block onset time was shorter in Group P compared to Group C (P < 0.05). Tourniquet pain onset time was delayed in Group P when compared with group C (P < 0.05). Postoperative pain and analgesic consumption were reduced in Group P and Group K compared to Group C (P < 0.001). Conclusions The addition of acetaminophen to lidocaine for IVRA shortens the onset time of sensory block and delays tourniquet pain onset time, but not with ketorolac. Both acetaminophen and ketorolac reduce postoperative pain and analgesic consumption. PMID:20508792

  9. Effects of lidocaine and droxicainide on myocardial necrosis: a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, D.B.; Cheung, W.M.; Ribeiro, L.G.; Maroko, P.R.

    1983-06-01

    Lidocaine has been shown to protect ischemic myocardium, but the degree of its effectiveness is not yet well established. Therefore, in this study, the effects of this drug on ultimate infarct size were examined quantitatively. Another member of the same class of drugs, droxicainide (ALS1249), DL-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-pipecolinyl-2,6-dimethylanilide hydrochloride, is a new antiarrhythmic agent that has shown a good therapeutic index in the initial experimental studies. Accordingly, the effects of this drug on ultimate infarct size were examined and compared with those of lidocaine. Coronary artery occlusion was performed on 29 dogs. One minute later, technetium-99m labeled microspheres were injected into the left atrium for assessment of the hypoperfused zone (the zone at risk of infarction). Fifteen minutes after occlusion, the dogs were randomized into three groups: 9 dogs served as a control group, 10 were given lidocaine and 10 were given the same dosage of droxicainide. Six hours after occlusion, the dogs were sacrificed and the hearts cut into 3 mm thick slices and incubated in triphenyltetrazolium chloride to delineate the area of myocardial damage. Autoradiography of the same slices provided images of the areas of myocardial hypoperfusion. Thereafter, in each dog, the percent of hypoperfused area that evolved to necrosis was calculated. In control dogs, it was 85.6 +/- 2.0%; in lidocaine-treated dogs, 68.1 +/- 4.1% (p less than 0.01), a reduction of 20%; and in droxicainide-treated dogs, 50.1 +/- 5.3%, a reduction of 41% (p less than 0.001 versus control and p less than 0.005 versus lidocaine).

  10. Transient impairment of the axolemma following regional anaesthesia by lidocaine in humans

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, Mihai; Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Krarup, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The local anaesthetic lidocaine is known to block voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs), although at high concentration it was also reported to block other ion channel currents as well as to alter lipid membranes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the clinical regional anaesthetic action of lidocaine could be accounted for solely by the block of VGSCs or whether other mechanisms are also relevant. We tested the recovery of motor axon conduction and multiple measures of excitability by ‘threshold-tracking’ after ultrasound-guided distal median nerve regional anaesthesia in 13 healthy volunteers. Lidocaine caused rapid complete motor axon conduction block localized at the wrist. Within 3 h, the force of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle and median motor nerve conduction studies returned to normal. In contrast, the excitability of the motor axons at the wrist remained markedly impaired as indicated by a 7-fold shift of the stimulus–response curves to higher currents with partial recovery by 6 h and full recovery by 24 h. The strength–duration properties were abnormal with markedly increased rheobase and reduced strength–duration time constant. The changes in threshold during electrotonus, especially during depolarization, were markedly reduced. The recovery cycle showed increased refractoriness and reduced superexcitability. The excitability changes were only partly similar to those previously observed after poisoning with the VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin. Assuming an unaltered ion-channel gating, modelling indicated that, apart from up to a 4-fold reduction in the number of functioning VGSCs, lidocaine also caused a decrease of passive membrane resistance and an increase of capacitance. Our data suggest that the lidocaine effects, even at clinical ‘sub-blocking’ concentrations, could reflect, at least in part, a reversible structural impairment of the axolemma. PMID:24710060

  11. Intravenous administration of lidocaine directly acts on spinal dorsal horn and produces analgesic effect: An in vivo patch-clamp analysis.

    PubMed

    Kurabe, Miyuki; Furue, Hidemasa; Kohno, Tatsuro

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous lidocaine administration produces an analgesic effect in various pain states, such as neuropathic and acute pain, although the underlying mechanisms remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that intravenous lidocaine acts on spinal cord neurons and induces analgesia in acute pain. We therefore examined the action of intravenous lidocaine in the spinal cord using the in vivo patch-clamp technique. We first investigated the effects of intravenous lidocaine using behavioural measures in rats. We then performed in vivo patch-clamp recording from spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons. Intravenous lidocaine had a dose-dependent analgesic effect on the withdrawal response to noxious mechanical stimuli. In the electrophysiological experiments, intravenous lidocaine inhibited the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by noxious pinch stimuli. Intravenous lidocaine also decreased the frequency, but did not change the amplitude, of both spontaneous and miniature EPSCs. However, it did not affect inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Furthermore, intravenous lidocaine induced outward currents in SG neurons. Intravenous lidocaine inhibits glutamate release from presynaptic terminals in spinal SG neurons. Concomitantly, it hyperpolarizes postsynaptic neurons by shifting the membrane potential. This decrease in the excitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons may be a possible mechanism for the analgesic action of intravenous lidocaine in acute pain. PMID:27188335

  12. Intravenous administration of lidocaine directly acts on spinal dorsal horn and produces analgesic effect: An in vivo patch-clamp analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kurabe, Miyuki; Furue, Hidemasa; Kohno, Tatsuro

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous lidocaine administration produces an analgesic effect in various pain states, such as neuropathic and acute pain, although the underlying mechanisms remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that intravenous lidocaine acts on spinal cord neurons and induces analgesia in acute pain. We therefore examined the action of intravenous lidocaine in the spinal cord using the in vivo patch-clamp technique. We first investigated the effects of intravenous lidocaine using behavioural measures in rats. We then performed in vivo patch-clamp recording from spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons. Intravenous lidocaine had a dose-dependent analgesic effect on the withdrawal response to noxious mechanical stimuli. In the electrophysiological experiments, intravenous lidocaine inhibited the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by noxious pinch stimuli. Intravenous lidocaine also decreased the frequency, but did not change the amplitude, of both spontaneous and miniature EPSCs. However, it did not affect inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Furthermore, intravenous lidocaine induced outward currents in SG neurons. Intravenous lidocaine inhibits glutamate release from presynaptic terminals in spinal SG neurons. Concomitantly, it hyperpolarizes postsynaptic neurons by shifting the membrane potential. This decrease in the excitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons may be a possible mechanism for the analgesic action of intravenous lidocaine in acute pain. PMID:27188335

  13. Durability of Benefit From Repeated Intravenous Lidocaine Infusions in Fibromyalgia Patients: A Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David M.; Newhouse, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a painful disorder with no curative treatments, and available medications typically provide partial relief of pain. Reported here is the effective use of serial intravenous lidocaine infusions for the chronic management of 3 patients with fibromyalgia. The details of the infusion procedure are described, and relevant literature is reviewed. Lidocaine infusions should be considered in fibromyalgia patients who are refractory to other treatments, and a positive response to 1 infusion may justify repeated infusions for chronic management. PMID:26835161

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of sentinel node identification is maintained with the addition of local lidocaine and subareolar radioactive colloid injection

    PubMed Central

    Stearns, Vered; Blackford, Amanda; Kessler, Jill; Sbaity, Eman; Habibi, Mehran; Khouri, Nagi; Lee, Cindy S.; May, Evelyn; Jeter, Stacie; Sahebi, Camila; Shehata, Christina; Tarpinian, Karineh; Jacobs, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative sentinel node localization (SNL) using a subareolar injection of radiotracer technetium-99m-sulfur colloid (Tc99mSC) is associated with significant pain. Lidocaine use during SNL is not widely adopted partly due to a concern that it can obscure sentinel node identification and reduce its diagnostic accuracy. We prospectively identified women with a biopsy-proven infiltrating breast cancer who were awaiting a SNL. The women completed the McGill pain questionnaire, Visual Analog Scale, and Wong–Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale prior to and following SNL. We identified a retrospective cohort of women with similar demographic and tumor characteristics who did not receive lidocaine before SNL. We compared sentinel lymph node identification rates in the two cohorts. We used Wilcoxon rank sum tests to compare continuous measures and Fisher's exact test for categorical measures. Between January 2011 to July 2012, 110 women consented, and 105 were eligible for and received lidocaine prior to Tc99mSC injection. The post-lidocaine identification rate of SNL was 95 % with Tc99mSC, and 100 % with the addition of intraoperative methylene blue dye/saline. Pain range prior to and following the SNL was unchanged (P = 0.703). We identified 187 women from 2005 to 2009 who did not receive lidocaine during preoperative SNL. There was no significant difference in the success rate of SNL, with or without lidocaine (P = 0.194). The administration of lidocaine during SNL prevents pain related to isotope injection while maintaining the success rate. We have changed our practice at our center to incorporate the use of lidocaine during all SNL. PMID:25788225

  15. Comparison of topical anesthetics with lidocaine infiltration during laceration repair in children.

    PubMed

    Smith, G A; Strausbaugh, S D; Harbeck-Weber, C; Shields, B J; Powers, J D

    1997-01-01

    This study is a randomized, blinded trial that compares the effectiveness of a new topical anesthetic preparation of 2% mepivacaine and 1:100,000 norepinephrine (Mepivanor); a topical solution of 1% tetracaine, 1:4,000 adrenaline, and 4% cocaine (TAC); and 1% lidocaine infiltration during laceration repair in children. The study was conducted in the emergency department of a large academic children's hospital. Study participants were children 2 years of age or older with a laceration on the face or scalp, 5 cm or less in length, that required suturing. Patients were randomly assigned to receive Mepivanor topical solution, TAC topical solution, or lidocaine infiltration anesthesia prior to laceration repair. Seventy-one patients were enrolled in the study during a 2-month period. Outcome measures assessed pain perceptions using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and a seven-point Likert scale. There was statistical power to detect differences of 1.2 to 1.7 units for the VAS outcome measures using alpha = 0.05 and beta = 0.20. There were no statistically significant (P > 0.05) differences between TAC and 1% lidocaine infiltration in providing effective anesthesia. Mepivanor was generally less effective in providing adequate anesthesia during laceration repair than TAC and lidocaine infiltration, with Tukey's post hoc test for ANOVA demonstrating statistically significant (P < 0.05) differences between Mepivanor and these agents for research assistant and suture technician VAS scores. Wound blanching was judged to be less with Mepivanor than with TAC, although this difference was not statistically significant. There were no adverse reactions, wound infections, or healing difficulties for any of the patients who received TAC or Mepivanor. It was concluded that non-cocaine-containing Mepivanor was generally less effective than TAC and lidocaine infiltration in providing adequate local anesthesia during laceration repair. TAC containing only 120 mg of cocaine (3 mL of 4

  16. Development of an ANN optimized mucoadhesive buccal tablet containing flurbiprofen and lidocaine for dental pain.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Amjad; Syed, Muhammad Ali; Abbas, Nasir; Hanif, Sana; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Bukhari, Nadeem Irfan; Hussain, Khalid; Akhlaq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2016-06-01

    A novel mucoadhesive buccal tablet containing flurbiprofen (FLB) and lidocaine HCl (LID) was prepared to relieve dental pain. Tablet formulations (F1-F9) were prepared using variable quantities of mucoadhesive agents, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and sodium alginate (SA). The formulations were evaluated for their physicochemical properties, mucoadhesive strength and mucoadhesion time, swellability index and in vitro release of active agents. Release of both drugs depended on the relative ratio of HPMC:SA. However, mucoadhesive strength and mucoadhesion time were better in formulations, containing higher proportions of HPMC compared to SA. An artificial neural network (ANN) approach was applied to optimise formulations based on known effective parameters (i.e., mucoadhesive strength, mucoadhesion time and drug release), which proved valuable. This study indicates that an effective buccal tablet formulation of flurbiprofen and lidocaine can be prepared via an optimized ANN approach. PMID:27279067

  17. Opiate refractory pain from an intestinal obstruction responsive to an intravenous lidocaine infusion.

    PubMed

    Bafuma, Patrick J; Nandi, Arun; Weisberg, Michael

    2015-10-01

    A 24-year-old female patient presented to our community emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain that had progressively worsened over the last 28 hours. Of note, 1 month prior to her presentation, the patient had a colostomy due to a rectal abscess and required stoma revision 5 days prior to her visit to our ED. The patient's pain was refractory to opiate analgesia in our ED, but experienced significant relief after an intravenous lidocaine infusion. Computer tomography of the abdomen and pelvis ultimately revealed a large bowel obstruction just proximal to the colostomy site. Historically, options for ED management of severe pain have been limited beyond narcotic analgesia. For patients whom are refractory to opiates in the ED, or for whom opiates are contraindicated, lidocaine infusions have shown promise for a variety of both acute and chronic painful conditions. PMID:26306434

  18. Lidocaine Sensitizes the Cytotoxicity of Cisplatin in Breast Cancer Cells via Up-Regulation of RARβ2 and RASSF1A Demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kehan; Yang, Jianxue; Han, Xuechang

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that lidocaine is toxic to various types of cells. And a recent study has confirmed that lidocaine exerts a demethylation effect and regulates the proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines. To recognize a potential anti-tumor effect of lidocaine, we evaluated the DNA demethylation by lidocaine in human breast cancer lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, and determined the influence of demethylation on the toxicity to these cells of cisplatin, which is a commonly utilized anti-tumor agent for breast cancer. Results demonstrated that lidocaine promoted a significant global genomic demethylation, and particularly in the promoters of tumor suppressive genes (TSGs), RARβ2 and RASSF1A. Further, the lidocaine treatment increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis and enhanced cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. The combined treatment with both lidocaine and cisplatin promoted a significantly higher level of MCF-7 cell apoptosis than singular lidocaine or cisplatin treatment. Moreover, the abrogation of RARβ2 or RASSF1A expression inhibited such apoptosis. In conclusion, the present study confirms the demethylation effect of lidocaine in breast cancer cells, and found that the demethylation of RARβ2 and RASSF1A sensitized the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in breast cancer cells. PMID:25526566

  19. Calcium Hydroxylapatite With Integral Lidocaine Provides Improved Pain Control for the Correction of Nasolabial Folds.

    PubMed

    Schachter, Daniel; Bertucci, Vince; Solish, Nowell

    2016-08-01

    Calcium hydroxylapatite microspheres in a carrier gel (CaHA; Radiesse®: Merz North America, Inc., Raleigh, NC) is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for subdermal implantation for the correction of moderate-to-severe facial wrinkles and folds, such as nasolabial folds (NLFs). Lidocaine is often mixed with injectable dermal fillers to reduce injection pain. A new formulation of CaHA has been developed with the convenience of integral 0.3% lidocaine, CaHA (+).
    This multicenter, split-face, double-blind study randomized subjects to receive treatment with CaHA (+) in one NLF and CaHA without lidocaine in the contralateral NLF. The pain level for each NLF was evaluated immediately following the injection using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS), and every 15 minutes for 60 minutes plus follow-up visits. Additional endpoints included aesthetic outcomes and subject preference. All subjects (N=102) received treatment.
    CaHA (+) treatment resulted in a statistically and clinically significant reduction in pain ratings immediately after injection compared with CaHA. The mean difference in VAS scores for pain was -4.41 (P<0.0001). In 90% of subjects, the VAS scores were ≥2.0 cm lower for the CaHA (+)-treated NLF. A significant reduction in pain ratings throughout the first hour after injection was observed with CaHA (+) compared with CaHA (P<0.0001). Both treatment groups achieved significant aesthetic improvement; however, the pain differential resulted in a subject-reported preference for CaHA (+). CaHA (+) with integral lidocaine significantly reduces pain and is as effective as CaHA.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(8):1005-1010. PMID:27538003

  20. Is Lidocaine Infiltration Really Necessary in Micro Ear Surgeries performed Under General Anaesthesia?

    PubMed

    Senthil, K; Samuel, John; Ramachandran, V V

    2012-12-01

    To study the role of infiltrating 2% Lidocaine in Micro ear surgeries performed under general anaesthesia. To measure the impact of infiltration of 2% Lidocaine in post operative pain relief and per operative bleeding. A Double blinded, Prospective randomized comparative study was conducted in a tertiary care referral centre. A total of 30 patients planned for micro ear surgeries under general anaesthesia (Tympanoplasty and Cortical mastoidectomy) for CSOM tubotympanic disease were selected and divided into two groups randomly by the chief senior consultant. Group A patients received local infiltration of 2% Lidocaine with one in 200,000 adrenaline and Group B patients received infiltration of one in 200,000 adrenaline in distilled water alone. Operating surgeon assessed the bleeding in the surgical field using Boezaart's grading system. Post operative pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Pain scores of these patients were assessed in the 1st, 4 and 24th h post operatively and recorded. The mean post operative pain score in the 1st h for the patients in Group A was 0.93 and for patients in Group B was two. The difference in the pain scores between the two groups was significant (P < 0.02).The difference in the mean post operative pain scores between the two groups in the 4 and 24th h were not significant (P < 0.1).Per operatively, grade III bleeding was present in 73% of patients in group B and only 33% of patients had grade III bleeding in group A. Infiltration of 2% Lidocaine has a significant impact over the grade of bleeding in the operative field and also on 1st h post operative pain relief. It did not have a significant influence on the pain relief in the 4 and 24th h post operatively. PMID:24294573

  1. Anesthetic effects of clove oil and lidocaine-HCl on marine medaka (Oryzias dancena).

    PubMed

    Park, In-Seok; Park, Sung Jun; Gil, Hyun Woo; Nam, Yoon Kwon; Kim, Dong Soo

    2011-02-01

    Fish may be anesthetized for various experimental and practical purposes, primarily to immobilize them in order to facilitate handling. Marine medaka (Oryzias dancena) is a teleost fish used in marine ecotoxicology studies. Despite the importance of anesthesia in handling experimental fish, the effects of anesthesia in marine medaka have not yet been investigated. In this study, the authors evaluated the anesthetic effects (time required for anesthesia to take effect and recovery time) of two anesthetic agents, clove oil and lidocaine-HCl, on marine medaka. They anesthetized fish at different water temperatures (23 °C, 26 °C and 29 °C) and using different concentrations of clove oil (50 ppm, 75 ppm, 100 ppm, 125 ppm, 150 ppm and 175 ppm) or lidocaine-HCl (300 ppm, 400 ppm, 500 ppm, 600 ppm, 700 ppm and 800 ppm). The time required for anesthesia to take effect decreased significantly as both anesthetic concentration and water temperature increased for both clove oil and lidocaine-HCl. To anesthetize marine medaka within approximately 1 min, the optimal concentrations for clove oil were 125 ppm at 23 °C, 100 ppm at 26 °C and 75 ppm at 29 °C and for lidocaine-HCl were 800 ppm at 23 °C and 700 ppm at both 26 °C and 29 °C. The authors also compared anesthetic effects in marine medaka of different sizes. Both anesthetic exposure time and recovery time were significantly shorter for smaller fish than for larger fish. These results provide a useful foundation for the laboratory handling of marine medaka. PMID:21252980

  2. Lidocaine inhibits the invasion and migration of TRPV6-expressing cancer cells by TRPV6 downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Gou, Hui; Zhu, Jiang; Tian, Si; Yu, Lehua

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that local anesthetics have a broad spectrum of pharmacological actions, acting as nerve blocks, and treating pain and cardiac arrhythmias via blocking of the sodium channel. The use of local anesthetics could reduce the possibility of cancer metastasis and recurrence following surgical tumor excision. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of lidocaine upon the invasion and migration of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 6 (TRPV6)-expressing cancer cells. Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, prostatic cancer PC-3 cells and ovarian cancer ES-2 cells were treated with lidocaine. Cell viability was quantitatively determined by MTT assay. The migration of the cells was evaluated using the wound healing assay, and the invasion of the cells was assessed using a Transwell assay. Calcium (Ca2+) measurements were performed using a Fluo-3 AM fluorescence kit. The expression of TRPV6 mRNA and protein in the cells was determined by quantitative-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. The results suggested that lidocaine inhibits the cell invasion and migration of MDA-MB-231, PC-3 and ES-2 cells at lower than clinical concentrations. The inhibitory effect of lidocaine on TRPV6-expressing cancer cells was associated with a reduced rate of calcium influx, and could occur partly as a result of the downregulation of TRPV6 expression. The use of appropriate local anesthetics may confer potential benefits in clinical practice for the treatment of patients with TRPV6-expressing cancer. PMID:27446413

  3. Hyaluron Filler Containing Lidocaine on a CPM Basis for Lip Augmentation: Reports from Practical Experience.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tanja C; Sattler, Gerhard; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2016-06-01

    Lip augmentation with hyaluronic acid fillers is established. As monophasic polydensified hyaluronic acid products with variable density, CPM-HAL1 (Belotero Balance Lidocaine, Merz Aesthetics, Raleigh, NC) and CPM-HAL2 (Belotero Intense Lidocaine, Merz Aesthetics, Raleigh, NC) are qualified for beautification and particularly natural-looking rejuvenation, respectively. The aim of this article was to assess the handling and outcome of lip augmentation using the lidocaine-containing hyaluronic acid fillers, CPM-HAL1 and CPM-HAL2. Data were documented from patients who received lip augmentation by means of beautification and/or rejuvenation using CPM-HAL1 and/or CPM-HAL2. Observation period was 4 months, with assessment of natural outcome, evenness, distribution, fluidity, handling, malleability, tolerability, as well as patient satisfaction and pain. A total of 146 patients from 21 German centers participated. Physicians rated natural outcome and evenness as good or very good for more than 95% of patients. Distribution, fluidity, handling, and malleability were assessed for both fillers as good or very good in more than 91% of patients. At every evaluation point, more than 93% of patients were very or very much satisfied with the product. A total of 125 patients (85.6%) experienced transient injection-related side effects. Pain intensity during the procedure was mild (2.72 ± 1.72 on the 0-10 pain assessment scale) and abated markedly within 30 minutes (0.42 ± 0.57). Lip augmentation with hyaluronic acid fillers produced a long-term cosmetic result. Due to the lidocaine content, procedural pain was low and transient. Accordingly, a high degree of patient satisfaction was achieved that was maintained throughout the observation period. PMID:27248026

  4. 2% Lidocaine gel or plain lubricating gel: Which one should be used in male flexible cystoscopy?

    PubMed Central

    Akkoç, Ali; Kartalmış, Mahir; Aydın, Cemil; Topaktaş, Ramazan; Altın, Selçuk; Aykaç, Aykut

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate and compare the effects on pain of intraurethral 2% lidocaine gel and plain lubricating gel in male patients underwent flexible cystoscopy. Material and methods The data of 220 male patients who underwent flexible cystoscopy between March 2012 and August 2014 were retrospectively analized. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to using intraurethral gel types. Group I included 120 patients who were underwent flexible cystoscopy with 2% lidocaine gel and Group II was consisted from 100 patients who underwent flexible cystoscopy with plain lubricating gel. The groups were compared according to postprocedure data including pain score, procedure time and age of patients. Results The mean age of the patients in Group I was 50.02±11.87 years while that in Group II was 52.03±13.37 years (p=0.492). The mean procedure times were 6.02±0.787 and 6.28±0.689 minutes in Group I and Group II respectively (p=0.061). Pain perception scores were not statistically different between the groups (Group I: 3.10±0.980, Group II: 3.34±0.789, p=0.132). Conclusion Use of intraurethral 2% lidocaine gel has no advantage over plain lubricating gel in regard to pain control during flexible cystoscopy in men. PMID:27274894

  5. Use of adrenalin with lidocaine in hand surgery☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Novais Junior, Ronaldo Antonio; Bacelar Costa, Jorge Ribamar; de Morais Carmo, Jose Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Objective Because of the received wisdom within our setting that claims that local anesthesia should not be used with adrenalin in hand surgery; we conducted a study using lidocaine with adrenalin, to demonstrate its safety, utility and efficacy. Methods We conducted a prospective study in which, in wrist, hand and finger surgery performed from July 2012 onwards, we used local anesthesia comprising a 1% lidocaine solution with adrenalin at 1:100,000. We evaluated the quantity of bleeding, systemic alterations, signs of arterial deficit and complications, among other parameters. We described the infiltration techniques for specific procedures individually. Results We operated on 41 patients and chose to describe separately the raising of a lateral microsurgical flap on the arm, which was done without excessive bleeding and within the usual length of time. In only three cases was there excessive bleeding or use of bipolar tweezers. No systemic alterations were observed by the anesthesiologists or any complications relating to ischemia and necrosis in the wounds or in the fingers, and use of tourniquets was not necessary in any case. Conclusions Use of lidocaine with adrenalin in hand surgery was shown to be a safe local anesthetic technique, without complications relating to necrosis. It provided efficient exsanguination of the surgical field and made it possible to perform the surgical procedures without using a pneumatic tourniquet, thereby avoiding its risks and benefiting the patient through lower sedation. PMID:26229844

  6. Effect of Lidocaine-Ketamine Infusions Combined with Morphine or Fentanyl in Sevoflurane-Anesthetized Pigs.

    PubMed

    Re, Michela; Canfrán, Susana; Largo, Carlota; Gómez de Segura, Ignacioa A

    2016-01-01

    Providing lidocaine, ketamine, and an opioid greatly decreases the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of volatile anesthetics in dogs. However, the efficacy of this combination shows marked interspecies variation, and opioids are likely to be less effective in pigs than in other species. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of constant-rate infusion of lidocaine and ketamine combined with either morphine or fentanyl on the MAC of sevoflurane in pigs. In a prospective, randomized, crossover design, 8 healthy crossbred pigs were premedicated with ketamine and midazolam, and anesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane. Pigs then received ketamine (0.6 mg/kg/h) and lidocaine (3 mg/kg/h) combined with either morphine (0.24 mg/kg/h; MLK) or fentanyl (0.0045 mg/kg/h; FLK) after a loading dose; the control group received Ringers lactate solution. The anesthetic-sparing action of the 2 infusion protocols was calculated according to the MAC, by using dewclaw clamping as the standard noxious stimulus. The sevoflurane MAC (mean ± 1 SD) was 2.0% ± 0.2%, 1.9% ± 0.4%, and 1.8% ± 0.2% in the control, MLK, and FLK groups, respectively. No differences among groups or treatments were found. In conclusion, the administration of MLK or FLK at the studied doses did not reduce the MAC of sevoflurane in pigs. PMID:27177566

  7. Lidocaine, Dexmedetomidine and Their Combination Reduce Isoflurane Minimum Alveolar Concentration in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Ibancovichi, José A.; Chavez, Julio R.; Gutierrez-Blanco, Eduardo; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Victoria-Mora, José M.; Tendillo-Cortijo, Francisco; Santos-González, Martín; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The effects of intravenous (IV) lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination delivered as a bolus followed by a constant rate infusion (CRI) on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (MACISO) in dogs were evaluated. Seven healthy adult dogs were included. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. For each dog, baseline MAC (MACISO/BASAL) was determined after a 90-minute equilibration period. Thereafter, each dog received one of the following treatments (loading dose, CRI): lidocaine 2 mg kg−1, 100 µg kg−1 minute−1; dexmedetomidine 2 µg kg−1, 2 µg kg−1 hour−1; or their combination. MAC was then determined again after 45- minutes of treatment by CRI. At the doses administered, lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination significantly reduced MACISO by 27.3% (range: 12.5–39.2%), 43.4% (33.3–53.3%) and 60.9% (46.1–78.1%), respectively, when compared to MACISO/BASAL. The combination resulted in a greater MACISO reduction than the two drugs alone. Their use, at the doses studied, provides a clinically important reduction in the concentration of ISO during anaesthesia in dogs. PMID:25232737

  8. Pheniramine Maleate is more effective than Lidocaine on Fentanyl Induced Cough

    PubMed Central

    Ozmen, Ozgur; Kara, Duygu; Karaman, Emine Uzlas; Karakoc, Fatma; Karakaya, Muhammet Ahmet; Arslan, Zakir

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Fentanyl is frequently used during anesthesia induction. The use of fentanyl can cause cough through different mechanisms. Here, we aimed to investigate effects of pheniramine maleate (PM), an antihistaminic agent, and compare it with lidocaine on fentanyl induced cough. Methods: This is a randomized double-blind prospective clinical study of ASA I-II, 120 patients scheduled for elective abdominal surgery. Patients were administered drugs intravenously and randomly allocated into three groups: Group C (2 ml 0.9 % normal saline), Group L (1mg/kg lidocaine), and Group F (PM 45.5 mg). 90 seconds after administration, 2µ/kg fentanyl was applied in three seconds to all patients. Severity of cough (mild: 1-2, moderate: 3-5, severe> 5), time of the cough and vital parameters were recorded 90 seconds after fentanyl injection. Results: Eight patients (25%) in Group C had fentanyl induced cough whereas three patients (7.5%) in Group L and one patient (2.5%) in Group F experienced this phenomenon. There was statistically significant difference between Group F and Group C (p<0.05); however, differences between Group L and Group C or Group F and Group L were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Conclusions: Pheniramine Maleate 45.5 mg is better that placebo and as effective as lidocaine to prevent fentanyl induced cough. PMID:27375720

  9. Effect of Duration and Amplitude of Direct Current when Lidocaine Is Delivered by Iontophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Saliba, Susan A.; Teeter-Heyl, Courtney L.; McKeon, Patrick; Ingeroll, Christopher D.; Saliba, Ethan N.

    2011-01-01

    Dosage for the galvanic stimulation for iontophoresis varies. Clinicians manipulate the duration or the amplitude of the current, but it is not known which is more effective. We compared the anesthetic effect of lidocaine HCL (2%) by manipulating the current parameters on 21 healthy volunteers (age: 21.2 ± 4.2, height 170.7 ± 10.2 cm, mass 82.1 ± 19.2 kg). Three conditions were administered in a random order using a Phoresor II® with 2 mL, 2% lidocaine HCL in an iontophoresis electrode. (1) HASD (40 mA*min): High amplitude (4 mA), short duration (10 min); (2) LALD (40 mA.min): Low amplitude (2 mA), long duration (20 min); (3) Sham condition (0 mA, 20 min). Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWM) scores were taken pre and post intervention to measure sensation changes. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to compare sensation. Both iontophoresis treatments: LALD (4.2 ± 0.32 mm) and HASD (4.2 ± 0.52 mm) significantly increased SWM scores, indicating an increase in anesthesia, compared to the sham condition (3.6 ± 0.06 mm) p < 0.05. Neither LALD nor HASD was more effective and there was no difference in anesthesia with the sham. Lidocaine delivered via iontophoresis reduces cutaneous sensation. However, there was no benefit in either a HASD or LALD treatment. PMID:24309314

  10. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats

    PubMed Central

    Hermeto, Larissa C.; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C.; Jardim, Paulo H.A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P < 0.05; mean ± SD). The cranial spread of analgesia obtained with LTEP was similar to that with LEP or LEPTIM, extending to dermatomic region T13–L1. Complete motor blockade was similar for the 3 treatments. It was concluded that tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures. PMID:26130854

  11. Hyaluronan suppresses lidocaine-induced apoptosis of human chondrocytes in vitro by inhibiting the p53-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Soo A; Lee, Sang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Intra-articular injection of local anesthetics (LAs) is a common procedure for therapeutic purposes. However, LAs have been found toxic to articular cartilage, and hyaluronan may attenuate this toxicity. In this study we investigated whether hyaluronan attenuated lidocaine-induced chondrotoxicity, and if so, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Human chondrocyte cell line SW1353 and newly isolated murine chondrocytes were incubated in culture medium containing hyaluronan and/or lidocaine for 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated using MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was detected with DAPI staining, caspase 3/7 activity assay and flow cytometry. Cell cycle distributions, ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined using flow cytometry. The expression of p53 and p53-regulated gene products was measured with Western blotting. Results: Lidocaine (0.005%−0.03%) dose-dependently decreased the viability of SW1353 cells. This local anesthetic (0.015%, 0.025%) induced apoptosis, G2/M phase arrest and loss of ΔΨm, and markedly increased ROS production in SW1353 cells. Hyaluronan (50−800 μg/mL) alone did not affect the cell viability, but co-treatment with hyaluronan (200 μg/mL) significantly attenuated lidocaine-induced apoptosis and other abnormalities in SW1353 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment with lidocaine and hyaluronan significantly decreased the levels of p53 and its transcription targets Bax and p21 in SW1353 cells, although treatment with lidocaine alone did not significantly change these proteins. Similar results were obtained in ex vivo cultured murine chondrocytes. Conclusion: Hyaluronan suppresses lidocaine-induced apoptosis of human chondrocytes in vitro through inhibiting the p53-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:27041463

  12. Comparison Between Intraperitoneal and Intravenous Lidocaine for Postoperative Analgesia After Elective Abdominal Hysterectomy, a Double-Blind Placebo Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Samimi, Saghar; Taheri, Arman; Davari Tanha, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of intravenous and intraperitoneal injection of lidocaine and normal saline in relieving postoperative pain after elective abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and methods: For this double-blind randomized controlled study 109 patients undergoing elective abdominal hysterectomy were randomly allocated to three groups :1) IV group (intravenous injection group) received intravenous lidocaine %2 bolus 1.5mg/kg 30 min before incision and then a continuous lidocaine infusion of 2mg/kg and before the wound closure an intraperitoneal injection of N/S , 2) IP group (intraperitoneal group) received intravenous N/S and intraperitoneal lidocaine 3mg/kg , 3) P group (placebo, N/S) received both intravenous and intraperitoneal N/S. The pain scores (VAS) at rest, total morphine consumption , the time to first need for rescue analgesic ,incidence of lidocaine related adverse effects and nausea and vomiting were recorded at 0,2,4,8,12 and 24 hrs postoperatively. Results: The VAS scores were significantly lower in IP and IV groups compared with placebo (p = 0.001). Total consumption of morphine (p = 0.001) and time to firs request of recue analgesic (p = 0.001) were lower too in IP and IV groups.Incidence of vomiting was comparable between groups (p < 0.05) but nausea was higher in control group (p > 0.05).There were not notable lidocaine-related adverse effects. IP and IV groups were not statistically different for all investigated variables. Conclusion: This study showed lidocaine administration both intravenously and intraperitoneally are effective in reducing the postoperative pain and also have opioid sparing effect and can be safely used in elective abdominal hysterectomy without any major adverse effects. PMID:27047566

  13. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats.

    PubMed

    Hermeto, Larissa C; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C; Jardim, Paulo H A

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P < 0.05; mean ± SD). The cranial spread of analgesia obtained with LTEP was similar to that with LEP or LEPTIM, extending to dermatomic region T13-L1. Complete motor blockade was similar for the 3 treatments. It was concluded that tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures. PMID:26130854

  14. Effect of adding 8 milligrams ondansetron to lidocaine for Bier's block on post-operative pain

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand, Azim; Safavi, Mohammadreza; Adineh-Mehr, Leili

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ondansetron has analgesic properties. The aim of the present study was to assess the analgesic effect of 8 mg ondansetron when added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA). Materials and Methods: Ninety patients undergoing hand surgery were randomly allocated to the three groups to receive 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine diluted with saline to a total dose of 40 mL (Group L, n = 30) or 8 mg ondansetron plus 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine diluted with saline to a total dose of 40 mL (group LO, n = 30) or 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine diluted with saline to a total dose of 40 mL plus 8 mg ondansetron intravenously (Group IO, n = 30). Tourniquet pain and analgesic use were recorded before and after the tourniquet application. Results: The sensory and motor block onset times were significantly shorter in Group LO compared with Group L and Group IO (4.2 ± 1.7 vs. 5.2 ± 0.8 and 5.1 ± 1.2 respectively, P < 0.05; 4.5 ± 1.4 vs. 5.8 ± 1.5 and 5.7 ± 1.4 respectively, P < 0.05). The sensory and motor block recovery times were significantly longer in Group LO compared with Group L and Group IO (6.1 ± 1.1 vs. 4.1 ± 1.3 and 4.5 ± 0.9 respectively, P < 0.05; 6.7 ± 1.4 vs. 4.4 ± 0.9 and 4.7 ± 0.7 respectively, P < 0.05). Post-operative VAS scores were significantly less in Group LO compared with Group L and Group IO till 24 h after tourniquet deflation (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The addition of 8 mg ondansetron to lidocaine for IVRA reduced intraoperative and post-operative analgesic use till 24 h. PMID:24516852

  15. WITHDRAWN The analgesic effect of paracetamol when added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Celik, M; Saricaoglu, F; Canbay, O; Dal, D; Uzumcigil, A; Leblebicioglu, G; Aypar, U

    2011-10-21

    Ahead of Print article withdrawn by publisher AIM: Intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) is frequently used in patients who will undergo upper extremity surgical operations for its ease of use, rapid effectiveness and short hospitalization period. Different drug combinations have been used to overcome some systemic adverse effects and to increase the postoperative analgesic effectiveness. In our study, we evaluated the effects of paracetamol (Perfalgan) when added to lidocaine for IVRA, looking specifically at tourniquet pain and postoperative pain. METHODS: Ninety patients undergoing elective hand surgery with IVRA were randomly assigned to three groups to receive either IV saline and C-IVRA with 0.5% lidocaine 3 mg/kg (control group, N=30), IV saline and IVRA with 0.5% lidocaine and 20 mL paracetamol (10 mg/cc) (P-IVRA group, N=30) or IV paracetamol and IVRA with 0.5% lidocaine (L-IV group, N=30). The following were measured: 1) sensory and motor block onset and recovery time, 2) tourniquet pain after tourniquet application and at 10, 20 and 30 min after tourniquet deflation, 3) the visual analog scale (VAS) scores of tourniquet pain at 30 min and 1, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h postoperatively, 4) the time to first analgesic requirement, 5) total analgesic consumption in 24 h and 6) side effects. RESULTS: Sensory and motor block onset and recovery times were similar in both groups. VAS scores of tourniquet pain were lower in group P-IRVA at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 24 h, postoperatively (P<0.01). Anesthesia quality, as determined by the anesthesiologist and surgeon, was similar in both groups. The time to the first postoperative analgesic request was 67.83±57.48 min in group C-IRVA and 93±80.79 min in group P-IRVA (P<0.05). Paracetamol consumption was significantly less in group P-IRVA (1.60± 1 [tablets]) when compared with group C-IRVA (2.45±0.9; P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Perfalgan as an adjunct to lidocaine improves postoperative analgesia in IVRA without adverse effects. PMID

  16. Electroencephalographic Changes Associated with Antinociceptive Actions of Lidocaine, Ketamine, Meloxicam, and Morphine Administration in Minimally Anaesthetized Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hui Cheng, Chen; Meng, Goh Yong; Fakurazi, Sharida; Kaka, Asmatullah; Behan, Atique Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Effects of ketamine and lidocaine on electroencephalographic (EEG) changes were evaluated in minimally anaesthetized dogs, subjected to electric stimulus. Six dogs were subjected to six treatments in a crossover design with a washout period of one week. Dogs were subjected to intravenous boluses of lidocaine 2 mg/kg, ketamine 3 mg/kg, meloxicam 0.2 mg/kg, morphine 0.2 mg/kg and loading doses of lidocaine 2 mg/kg followed by continuous rate infusion (CRI) of 50 and 100 mcg/kg/min, and ketamine 3 mg/kg followed by CRI of 10 and 50 mcg/kg/min. Electroencephalogram was recorded during electrical stimulation prior to any drug treatment (before treatment) and during electrical stimulation following treatment with the drugs (after treatment) under anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with halothane at a stable concentration between 0.85 and 0.95%. Pretreatment median frequency was evidently increased (P < 0.05) for all treatment groups. Lidocaine, ketamine, and morphine depressed the median frequency resulting from the posttreatment stimulation. The depression of median frequency suggested evident antinociceptive effects of these treatments in dogs. It is therefore concluded that lidocaine and ketamine can be used in the analgesic protocol for the postoperative pain management in dogs. PMID:25695060

  17. Electroencephalographic changes associated with antinociceptive actions of lidocaine, ketamine, meloxicam, and morphine administration in minimally anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Kaka, Ubedullah; Hui Cheng, Chen; Meng, Goh Yong; Fakurazi, Sharida; Kaka, Asmatullah; Behan, Atique Ahmed; Ebrahimi, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Effects of ketamine and lidocaine on electroencephalographic (EEG) changes were evaluated in minimally anaesthetized dogs, subjected to electric stimulus. Six dogs were subjected to six treatments in a crossover design with a washout period of one week. Dogs were subjected to intravenous boluses of lidocaine 2 mg/kg, ketamine 3 mg/kg, meloxicam 0.2 mg/kg, morphine 0.2 mg/kg and loading doses of lidocaine 2 mg/kg followed by continuous rate infusion (CRI) of 50 and 100 mcg/kg/min, and ketamine 3 mg/kg followed by CRI of 10 and 50 mcg/kg/min. Electroencephalogram was recorded during electrical stimulation prior to any drug treatment (before treatment) and during electrical stimulation following treatment with the drugs (after treatment) under anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with halothane at a stable concentration between 0.85 and 0.95%. Pretreatment median frequency was evidently increased (P < 0.05) for all treatment groups. Lidocaine, ketamine, and morphine depressed the median frequency resulting from the posttreatment stimulation. The depression of median frequency suggested evident antinociceptive effects of these treatments in dogs. It is therefore concluded that lidocaine and ketamine can be used in the analgesic protocol for the postoperative pain management in dogs. PMID:25695060

  18. Prophylactic Effects of Lidocaine or Beclomethasone Spray on Post-Operative Sore Throat and Cough after Orotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Banihashem, Nadia; Alijanpour, Ebrahim; Hasannasab, Bahman; Zarei, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Post-operative sore throat and cough are common complications of endotracheal intubation. These conditions may be very distressing for the patient and may lead to unpleasant memories. This study was performed in order to determine whether beclomethasone and lidocaine spray could reduce the frequency of post-operative sore throat and hoarseness after tracheal extubation. Materials and Methods: Ninety women (18–60 years of age) with an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II and undergoing elective mastoidectomy were randomized into three groups of 30 patients. The endotracheal tubes in each group were sprayed with 50% beclomethasone, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride, or normal saline (control group) before endotracheal intubation. Patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe), cough, and hoarseness at 1 and 24 h after extubation. Results: There was a significantly lower incidence and severity of post-operative sore throat in the beclomethasone group than the lidocaine and control groups (P<0.05) at each observation time point. At 24 h after extubation, the incidence and severity of sore throat and cough was significantly lower in the lidocaine compared with the control group. The incidence of hoarseness was not significantly different among the three groups. Conclusion: Spraying beclomethasone and lidocaine on the endotracheal tube is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of post-operative sore throat. PMID:26082898

  19. A comparative evaluation of 4% articaine and 2% lidocaine in mandibular buccal infiltration anesthesia: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Maruthingal, Sunith; Mohan, Dennis; Maroli, Ramesh Kumar; Alahmari, Ali; Alqahtani, Ahmed; Alsadoon, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare 4% articaine and 2% lidocaine local anesthetics in achieving pulpal anesthesia of the lower first permanent molar teeth objectively, and to assess and compare lip and lingual mucosa numbness subjectively. Materials and Methods: All subjects received 1.7 ml of any one anesthetic in the mucobuccal fold adjacent to mandibular first molar teeth; the same individuals received the second infiltration at least 1 week after the first. Later, comparisons for pulpal anesthesia, lip and lingual mucosa numbness between these two anesthetics solutions were made. Results: Articaine showed significant results with P = 0.006 in achieving pulpal anesthesia objectively, when compared with lidocaine. Articaine also showed very high significant results subjectively with P = 0.0006 in achieving lip numbness, when compared with lidocaine. But the results in achieving lingual mucosa numbness with articaine subjectively was not significant with P = 0.01, when compared with lidocaine. Conclusion: Endodontic and operative treatments are one of the most common oral non-surgical procedures done under local anesthesia. The diversity of anesthetic substances currently available on the market requires dental professionals to assess the drug both by its pharmacokinetic and also by its clinical characteristics during dental treatments. Our study used 4% articaine, which is available in the market, for comparison with 2% lidocaine. Further studies are required to use an equal concentration of solutions to achieve more accurate results. PMID:26759799

  20. Intra-articular administration of lidocaine plus adrenaline in dogs: Pharmacokinetic profile and evaluation of toxicity in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, A; Chiaradia, E; Della Rocca, G; Mancini, F; Galarini, R; Giusepponi, D; De Monte, V; Cagnardi, P; Marenzoni, M L; Bufalari, A

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of intra-articular (IA) lidocaine plus adrenaline for improving peri-operative analgesia in anaesthetized dogs undergoing arthroscopy of the elbow. A solution of lidocaine (L) 1.98% plus adrenaline 1:100.000 was administered via the IA route and its safety evaluated in terms of cardio-, neuro-, and chondro-toxicity. No bradycardia or hypotension was recorded from induction to the last observational time point. Signs of toxicity of the nervous system could have been masked by the general anaesthesia but lidocaine concentrations detected in the blood were lower than those thought to be capable of producing toxicity. The assessment of in vitro chondrotoxicity showed a dose- and time-dependent effect of lidocaine on the viability of articular cells. Adrenaline appeared to reduce the chondrotoxicity of 1% lidocaine, following an exposure of up to 30 min. PMID:26681138

  1. Effects of lidocaine constant rate infusion on sevoflurane requirement, autonomic responses, and postoperative analgesia in dogs undergoing ovariectomy under opioid-based balanced anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Columbano, Nicolò; Secci, Fabio; Careddu, Giovanni M; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Rossi, Gabriele; Driessen, Bernd

    2012-08-01

    The effects of constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine on sevoflurane (SEVO) requirements, autonomic responses to noxious stimulation, and postoperative pain relief were evaluated in dogs undergoing opioid-based balanced anesthesia. Twenty-four dogs scheduled for elective ovariectomy were randomly assigned to one of four groups: BC, receiving buprenorphine without lidocaine; FC, receiving fentanyl without lidocaine; BL, receiving buprenorphine and lidocaine; FL, receiving fentanyl and lidocaine. Dogs were anesthetized with intravenous (IV) diazepam and ketamine and anesthesia maintained with SEVO in oxygen/air. Lidocaine (2mg/kg plus 50 μg/kg/min) or saline were infused in groups BL/FL and BC/FC, respectively. After initiation of lidocaine or saline CRI IV buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg) or fentanyl (4 μg/kg plus 8 μg/kg/h CRI) were administered IV in BC/BL and FC/FL, respectively. Respiratory and hemodynamic variables, drug plasma concentrations, and end-tidal SEVO concentrations (E'SEVO) were measured. Behaviors and pain scores were subjectively assessed 1 and 2h post-extubation. Lidocaine CRI produced median drug plasma concentrations <0.4 μg/mL during peak surgical stimulation. Lidocaine produced a 14% decrease in E'SEVO in the BL (P<0.01) but none in the FL group and no change in cardio-pulmonary responses to surgery or postoperative behaviors and pain scores in any group. Thus, depending on the opioid used, supplementing opioid-based balanced anesthesia with lidocaine (50 μg/kg/min) may not have any or only a minor impact on anesthetic outcome in terms of total anesthetic dose, autonomic responses to visceral nociception, and postoperative analgesia. PMID:22261004

  2. Treatment of localized neuropathic pain of different etiologies with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster – a case series

    PubMed Central

    Likar, Rudolf; Demschar, Susanne; Kager, Ingo; Neuwersch, Stefan; Pipam, Wolfgang; Sittl, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of the topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. Study design This was a case series at an Austrian pain clinic, using retrospective analysis. Patients and methods Data of 27 patients treated for localized neuropathic pain with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster were retrospectively analyzed. Assessment included changes in overall pain intensity, in intensity of different pain qualities, and of hyperalgesia and allodynia, and changes in sleep quality. Results Patients (17 female, ten male; mean age 53.4±11.4 years) presented mainly with dorsalgia (16 patients) or postoperative/posttraumatic pain (seven patients); one patient suffered from both. The mean overall pain intensity prior to treatment with lidocaine medicated plaster was 8.4±1.2 on the 11-point Likert scale. In the majority of cases, the lidocaine plaster was applied concomitantly with preexisting pain medication (81.5% of the patients). During the 6-month observation period, overall mean pain intensity was reduced by almost 5 points (4.98) to 3.5±2.6. Substantial reductions were also observed for neuralgiform pain (5 points from 7.9±2.6 at baseline) and burning pain (3 points from 5.2±4.1). Sleep quality improved from 4.6±2.6 at baseline to 5.5±1.8. Stratification by pain diagnosis showed marked improvements in overall pain intensity for patients with dorsalgia or postoperative/posttraumatic pain. The lidocaine plaster was well tolerated. Conclusion Overall, topical treatment with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster was associated with effective pain relief and was well tolerated. PMID:25565882

  3. Presentation of Neurolytic Effect of 10% Lidocaine after Perineural Ultrasound Guided Injection of a Canine Sciatic Nerve: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Asma; Kataria, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Background Phenol and alcohol have been used to ablate nerves to treat pain but are not specific for nerves and can damage surrounding soft tissue. Lidocaine at concentrations > 8% injected intrathecal in the animal model has been shown to be neurotoxic. Tests the hypothesis that 10% lidocaine is neurolytic after a peri-neural blockade in an ex vivo experiment on the canine sciatic nerve. Methods Under ultrasound, one canine sciatic nerve was injected peri-neurally with 10 cc saline and another with 10 cc of 10% lidocaine. After 20 minutes, the sciatic nerve was dissected with gross inspection. A 3 cm segment was excised and preserved in 10% buffered formalin fixative solution. Both samples underwent progressive dehydration and infusion of paraffin after which they were placed on paraffin blocks. The sections were cut at 4 µm and stained with hemoxylin and eosin. Microscopic review was performed by a pathologist from Henry Ford Hospital who was blinded to which experimental group each sample was in. Results The lidocaine injected nerve demonstrated loss of gross architecture on visual inspection while the saline injected nerve did not. No gross changes were seen in the surrounding soft tissue seen in either group. The lidocaine injected sample showed basophilic degeneration with marked cytoplasmic vacuolation in the nerve fibers with separation of individual fibers and endoneurial edema. The saline injected sample showed normal neural tissue. Conclusions Ten percent lidocaine causes rapid neurolytic changes with ultrasound guided peri-neural injection. The study was limited by only a single nerve being tested with acute exposure. PMID:27413480

  4. Comparison of lidocaine and bupivacaine depression of sinoatrial nodal activity during hypoxia and acidosis in adult and neonatal guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Bosnjak, Z J; Stowe, D F; Kampine, J P

    1986-09-01

    High blood concentrations of local anesthetics are cardiotoxic. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of lidocaine and bupivacaine on the intrinsic pacemaker activity of in vitro sinoatrial nodal cells of the adult and neonatal guinea pig in the presence and absence of hypoxia and acidosis. Fifteen pairs of adult (greater than 80 days old) and neonatal (0-3 days old) hearts were isolated. Nodal tissues were suffused with Krebs-Ringer solution at 37 degrees C and exposed to increasing concentrations of either lidocaine (0.05-0.8 mM) or bupivacaine (0.01-0.4 mM). The suffusate was equilibrated either with 5% CO2, 95% O2 (pH 7.40, PO2 482 torr) or with 12% CO2, 88% N2 (pH 7.01, PO2 58 torr). Transmembrane action potentials were recorded from sinoatrial nodal cells and impulse intervals were converted to rates. We found that hypoxia and acidosis alone reduced rates in both adults and neonates, and that the reduction was additive to the effects of local anesthetics. Bupivacaine was 4-5 times more potent in decreasing rates than was lidocaine in both age groups. Lidocaine was about twice as effective in depressing neonatal rates as adult rates, and bupivacaine caused cessation of pacemaker activity in a greater percentage of nodes than did lidocaine. Our results demonstrate, in vitro, that the neonatal sinoatrial node is more sensitive to lidocaine and bupivacaine than is the adult node, that bupivacaine is more potent in depressing and stopping nodal activity, and that hypoxia and acidosis enhance pacemaker depression caused by these agents.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3740490

  5. Effect of antipyrine coadministration on the kinetics of acetaminophen and lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Blyden, G T; Greenblatt, D J; LeDuc, B W; Scavone, J M

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic interactions between antipyrine and acetaminophen were evaluated in 7 healthy volunteers. On 3 occasions subjects received: 1, antipyrine 1.0 g intravenously (i.v.); 2, acetaminophen 650 mg i.v.; 3, antipyrine 1.0 g and acetaminophen 650 mg i.v. simultaneously. Between Trials 1 and 3, antipyrine elimination t1/2 (17.2 vs 17.4 h), clearance (0.44 vs 0.43 ml.min-1.kg-1) and 24-h recovery of antipyrine and metabolites (313 vs 293 mg) did not differ significantly. Between Trials 2 and 3, acetaminophen VZ was reduced (1.14 vs 1.00 l.kg-1), t1/2 prolonged (2.7 vs 3.3 h), clearance reduced (4.8 vs 3.6 ml.min-1.kg-1), and fractional urinary recovery of acetaminophen glucuronide reduced. Eight additional subjects received 50 mg of lidocaine hydrochloride i.v. in the control state, and on a second occasion immediately after antipyrine 1.0 g given i.v. The two trials did not differ significantly in lidocaine VZ (2.6 vs 2.7 l.kg-1), t1/2 (2.0 vs 2.4 h) or clearance (15.0 vs 13.5 ml.min-1.kg-1). Although acetaminophen does not alter antipyrine kinetics, acute administration of antipyrine appears to impair acetaminophen clearance, possibly via inhibition of glucuronide formation. However, antipyrine has no significant effect on the kinetics of a single i.v. dose of lidocaine. PMID:3197750

  6. Comparison of two different doses of lidocaine on the pain sensation during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Ateş, Ferhat; Dursun, Furkan; Malkoç, Ercan; Yılmaz, Ömer; Soydan, Hasan; Şen, Hüseyin; Başal, Şeref; Zekey, Fatih; Karademir, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare two different doses of lidocaine used for periprostatic nerve block on pain perception during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy. Material and methods A total of 288 patients with elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels and/or abnormal digital rectal examination who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were included in the study. The patients were divided into 3 groups: Group 1 (n=103) prostate biopsy were performed after administering perianal intrarectal application of 10 mL 2% lidocaine gel, Group 2 (n=98) 2 mL of 2% lidocaine injection on each side following rectal installation of lidocaine gel and Group 3 (n=87) 4 mL of 2% lidocaine injection on each side after rectal instillation of lidocaine gel. Patients’ pain scores during biopsy procedure were reported using visual analogue score (VAS). Independent sample t test, ANOVA test and Tukey test were used for statistical evaluation. Results The mean age, prostate volume and PSA level were 65.6±8.4 years, 58.2±34.8 mL, and 11.8±3.4 ng/mL respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in baseline characteristics between the groups. The mean VAS scores were 2.4±1.8 in Group 1, 2.5±1.9 in Group 2 and 1.6±1.6 in Group 3. Patients in Group 3, reported significant pain reduction compared with patients in Groups 1 and 2 (p=0.002, and 0.001, respectively). However, there was no statistically significant difference in VAS scores between Groups 1 and 2 (p=0.815). Conclusion According to our results we recommend the use of perianal intrarectal lidocain gel application, and periprostatic nerve block with injection of 4 ml 2% lidocaine per side combination in TRUS-guided prostate biopsies. Further large-scale randomized control studies are needed to validate these finding.

  7. Tolerability of 2.5% Lidocaine/Prilocaine Hydrogel in Children Undergoing Cryotherapy for Molluscum Contagiosum.

    PubMed

    Gobbato, André A M; Babadópulos, Tainah; Gobbato, Cintia A R S; Moreno, Ronilson A; Gagliano-Jucá, Thiago; De Nucci, Gilberto

    2016-05-01

    The tolerability of a 2.5% lidocaine/prilocaine hydrogel (Nanorap, Biolab Indústria Farmacêutica Ltd., Sao Paulo, Brazil) was evaluated in 20 children ages 2 to 11 years undergoing cryotherapy for molluscum contagiosum (MC). The product was well tolerated, with only two children presenting with eczema at the application site. These adverse reactions were considered unlikely to be related to the test product, because a patch test was negative in one of the individuals and the other event occurred in only one of the two treated areas. Nanorap is an efficacious and well-tolerated option for topical anesthesia in children undergoing cryotherapy for MC. PMID:27041686

  8. Effects of topical lidocaine on successful extubation time among patients undergoing elective carotid endarterectomies.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Jeremy; Lee, Doohee; White, William A; Mundy, Susan

    2012-04-01

    Little research has been done on the effects that topical intratracheal anesthesia have on the length of time required to successfully extubate patients after surgical interventions. This retrospective case-control study, using a convenience sample (n = 100 patients), explored the effects of using topical lidocaine laryngotracheal anesthesia injected into the adult trachea before insertion of the endotracheal tube on patients undergoing surgical treatment for blockage of the carotid artery. Both descriptive and inferential analyses were performed to evaluate differences among all variables. Multiple linear regression was also performed while adjusting for the confounding factors (age, gender, and smoking status). Results revealed that the use of lidocaine laryngotracheal anesthesia during induction of anesthesia prolonged the mean times for postoperative removal of the endotracheal tube by nearly 2 minutes. Extended time for removal of endotracheal tubes may lead to increased costs to the healthcare institution and to the patient, which in turn may lead to dissatisfaction within healthcare teams and possibly to patient discontent with care provided. PMID:22586878

  9. Painless injection of propofol: pretreatment with ketamine vs thiopental, meperidine, and lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Saadawy, Iman; Ertok, Erturğrul; Boker, Abdulaziz

    2007-10-01

    Propofol, a commonly used anesthetic, often causes pain on injection. Several methods have been described to reduce this pain, however, complete inhibition has not been achieved. Our randomized, placebo controlled, double blind study has been conducted to compare the analgesic efficacy of iv pretreatment of ketamine, meperidine, thiopental, lidocaine to minimize the injection pain of propofol. 125 patients ASA I and II were randomly allocated into 5 groups and received. Group K, ketamine 0.4 mg/kg; Group T, thiopental 0.5 mg/kg; Group M, meperidine 0.5 [corrected] mg/kg; Group L, lidocaine 1 mg/kg; Group S, saline 3 ml. All pretreatment drugs were made into 4 ml solutions and were accompanied by manual venous occlusion for 1 min, followed by tourniquet release and slowly IV administration of propofol. Pain was assessed with a four point scale. All treatment groups had a significantly lower incidence of pain than placebo group (p <0.05). However, it has been observed that pretreatment with ketamine was the most effective in attenuating pain associated with propofol injection (p <0.05). For painless injection of propofol, routine pretreatment with ketamine 0.4 mg/kg along with venous occlusion is recommended. PMID:18044291

  10. Effect of a trial pharmaceutical solution on reversing sensations after using lidocain: An animal study

    PubMed Central

    Haghighat, Abbas; Davoudi, Amin; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Molai, Meghdad; Afshar, Abdolreza; Basiri, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Local anesthesia has a paramount role in any branches of medical sciences specially dentistry. Soft tissue irritations and lips biting are adverse side-effects in some cases. This study tried out to represent a new pharmaceutical solution in returning sensations faster. Materials and Methods: Five New Zealand laboratory rabbits were anesthetized with 1 cc Ketamine and Xilosine intramuscularly in thigh site. Electrodes were attached to the palms and wrists. Then, 0.2 cc lidocain 2% was injected in forearm origin in order to block median proximal nerve in both forelegs. The nerves conduction study (NCS) was recorded before and after lidocain injection, plus 30 min and once again 1 h after calcium gloconate 10%, dextrose 50%, citric acid solution injection. The recorded data were analyzed using Wilcoxon test and using SPSS software (version 11.5) at significant level of 0.05. Results: The NCS of left and right forearms was 1.4 ± 1.35 mV and 0.48 ± 0.45 mV. According to the statistical test, there was no significant difference between two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Calcium gloconate 10%, dextrose 50%, citric acid solution did not reverse the effect of anesthetic drugs. Possible reasons were pressure to the nerves, which were caused by drug volume, and low sample size. PMID:25886425

  11. Interspinous Ligament Lidocaine and Steroid Injections for the Management of Baastrup's Disease: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kentaro; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Eguchi, Yawara; Nakamura, Junichi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Purpose To examine the long-term effects of interspinous ligament injections of local anesthetics and steroids for the treatment of Baastrup's diseases. Overview of Literature Baastrup's disease is associated with axial low back pains. Baastrup's disease has been more recently described as the "kissing spinous processes" disease. Several authors have reported methods for the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. However, there has been only one report of patients receiving interspinous ligament injections of agents for the treatment of Baastrup's disease. Methods Seventeen patients showed severe low back pains between spinous processes at L3-L4 or L4-L5. X-ray imaging, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed kissing spinous processes, consolidation of spinous process, or inflammation of an interspinous ligament. Pain reliefs after lidocaine and dexamethasone administration into interspinous ligament as therapy for low back pains were being examined and followed up. Results Low back pain scores significantly improved immediately after injection of the agents into interspinous ligaments. At final follow-up (1.4 year), low back pain scores significantly improved as compared with before the treatment. Conclusions Findings from the current study indicate that lidocaine and dexamethasone administration into interspinous ligament in patients diagnosed with Baastrup's disease is effective for managing the pain associated with this disease. PMID:24967039

  12. Xyloglucan Based In Situ Gel of Lidocaine HCl for the Treatment of Periodontosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Ashlesha P.; Pol, Vaibhav V.; Kulkarni, Vinit S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed at formulating thermoreversible in situ gel of local anesthetic by using xyloglucan based mucoadhesive tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP) into periodontal pocket. Temperature-sensitive in situ gel of lidocaine hydrochloride (LH) (2% w/v) was formulated by cold method. A full 32 factorial design was employed to study the effect of independent variables concentrations of Lutrol F127 and TSP to optimize in situ gel. The dependent variables evaluated were gelation temperature (Y1) and drug release (Y2). The results revealed the surface pH of 6.8, similar to the pH of saliva. Viscosity study showed the marked increase in the viscosity of gel at 37°C due to sol-gel conversion. TSP was found to act as good mucoadhesive component to retain gel at the site of application in dental pocket. Gelation of formulation occurred near to body temperature. In vitro study depicted the fast onset of drug action but lasting the release (90%) till 2 h. Formulation F7 was considered as optimized batch, containing 18% Lutrol F127 and 1% tamarind seed polysaccharide. Thus, lidocaine hydrochloride thermoreversible in situ gel offered an alternative to painful injection therapy of anesthesia during dental surgery, with fast onset of anesthetic action lasting throughout the dental procedure. PMID:27034908

  13. Risk of systemic toxicity with topical lidocaine/prilocaine: a review.

    PubMed

    Tran, Anh N; Koo, John Y

    2014-09-01

    The eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (EMLA, APP Pharmaceuticals, LLC.) is an anesthetic cream frequently used by dermatologists. Although side effects of EMLA are usually mild local skin reactions (ie, edema, pallor, erythema), more severe complications can be encountered including methemoglobinemia, central nervous system toxicity, and cardiotoxicity. This article reviewed the literature regarding risk of systemic toxicity associated with use of EMLA in the pediatric and adult population. All 12 clinical trials evaluating the safety of EMLA in either the pediatric or adult population generally followed dosing and administration guidelines set by the manufacturer and reported clinically insignificant plasma levels of methemoglobin, lidocaine, prilocaine, and their respective metabolites. To date, nine pediatric cases and three adult cases of systemic toxicity associated with EMLA have been published. Possible factors that contributed to the development of systemic toxicity include excessive amount of EMLA, large application area, prolonged application time, diseased and/or inflamed skin (eg, vascular malformations, molluscum contagiosum, eczema, previously abraded skin), age less than 3 months, prematurity, and concomitant use of a methemoglobin-inducing agent. Recommendations are provided on how to safely use EMLA to minimize the risk of systemic toxicity. PMID:25226014

  14. Epidural anesthesia and postoperatory analgesia with alpha-2 adrenergic agonists and lidocaine for ovariohysterectomy in bitches

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Virgínia H.; Carregaro, Adriano B.; Lopes, Carlize; Gehrcke, Martielo I.; Muller, Daniel C.M.; Garlet, Clarissa D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the viability and cardiorespiratory effects of the association of epidural alpha-2 adrenergic agonists and lidocaine for ovariohysterectomy (OH) in bitches. Forty-two bitches were spayed under epidural anesthesia with 2.5 mg/kg body weight (BW) of 1% lidocaine with adrenaline (CON) or in association with 0.25 mg/kg BW of xylazine (XYL), 10 μg/kg BW of romifidine (ROM), 30 μg/kg BW of detomidine (DET), 2 μg/kg BW of dexmedetomidine (DEX), or 5 μg/kg BW of clonidine (CLO). Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (fR) and arterial pressures were monitored immediately before and every 10 min after the epidural procedure. Blood gas and pH analysis were done before, and at 30 and 60 min after the epidural procedure. Animals were submitted to isoflurane anesthesia if they presented a slightest sign of discomfort during the procedure. Time of sensory epidural block and postoperative analgesia were evaluated. All animals in CON and DEX, 5 animals in ROM and CLO, 4 animals in XYL, and 3 in DET required supplementary isoflurane. All groups, except CLO, showed a decrease in HR. There was an increase in arterial pressures in all groups. Postoperative analgesia lasted the longest in XYL. None of the protocols were totally efficient to perform the complete procedure of OH; however, xylazine provided longer postoperative analgesia than the others. PMID:23277701

  15. Reduction in radiation-induced brain injury by use of pentobarbital or lidocaine protection

    SciTech Connect

    Oldfield, E.H.; Friedman, R.; Kinsella, T.; Moquin, R.; Olson, J.J.; Orr, K.; DeLuca, A.M. )

    1990-05-01

    To determine if barbiturates would protect brain at high doses of radiation, survival rates in rats that received whole-brain x-irradiation during pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia were compared with those of control animals that received no medication and of animals anesthetized with ketamine. The animals were shielded so that respiratory and digestive tissues would not be damaged by the radiation. Survival rates in rats that received whole-brain irradiation as a single 7500-rad dose under pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia was increased from between from 0% and 20% to between 45% and 69% over the 40 days of observation compared with the other two groups (p less than 0.007). Ketamine anesthesia provided no protection. There were no notable differential effects upon non-neural tissues, suggesting that pentobarbital afforded protection through modulation of ambient neural activity during radiation exposure. Neural suppression during high-dose cranial irradiation protects brain from acute and early delayed radiation injury. Further development and application of this knowledge may reduce the incidence of radiation toxicity of the central nervous system (CNS) and may permit the safe use of otherwise unsafe doses of radiation in patients with CNS neoplasms.

  16. Buccal Injection of 2% Lidocaine With Epinephrine for the Removal of Maxillary Third Molars

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sunil; Verma, Ajay; Sachdeva, Akash

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate if 2% lidocaine hydrochloride with 1 : 200,000 epinephrine could provide palatal anesthesia in maxillary tooth removal with a single buccal injection. The subjects included in the clinical study were those requiring extraction of the maxillary third molar of either side. For the purpose of comparison, the sample was randomly divided into 2 main groups: group 1 (study group) included 100 subjects who were to receive a single injection before extraction, and group 2 (control group) included 100 subjects who were to receive a single buccal injection and a single palatal injection before extraction. After 5 minutes the extraction was performed. All patients were observed for Faces Pain Scale during extraction and asked for the same on a 100-mm visual analog scale after extraction. According to visual analog scale and Faces Pain Scale scores, when maxillary third molar removal without palatal injection (study group) and with palatal injection (control group) were compared the difference was not statistically significant (P > .05). Removal of maxillary third molars without palatal injection is possible by depositing 2 mL of 2% lidocaine hydrochloride with 1 : 200,000 epinephrine to the buccal vestibule of the tooth. PMID:24010986

  17. Comparison of lidocaine spray and paracervical block application for pain relief during first-trimester surgical abortion: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Huseyin; Aksoy, Ulku; Ozyurt, Sezin; Ozoglu, Nil; Acmaz, Gokhan; Aydın, Turgut; İdem Karadağ, Özge; Tayyar, Ahter Tanay

    2016-07-01

    Surgical abortion is one of the most frequently performed gynaecological procedures and its associated pain has always been a problem in gynaecology. Here we studied the analgesic efficacy of lidocaine spray and paracervical block (PCB) in patients undergoing first-trimester surgical abortion. A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted on 108 women requesting pregnancy termination. The subjects were randomly assigned into four groups: Group 1 (PCB plus lidocaine spray) (n=27), Group 2 (PCB) (n=27), Group 3 (lidocaine spray) (n=27) and Group 4 (placebo) (n=27). Intra-procedural and post-procedural pain scores were measured with a standard visual analogue scale (VAS). The median VAS scores during procedure in placebo, lidocaine spray, PCB plus lidocaine spray and PCB groups were 8 (7-9), 5 (4-8), 4 (3-4) and 5 (3-5), respectively. The most effective method of pain relief during first-trimester abortion can be achieved through a combined use of PCB plus lidocaine spray. Therefore, lidocaine spray is a non-invasive complementary anaesthetic method versus traditional PCB for first-trimester surgical abortion. PMID:26926158

  18. Perineural Dexmedetomidine as an Adjuvant Reduces the Median Effective Concentration of Lidocaine for Obturator Nerve Blocking: A Double-Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuechun; Sun, Jian; Zhuang, Xinqi; Lv, Guoyi; Li, Yize; Wang, Haiyun; Wang, Guolin

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that the addition of dexmedetomidine to local anesthetics can prolong peripheral nerve blocks; however, it is not known whether dexmedetomidine can reduce the quantity of local anesthetic needed. We hypothesized that adding dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to an obturator nerve block could reduce the median effective concentration of lidocaine. In this double-blinded randomized trial, 60 patients scheduled for elective transurethral resection of bladder tumors on the lateral wall were randomly divided into two groups: the control group (C group, n = 30) and the dexmedetomidine group (D group, n = 30). Two main branches of the obturator nerve (i.e., anterior and posterior) were identified using neural stimulation at the inguinal level, with only lidocaine used for the C group and 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine combined with lidocaine used for the D group. The median effective concentration was determined by an up-and-down sequential trial. The ratio of two consecutive concentrations was 1.2. The median effective concentration (95% confidence interval) of lidocaine was 0.57% (0.54%-0.62%) in the C group and 0.29% (0.28%-0.38%) in the D group. The median effective concentration of lidocaine was significantly lower in the D group than in the C group (p < 0.05). These results indicate that dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg) in combination with lidocaine for obturator nerve block decreases the median effective concentration of lidocaine. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02066727 PMID:27341450

  19. The effects of clonidine premedication and scalp infiltration of lidocaine on hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and skull pin head-holder insertion during skull base procedures.

    PubMed

    Jellish, W S; Theard, M A; Cheng, M A; Leonetti, J P; Crowder, C M; Tempelhoff, R

    2001-08-01

    This study was designed to determine if oral clonidine or lidocaine, injected into the scalp before head-holder (H-H) insertion, would attenuate the hemodynamic effects associated with intubation and H-H placement. Thirty-four patients undergoing skull base procedures were randomized to four groups. Group 1 received clonidine 5 mcg/kg po before surgery with 10 to 15 ml of 1% lidocaine infiltrated at pin insertion sites; Group 2 received clonidine with saline infiltration; Group 3 received a placebo preoperatively and had lidocaine infiltrated at pin sites; and Group 4 received a placebo with saline infiltrated. All patients had a standard anesthetic titrated to a 10 to 14 Hz EEG endpoint during laryngoscopy and H-H placement. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was similar between groups during intubation, but heart rate (HR) increased in patients who did not receive clonidine. H-H application increased HR and MAP in Group 4. HR also increased after H-H placement in patients who received oral clonidine, while patients receiving scalp lidocaine or both clonidine and scalp lidocaine had little change in either value. Clonidine attenuated HR increases after laryngoscopy but not after H-H placement. Lidocaine injected at the pin sites reduced HR, and MAP increased after H-H insertion. The combination of oral clonidine and scalp lidocaine blunted hemodynamic responses to both intubation and H-H placement. PMID:17167618

  20. The Effects of Clonidine Premedication and Scalp Infiltration of Lidocaine on Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Skull Pin Head-Holder Insertion During Skull Base Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Jellish, W. Scott; Theard, M. Angele; Cheng, Mary Ann; Leonetti, John P.; Crowder, C. Michael; Tempelhoff, Rene

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if oral clonidine or lidocaine, injected into the scalp before head-holder (H-H) insertion, would attenuate the hemodynamic effects associated with intubation and H-H placement. Thirty-four patients undergoing skull base procedures were randomized to four groups. Group 1 received clonidine 5 mcg/kg po before surgery with 10 to 15 ml of 1% lidocaine infiltrated at pin insertion sites; Group 2 received clonidine with saline infiltration; Group 3 received a placebo preoperatively and had lidocaine infiltrated at pin sites; and Group 4 received a placebo with saline infiltrated. All patients had a standard anesthetic titrated to a 10 to 14 Hz EEG endpoint during laryngoscopy and H-H placement. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was similar between groups during intubation, but heart rate (HR) increased in patients who did not receive clonidine. H-H application increased HR and MAP in Group 4. HR also increased after H-H placement in patients who received oral clonidine, while patients receiving scalp lidocaine or both clonidine and scalp lidocaine had little change in either value. Clonidine attenuated HR increases after laryngoscopy but not after H-H placement. Lidocaine injected at the pin sites reduced HR, and MAP increased after H-H insertion. The combination of oral clonidine and scalp lidocaine blunted hemodynamic responses to both intubation and H-H placement. PMID:17167618

  1. The Onset and Duration of Action of 0.2% Lidocaine in a One-per-Mil Tumescent Solution for Hand Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Prasetyono, Theddeus O.H.

    2016-01-01

    Background One-per-mil tumescent solution, which contains 0.2% lidocaine with 1:1,000,000 epinephrine, has been reported to be clinically effective for hand surgery under local anesthesia. However, it was lacking in its basic pharmacokinetics profile in regard to the onset of action (OOA) and duration of action (DOA). Methods A randomized, double-blind study was conducted on 12 volunteers who met the inclusion criteria from October to November 2014. All volunteers had their right and left ring finger pulps injected with either one-per-mil solution or 2% lidocaine. Semmes-Weinstein and two-point discrimination tests were used to test sensation. Visual analogue scale was recorded at the time when the finger lost its sensation and when it regained normal sensation to measure the OOA and DOA. The data were then analyzed with a paired t-test and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results The OOA and DOA of 2% plain lidocaine were 1 minute and 99.67 minutes, respectively. Meanwhile, 0.2% lidocaine in a one-per-mil tumescent solution showed an OOA of 5 minutes and a DOA of 186.83 minutes. The OOA of 0.2% lidocaine in a one-per-mil tumescent solution is statistically shorter than 2% plain lidocaine (P=0.04); while its DOA is statistically longer than 2% plain lidocaine (P<0.001). Conclusions The 0.2% lidocaine in a one-per-mil tumescent solution is statistically and clinically superior to 2% plain lidocaine in achieving longer duration of local anesthesia. PMID:27218026

  2. Lidocaine concentration in mandibular bone after subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia decreases with elevation of periosteal flap and irrigation with saline.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Sachie; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Tada, Hitoshi; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that the action of infiltration anesthesia on the jawbone is attenuated significantly by elevation of the periosteal flap with saline irrigation in clinical studies; however, the reason is unclear. Therefore, the lidocaine concentration in mandibular bone after subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia was measured under several surgical conditions. The subjects were 48 rabbits. Infiltration anesthesia by 0.5 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 80,000 epinephrine (adrenaline) was injected into the right mandibular angle and left mandibular body, respectively. Under several surgical conditions (presence or absence of periosteal flap, and presence or absence of saline irrigation), both mandibular bone samples were removed at a fixed time after subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia. The lidocaine concentration in each mandibular bone sample was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. As a result, elevation of the periosteal flap with saline irrigation significantly decreased the lidocaine concentration in the mandibular bone. It is suggested that the anesthetic in the bone was washed out by saline irrigation. Therefore, supplemental conduction and/or general anesthesia should be utilized for long operations that include elevation of the periosteal flap with saline irrigation. PMID:24932978

  3. Can treatment success with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster be predicted in cancer pain with neuropathic components or trigeminal neuropathic pain?

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Kai-Uwe; Nalamachu, Srinivas; Brasseur, Louis; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2013-01-01

    An expert group of 40 pain specialists from 16 countries performed a first assessment of the value of predictors for treatment success with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster in the management of cancer pain with neuropathic components and trigeminal neuropathic pain. Results were based on the retrospective analysis of 68 case reports (sent in by participants in the 4 weeks prior to the conference) and the practical experience of the experts. Lidocaine plaster treatment was mostly successful for surgery or chemotherapy-related cancer pain with neuropathic components. A dose reduction of systemic pain treatment was observed in at least 50% of all cancer pain patients using the plaster as adjunct treatment; the presence of allodynia, hyperalgesia or pain quality provided a potential but not definitively clear indication of treatment success. In trigeminal neuropathic pain, continuous pain, severe allodynia, hyperalgesia, or postherpetic neuralgia or trauma as the cause of orofacial neuropathic pain were perceived as potential predictors of treatment success with lidocaine plaster. In conclusion, these findings provide a first assessment of the likelihood of treatment benefits with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster in the management of cancer pain with neuropathic components and trigeminal neuropathic pain and support conducting large, well-designed multicenter studies. PMID:23630431

  4. Validation of a thin-layer chromatography for the determination of hydrocortisone acetate and lidocaine in a pharmaceutical preparation.

    PubMed

    Dołowy, Małgorzata; Kulpińska-Kucia, Katarzyna; Pyka, Alina

    2014-01-01

    A new specific, precise, accurate, and robust TLC-densitometry has been developed for the simultaneous determination of hydrocortisone acetate and lidocaine hydrochloride in combined pharmaceutical formulation. The chromatographic analysis was carried out using a mobile phase consisting of chloroform+acetone+ammonia (25%) in volume composition 8:2:0.1 and silica gel 60F254 plates. Densitometric detection was performed in UV at wavelengths 200 nm and 250 nm, respectively, for lidocaine hydrochloride and hydrocortisone acetate. The validation of the proposed method was performed in terms of specificity, linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), precision, accuracy, and robustness. The applied TLC procedure is linear in hydrocortisone acetate concentration range of 3.75÷12.50  μg·spot(-1), and from 1.00÷2.50  μg·spot(-1) for lidocaine hydrochloride. The developed method was found to be accurate (the value of the coefficient of variation CV [%] is less than 3%), precise (CV [%] is less than 2%), specific, and robust. LOQ of hydrocortisone acetate is 0.198  μg·spot(-1) and LOD is 0.066  μg·spot(-1). LOQ and LOD values for lidocaine hydrochloride are 0.270 and 0.090  μg·spot(-1), respectively. The assay value of both bioactive substances is consistent with the limits recommended by Pharmacopoeia. PMID:24526880

  5. Reduction in Procedure-associated Pain by Treatment with a Unique Topical Anesthetic Foam Containing 4% Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated a unique formulation of lidocaine 4% in an emollient aerosol foam microemulsion system to facilitate rapid delivery of the active ingredient and reduce pain associated with cosmetic dermatologic laser treatment. Design: This was a noncontrolled, open-label, paired, comparison study. Setting: Private practice dermatology clinic. Participants: Ten patients undergoing various cosmetic laser treatments, 18 years of age or older and considered clinically appropriate for study participation. Measurements: Primary endpoints were patient and clinician assessments of procedural pain intensity for the treated and untreated areas. Ratings were recorded on a visual analog scale ranging from “no pain at all” to “the most intense pain imaginable.” Secondary study endpoints included clinician and patient subjective assessments of the lidocaine 4% foam. Results: Mean patient and clinician ratings of pain were significantly lower for areas treated with the lidocaine 4% foam compared with pain ratings for untreated areas. No adverse events were reported. Clinician’s mean ratings for ease of application and overall satisfaction were favorable. Conclusion: The results from this pilot, 10-patient, open-label study suggest that the lidocaine 4% foam may be acceptable to both patients and clinicians for the safe and effective reduction of pain associated with cosmetic dermatologic laser procedures. However, a blinded, placebo-controlled study of a larger population is needed to confirm these preliminary results. PMID:20729937

  6. Effects of lidocaine injections into the lateral parabrachial nucleus on dipsogenic and pressor response to central angiotensin 2 in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menani, Jose Vanderlei; Beltz, Terry G.

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of bilateral injections of the local anesthetic, lidocaine, into the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) on the dipsogenic and pressor responses induced by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of angiotensin 2 (ANG 2). Centrally injected ANG 2 (50 ng/1 microliter) induced water intake ( IO.2 +/- 0.8 ml/h) and pressor responses (22 +/- 1 mmHg). Prior bilateral injection of 10% lidocaine (200 nl) into the LPBN increased the water intake (14.2 +/- 1.4 ml/h), but did not change the pressor response (17 +/- 1 mmHg) to i.c.v. ANG 2. Lidocaine alone injected into the LPBN also induced a pressor response (23 +/- 3 mmHg). These results showing that bilateral LPBN injection of lidocaine increase water intake induced bv i.c.v. ANG 2 are consistent with electrolytic and neurotoxic lesion studies and suggest that the LPBN is associated with inhibitory mechanisms controlling water intake induced by ANG 2. These results also provide evidence that it is feasible to reversibly anesthetize this brain area to facilitate fluid-related ingestive behavior.

  7. Intra-articular administration of lidocaine in anaesthetized dogs: pharmacokinetic profile and safety on cardiovascular and nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, A; Bufalari, A; De Monte, V; Cagnardi, P; Marenzoni, M L; Catanzaro, A; Vigorito, V; Della Rocca, G

    2015-08-01

    The intra-articular administration of lidocaine is a frequent practice in human orthopaedic surgical procedures, but an eventual absorption of the drug into the bloodstream can lead to toxicity, mainly concerning the central nervous system and the cardiovascular systems. The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic profile and the safety, in terms of cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, of lidocaine after intra-articular administration to anesthetized dogs undergoing arthroscopy. Lidocaine 2% was administered to eight dogs before surgery in differing amounts, depending on the volume of the joints involved, and blood samples were taken at predetermined time points. The maximum serum concentration of lidocaine ranged from 0.50 to 3.01 μg/mL (mean ± SD: 2.18 ± 0.91 μg/mL), and the time to reach it was 28.75 ± 15.74 min. No signs of cardiac toxicity were detected during the entire procedure, and possible signs of CNS toxicity were masked by the anaesthesia. However, concentrations reported in literature as responsible for neurotoxicity in dog were achieved in three of eight investigated subjects. Pending further studies, veterinarians should consider the possibility of side effects occurring following the intra-articular administration of local anaesthetics. PMID:25428796

  8. Validation of a Thin-Layer Chromatography for the Determination of Hydrocortisone Acetate and Lidocaine in a Pharmaceutical Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Dołowy, Małgorzata; Kulpińska-Kucia, Katarzyna; Pyka, Alina

    2014-01-01

    A new specific, precise, accurate, and robust TLC-densitometry has been developed for the simultaneous determination of hydrocortisone acetate and lidocaine hydrochloride in combined pharmaceutical formulation. The chromatographic analysis was carried out using a mobile phase consisting of chloroform + acetone + ammonia (25%) in volume composition 8 : 2 : 0.1 and silica gel 60F254 plates. Densitometric detection was performed in UV at wavelengths 200 nm and 250 nm, respectively, for lidocaine hydrochloride and hydrocortisone acetate. The validation of the proposed method was performed in terms of specificity, linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), precision, accuracy, and robustness. The applied TLC procedure is linear in hydrocortisone acetate concentration range of 3.75 ÷ 12.50 μg·spot−1, and from 1.00 ÷ 2.50 μg·spot−1 for lidocaine hydrochloride. The developed method was found to be accurate (the value of the coefficient of variation CV [%] is less than 3%), precise (CV [%] is less than 2%), specific, and robust. LOQ of hydrocortisone acetate is 0.198 μg·spot−1 and LOD is 0.066 μg·spot−1. LOQ and LOD values for lidocaine hydrochloride are 0.270 and 0.090 μg·spot−1, respectively. The assay value of both bioactive substances is consistent with the limits recommended by Pharmacopoeia. PMID:24526880

  9. A Needle-Free Injection System (INJEX™) with lidocaine for epidural needle insertion: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gozdemir, Muhammet; Demircioglu, Ruveyda Irem; Karabayirli, Safinaz; Sert, Huseyin; Muslu, Bunyamin; Usta, Burhanettin; Yazici, Ummugulsum

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Local anesthetic infiltration is also a process of a painful process itself. INJEX™ technology, known as “Needle-free” drug delivery system, was designed for reducing the pain associated with cutaneous procedures. We conducted a prospective, randomized trial to evaluate the application of lidocaine with INJEX™ system and 27-gauge needle. Methods: A total of 60 consecutive patients were allocated to receive either INJEX group or 27-gauge needle group. Local anesthetic infiltration was applied two minutes before epidural needle insertion. Results: Mean VAS, at the time of local anesthetic injection was 0 for group I and 2 for group II. When the effect of epidural needle insertion was compared, the mean VAS score was one versus two for Group-I versus Group-II, respectively. Lidocaine applied with the INJEX™ system before epidural needle insertion significantly reduced the intensity of pain during that procedure and was least effective the lidocaine applied with the 27-gauge needle and patients felt less pain during at the time of local anesthetic injection in Group-I. Conclusion: Needle-free delivery of lidocaine is an effective, easy to-use and noninvasive method of providing local anesthesia for the epidural needle insertion. PMID:27375728

  10. Efficacy of caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, xylazine and xylazine plus hyaluronidase in reducing discomfort produced by electroejaculation in bulls.

    PubMed

    Pagliosa, Ronaldo C; Derossi, Rafael; Costa, Deiler S; Faria, Fabio J C

    2015-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that epidural administration of lidocaine, xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase provides reduced pain and stress during electroejaculation in bulls, eight 30-month-old Nellore bulls received saline solution (control), 2% lidocaine, 2% xylazine or 2% xylazine plus hyaluronidase injected into the first intercoccygeal (Co1-Co2) epidural space in randomized order. Heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, analgesia, animal behavior and motor blockade were evaluated before treatment and at predetermined intervals during and after treatment. Pain and stress were scored subjectively, and semen quality was evaluated. The onset of anesthetic action was significantly faster with lidocaine (3.0 ± 1.2 min) than with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase (8.9 ± 1.5 and 5.5 ± 2.6 min, P=0.021 and P=0.012, respectively), and the onset of anesthesia with xylazine plus hyaluronidase was significantly faster than that with xylazine alone (P=0.032). Treatment with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase resulted in less discomfort than treatment with lidocaine, as indicated by animal behavior. Changes in heart rate, respiratory rate and arterial pressure were within acceptable limits. Penile protrusion and semen emission occurred in all animals during all four treatments. Our results suggest that xylazine plus hyaluronidase reduced discomfort during electroejaculation more effectively than xylazine or lidocaine alone. Further experiments are necessary to determine whether electroejaculation with xylazine plus hyaluronidase is feasible for obtaining semen from Nellore bulls unaccustomed to being handled or restrained. PMID:26097016

  11. Efficacy of caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, xylazine and xylazine plus hyaluronidase in reducing discomfort produced by electroejaculation in bulls

    PubMed Central

    PAGLIOSA, Ronaldo C.; DEROSSI, Rafael; COSTA, Deiler S.; FARIA, Fabio J.C.

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that epidural administration of lidocaine, xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase provides reduced pain and stress during electroejaculation in bulls, eight 30-month-old Nellore bulls received saline solution (control), 2% lidocaine, 2% xylazine or 2% xylazine plus hyaluronidase injected into the first intercoccygeal (Co1–Co2) epidural space in randomized order. Heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, analgesia, animal behavior and motor blockade were evaluated before treatment and at predetermined intervals during and after treatment. Pain and stress were scored subjectively, and semen quality was evaluated. The onset of anesthetic action was significantly faster with lidocaine (3.0 ± 1.2 min) than with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase (8.9 ± 1.5 and 5.5 ± 2.6 min, P=0.021 and P=0.012, respectively), and the onset of anesthesia with xylazine plus hyaluronidase was significantly faster than that with xylazine alone (P=0.032). Treatment with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase resulted in less discomfort than treatment with lidocaine, as indicated by animal behavior. Changes in heart rate, respiratory rate and arterial pressure were within acceptable limits. Penile protrusion and semen emission occurred in all animals during all four treatments. Our results suggest that xylazine plus hyaluronidase reduced discomfort during electroejaculation more effectively than xylazine or lidocaine alone. Further experiments are necessary to determine whether electroejaculation with xylazine plus hyaluronidase is feasible for obtaining semen from Nellore bulls unaccustomed to being handled or restrained. PMID:26097016

  12. Echinacea/sage or chlorhexidine/lidocaine for treating acute sore throats: a randomized double-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this trial was to assess the relative efficacy of a sage/echinacea spray and a chlorhexidine/lidocaine spray in the treatment of acute sore throats. Methods This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy controlled trial carried out in eleven general practices in Switzerland. A total of 154 patients (133 analyzed in per protocol collective) at least 12 years old with acute sore throat present for not more than 72 hours prior to inclusion and with a throat score ≥6 participated in the study. They used either an echinacea/sage spray or a chlorhexidine/lidocaine spray with two puffs every 2 hours, in a double-dummy blinded manner, up to 10 times daily until they were symptom-free, for a maximum of 5 days. The main outcome measures was the comparison of response rates during the first three days. A response was defined as a decrease of at least 50% of the total symptoms compared to baseline. Results The echinacea/sage treatment exhibited similar efficacy to the chlorhexidine/lidocaine treatment in reducing sore throat symptoms during the first 3 days (P(x < Y) = .5083). Response rates after 3 days were 63.8% in the echinacea/sage group and 57.8% in the chlorhexidine/lidocaine group. For all secondary parameters, such as time to becoming symptom free, throat pain, and global assessments of efficacy by the physician and patient, no difference between the two treatments was seen. They were both very well tolerated. Conclusion An echinacea/sage preparation is as efficacious and well tolerated as a chlorhexidine/lidocaine spray in the treatment of acute sore throats. PMID:19748859

  13. Comparison of the efficacy of intrauterine lidocaine, paracervical block and oral etodolac for decreasing pain in endometrial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Ayşe; Şahin, H. Güler; Küçükaydın, Zehra; Erdemoğlu, Evrim

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of paracervical block, intrauterine lidocaine and oral etodolac in decreasing the pain caused by pipelle endometrial sampling. A secondary goal of this study was to determine the adverse effects and compare possible effects of these methods on pulse and blood pressure. Material and Methods The study was performed between April 2006 and October 2006 in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of Van Yüzüncü Yıl University Research Hospital. One-hundred twenty patients were randomized into four groups: 1. Group: Paracervical block was performed with 3 ml 2% prilocaine solution. 2. Group: Five ml of 2% lidocaine solution was instilled through the endocervix into the uterine cavity. 3. Group: Subjects received 400 mg oral etodolac tablet 1–1.5 hour before the procedure. 4. Group: No method of anesthesia was used in the control group. Endometrial sampling was performed with pipelle. Severity of pain during the procedure was scored by the subjects according to the “6-point Verbal Rating Scale (VRS)”. Blood pressure and pulse rate were measured before, during and 30 minutes after the procedure. Results Pain scores in intrauterine lidocaine group (2nd group) were found statistically significantly lower than the other three groups (p<0.05). Conclusion Intrauterine lidocaine anesthesia technique decreases pain in endometrial sampling with pipelle more efficiently than paracervical block or oral etodolac. While indication of menorrhagia and endometrial thickness more than 5 mm increased pain scores, intrauterine lidocaine application or paracervical block decreased the scores significantly (p<0.05). PMID:24591932

  14. Effects of Intravenous Magnesium Sulfate and Lidocaine on Hemodynamic Variables Following Direct Laryngoscopy and Intubation in Elective Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dehkordi, Masih Ebrahimi; Radpay, Badiozaman; Teimoorian, Hooman; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir

    2013-01-01

    Background Laryngoscopy and intubation incur hemodynamic changes like increase in heart rate, arterial blood pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, wedge capillary pressure and arrhythmias. Anesthesiologists are continually in search of ways to alleviate such complications. Several medicinal methods have been suggested that serve the purpose including the administration of intravenous magnesium sulfate to minimize these unfavorable responses. This study compares the effects of intravenous administration of lidocaine and magnesium sulfate on unwanted hemodynamic responses following laryngoscopy and intubation in elective surgery candidates. Materials and Methods This randomized double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 60 ASA-I and ASA-II candidates who received 60 mg/kg (based on Lean Body Mass) magnesium sulfate or lidocaine randomly before intubation. Values of systolic and diastolic blood pressures, mean arterial pressure, and heart rate were recorded for both groups during the 5 minutes following administration, and compared with baseline values. Results In both groups, systolic blood pressure increased compared to the baseline value. However, there was a significant difference between the two groups as this increase occurred within the first 3 minutes in the lidocaine group, while within the first minute in the magnesium sulfate group. The increase in diastolic blood pressure was not significant. But there was a significant difference in the mean arterial pressure increase between the two groups since in the magnesium sulfate group this increase occurred in the first minute whereas in the lidocaine group it occurred during the first two minutes. There was no significant difference in the heart rates after intubation between the two groups. Conclusion Magnesium sulfate is more effective than lidocaine in controlling hemodynamics, although it may increase the heart rate. PMID:25191450

  15. Pregabalin, the lidocaine plaster and duloxetine in patients with refractory neuropathic pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients frequently fail to receive adequate pain relief from, or are intolerant of, first-line therapies prescribed for neuropathic pain (NeP). This refractory chronic pain causes psychological distress and impacts patient quality of life. Published literature for treatment in refractory patients is sparse and often published as conference abstracts only. The aim of this study was to identify published data for three pharmacological treatments: pregabalin, lidocaine plaster, and duloxetine, which are typically used at 2nd line or later in UK patients with neuropathic pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and CCTR was carried out and supplemented with extensive conference and grey literature searching. Studies of any design (except single patient case studies) that enrolled adult patients with refractory NeP were included in the review and qualitatively assessed. Results Seventeen studies were included in the review: nine of pregabalin, seven of the lidocaine plaster, and one of duloxetine. No head-to-head studies of these treatments were identified. Only six studies included treatments within UK licensed indications and dose ranges. Reported efficacy outcomes were not consistent between studies. Pain scores were most commonly assessed in studies including pregabalin; trials of pregabalin and the lidocaine plaster reported the proportion of responders. Significant improvements in the total, sensory and affective scores of the Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and in function interference, sleep interference and pain associated distress, were associated with pregabalin treatment; limited or no quality of life data were available for the other two interventions. Limitations to the review are the small number of included studies, which are generally small, of poor quality and heterogeneous in patient population and study design. Conclusions Little evidence is available relevant to the treatment of refractory

  16. Bladder tissue permeability and transport modelling of intravesical alum, lidocaine hydrochloride, methylprednisolone hemisuccinate and mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Moch, Céline; Salmon, Damien; Rodríguez Armesto, Laura; Colombel, Marc; Pivot, Christine; Pirot, Fabrice

    2014-04-10

    The aims of this study were to assess the tissue permeability of the bladder and to characterize the transport of four drugs displaying different physico-chemical properties and commonly used in intravesical delivery, through porcine bladder. The transport of aluminium through porcine bladder was assessed by using a vertical static diffusion cell. Lidocaine hydrochloride, methylprednisolone hemisuccinate and mitomycin C were tested by using three different experimental setups, including vertical static diffusion cell, microdialyseur and lab-patented device. Penetration results on different experimental setups were homogenous suggesting dependency on physico-chemical characteristics of drug and subsequent interaction with bladder wall structure. Oppositely, permeation varied consistently with experimental setup characteristics (i.e., permeation surface, receptor fluid volume and hydrodynamic). Mathematical modelling of drug transport through bladder wall is proposed considering scarce literature on this route of administration. Practical outcome of this study could drive compounding optimization towards improvement of safety and efficacy in patient undergoing intravesical administration. PMID:24463072

  17. Masking the bitter taste of injectable lidocaine HCl formulation for dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yangjie; Nedley, Michael P; Bhaduri, Sarit B; Bredzinski, Xavier; Boddu, Sai H S

    2015-04-01

    Several attempts have been made to mask the bitter taste of oral formulations, but none have been made for injectable formulations. This study aims to mask the bitter taste of dental lidocaine HCl (LID) injection using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and sodium saccharin. Inclusion complexes of LID and HP-β-CD were prepared by the solution method in 1:1 and 1:2 M ratios. Inclusion complexes in solution were studied using phase solubility in phosphate buffer solutions (pH 8, 9, and 10). Freeze-dried inclusion complexes were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and in vitro release. Injectable formulations were prepared using inclusion complexes and characterized for stability and for taste using an Alpha MOS ASTREE electronic tongue (ETongue). The association constants of HP-β-CD with lidocaine-free base and its ionized form were found to be 26.23 ± 0.00025 and 0.8694 ± 0.00045 M(-1), respectively. Characterization studies confirmed the formation of stable inclusion complexes of LID and HP-β-CD. Injectable formulations were found to be stable for up to 6 months at 4°C, 25°C, and 40°C. The taste evaluation study indicated that HP-β-CD (1:1 and 1:2 M ratios) significantly improved the bitter taste of LID injectable formulation. In conclusion, inclusion complex in the 1:1 M ratio with 0.09% sodium saccharin was considered to be optimum in masking the bitter taste of LID. PMID:25361901

  18. The conformational stability, solvation and the assignments of the experimental infrared, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2015-05-01

    The structure, vibrational and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine were investigated by the B3LYP/6-311G∗∗ calculations. The molecule was predicted to have the non-planar cis (NCCN ∼ 0°) structures being about 2-6 kcal/mol lower in energy than the corresponding trans (NCCN ∼ 180°) forms. The calculated NCCN (9.6°) and CNCC (-132.2°) torsional angles were in a good qualitative agreement with the reported X-ray angles (3.1 and 13.0°, -102.67 and -77.9°, respectively, for H-bonded dimers). The Gibbs energy of solution of lidocaine in formamide, water, dimethylsulfoxide, acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol and chloroform solutions was estimated at the B3LYP level. The predicted affinity of lidocaine toward the alcohols, acetonitrile and chloroform solutions was in excellent agreement with the reported experimental solubility of the drug in organic solvents. The analysis of the observed vibrational spectra is consistent with the presence of lidocaine in only one conformation at room temperature. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of lidocaine were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the drug. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for lidocaine is 0.47 and 8.26 ppm, respectively.

  19. Distal Radius Fracture Hematoma Block with Combined Lidocaine and Bupivacaine can induce Seizures while within Therapeutic Window: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dezfuli, Bobby; Edwards, Christopher J.; DeSilva, Gregory L

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Hematoma blocks are effective pain management modalities for closed reduction of distal radius fractures. Complications of hematoma blocks are associated with systemic reaction to anesthetic used. Case Report: We present a case report of an elderly patient who received a hematoma block of lidocaine and bupivacaine for a distal radius fracture and subsequently developed a generalized tonic clonic seizure. The dose of both lidocaine and bupivacaine were well within the suggested dose limit. The episode was self limiting and patient had the cast applied. Conclusions: We conclude that hematoma blocks with a combination of anesthetics may decrease the threshold to neurologic complications, especially in elderly patients. Precautions and ready treatment measures should be made available while performing closed reduction

  20. Sterilisation of hybrid Galapagos tortoises (Geochelone nigra) for island restoration. Part 2: phallectomy of males under intrathecal anaesthesia with lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Rivera, S; Divers, S J; Knafo, S E; Martinez, P; Cayot, L J; Tapia-Aguilera, W; Flanagan, J

    2011-01-22

    Lidocaine intrathecal anaesthesia was used to perform phallectomies in 15 hybrid Galapagos tortoises (Geochelone nigra) in a field setting as part of a conservation and ecosystem restoration project in the Galapagos Islands. The intrathecal injection was performed in the dorsal intercoccygeal region of the tail. Once the tail and hindlimbs were relaxed and the phallus was easily exteriorised, phallectomy was performed in a routine manner. All the animals recovered well from the procedure and were walking 30 to 60 minutes after surgery. No adverse effects were noted as a result of lidocaine intrathecal anaesthesia. One of the larger animals had evidence of haemorrhage from the surgical site 48 hours postoperatively. All tortoises continued to make full recoveries and were released on to the island of Pinta in May 2010. PMID:21257586

  1. Prevention of Withdrawal Movement Associated with the Injection of Rocuronium in Children: Comparison of Paracetamol and Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Reyhan; Akın, Mine; Keskin, Gülsen; Ünal, Dilek; Dönmez, Aslı

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pain from rocuronium injection is observed in 50%–80 % of patients. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of pretreatment with paracetamol and lidocaine in preventing pain-induced withdrawal caused by the intravenous injection of rocuronium during the induction of general anaesthesia in paediatric patients. Methods Ninety children were randomized into two groups using a simple drawing from the box method: a paracetamol group (Group P, n=45) and a lidocaine group (Group L, n=45). After anaesthesia induction, venous occlusion was applied by a paediatric cuff inflated to a pressure of 75 mmHg and by 50 mg paracetamol and 0.5 mg kg−1 lidocaine was injected in Groups P and L, respectively. Venous occlusion was then released, followed by rocuronium injection (0.6 mg kg−1). Withdrawal was evaluated using a 4-point scale (1, no response; 2, movement at the wrist only; 3, movement/withdrawal involving arm only (elbow/shoulder) and 4, generalized response, movement/withdrawal in more than one extremity). Results The incidence of withdrawal movement was 42% and 26% in the Groups P and L, respectively (p=0.120). Although no significant differences were noted in the number of patients who had no withdrawal movement and mild withdrawal movement in Groups P and L, compared with Group L, the incidences of moderate withdrawal movement were significantly higher in Group P (p<0.05). No patient in either group revealed generalized movement. Conclusion Using a venous occlusion technique, pretreatment with 50 mg paracetamol can prevent withdrawal movement caused by rocuronium injection in children but is not as effective as lidocaine to prevent moderate withdrawal movement. PMID:27366564

  2. Effects of intravenously infused lidocaine on analgesia and gastrointestinal function of patients receiving laparoscopic common bile duct exploration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Hu, Wei-Lan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of intravenously infused lidocaine on analgesia and gastrointestinal function of patients receiving laparoscopic common bile duct exploration. Methods: Seventy-eight patients with cholelithiasis were randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group (n=39) that all had laparoscopic common bile duct exploration. The treatment group was intravenously infused with 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine by using a venous pump under anesthesia induction at the speed of 2 mg·kg-1 ·h-1 until the end of surgery, while the control group was given normal saline with the same volume. Results: All patients successfully completed the surgery, with similar surgical time, incision length and intraoperative blood loss. The required lidocaine concentrations of the treatment group were 2.64±1.23 μg/ml, 1.14±0.4 μg/ml and 0.93±0.32 μg/ml respectively 2 hour, 12 hour and 48 hour after surgery. Pain score of the treatment group, which was significantly lower than that of the control group at the postoperative 2 hour (P<0.05), was similar to those of the control group at the postoperative 12 hour and 48 hour. With extended time, the pain score significantly decreased (P<0.05). The treatment group had significantly shorter first anal exhaust time and first defecation time than those of the control group (P<0.05). Adverse reactions, such as nausea and vomiting, dizziness, headache, subcutaneous emphysema and fat liquefaction of incision, occurred similarly in the two groups, which were alleviated by symptomatic treatment. Conclusion: Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration is a promising minimally invasive surgery for patients with cholelithiasis, during which intravenously infused lidocaine can rapidly recover the gastrointestinal function and exert short-term analgesic effects, with mild adverse reactions also. PMID:26648989

  3. Randomized clinical trial of multimodal physiotherapy treatment compared to overnight lidocaine ointment in women with provoked vestibulodynia: Design and methods.

    PubMed

    Morin, Mélanie; Dumoulin, Chantale; Bergeron, Sophie; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Khalifé, Samir; Waddell, Guy; Dubois, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a highly prevalent and debilitating condition yet its management relies mainly on non-empirically validated interventions. Among the many causes of PVD, there is growing evidence that pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunctions play an important role in its pathophysiology. Multimodal physiotherapy, which addresses these dysfunctions, is judged by experts to be highly effective and is recommended as a first-line treatment. However, the effectiveness of this promising intervention has been evaluated through only two small uncontrolled trials. The proposed bi-center, single-blind, parallel group, randomized controlled trial (RCT) aims to evaluate the efficacy of multimodal physiotherapy and compare it to a frequently used first-line treatment, topical overnight application of lidocaine, in women with PVD. A total of 212 women diagnosed with PVD according to a standardized protocol were eligible for the study and were randomly assigned to either multimodal physiotherapy or lidocaine treatment for 10weeks. The primary outcome measure is pain during intercourse (assessed with a numerical rating scale). Secondary measures include sexual function, pain quality, psychological factors (including pain catastrophizing, anxiety, depression and fear of pain), PFM morphology and function, and patients' global impression of change. Assessments are made at baseline, post-treatment and at the 6-month follow-up. This manuscript presents and discusses the rationale, design and methodology of the first RCT investigating physiotherapy in comparison to a commonly prescribed first-line treatment, overnight topical lidocaine, for women with PVD. PMID:26600287

  4. Phospholipid microemulsion-based hydrogel for enhanced topical delivery of lidocaine and prilocaine: QbD-based development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Negi, Poonam; Singh, Bhupinder; Sharma, Gajanand; Beg, Sarwar; Raza, Kaisar; Katare, Om Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Topical delivery of local anesthetics has been an area of interest for researchers considering the barrier properties of skin and unfavorable physicochemical properties of drugs. In the present study, efforts have been made to modify the in vivo efficacy of eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine by exploiting the phospholipid modified microemulsion based delivery systems. The strategic QbD (D-optimal mixture design) enabled systematic optimization approach, after having obtained the isotropic area of interest by ternary phase diagram, has resulted into the system with most desirable attributes. Latter include nano-scale, globular structures with an average size of 40.6 nm, as characterized by TEM and DLS. The optimized microemulsion systems in gel dosage forms revealed the better permeability over commercial cream (CC) through abdominal rat skin. Enhancement in the flux from MOPT-NMP gel was 3.22-folds for prilocaine and 4.94-folds for lidocaine, in comparison to that of CC. This enhanced skin permeability is very well reflected in the in vivo studies, wherein intensity and duration of action was augmented significantly. The skin compliance of the optimized formulation was revealed in histopathological studies. The overall benefit relating to efficacy and safety-compliance could be correlated to the uniqueness of the carriers, composed of phospholipids and other components. Hence, the developed phospholipid-microemulsion based gel formulation has been proposed as more useful alternative for the topical delivery of lidocaine and prilocaine. PMID:24892623

  5. Comparison of Topical Anesthetics for Radiofrequency Ablation of Achrocordons: Eutectic Mixture of Lignocaine/Prilocaine versus Lidocaine/Tetracaine

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nitin; Chauhan, Sandhya; Rastogi, Madhur Kant

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Topical application of local anesthetics is currently considered to be the easiest, most effective, and convenient way for treatment of patients who may be undergoing superficial dermatosurgical procedures. Materials and Methods. This study compares the anesthetic potential of 2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine topical cream with 7% lignocaine and 7% tetracaine combination cream for radio ablative dermatosurgery when applied, under occlusion, for 30 minutes. 40 subjects of achrocordons were enrolled in this split-side randomized trial. Result. The pain severity experienced by subjects in terms of visual analogue scale score was significantly lesser for lignocaine/tetracaine combination cream as compared to lidocaine/prilocaine combination. Conclusion. This small study proves the efficacy of lidocaine/tetracaine combination as a topical anesthetic cream when applied for a short time interval of 30 minutes. This will help a dermatosurgeon to perform various dermatological procedures in a better and efficient manner with a shorter waiting period for analgesia to set in. PMID:24600520

  6. Paracetamol, Ondansetron, Granisetron, Magnesium Sulfate and Lidocaine and Reduced Propofol Injection Pain

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Mohammad; Tabari, Masoomeh; Alipour, Masoomeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Propofol is a most widely used intravenous anesthetic drug. One of its most common complications is the pain upon injection; therefore, different methods, with various effects, have been proposed in order to alleviate the pain. Objectives: This study investigates the effects of paracetamol, ondansetron, granisetron, magnesium sulfate and lidocaine drugs on reducing the pain of propofol injection during anesthetic induction. Also, the hemodynamic changes will be analyzed. Patients and Methods: This is an interventional study containing 336 patients underwent elective orthopedic surgeries in Educational Hospitals of Mashhad University, using systematic sampling, the patients were divided into six groups. A 20-gauge needle was inserted into a venous vessel in the back of the hand and 100 cc of Ringer serum was injected into the vein, which was applied proximal to the injection site. Afterwards, paracetamol 2 mg/kg (group p), magnesium sulfate 2 mmol (group M), ondansetron 4 mg (group O), granisetron 2 mg (group G), lidocaine 40 mg (group L) and 5 cc saline (group S) were injected into the vessel, after 60 seconds, the tourniquet was opened. One quarter of the total dose of propofol (2.5 mg/kg) was injected with a flow rate of 4 mg/sec and then the injection pain was measured. Finally, the fentanyl (2 µg/kg), atracurium 0.5 mg/kg, and the remaining dose of propofol were injected and the vital signs were recorded before the administration of propofol and 1, 3, 5 and 10 minutes after the propofol injection. Results: The six groups did not significantly differ, regarding their gender, weight or age. Propofol injection pain was less in L and G groups, in comparison with the others (P ≤ 0.001). By analyzing the hemodynamic changes, it was observed that the least amount of change in mean arterial pressure was observed in the paracetamol group. Conclusions: The reduction of propofol injection pain was observed by using medications (in comparison with normal

  7. Dynamics of bio-membranes investigated by neutron spin echo: Effects of phospholipid conformations and presence of lidocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zheng

    Bio-membranes of the natural living cells are made of bilayers of phospholipids molecules embedded with other constituents, such as cholesterol and membrane proteins, which help to accomplish a broad range of functions. Vesicles made of lipid bilayers can serve as good model systems for bio-membranes. Therefore these systems have been extensively characterized and much is known about their shape, size, porosity and functionality. In this dissertation we report the studies of the effects of the phosoholipid conformation, such as hydrocarbon number and presence of double bond in hydrophobic tails on dynamics of phospholipids bilayers studied by neutron spin echo (NSE) technique. We have investigated how lidocaine, the most medically used local anesthetics (LA), influence the structural and dynamical properties of model bio-membranes by small angle neutron scattering (SANS), NSE and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). To investigate the influence of phospholipid conformation on bio-membranes, the bending elasticities kappac of seven saturated and monounsaturated phospholipid bilayers were investigated by NSE spectroscopy. kappa c of phosphatidylcholines (PCS) in liquid crystalline (L alpha) phase ranges from 0.38x10-19 J for 1,2-Dimyristoyl- sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (14:0 PC) to 0.64x10-19 J for 1,2-Dieicosenoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (20:1 PC). It was confirmed that when the area modulus KA varies little with chain unsaturation or length, the elastic ratios (kappac/ KA)1/2 of bilayers varies linearly with lipid hydrophobic thickness d. For the study of the influence of LA on bio-membranes, SANS measurements have been performed on 14:0 PC bilayers with different concentrations of lidocaine to determine the bilayer thickness dL as a function of the lidocaine concentration. NSE has been used to study the influence of lidocaine on the bending elasticity of 14:0 PC bilayers in Lalpha and ripple gel (Pbeta') phases. Our results confirmed that the molecules of

  8. Estimation of skin concentrations of topically applied lidocaine at each depth profile.

    PubMed

    Oshizaka, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Kadhum, Wesam R; Todo, Hiroaki; Hatanaka, Tomomi; Wierzba, Konstanty; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2014-11-20

    Skin concentrations of topically administered compounds need to be considered in order to evaluate their efficacies and toxicities. This study investigated the relationship between the skin permeation and concentrations of compounds, and also predicted the skin concentrations of these compounds using their permeation parameters. Full-thickness skin or stripped skin from pig ears was set on a vertical-type diffusion cell, and lidocaine (LID) solution was applied to the stratum corneum (SC) in order to determine in vitro skin permeability. Permeation parameters were obtained based on Fick's second law of diffusion. LID concentrations at each depth of the SC were measured using tape-stripping. Concentration-depth profiles were obtained from viable epidermis and dermis (VED) by analyzing horizontal sections. The corresponding skin concentration at each depth was calculated based on Fick's law using permeation parameters and then compared with the observed value. The steady state LID concentrations decreased linearly as the site became deeper in SC or VED. The calculated concentration-depth profiles of the SC and VED were almost identical to the observed profiles. The compound concentration at each depth could be easily predicted in the skin using diffusion equations and skin permeation data. Thus, this method was considered to be useful for promoting the efficient preparation of topically applied drugs and cosmetics. PMID:25158219

  9. Flexible Method for Analysis of Lidocaine and Its Metabolite in Biological Fluids.

    PubMed

    Saluti, Giorgio; Giusepponi, Danilo; Moretti, Simone; Di Salvo, Alessandra; Galarini, Roberta

    2016-08-01

    A robust liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method has been developed and validated for the determination of lidocaine (LIDO) and its metabolite (monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX)) in serum. One hundred microliters of bovine serum were spiked with LIDO-d10 as internal standard and deproteinized with acetonitrile prior to solid-phase extraction purification using strong cation exchange cartridge. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a BetaBasic-18 column with a mobile phase consisting of aqueous 0.1% formic acid and 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile. The instrumental linearity was verified from 0.4 to 1,000 ng/mL obtaining determination coefficients (r(2)) of >0.99. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was set at 1 ng/mL for both LIDO and MEGX. The coefficients of variation for within- and between-batch imprecision, including LOQ, were ≤10% and the percentage of inaccuracy was <15%. The absolute recoveries were >75% for both analytes. Experiments demonstrated the method applicability to sera of different animal species and also to plasma, urine and milk matrices. PMID:27060111

  10. Influence of lidocaine hydrochloride and penetration enhancers on the barrier function of human skin.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Kazumasa; Mohammed, Diar; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2014-12-30

    Skin penetration enhancers (SPEs) are commonly employed in pharmaceutical and personal care products. These compounds transiently alter the barrier properties of the skin and we have previously investigated the effects of specific SPEs on skin barrier function in vivo. In the present study the effects of incorporation of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), lidocaine hydrochloride (LID HCl) in the SPEs previously studied were investigated. Solutions of LID HCl were prepared and applied to the volar forearm of human subjects with occlusion for 24h. Subsequently, tape stripping and trans epidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements were conducted for treated and control sites. The activities of the desquamatory proteases, kallikrein 5 (KLK 5) and kallikrein 7 (KLK 7) and API content were also measured from the tape strips. The propylene glycol (PG) formulation increased TEWL significantly (p<0.05) compared with the other SPEs and a mixture of the SPEs. However, only the isopropyl myristate (IPM) solution altered protease activity with a significant observed increase in kallikrein 5 (KLK 5). Incorporation of LID HCl appeared to ameliorate the effects of some of the SPEs on TEWL measurements compared with our previous study. Overall uptake of LID HCl into skin from the various formulations correlated very well with changes in TEWL. The findings should have implications for the choice of SPEs in topical and transdermal formulations, particularly where the skin barrier function of patients is already impaired for example in atopic eczema or psoriasis. PMID:25305378

  11. Lidocaine Transdermal Patch: Pharmacokinetic Modeling and In Vitro-In Vivo Correlation (IVIVC).

    PubMed

    Kondamudi, Phani Krishna; Tirumalasetty, Phani Prasanth; Malayandi, Rajkumar; Mutalik, Srinivas; Pillai, Raviraj

    2016-06-01

    The present study aims to develop the correlation between in vitro and in vivo skin permeation of lidocaine in its transdermal patch. In order to minimize the run-to-run variability during in vitro skin permeation studies, release normalized cumulative percent (%Ct n) was calculated. A suitable polynomial mathematical model was used to establish a correlation between time and %Ct n. Percent in vivo absorbed was calculated by using numerical deconvolution (NDC) and non-compartmental analysis (NCA) methods. Pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters such as AUC last and C max were predicted with the established in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) models. The minimum prediction errors in NDC method for C max were found to be -30.9 and -25.4% for studies I (in vivo study in human volunteers with one batch of Lidoderm patch; internal validation) and II (in vivo study in human volunteers with another batch of Lidoderm patch; external validation), respectively, whereas minimum prediction errors in NCA method were relatively low (3.9 and 0.03% for studies I and II, respectively) compared to those in NDC method. The prediction errors for AUC last were found to be less than 2% for both methods and studies. The established method in this study could be a potential approach for predicting the bioavailability and/or bioequivalence for transdermal drug delivery systems. PMID:26283198

  12. EMLA and Lidocaine Spray: A Comparison for Surgical Debridement in Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Roberto; D'Aniello, Carlo; Grimaldi, Luca; Nisi, Giuseppe; Botteri, Gaia; Zerini, Irene; Brandi, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study the author proposes to compare eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) and an odontoiatric spray solution of 10% Lidocaine (Ecocain) for surgical debridement in venous leg ulcers. Approach: Fifty patients were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups (A, B). All of them have venous leg ulcer in the medial and/or lateral malleolar region. Group A: topical anesthetic EMLA with film occlusion. Group B: topical anesthesia with Ecocain. The author proceeded to surgical debridement after local anesthesia. A questionnaire and a visual analog scale (VAS) were administered to assess the amount of pain felt during the debridement and during the following 6 h. Results: The analysis of the VAS revealed no major significant differences statistically. The analysis of the questionnaires showed patients treated with Ecocain took more analgesic drugs. Analysis of the timing and quality of procedure showed that Ecocain reduced the timing of debridement and dressing change, improving the outpatient management and patient compliance. Innovations: For rapid debridement, the most appropriate is to use Ecocain. Conclusion: Methods of local anesthesia are multiple and must be identified according to the needs of the patient and the surgeon trying to get the best anesthesia with minimal use of time and resources. PMID:26029486

  13. Improving the Functionality of Intra-Operative Nerve Monitoring During Thyroid Surgery: Is Lidocaine an Option?

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Ramasamy; Shah, Ajay; Reddy, Vemuru Sunil; Parithivel, Vellore; Ravikumar, Saiganesh; Livingstone, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Intra-operative nerve monitoring (IONM) is rapidly becoming a standard of care in many institutions across the country. In the absence of neuromuscular blocking agents to facilitate the IONM, the depth of anesthesia required to abolish the laryngo tracheal reflexes often results in profound hemodynamic instability during surgery, necessitating the use of large doses of sympathomimetic amines. The excessive alpha and beta adrenergic effects exhibited by these agents are undesirable in the presence of cardiovascular co-morbidities. Trying to strike a balance frequently results in an unsatisfactory intra-operative course. In the course of the near total thyroidectomy performed on a 60-year-old female, we employed lidocaine infusion at 1.5 mg/kg/hour following a bolus dose of 1 mg/kg. The troublesome laryngo tracheal reflexes were successfully blunted and we were able to moderate the depth of anesthesia resulting in stable hemodynamics. A bispectral index monitor was employed to guard against “recall” and a train of four monitor was used to ensure the absence of inadvertent neuromuscular blockade. During the surgery, there was loss of signal on the left recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). The signal strength was restored by rotating the endotracheal tube on its long axis to realign the electrode with the vocal cords under Glidescope® visualization. PMID:25699129

  14. Methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin formation due to benzocaine and lidocaine in macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.G.; Woodard, C.L.; Gold, M.B.; Watson, C.E.; Baskin, S.I.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine (BNZ) and lidocaine (LC) are commonly used topical (spray) anesthetics approved for use in humans. BNZ has structural similarities to methemoglobin (MHb) forming drugs that are current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis, while LC has been reported to increase MHb in man. We therefore, compared MHb and sulfhemoglobin (SHb) production in three groups of Macaques (Macaca mulata, Chinese rhesus and Indian rhesus, and Macaca nemistrina, Pig-tailed Macaques) after exposure to BNZ and LC. Formation of SHb, unlike MHb, is not thought to be reversible and is considered to be toxic. MHb and SHb levels were measured periodically on a CO-Oximeter. All rhesus (n=8) were dosed intratrachealy/intranasaly with 56 mg and 280 mg BNZ and with 40 mg of LC in a randomized cross-over design. Pig-tailed macaques (n=6) were dosed with BNZ intranasaly 56 mg and with 40 mg of LC. Since no differences in the peak MHb or time to peak (mean +/- SD) were observed among the three macaque subspecies, the data were pooled. LC did not cause MHb or SHb formation above baseline in any monkey.

  15. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joon Young Kim, Shin Jung Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Yong Tae; Lim, Nam Yeol Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Sang Young Choi, Soo Jin Na Lee, Ho Kyun

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  16. Outward stabilization of the S4 segments in domains III and IV enhances lidocaine block of sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Michael F; Hanck, Dorothy A

    2007-01-01

    The anti-arrhythmic drug lidocaine has been shown to have a lower affinity for block of voltage-gated sodium channels at hyperpolarized potentials compared to depolarized potentials. Concomitantly, lidocaine reduces maximum gating charge (Qmax) by 40% resulting from the complete stabilization of the S4 in domain III in an outward, depolarized position and partial stabilization of the S4 in domain IV in wild-type Na+ channels (NaV1.5). To investigate whether the pre-positioning of the S4 segments in these two domains in a depolarized conformation increases affinity for lidocaine block, a cysteine residue was substituted for the 3rd outermost charged residue in the S4 of domain III (R3C-DIII) and for the 2nd outermost Arg in S4 of domain IV (R2C-DIV) in NaV1.5. After biotinylation by exposure to extracellular MTSEA-biotin the mutated S4s became stabilized in an outward, depolarized position. For Na+ channels containing both mutations (R3C-DIII + R2C-DIV) the IC50 for rested-state lidocaine block decreased from 194 ± 15 μm in control to 28 ± 2 μm after MTSEA-biotin modification. To determine whether an intact inactivation gate (formed by the linker between domains III and IV) was required for local anaesthetic drugs to modify Na+ channel gating currents, a Cys was substituted for the Phe in the IFM motif of the inactivation gate (ICM) and then modified by intracellular MTSET (WT-ICMMTSET) before exposure to intracellular QX-222, a quarternary amine. Although WT-ICMMTSET required higher concentrations of drug to block INa compared to WT, Qmax decreased by 35% and the V1/2 shifted leftward as previously demonstrated for WT. The effect of stabilization of the S4s in domains III and IV in the absence of an intact inactivation gate on lidocaine block was determined for R3C-DIII + ICM, R2C-DIV + ICM and R3C-DIII + R2C-DIV + ICM, and compared to WT-ICM. IC50 values were 1360 ± 430 μm, 890 ± 70 μm, 670 ± 30 μm and 1920 ± 60 μm, respectively. Thermodynamic mutant

  17. Fast-onset lidocaine block of rat NaV1.4 channels suggests involvement of a second high-affinity open state.

    PubMed

    Gingrich, Kevin J; Wagner, Larry E

    2016-06-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) block resting, open, and inactivated states of voltage-gated Na(+) channels where inactivated states are thought to bind with highest affinity. However, reports of fast-onset block occurring over milliseconds hint at high-affinity block of open channels. Movement of voltage-sensor domain IV-segment 4 (DIVS4) has been associated with high affinity LA block termed voltage-sensor block (VSB) that also leads to a second open state. These observations point to a second high-affinity open state that may underlie fast-onset block. To test for this state, we analyzed the modulation of Na(+) currents by lidocaine and its quaternary derivative (QX222) from heterologously expressed (Xenopus laevis oocytes) rat skeletal muscle μ1 NaV1.4 (rSkM1) with β1 (WT-β1), and a mutant form (IFM-QQQ mutation in the III-IV interdomain, QQQ) lacking fast inactivation, in combination with Markov kinetic gating models. 100 μM lidocaine induced fast-onset (τonset≈2 ms), long-lived (τrecovery≈120 ms) block of WT-β1 macroscopic currents. Lidocaine blocked single-channel and macroscopic QQQ currents in agreement with our previously described mechanism of dual, open-channel block (DOB mechanism). A DOB kinetic model reproduced lidocaine effects on QQQ currents. The DOB model was extended to include trapping fast-inactivation and activation gates, and a second open state (OS2); the latter arising from DIVS4 translocation that precedes inactivation and exhibits high-affinity, lidocaine binding (apparent Kd=25 μM) that accords with VSB (DOB-S2VSB mechanism). The DOB-S2VSB kinetic model predicted fast-onset block of WT-β1. The findings support the involvement of a second, high-affinity, open state in lidocaine modulation of Na(+) channels. PMID:26922882

  18. Lidocaine versus ropivacaine for postoperative continuous paravertebral nerve blocks in patients undergoing laparoscopic bowel surgery: a randomized, controlled, double-blinded, pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Ghisi, Daniela; Fanelli, Andrea; Jouguelet-Lacoste, Julie; La Colla, Luca; Auroux, Anne-Sophie; Chelly, Jacques E

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Lidocaine could provide many advantages in continuous regional anesthesia techniques, including faster onset, greater titratability, and lower cost than long-acting local anesthetics. This prospective, randomized, double-blinded, pilot study is therefore intended to compare lidocaine to ropivacaine in bilateral continuous paravertebral blocks using a multimodal approach for postoperative pain management following laparoscopic bowel surgery. Methods Thirty-five ASA I–III consecutive patients undergoing elective laparoscopic bowel surgery and bilateral thoracic paravertebral continuous blocks were analyzed: bilateral thoracic paravertebral infusions of ropivacaine 0.2% (Group Ropi, n=18) or lidocaine 0.25% (Group Lido, n=17) were started at 7 mL/h in the postanesthesia care unit. For each patient, we collected numerical rating scores (NRS) for pain at rest and during movement at baseline, at postanesthesia care unit discharge, at 24 hours and 48 hours after the end of surgery, as well as hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia requirements, local anesthetic consumption, side effects, postoperative complications, and functional outcomes. Results No effect of group distribution on NRS scores for pain at rest or at movement (P=0.823 and P=0.146), nor on hydromorphone (P=0.635) or local anesthetic consumption (P=0.063) was demonstrated at any analyzed time point. Hospital length of stay and spontaneous ambulation were comparable between groups (P=0.636 and P=0.148). In the context of a multimodal approach, the two drugs showed comparable safety profiles. Discussion Lidocaine 0.25% and ropivacaine 0.2% provided similar analgesic profiles after elective abdominal surgeries, without any difference in terms of functional outcomes. The easier titratability of lidocaine together with its lower cost induced our clinical practice to definitely switch from ropivacaine to lidocaine for postoperative bilateral paravertebral continuous infusions. PMID

  19. Building a diagnostic algorithm on localized neuropathic pain (LNP) and targeted topical treatment: focus on 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Roberto; Mattia, Consalvo

    2014-01-01

    Within the broad definition of neuropathic pain, the refinement of clinical diagnostic procedures has led to the introduction of the concept of localized neuropathic pain (LNP). It is characterized by consistent and circumscribed area(s) of maximum pain, which are associated with negative or positive sensory signs and/or spontaneous symptoms typical of neuropathic pain. This description outlines the clinical features (currently lacking in guidelines and treatment recommendations) in patients for whom topical targeted treatment with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster is suggested as first-line therapy. Few epidemiologic data are present in the literature but it is generally estimated that about 60% of neuropathic pain conditions are localized, and therefore identifiable as LNP. A mandatory clinical criterion for the diagnosis of LNP is that signs and symptoms must be present in a clearly identified and defined area(s). Cartographic recordings can help to define each area and to assess variations. The diagnosis of LNP relies on careful neurological examination more than on pain questionnaires, but it is recognized that they can be extremely useful for recording the symptom profiles and establishing a more targeted treatment. The most widely studied frequent/relevant clinical presentations of LNP are postherpetic neuralgia, diabetic neuropathy, and neuropathic postoperative pain. They successfully respond to treatment with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster with equal if not better pain control but with fewer side effects versus conventional systemic treatments. Generally, the more localized the pain (ie, the area of an A4 sheet of paper) the better the results of topical treatment. This paper proposes an easy-to-understand algorithm to identify patients with LNP and to guide targeted topical treatments with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster. PMID:24790451

  20. Comparing Clonidine and Lidocaine on Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation in Controlled Hypertensive Patients: A Randomized, Double-Blinded Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soltani Mohammadi, Sussan; Maziar, Alireza; Saliminia, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hemodynamic fluctuations in response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation and their potential hazards have been well-recognized, especially in hypertensive patients. Many drugs in various combinations have been used to attenuate these adverse responses. Objectives: We conducted a study to compare lidocaine with clonidine on the attenuation of hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation, in controlled hypertensive patients undergoing general anesthesia. Patients and Methods: Eighty-six patients of American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) class II, who were aged 18 to 65-years-old and were scheduled for elective surgeries under general anesthesia, were included. The patients were randomly divided into two equal groups. The clonidine group received 0.2 mg oral clonidine 90 minutes before surgery and the lidocaine group received a placebo tablet at the same time. All patients in both groups were anesthetized with the same technique, including: intravenous fentanyl 3 mcg/kg, sodium thiopental 5 mg/kg, and atracurium 0.5 mg/kg. The lidocaine group received 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine but the clonidine group received the same volume of saline ninety seconds before intubation. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded before intubation and 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes after endotracheal intubation. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups’ hemodynamic parameters, including heart rate and systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures at the measured points. There were also no significant differences within each group in hemodynamic responses at the measured points (P > 0.05). Twenty patients in the clonidine and three patients in the lidocaine group complained of mouth dryness (P = 0.001). Fourteen patients in the clonidine and four patients in the lidocaine group had bradycardia (P = 0.008). Nineteen patients in the clonidine and six patients in the lidocaine group had orthostatic hypotension (P = 0

  1. Lidocaine injection of pericranial myofascial trigger points in the treatment of frequent episodic tension-type headache

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of local lidocaine injections into the myofascial trigger points (TPs) located at the pericranial muscles in patients with episodic tension-type headache (ETTH). Methods The study included 108 patients with frequent ETTH that were randomized into 4 groups. One injection of saline (NaCl 0.9%) was administered to group 1 (n = 27), 1 injection of lidocaine (0.5%) was administered to group 2 (n = 27), group 3 (n = 27) received 5 injections of saline (NaCl 0.9%), and group 4 (n = 27) received 5 injections of lidocaine (0.5%); on alternate days 2 mL for each muscle was injected into the frontal, temporal, masseter, sternocleidomastoid, semispinalis capitis, trapezius and splenius capitis muscles bilaterally. The frequency of painful days per month (FPD) and the patients’ visual analogue scales (VAS) were evaluated before treatment, and 2, 4 and 6 months after treatment. Results Mean age of the patients was 36.28 ± 9.41 years (range: 18–54 years). FPD scores improved significantly in group 2, 3 and 4 at 2 months posttreatment compared to pre- treatment (all P < 0.05), and also VAS scores improved significantly in group 2 and 4 at 2 months posttreatment (P < 0.05) but this improvement insisted at the 6 month only in group 4. Group 2 had better VAS and FPD than group 1 only at 2. and 4. months after treatment (for VAS P < 0.0121, P = 0.0232; for FPD P = 0.0003, P = 0.0004, respectively). Group 4 had better scores than group 3 at the 2., 4. and 6. months after treatment in both parameters (all P < 0.05). Group 2 had better scores than group 1 in FPD at the 2. and 4. months posttreatment (P = 0.0003, P = 0.0004, respectively), but not at the 6. month. Conclusion Local lidocaine injections into the myofascial TPs located in the pericranial muscles could be considered as an effective alternative treatment for ETTH. PMID:23698019

  2. Preemptive effects of a combination of preoperative diclofenac, butorphanol, and lidocaine on postoperative pain management following orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nagatsuka, C; Ichinohe, T; Kaneko, Y

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether preemptive multimodal analgesia (diclofenac, butorphanol, and lidocaine) was obtained during sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO). Following institutional approval and informed consent, 82 healthy patients (ASA-I) undergoing SSRO were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups, the preemptive multimodal analgesia group (group P, n = 41) and the control group (group C, n = 41). This study was conducted in a double-blind manner. Patients in group P received 50 mg rectal diclofenac sodium, 10 micrograms/kg intravenous 0.1% butorphanol tartrate, and 1% lidocaine solution containing 10 micrograms/mL epinephrine for regional anesthesia and for bilateral inferior alveolar nerve blocks before the start of surgery. Postoperative pain intensity at rest (POPI) was assessed on a numerical rating score (NRS) in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and on a visual analogue scale (VAS) at the first water intake (FWI) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after extubation. POPI in the PACU was significantly lower in group P than in group C, whereas there were no significant differences at FWI, 24, 48, and 72 hours after extubation in both groups. Preemptive multimodal analgesia was not observed in this study. PMID:11432176

  3. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation: Propacetamol versus Lidocaine-A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Nabavian, Omid; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Kord, Hadi; Vafainejad, Hossein; Kord Valeshabad, Reza; Reza Feili, Ali; Rezaei, Mehdi; Darabi, Hamed; Koohkan, Mohammad; Golbinimofrad, Poorya; Jafari, Samira

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of propacetamol on attenuating hemodynamic responses subsequent laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation compared to lidocaine. In this randomized clinical trial, 62 patients with the American Anesthesiologists Society (ASA) class I/II who required laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation for elective surgery were assigned to receive propacetamol 2 g/I.V./infusion (group P) or lidocaine 1.5 mg/kg (group L) prior to laryngoscopy. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP, DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded at baseline, before laryngoscopy and within nine minutes after intubation. In both groups P and L, MAP increased after laryngoscopy and the changes were statistically significant (P < 0.001). There were significant changes of HR in both groups after intubation (P < 0.02), but the trend of changes was different between two groups (P < 0.001). In group L, HR increased after intubation and its change was statistically significant within 9 minutes after intubation (P < 0.001), while in group P, HR remained stable after intubation (P = 0.8). Propacetamol 2 gr one hour prior intubation attenuates heart rate responses after laryngoscopy but is not effective to prevent acute alterations in blood pressure after intubation. PMID:24822063

  4. Does the use of ketamine or nitroglycerin as an adjuvant to lidocaine improve the quality of intravenous regional anesthesia?

    PubMed Central

    Elmetwaly, Khaled Fawzy; Hegazy, Nasr Abdelmohsen; Aboelseoud, Abdelkhalek Abdelmonem; Alshaer, Ahmad Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the effect of adding ketamine or nitroglycerin (NTG) as adjuncts to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) on intraoperative and postoperative analgesia, sensorial and motor block onset times, and tourniquet pain. Settings and Design: A prospective, randomized, double-blind study was carried out. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients undergoing hand surgery were divided into three groups as follows: control group receiving lidocaine 2%, LK group receiving lidocaine 2% with ketamine, and LN group administered lidocaine 2% with NTG. Sensory and motor blocks' onset and recovery times were recorded. Visual analog scale (VAS) for tourniquet pain was measured after tourniquet application and it was also used to measure postoperative pain. Analgesic consumption for tourniquet pain and postoperatively were recorded. Results: Sensory block onset times were shorter in the LK (4.4 ± 1.2 minutes) and LN (3.5 ± 0.9 minutes) groups compared with the control group (6.5 ± 1.1 minute) (P < 0.0001) and motor block onset times were shorter in the LK (7.3 ± 1.6 minutes) and LN (3.6 ± 1.2 minutes) groups compared with the control group (10.2 ± 1.5 minutes) (P< 0.0001). Sensory recovery time prolonged in the LK (6.7 ± 1.3 minutes) and LN (6.9 ± 1.1 minutes) groups compared with the control group (5.3 ± 1.4 minutes) (P = 0.0006 and < 0.0001, respectively). Motor recovery time prolonged in the LK (8.4 ± 1.4 minutes) and LN (7.9 ± 1.1 minutes) groups compared with the control group (7.1 ± 1.3 minutes) (P = 0.0014 and 0.023, respectively). The sensory and motor block onset times were also shorter in LN group than in the LK group (3.5 ± 0.9 versus 4.4 ± 1.2 minutes, P=0.004; and 3.6 ± 1.2 versus 7.3 ± 1.6 minutes, P < 0.0001, respectively). The amount of fentanyl required for tourniquet pain was less in adjuvant groups when compared with control group. It was 13.6 ± 27.9 and 27.6 ± 34.9 µg in LK group and LN groups

  5. Anesthetic Efficacy of a Combination of 0.9 M Mannitol Plus 68.8 mg of Lidocaine With 50 μg Epinephrine in Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks: A Prospective Randomized, Single Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Howard; Reader, Al; Drum, Melissa; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective randomized, single blind study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of 68.8 mg of lidocaine with 50 μg epinephrine compared to 68.8 mg lidocaine with 50 μg epinephrine plus 0.9 M mannitol in inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) blocks. Forty subjects randomly received 2 IAN blocks consisting of a 1.72-mL formulation of 68.8 mg lidocaine with 50 μg epinephrine and a 5-mL formulation of 68.8 mg lidocaine with 50 μg epinephrine (1.72 mL) plus 0.9 M mannitol (3.28 mL) in 2 separate appointments spaced at least 1 week apart. Mandibular anterior and posterior teeth were blindly electric pulp tested at 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes postinjection. No response from the subject to the maximum output (80 reading) of the pulp tester was used as the criterion for pulpal anesthesia. Total percent pulpal anesthesia was defined as the total of all the times of pulpal anesthesia (80 readings), for each tooth, over the 60 minutes. One hundred percent of the subjects had profound lip numbness with both inferior alveolar nerve blocks. The results demonstrated that the 5 mL-formulation of 68.8 mg lidocaine with 50 μg epinephrine plus 0.9 M mannitol was significantly better than the 1.72-mL formulation of 68.8 mg lidocaine with 50 μg epinephrine for all teeth, except the lateral incisor. We concluded that adding 0.9 M mannitol to a lidocaine with epinephrine formulation was significantly more effective in achieving a greater percentage of total pulpal anesthesia (as defined in this study) than a lidocaine formulation without mannitol. However, the 0.9 M mannitol/lidocaine formulation would not provide 100% pulpal anesthesia for all the mandibular teeth. PMID:24423417

  6. Effects of Addition of Systemic Tramadol or Adjunct Tramadol to Lidocaine Used for Intravenous Regional Anesthesia in Patients Undergoing Hand Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yektaş, Abdulkadir; Gümüş, Funda; Karayel, Abdulhalim; Alagöl, Ayşin

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) is used in outpatient hand surgery as an easily applicable and cost-effective technique with clinical advantages. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of addition of systemic tramadol or adjunct tramadol to lidocaine for IVRA in patients undergoing hand surgery. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I-II patients (n = 60) who underwent hand surgery were included. For this purpose, only lidocaine (LDC), lidocaine+adjunct tramadol (LDC+TRA group), or lidocaine+systemic tramadol (LDC+SysTRA group) was administered to the patients for IVRA and the groups were compared in terms of onset and recovery time of sensory and motor blocks, quality of anesthesia, and the degree of intraoperative and postoperative pain. The onset time of sensorial block was significantly shorter in the LDC+TRA group than that in the LDC+SysTRA group. The motor block recovery time was significantly shorter in the LDC+SysTRA group than that in the LDC+TRA and LDC groups. Administration of tramadol as an adjunct showed some clinical benefits by providing a shorter onset time of sensory and motor block, decreasing pain and analgesic requirement, and improving intraoperative conditions during IVRA. It was determined that systemic tramadol administration had no superiority. PMID:27313608

  7. Reduction of the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in dogs using a constant rate of infusion of lidocaine-ketamine in combination with either morphine or fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Delia; Benito, Javier; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a constant rate of infusion of lidocaine and ketamine in combination with either morphine or fentanyl on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (MAC(ISO)) during ovariohysterectomy in dogs. Female dogs (n=44) were premedicated with acepromazine and midazolam. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. Dogs received ketamine (0.6 mg/kg/h) and lidocaine (3 mg/kg/h) together with morphine (0.24 mg/kg/h; MLK) or fentanyl (0.0036 mg/kg/h; FLK). The control group received Ringer's lactate solution. A skin incision was used as the noxious stimulus. The MAC(ISO) value was obtained with Dixon's up-and-down method. MAC(ISO) was 0.7±0.0 vol.% in the control group, 0.3±0.0 vol.% in the MLK group (45% MAC reduction) and 0.0±0.0 vol.% in the FLK group (97% MAC reduction). A combination of fentanyl with lidocaine and ketamine decreased the MAC(ISO) in dogs; this decrease was more pronounced than that produced by morphine, lidocaine and ketamine. PMID:20594878

  8. Effect of paracetamol, dexketoprofen trometamol, lidocaine spray, pethidine & diclofenac sodium application for pain relief during fractional curettage: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Açmaz, Gökhan; Bayraktar, Evrim; Aksoy, Hüseyin; Başer, Mürvet; Yilmaz, Mustafa Oğuz; Müderris, İptisam İpek

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Patients frequently experience pain of moderate to severe degree during gynaecologic procedures. This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was aimed to investigate the analgesic efficacy of preoperative oral dexketoprofen trometamol, intravenous paracetamol, lidocaine spray, pethidine and diclofenac sodium on fractional curettage procedure. Methods: A total of 144 mutiparous women were randomly allocated to one of the six groups. The first group (control group) consisted of 22 participants and they did not receive any treatment. The second group had 26 participants receiving oral 25 mg dexketoprofen trometamol. The 23 participants of the third group received two puff lidocaine sprays on cervical mucosa. The forth group consisted of 25 participants receiving 100 mg pethidine. In the fifth group, the 23 participants received 1000 mg intravenous paracetamol and the sixth group consisted of 25 participants receiving diclofenac sodium. Results: Pethidine was the best choice for reducing pain score during curettage procedure (t2:intra-operative). All analgesic procedures were significantly effective in reducing pain during postoperative period (t3). Significant pain reduction was achieved for both intra- and postoperative period by using analgesics. Interpretation & conclusions: The results of our study showed that lidocaine puffs provided the best pain relief than the other analgesics used. Therefore, lidocaine may be considered as the first choice analgesic in fractional curettage (NCT ID: 01993589). PMID:26609031

  9. The Effect of Adding Magnesium Sulfate to Lidocaine Compared with Paracetamol in Prevention of Acute Pain in Hand Surgery Patients Under Intravenous Regional Anesthesia (IVRA)

    PubMed Central

    Mirkheshti, Alireza; Aryani, Mohammad Reza; Shojaei, Poujia; Dabbagh, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study was done to compare the analgesic effects of “magnesium plus lidocaine”, “paracetamol plus lidocaine”, and “placebo plus lidocaine” on block characteristics for intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) in patients undergoing upper extremity orthopedic surgery. Methods: In a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial, 90 patients were selected and entered randomly into three study groups after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Time to start of the sensory and motor block were measured separately and also the duration of these two block types were measured. Post-op pain assessment was measured using a numeric rating scale. Venous samples were checked and compared regarding blood gas and pH measurements. Results: The time from drug injection to sensory block onset was the shortest in the magnesium plus lidocaine group; the time from drug injection to the time of motor block onset was the shortest in the lidocaine plus magnesium group; the duration of the motor block was the longest in the lidocaine plus magnesium group. Discussion: Addition of magnesium lidocaine in patients undergoing upper extremity orthopedic operations using IVRA decreases significantly the time gap between drug administration and the start of the block; also, this drug combination increases the IVRA block length, while paracetamol does not have such a significant effect. PMID:23024850

  10. Cardiorespiratory and antinociceptive effects of two different doses of lidocaine administered to horses during a constant intravenous infusion of xylazine and ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of a constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine during xylazine and ketamine anesthesia in horses and aimed to correlate these effects with cardiorespiratory variables, bispectral index (BIS) and plasma lidocaine concentrations. Six adult crossbred mares weighing 320–400 kg were anesthetized on three different occasions. Sedation was performed with xylazine (0.75 mg/kg IV) and anesthetic induction with guaifenesin (75 mg/kg IV) and ketamine (2 mg/kg IV). Anesthesia was maintained with 37.5 μg/kg/min of xylazine and 87.5 μg/kg/min of ketamine both administered intravenously for 75 min. The three treatments consisted of: lidocaine (loading dose: 5 mg/kg, CRI: 100 μg/kg/min; THL); lidocaine (loading dose: 2.5 mg/kg; CRI: 50 μg/kg/min: TLL); and saline (TS); all given 15 min after induction and maintained for 1 h. Antinociception was measured by response to electrical stimulation and bispectral index (BIS) was recorded during anesthesia. Parametric and non-parametric data were compared using ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls and Friedman tests, respectively. Results Plasma lidocaine concentrations peaked at the end of lidocaine loading dose and was greater in THL (9.61 ± 2.75 μg/mL) vs TLL (4.50 ± 3.34 μg/mL). Electrical noxious stimulation caused purposeful movement in all horses from TS, but no response in THL. The BIS was decreased in THL only and was less when compared to the other treatments throughout anesthesia. Blood pressure, PaO2 and PaCO2 increased and heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), pH, total plasma protein and temperature decreased during anesthesia in all treatments. PaCO2 and HR were greater and RR and pH less in THL compared to TLL and TS at 30 min during anesthesia. All recoveries were considered excellent. Time to standing was longer after THL (60 ± 20 min) than following TLL and TS (32 ± 17 and 30 ± 15 min, respectively

  11. Manipulations of extracellular Loop 2 in α1 GlyR ultra-sensitive ethanol receptors (USERs) enhance receptor sensitivity to isoflurane, ethanol, and lidocaine, but not propofol

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Anna; Muchhala, Karan H.; Trang, Janice; Asatryan, Liana; Trudell, James R.; Homanics, Gregg E.; Alkana, Ronald L.; Davies, Daryl L.

    2015-01-01

    We recently developed Ultra-Sensitive Ethanol Receptors (USERs) as a novel tool for investigation of single receptor subunit populations sensitized to extremely low ethanol concentrations that do not affect other receptors in the nervous system. To this end, we found that mutations within the extracellular Loop 2 region of glycine receptors (GlyRs) and γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) can significantly increase receptor sensitivity to micro-molar concentrations of ethanol resulting in up to a 100-fold increase in ethanol sensitivity relative to wild type (WT) receptors. The current study investigated: 1) Whether structural manipulations of Loop 2 in α1 GlyRs could similarly increase receptor sensitivity to other anesthetics; and 2) If mutations exclusive to the C-terminal end of Loop 2 are sufficient to impart these changes. We expressed α1 GlyR USERs in Xenopus oocytes and tested the effects of three classes of anesthetics, isoflurane (volatile), propofol (intravenous), and lidocaine (local), known to enhance glycine-induced chloride currents using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. Loop 2 mutations produced a significant 10-fold increase in isoflurane and lidocaine sensitivity, but no increase in propofol sensitivity compared to WT α1 GlyRs. Interestingly, we also found that structural manipulations in the C-terminal end of Loop 2 were sufficient and selective for α1 GlyR modulation by ethanol, isoflurane, and lidocaine. These studies are the first to report the extracellular region of α1 GlyRs as a site of lidocaine action. Overall, the findings suggest that Loop 2 of α1 GlyRs is a key region that mediates isoflurane and lidocaine modulation. Moreover, the results identify important amino acids in Loop 2 that regulate isoflurane, lidocaine, and ethanol action. Collectively, these data indicate the commonality of the sites for isoflurane, lidocaine, and ethanol action, and the structural requirements for allosteric modulation on

  12. Inhibitory effect of lidocaine on pain and itch using formalin-induced nociception and 5′-guanidinonaltrindole-induced scratching models in mice: behavioral and neuroanatomical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Inan, Saadet; Dun, Nae J.; Cowan, Alan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the effect of lidocaine, a local anesthetic, on pain and itch using formalin-induced nociception and kappa opioid antagonist-induced scratching models in mice. We investigated if local intradermal pretreatment (at −10 min) with lidocaine N-ethyl bromide (lidocaine, 2%, 0.1 ml) antagonizes behavioral responses and prevents c-fos expression induced by pain and itch. Male, Swiss Webster mice (25–30 g, n=6–10) were used. Formalin (5%, 20 µl, s.c.) or saline was administered to the right dorsal hindpaw and the time spent licking this paw was recorded at 0–10 min and 20–35 min. For itching, mice were challenged with 5′- guanidinonaltrindole (GNTI, 0.3 mg/kg, s.c., behind the neck) or saline and the number of neck-directed scratches with hindpaws was counted for 30 min. C-fos immunohistochemistry was performed in lumbar (for pain) and cervical (for scratching) spinal sections 2 h after respective treatments. We found that lidocaine (a) antagonizes both formalin-induced pain and GNTI-induced scratching and (b) prevents c-fos expression evoked by pain (medial side of the superficial layer and deeper layers of the dorsal horn) and itch (lateral side of the superficial layer of the dorsal horn). Additionally, GNTI caused c-fos activation in mice wearing an Elizabethan collar (to prevent scratching of the neck) suggesting that GNTI provokes c-fos expression by inducing an itch sensation. Our results highlight the antipruritic properties of lidocaine and argue for its comprehensive clinical testing against pruritic states. PMID:19549515

  13. Pharmacokinetics of lidocaine and bupivacaine following subarachnoid administration in surgical patients: simultaneous investigation of absorption and disposition kinetics using stable isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Burm, A.G.; Van Kleef, J.W.; Vermeulen, N.P.; Olthof, G.; Breimer, D.D.; Spierdijk, J.

    1988-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of lidocaine and bupivacaine following subarachnoid administration were studied in 12 surgical patients using a stable isotope method. After subarachnoid administration of the agent to be evaluated, a deuterium-labelled analogue was administered intravenously. Blood samples were collected for 24 h. Plasma concentrations of the unlabelled and the deuterium-labelled local anesthetics were determined using a combination of capillary gas chromatography and mass fragmentography. Bi-exponential functions were fitted to the plasma concentration-time data of the deuterium-labelled local anesthetics. The progression of the absorption was evaluated using deconvolution. Mono- and bi-exponential functions were then fitted to the fraction absorbed versus time data. The distribution and elimination half-lives of the deuterium-labelled analogues were 25 +/- 13 min (mean +/- SD) and 121 +/- 31 min for lidocaine and 19 +/- 10 min and 131 +/- 33 min for bupivacaine. The volumes of the central compartment and steady-state volumes of distribution were: lidocaine 57 +/- 10 l and 105 +/- 25 l, bupivacaine 25 +/- 6 l and 63 +/- 22 l. Total plasma clearance values averaged 0.97 +/- 0.21 l/min for lidocaine and 0.56 +/- 0.14 l/min for bupivacaine. The absorption of lidocaine could be described by a single first order absorption process, characterized by a half-life of 71 +/- 17 min in five out of six patients. The absorption of bupivacaine could be described adequately assuming two parallel first order absorption processes in all six patients. The half-lives, characterizing the fast and slow absorption processes of bupivacaine, were 50 +/- 27 min and 408 +/- 275 min, respectively. The fractions of the dose, absorbed in the fast and slow processes, were 0.35 +/- 0.17 and 0.61 +/- 0.16, respectively.

  14. Effect of Intracuff Lidocaine on Postoperative Sore Throat and the Emergence Phenomenon: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Fai; Lin, Yu-Cih; Tsai, Hsiao-Chien; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative sore throat and other airway morbidities are common and troublesome after endotracheal tube intubation general anesthesia (ETGA). We propose lidocaine as endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff inflation media to reduce the postintubation-related emergence phenomenon. Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases systematically for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have investigated the outcome of intracuff lidocaine versus air or saline in patients receiving ETGA. Using a random-effects model, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the relative risks (RRs) and mean difference (MD) of the incidence and intensity of relevant adverse outcomes. Results We reviewed nineteen trials, which comprised 1566 patients. The incidence of early- and late-phase postoperative sore throat (POST), coughing, agitation, hoarseness, and dysphonia decreased significantly in lidocaine groups, with RRs of 0.46 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.31 to 0.68), 0.41 (95% CI: 0.25 to 0.66), 0.43 (95% CI: 0.31 to 0.62), 0.37 (95% CI: 0.25 to 0.55), 0.43 (95% CI: 0.29 to 0.63), and 0.19 (95% CI: 0.08 to 0.5), respectively, when compared with the control groups. The severity of POST also reduced significantly (mean difference [MD] -16.43 mm, 95% CI: -21.48 to -11.38) at 1 h and (MD -10.22 mm, 95% CI: -13.5 to -6.94) at 24 h. Both alkalinized and non-alkalinized lidocaine in the subgroup analyses showed significant benefits in emergence phenomena prevention compared with the control. Conclusion Our results indicate that both alkalinized and non-alkalinized intracuff lidocaine may prevent and alleviate POST and postintubation-related emergence phenomena. PMID:26288276

  15. Functional Connectivity of the Default Mode Network and Its Association With Pain Networks in Irritable Bowel Patients Assessed via Lidocaine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Letzen, Janelle E.; Craggs, Jason G.; Perlstein, William M.; Price, Donald D.; Robinson, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    The default mode network (DMN), a group of brain regions implicated in passive thought processes, has been proposed as a potentially informative neural marker to aid in novel treatment development. However, the DMN’s internal connectivity and its temporal relationship (ie, functional network connectivity) with pain-related neural networks in chronic pain conditions is poorly understood, as is the DMN’s sensitivity to analgesic effects. The current study assessed how DMN functional connectivity and its temporal association with 3 pain-related networks changed after rectal lidocaine treatment in irritable bowel syndrome patients. Eleven females with irritable bowel syndrome underwent a rectal balloon distension paradigm during functional magnetic resonance imaging in 2 conditions: natural history (ie, baseline) and lidocaine. Results showed increased DMN connectivity with pain-related regions during natural history and increased within-network connectivity of DMN structures under lidocaine. Further, there was a significantly greater lag time between 2 of the pain networks, those involved in cognitive and in affective pain processes, comparing lidocaine to natural history. These findings suggest that 1) DMN plasticity is sensitive to analgesic effects, and 2) reduced pain ratings via analgesia reflect DMN connectivity more similar to pain-free individuals. Findings show potential implications of this network as an approach for understanding clinical pain management techniques. Perspective This study shows that lidocaine, a peripheral analgesic, significantly altered DMN connectivity and affected its relationship with pain-related networks. These findings suggest that the DMN, which is hypothesized to represent non-goal-oriented activity, is sensitive to analgesic effects and could be useful to understand pain treatment mechanisms. PMID:23743257

  16. The Usefulness of Subcutaneous Infiltration of Epinephrine-Containing Lidocaine for Curative Transarterial Embolization of Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Shigeru; Nishio, Akimasa; Takahashi, Yoshinobu; Mitsuhashi, Yutaka; Terakawa, Yuzo; Kawakami, Taichiro; Ohata, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Summary Recently, transarterial embolization (TAE) with liquid embolic materials has been recognized as one of the curative therapeutic options for non-sinus type dural arteriovenous fistula (d-AVF). To prevent glue fragmentation and incomplete obliteration, flow reduction of transosseous high-flow feeders is one of the key points of this therapy. However, flow reduction of transosseous feeders is sometimes difficult with previously reported techniques such as particle embolization, manual compression, or proximal balloon occlusion. This report introduces a new technique to reduce the flow of transosseous feeders using epinephrine-containing lidocaine, and describes a case of intracranial d-AVF successfully treated with this technique. The usefulness and efficacy of the technique are discussed. PMID:24556305

  17. Percutaneous Injection of Lidocaine Within the Carotid Body Area in Carotid Artery Stenting: An 'Old-New' Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mourikis, Dimitrios; Chatoupis, Konstantinos; Katsenis, Konstantinos; Vlahos, Lampros; Chatziioannou, Achilles

    2008-07-15

    Severe bradycardia is a common untoward effect during balloon angioplasty when performing carotid artery stenting. Therefore atropine injection even before dilatation and the presence of an anesthesiologist are advocated in all patients. In the surgical literature, injection of a local anesthetic agent into the carotid sinus before carotid endarterectomy was performed in an attempt to ameliorate perioperative hemodynamic instability. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that percutaneous infiltration of the carotid sinus with local anesthetic immediately before balloon dilatation reduces bradycardia and ameliorates the need for atropine injection or the presence of an anesthesiologist. Infiltration of the carotid sinus with 5 ml of 1% lidocaine, 3 min before dilatation, was performed in 30 consecutive patients. No one exhibited any significant rhythm change that required atropine injection. The anesthesiologist did not face any hemodynamic instability during the carotid artery stenting procedure.

  18. Anesthetic Efficacy of a Combination of 0.5 M Mannitol Plus 36.8 mg of Lidocaine With 18.4 μg Epinephrine in Maxillary Infiltration: A Prospective, Randomized, Single-Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Younkin, Kevin; Reader, Al; Drum, Melissa; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, single-blind study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of lidocaine with epinephrine compared to lidocaine with epinephrine plus 0.5 M mannitol in maxillary lateral incisor infiltrations. Forty-one subjects randomly received 2 maxillary lateral infiltrations consisting of a 1.84-mL solution of 36.8 mg lidocaine with 18.4 μg epinephrine (control solution) and a 2.90-mL solution of 36.8 mg lidocaine with 18.4 μg epinephrine (1.84 mL) plus 0.5 M mannitol (1.06 mL) in 2 separate appointments spaced at least 1 week apart. The maxillary lateral incisor was blindly electric pulp–tested in 2-minute cycles for 60 minutes postinjection. No response from the subject to the maximum output (a reading of 80) of the pulp tester was used as the criterion for pulpal anesthesia. Total percent pulpal anesthesia was defined as the total of all pulpal anesthesia readings (at output of 80) over the 60-minute test period. Pain during solution deposition and postoperative pain were also measured. The results demonstrated that a 2.90-mL solution of 36.8 mg lidocaine with 18.4 μg epinephrine (1.84 mL) plus 0.5 M mannitol (1.06 mL) was not statistically significantly superior to a 1.84-mL solution of 36.8 mg lidocaine with 18.4 μg epinephrine. The pain of solution deposition was lower with the lidocaine/mannitol formulation. Postoperative pain was not statistically significantly different between the lidocaine/mannitol formulation and the lidocaine formulation without mannitol. We concluded that adding 0.5 M mannitol to a lidocaine with epinephrine formulation was not significantly more effective in achieving a greater percentage of total pulpal anesthesia (as defined in this study) than a lidocaine formulation without mannitol in the maxillary lateral incisor. PMID:24932979

  19. Comparison of the effects of two opioid antitussives, vadocaine hydrochloride, clobutinol and lidocaine on lung mechanics in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Salonen, R O

    1988-04-01

    Intravenous administration of opioids, e.g. morphine and codeine, causes bronchoconstriction in animals and susceptible patients such as asthmatics. Therefore, the effects of two opioid antitussives (codeine and dextromethorphan), two non-opioid antitussives (vadocaine hydrochloride (2',4'-dimethyl-6'-methoxy-3-(2-methylpiperidyl) propionanilide hydrochloride, OR K-242-HCl; INN: vadocaine) and clobutinol), and lidocaine on basal lung mechanics and methacholine (MeCh, 6 micrograms/kg i.v.)-induced airway obstruction were investigated in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Intravenous administration of codeine (10-20 mg/kg) produced a dual response in the airways; initial bronchoconstriction was followed by attenuation of the MeCh-response. Dextromethorphan (10 and 15 mg/kg) caused bronchoconstriction only. Both the opioids affected dynamic lung compliance (CDyn) more than lung resistance (RL). At doses between 1 and 20 mg/kg i.v., vadocaine, clobutinol, and lidocaine had no obvious effect on the airways. Dextromethorphan and vadocaine, both at doses of 10 and 15 mg/kg, and clobutinol (15 and 20 mg/kg) caused irreversible bradycardia and hypotension, whereas codeine (5-20 mg/kg) increased blood pressure, and to a lesser extent heart rate. These results suggest that intravenous administration of an opioid antitussive influences the small peripheral airways more than the large airways, whether the opioid has euphoric analgesic properties or not. In contrast to this, non-opioid antitussives such as vadocaine and clobutinol are without effect. At large doses, all antitussives influence the cardiovascular system considerably. PMID:3395396

  20. [Pharmacokinetics of lidocaine and its metabolites in dog. Comparison between normal and CCl4-induced hepatic lesion].

    PubMed

    Yamane, J

    1989-09-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis of lidocaine (Lid) and its metabolites, monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX) and glycinexylidide (GX), was performed in a dog bearing carbon tetrachloride (CCl4, 0.75 ml/kg ip)-induced acute hepatitis. Following pentobarbital sodium (25 mg/kg iv) anesthesia, lidocaine hydrochloride (2.5 mg/kg iv) was given and arterial blood was drawn 2, 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after administration. Lid and its metabolites in plasma were extracted with chloroform-hexane-isopropanol (60 : 30 : 10), and organic layer was dried down at 50 degrees C under N2. The residue was dissolved in 50mM phosphoric acid and subjected to HPLC analysis. 4-compartment model was introduced to analyze pharmacokinetic parameters, and which gave the most reasonable fit with actual results. Control experiment was carried out using identical dog with acute hepatitis. The following results were given: 1) Elimination of Lid was slightly depressed, but T1/2 was not altered. Plasma level of Lid was kept higher. 2) As for MEGX, the formation was depressed, and upto 23 min after Lid administration, MEGX concentration in the dog with acute hepatitis was lower than that of control, but after 23 min it was vice versa. 3) As for GX, the formation was depressed, but the elimination was not affected. In the dog with CCl4-induced hepatitis, metabolism of Lid was suppressed, and which resulted in maintaining a relatively higher levels of Lid and MEGX concentration in plasma. These results suggested that care should be taken to avoid acute poisoning with Lid especially in patients with acute hepatitis. PMID:2489793

  1. Efficacy and safety of articaine versus lidocaine for irreversible pulpitis treatment: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Su, Naichuan; Li, Chunjie; Wang, Hang; Shen, Jiefei; Liu, Wenjia; Kou, Liang

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to assess the efficacy and safety of articaine compared with lidocaine for irreversible pulpitis (IP) treatment. Databases were explored electronically and relevant journals as well as the references of the included studies were hand-searched for randomised clinical trials comparing the efficacy and safety of articaine with lidocaine in treatment of IP. Twenty studies were included, of which eight had low risk of bias, 10 had moderate risk of bias and two had high risk of bias. In comparison with 2% lidocaine with 1:100 000 epinephrine, 4% articaine with 1:100 000 epinephrine showed a higher success rate in anaesthesia of IP at either person (risk ratio (RR) 1.15; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.10 1.20; P < 0.00001) or tooth unit (RR 1.10; 95% CI 1.10 1.19, P < 0.00001), lower VAS scores during injection phase (mean difference (MD) -0.67; 95% CI -1.26 -0.08, P = 0.02) and treatment phase (MD -3.35; 95% CI -3.78 -2.91, P < 0.00001), shorter onset time of pulpal anaesthesia (MD -0.94; 95% CI -1.13 -0.74, P < 0.00001) and lower percentage of patients undergoing adverse events (RR 0.17; 95% CI 0.03 0.92, P = 0.04). Given the efficacy and safety of the two solutions, 4% articaine with 1:100 000 epinephrine was superior to 2% lidocaine with 1:100 000 epinephrine in dental treatments in IP. PMID:27062318

  2. Efficacy of Articaine and Lidocaine for Buccal Infiltration of First Maxillary Molars with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Double-blinded Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Hamid Reza; Parirokh, Masoud; Nakhaee, Nouzar; V. Abbott, Paul; Samani, Syamak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of 2% lidocaine to 4% articaine in buccal infiltration of maxillary first molars with irreversible pulpitis. Moreover, the effect of root length on success of anesthesia irrespective of the type of anesthetic agent was assessed. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients suffering from painful maxillary first molars with irreversible pulpitis received an infiltration injection of either 4% articaine with 1:100000 epinephrine or 2% lidocaine with 1:80000 epinephrine. Each patient recorded their pain score in response to a cold test on a Heft-Parker visual analogue scale (VAS) before commencing the treatment, 5 min following injection, during access preparation, after pulp exposure and during root canal instrumentation. No or mild pain at any stage was considered a success. Data were analyzed using the multivariate logistic regression analysis, chi-square and t tests. Results: Finally, 47 out of 50 patients were eligible to be included in this study. The anesthetic success rates in the lidocaine and articaine groups were 56.52% and 66.67%, respectively and the difference was not significant (P=0.474). Irrespective of the anesthetic agent, the length of the palatal root (Odds Ratio=0.24, P=0.007) had an adverse effect on anesthetic success. There was an association between longer palatal root length and anesthetic failure. Conclusion: No significant difference was found between 2% lidocaine and 4% articaine in terms of anesthetic success in maxillary first molars with irreversible pulpitis. The length of the palatal root had a significant negative influence on anesthetic success. PMID:27141212

  3. Distributions of ethanol and intubation-related lidocaine in the brain of a trauma patient who was brain dead for about 5 days.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Fumio; Hashimoto, Yoshiaki; Nakanishi, Akinori

    2003-03-01

    A 48-year-old intoxicated man was admitted to a hospital with an acute subarachnoid hemorrhage from a blow to the head following a drinking session. Lidocaine jelly was used to facilitate intubation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. While his heart resumed beating, he was classified as brain dead and his heart stopped 114 h after admission. His brain was soft and weighed 1.7 kg at autopsy. A small rupture (0.5 by 0.3 cm) of the left vertebral artery and diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage were observed. Ethanol was detected only in the cerebrum, cerebellum and clotted blood in the superior sagittal sinus at 0.29, 0.15 and 0.12 mg/g, respectively. Lidocaine was also found in these areas at levels of 28, 24 and 7 ng/g, respectively. Significant amounts of ethanol were present in his brain because blood flow stopped after the injury. Smaller amounts of intubation-related lidocaine were probably distributed to the brain by limited cerebral circulation and remained there after circulation ceased. Toxicological analysis of the brain after death was useful for evaluating his state during treatment. PMID:12935567

  4. Effect of Paracetamol, Dexketoprofen Trometamol, Lidocaine Spray, and Paracervical Block Application for Pain Relief during Suction Termination of First-Trimester Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Açmaz, Gökhan; Aksoy, Hüseyin; Özoğlu, Nil; Aksoy, Ülkü; Albayrak, Evrim

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the analgesic efficacy of preoperative oral dexketoprofen trometamol, intravenous paracetamol, lidocaine spray, and paracervical block with ultracaine on curettage procedure. A total of 111 subjects with the request of pregnancy termination between 5 and 7 weeks of gestation were included in the study. The first group (control group) consisted of 20 participants without medication. The second group consisted of 25 participants receiving 2 puffs of lidocaine sprays on cervical mucosa. The third group consisted of 20 participants receiving oral 25 mg dexketoprofen trometamol. The fourth group consisted of 23 participants receiving 1000 mg intravenous paracetamol and the fifth group consisted of 23 participants receiving paracervical block with ultracaine. Paracervical block reduced pain score significantly in both intraoperative and postoperative periods. All analgesic procedures were significantly effective for reducing pain in postoperative period. Paracervical block may be the best method for reducing pain scores in intraoperative and postoperative periods during curettage procedure. All analgesic procedures such as lidocaine, paracetamol, ultracaine, and paracervical block with ultracaine can be used for reducing pain score in postoperative period. This trial is registered with NCT01947205. PMID:24455735

  5. The efficacy of different doses of Midazolam added to Lidocaine for upper extremity Bier block on the sensory and motor block characteristics and postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand, Azim; Safavi, Mohammadreza; Nemati, Koorosh; Oghab, Padideh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of different doses of midazolam on anesthesia and analgesia quality when added to lidocaine during the intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA). Methods: One hundred and forty patients underwent hand surgery were randomly allocated into four groups to receive 3 mg/kg lidocaine 2% diluted with saline to a total volume of 40 mL in the control Group L-C (n = 35), 30 μg/kg midazolam plus 3 mg/kg lidocaine 2% diluted with saline to a total volume of 40 mL in the midazolam Group L-M1 (n = 35), 40 μg/kg midazolam plus 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine diluted with saline to a total volume of 40 mL in the midazolam Group L-M2 (n = 35), and 50 μg/kg midazolam plus 3 mg/kg lidocaine 2% diluted with saline to a total volume of 40 mL in the midazolam Group L-M3 (n = 35). Sensory and motor block and recovery times, tourniquet pain, intra-operative analgesic requirement, and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were recorded. Findings: Onset time of sensory and motor block in L-M3 Group was shorter than the L-M2 and L-M1 and L-C Groups (P < 0.001). Furthermore, prolonged sensory (P = 0.005) and motor recovery time (P = 0.001) in L-M3 were longer than the other groups. Intra-operative VAS score and intra-operative fentanyl consumption in L-M3 were lower than the other groups (P < 0.001). The numbers of patients needed to pethidine in Group L-M3 were significantly less compared with the other groups (P = 0.035). VAS scores were significantly lower in Group L-M3 in different time intervals in the postoperative period compared with the other groups (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Addition of 50 μg/kg midazolam for IVRA (Group L-M3) enhanced intra-operative analgesia and improved anesthesia quality better than other groups receiving lower midazolam doses as well as a control group. PMID:26312256

  6. Fabrication of a bioadhesive transdermal device from chitosan and hyaluronic acid for the controlled release of lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Anirudhan, T S; Nair, Syam S; Nair, Anoop S

    2016-11-01

    A novel efficient transdermal (TD) lidocaine (LD) delivery device based on chitosan (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) was successfully developed in the present investigation. CS was grafted with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and butyl methacrylate (BMA) to fabricate a versatile material with improved adhesion and mechanical properties. HA was hydrophobically modified by covalently conjugating 3-(dimethylamino)-1-propylamine (DMPA) to encapsulate poorly water soluble LD and was uniformly dispersed in modified CS matrix. The prepared materials were characterized through FTIR, NMR, XRD, SEM, TEM and tensile assay. The dispersion of amine functionalized HA (AHA) on modified CS matrix offered strong matrix - filler interaction, which improved the mechanical properties and drug retention behavior of the device. In vitro skin permeation study of LD was performed with modified Franz diffusion cell using rat skin and exhibited controlled release. The influence of storage time on release profile was investigated and demonstrated that after the initial burst, LD release profile of the device after 30 and 60days storage was identical to that of a device which was not stored. In vivo skin adhesion test and skin irritation assay in human subjects, water vapor permeability and environmental fitness test was performed to judge its application in biomedical field. All results displayed that the fabricated device is a potential candidate for TD LD administration to the systemic circulation. PMID:27516320

  7. High-Throughput Analysis of Lidocaine in Pharmaceutical Formulation by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis Using Multiple Injections in a Single Run.

    PubMed

    Valese, Andressa C; Spudeit, Daniel A; Dolzan, Maressa D; Bretanha, Lizandra C; Vitali, Luciano; Micke, Gustavo A

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a subminute separation method by capillary zone electrophoresis in an uncoated capillary using multiple injection procedure for the determination of lidocaine in samples of pharmaceutical formulations. The separation was performed in less than a minute leading to doing four injections in a single run. The cathodic electroosmotic flow contributed to reducing the analyses time. The background electrolyte was composed of 20 mmol L(-1) 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol and 40 mmol L(-1) 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid at pH 6.1. The internal standard used was benzylamine. Separations were performed in a fused uncoated silica capillary (32 cm total length, 23.5 cm effective length, and 50 μm internal diameter) with direct UV detection at 200 nm. Samples and standards were injected hydrodynamically using 40 mbar/3 s interspersed with spacer electrolyte using 40 mbar/7 s. The electrophoretic system was operated under constant voltage of 30 kV with positive polarity on the injection side. The evaluation of some analytical parameters of the method showed good linearity (r (2) > 0.999), a limit of detection 0.92 mg L(-1), intermediate precision better than 3.2% (peak area), and recovery in the range of 92-102%. PMID:27069712

  8. The effect of epidural anaesthesia with 1% lidocaine on the pressor response to dynamic exercise in man.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, D B; Brennum, J; Sztuk, F; Hansen, O B; Clifford, P S; Bach, F W; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Mitchell, J H; Secher, N H

    1993-01-01

    1. In order to examine the sensitivity to local anaesthetics of afferent neural feedback from working muscle during dynamic exercise, sixteen subjects cycled for 12 min before and after epidural anaesthesia using 1% lidocaine. The presence of afferent neural blockade was verified by elimination of the blood pressure response to a cold pressor test, laser-induced evoked potentials and increases in pain detection and tolerance thresholds of the foot. Conversely, epidural anaesthesia had no effect on these variables in the unblocked skin areas or on electrically evoked potentials in blocked or unblocked skin. 2. During dynamic exercise, heart rate increased as did mean arterial pressure and cardiac output. Mean arterial pressure remained at the exercise level during post-exercise ischaemia, but heart rate and cardiac output decreased while total peripheral resistance increased. Epidural anaesthesia did not significantly affect these variables during rest, dynamic exercise, post-exercise ischaemia or recovery. 3. The results of this study show that, in order to affect blood pressure during dynamic exercise, epidural anaesthesia must block the pressor response to post-exercise ischaemia. The implication of these data is that complete or almost complete block of group III and/or group IV muscle afferents is necessary to inhibit the pressor response to dynamic exercise in man. PMID:8308749

  9. High-Throughput Analysis of Lidocaine in Pharmaceutical Formulation by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis Using Multiple Injections in a Single Run

    PubMed Central

    Valese, Andressa C.; Spudeit, Daniel A.; Dolzan, Maressa D.; Bretanha, Lizandra C.; Micke, Gustavo A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a subminute separation method by capillary zone electrophoresis in an uncoated capillary using multiple injection procedure for the determination of lidocaine in samples of pharmaceutical formulations. The separation was performed in less than a minute leading to doing four injections in a single run. The cathodic electroosmotic flow contributed to reducing the analyses time. The background electrolyte was composed of 20 mmol L−1 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol and 40 mmol L−1 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid at pH 6.1. The internal standard used was benzylamine. Separations were performed in a fused uncoated silica capillary (32 cm total length, 23.5 cm effective length, and 50 μm internal diameter) with direct UV detection at 200 nm. Samples and standards were injected hydrodynamically using 40 mbar/3 s interspersed with spacer electrolyte using 40 mbar/7 s. The electrophoretic system was operated under constant voltage of 30 kV with positive polarity on the injection side. The evaluation of some analytical parameters of the method showed good linearity (r2 > 0.999), a limit of detection 0.92 mg L−1, intermediate precision better than 3.2% (peak area), and recovery in the range of 92–102%. PMID:27069712

  10. Topical gels of lidocaine HCl using cashew gum and Carbopol 940: preparation and in vitro skin permeation.

    PubMed

    Das, Biswarup; Nayak, Amit Kumar; Nanda, Upendranath

    2013-11-01

    The present study was attempted to prepare novel topical gels of 4% lidocaine HCl using cashew gum and Carbopol 940. The prepared gels were evaluated for pH, viscosity, and in vitro skin permeation through excised porcine skin. The pH of these topical gels was found within the range of 5.98-6.06; whereas, the viscosity was found 4.58 × 10(6) to 4.88 × 10(6) cps. The in vitro skin permeation from these gels showed permeation flux range, 851.34 ± 9.16 to 1568.15 ± 14.03 μg/cm(2)/h. The highest permeation flux (1568.15 ± 14.03 μg/cm(2)/h) was observed, when 0.01% menthol was added, which was higher than that of the marketed 4% lidicaine HCl topical gel (1355.41 ± 10.92 μg/cm(2)/h). These topical gels found best-fit with Korsmeyer-Peppas model and almost the super case-II transport mechanism. The stability study revealed that these gels were physically stable without occurrence of syneresis. PMID:24099938

  11. Comparison of the effects of ketamine or lidocaine on fentanyl-induced cough in patients undergoing surgery: A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Gülen; Aksu, Recep; Bicer, Cihangir; Tosun, Zeynep; Boyaci, Adem

    2010-01-01

    Background: Fentanyl-induced cough is common but has not been viewed as a serious anesthetic problem. However, the cough may be explosive at times, may require immediate intervention, and may be associated with undesirable increases in intracranial, intraocular, and intra-abdominal pressures. Prevention of fentanylinduced cough in such situations is of paramount importance. Ketamine, at concentrations achieved with standard clinical doses, has a direct relaxant effect on airway smooth muscle. Objective: This study was designed to assess the effects of ketamine or lidocaine on fentanyl-induced cough. Methods: This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted at the Erciyes University Medical School, Kayseri, Turkey. Consecutive adult patients aged 18 to 65 years and classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II who were undergoing elective surgery with general anesthesia were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated equally into 3 groups to receive lidocaine 1 mg/kg, ketamine 0.5 μg/kg, or placebo intravenously 1 minute before fentanyl administration. Following intravenous fentanyl (1.5 μg/kg over 2 seconds) injection, an observer, unaware of the type of medication given to the patients, recorded the number of episodes of coughing, if any. Any episode of cough was classified as coughing and graded by investigators blinded to treatment as mild (1–2 coughs), moderate (3–4), or severe (≥5). Blood pressure, heart rate, pulse oximetry oxygen saturation (SpO2), and adverse effects (AEs) were recorded. Results: A total of 368 patients were approached for inclusion; 300 patients met the inclusion criteria and were enrolled in the study. No patients in the ketamine group had cough. The frequency of cough was significantly lower in the lidocaine (11/100 [11%]; P = 0.024) and ketamine (0/100; P = 0.001) groups compared with the placebo group (23/100 [23%]). The intensity of cough was significantly lower in the

  12. Comparative evaluation of adding different opiates (morphine, meperidine, buprenorphine, or fentanyl) to lidocaine in duration and quality of axillary brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Saryazdi, Hamid; Yazdani, Alireza; Sajedi, Parvin; Aghadavoudi, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is no agreement about the effect of adding opioids to local anesthetics in peripheral nerve blocks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adding different opioids with equipotent doses of lidocaine in axillary brachial plexus block using ultrasonography and nerve locator guidance. Materials and Methods: In a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial study, 72 adult patients aged 18–65 years old scheduled for orthopedic surgery of the forearm and hand with axillary brachial plexus block were selected and randomly allocated to four groups. Meperidine (pethidine), buprenorphine, morphine, and fentanyl with equipotent doses were added in 40cc of 1% lidocaine in P, B, M, and F groups, respectively. The onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks, severity of patients’ pain, duration of analgesia, hemodynamic and respiratory parameters, and adverse events (such as nausea and pruritus) during perioperative period were recorded. Results: The onset time for the sensory block was similar in the four groups. The onset time for the motor block was significantly faster in morphine and pethidine groups (P = 0.006). The duration of sensory and motor blocks was not statistically different among the four groups. The quality of motor blockade was complete in 100% of patients receiving pethidine or morphine and 77.8% of patients receiving buprenorphine or fentanyl (P = 0.021). Conclusion: In the upper extremity surgeries performed under axillary brachial plexus block addition of morphine or pethidine to lidocaine may be superior to other opioids (i.e. fentanyl and buprenorphine) due to better quality and quantity of motor blockade and faster onset of the block. PMID:26645017

  13. Electro-Oxidation Mechanism and Direct Square-Wave Voltammetric Determination of Lidocaine With a Carbon-Paste Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Nadereh; Ramezani, Zahra; Babapour, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background Lidocaine hydrochloride (LH) is one of the most extensively used local anesthetics and peripheral analgesics. Availability of a simple and sensitive assay method for this analyte in pharmaceutical preparations as well as development of new voltammetric detectors that can be applied in chromatographic systems for determination of this analyte in biological samples are of great importance. Objectives In this study, a square-wave voltammetric (SWV) determination of LH at a bare carbon-paste electrode (CPE) was reported. Moreover, the oxidation mechanism for LH molecule at this electrode was investigated. Materials and Methods The SW voltammogram of LH solution at CPE showed a well-defined peak between +0.80 and +0.88 V depending on a scan rate in potassium nitrate (KNO3) solution. Different chemical and instrumental parameters influencing the voltammetric response, such as the pH level and scan rate were optimized for LH determination. Results A linear range of 8.0 - 1000.0 μmol L-1 (r2 = 0.999) was obtained. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.29 μmol L-1. The relative standard deviations of 2.1% obtained for 0.8 800 μmol L-1 solution of LH indicated a reasonable reproducibility of the method. Conclusions The results of this study show that LH in different pharmaceutical preparations could be determined with good reliability. In addition, the results reveal that the equal numbers of electrons and protons are involved in the oxidation of LH and the irreversible oxidation of an analyte was performed via amine groups of LH molecule. PMID:25866720

  14. The behavioral assessment and alleviation of pain associated with castration in beef calves treated with flunixin meglumine and caudal lidocaine epidural anesthesia with epinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Currah, Jan M.; Hendrick, Steven H.; Stookey, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to determine the effects of flunixin megulmine in combination with caudal epidural anesthesia as a postoperative analgesic in beef calves following surgical castration, and 2) to consider stride length and pedometry as potential behavioral assessment tools for detecting postcastration pain. Surgical castration was performed in 101 beef calves randomly assigned to 3 treatment subgroups: 1) castration without anesthesia (SURG); 2) castration following lidocaine with epinephrine caudal epidural anesthesia (SURG + EPI); 3) castration following lidocaine with epinephrine caudal epidural anesthesia and flunixin meglumine (SURG + EPI + F). Several outcomes, including pedometer counts, changes in stride length, subjective visual assessment of pain, instantaneous scan sampling of the calves’ postoperative activities, and the amount of movement and vocalization during the castration procedure, were measured to identify and quantify pain. The results indicated that stride length and the number of steps taken by calves after castration appear to be good measures of pain. Significant differences found between treatment groups for stride length and visual assessments suggest that flunixin meglumine can be considered to provide visible pain relief up to 8 hours postcastration. PMID:19436444

  15. Enhancement of the 1-Octanol/Water Partition Coefficient of the Anti-Inflammatory Indomethacin in the Presence of Lidocaine and Other Local Anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Ryo; Sagawa, Naoki; Shimada, Yohsuke; Goto, Satoru

    2015-07-30

    Side effects and excessive potentiation of drug efficacy caused by polypharmacy are becoming important social issues. The apparent partition coefficient of indomethacin (log P'IND) increases in the presence of lidocaine, and this is used as a physicochemical model for investigating polypharmacy. We examined the changes in log P'IND caused by clinically used local anesthetics-lidocaine, tetracaine, mepivacaine, bupivacaine, and dibucaine-and by structurally similar basic drugs-procainamide, imipramine, and diltiazem. The quantitative structure-activity relationship study of log P'IND showed that the partition coefficient values (log PLA) and the structural entropic terms (ΔSobs, log f) of the additives affect log P'IND. These results indicate that the local anesthetics and structurally similar drugs function as phase-transfer catalysts, increasing the membrane permeability of indomethacin via heterogeneous intermolecular association. Therefore, we expect that the potency of indomethacin, an acidic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, will be increased by concurrent administration of the other drugs. PMID:26121007

  16. Determination of Degradation Products of Cyclobenzaprine Hydrochloride, Lidocaine and Piroxicam in a Semi-Topical Formulation: MS-MS Confirmation of Unknown Impurities.

    PubMed

    Cioroiu, Bogdan Ionel; Grigoriu, Ioana Cezara; Cioroiu, Mona Elisabeta; Niculaua, Marius; Lupuleasa, Roxana; Lazar, Mihai Ioan

    2016-07-01

    Association of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride, piroxicam and lidocaine in a topical formulation is one of the newest innovations in the pharmaceutical formulary field. In this study, a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method was developed for the establishment of the impurities of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride, lidocaine and piroxicam in the semisolid topical formulation. In this study, we not only determined 2,6-dimethylaniline, 2-pyrydilamine but also specified impurities of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride (dibenzosuberenone, amitriptyline, carbinole, cyclobenzaprine N-oxide and anthrachinone). The target compounds were determined using a mobile phase that consisted of a mixture of phosphate buffer (0.025 M; pH 6.2)-acetonitrile-methanol (60 : 13 : 27, v/v/v). A minimum of three supplementary possible degradation products were determined. Using mass spectrometry, the unspecified impurities were identified and the use of correlation matrices permitted the association with the possible source compounds. The chromatographic conditions were qualified and validated according to ICH guideline requirements to confirm specificity, linearity, accuracy and precision. PMID:27056018

  17. Effects of a quaternary lidocaine derivative, QX-314, on the respiratory activity in brainstem-spinal cord preparation from newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Chikara; Onimaru, Hiroshi

    2016-04-21

    In the clinical setting, the use of QX-314 (a quaternary derivative of lidocaine) has been proposed to achieve the selective inhibition of nociceptors that express transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels with fewer motor deficits. However, it has been also reported that QX-314 may produce systemic CNS toxicities with relative potencies that are approximately twice as high as those of lidocaine. There are no reports concerning the effects of extracellular QX-314 on the rhythm-generating neurons in the respiratory center. In the present study, we examined the effects of QX-314 on respiratory rhythm generation in brainstem-spinal cord preparations from newborn rats. The extracellular application of QX-314 (200μM) decreased the C4 burst rate, amplitude and slope during the initial rising phase, and the effects slowly developed with a half-decay time of approximately 20min. The combined application of capsaicin (10 or 100μM) with QX-314 (100μM) showed no additional effect. The intracellular application of QX-314 (100μM) to respiratory neurons depressed the action potentials with a half-decay time of around 5min. Our findings could explain one of the mechanisms underlying the central toxicities that occur after the systemic application of QX-314. PMID:26992939

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Lidocaine Hydrochloride Metabolized by CYP3A4 in Chinese Han Volunteers Living at Low Altitude and in Native Han and Tibetan Chinese Volunteers Living at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juanling; Zhu, Junbo; Yao, Xingchen; Duan, Yabin; Zhou, Xuejiao; Yang, Meng; Li, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the pharmacokinetics of lidocaine hydrochloride metabolized by cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) in Chinese Han volunteers living at low altitude (LA) and in native Han and Tibetan Chinese volunteers living at high altitude, lidocaine hydrochloride 10 mg was given by intramuscular injection to 3 groups: Han volunteers living at LA, and native Han and Tibetan volunteers living at a high altitude. Blood samples were collected before the (baseline) study drug was given and at 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0 h after study drug administration. Lidocaine hydrochloride in plasma was determined by RP-HPLC. Pharmacokinetics parameters of lidocaine hydrochloride showed that there were no significant difference between the native Han and Tibetan volunteers, but the t1/2 was 29.8 and 29.8% higher in 2 groups, respectively, than in the LA group. To study related mechanism, the effects of exposure to chronic high-altitude hypoxia (CHH) on the activity and expression of CYP3A1 were examined in rats. Rats were divided into LA, chronic moderate altitude hypoxia, and CHH groups. CHH caused significant decreases in the activity and protein and mRNA expression of rat CYP3A1 in vivo. This study found significant changes in the disposition of lidocaine hydrochloride in native healthy Tibetan and Han Chinese subjects living at a high altitude in comparison to healthy Han Chinese subjects living at LA, it might be due to significant decreases in the activity and protein and mRNA expression of CYP3A4 under CHH condition. PMID:26730802

  19. In Vivo Assessment of Osseous Wound Healing Using a Novel Bone Putty Containing Lidocaine in the Surgical Management of Tooth Extractions

    PubMed Central

    Kumarswamy, Akshay; Moretti, Antonio; Paquette, David; Padilla, Ricardo; Everett, Eric; Nares, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This preclinical pilot study evaluated the systemic, radiographic, and histological responses to bone putty containing lidocaine in a canine tooth extraction model. Methods. In five beagle dogs the right mandibular premolars were extracted and sockets grafted with (1) xenograft particulate bone and a collagen sponge plug (control), (2) bone putty alone, (3) bone putty mixed with xenograft (3 : 1), or (4) xenograft sandwiched between bone putty. At 6 weeks post-op, the systemic and local responses were evaluated using a blood chemistry panel, micro-CT, and histological analyses. Results. No significant differences in blood chemistries were noted at 6 weeks postgrafting compared to baseline. Sockets grafted with either bone putty formulation demonstrated comparable radiographic and histologic evidence of bone healing compared to control sockets. Conclusions. Our preclinical results indicate that this bone putty appears to be a safe biocompatible device that may be useful in the postoperative management of tooth extractions. PMID:22754572

  20. Lidocaine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... patches are used to relieve the pain of post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN; the burning, stabbing pains, or ... in your eye, wash it with plenty of water or saline solution. Wash your hands after handling ...

  1. Lidocaine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... that area. Use scissors to remove the outer seal from the package. Then pull apart the zipper seal. Remove up to three patches from the package and press the zipper seal tightly together. The remaining patches may dry out ...

  2. Preformulation and characterization of a lidocaine hydrochloride and dexamethasone sodium phosphate thermo-reversible and bioadhesive long-acting gel for intraperitoneal administration.

    PubMed

    Arbelaez-Camargo, Diana; Suñé-Negre, Josep Maria; Roig-Carreras, Manel; García-Montoya, Encarna; Pérez-Lozano, Pilar; Miñarro-Carmona, Montserrat; Ticó-Grau, Josep Ramon

    2016-02-10

    The search for new formulations of anaesthetic agents that allow a localized administration and provide a prolonged effect is of great interest in the multimodal management of postoperative pain. The pre-formulation and characterization of a lidocaine and dexamethasone thermosensitive and bioadhesive long-acting gel for intraperitoneal administration was done as a tool in the management of pain in abdominal surgeries. The pre-formulation process was conducted by a systematic variation of the concentration of the different polymers, until setting it, in a suitable concentration that allowed an adequate gelation temperature. The poloxamer 407 (P407) was used as the main polymer; hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) as the bioadhesive agent and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) to adjust the gelation temperature and physicochemical properties. The formulations were characterized by gelation temperature, pH, viscosity at 25°C and 37°C, gelation time, density and osmolality. Gelation temperature was decreased when increasing the concentration of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and poloxamer 407, this effect was also observed when adding lidocaine hydrochloride and dexamethasone sodium phosphate to the formulations. The gelation temperature did not have statistically significant relation with the PVP concentration (P-value of 0.6797), even though, there is a tendency in the gelation temperature by varying it. Between the developed formulations, the 12.5/3.3/0.4% (P407/HPMC/PVP) formulation presents an appropriate gelation temperature, a suitable viscosity for administration by syringe, an adequate and stable pH and osmolality to prevent tissue damage and a correct gelation time that allowed the formation of a prolonged release implant. PMID:26685726

  3. Changes in acral blood flux under local application of ropivacaine and lidocaine with and without an adrenaline additive: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Häfner, Hans-Martin; Schmid, Ute; Moehrle, Matthias; Strölin, Anke; Breuninger, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Vascular effects of local anesthetics are especially important in dermatological surgery. In particular, adequate perfusion must be ensured in order to offset surgical manipulations during surgical interventions at the acra. However, the use of adrenaline additives appears fraught with problems when anesthesia affects the terminal vascular system, particularly during interventions at the fingers, toes, penis, outer ears, and tip of the nose. We studied skin blood flux at the fingerpads via laser Doppler flowmetry over the course of 24 hours in a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study with 20 vascularly healthy test persons following Oberst's-method anesthetic blocks. In each case, 6 ml ropivacaine (7.5 mg/ml) (A), lidocaine 1% without an additive (B), and lidocaine 1% with an adrenaline additive (1:200,000) (C) was used respectively as a verum. Isotonic saline solution was injected as a placebo (D). Measurements were carried out with the aid of a computer simultaneously at D II and D IV on both hands. Administration of (A) led to increased blood flux (+155.2%); of (B) initially to a decrease of 27%; of (C) to a reduction of 55% which was reversible after 40 minutes and of (D) to no change.(A) resulted in sustained vasodilatation which was still demonstrable after 24 h. (B) had notably less vasodilative effect, although comparison with (D) clearly showed that (B) is indeed vasodilative. (C) resulted in only a passing decrease in perfusion; this was no longer measurable when checked after 6 and 24 h. This transient inadequacy of blood flux also appeared after administration of (D). These tests show that adrenaline additive in local anesthesia does not decrease blood flow more than 55% for a period of 16 min. Following these results an adrenaline additive can be safely used for anesthetic blocks at the acra in healthy persons. PMID:18334782

  4. Efficacy and Safety of a Lidocaine Gel in Patients from 6 Months up to 8 Years with Acute Painful Sites in the Oral Cavity: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Dörte; Otto, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine is a well-accepted topical anaesthetic, also used in minors to treat painful conditions on mucosal membranes. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (registered prospectively as EudraCT number 2011-005336-25) was designed to generate efficacy and safety data for a lidocaine gel (2%) in younger children with painful conditions in the oral cavity. One hundred sixty-one children were included in two subgroups: 4–8 years, average age 6.4 years, treated with verum or placebo and 6 months–<4 years, average age 1.8 years, treated only with verum. Pain reduction was measured from the time prior to administration to 10 or 30 minutes after. In addition, adverse events and local tolerability were evaluated. In group I, pain was reduced significantly after treatment with verum compared to placebo at both time points. In group II, the individual pain rating shift showed statistically significant lower pain after treatment. Only seven out of 161 patients reported an adverse event but none were classified as being related to the study medication. The local tolerability was assessed as very good in over 97% of cases. For painful sites in the oral cavity, a 2% lidocaine gel is a meaningful tool for short-term treatment in the paediatric population. PMID:26693229

  5. Efficacy and Safety of a Lidocaine Gel in Patients from 6 Months up to 8 Years with Acute Painful Sites in the Oral Cavity: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Dörte; Otto, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine is a well-accepted topical anaesthetic, also used in minors to treat painful conditions on mucosal membranes. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (registered prospectively as EudraCT number 2011-005336-25) was designed to generate efficacy and safety data for a lidocaine gel (2%) in younger children with painful conditions in the oral cavity. One hundred sixty-one children were included in two subgroups: 4-8 years, average age 6.4 years, treated with verum or placebo and 6 months-<4 years, average age 1.8 years, treated only with verum. Pain reduction was measured from the time prior to administration to 10 or 30 minutes after. In addition, adverse events and local tolerability were evaluated. In group I, pain was reduced significantly after treatment with verum compared to placebo at both time points. In group II, the individual pain rating shift showed statistically significant lower pain after treatment. Only seven out of 161 patients reported an adverse event but none were classified as being related to the study medication. The local tolerability was assessed as very good in over 97% of cases. For painful sites in the oral cavity, a 2% lidocaine gel is a meaningful tool for short-term treatment in the paediatric population. PMID:26693229

  6. Reduction in pain response by combined use of local lidocaine anesthesia and systemic ketoprofen in dairy calves dehorned by heat cauterization

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Todd F.; Heinrich, Anneliese; Millman, Suzanne T.; DeHaan, Andrew; James, Shelley; Lissemore, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of ketoprofen for mitigating pain following dehorning with an electric cautery iron. Forty Holstein heifer calves, 4 to 8 wk of age, were randomized to receive a lidocaine cornual nerve block and either an injection of ketoprofen (3 mg/kg IM) or physiological saline, 10 min prior to dehorning. Cortisol was measured from serum obtained 10 min prior to dehorning and at 3 and 6 h post-dehorning. Calf behavior was video-recorded between 0 to 2, 3 to 5, and 6 to 8 h post-dehorning, and frequency of ear flicks, head shakes, head rubs, lying, standing, feeding, and grooming were recorded. Finally, 24-h intake of calf starter was recorded. There was no effect of treatment on cortisol (P > 0.1); however, ketoprofen-treated calves displayed less ear-flicks and total head behavior (P < 0.05), and tended to consume more starter (P = 0.09) than control calves. Ketoprofen is effective for mitigating behavioral effects of postsurgical pain following dehorning in 4- to 8-week-old calves. PMID:20514252

  7. Validated RP-HPLC and TLC-Densitometric Methods for Analysis of Ternary Mixture of Cetylpyridinium Chloride, Chlorocresol and Lidocaine in Oral Antiseptic Formulation.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Nada S; Ali, Nouruddin W; Abdelkawy, M; Emam, Aml A

    2016-03-01

    This work was concerned with development, optimization, application and validation of reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and thin layer chromatography (TLC)-densitometric methods for analysis of cetylpyridinium chloride, chlorocresol and lidocaine in Canyon(®) gel. The first developed RP-HPLC method depended on chromatographic separation on a ZORBAX Eclipse Plus C8 column, with elution with a mobile phase consisting of 0.05% phosphoric acid solution : acetonitrile : methanol (15 : 24 : 61, by volume), pumping the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.00 mL min(-1), with ultraviolet detection at 220 nm. While in the subsequently developed method, the TLC-densitometric method, complete separation of the studied mixture was achieved using methanol : acetone : acetic acid (7 : 3 : 0.2, by volume) as a mobile phase, aluminum plates precoated with silica gel 60 F254 as a stationary phase and 215 nm as the scanning wavelength. Factors affecting the developed methods were studied and optimized; moreover, methods had been validated as per the International Conference of Harmonization guideline and the results indicated that the suggested methods were reproducible, reliable and applicable for rapid routine analysis. Statistical comparison of the two developed methods with the reported HPLC ones using F- and Student's t tests showed no significant difference. PMID:26363491

  8. Lidocaine/prilocaine cream (EMLA(R)) versus infiltration anaesthesia: a comparison of the analgesic efficacy for punch biopsy and electrocoagulation of genital warts in men.

    PubMed Central

    vd Berg, G M; Lillieborg, S; Stolz, E

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To compare analgesic efficacy and pain caused by administration of lidocaine/prilocaine cream (EMLA(R)) versus xylocaine 1% local infiltration for punch biopsy and electrocoagulation of genital warts in men. DESIGN--Open randomised comparative parallel-group study. SETTING--Department of Dermatovenereology, University Hospital Rotterdam/Dijkzigt, the Netherlands. PATIENTS--63 males with warts on the genital mucosa and/or perianal area. METHODS--EMLA(R) cream (2.5-5 g) was applied during 13-45 minutes before surgery. Xylocaine 1% (0.1-4 ml) was infiltrated 0.5-4 minutes before surgery. Pain during administration and surgery was assessed by the patient on a verbal rating scale and on a visual analogue scale. RESULTS--EMLA(R) application was painless in all patients (n = 31) whereas xylocaine infiltration was slightly painful in 17/29 patients and moderately painful in 10/29 patients. EMLA(R) analgesia was satisfactory for 94% of biopsies and 62% of electrocoagulations. Xylocaine infiltration was satisfactory in all procedures. CONCLUSIONS--EMLA(R) application on the male genital mucosa is painless but it has a lower analgesic efficacy than xylocaine infiltration. However EMLA is a useful anaesthetic for taking biopsies in this area and may be used as premedication for local infiltration. PMID:1607191

  9. Effects of Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation on Cardiopulmonary Function in Horses Anesthetized with Total Intravenous Anesthesia Using Combination of Medetomidine, Lidocaine, Butorphanol and Propofol (MLBP-TIVA)

    PubMed Central

    ISHIZUKA, Tomohito; TAMURA, Jun; NAGARO, Tsukasa; SUDO, Kanako; ITAMI, Takaharu; UMAR, Mohammed Ahamed; MIYOSHI, Kenjirou; SANO, Tadashi; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    Effects of intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) on cardiopulmonary function were evaluated in horses anesthetized with total intravenous anesthesia using constant rate infusions of medetomidine (3.5 µg/kg/hr), lidocaine (3 mg/kg/hr), butorphanol (24 µg/kg/hr) and propofol (0.1 mg/kg/min) (MLBP-TIVA). Five horses were anesthetized twice using MLBP-TIVA with or without IPPV at 4-week interval (crossover study). In each occasion, the horses breathed 100% oxygen with spontaneous ventilation (SB-group, n=5) or with IPPV (CV-group, n=5), and changes in cardiopulmonary parameters were observed for 120 min. In the SB-group, cardiovascular parameters were maintained within acceptable ranges (heart rate: 33–35 beats/min, cardiac output: 27–30 l/min, mean arterial blood pressure [MABP]: 114–123 mmHg, mean pulmonary arterial pressure [MPAP]: 28–29 mmHg and mean right atrial pressure [MRAP]: 19–21 mmHg), but severe hypercapnea and insufficient oxygenation were observed (arterial CO2 pressure [PaCO2]: 84–103 mmHg and arterial O2 pressure [PaO2]: 155–172 mmHg). In the CV-group, normocapnea (PaCO2: 42–50 mmHg) and good oxygenation (PaO2: 395–419 mmHg) were achieved by the IPPV without apparent cardiovascular depression (heart rate: 29–31 beats/min, cardiac output: 17–21 l /min, MABP: 111–123 mmHg, MPAP: 27–30 mmHg and MRAP: 15–16 mmHg). MLBP-TIVA preserved cardiovascular function even in horses artificially ventilated. PMID:25649938

  10. Effects of intermittent positive pressure ventilation on cardiopulmonary function in horses anesthetized with total intravenous anesthesia using combination of medetomidine, lidocaine, butorphanol and propofol (MLBP-TIVA).

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomohito; Tamura, Jun; Nagaro, Tsukasa; Sudo, Kanako; Itami, Takaharu; Umar, Mohammed Ahamed; Miyoshi, Kenjirou; Sano, Tadashi; Yamashita, Kazuto

    2014-12-01

    Effects of intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) on cardiopulmonary function were evaluated in horses anesthetized with total intravenous anesthesia using constant rate infusions of medetomidine (3.5 µg/kg/hr), lidocaine (3 mg/kg/hr), butorphanol (24 µg/kg/hr) and propofol (0.1 mg/kg/min) (MLBP-TIVA). Five horses were anesthetized twice using MLBP-TIVA with or without IPPV at 4-week interval (crossover study). In each occasion, the horses breathed 100% oxygen with spontaneous ventilation (SB-group, n=5) or with IPPV (CV-group, n=5), and changes in cardiopulmonary parameters were observed for 120 min. In the SB-group, cardiovascular parameters were maintained within acceptable ranges (heart rate: 33-35 beats/min, cardiac output: 27-30 l/min, mean arterial blood pressure [MABP]: 114-123 mmHg, mean pulmonary arterial pressure [MPAP]: 28-29 mmHg and mean right atrial pressure [MRAP]: 19-21 mmHg), but severe hypercapnea and insufficient oxygenation were observed (arterial CO(2) pressure [PaCO(2)]: 84-103 mmHg and arterial O(2) pressure [PaO(2)]: 155-172 mmHg). In the CV-group, normocapnea (PaCO(2): 42-50 mmHg) and good oxygenation (PaO(2): 395-419 mmHg) were achieved by the IPPV without apparent cardiovascular depression (heart rate: 29-31 beats/min, cardiac output: 17-21 l /min, MABP: 111-123 mmHg, MPAP: 27-30 mmHg and MRAP: 15-16 mmHg). MLBP-TIVA preserved cardiovascular function even in horses artificially ventilated. PMID:25649938